WorldWideScience

Sample records for experience sharing tool

  1. Sustaining an Online, Shared Community Resource for Models, Robust Open source Software Tools and Data for Volcanology - the Vhub Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, A. K.; Valentine, G. A.; Bursik, M. I.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Jones, M.; Simakov, N.; Aghakhani, H.; Jones-Ivey, R.; Kosar, T.; Zhang, B.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 5 years we have created a community collaboratory Vhub.org [Palma et al, J. App. Volc. 3:2 doi:10.1186/2191-5040-3-2] as a place to find volcanology-related resources, and a venue for users to disseminate tools, teaching resources, data, and an online platform to support collaborative efforts. As the community (current active users > 6000 from an estimated community of comparable size) embeds the tools in the collaboratory into educational and research workflows it became imperative to: a) redesign tools into robust, open source reusable software for online and offline usage/enhancement; b) share large datasets with remote collaborators and other users seamlessly with security; c) support complex workflows for uncertainty analysis, validation and verification and data assimilation with large data. The focus on tool development/redevelopment has been twofold - firstly to use best practices in software engineering and new hardware like multi-core and graphic processing units. Secondly we wish to enhance capabilities to support inverse modeling, uncertainty quantification using large ensembles and design of experiments, calibration, validation. Among software engineering practices we practice are open source facilitating community contributions, modularity and reusability. Our initial targets are four popular tools on Vhub - TITAN2D, TEPHRA2, PUFF and LAVA. Use of tools like these requires many observation driven data sets e.g. digital elevation models of topography, satellite imagery, field observations on deposits etc. These data are often maintained in private repositories that are privately shared by "sneaker-net". As a partial solution to this we tested mechanisms using irods software for online sharing of private data with public metadata and access limits. Finally, we adapted use of workflow engines (e.g. Pegasus) to support the complex data and computing workflows needed for usage like uncertainty quantification for hazard analysis using physical

  2. The Experiment Data Depot: A Web-Based Software Tool for Biological Experimental Data Storage, Sharing, and Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, William C; Birkel, Garrett W; Forrer, Mark; Lopez, Teresa; Backman, Tyler W H; Dussault, Michael; Petzold, Christopher J; Baidoo, Edward E K; Costello, Zak; Ando, David; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; George, Kevin W; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Vaino, Ian; Keasling, Jay D; Adams, Paul D; Hillson, Nathan J; Garcia Martin, Hector

    2017-12-15

    Although recent advances in synthetic biology allow us to produce biological designs more efficiently than ever, our ability to predict the end result of these designs is still nascent. Predictive models require large amounts of high-quality data to be parametrized and tested, which are not generally available. Here, we present the Experiment Data Depot (EDD), an online tool designed as a repository of experimental data and metadata. EDD provides a convenient way to upload a variety of data types, visualize these data, and export them in a standardized fashion for use with predictive algorithms. In this paper, we describe EDD and showcase its utility for three different use cases: storage of characterized synthetic biology parts, leveraging proteomics data to improve biofuel yield, and the use of extracellular metabolite concentrations to predict intracellular metabolic fluxes.

  3. Beyond sharing experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Faugstad, Magnus Eian; Melby, Andreas Sandness

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of knowledge management activities and practice is to enhance the ability to utilize the knowledge and experiences that exist embedded in the organization. Knowledge management is absolutely essential for the success of knowledge intensive project-oriented organizations like construction, and management should arguably put adequate resources in motion to facilitate and foster knowledge utilization on an organizational level. Even so, knowledge utilization has no real value to the ...

  4. Sharing tools and know-how

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna

    In this position paper I address the theme of designing for sharing in self-organized urban communities by bringing forward the aspect of sharing tools and know-how. I report the lessons learned from a case in Helsinki and open questions for discussion regarding some of the identified challenges...

  5. A simple tool for neuroimaging data sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselgrove, Christian; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kennedy, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Data sharing is becoming increasingly common, but despite encouragement and facilitation by funding agencies, journals, and some research efforts, most neuroimaging data acquired today is still not shared due to political, financial, social, and technical barriers to sharing data that remain. In particular, technical solutions are few for researchers that are not a part of larger efforts with dedicated sharing infrastructures, and social barriers such as the time commitment required to share can keep data from becoming publicly available. We present a system for sharing neuroimaging data, designed to be simple to use and to provide benefit to the data provider. The system consists of a server at the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) and user tools for uploading data to the server. The primary design principle for the user tools is ease of use: the user identifies a directory containing Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data, provides their INCF Portal authentication, and provides identifiers for the subject and imaging session. The user tool anonymizes the data and sends it to the server. The server then runs quality control routines on the data, and the data and the quality control reports are made public. The user retains control of the data and may change the sharing policy as they need. The result is that in a few minutes of the user’s time, DICOM data can be anonymized and made publicly available, and an initial quality control assessment can be performed on the data. The system is currently functional, and user tools and access to the public image database are available at http://xnat.incf.org/. PMID:24904398

  6. Involving people with dementia in developing an interactive web tool for shared decision-making: experiences with a participatory design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Span, Marijke; Hettinga, Marike; Groen-van de Ven, Leontine; Jukema, Jan; Janssen, Ruud; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Eefsting, Jan; Smits, Carolien

    2017-03-12

    The aim of this study was at gaining insight into the participatory design approach of involving people with dementia in the development of the DecideGuide, an interactive web tool facilitating shared decision-making in their care networks. An explanatory case study design was used when developing the DecideGuide. A secondary analysis focused on the data gathered from the participating people with dementia during the development stages: semi-structured interviews (n = 23), four focus group interviews (n = 18), usability tests (n = 3), and a field study (n = 4). Content analysis was applied to the data. Four themes showed to be important regarding the participation experiences of involving people with dementia in research: valuable feedback on content and design of the DecideGuide, motivation to participate, perspectives of people with dementia and others about distress related to involvement, and time investment. People with dementia can give essential feedback and, therefore, their contribution is useful and valuable. Meaningful participation of people with dementia takes time that should be taken into account. It is important for people with dementia to be able to reciprocate the efforts others make and to feel of significance to others. Implications for Rehabilitation People with dementia can contribute meaningfully to the content and design and their perspective is essential for developing useful and user-friendly tools. Participating in research activities may contribute to social inclusion, empowerment, and quality of life of people with dementia.

  7. Job Sharing: One District's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Mahlon L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes responses of principals, teachers, and parents to a job sharing program instituted to reduce impact of staff layoffs. Principals were satisfied overall; teachers believed that students benefited from interaction with two instructors; and a majority of parents felt likewise. (TE)

  8. Sharing Experiences of Intercountry Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko; McIlvenny, Paul

    ). In this setting, the participants use language and other mediational means (eg. telephone, speakerphone, written details about the child, photograph, pen, paper) to accomplish the joint receipt of news about the child-to-be-adopted. In the analysis, we concentrate on how the parents’ affective displays......In recent years, fields such as discursive psychology have paid attention to the social, instead of solely individual, character of emotions, bringing to the fore the interactional organisation of affect displays. In the same vein, other ‘inner’ processes, such as memory, are studied from...... of this research is to better understand the relationships between multimodality, embodiment, interaction and affect. We present the results of our analysis of how the experiences of adoptive parents are (re)mediated in a Danish television documentary series following five prospective adoptive couples, not all...

  9. Tool sharing in parallel part production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, W.M.; Gaalman, G.J.C.

    1996-01-01

    A group of identical NC machines, laid out in a line, manufactures relatively few part types in large batch size. Parts of the same type are processed by the machines simultaneously. The operations on a part are performed by one machine only, using a part type specific tool set. During batch

  10. Genome project: An experiment in sharing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, L.

    1990-05-25

    The Human Genome Project is in many respects a gigantic experiment in data sharing. Around the world, investigators are working on pieces of the same puzzle. And whether the project succeeds will depend in large measure on these investigators making available their data and materials - cell lines, probes, and clones - to their colleagues and competitors. While sharing may be the norm in, say, immunology or bacterial genetics, human genetics has always been intensely competitive. So should the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy, which both fund the genome project, promulgate rules to govern access to data and sharing of materials A DOE committee has drafted some guidelines, which have yet to be formally endorsed. They stipulate that data and materials must be publicly available 6 months after they are generated or characterized. But at NIH, James Watson, who heads the genome project, is shying away from setting rules. He points to the new collaborative plans to map chromosome 21 as evidence that the community will develop its own ways of sharing data. Because of its known role in Down syndrome and its suspected role in Alzheimer's disease, chromosome 21 has generated a vast amount of interest. Lots of groups are already hard at work constructing maps of the chromosome - first developing a series of landmarks spaced along the chromosome, and then a collection of ordered DNA fragments. But the maps all these groups generate will be essentially useless unless they pool their data and adopt a common language.

  11. SHARE 2012: subpixel detection and unmixing experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, John P.; Ludgate, Kyle; Giannandrea, AnneMarie; Raqueno, Nina G.; Goldberg, Daniel S.

    2013-05-01

    The quantitative evaluation of algorithms applied to remotely sensed hyperspectral imagery require data sets with known ground truth. A recent data collection known as SHARE 2012, conducted by scientists in the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory at the Rochester Institute of Technology together with several outside collaborators, acquired hyperspectral data with this goal in mind. Several experiments were designed, deployed, and ground truth collected to support algorithm evaluation. In this paper, we describe two experiments that addressed the particular needs for the evaluation of subpixel detection and unmixing algorithms. The subpixel detection experiment involved the deployment of dozens of nearly identical subpixel targets in a random spatial array. The subpixel targets were pieces of wood painted either green or yellow. They were sized to occupy about 5% to 20% of the 1 m pixels. The unmixing experiment used novel targets with prescribed fractions of different materials based on a geometric arrangement of subpixel patterns. These targets were made up of different fabrics with various colors. Whole pixel swatches of the same materials were also deployed in the scene to provide in-scene endmembers. Alternatively, researchers can use the unmixing targets alone to derive endmembers from the mixed pixels. Field reflectance spectra were collected for all targets and adjacent background areas. While efforts are just now underway to evaluate the detection performance using the subpixel targets, initial results for the unmixing targets have demonstrated retrieved fractions that are close approximations to the geometric fractions. These data, together with the ground truth, are planned to be made available to the remote sensing research community for evaluation and development of detection and unmixing algorithms.

  12. KM Tools and Technologies that Share Distribute Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Hauer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The exponential increase in information, primarily due to the electronic capture of data and its storage in vast data warehouses, has created a demand for analyzing the large amount of data generated by today’s organizations so that enterprise can respond quickly to fast changing markets. There are various tools and technologies that can be used to share and distribute knowledge, include e-mail, groupware, data mining ,expert systems and others. The paper outlines these technologies, which dominate the technical tools for sharing knowledge from an organizations data assets and finally. The case study, an Expert System, use expert knowledge to attain highlevel decision performance in a narrow domain.

  13. Solidarity through shared disadvantage: Highlighting shared experiences of discrimination improves relations between stigmatized groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortland, Clarissa I; Craig, Maureen A; Shapiro, Jenessa R; Richeson, Jennifer A; Neel, Rebecca; Goldstein, Noah J

    2017-10-01

    Intergroup relations research has largely focused on relations between members of dominant groups and members of disadvantaged groups. The small body of work examining intraminority intergroup relations, or relations between members of different disadvantaged groups, reveals that salient experiences of ingroup discrimination promote positive relations between groups that share a dimension of identity (e.g., 2 different racial minority groups) and negative relations between groups that do not share a dimension of identity (e.g., a racial minority group and a sexual minority group). In the present work, we propose that shared experiences of discrimination between groups that do not share an identity dimension can be used as a lever to facilitate positive intraminority intergroup relations. Five experiments examining relations among 4 different disadvantaged groups supported this hypothesis. Both blatant (Experiments 1 and 3) and subtle (Experiments 2, 3, and 4) connections to shared experiences of discrimination, or inducing a similarity-seeking mindset in the context of discrimination faced by one's ingroup (Experiment 5), increased support for policies benefiting the outgroup (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and reduced intergroup bias (Experiments 3, 4, and 5). Taken together, these experiments provide converging evidence that highlighting shared experiences of discrimination can improve intergroup outcomes between stigmatized groups across dimensions of social identity. Implications of these findings for intraminority intergroup relations are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. A Standardized Tool for Assessing the Quality of Classroom-Based Shared Reading: Systematic Assessment of Book Reading (SABR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimonti, Jill M.; Zucker, Tricia A.; Justice, Laura M.; Petscher, Yaacov; Piasta, Shayne B.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2012-01-01

    Participation in shared-reading experiences is associated with children's language and literacy outcomes, yet few standardized assessments of shared-reading quality exist. The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric characteristics of the Systematic Assessment of Book Reading (SABR), an observational tool designed to characterize…

  15. Experience sharing, emotional reciprocity, and turn-taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa eStevanovic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this perspective article, we consider the relationship between experience sharing and turn-taking. There is much evidence suggesting that human social interaction is permeated by two temporal organizations: (1 the sequential framework of turn-taking and (2 the concurrent framework of emotional reciprocity. From this perspective, we introduce two alternative hypotheses about how the relationship between experience sharing and turn-taking could be viewed. According to the first hypothesis, the home environment of experience sharing is in the concurrent framework of emotional reciprocity, while the motivation to share experiences is in tension with the sequential framework of turn-taking. According to the second hypothesis, then again, people’s inclination to coordinate their actions in terms of turn-taking is motivated precisely by their propensity to share experiences. We consider theoretical and empirical ideas in favor of both of these hypotheses and discuss their implications for future research.

  16. Large scale experiments as a tool for numerical model development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Jens; Hansen, Erik Asp; Fuchs, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Experimental modelling is an important tool for study of hydrodynamic phenomena. The applicability of experiments can be expanded by the use of numerical models and experiments are important for documentation of the validity of numerical tools. In other cases numerical tools can be applied for im...... hydrodynamic interaction with structures. The examples also show that numerical model development benefits from international co-operation and sharing of high quality results.......Experimental modelling is an important tool for study of hydrodynamic phenomena. The applicability of experiments can be expanded by the use of numerical models and experiments are important for documentation of the validity of numerical tools. In other cases numerical tools can be applied...... for improvement of the reliability of physical model results. This paper demonstrates by examples that numerical modelling benefits in various ways from experimental studies (in large and small laboratory facilities). The examples range from very general hydrodynamic descriptions of wave phenomena to specific...

  17. Flow Experience in Teams: The Role of Shared Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubé, Caroline; Rousseau, Vincent; Brunelle, Eric

    2017-02-02

    The present study tests a multilevel mediation model concerning the effect of shared leadership on team members' flow experience. Specifically, we investigate the mediating role of teamwork behaviors in the relationships between 2 complementary indicators of shared leadership (i.e., density and centralization) and flow. Based on a multisource approach, we collected data through observation and survey of 111 project teams (521 individuals) made up of university students participating in a project management simulation. The results show that density and centralization have both an additive effect and an interaction effect on teamwork behaviors, such that the relationship between density and teamwork behaviors is stronger when centralization is low. In addition, teamwork behaviors play a mediating role in the relationship between shared leadership and flow. Overall, the findings highlight the importance of promoting team-based shared leadership in organizations to favor the flow experience. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. The evolution of extreme cooperation via shared dysphoric experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Harvey; Jong, Jonathan; Buhrmester, Michael D; Gómez, Ángel; Bastian, Brock; Kavanagh, Christopher M; Newson, Martha; Matthews, Miriam; Lanman, Jonathan A; McKay, Ryan; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2017-03-14

    Willingness to lay down one's life for a group of non-kin, well documented historically and ethnographically, represents an evolutionary puzzle. Building on research in social psychology, we develop a mathematical model showing how conditioning cooperation on previous shared experience can allow individually costly pro-group behavior to evolve. The model generates a series of predictions that we then test empirically in a range of special sample populations (including military veterans, college fraternity/sorority members, football fans, martial arts practitioners, and twins). Our empirical results show that sharing painful experiences produces "identity fusion" - a visceral sense of oneness - which in turn can motivate self-sacrifice, including willingness to fight and die for the group. Practically, our account of how shared dysphoric experiences produce identity fusion helps us better understand such pressing social issues as suicide terrorism, holy wars, sectarian violence, gang-related violence, and other forms of intergroup conflict.

  19. The evolution of extreme cooperation via shared dysphoric experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Harvey; Jong, Jonathan; Buhrmester, Michael D.; Gómez, Ángel; Bastian, Brock; Kavanagh, Christopher M.; Newson, Martha; Matthews, Miriam; Lanman, Jonathan A.; McKay, Ryan; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Willingness to lay down one’s life for a group of non-kin, well documented historically and ethnographically, represents an evolutionary puzzle. Building on research in social psychology, we develop a mathematical model showing how conditioning cooperation on previous shared experience can allow individually costly pro-group behavior to evolve. The model generates a series of predictions that we then test empirically in a range of special sample populations (including military veterans, college fraternity/sorority members, football fans, martial arts practitioners, and twins). Our empirical results show that sharing painful experiences produces “identity fusion” – a visceral sense of oneness – which in turn can motivate self-sacrifice, including willingness to fight and die for the group. Practically, our account of how shared dysphoric experiences produce identity fusion helps us better understand such pressing social issues as suicide terrorism, holy wars, sectarian violence, gang-related violence, and other forms of intergroup conflict. PMID:28290499

  20. Experiences of medical and pharmacy students' learning in a shared ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiences of medical and pharmacy students' learning in a shared environment: A qualitative study. ... African Journal of Health Professions Education ... undergraduate learning environment, medical and pharmacy students have the opportunity to start working in a collaborative manner early on in their careers.

  1. DeID - a data sharing tool for neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuebo; Wang, James; Wang, Anlin; Meng, Qingping; Prescott, Christian; Tsu, Loretta; Eckert, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Funding institutions and researchers increasingly expect that data will be shared to increase scientific integrity and provide other scientists with the opportunity to use the data with novel methods that may advance understanding in a particular field of study. In practice, sharing human subject data can be complicated because data must be de-identified prior to sharing. Moreover, integrating varied data types collected in a study can be challenging and time consuming. For example, sharing data from structural imaging studies of a complex disorder requires the integration of imaging, demographic and/or behavioral data in a way that no subject identifiers are included in the de-identified dataset and with new subject labels or identification values that cannot be tracked back to the original ones. We have developed a Java program that users can use to remove identifying information in neuroimaging datasets, while still maintaining the association among different data types from the same subject for further studies. This software provides a series of user interaction wizards to allow users to select data variables to be de-identified, implements functions for auditing and validation of de-identified data, and enables the user to share the de-identified data in a single compressed package through various communication protocols, such as FTPS and SFTP. DeID runs with Windows, Linux, and Mac operating systems and its open architecture allows it to be easily adapted to support a broader array of data types, with the goal of facilitating data sharing. DeID can be obtained at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/deid.

  2. Mediating Tourist Experiences. Access to Places via Shared Videos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tussyadiah, Iis; Fesenmaier, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of new media using multimedia features has generated a new set of mediators for tourists' experiences. This study examines two hypotheses regarding the roles that online travel videos play as mediators of tourist experiences. The results confirm that online shared videos can provide...... mental pleasure to viewers by stimulating fantasies and daydreams, as well as bringing back past travel memories. In addition, the videos act as a narrative transportation, providing access to foreign landscapes and socioscapes....

  3. Shared Negative Experiences Lead to Identity Fusion via Personal Reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Jonathan; Whitehouse, Harvey; Kavanagh, Christopher; Lane, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Across three studies, we examined the role of shared negative experiences in the formation of strong social bonds--identity fusion--previously associated with individuals' willingness to self-sacrifice for the sake of their groups. Studies 1 and 2 were correlational studies conducted on two different populations. In Study 1, we found that the extent to which Northern Irish Republicans and Unionists experienced shared negative experiences was associated with levels of identity fusion, and that this relationship was mediated by their reflection on these experiences. In Study 2, we replicated this finding among Bostonians, looking at their experiences of the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombings. These correlational studies provide initial evidence for the plausibility of our causal model; however, an experiment was required for a more direct test. Thus, in Study 3, we experimentally manipulated the salience of the Boston Marathon Bombings, and found that this increased state levels of identity fusion among those who experienced it negatively. Taken together, these three studies provide evidence that shared negative experience leads to identity fusion, and that this process involves personal reflection.

  4. The new alchemy: Online networking, data sharing and research activity distribution tools for scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Antony J; Peck, Lou; Ekins, Sean

    2017-01-01

    There is an abundance of free online tools accessible to scientists and others that can be used for online networking, data sharing and measuring research impact. Despite this, few scientists know how these tools can be used or fail to take advantage of using them as an integrated pipeline to raise awareness of their research outputs. In this article, the authors describe their experiences with these tools and how they can make best use of them to make their scientific research generally more accessible, extending its reach beyond their own direct networks, and communicating their ideas to new audiences. These efforts have the potential to drive science by sparking new collaborations and interdisciplinary research projects that may lead to future publications, funding and commercial opportunities. The intent of this article is to: describe some of these freely accessible networking tools and affiliated products; demonstrate from our own experiences how they can be utilized effectively; and, inspire their adoption by new users for the benefit of science.

  5. Power-sharing Partnerships: Teachers' Experiences of Participatory Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ronél; Ebersöhn, Liesel; Mbongwe, Bathsheba B

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the experiences of teachers as coresearchers in a long-term partnership with university researchers, who participated in an asset-based intervention project known as Supportive Teachers, Assets and Resilience (STAR). In an attempt to inform participatory research methodology, the study investigated how coresearchers (teachers) experienced power relations. We utilized Gaventa's power cube as a theoretical framework and participatory research as our methodologic paradigm. Ten teachers of a primary school in the Eastern Cape and five teachers of a secondary school in a remote area in the Mpumalanga Province in South Africa participated (n=15). We employed multiple data generation techniques, namely Participatory Reflection and Action (PRA) activities, observation, focus group discussions, and semistructured interviews, using thematic analysis and categorical aggregation for data analysis. We identified three themes, related to the (1) nature of power in participatory partnerships, (2) coreasearchers' meaning making of power and partnerships, and their (3) role in taking agency. Based on these findings, we developed a framework of power sharing partnerships to extend Gaventa's power cube theory. This framework, and its five interrelated elements (leadership as power, identifying vision and mission, synergy, interdependent role of partners, and determination), provide insight into the way coresearchers shared their experiences of participatory research methodology. We theorise power-sharing partnerships as a complimentary platform hosting partners' shared strengths, skills, and experience, creating synergy in collaborative projects.

  6. Making music in a group: synchronization and shared experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overy, Katie

    2012-04-01

    To consider the full impact of musical learning on the brain, it is important to study the nature of everyday, non-expert forms of musical behavior alongside expert instrumental training. Such informal forms of music making tend to include social interaction, synchronization, body movements, and positive shared experiences. Here, I propose that when designing music intervention programs for scientific purposes, such features may have advantages over instrumental training, depending on the specific research aims, contexts, and measures. With reference to a selection of classroom approaches to music education and to the shared affective motion experience (SAME) model of emotional responses to music, I conclude that group learning may be particularly valuable in music pedagogy. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Modern ICT Tools: Online Electronic Resources Sharing Using Web ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Libraries can also operate information commons and derive the befits that go with their operations; and use web 2.0 tools like Facebook, RSS feeds, wikis, blogs, podcasts, flickr, tagging, Myspace, etc for web visibility, enhanced information generation, processing, dissemination, access and utilization, as well as facilitating ...

  8. Psychiatric service staff perceptions of implementing a shared decision-making tool: a process evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Ulla-Karin; Grim, Katarina; Wallin, Lars; Rosenberg, David; Svedberg, Petra

    2018-12-01

    Shared decision making, SDM, in psychiatric services, supports users to experience a greater sense of involvement in treatment, self-efficacy, autonomy and reduced coercion. Decision tools adapted to the needs of users have the potential to support SDM and restructure how users and staff work together to arrive at shared decisions. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the implementation process of an SDM intervention for users of psychiatric services in Sweden. The implementation was studied through a process evaluation utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods. In designing the process evaluation for the intervention, three evaluation components were emphasized: contextual factors, implementation issues and mechanisms of impact. The study addresses critical implementation issues related to decision-making authority, the perceived decision-making ability of users and the readiness of the service to increase influence and participation. It also emphasizes the importance of facilitation, as well as suggesting contextual adaptations that may be relevant for the local organizations. The results indicate that staff perceived the decision support tool as user-friendly and useful in supporting participation in decision-making, and suggest that such concrete supports to participation can be a factor in implementation if adequate attention is paid to organizational contexts and structures.

  9. A Tool for Sharing Empirical Models of Climate Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, J.; Kopp, R. E.; Hsiang, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists, policy advisors, and the public struggle to synthesize the quickly evolving empirical work on climate change impacts. The Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) used to estimate the impacts of climate change and the effects of adaptation and mitigation policies can also benefit greatly from recent empirical results (Kopp, Hsiang & Oppenheimer, Impacts World 2013 discussion paper). This paper details a new online tool for exploring, analyzing, combining, and communicating a wide range of impact results, and supporting their integration into IAMs. The tool uses a new database of statistical results, which researchers can expand both in depth (by providing additional results that describing existing relationships) and breadth (by adding new relationships). Scientists can use the tool to quickly perform meta-analyses of related results, using Bayesian techniques to produce pooled and partially-pooled posterior distributions. Policy advisors can apply the statistical results to particular contexts, and combine different kinds of results in a cost-benefit framework. For example, models of the impact of temperature changes on agricultural yields can be first aggregated to build a best-estimate of the effect under given assumptions, then compared across countries using different temperature scenarios, and finally combined to estimate a social cost of carbon. The general public can better understand the many estimates of climate impacts and their range of uncertainty by exploring these results dynamically, with maps, bar charts, and dose-response-style plots. Front page of the climate impacts tool website. Sample "collections" of models, within which all results are estimates of the same fundamental relationship, are shown on the right. Simple pooled result for Gelman's "8 schools" example. Pooled results are calculated analytically, while partial-pooling (Bayesian hierarchical estimation) uses posterior simulations.

  10. The importance of shared mental models and shared situation awareness for transforming robots from tools to teammates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ososky, Scott; Schuster, David; Jentsch, Florian; Fiore, Stephen; Shumaker, Randall; Lebiere, Christian; Kurup, Unmesh; Oh, Jean; Stentz, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    Current ground robots are largely employed via tele-operation and provide their operators with useful tools to extend reach, improve sensing, and avoid dangers. To move from robots that are useful as tools to truly synergistic human-robot teaming, however, will require not only greater technical capabilities among robots, but also a better understanding of the ways in which the principles of teamwork can be applied from exclusively human teams to mixed teams of humans and robots. In this respect, a core characteristic that enables successful human teams to coordinate shared tasks is their ability to create, maintain, and act on a shared understanding of the world and the roles of the team and its members in it. The team performance literature clearly points towards two important cornerstones for shared understanding of team members: mental models and situation awareness. These constructs have been investigated as products of teams as well; amongst teams, they are shared mental models and shared situation awareness. Consequently, we are studying how these two constructs can be measured and instantiated in human-robot teams. In this paper, we report results from three related efforts that are investigating process and performance outcomes for human robot teams. Our investigations include: (a) how human mental models of tasks and teams change whether a teammate is human, a service animal, or an advanced automated system; (b) how computer modeling can lead to mental models being instantiated and used in robots; (c) how we can simulate the interactions between human and future robotic teammates on the basis of changes in shared mental models and situation assessment.

  11. Student experiences of creating and sharing material in online learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Henry W W

    2011-01-01

    User-generated content in an online environment has significant implications in both education and health. Instead of a model of knowledge being something transferred from the expert to the student or to the patient, Web 2.0 technologies offer the hope of making learning, and healthcare delivery, a more collaborative and participative process. However, some evidence suggests that this supposed democratisation of production is not entirely democratic and, in an educational context, many students are uncomfortable about sharing material they create with their peers. To understand students' affective and other experiences of generating content to be shared online with peers (e.g. in online discussions). Online interviews, face-to-face focus groups and further methods with two student groups in medical education, one undergraduate and one postgraduate. Students were broadly positive about creating and sharing material online, but were also quite anxious about doing so. Many practical issues, including around course design, student workload and assessment pressures, were barriers to students creating and sharing material. Group size is also important, with self-sustaining activity less likely in small groups. Successfully introducing user-generated content into medical education requires attention to practical details and an awareness of the student anxiety that can arise.

  12. He Asked Me What!?--Using Shared Online Accounts as Training Tools for Distance Learning Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kelly; Casey, Anne Marie; Citro, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the idea of creating a knowledge base from shared online accounts to use in training librarians who perform distance reference services. Through a survey, follow-up interviews and a case study, the investigators explored current and potential use of shared online accounts as training tools. This study revealed that the…

  13. Federating heterogeneous datasets to enhance data sharing and experiment reproducibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Juan C.; Paniagua, Beatriz; Yatabe, Marilia S.; Ruellas, Antonio C. O.; Fattori, Liana; Muniz, Luciana; Styner, Martin; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the difficulties to replicate scientific findings and/or experiments published in past.1 The effects seen in the replicated experiments were smaller than previously reported. Some of the explanations for these findings include the complexity of the experimental design and the pressure on researches to report positive findings. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) suggests that every study considered for publication must submit a plan to share the de-identified patient data no later than 6 months after publication. There is a growing demand to enhance the management of clinical data, facilitate data sharing across institutions and also to keep track of the data from previous experiments. The ultimate goal is to assure the reproducibility of experiments in the future. This paper describes Shiny-tooth, a web based application created to improve clinical data acquisition during the clinical trial; data federation of such data as well as morphological data derived from medical images; Currently, this application is being used to store clinical data from an osteoarthritis (OA) study. This work is submitted to the SPIE Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging conference.

  14. Shared trauma reality in war: Mental health therapists' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Sara A; Tuval Mashiach, Rivka

    2018-01-01

    Shared traumatic reality occurs when therapists are doubly exposed to a traumatic event, both through their clients' experience, along with their own direct exposure. Studies have shown that a shared traumatic reality can lead to both positive and negative outcomes for therapists. Most studies have examined these reactions sometime after the end of the traumatic event, and less is known about reactions that occur during a traumatic event. In addition, most studies have assumed, rather than examined, indirect exposure. In this study, we extend this literature by examining direct and indirect exposure of therapists during a war situation, and their psychological reactions. Over a period of two months in 2014, 70% of the Israeli population was exposed to rocket fire. Geographical areas differed in terms of amount of exposure, and its potential danger. 151 therapists living throughout Israel were assessed via an Internet based survey in the middle of the war, and were assessed for the effects on their professional and personal lives, degree of burnout, ways of coping and symptoms levels of PTSD and psychological distress. These indicate that significant differences in direct exposure occurred depending on place of residence. PTSD levels were related to higher direct exposure, as well as prior trauma exposure, but not to indirect exposure. Indirect exposure, as measured by increased workload, was related to increased distress and emotional exhaustion. These data shed light on the effects of direct and indirect exposure to a shared traumatic experience of war amongst therapists. The data support previous studies showing a greater effect of direct exposure on PTSD. Since indirect exposure appears to negatively impact burnout and psychological distress, rather than PTSD, this study shows that symptoms other than PTSD should be the result of in a shared traumatic reality.

  15. C++ Software Quality in the ATLAS Experiment: Tools and Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Kluth, Stefan; The ATLAS collaboration; Obreshkov, Emil; Roe, Shaun; Seuster, Rolf; Snyder, Scott; Stewart, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN uses about six million lines of code and currently has about 420 developers whose background is largely from physics. In this paper we explain how the C++ code quality is managed using a range of tools from compile-time through to run time testing and reflect on the great progress made in the last year largely through the use of static analysis tools such as Coverity®, an industry-standard tool which enables quality comparison with general open source C++ code. Other tools including cppcheck, Include-What-You-Use and run-time 'sanitizers' are also discussed.

  16. The tissue microarray OWL schema: An open-source tool for sharing tissue microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunseok P Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tissue microarrays (TMAs are enormously useful tools for translational research, but incompatibilities in database systems between various researchers and institutions prevent the efficient sharing of data that could help realize their full potential. Resource Description Framework (RDF provides a flexible method to represent knowledge in triples, which take the form Subject- Predicate-Object. All data resources are described using Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs, which are global in scope. We present an OWL (Web Ontology Language schema that expands upon the TMA data exchange specification to address this issue and assist in data sharing and integration. Methods: A minimal OWL schema was designed containing only concepts specific to TMA experiments. More general data elements were incorporated from predefined ontologies such as the NCI thesaurus. URIs were assigned using the Linked Data format. Results: We present examples of files utilizing the schema and conversion of XML data (similar to the TMA DES to OWL. Conclusion: By utilizing predefined ontologies and global unique identifiers, this OWL schema provides a solution to the limitations of XML, which represents concepts defined in a localized setting. This will help increase the utilization of tissue resources, facilitating collaborative translational research efforts.

  17. Enjoyable company in sharing stroke experiences; - lifestyle groups after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Anne; Melhus, Mali; Sveen, Unni

    2018-03-01

    Even people with mild to moderate stroke will experience changes in their abilities to perform everyday occupations. Group interventions may be appropriate in late-stage rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to explore how the participants involved themselves in person-centered lifestyle groups after stroke in Norway. Semi-structured interviews were performed with six older adults with mild-to-moderate stroke who had participated in lifestyle groups over a period of nine months. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The participants involved themselves in the lifestyle groups in a variety of ways by creating enjoyable company in sharing stroke experiences, sharing knowledgeable interest, pushing and forcing each other forward and reflecting on self-worth. Through doing group activities together, they created various ways of being, belonging and becoming, addressing development of strategies for regaining self-belief and a sense of autonomy, and for adapting to everyday life post-stroke. The participants were active contributors in the groups and pushed each other and themselves regarding involvement in meaningful occupations. This active participation seemed to bring the participants' resources into focus and contrasted with the frequent negative perceptions of people post-stroke as 'victims'.

  18. Network Computing Infrastructure to Share Tools and Data in Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Guehee; Suzuki, Yoshio; Teshima, Naoya

    CCSE/JAEA (Center for Computational Science and e-Systems/Japan Atomic Energy Agency) integrated a prototype system of a network computing infrastructure for sharing tools and data to support the U.S. and Japan collaboration in GNEP (Global Nuclear Energy Partnership). We focused on three technical issues to apply our information process infrastructure, which are accessibility, security, and usability. In designing the prototype system, we integrated and improved both network and Web technologies. For the accessibility issue, we adopted SSL-VPN (Security Socket Layer-Virtual Private Network) technology for the access beyond firewalls. For the security issue, we developed an authentication gateway based on the PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) authentication mechanism to strengthen the security. Also, we set fine access control policy to shared tools and data and used shared key based encryption method to protect tools and data against leakage to third parties. For the usability issue, we chose Web browsers as user interface and developed Web application to provide functions to support sharing tools and data. By using WebDAV (Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning) function, users can manipulate shared tools and data through the Windows-like folder environment. We implemented the prototype system in Grid infrastructure for atomic energy research: AEGIS (Atomic Energy Grid Infrastructure) developed by CCSE/JAEA. The prototype system was applied for the trial use in the first period of GNEP.

  19. Sharing as risk pooling in a social dilemma experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd L. Cherry

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In rural economies with missing or incomplete markets, idiosyncratic risk is frequently pooled through informal networks. Idiosyncratic shocks, however, are not limited to private goods but can also restrict an individual from partaking in or benefiting from a collective activity. In these situations, a group must decide whether to provide insurance to the affected member. We describe results of a laboratory experiment designed to test whether a simple sharing institution can sustain risk pooling in a social dilemma with idiosyncratic risk. We tested whether risk could be pooled without a commitment device and, separately, whether effective risk pooling induced greater cooperation in the social dilemma. We found that even in the absence of a commitment device or reputational considerations, subjects voluntarily pooled risk, thereby reducing variance in individual earnings. In spite of effective risk pooling, however, cooperation in the social dilemma was unaffected.

  20. Generating community-built tools for data sharing and analysis in environmental networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jordan S.; Gries, Corinna; Read, Emily K.; Klug, Jennifer; Hanson, Paul C.; Hipsey, Matthew R.; Jennings, Eleanor; O'Reilley, Catherine; Winslow, Luke A.; Pierson, Don; McBride, Christopher G.; Hamilton, David

    2016-01-01

    Rapid data growth in many environmental sectors has necessitated tools to manage and analyze these data. The development of tools often lags behind the proliferation of data, however, which may slow exploratory opportunities and scientific progress. The Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) collaborative model supports an efficient and comprehensive data–analysis–insight life cycle, including implementations of data quality control checks, statistical calculations/derivations, models, and data visualizations. These tools are community-built and openly shared. We discuss the network structure that enables tool development and a culture of sharing, leading to optimized output from limited resources. Specifically, data sharing and a flat collaborative structure encourage the development of tools that enable scientific insights from these data. Here we provide a cross-section of scientific advances derived from global-scale analyses in GLEON. We document enhancements to science capabilities made possible by the development of analytical tools and highlight opportunities to expand this framework to benefit other environmental networks.

  1. New Approaches for Collaborative Sharing of Chemical Model Data and Analysis Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchardt, K; Oluwole, O; Pitz, W; Rahn, L A; Green, Jr., W H; Leahy, D; Pancerella, C; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J

    2005-01-19

    The urgent need for high-efficiency, low-emission energy utilization technologies for transportation, power generation, and manufacturing processes presents difficult challenges to the combustion research community. The required predictive understanding requires systematic knowledge across the full range of physical scales involved in combustion processes--from the properties and interactions of individual molecules to the dynamics and products of turbulent multi-phase reacting flows. Innovative experimental techniques and computational approaches are revolutionizing the rate at which chemical science research can produce the new information necessary to advance our combustion knowledge. But the increased volume and complexity of this information often makes it even more difficult to derive the systems-level knowledge we need. Combustion researchers have responded by forming interdisciplinary communities intent on sharing information and coordinating research priorities. Such efforts face many barriers, however, including lack of data accessibility and interoperability, missing metadata and pedigree information, efficient approaches for sharing data and analysis tools, and the challenges of working together across geography, disciplines, and a very diverse spectrum of applications and funding. This challenge is especially difficult for those developing, sharing and/or using detailed chemical models of combustion to treat the oxidation of practical fuels. This is a very complex problem, and the development of new chemistry models requires a series of steps that involve acquiring and keeping track of a large amount of data and its pedigree. Also, this data is developed using a diverse range of codes and experiments spanning ab initio chemistry codes, laboratory kinetics and flame experiments, all the way to reacting flow simulations on massively parallel computers. Each of these processes typically requires different data formats, and often the data and/or analysis

  2. Profile Building, Research Sharing and Data Proliferation using Social Media Tools for Scientists (RTI presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many of us nowadays invest significant amounts of time in sharing our activities and opinions with friends and family via social networking tools such as Facebook, Twitter or other related websites. However, despite the availability of many platforms for scientists to connect and...

  3. An interoperability experiment for sharing hydrological rating tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, D.; Taylor, P.; Sheahan, P.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing demand on freshwater resources is requiring authorities to produce more accurate and timely estimates of their available water. Calculation of continuous time-series of river discharge and storage volumes generally requires rating tables. These approximate relationships between two phenomena, such as river level and discharge, and allow us to produce continuous estimates of a phenomenon that may be impractical or impossible to measure directly. Standardised information models or access mechanisms for rating tables are required to support sharing and exchange of water flow data. An Interoperability Experiment (IE) is underway to test an information model that describes rating tables, the observations made to build these ratings, and river cross-section data. The IE is an initiative of the joint World Meteorological Organisation/Open Geospatial Consortium's Hydrology Domain Working Group (HydroDWG) and the model will be published as WaterML2.0 part 2. Interoperability Experiments (IEs) are low overhead, multiple member projects that are run under the OGC's interoperability program to test existing and emerging standards. The HydroDWG has previously run IEs to test early versions of OGC WaterML2.0 part 1 - timeseries. This IE is focussing on two key exchange scenarios: Sharing rating tables and gauging observations between water agencies. Through the use of standard OGC web services, rating tables and associated data will be made available from water agencies. The (Australian) Bureau of Meteorology will retrieve rating tables on-demand from water authorities, allowing the Bureau to run conversions of data within their own systems. Exposing rating tables and gaugings for online analysis and educational purposes. A web client will be developed to enable exploration and visualization of rating tables, gaugings and related metadata for monitoring points. The client gives a quick view into available rating tables, their periods of applicability and the

  4. Experience Differences and Continuance Intention of Blog Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsi-Peng; Lee, Ming-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Although many studies focus on information sharing in communities and organisations, little research has been carried out on the antecedents of continuance intention of blog sharing. This study focuses on amateur blogs, which are the major customers for blog service providers (BSPs). The purposes are to investigate the antecedents of continuous…

  5. Choosing and Using Tools: Prior Experience and Task Difficulty Influence Preschoolers' Tool-Use Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Amy K.; Bjorklund, David F.; Greif, Marissa L.; Gray, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Children's acquisition of tool use abilities is an important part of development but is not yet well understood. This study compares two modes of tool-use learning, observation and individual haptic experience. Two- and 3-year-olds had haptic experience with tools, observed tool use by others, had both haptic and observational experience, or no…

  6. New tools for Content Innovation and data sharing: Enhancing reproducibility and rigor in biomechanics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilak, Farshid

    2017-03-21

    We are currently in one of the most exciting times for science and engineering as we witness unprecedented growth in our computational and experimental capabilities to generate new data and models. To facilitate data and model sharing, and to enhance reproducibility and rigor in biomechanics research, the Journal of Biomechanics has introduced a number of tools for Content Innovation to allow presentation, sharing, and archiving of methods, models, and data in our articles. The tools include an Interactive Plot Viewer, 3D Geometric Shape and Model Viewer, Virtual Microscope, Interactive MATLAB Figure Viewer, and Audioslides. Authors are highly encouraged to make use of these in upcoming journal submissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Social Media - DoD’s Greatest Information Sharing Tool or Weakest Security Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    OR WEAKEST SECURITY LINK? BY LIEUTENTANT COLONEL SUSAN CAMORODA United States Army National Guard Se ni or S er vi ce C ol le ge F el lo w...SHARING TOOL OR WEAKEST SECURITY LINK? by Lieutenant Colonel Susan Camoroda United States Army National Guard Dr Rahul...CRP is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Senior Serivce College Fellowship. The U.S. Army War College is accredited by the

  8. Legal assessment tool (LAT): an interactive tool to address privacy and data protection issues for data sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Krauth, Christian; Bergmann, René; Karakoyun, Töresin; Woollard, Astrid; Schluender, Irene; Braasch, Benjamin; Eckert, Martin; Ohmann, Christian

    2016-07-07

    In an unprecedented rate data in the life sciences is generated and stored in many different databases. An ever increasing part of this data is human health data and therefore falls under data protected by legal regulations. As part of the BioMedBridges project, which created infrastructures that connect more than 10 ESFRI research infrastructures (RI), the legal and ethical prerequisites of data sharing were examined employing a novel and pragmatic approach. We employed concepts from computer science to create legal requirement clusters that enable legal interoperability between databases for the areas of data protection, data security, Intellectual Property (IP) and security of biosample data. We analysed and extracted access rules and constraints from all data providers (databases) involved in the building of data bridges covering many of Europe's most important databases. These requirement clusters were applied to five usage scenarios representing the data flow in different data bridges: Image bridge, Phenotype data bridge, Personalised medicine data bridge, Structural data bridge, and Biosample data bridge. A matrix was built to relate the important concepts from data protection regulations (e.g. pseudonymisation, identifyability, access control, consent management) with the results of the requirement clusters. An interactive user interface for querying the matrix for requirements necessary for compliant data sharing was created. To guide researchers without the need for legal expert knowledge through legal requirements, an interactive tool, the Legal Assessment Tool (LAT), was developed. LAT provides researchers interactively with a selection process to characterise the involved types of data and databases and provides suitable requirements and recommendations for concrete data access and sharing situations. The results provided by LAT are based on an analysis of the data access and sharing conditions for different kinds of data of major databases in Europe

  9. LabKey Server NAb: A tool for analyzing, visualizing and sharing results from neutralizing antibody assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple types of assays allow sensitive detection of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. For example, the extent of antibody neutralization of HIV-1, SIV and SHIV can be measured in the TZM-bl cell line through the degree of luciferase reporter gene expression after infection. In the past, neutralization curves and titers for this standard assay have been calculated using an Excel macro. Updating all instances of such a macro with new techniques can be unwieldy and introduce non-uniformity across multi-lab teams. Using Excel also poses challenges in centrally storing, sharing and associating raw data files and results. Results We present LabKey Server's NAb tool for organizing, analyzing and securely sharing data, files and results for neutralizing antibody (NAb) assays, including the luciferase-based TZM-bl NAb assay. The customizable tool supports high-throughput experiments and includes a graphical plate template designer, allowing researchers to quickly adapt calculations to new plate layouts. The tool calculates the percent neutralization for each serum dilution based on luminescence measurements, fits a range of neutralization curves to titration results and uses these curves to estimate the neutralizing antibody titers for benchmark dilutions. Results, curve visualizations and raw data files are stored in a database and shared through a secure, web-based interface. NAb results can be integrated with other data sources based on sample identifiers. It is simple to make results public after publication by updating folder security settings. Conclusions Standardized tools for analyzing, archiving and sharing assay results can improve the reproducibility, comparability and reliability of results obtained across many labs. LabKey Server and its NAb tool are freely available as open source software at http://www.labkey.com under the Apache 2.0 license. Many members of the HIV research community can also access the LabKey Server NAb tool without

  10. LabKey Server NAb: a tool for analyzing, visualizing and sharing results from neutralizing antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehler, Britt; Nelson, Elizabeth K; Eckels, Josh; Ramsay, Sarah; Lum, Karl; Wood, Blake; Greene, Kelli M; Gao, Hongmei; Seaman, Michael S; Montefiori, David C; Igra, Mark

    2011-05-27

    Multiple types of assays allow sensitive detection of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. For example, the extent of antibody neutralization of HIV-1, SIV and SHIV can be measured in the TZM-bl cell line through the degree of luciferase reporter gene expression after infection. In the past, neutralization curves and titers for this standard assay have been calculated using an Excel macro. Updating all instances of such a macro with new techniques can be unwieldy and introduce non-uniformity across multi-lab teams. Using Excel also poses challenges in centrally storing, sharing and associating raw data files and results. We present LabKey Server's NAb tool for organizing, analyzing and securely sharing data, files and results for neutralizing antibody (NAb) assays, including the luciferase-based TZM-bl NAb assay. The customizable tool supports high-throughput experiments and includes a graphical plate template designer, allowing researchers to quickly adapt calculations to new plate layouts. The tool calculates the percent neutralization for each serum dilution based on luminescence measurements, fits a range of neutralization curves to titration results and uses these curves to estimate the neutralizing antibody titers for benchmark dilutions. Results, curve visualizations and raw data files are stored in a database and shared through a secure, web-based interface. NAb results can be integrated with other data sources based on sample identifiers. It is simple to make results public after publication by updating folder security settings. Standardized tools for analyzing, archiving and sharing assay results can improve the reproducibility, comparability and reliability of results obtained across many labs. LabKey Server and its NAb tool are freely available as open source software at http://www.labkey.com under the Apache 2.0 license. Many members of the HIV research community can also access the LabKey Server NAb tool without installing the software by using the

  11. LabKey Server NAb: A tool for analyzing, visualizing and sharing results from neutralizing antibody assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Hongmei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple types of assays allow sensitive detection of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. For example, the extent of antibody neutralization of HIV-1, SIV and SHIV can be measured in the TZM-bl cell line through the degree of luciferase reporter gene expression after infection. In the past, neutralization curves and titers for this standard assay have been calculated using an Excel macro. Updating all instances of such a macro with new techniques can be unwieldy and introduce non-uniformity across multi-lab teams. Using Excel also poses challenges in centrally storing, sharing and associating raw data files and results. Results We present LabKey Server's NAb tool for organizing, analyzing and securely sharing data, files and results for neutralizing antibody (NAb assays, including the luciferase-based TZM-bl NAb assay. The customizable tool supports high-throughput experiments and includes a graphical plate template designer, allowing researchers to quickly adapt calculations to new plate layouts. The tool calculates the percent neutralization for each serum dilution based on luminescence measurements, fits a range of neutralization curves to titration results and uses these curves to estimate the neutralizing antibody titers for benchmark dilutions. Results, curve visualizations and raw data files are stored in a database and shared through a secure, web-based interface. NAb results can be integrated with other data sources based on sample identifiers. It is simple to make results public after publication by updating folder security settings. Conclusions Standardized tools for analyzing, archiving and sharing assay results can improve the reproducibility, comparability and reliability of results obtained across many labs. LabKey Server and its NAb tool are freely available as open source software at http://www.labkey.com under the Apache 2.0 license. Many members of the HIV research community can also access the Lab

  12. The new alchemy: Online networking, data sharing and research activity distribution tools for scientists [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony J. Williams

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an abundance of free online tools accessible to scientists and others that can be used for online networking, data sharing and measuring research impact. Despite this, few scientists know how these tools can be used or fail to take advantage of using them as an integrated pipeline to raise awareness of their research outputs. In this article, the authors describe their experiences with these tools and how they can make best use of them to make their scientific research generally more accessible, extending its reach beyond their own direct networks, and communicating their ideas to new audiences. These efforts have the potential to drive science by sparking new collaborations and interdisciplinary research projects that may lead to future publications, funding and commercial opportunities. The intent of this article is to: describe some of these freely accessible networking tools and affiliated products; demonstrate from our own experiences how they can be utilized effectively; and, inspire their adoption by new users for the benefit of science.

  13. Sharing learning experiences through correspondence on the WWW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Okamoto, T; Hartley, R.; Kinshuk, T.; Klus, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Asynchronous learning networks are facilities and procedures to allow members of learning communities to be more effective and efficient in their learning. One approach is to see how the `sharing' of knowledge can be augmented through meta-data descriptions attached to portfolios and project work.

  14. Dealing with emotions : medical undergraduates' preferences in sharing their experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries-Erich, Joy M.; Dornan, Tim; Boerboom, Tobias B. B.; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Helmich, Esther

    ContextPatient care evokes emotional responses such as uncertainty, grief and pride in medical students. There is a need for opportunities to share and express such emotions because they influence students' professional development and well-being. There is a trend towards introducing mentor

  15. Making data sharing work: The FCP/INDI experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennes, Maarten; Biswal, Bharat; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the fMRI Data Center (fMRIDC) pioneered open-access data sharing in the task-based functional neuroimaging community. Well ahead of its time, the fMRIDC effort encountered logistical, sociocultural and funding barriers that impeded the field-wise instantiation of open-access data sharing. In 2009, ambitions for open-access data sharing were revived in the resting state functional MRI community in the form of two grassroots initiatives: the 1000 Functional Connectomes Project (FCP) and its successor, the International Neuroimaging Datasharing Initiative (INDI). Beyond providing open access to thousands of clinical and non-clinical imaging datasets, the FCP and INDI have also demonstrated the feasibility of large-scale data aggregation for hypothesis generation and testing. Yet, the success of the FCP and INDI should not be confused with widespread embracement of open-access data sharing. Reminiscent of the challenges faced by fMRIDC, key controversies persist and include participant privacy, the role of informatics, and the logistical and cultural challenges of establishing an open science ethos. We discuss the FCP and INDI in the context of these challenges, highlighting the promise of current initiatives and suggesting solutions for possible pitfalls. PMID:23123682

  16. A shared vision on user experiences on mics, nerves, Madonna and more

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Bijl-Brouwer, M.; Boess, S.U.

    2012-01-01

    This workshop introduces the Envisioning Use technique which is aimed at generating a shared vision on user experiences in product development teams. This shared vision could support decision making with regard to user experiences and inspire solution generation by making team members more dedicated

  17. A shared vision on user experiences, on mics, merves, Madonna and more

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bijl-Brouwer, Mieke; Boess, Stella; Brassett, J.; McDonnell, J.; Malpass, M.

    2012-01-01

    This workshop introduces the Envisioning Use technique which is aimed at generating a shared vision on user experiences in product development teams. This shared vision could support decision making with regard to user experiences and inspire solution generation by making team members more dedicated

  18. Motivations for Sharing Tourism Experiences through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; Jacobsen, Jens Kr. Steen

    2014-01-01

    Social media are increasingly relevant as part of tourism practices affecting destinations and businesses. Based on a destination-specific survey, this study charts and explores summer holidaymakers' motivations for social media contributions and their willingness to share content through various...... social media appear as valuable articulations of sociability and emotional support, while having lesser relevance as information sources for holiday decision-making. The paper additionally shows the extent to which old and new technologies overlap and complement each other....

  19. Real World SharePoint 2010 Indispensable Experiences from 22 MVPs

    CERN Document Server

    Hillier, Scot; Bishop, Darrin; Bleeker, Todd; Bogue, Robert; Bosch, Karine; Brotto, Claudio; Buenz, Adam; Connell, Andrew; Drisgill, Randy; Lapointe, Gary; Medero, Jason; Molnar, Agnes; O'Brien, Chris; Klindt, Todd; Poelmans, Joris; Rehmani, Asif; Ross, John; Swan, Nick; Walsh, Mike; Williams, Randy; Young, Shane; Macori, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Proven real-world best practices from leading Microsoft SharePoint MVPsSharePoint enables Web sites to host shared workspaces and is a leading solution for Enterprise Content Management. The newest version boasts significant changes, impressive enhancements, and new features, requiring developers and administrators of all levels of experience to quickly get up to speed on the latest changes. This book is a must-have anthology of current best practices for SharePoint 2010 from 20 of the top SharePoint MVPs. They offer insider advice on everything from installation, workflow, and Web parts to bu

  20. Mineotaur: a tool for high-content microscopy screen sharing and visual analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Bálint; Chessel, Anatole; Carazo Salas, Rafael E

    2015-12-17

    High-throughput/high-content microscopy-based screens are powerful tools for functional genomics, yielding intracellular information down to the level of single-cells for thousands of genotypic conditions. However, accessing their data requires specialized knowledge and most often that data is no longer analyzed after initial publication. We describe Mineotaur ( http://www.mineotaur.org ), a open-source, downloadable web application that allows easy online sharing and interactive visualisation of large screen datasets, facilitating their dissemination and further analysis, and enhancing their impact.

  1. SoTRE's Speak Up: Students Share the Benefits of Teacher Researcher Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks, E.; Allen, S.; Farmer, S.; Jones, K.

    2016-12-01

    Being Students of Teacher Researcher Experiences (SoTRE) gives students special advantages that most students do not get. Teachers Elizabeth Eubanks and Steve Allen share their knowledge gained via partnerships with Teacher Researcher Experiences (TRE's) such as the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Teacher at Sea program (NOAA- TAS), Polar TREC (Teachers and Researchers & Exploring & Collaboration), National Science Foundation (NSF) funded researchers, (EARTH) Education and Research: Testing Hypothesis, the RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program, C-DEBI (Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations and (STARS) Sending Teachers Aboard Research Ships, The Maury Project and Mate. Students gain special privileges such as understanding unique research ideas, tracking tagged sharks, following daily journals written on location, taking part in cross-continental experiments, tracking real time data, exploring current research via posters or visiting universities. Furthermore, contacts made by a TRE give students an added set of resources. When doing experiments for class or advancing their education or career goals Eubanks and Allen help students connect with scientists. Many students have felt so strongly about the TRE relationship that they have presented at several local and international science conferences. Their message is to encourage scientists to partner with teachers. The benefits of participation in such conferences have included abstract writing and submission, travel, poster creation, oral presentation, networking and personal research presentation, all tools that they will carry with them for a lifetime.

  2. Secure data sharing across portals: experiences from OneVRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Martin; Jones, Michael; Poschen, Meik; Procter, Rob; Rowley, Andrew; Schiebeck, Tobias

    2013-01-28

    Research and higher education are facing an on-going transformation of practice resulting in the need for effective collaboration and sharing of resources within and across disciplinary and geographical boundaries. Portal technologies and portal-based virtual research and learning environments (VREs and VLEs) already have become standard infrastructures within a large number of research communities and institutions. From 2004, a series of research and development projects began to ask the question whether an open source videoconferencing and collaboration system could be used as a complete, or as a part of, VRE. This study presents the evolution of these projects and at the same time, describes the definition of a VRE and their future possible integration. The OneVRE portlet integration project attempted to create missing components, including adding secure and universal identity management. This moves the idea of shared data to a different level by creating a new administrative domain that is outside the control of a single local institution portal and resolves certain administrative virtual organizations problems. We explain some of the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make this venture truly successful, when a complete toolkit can be designed for the researcher of the future.

  3. From IPTV Services to Shared Experiences: Challenges in Architecture Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Vaishnavi (Ishan); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); O. Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper discusses the architectural challenges of transitioning from services to experiences. In particular, it focuses on evolution from traditional IPTV services to more social scenarios, in which groups of people in different locations watch synchronized multimedia content

  4. Sharing for Health: A Study of Chinese Adolescents' Experiences and Perspectives on Using Social Network Sites to Share Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Teti, Michele; Stanfield, Kellie; Campo, Shelly

    2017-07-01

    This exploratory qualitative study examines Chinese adolescents' health information sharing habits on social network sites. Ten focus group meetings with 76 adolescents, ages 12 to 17 years, were conducted at community-based organizations in Chicago's Chinatown. The research team transcribed the recording and analyzed the transcripts using ATLAS.ti. Chinese adolescents are using different social network sites for various topics of health information including food, physical activity, and so on. Adolescents would share useful and/or interesting health information. Many adolescents raised credibility concerns regarding health information and suggested evaluating the information based on self-experience or intuition, word-of-mouth, or information online. The findings shed lights on future intervention using social network sites to promote health among Chinese adolescents in the United States. Future interventions should provide adolescents with interesting and culturally sensitive health information and educate them to critically evaluate health information on social network sites.

  5. The Lived Experience of MRKH: Sharing Health Information with Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michelle E; Sandberg, David E; Keegan, Catherine; Quint, Elisabeth H; Lossie, Amy C; Yashar, Beverly M

    2016-04-01

    To examine the process and emotional effect of disclosing a personal diagnosis of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH) to peers during adolescence and young adulthood. Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Nine women diagnosed with MRKH, aged 21-31 years, recruited via patient support groups. Motivators and barriers to self-disclosure of a diagnosis of MRKH to peers and partners. Motivators to tell peers about a diagnosis included significant trust in the relationship (whether platonic or romantic), needing to unload the experienced burden of diagnosis, and a sense of responsibility to be forthcoming if a long-term romantic future was desired. The most common barrier to telling others was fear of rejection or being labeled a "freak." Although most participants did not receive guidance from a health care provider regarding approaches to sharing diagnostic information with others, almost all participants reported wishing they had received such counseling. A diagnosis of MRKH elicits recurring anxieties about disclosure and the effect on relationships that are inadequately addressed by health care providers. Guidance and support on disclosure to friends and romantic partners should be provided whenever possible. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fathers’ Experience of Shared Parental Leave in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Chronholm

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of the Swedish parental leave reform in 1974, fathers have had the same rights to use parental leave as mothers. Between 2000 and 2003, a research project at the Department of Sociology, University of Gothenburg, focused on fathers who had taken more than four months of paid parental leave. The approach of the study was mainly qualitative, based upon a combination of a survey and interviews. A majority of the fathers who answered the questionnaire had been the main caregivers for their children during their parental leave. During the interviews many of the men described their mothers as role models for their fatherhood. The men also described their own partner as both anxious to get back to her work after her own parental leave period and convinced of the importance of a nurturing father. An early decision to take part of the parental leave probably made it easier for the men to reach workplace agreements. Most of the men described themselves as both nurturing fathers and as sharing housework equally. They stressed the importance of being alone with their child during a long period, to be able to develop a deep relationship with their child.

  7. Students' Acceptance of File Sharing Systems as a Tool for Sharing Course Materials: The Case of Google Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, Alaa

    2017-01-01

    Students' perceptions about both ease of use and usefulness are fundamental factors in determining their acceptance and successful use of technology in higher education. File sharing systems are one of these technologies and can be used to manage and deliver course materials and coordinate virtual teams. The aim of this study is to explore how…

  8. [Introduction to Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap2SDTM, a Conversion Tool to Facilitate Clinical Research Data Sharing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2017-07-01

    Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), Study Data Tabulation Model (SDTM) is used in new drug application studies and for sharing and reuse of accumulated clinical research data. Clinical trial manuscripts submitted to International Committee of Medical Journal Editors member journals are required to contain a statement on data sharing. We introduce here Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap2SDTM, a tool for converting research data to CDISC SDTM for facilitating data sharing. This tool will help reduce the workload in new drug application studies and allow the effective reuse of clinical research data.

  9. C++ software quality in the ATLAS experiment: tools and experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00236968; The ATLAS collaboration; Kluth, Stefan; Seuster, Rolf; Snyder, Scott; Obreshkov, Emil; Roe, Shaun; Sherwood, Peter; Stewart, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we explain how the C++ code quality is managed in ATLAS using a range of tools from compile-time through to run time testing and reflect on the substantial progress made in the last two years largely through the use of static analysis tools such as Coverity®, an industry-standard tool which enables quality comparison with general open source C++ code. Other available code analysis tools are also discussed, as is the role of unit testing with an example of how the GoogleTest framework can be applied to our codebase.

  10. C++ software quality in the ATLAS experiment: tools and experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Haugh, S.; Kluth, S.; Seuster, R.; Snyder, S.; Obreshkov, E.; Roe, S.; Sherwood, P.; Stewart, G. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we explain how the C++ code quality is managed in ATLAS using a range of tools from compile-time through to run time testing and reflect on the substantial progress made in the last two years largely through the use of static analysis tools such as Coverity®, an industry-standard tool which enables quality comparison with general open source C++ code. Other available code analysis tools are also discussed, as is the role of unit testing with an example of how the GoogleTest framework can be applied to our codebase.

  11. A Benchmarking Tool for the HLT of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    De Aguiar Francisco, O A

    2010-01-01

    We present a tool for benchmarking the HLT application of the LHCb experiment. This tool measures the time between state changes of the components and allows the user to automatize this process. It is a useful tool for evaluating future upgrades of the HLT farm and for optimizing its configuration time.

  12. General-purpose computer networks and resource sharing in ERDA. Volume 3. Remote resource-sharing experience and findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-15

    The investigation focused on heterogeneous networks in which a variety of dissimilar computers and operating systems were interconnected nationwide. Homogeneous networks, such as MFE net and SACNET, were not considered since they could not be used for general purpose resource sharing. Issues of privacy and security are of concern in any network activity. However, consideration of privacy and security of sensitive data arise to a much lesser degree in unclassified scientific research than in areas involving personal or proprietary information. Therefore, the existing mechanisms at individual sites for protecting sensitive data were relied on, and no new protection mechanisms to prevent infringement of privacy and security were attempted. Further development of ERDA networking will need to incorporate additional mechanisms to prevent infringement of privacy. The investigation itself furnishes an excellent example of computational resource sharing through a heterogeneous network. More than twenty persons, representing seven ERDA computing sites, made extensive use of both ERDA and non-ERDA computers in coordinating, compiling, and formatting the data which constitute the bulk of this report. Volume 3 analyzes the benefits and barriers encountered in actual resource sharing experience, and provides case histories of typical applications.

  13. Teaching Science IBL, a shared experience between schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruas, Fatima; Carneiro, Paula

    2015-04-01

    Key words: Problem based learning, Inquiry-based learning, digital resources, climate changes The inquiry-based learning approach is applied by watching a video about the last rigorous winter and its effects. The teacher starts by posing some questions related with the video news: Why only after a 20 or 30 years from now, how will it be possible to explain the occurrence of two storms in just a month's time? Is our climate effectively changing? What is the difference between weather and climate? The teacher helps students to think about where and how they can find information about the subject, providing/teaching them suitable tools to access and use information. The teacher plays the role of mentor/facilitator. Students should proceed to their research, presenting the results to their colleagues, discussing in groups, doing brainstorming and collaborate in the learning process. After the discussion the students must present their conclusions. The main goals are: explain the difference between weather and climate; understand whether or not climate change exists; identify the causes of climate change and extreme weather events; raising awareness among young people about environmental issues of preservation and sustainability of our planet. The results globally show that this educational approach motivates students' towards science, helping them to solve problems from daily life, as well as the collaborative working. The cognitive strand continues to be the most valued by pupils.

  14. [Sharing experiences: rotation in primary care in Posadas, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Garrido, A B; Caballero, L G; Basiuk, S

    2013-09-01

    Primary care should be the cornerstone of any health system. It is the first contact with the community health system of any country. The Declaration of Alma-Ata, 1978, seeks to provide the basis for the construction of a new health system that will allow the full exercise of the right to health. Carrying out an external rotation in Primary Care in Posadas, Misiones Province, Argentina, during medical training, in family medicine, offers an insight into how other health systems work, provide health care to the community in a Primary Care Center in a country with its similarities and differences like ours, follow the implementation of programs, working with family medicine residents in another country, and living a rewarding personal and professional experience. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Sharing clinical decisions for multimorbidity case management using social network and open-source tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Alicia; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Leal, Sandra; Parra, Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Social networks applied through Web 2.0 tools have gained importance in health domain, because they produce improvements on the communication and coordination capabilities among health professionals. This is highly relevant for multimorbidity patients care because there is a large number of health professionals in charge of patient care, and this requires to obtain clinical consensus in their decisions. Our objective is to develop a tool for collaborative work among health professionals for multimorbidity patient care. We describe the architecture to incorporate decision support functionalities in a social network tool to enable the adoption of shared decisions among health professionals from different care levels. As part of the first stage of the project, this paper describes the results obtained in a pilot study about acceptance and use of the social network component in our healthcare setting. At Virgen del Rocío University Hospital we have designed and developed the Shared Care Platform (SCP) to provide support in the continuity of care for multimorbidity patients. The SCP has two consecutively developed components: social network component, called Clinical Wall, and Clinical Decision Support (CDS) system. The Clinical Wall contains a record where health professionals are able to debate and define shared decisions. We conducted a pilot study to assess the use and acceptance of the SCP by healthcare professionals through questionnaire based on the theory of the Technology Acceptance Model. In March 2012 we released and deployed the SCP, but only with the social network component. The pilot project lasted 6 months in the hospital and 2 primary care centers. From March to September 2012 we created 16 records in the Clinical Wall, all with a high priority. A total of 10 professionals took part in the exchange of messages: 3 internists and 7 general practitioners generated 33 messages. 12 of the 16 record (75%) were answered by the destination health professionals

  16. Drawing as a user experience research tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleury, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of participant-generated drawings as a user experience research method. In spite of the lack of background literature on how drawings can generate useful insights on HCI issues, drawings have been successfully used in other research fields. After briefly introducing...... such previous work, two case studies are presented, in which drawings helped investigate the relationship between media technology users and two specific devices, namely television and mobile phones. The experiment generated useful data and opened for further consideration of the method as an appropriate HCI...

  17. Drawing as a user experience research tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleury, Alexandre

    This paper discusses the use of participant-generated drawings as a user experience research method. In spite of the lack of background literature on how drawings can generate useful insights on HCI issues, drawings have been successfully used in other research fields. After briefly introducing...... such previous work, two case studies are presented, in which drawings helped investigate the relationship between media technology users and two specific devices, namely television and mobile phones. The experiment generated useful data and opened for further consideration of the method as an appropriate HCI...

  18. Designing the user experience of game development tools

    CERN Document Server

    Lightbown, David

    2015-01-01

    The Big Green Button My Story Who Should Read this Book? Companion Website and Twitter Account Before we BeginWelcome to Designing the User Experience of Game Development ToolsWhat Will We Learn in This Chapter?What Is This Book About?Defining User ExperienceThe Value of Improving the User Experience of Our ToolsParallels Between User Experience and Game DesignHow Do People Benefit From an Improved User Experience?Finding the Right BalanceWrapping UpThe User-Centered Design ProcessWhat Will We

  19. The daily of an school of early childhood education: sharing experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Souza Broering

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Assuming the difficulty of talking about the experience and want to say without a model, this report presents the experience lived and shared by professionals, children and families of the "Creche Municipal Nossa Senhora Aparecida" known as nursery school "Pantanal".

  20. Experience Facilitates the Emergence of Sharing Behavior among 7.5-Month-Old Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Saether, Lucie; Sommerville, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Given the centrality of prosociality in everyday social functioning, understanding the factors and mechanisms underlying the origins of prosocial development is of critical importance. This experiment investigated whether experience with reciprocal object exchanges can drive the developmental onset of sharing behavior. Seven-month-old infants took…

  1. An Experiment on Creating Enterprise Specific BPM Languages and Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahe, Steen

    and automation to BPM tools through a tool experiment in Danske Bank, a large financial institute; We develop business process modeling languages, tools and transformations that capture Danske Banks specific modeling concepts and use of technology, and which automate the generation of code. An empirical...... evaluation shows that Danske Bank will possibly gain remarkable improvements in development productivity and the quality of the implemented code.This leads us to the conclusion that BPM tools should provide flexibility to allow customization of languages, tools and transformations to the specific needs...

  2. A tool for sharing annotated research data: the "Category 0" UMLS (Unified Medical Language System) vocabularies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jules J

    2003-06-16

    for a medical phrase, the Category 0 vocabularies performed 86% as well as the complete UMLS metathesaurus. The Category 0 vocabularies of UMLS constitute a large nomenclature that can be used by biomedical researchers to annotate biomedical data. These annotated data sets can be distributed for research purposes without violating the UMLS License Agreement. These vocabularies may be of particular importance for sharing heterogeneous data from diverse biomedical data sets. The software tools to extract the Category 0 vocabularies are freely available Perl scripts entered into the public domain and distributed with this article.

  3. A tool for sharing annotated research data: the "Category 0" UMLS (Unified Medical Language System vocabularies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman Jules J

    2003-06-01

    evaluated by their fitness to find at least one term for a medical phrase, the Category 0 vocabularies performed 86% as well as the complete UMLS metathesaurus. Conclusion The Category 0 vocabularies of UMLS constitute a large nomenclature that can be used by biomedical researchers to annotate biomedical data. These annotated data sets can be distributed for research purposes without violating the UMLS License Agreement. These vocabularies may be of particular importance for sharing heterogeneous data from diverse biomedical data sets. The software tools to extract the Category 0 vocabularies are freely available Perl scripts entered into the public domain and distributed with this article.

  4. Tool-assisted rhythmic drumming in palm cockatoos shares key elements of human instrumental music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsohn, Robert; Zdenek, Christina N.; Cunningham, Ross B.; Endler, John A.; Langmore, Naomi E.

    2017-01-01

    All human societies have music with a rhythmic “beat,” typically produced with percussive instruments such as drums. The set of capacities that allows humans to produce and perceive music appears to be deeply rooted in human biology, but an understanding of its evolutionary origins requires cross-taxa comparisons. We show that drumming by palm cockatoos (Probosciger aterrimus) shares the key rudiments of human instrumental music, including manufacture of a sound tool, performance in a consistent context, regular beat production, repeated components, and individual styles. Over 131 drumming sequences produced by 18 males, the beats occurred at nonrandom, regular intervals, yet individual males differed significantly in the shape parameters describing the distribution of their beat patterns, indicating individual drumming styles. Autocorrelation analyses of the longest drumming sequences further showed that they were highly regular and predictable like human music. These discoveries provide a rare comparative perspective on the evolution of rhythmicity and instrumental music in our own species, and show that a preference for a regular beat can have other origins before being co-opted into group-based music and dance. PMID:28782005

  5. Tool-assisted rhythmic drumming in palm cockatoos shares key elements of human instrumental music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsohn, Robert; Zdenek, Christina N; Cunningham, Ross B; Endler, John A; Langmore, Naomi E

    2017-06-01

    All human societies have music with a rhythmic "beat," typically produced with percussive instruments such as drums. The set of capacities that allows humans to produce and perceive music appears to be deeply rooted in human biology, but an understanding of its evolutionary origins requires cross-taxa comparisons. We show that drumming by palm cockatoos (Probosciger aterrimus) shares the key rudiments of human instrumental music, including manufacture of a sound tool, performance in a consistent context, regular beat production, repeated components, and individual styles. Over 131 drumming sequences produced by 18 males, the beats occurred at nonrandom, regular intervals, yet individual males differed significantly in the shape parameters describing the distribution of their beat patterns, indicating individual drumming styles. Autocorrelation analyses of the longest drumming sequences further showed that they were highly regular and predictable like human music. These discoveries provide a rare comparative perspective on the evolution of rhythmicity and instrumental music in our own species, and show that a preference for a regular beat can have other origins before being co-opted into group-based music and dance.

  6. The share flight experiment - An advanced heat pipe radiator for Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J. P.; Otterstedt, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and thermal vacuum certification testing of the Space Station Heat Pipe Advanced Radiator Element (SHARE) Shuttle flight experiment, with primary emphasis on the heat pipe radiator system. The main objective of the SHARE experiment is to demonstrate suitable 0 g heat transfer performance of a 50 ft-long high-capacity monogroove heat pipe radiator element being developed for possible Space Station application. All of the flight certification tests were achieved, including a maximum heat rejection of 2 kW and thawing of a frozen heat pipe; and uninterrupted operation under cycling environmental and evaporator heat loads.

  7. Sharing Experience dan Resiliensi: Studi atas Facebook Group Orang Tua Anak Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safrina Rofasita

    2017-06-01

    [Orang tua yang mendapati anaknya terfonis sebagai anak Cerebral Palsy mengalami kedukaan mendalam yang mengakibatkan ketidakpercayaan diri, dan putus asa. Hal itu diakibatkan ketahanan terhadap stres (resiliensi rendah, oleh karena itu orang tua mengikuti sharing experiences penyandang Cerebral Palsy melalui Facebook Group orang tua anak Cerebral Palsy. Penelitian ini bertujuan menjawab pertanyaan adakah pengaruh sharing experiences penyandang Cerebral Palsy terhadap resiliensi orang tua anak Cerebral Palsy yang terhimpun dalam Facebook Group Orang Tua Anak Cerebral Palsy. Penelitian menggunakan methode kombinasi antara kuantitatif dan kualitatif. Penelitian menemukan bahwa Facebook Group berpengaruh pada peningkatan resiliensi orang tua anak cerebal palcy karena mereka mendapatkan pengetahuan dan informasi tambahan dari forum itu.

  8. Joint Perception of a Shared Object: a Minimalist Perceptual Crossing Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Deschamps

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The minimalist perceptual crossing paradigm has emphasized the essential role of interpersonal dynamics on social understanding. Within the particular case of minimalist interaction, it has been argued that interpersonal processes can constitute social cognition, at least partially, which calls for a paradigm shift in social cognition studies. In this paper, we review several perceptual crossing experiments and their theoretical implications, and propose an original experiment to go beyond strictly dyadic interactions. Whereas past experiments have used objects as distractors of dyadic interaction, our experiment aims at integrating objects themselves as the goal of interpersonal coordination. We asked 24 subjects to participate in a minimalist perceptual crossing experiment where they had to decide, based on their on-line interaction in a one-dimensional digital space, which of the objects they perceived was also perceptible by their partner. The main results suggest that the mutual awareness of a shared object arises from the quality of sensorimotor coordination between the partners. Indeed, the presence of a shared object acts as a simultaneous affordance that attracts and structures individual perceptive activities, giving both partners the opportunity to co-construct a shared world where their respective actions make sense. We discuss our results by way of an enactive account of social cognition, taking the joint perception of a shared object as a first step to account for joint attention.

  9. Exploring the process of writing about and sharing traumatic birth experiences online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blainey, Sarah H; Slade, Pauline

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to explore the experience of writing about a traumatic birth experience and sharing it online. Twelve women who had submitted their stories about traumatic birth experiences to the Birth Trauma Association for online publication were interviewed about their experiences. Women were interviewed shortly after writing but before posting and again 1 month after the story was posted online. All participants completed both interviews. These were transcribed and analysed using template analysis. Women described varied reasons for writing and sharing their stories, including wanting to help themselves and others. The process of writing was described as emotional, however was generally seen as a positive thing. Aspects of writing that were identified as helpful included organizing their experiences into a narrative, and distancing themselves from the experience. Writing and posting online about a traumatic birth is experienced positively by women. It may be a useful self-help intervention and is worthy of systematic evaluation. The mechanisms through which writing is reported to have impacted as described in the interviews link to the mechanisms of change in cognitive-behavioural approaches to post-traumatic symptoms. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Some women develop post-traumatic stress disorder-like symptoms following birth. These can impact on both themselves and their family, yet these women may not seek professional help. Writing about a traumatic event may be a useful approach for reducing post-traumatic stress symptoms, but the impact of online sharing is unknown. What does this study add? This study demonstrates that women report benefits from writing about their birth experiences. Writing enabled organizing the experience into a narrative and distancing from the trauma, which was helpful. Sharing the story online was an emotional experience for participants, however was generally seen positively. © 2014 The

  10. Explaining effervescence: Investigating the relationship between shared social identity and positive experience in crowds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Nick; Reicher, Stephen D; Khan, Sammyh S; Tewari, Shruti; Srinivasan, Narayanan; Stevenson, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the intensely positive emotional experiences arising from participation in a large-scale collective event. We predicted such experiences arise when those attending a collective event are (1) able to enact their valued collective identity and (2) experience close relations with other participants. In turn, we predicted both of these to be more likely when participants perceived crowd members to share a common collective identity. We investigated these predictions in a survey of pilgrims (N = 416) attending a month-long Hindu pilgrimage festival in north India. We found participants' perceptions of a shared identity amongst crowd members had an indirect effect on their positive experience at the event through (1) increasing participants' sense that they were able to enact their collective identity and (2) increasing the sense of intimacy with other crowd members. We discuss the implications of these data for how crowd emotion should be conceptualised.

  11. The Effects of Cost Sharing on the Health of Children. Health Insurance Experiment Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Robert Otto Burciaga

    While many health plans have increased the proportion of costs borne by users, opponents to cost sharing fear that this may result in poorer health for children. The Rand Health Insurance Experiment examined this issue in a general population. Health outcomes of children in a free-care plan were compared with those of children in cost-sharing…

  12. Shared Decision-Making Tool for Self-Management of Home Therapies for Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H. Eckman MD, MS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF undertake time-consuming programs of home therapies. Our objective was to develop a tool to help CF patients prioritize personal goals for some of these treatments. We describe the development and results of initial evaluation of this shared decision-making tool. Methods: Multicriteria decision-making method to develop a shared decision-making tool that integrates patient’s values and perceptions of treatment impact on functionality/sense of well-being. Treatment efficacy data obtained through comprehensive review of English language literature and Cochrane reviews. Field study of 21 patients was performed to assess acceptability of the approach, understandability of the tool, and to determine whether there was sufficient patient-to-patient variability in treatment goals and patient preferences to make use of a personalized tool worthwhile. Results: Patients found the tool easy to understand and felt engaged as active participants in their care. The tool was responsive to variations in patient preferences. Priority scores were calculated (0–1.0 ± SD. Patients’ most important treatment goals for improving lung health included improving breathing function (0.27 ± 0.11, improving functionality/sense of well-being (0.24 ± 0.13, preventing lung infection (0.21 ± 0.08, minimizing time to complete treatments (0.16 ± 0.12, and minimizing cost (0.11 ± 0.09. Conclusions: A shared decision-making tool that integrates patients’ values and best evidence is feasible and could result in improved patient engagement in their own care.

  13. The journey toward shared governance: the lived experience of nurse managers and staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Joyce; Ross, Carl

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the lived experience of nurse managers and staff nurses in shared governance. Shared governance refers to systems and services aligned in partnership. The information gained by studying the lived experience of nurse managers and staff nurses in shared governance is valuable for providing knowledge of empowerment. A qualitative design was used. Data were collected through a semi-structured interview using five questions with 11 Registered Nurses. Data were analysed through thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from data analysis. Nurse managers identified the journey of patient satisfaction; journey of empowerment; journey of self-management and journey of wellness. Staff nurses identified the journey of development and implementation of best practice; journey to provide quality patient care, journey to a new culture of nursing; and journey of a variety of challenges. This study supports the idea that collaboration between nurse managers and staff nurses develops a journey toward shared governance. Nursing management can use findings to empower nurses to collaborate with nurse managers toward best practice. This adds to current knowledge that partnership of nurse managers and staff nurses, supports and encourages ownership in shared governance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. GSSIM – A Tool for Distributed Computing Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Bąk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the Grid Scheduling Simulator (GSSIM, a comprehensive and advanced simulation tool for distributed computing problems. Based on a classification of simulator features proposed in the paper, we define problems that can be simulated using GSSIM and compare it to other simulation tools. We focus on an extension of our previous works including advanced workload generation methods, simulation of a network with advance reservation features, handling specific application performance models and energy efficiency modeling. Some important features of GSSIM are demonstrated by three diverse experiments conducted with the use of the tool. We also present an advanced web tool for the remote management and execution of simulation experiments, which makes GSSIM the comprehensive distributed computing simulator available on the Web.

  15. 5As Team obesity intervention in primary care: development and evaluation of shared decision‐making weight management tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, J.; Anderson, R.; Ogunleye, A. A.; Cave, A.; Sharma, A. M.; Campbell‐Scherer, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite several clinical practice guidelines, there remains a considerable gap in prevention and management of obesity in primary care. To address the need for changing provider behaviour, a randomized controlled trial with convergent mixed method evaluation, the 5As Team (5AsT) study, was conducted. As part of the 5AsT intervention, the 5AsT tool kit was developed. This paper describes the development process and evaluation of these tools. Tools were co‐developed by the multidisciplinary research team and the 5AsT, which included registered nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 15), mental health workers (n = 7) and registered dieticians (n = 7), who were previously randomized to the 5AsT intervention group at a primary care network in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The 5AsT tool development occurred through a practice/implementation‐oriented, need‐based, iterative process during learning collaborative sessions of the 5AsT intervention. Feedback during tool development was received through field notes and final provider evaluation was carried out through anonymous questionnaires. Twelve tools were co‐developed with 5AsT. All tools were evaluated as either ‘most useful’ or ‘moderately useful’ in primary care practice by the 5AsT. Four key findings during 5AsT tool development were the need for: tools that were adaptive, tools to facilitate interdisciplinary practice, tools to help patients understand realistic expectations for weight loss and shared decision‐making tools for goal setting and relapse prevention. The 5AsT tools are primary care tools which extend the utility of the 5As of obesity management framework in clinical practice. PMID:26129630

  16. 5As Team obesity intervention in primary care: development and evaluation of shared decision-making weight management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osunlana, A M; Asselin, J; Anderson, R; Ogunleye, A A; Cave, A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D L

    2015-08-01

    Despite several clinical practice guidelines, there remains a considerable gap in prevention and management of obesity in primary care. To address the need for changing provider behaviour, a randomized controlled trial with convergent mixed method evaluation, the 5As Team (5AsT) study, was conducted. As part of the 5AsT intervention, the 5AsT tool kit was developed. This paper describes the development process and evaluation of these tools. Tools were co-developed by the multidisciplinary research team and the 5AsT, which included registered nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 15), mental health workers (n = 7) and registered dieticians (n = 7), who were previously randomized to the 5AsT intervention group at a primary care network in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The 5AsT tool development occurred through a practice/implementation-oriented, need-based, iterative process during learning collaborative sessions of the 5AsT intervention. Feedback during tool development was received through field notes and final provider evaluation was carried out through anonymous questionnaires. Twelve tools were co-developed with 5AsT. All tools were evaluated as either 'most useful' or 'moderately useful' in primary care practice by the 5AsT. Four key findings during 5AsT tool development were the need for: tools that were adaptive, tools to facilitate interdisciplinary practice, tools to help patients understand realistic expectations for weight loss and shared decision-making tools for goal setting and relapse prevention. The 5AsT tools are primary care tools which extend the utility of the 5As of obesity management framework in clinical practice. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical Obesity published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  17. Indirect Reciprocity, Resource Sharing, and Environmental Risk: Evidence from Field Experiments in Siberia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lance Howe

    Full Text Available Integrating information from existing research, qualitative ethnographic interviews, and participant observation, we designed a field experiment that introduces idiosyncratic environmental risk and a voluntary sharing decision into a standard public goods game. Conducted with subsistence resource users in rural villages on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Northeast Siberia, we find evidence consistent with a model of indirect reciprocity and local social norms of helping the needy. When participants are allowed to develop reputations in the experiments, as is the case in most small-scale societies, we find that sharing is increasingly directed toward individuals experiencing hardship, good reputations increase aid, and the pooling of resources through voluntary sharing becomes more effective. We also find high levels of voluntary sharing without a strong commitment device; however, this form of cooperation does not increase contributions to the public good. Our results are consistent with previous experiments and theoretical models, suggesting strategic risks tied to rewards, punishments, and reputations are important. However, unlike studies that focus solely on strategic risks, we find the effects of rewards, punishments, and reputations are altered by the presence of environmental factors. Unexpected changes in resource abundance increase interdependence and may alter the costs and benefits of cooperation, relative to defection. We suggest environmental factors that increase interdependence are critically important to consider when developing and testing theories of cooperation.

  18. Indirect Reciprocity, Resource Sharing, and Environmental Risk: Evidence from Field Experiments in Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, E Lance; Murphy, James J; Gerkey, Drew; West, Colin Thor

    2016-01-01

    Integrating information from existing research, qualitative ethnographic interviews, and participant observation, we designed a field experiment that introduces idiosyncratic environmental risk and a voluntary sharing decision into a standard public goods game. Conducted with subsistence resource users in rural villages on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Northeast Siberia, we find evidence consistent with a model of indirect reciprocity and local social norms of helping the needy. When participants are allowed to develop reputations in the experiments, as is the case in most small-scale societies, we find that sharing is increasingly directed toward individuals experiencing hardship, good reputations increase aid, and the pooling of resources through voluntary sharing becomes more effective. We also find high levels of voluntary sharing without a strong commitment device; however, this form of cooperation does not increase contributions to the public good. Our results are consistent with previous experiments and theoretical models, suggesting strategic risks tied to rewards, punishments, and reputations are important. However, unlike studies that focus solely on strategic risks, we find the effects of rewards, punishments, and reputations are altered by the presence of environmental factors. Unexpected changes in resource abundance increase interdependence and may alter the costs and benefits of cooperation, relative to defection. We suggest environmental factors that increase interdependence are critically important to consider when developing and testing theories of cooperation.

  19. Shared brain lateralization patterns in language and Acheulean stone tool production: a functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uomini, Natalie Thaïs; Meyer, Georg Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The popular theory that complex tool-making and language co-evolved in the human lineage rests on the hypothesis that both skills share underlying brain processes and systems. However, language and stone tool-making have so far only been studied separately using a range of neuroimaging techniques and diverse paradigms. We present the first-ever study of brain activation that directly compares active Acheulean tool-making and language. Using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (fTCD), we measured brain blood flow lateralization patterns (hemodynamics) in subjects who performed two tasks designed to isolate the planning component of Acheulean stone tool-making and cued word generation as a language task. We show highly correlated hemodynamics in the initial 10 seconds of task execution. Stone tool-making and cued word generation cause common cerebral blood flow lateralization signatures in our participants. This is consistent with a shared neural substrate for prehistoric stone tool-making and language, and is compatible with language evolution theories that posit a co-evolution of language and manual praxis. In turn, our results support the hypothesis that aspects of language might have emerged as early as 1.75 million years ago, with the start of Acheulean technology.

  20. Communicating polar science to the general public: sharing the social media experience of @OceanSeaIceNPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösel, Anja; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Granskog, Mats A.; Gerland, Sebastian; Meyer, Amelie; Hudson, Stephen R.; King, Jennifer; Itkin, Polona; Cohen, Lana; Dodd, Paul; de Steur, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The findings of climate science need to be communicated to the general public. Researchers are encouraged to do so by journalists, policy-makers and funding agencies and many of us want to become better science communicators. But how can we do this at the lab or small research group level without specifically allocated resources in terms of funds and communication officers? And how do we sustain communication on a regular basis and not just during the limited lifetime of a specific project? One of the solutions is to use the emerging platform of social media, which has become a powerful and inexpensive tool for communicating science to different target audiences. Many research institutions and individual researchers are already advanced users of social media, but small research groups and labs remain underrepresented. The group of oceanographers, sea ice and atmospheric scientists at the Norwegian Polar Institute (@OceanSeaIceNPI( will share our experiences developing and maintaining researcher-driven outreach for over a year through Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. We will present our solutions to some of the practical considerations such as identifying key target groups, defining the framework for sharing responsibilities and interactions within the research group, and choosing an up-to-date and appropriate social medium. By sharing this information, we aim to inspire and assist other research groups and labs in conducting their own effective science communication.

  1. A compact tool for coaxial laser alignment on a time-sharing beamline at Taiwan Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Jih Young

    2014-09-01

    A simple design and easily installed tool for alignment has been developed for time-sharing undulator beamlines. A laser beam is directed onto a beam splitter inside the vacuum chamber, then reflects 90° along the synchrotron beam path; this beam serves as a reference to mimic the synchrotron beam path. Use of this tool greatly abbreviated alignment of an end-station after beamline switching; both beamline diagnosis and end-station development can be completed before the synchrotron beam time begins.

  2. Development and field testing of a decision support tool to facilitate shared decision making in contraceptive counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehlendorf, Christine; Fitzpatrick, Judith; Steinauer, Jody; Swiader, Lawrence; Grumbach, Kevin; Hall, Cara; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2017-07-01

    We developed and formatively evaluated a tablet-based decision support tool for use by women prior to a contraceptive counseling visit to help them engage in shared decision making regarding method selection. Drawing upon formative work around women's preferences for contraceptive counseling and conceptual understanding of health care decision making, we iteratively developed a storyboard and then digital prototypes, based on best practices for decision support tool development. Pilot testing using both quantitative and qualitative data and cognitive testing was conducted. We obtained feedback from patient and provider advisory groups throughout the development process. Ninety-six percent of women who used the tool in pilot testing reported that it helped them choose a method, and qualitative interviews indicated acceptability of the tool's content and presentation. Compared to the control group, women who used the tool demonstrated trends toward increased likelihood of complete satisfaction with their method. Participant responses to cognitive testing were used in tool refinement. Our decision support tool appears acceptable to women in the family planning setting. Formative evaluation of the tool supports its utility among patients making contraceptive decisions, which can be further evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Flight Experiment Verification of Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Berger, Karen T.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition at hypersonic conditions is critical to the design of future high-speed aircraft and spacecraft. Accurate methods to predict transition would directly impact the aerothermodynamic environments used to size a hypersonic vehicle's thermal protection system. A transition prediction tool, based on wind tunnel derived discrete roughness correlations, was developed and implemented for the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program. This tool was also used to design a boundary layer transition flight experiment in order to assess correlation uncertainties, particularly with regard to high Mach-number transition and tunnel-to-flight scaling. A review is provided of the results obtained from the flight experiment in order to evaluate the transition prediction tool implemented for the Shuttle program.

  4. The monitoring of optimal experience. A tool for psychiatric rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimini, F; Csikszentmihalyi, M; Carli, M

    1987-09-01

    This article illustrates the use of quantitative time-sampling data in developing a psychology of "optimal experience" to help in the psychiatric development of adequate rehabilitation approaches. The Experience-Sampling Method was used on a sample of 47 Italian adolescent students to measure fluctuations in their experience. We found that the ratio of subjectively experienced challenges and skills was a fundamental parameter that predicted optimal experience as well as boredom and anxiety. In contrast, "low" experience in daily life was viewed as a risk factor that could be minimized to increase the quality of life. Monitoring fluctuations in optimal and low experience may therefore be an important tool in developing personalized psychiatric rehabilitation plans.

  5. [Improving shared decision-making for hospital patients: Description and evaluation of a treatment intensity assessment tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblàs-Novellas, Jordi; Casas, Sílvia; Catalán, Rosa María; Oriol-Ruscalleda, Margarita; Lucchetti, Gianni Enrico; Quer-Vall, Francesc Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision-making between patients and healthcare professionals is crucial to guarantee adequate coherence between patient values and preferences, caring aims and treatment intensity, which is key for the provision of patient-centred healthcare. The assessment of such interventions are essential for caring continuity purposes. To do this, reliable and easy-to-use assessment systems are required. This study describes the results of the implementation of a hospital treatment intensity assessment tool. The pre-implementation and post-implementation results were compared between two cohorts of patients assessed for one month. Some record of care was registered in 6.1% of patients in the pre-implementation group (n=673) compared to 31.6% of patients in the post-implementation group (n=832) (P<.01), with differences between services. Hospital mortality in both cohorts is 1.9%; in the pre-implementation group, 93.75% of deceased patients had treatment intensity assessment. In hospital settings, the availability of a specific tool seems to encourage very significantly shared decision-making processes between patients and healthcare professionals -multiplying by more than 5 times the treatment intensity assessment. Moreover, such tools help in the caring continuity processes between different teams and the personalisation of caring interventions to be monitored. More research is needed to continue improving shared decision-making for hospital patients. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Sharing Experience Learned Firsthand (SELF): Self-disclosure of lived experience in mental health services and supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Casadi Khaki; Child, Beckie; Campbell Krasinski, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    Self-disclosure of lived experiences with mental health challenges is a central method for challenging stigma and promoting empowerment. Individuals are encouraged to share their stories yet little is known about the process of self-disclosure in this context. This article presents the results of an investigation of the role of lived experience in professional training and work. A mixed methods design was used in a sequential exploratory manner. A purposive sample of 35 individuals participated in interviews and focus groups. Based on their reports and a literature review, an anonymous online survey (N = 117) was developed and distributed through consumer networks and the SAMHSA funded Consumer Technical Assistance Centers. The qualitative data was subjected to thematic analysis. The survey data were statistically analyzed for differences in levels of disclosure and factors regarding risks, benefits, and guidance regarding self-disclosure. Participants valued their lived experience as a resource through which they could assist others and service delivery. Lived experience was foundational to building relationships with individuals in recovery. Disclosure was dependent on social context and perceptions of safety. Individuals expressed concerns regarding exclusion and discrimination. Project participants maintained that their lived experience was their greatest strengths in helping others. At the same time, decisions about disclosure were made in complex social contexts featuring power differentials. Sharing lived experience is essential to peer-delivered services and further exploration is needed to support service development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. The Relationship Between Therapist Approach Postures, Avoidance Postures and Posture Sharing, and Subjects' Experience of Rapport

    OpenAIRE

    Carcelli, Lawrence A.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between approach, avoidance and congruent postures and the experience of rapport was investigated. Sixty undergraduate college students (30 male, 30 female) were interviewed by a therapist who displayed either approach postures, avoidance postures or who posture shared. The degree of rapport experienced by the 20 subjects in the three groups was compared. In addition, the subjects' behaviors were divided into four groups (n = 11, or 19) along two orthogonal dimensions (high a...

  8. Mobile Opportunistic Services for Experience Sharing : Via a NetInf Android Application

    OpenAIRE

    Moradinia, Pourya; Sakhi, Imal

    2014-01-01

    Information-Centric Networking (ICN) is a new research area concerning creating a new network architecture that would be more suitable for both current and the future's network. The MOSES (Mobile Opportunistic Services for Experience Sharing) project is part of this development. The project works with the development and demonstration of the Network of Information (NetInf) protocol, which is an implementation of the ICN concept. This Master’s thesis project is part of the MOSES project and ai...

  9. Eduserv - the Education Service of Eurosdr: Sharing Experience for Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, D.; Mooney, K.; Oestman, A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes EduServ, the Education Service of EuroSDR - a European spatial data research organisation whose aim is to address the research needs of spatial data provision in Europe. With a current membership coming from seventeen European countries and a strong working relationship with related European organisations, EuroSDR has amassed considerable experience in addressing the extent and nature of this need. In order to facilitate the transfer of outcomes of EuroSDR research activities to the user domain, e.g. to key personnel in geographic information (GI) production organisations and industry, EuroSDR commenced this annual series of elearning courses in 2002. The Internet courses are preceded by a seminar at which participants meet tutors and receive guidelines for following the courses from their own locations. Delivery of the two-week courses requires an acceptable level of Internet connectivity, which exists in most member countries. EuroSDR is aware, however, that should such courses be shared internationally, other forms of communication will need to be addressed, such as satellite broadcasting. This would require effective collaboration with related organisations with experience with this means of communication. EduServ courses are offered in two successive years. During the courses, participants enjoy access to course tutors with a 24-hour response to queries guaranteed. Thereafter, course material for these courses is made available online. EuroSDR continues to work with past course tutors to ensure that this valuable resource is maintained as an effective and sustainable archive. This paper is aimed at sharing EuroSDR's experience in distance education with the wider scientific community with a view to its applicability to a global audience, whereby instead of sharing expertise within the GI community in Europe, European mapping agencies can share their knowledge and experience with the international GI community.

  10. EDUSERV – THE EDUCATION SERVICE OF EUROSDR: SHARING EXPERIENCE FOR CAPACITY BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fritsch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes EduServ, the Education Service of EuroSDR – a European spatial data research organisation whose aim is to address the research needs of spatial data provision in Europe. With a current membership coming from seventeen European countries and a strong working relationship with related European organisations, EuroSDR has amassed considerable experience in addressing the extent and nature of this need. In order to facilitate the transfer of outcomes of EuroSDR research activities to the user domain, e.g. to key personnel in geographic information (GI production organisations and industry, EuroSDR commenced this annual series of elearning courses in 2002. The Internet courses are preceded by a seminar at which participants meet tutors and receive guidelines for following the courses from their own locations. Delivery of the two-week courses requires an acceptable level of Internet connectivity, which exists in most member countries. EuroSDR is aware, however, that should such courses be shared internationally, other forms of communication will need to be addressed, such as satellite broadcasting. This would require effective collaboration with related organisations with experience with this means of communication. EduServ courses are offered in two successive years. During the courses, participants enjoy access to course tutors with a 24-hour response to queries guaranteed. Thereafter, course material for these courses is made available online. EuroSDR continues to work with past course tutors to ensure that this valuable resource is maintained as an effective and sustainable archive. This paper is aimed at sharing EuroSDR's experience in distance education with the wider scientific community with a view to its applicability to a global audience, whereby instead of sharing expertise within the GI community in Europe, European mapping agencies can share their knowledge and experience with the international GI community.

  11. New tools for sculpting cranial implants in a shared haptic augmented reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhuming; Evenhouse, Ray; Leigh, Jason; Charbel, Fady; Rasmussen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    New volumetric tools were developed for the design and fabrication of high quality cranial implants from patient CT data. These virtual tools replace time consuming physical sculpting, mold making and casting steps. The implant is designed by medical professionals in tele-immersive collaboration. Virtual clay is added in the virtual defect area on the CT data using the adding tool. With force feedback the modeler can feel the edge of the defect and fill only the space where no bone is present. A carving tool and a smoothing tool are then used to sculpt and refine the implant. To make a physical evaluation, the skull with simulated defect and the implant are fabricated via stereolithography to allow neurosurgeons to evaluate the quality of the implant. Initial tests demonstrate a very high quality fit. These new haptic volumetric sculpting tools are a critical component of a comprehensive tele-immersive system.

  12. DeID – A Data Sharing Tool for Neuroimaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebo eSong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Funding institutions and researchers increasingly expect that data will be shared to increase scientific integrity and provide other scientists with the opportunity to use the data with novel methods that may advance understanding in a particular field of study. In practice, sharing human subject data can be complicated because data must be de-identified prior to sharing. Moreover, integrating varied data types collected in a study can be challenging and time consuming. For example, sharing data from structural imaging studies of a complex disorder requires the integration of imaging, demographic and/or behavioral data in a way that no subject identifiers are included in the de-identified dataset and with new subject labels or identification values that cannot be tracked back to the original ones. We have developed a Java program that users can use to remove identifying information in neuroimaging datasets, while still maintaining the association among different data types from the same subject for further studies. This software provides a series of user interaction wizards to allow users to select data variables to be de-identified, implements functions for auditing and validation of de-identified data, and enables the user to share the de-identified data in a single compressed package through various communication protocols, such as FTPS and SFTP. DeID runs with Windows, Linux, and Mac operating systems and its open architecture allows it to be easily adapted to support a broader array of data types, with the goal of facilitating data sharing. DeID can be obtained at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/deid.

  13. Social Media Platforms as a Tool for Sharing Emotions. A Perspective upon the National Security Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona-Diana LEON

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Emotions importance increases even more in the context of the national security agencies. Since their mission is to protect and defend the citizens against attacks and also to provide leadership and justice services to other agencies and partners, the aim of the information they post on social media should be twofold: on the one hand, it should reflect the attitudes, values and beliefs, supported by the institution, and on the other hand, it should have an impact on citizens feeling of security. But, do they manage to meet these demands? Are they focusing on impressing the audience or they concentrate on sharing specific emotions? Is it a marketing strategy or a knowledge strategy? Starting from these, the purpose of this research is to set a nexus between emotions and the use of social media by the national security organizations. In other words, we aim (i to determine the main types of emotions, (ii to establish whether these are shared within the social media platforms, (iii to identify the purpose for which the national security organizations use social media, (iv to determine whether social media could serve as Ba for the national security organizations. In order to achieve these objectives, we employ an ethic approach and develop a longitudinal study based on quantitative and qualitative content analysis. The results prove that social media platforms may serve as Ba since they appear as a shared space which fosters individual and collective knowledge creation and sharing. The national security agencies  use social media platforms for combining the classical four types of Ba: originating Ba (it shares its emotions, feelings and thoughts through its posts, interacting Ba (through the generated reactions and comments, it ensures the development of shared models and the conversion of tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge, cyber Ba (by fostering the virtual interaction among its followers and exercising Ba (by facilitating the creation of

  14. Information Sharing between the U.S. Department State and the U.S. Army: Using Knowledge Management Technology and Tools to Bridge the Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    preferred KM tool. Both organizations use email, wikis, blogs, communities of practice (COP), document management systems ( SharePoint ), people pages... SharePoint or wiki sites, can communicate information from many to many by allowing multiple authors and consumers. SharePoint is a commercial of the...they are not included as an addressee, they will not benefit from the information. Wiki and SharePoint sites can be accessed by multiple users, thus

  15. Project Management Web Tools at the MICE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Project management tools like Trac are commonly used within the open-source community to coordinate projects. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) uses the project management web application Redmine to host mice.rl.ac.uk. Many groups within the experiment have a Redmine project: analysis, computing and software (including offline, online, controls and monitoring, and database subgroups), executive board, and operations. All of these groups use the website to communicate, track effort, develop schedules, and maintain documentation. The issue tracker is a rich tool that is used to identify tasks and monitor progress within groups on timescales ranging from immediate and unexpected problems to milestones that cover the life of the experiment. It allows the prioritization of tasks according to time-sensitivity, while providing a searchable record of work that has been done. This record of work can be used to measure both individual and overall group activity, identify areas lacking sufficient personne...

  16. The "nuts and bolts" of implementing shared medical appointments: the Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Fiffy, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates (Harvard Vanguard) decided to develop a Shared Medical Appointment (SMA) program in 2007 for a variety of reasons. The program has launched 86 SMAs in 17 specialties at 12 sites and has exceeded 13 000 patient visits. Currently, the practice offers 54 SMAs and is believed to be the largest program in the country. This article provides an overview regarding staffing, space and equipment, project planning, promotional materials, training programs, workflow development, and the use of quality improvement (ie, LEAN) tools used to monitor the work to be completed and the metrics to date.

  17. Shared-Book Experience Using Science-Themed Books to Develop Scientific Literacy: An Interactive Approach with Struggling Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Mi-Hyun; Keckler, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This paper will explain what a reading teacher learned from working with a group of first-grade struggling readers in a series of shared-book experience classes. The shared-book experience approach used a variety of science-themed books that were aligned with the first-grade curriculum and appropriate for beginning readers. Considering the…

  18. Shared decision-making - Rhetoric and reality: Women's experiences and perceptions of adjuvant treatment decision-making for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Neda; Sargeant, Sally

    2017-01-01

    This interview-based study uses phenomenology as a theoretical framework and thematic analysis to challenge existing explanatory frameworks of shared decision-making, in an exploration of women's experiences and perceptions of shared decision-making for adjuvant treatment in breast cancer. Three themes emerged are as follows: (1) women's desire to participate in shared decision-making, (2) the degree to which shared decision-making is perceived to be shared and (3) to what extent are women empowered within shared decision-making. Studying breast cancer patients' subjective experiences of adjuvant treatment decision-making provides a broader perspective on patient participatory role preferences and doctor-patient power dynamics within shared decision-making for breast cancer.

  19. Digital Tools to Support Knowledge Sharing and Cooperation in High-Investment Product-Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aromaa, S.; Leino, S.P.; Reyes-Lecuona, A.; Frangakis, N.; Berglund, J.; Bosch, T.; Rhijn, G. van; Granholm, G.

    2018-01-01

    The manufacturing industry needs to adapt their product-services to meet customer requirements in today’s rapidly changing markets. This paper presents how technologies can support knowledge sharing and collaboration during product-service processes. This work was part of the European Union

  20. Enhancing socially shared regulation in collaborative learning groups: Designing for CSCL regulation tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Järvelä, Sanna; Kirschner, Paul|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079457037; Panadero, Ernesto; Malmberg, Jonna; Phielix, Chris|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833738; Jaspers, Jos|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304825220; Koivuniemi, Marika; Järvenoja, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    For effective computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL), socially shared regulation of learning (SSRL) is necessary. To this end, this article extends the idea first posited by Järvelä and Hadwin (Educ Psychol 48(1):25–39, 2013) that successful collaboration in CSCL contexts requires targeted

  1. Enhancing socially shared regulation in collaborative learning groups: designing for CSCL regulation tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Järvelä, Sanna; Kirschner, Paul A.; Panadero, Ernesto; Malmberg, Jonna; Phielix, Chris; Jaspers, Jos; Koivuniemi, Marieke; Järvenoja, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    For effective computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL), socially shared regulation of learning (SSRL) is necessary. To this end, this article extends the idea first posited by Ja¨rvela¨ and Hadwin (Educ Psychol 48(1):25–39, 2013) that successful collaboration in CSCL contexts requires

  2. Harnessing modern web application technology to create intuitive and efficient data visualization and sharing tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eWood

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscientists increasingly need to work with big data in order to derive meaningful results in their field. Collecting, organizing and analyzing this data can be a major hurdle on the road to scientific discovery. This hurdle can be lowered using the same technologies that are currently revolutionizing the way that cultural and social media sites represent and share information with their users. Web application technologies and standards such as RESTful webservices, HTML5 and high-performance in-browser JavaScript engines are being utilized to vastly improve the way that the world accesses and shares information. The neuroscience community can also benefit tremendously from these technologies. We present here a web application that allows users to explore and request the complex datasets that need to be shared among the neuroimaging community. The COINS (Collaborative Informatics and Neuroimaging Suite Data Exchange uses web application technologies to facilitate data sharing in three phases: Exploration, Request/Communication, and Download. This paper will focus on the first phase, and how intuitive exploration of large and complex datasets is achieved using a framework that centers around asynchronous client-server communication (AJAX and also exposes a powerful API that can be utilized by other applications to explore available data. First opened to the neuroscience community in August 2012, the Data Exchange has already provided researchers with over 2500 GB of data.

  3. Joint Perception of a Shared Object: A Minimalist Perceptual Crossing Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Loïc; Lenay, Charles; Rovira, Katia; Le Bihan, Gabrielle; Aubert, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The minimalist perceptual crossing paradigm has emphasized the essential role of interpersonal dynamics on social understanding. Within the particular case of minimalist interaction, it has been argued that interpersonal processes can constitute social cognition, at least partially, which calls for a paradigm shift in social cognition studies. In this paper, we review several perceptual crossing experiments and their theoretical implications, and propose an original experiment to go beyond strictly dyadic interactions. Whereas past experiments have used objects as distracters of dyadic interaction, our experiment aims at integrating objects themselves as the goal of interpersonal coordination. We asked 24 subjects to participate in a minimalist perceptual crossing experiment where they had to decide, based on their on-line interaction in a one-dimensional digital space, which of the objects they perceived was also perceptible by their partner. The main results suggest that the mutual awareness of a shared object (SO) arises from the quality of sensorimotor coordination between the partners. Indeed, the presence of a SO acts as a simultaneous affordance that attracts and structures individual perceptive activities, giving both partners the opportunity to co-construct a shared world where their respective actions make sense. We discuss our results by way of an enactive account of social cognition, taking the joint perception of a SO as a first step to account for joint attention.

  4. Profit-Sharing – A Tool for Improving Productivity, Profitability and Competitiveness of Firms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fibirova Jana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of appropriate utilization of rewards for performance is still growing and therefore this type of rewards can be seen as a significant part of a total rewards package. Companies that are able to appropriately implement rewards for performance may gain competitive advantage over their competitors, but successful implementation requires a good knowledge of these rewards. The main aim of this paper is to contribute to the growth of this knowledge by identifying possible positive and negative impacts of profit-sharing on various areas that are important for the performance of a company, nevertheless, addressed are also macroeconomic consequences of profit-sharing. Furthermore, a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the relevant literature is provided, under-researched areas are identified and suggestions for further research are given. To accomplish these goals, we applied methods of bibliometric analysis to the articles indexed in ISI Web of Knowledge to identify the most important articles, authors and topics. According to our findings, the majority of studies report a neutral or positive impact of profit-sharing on productivity and profitability. This impact may be achieved by direct influence of profit-sharing on productivity of employees (due to the dependence of their pay on profit, but it seems that yet more important are various mediating mechanisms, especially effects on employment stability, absenteeism, quits and related issues, as well as effects on attitudes of employees and on relationships between employees. We argue that a well-designed profit-sharing plan is crucial for its success, but it is a relatively under-researched problem.

  5. Interactive Data Visualization for HIV Cohorts: Leveraging Data Exchange Standards to Share and Reuse Research Tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meridith Blevins

    Full Text Available To develop and disseminate tools for interactive visualization of HIV cohort data.If a picture is worth a thousand words, then an interactive video, composed of a long string of pictures, can produce an even richer presentation of HIV population dynamics. We developed an HIV cohort data visualization tool using open-source software (R statistical language. The tool requires that the data structure conform to the HIV Cohort Data Exchange Protocol (HICDEP, and our implementation utilized Caribbean, Central and South America network (CCASAnet data.This tool currently presents patient-level data in three classes of plots: (1 Longitudinal plots showing changes in measurements viewed alongside event probability curves allowing for simultaneous inspection of outcomes by relevant patient classes. (2 Bubble plots showing changes in indicators over time allowing for observation of group level dynamics. (3 Heat maps of levels of indicators changing over time allowing for observation of spatial-temporal dynamics. Examples of each class of plot are given using CCASAnet data investigating trends in CD4 count and AIDS at antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation, CD4 trajectories after ART initiation, and mortality.We invite researchers interested in this data visualization effort to use these tools and to suggest new classes of data visualization. We aim to contribute additional shareable tools in the spirit of open scientific collaboration and hope that these tools further the participation in open data standards like HICDEP by the HIV research community.

  6. Geospatial tools for data-sharing : case studies of select transportation agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report provides case studies from 23 State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) and others that are developing, using, and maintaining a variety of geospatial applications and tools to support GDC goals. The report also summarizes the state of t...

  7. [Part-time medical specialist training; experiences with job-sharing for trainee internists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, K; Nauta, S; Stuyt, P M

    2004-02-14

    Due to various factors such as social changes, an increasing number of couples with two incomes, and a growing proportion of female doctors, there has been a growing demand for part-time work in recent years. This is also true for resident physicians. Objections such as a discontinuity in care and the decline in the quality of education frequently prevent resident physicians from working part-time. Over the past two years, the University Medical Centre Nijmegen, the Netherlands, has experimented with job-sharing on clinical wards for resident physicians in internal medicine. This approach works well in practice, as long as a number of conditions, including the proper transfer of medical information and good communication, are satisfied. Job-sharing is one means of satisfying the growing demand for part-time work among resident physicians and specialists.

  8. Being differently the same: the mediation of identity tensions in the sharing of illness experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanderani, Fadhila; Locock, Louise; Powell, John

    2012-02-01

    The sharing of experiences between patients has become increasingly privileged as a source of knowledge and support in contemporary healthcare. Despite this, relatively little is known about the processes whereby people's experiences become, or fail to become, valued as sources of health-related knowledge in different contexts. Through a secondary analysis of 87 interviews conducted between 2006 and 2008 in the UK with people affected by motor neurone disease (46 interviews) and Parkinson's disease (41 interviews), we explore the identity work involved in turning other people's experiences into 'experiential knowledge' that can be shared between patients. Of particular interest is how the turning of others' experiences into knowledge is presupposed by negotiating a particular type of identity tension - what, drawing on the work of Paul Ricoeur (2003) on metaphor, we refer to as 'being differently the same'. We examine the way in which people living with motor neurone disease and Parkinson's disease spoke of managing this tension as part of the process of accessing and valuing other patients' experiences, both epistemologically and emotionally. Instead of treating others' experiences as a pre-given source of knowledge, we emphasise how experience comes to be embodied and articulated through different media - bodies, speech, text, and images. Moreover, we suggest that paying closer attention to these media provides opportunities for enhancing our understanding of how people with different chronic and/or terminal illnesses use or do not use different forms of peer support - and in particular online ones - as a source of health-related experiential knowledge. Some of the implications of this are discussed in the specific context of people diagnosed with incurable neurodegenerative conditions characterised by visible physical deterioration and associated emotional distress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. D and D knowledge management information tool - a web based system developed to share D and D knowledge worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, L.; Upadhyay, H.; Shoffner, P. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler Street,EC2100, Miami, FL (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) work is a high risk and technically challenging enterprise within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. During the past three decades, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management has been in charge of carrying out one of the largest environmental restoration efforts in the world: the cleanup of the Manhattan Project legacy. In today's corporate world, worker experiences and knowledge that have developed over time represent a valuable corporate asset. The ever-dynamic workplace, coupled with an aging workforce, presents corporations with the ongoing challenge of preserving work-related experiences and knowledge for cross-generational knowledge transfer to the future workforce [5]. To prevent the D and D knowledge base and expertise from being lost over time, the DOE and the Applied Research Center at Florida International University (FIU) have developed the web-based Knowledge Management Information Tool (KM-IT) to capture and maintain this valuable information in a universally available and easily accessible and usable system. The D and D KM-IT was developed in collaboration with DOE Headquarters (HQ), the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG), and the ALARA [as low as reasonably achievable] Centers at Savannah River Sites to preserve the D and D information generated and collected by the D and D community. This is an open secured system that can be accessed from https://www.dndkm.org over the web and through mobile devices at https://m.dndkm.org. This knowledge system serves as a centralized repository and provides a common interface for D and D-related activities. It also improves efficiency by reducing the need to rediscover knowledge and promotes the reuse of existing knowledge. It is a community-driven system that facilitates the gathering, analyzing, storing, and sharing of knowledge and information within the D and D community. It assists the DOE D and D community in identifying potential solutions

  10. The Shared Experience Help the Bereavement to Flow: A Family Support Group Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henoch, Ingela; Berg, Christina; Benkel, Inger

    2016-12-01

    When a family member dies, a bereavement period is taking place for all family members. The death of a parent during childhood is a highly stressful event. This study evaluates families' experiences of family support groups when a parent has died. Families were participate in groups for children, teenagers, young adults, and parents in seven sessions. The same topic which was discussed in all groups. The support groups were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The participants were satisfied with the groups and experienced that the shared experience facilitated bereavement to proceed. The results indicate that families' experiences is being more open about feelings in their own family. A support group can be one possibility to help the whole family in the bereavement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Sharing code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  12. Experiences of Parent Peer Nutrition Educators Sharing Child Feeding and Nutrition Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Richard; Collins, Clare

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of parents as peer educators disseminating nutrition and child feeding information. Parents of infants aged from birth to three years were trained as peer educators in a face-to-face workshop, and then shared evidence-based child feeding and nutrition information via Facebook, email, and printed resources for six months to peers, family, and social media contacts. Semi-structured telephone or group interviews were conducted after a six-month online and face-to-face peer nutrition intervention period investigating peer educator experiences, barriers, enablers of information dissemination, and the acceptability of the peer educator model. Transcripts from interviews were independently coded by two researchers and thematically analysed. Twenty-eight participants completed the study and were assigned to either group or individual interviews. The cohort consenting to the study were predominantly female, aged between 25 and 34 years, non-indigenous, tertiary educated, and employed or on maternity leave. Dominant themes to emerge from the interviews included that the information was trustworthy, child feeding practice information was considered most helpful, newer parents were the most receptive and family members the least receptive to child feeding and nutrition information, and sharing and receiving information verbally and via social media were preferred over print and email. In conclusion, parents reported positive experiences as peer nutrition educators, and considered it acceptable for sharing evidence-based nutrition information. Further research may determine the impact on diet quality and the food-related behaviours of babies and young children on a population level. PMID:28850096

  13. CLASSROOM SHARING EXPERIENCES: BUILDING STUDENTS’ AWARENESS FOR PROBLEM SOLVING IN TRANSLATING POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Handayani

    2015-12-01

    Abstract This research was aimed at describing the classroom sharing experiences to build students’ awareness dealing with the problem solving in translating poetry. The data were collected through questionnaire, interview and classroom observation involving 85 sixth semester students in two different classes and two lecturers of Translating Literary Works course at the English Language and Literature Studies in one state university in Bandung city.  The questionnaire was completed by 55 (out of 85 students invited to fill in the questionnaire. Interview was done to complete and cross check the information derived from the questionnaire.  Meanwhile, the observation was administered in the two parallel classes to observe the activities done by the two lecturers and students in the two classes.  The observation was focused on the course materials, teaching methods and techniques applied by the lecturers, problems faced and techniques used to solve the problems by the students in translating poetry. The data were then analyzed based on some relevant theories of translation.  The result of the research showed that the classroom sharing experiences gave some advantages to the students with several reasons: (1 motivating students to do their translation works more seriously since they had to present their translation works to the class; (2 developing the students’ self-confidence in translating the tasks since their translation works were given some feedbacks; (3 training the students to analyze the problems to find out the most appropriate techniques to solve the problems; (4 introducing the students to have more critical knowledge of both source and target languages; and (5 building the students’ awareness of how the problems appeared in a very complex translation process were solved. Keywords: awareness, problem solving, sharing experience

  14. CTS digital video college curriculum-sharing experiment. [Communications Technology Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, D. R.; Sites, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    NASA-Ames Research Center, Stanford University, and Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, are participating in a joint experiment to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of college curriculum sharing using compressed digital television and the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS). Each university will offer televised courses to the other during the 1976-1977 academic year via CTS, a joint program by NASA and the Canadian Department of Communications. The video compression techniques to be demonstrated will enable economical interconnection of educational institutions using existing and planned domestic satellites.

  15. U-Compare: share and compare text mining tools with UIMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Yoshinobu; Baumgartner, William A.; McCrohon, Luke; Ananiadou, Sophia; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Hunter, Lawrence; Tsujii, Jun'ichi

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Due to the increasing number of text mining resources (tools and corpora) available to biologists, interoperability issues between these resources are becoming significant obstacles to using them effectively. UIMA, the Unstructured Information Management Architecture, is an open framework designed to aid in the construction of more interoperable tools. U-Compare is built on top of the UIMA framework, and provides both a concrete framework for out-of-the-box text mining and a sophisticated evaluation platform allowing users to run specific tools on any target text, generating both detailed statistics and instance-based visualizations of outputs. U-Compare is a joint project, providing the world's largest, and still growing, collection of UIMA-compatible resources. These resources, originally developed by different groups for a variety of domains, include many famous tools and corpora. U-Compare can be launched straight from the web, without needing to be manually installed. All U-Compare components are provided ready-to-use and can be combined easily via a drag-and-drop interface without any programming. External UIMA components can also simply be mixed with U-Compare components, without distinguishing between locally and remotely deployed resources. Availability: http://u-compare.org/ Contact: kano@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp PMID:19414535

  16. School Leadership and Educational Change: Tools and Practices in Shared School Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Trond Eiliv; Norenes, Svein Olav; Vedøy, Gunn

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the features of school leadership as it evolved in an upper secondary school attempting to enhance school improvement through a dedicated team of developmental leaders. We study the team leadership's tools and design over one school year and report on the evolution of a collective approach to leadership for school…

  17. Animal health policy principles for highly pathogenic avian influenza: shared experience from China and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, C; Ninghui, L; Yeh, F; Zhang, L

    2011-08-01

    Animal health policy for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) must, for the time being, be based on expert opinion and shared international experience. We used the intellectual capital and knowledge of experienced Chinese and Canadian practitioners and policy makers to inform policy options for China and find shared policy elements applicable to both countries. No peer-reviewed comprehensive evaluations or systematic regulatory impact assessments of animal health policies were found. Sixteen guiding policy principles emerged from our thematic analysis of Chinese and Canadian policies. We provide a list of shared policy goals, targets and elements for HPAI preparedness, response and recovery. Policy elements clustered in a manner consistent with core public health competencies. Complex situations like HPAI require complex and adaptive policies, yet policies that cross jurisdictions and are fully integrated across agencies are rare. We encourage countries to develop or deploy capacity to undertake and publish regulatory impact assessments and policy evaluation to identify policy needs and provide a basis for evidence-based policy development. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Knowledge sharing Network analysis and its relationship with the experience and education of librarians at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Salami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As human resources are important resources in organization, it is important for organizations to use knowledge organization of human resources. Thus managing and sharing knowledge in organizations is so important. Libraries as well service-oriented and knowledge-based organizations, librarians’ contribution of knowledge management is important. The study tries to determine Ferdowsi University of Mashhad librarians’ participation in the process of knowledge sharing by knowledge sharing network analysis method. The application used for social network analysis is UCINET6. Determining the degree of centralization in the network of knowledge sharing can also help to detect factors may influence it. In this study, the degree of centralization in the network of knowledge sharing communicating with the librarians' qualifications and work experiences were tested. It is also determined the degree centralization of the whole of the knowledge sharing network with 26.76% that is not so satisfactory.  The results show that despite the positive relationship between level of education and the centrality of people, the experience no significant relationship. Statistically, there is also no significant difference between men and women in knowledge sharing degrees of librarians in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. At the end, according to the results of this research some suggestions are given to increase degrees of knowledge sharing of librarians and generally knowledge sharing degree of the network knowledge sharing.

  19. Computational Tools for the Secondary Analysis of Metabolomics Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Cameron Booth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics experiments have become commonplace in a wide variety of disciplines. By identifying and quantifying metabolites researchers can achieve a systems level understanding of metabolism. These studies produce vast swaths of data which are often only lightly interpreted due to the overwhelmingly large amount of variables that are measured. Recently, a number of computational tools have been developed which enable much deeper analysis of metabolomics data. These data have been difficult to interpret as understanding the connections between dozens of altered metabolites has often relied on the biochemical knowledge of researchers and their speculations. Modern biochemical databases provide information about the interconnectivity of metabolism which can be automatically polled using metabolomics secondary analysis tools. Starting with lists of altered metabolites, there are two main types of analysis: enrichment analysis computes which metabolic pathways have been significantly altered whereas metabolite mapping contextualizes the abundances and significances of measured metabolites into network visualizations. Many different tools have been developed for one or both of these applications. In this review the functionality and use of these software is discussed. Together these novel secondary analysis tools will enable metabolomics researchers to plumb the depths of their data and produce farther reaching biological conclusions than ever before.

  20. COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS FOR THE SECONDARY ANALYSIS OF METABOLOMICS EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C. Booth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics experiments have become commonplace in a wide variety of disciplines. By identifying and quantifying metabolites researchers can achieve a systems level understanding of metabolism. These studies produce vast swaths of data which are often only lightly interpreted due to the overwhelmingly large amount of variables that are measured. Recently, a number of computational tools have been developed which enable much deeper analysis of metabolomics data. These data have been difficult to interpret as understanding the connections between dozens of altered metabolites has often relied on the biochemical knowledge of researchers and their speculations. Modern biochemical databases provide information about the interconnectivity of metabolism which can be automatically polled using metabolomics secondary analysis tools. Starting with lists of altered metabolites, there are two main types of analysis: enrichment analysis computes which metabolic pathways have been significantly altered whereas metabolite mapping contextualizes the abundances and significances of measured metabolites into network visualizations. Many different tools have been developed for one or both of these applications. In this review the functionality and use of these software is discussed. Together these novel secondary analysis tools will enable metabolomics researchers to plumb the depths of their data and produce farther reaching biological conclusions than ever before.

  1. Tools for Interdisciplinary Data Assimilation and Sharing in Support of Hydrologic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, D. L.; Walker, J.; Suftin, I.; Warren, M.; Kunicki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Information consumed and produced in hydrologic analyses is interdisciplinary and massive. These factors put a heavy information management burden on the hydrologic science community. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Water Information Center for Integrated Data Analytics (CIDA) seeks to assist hydrologic science investigators with all-components of their scientific data management life cycle. Ongoing data publication and software development projects will be presented demonstrating publically available data access services and manipulation tools being developed with support from two Department of the Interior initiatives. The USGS-led National Water Census seeks to provide both data and tools in support of nationally consistent water availability estimates. Newly available data include national coverages of radar-indicated precipitation, actual evapotranspiration, water use estimates aggregated by county, and South East region estimates of streamflow for 12-digit hydrologic unit code watersheds. Web services making these data available and applications to access them will be demonstrated. Web-available processing services able to provide numerous streamflow statistics for any USGS daily flow record or model result time series and other National Water Census processing tools will also be demonstrated. The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center is a USGS center leading DOI-funded academic global change adaptation research. It has a mission goal to ensure data used and produced by funded projects is available via web services and tools that streamline data management tasks in interdisciplinary science. For example, collections of downscaled climate projections, typically large collections of files that must be downloaded to be accessed, are being published using web services that allow access to the entire dataset via simple web-service requests and numerous processing tools. Recent progress on this front includes, data web services for Climate

  2. 'To talk or not to talk?' : Foster youth's experiences of sharing stories about their past and being in foster care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Anne; van der Steen, Steffie; Grietens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Sharing stories about the past and about being in care, can help adolescents placed in foster families to make meaning of their experiences and connect with their conversation partner. However, what obstacles and opportunities for sharing stories are experienced by foster youth has not been

  3. Automatic Tools for Enhancing the Collaborative Experience in Large Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourilkov, D.; Rodriquez, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    With the explosion of big data in many fields, the efficient management of knowledge about all aspects of the data analysis gains in importance. A key feature of collaboration in large scale projects is keeping a log of what is being done and how - for private use, reuse, and for sharing selected parts with collaborators and peers, often distributed geographically on an increasingly global scale. Even better if the log is automatically created on the fly while the scientist or software developer is working in a habitual way, without the need for extra efforts. This saves time and enables a team to do more with the same resources. The CODESH - COllaborative DEvelopment SHell - and CAVES - Collaborative Analysis Versioning Environment System projects address this problem in a novel way. They build on the concepts of virtual states and transitions to enhance the collaborative experience by providing automatic persistent virtual logbooks. CAVES is designed for sessions of distributed data analysis using the popular ROOT framework, while CODESH generalizes the approach for any type of work on the command line in typical UNIX shells like bash or tcsh. Repositories of sessions can be configured dynamically to record and make available the knowledge accumulated in the course of a scientific or software endeavor. Access can be controlled to define logbooks of private sessions or sessions shared within or between collaborating groups. A typical use case is building working scalable systems for analysis of Petascale volumes of data as encountered in the LHC experiments. Our approach is general enough to find applications in many fields.

  4. An interactive web tool for facilitating shared decision-making in dementia-care networks: a field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke eSpan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAn interactive web tool has been developed for facilitating shared decision-making in dementia-care networks. The DecideGuide provides a chat function for easier communication between network members, a deciding together function for step-by-step decision-making, and an individual opinion function for eight dementia-related life domains. The aim of this study was to gain insight in the user friendliness of the DecideGuide, user acceptance and satisfaction, and participants’ opinion of the DecideGuide for making decisions.Materials and methodsA 5-month field study included four dementia-care networks (19 participants in total. The data derived from structured interviews, observations, and information that participants logged in the DecideGuide. Structured interviews took place at the start, middle, and end of the field study with people with dementia, informal caregivers, and case managers. Results1. The user friendliness of the chat and individual opinion functions was adequate for case managers and most informal caregivers. Older participants, with or without dementia, had some difficulties using a tablet and the DecideGuide. The deciding together function does not yet provide adequate instructions for all. The user interface needs simplification. 2. User acceptance and satisfaction: everybody liked the chat’s easy communication, handling difficult issues for discussion, and the option of individual opinions. 3. The DecideGuide helped participants structure their thoughts. They felt more involved and shared more information about daily issues than before. ConclusionParticipants found the DecideGuide valuable in decision-making. The chat function seems powerful in helping members engage with one another constructively. Such engagement is a prerequisite for making shared decisions. Regardless of participants’ use of the tool, they saw the DecideGuide's added value.

  5. Sourcing the crowd for health services improvement: The reflexive patient and "share-your-experience" websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Samantha A

    2011-04-01

    In countries where the notion of "reflexive patients" dominates the health policy landscape, patients are increasingly encouraged to publicize their personal experiences with health services provision by reviewing hospitals and professionals on the web. The number of websites where patients can review one or more aspects of their care (and read reviews posted by others) is growing. These sites are an example of the practice of crowdsourcing, where applications that facilitate user-generated content solicit feedback from a given public; site administrators then use this feedback for product development, quality improvement and policy change. The research presented here examines such developments in the context of ongoing discussions about reflexive consumerism and increased transparency in healthcare. It draws on data from a three-year study of share-your-experience sites in the U.S., U.K., and The Netherlands. Data is taken primarily from a discourse analysis of four of the six sites under study, including patient reviews of institutions and professionals (n=450). Supplementary data from interviews with stakeholders related to the Dutch sites (n=15) is also used. This is the first known study of multiple share-your-experience websites in different countries. It shows that monitoring as "reflexive" behavior is not automatic, but is encouraged by website creators who, hoping to use the posts for other purposes, act as mediators between patients and other healthcare stakeholders. It further argues that patients demonstrate more reflexivity than some stakeholders realize, although not necessarily in the way that Giddens proposed. It concludes with the argument that the focus on reflexivity in healthcare means that not only institutions must be more transparent about their performance; patients are expected to be more transparent about their choices, as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Three Online Neutron Beam Experiments Based on the iLab Shared Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakov Ostrocsky

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Students at MIT have traditionally executed certain experiments in the containment building of the MIT nuclear reactor as part of courses in Nuclear Engineering and the third year laboratory course for Physics majors. A joint team of faculty and research staff from the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT-NRL and MIT’s Center for Educational Computing Initiatives have implemented online versions of three classic experiments; (a a determination of MIT reactor coolant temperature through measurement of thermal neutron velocity, (b a demonstration of the DeBroglie relationship of the kinetic energy and momentum of thermal neutrons and study of Bragg diffraction through a single copper crystal at various orientations, and (c a measurement of beam depletion using a variety of shielding filters. These online experiments were implemented using the LabVIEW® virtual instrumentation package and the interactive version of the iLab Shared Architecture (ISA. Initial assessment of the online experiments indicates that they achieve comparable educational outcomes to traditional versions of the labs executed in the reactor containment building.

  7. Using students' journals about death experiences as a pedagological tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Kevin; Kereakoglow, Sandra; Radhika Sarma, Arti; Hare, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate a pedagological tool for student's study of death and bereavement. Previous research suggests that students may be more willing to discuss issues associated with death through written correspondence rather than through oral communication. However, despite these efforts there are still students who experience great difficulty in expressing themselves fully in class by no fault of the teacher but merely due to the student's own disposition. Based on the data, it appears as if journal writing may offer a way around this difficulty. Data were collected from two sites: a private college in New England and a Midwestern state university. Common themes that students stated effected their experiences with death included reactions of significant others to the death in question, the funeral services provided, and the familial events postfuneral. The limitations and benefits of using journaling as a pedagological tool for a bereavement course are discussed. Using projects such as this one may help students to accurately display their learning to the professor while still bringing in their own perceptions of death.

  8. Ubuntunet Alliance: A Collaborative Research Platform for Sharing of Technological Tools for Eradication of Brain Drain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson Mbale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The UbuntuNet Alliance Alliance is well-placed to facilitate interaction between education and research institutions and the African academic and researcher in the Diaspora so that together they can strengthen research that will exploit new technological tools and increase the industrial base. It is envisaged that the Alliance will become an important vehicle for linkages that will facilitate repatriation of scientific knowledge and skills to Africa and even help reduce and eventually eradicate the brain drain which has taken so many excellent intellectuals to the developed world. As organisational vehicles for inter-institutional collaboration both established and emerging NRENs can play a critical role in reversing these trends and in mitigating what appears to be the negative impact of the brain drain.

  9. How to conduct a workshop on medical writing: Tips, advice and experience sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Mansoor, Sahibzada Nasir

    2015-06-01

    Medical writing has become an essential skill for anybody in academia and engaged in teaching. Workshops on medical writing are an effective way to teach the essential skills of medical writing to students and faculty members. There is a huge demand for these workshops all around the globe. Usually there is no curriculum of medical writing for the undergraduates or dedicated structured training sessions for the faculty members. One of the authors won an Author AID grant to conduct a series of workshops on medical writing. Eight workshops were conducted in three months, benefitting more than 200 students and faculty staff. We share our experience of holding this successful series of workshops with the aim that it might serve as a guide for researchers and faculty members who are eager to share and transfer their skills and knowledge. We also offer lessons learnt during this educational activity, tips to improve the quality and delivery of the content with limited resources and maximizing the impact. Experienced medical writers need to conduct these workshops to transfer their skills and to facilitate their colleagues and students to become better medical writers. Planning, rehearsal, motivation, resource management, good team work, audience analysis and feedback can make a workshop successful. Well prepared workshop content delivered in an interactive way with a variety of activities makes the workshop an engaging and interesting educational activity.

  10. Can sharing experiences in groups reduce the burden of living with diabetes, regardless of glycaemic control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Christensen, Mette; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hommel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    and depression subscale), well-being (World Health Organization 5) and HbA1c. Results Equal numbers of patients with HbA1c above and below 64 mmol/mol (8%) joined the support groups (n = 54). Focus group interviews revealed that major benefits were feeling less alone and being intuitively understood among peers....... The patients perceived the support groups as a safe environment for sharing experiences. Problem Areas in Diabetes, Global Severity Index and depression subscale scores were significantly reduced post-intervention and maintained at 1-year follow-up. Well-being increased insignificantly. HbA1c was unchanged...... glycaemic control might have an unacknowledged psychosocial burden of living with the illness....

  11. Disrupted by disaster: shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists affected by hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisz-Everson, Marjorie A; Bennett, Marsha J; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Biddle, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) whose senior year of education and training was disrupted by Hurricane Katrina, as well as to determine the storm's psychosocial impact on them. A convenience sample of 10 former SRNAs participated in focus groups that were audiorecorded, transcribed, and qualitatively analyzed. Three major themes emerged from the study: Seriousness of Urgency, Managing Uncertainty, and Stability Equaled Relief. The themes represented how the SRNAs appraised and coped with the stressful events surrounding Hurricane Katrina. The psychosocial impact of Hurricane Katrina on the SRNAs resulted mainly in temporary increased alcohol consumption and short-term anxiety. One person started smoking. The results of this study should serve as a guide to formulate policies regarding the education of SRNAs during and immediately after a disaster and to provide a framework for future disaster studies regarding SRNAs. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Transdisciplinary Project Communication and Knowledge Sharing Experiences in Tanzania and Zambia through a One Health Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnol, Brigitte; Clarke, Elizabeth; Li, Mu; Maulaga, Wende; Lumbwe, Hilda; McConchie, Robyn; de Bruyn, Julia; Alders, Robyn Gwen

    2016-01-01

    The project "Strengthening food and nutrition security through family poultry and crop integration in Tanzania and Zambia" brings together animal, crop, and human health specialists, economists, ecologists, social scientists, and practitioners to work with participating communities. It aims to increase poultry value chain, crop farming systems efficiency, and household food and nutrition security and thus requires understanding of, and ability to work effectively within, complex systems. In this context, communication knowledge sharing and synthesis between stakeholders from diverse backgrounds and a range of experiences, perspectives, agendas, and knowledge is a challenge. To address this situation, communication is conceived as a dialog and a participatory process bringing together all stakeholders. This process results in unanticipated and unexpected results that require a high degree of flexibility and adaptability from team members. The paper analyses the approach and aim of the communication strategy developed for the project and the challenges faced.

  13. Converging free and open source software tools for knowledge sharing in smallholder agricultural communities in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandana Kumara Jayathilake

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In a world where the notion of ‘sharing of knowledge’ has been gained much prominence in the recent past, the importance of information and communications technologies (ICTs to promote sustainable agriculture, especially when combined with mobile and open source software technologies is discussed critically. On this rationale, this study was carried out to explore the applicability of the concept of converging ‘Free and Open Source Software (FOSS’ to promote sustainable knowledge sharing amongst the agricultural communities in Sri Lanka. A multi-stage community consultative process with a set of designated officials (“Sponsors” and a series of semi-structured questionnaire survey with a cross section of smallholder agriculture farmers (n=246, were carried out in the Batticaloa, Kurunegala and Puttalam districts to gather the baseline data. This was followed by a number of field experiments (“Campaigns” with the farmers (n=340 from same geographical areas. The two FOSS, namely: (1 “FrontlineSMS” for ‘Text Messaging’ and (2 “FreedomFone” for ‘Interactive Voice Responses’, were applied to evaluate the effectiveness of knowledge sharing within the farming communities. It was found that FOSS intervention increases the ‘Text messaging’ and ‘Voice Call’ usage in day-to-day agricultural communication by 26 and 8 percent, respectively. The demographic factors like age and income level of the farmers has positively influence on the knowledge sharing process. And also the ‘Mobile Telephony’ was the most extensive mode of communication within the communities. The outcome of analysis, as a whole, implies that, with a fitting mechanism in place, this approach can be promoted as a “drive for positive changes” in agriculture-based rural communities in developing countries like Sri Lanka, and those in South and East Asia with similar socio-economic and cultural perspectives.

  14. Life-sharing experiences of relatives of persons with severe mental illness - a phenomenographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimand, Bente M; Hall-Lord, Marie Louise; Sällström, Christina; Hedelin, Birgitta

    2013-03-01

    Relatives of those suffering from severe mental illness experience multiple challenges and a complex life situation. The aim of this study was to describe life-sharing experiences from the perspective of relatives of someone with severe mental illness. A qualitative, descriptive study was performed, and interviews were carried out with eighteen relatives of persons with severe mental illness. A phenomenographic analysis, according to the steps described by Dahlgren and Fallsberg, was used to describe the relatives' conceptions of their situation. The findings show that the experiences of these relatives can be summarized in one main category: 'The art of balancing between multiple concerns'. Two descriptive categories emerged: 'Making choices on behalf of others and oneself' and 'Constantly struggling between opposing feelings and between reflections'. Relatives report that they have to manoeuvre between different ways to act and to prioritize between different wishes and needs. In addition, they face a wide range of strong feelings and they search for hope and meaning. Relatives of someone with severe mental illness have to balance multiple concerns, which induce ethical dilemmas. They felt love, compassion or sense of duty towards the mentally ill person. The changeable situation made it difficult for the relatives to establish a balance in their lives. To be able to prioritize some private time was important. Relatives need own support and sufficient follow-up of the mentally ill next of kin from the mental health services. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. PhysioSpace: relating gene expression experiments from heterogeneous sources using shared physiological processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lenz

    Full Text Available Relating expression signatures from different sources such as cell lines, in vitro cultures from primary cells and biopsy material is an important task in drug development and translational medicine as well as for tracking of cell fate and disease progression. Especially the comparison of large scale gene expression changes to tissue or cell type specific signatures is of high interest for the tracking of cell fate in (trans- differentiation experiments and for cancer research, which increasingly focuses on shared processes and the involvement of the microenvironment. These signature relation approaches require robust statistical methods to account for the high biological heterogeneity in clinical data and must cope with small sample sizes in lab experiments and common patterns of co-expression in ubiquitous cellular processes. We describe a novel method, called PhysioSpace, to position dynamics of time series data derived from cellular differentiation and disease progression in a genome-wide expression space. The PhysioSpace is defined by a compendium of publicly available gene expression signatures representing a large set of biological phenotypes. The mapping of gene expression changes onto the PhysioSpace leads to a robust ranking of physiologically relevant signatures, as rigorously evaluated via sample-label permutations. A spherical transformation of the data improves the performance, leading to stable results even in case of small sample sizes. Using PhysioSpace with clinical cancer datasets reveals that such data exhibits large heterogeneity in the number of significant signature associations. This behavior was closely associated with the classification endpoint and cancer type under consideration, indicating shared biological functionalities in disease associated processes. Even though the time series data of cell line differentiation exhibited responses in larger clusters covering several biologically related patterns, top scoring

  16. Neurophysiological analytics for all! Free open-source software tools for documenting, analyzing, visualizing, and sharing using electronic notebooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, David M; Horn, Charles C

    2016-08-01

    Neurophysiology requires an extensive workflow of information analysis routines, which often includes incompatible proprietary software, introducing limitations based on financial costs, transfer of data between platforms, and the ability to share. An ecosystem of free open-source software exists to fill these gaps, including thousands of analysis and plotting packages written in Python and R, which can be implemented in a sharable and reproducible format, such as the Jupyter electronic notebook. This tool chain can largely replace current routines by importing data, producing analyses, and generating publication-quality graphics. An electronic notebook like Jupyter allows these analyses, along with documentation of procedures, to display locally or remotely in an internet browser, which can be saved as an HTML, PDF, or other file format for sharing with team members and the scientific community. The present report illustrates these methods using data from electrophysiological recordings of the musk shrew vagus-a model system to investigate gut-brain communication, for example, in cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis. We show methods for spike sorting (including statistical validation), spike train analysis, and analysis of compound action potentials in notebooks. Raw data and code are available from notebooks in data supplements or from an executable online version, which replicates all analyses without installing software-an implementation of reproducible research. This demonstrates the promise of combining disparate analyses into one platform, along with the ease of sharing this work. In an age of diverse, high-throughput computational workflows, this methodology can increase efficiency, transparency, and the collaborative potential of neurophysiological research. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. ORRION: A specific information sharing tool to (rebuild a “flood risk culture” in the Rhine Graben (France - Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Brice

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When is led a prevention initiative concerning flood risk, the recall of old events allows just as much to act as pedagogy to legitimize the initiative. So as it is written in the information leaflet on the “Plan de Prévention des Risques d’Inondation” (PPRI:«Alsace did not know any more exceptional floods since 1910. In almost a century, the flood risk thus naturally faded of our memory”. A paradoxical assertion because the floods of 1910 are not taken into account for risk mapping. Only the recent floods (1983, 1990 are used as benchmarks. We were able to show [1] that, although legitimate as reference events, the floods of 1910 and many others had become manifestly underestimated for multiple reasons connected to the history of Alsace, or due to disorganization of the archives. Worse, these riks unawareness is shared by all the actors, causing problems of acceptance of the risk and their management, and an additional vulnerability in terms of population behavior before, during and after the crises. This is the reason why an online participative database (ORRION has been created. the objective of this database is to inform and to share the information about floods history, in the particular context of a cross-border territory (France, Germany, Switzerland. This tool has been immediately involved into risks prevention actions (PAPI, PPRI.

  18. Experiences with the BSCW Shared Workspace System as the Backbone of a Virtual Learning Environment for Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelt, Wolfgang; Mambrey, Peter

    The GMD (German National Research Center for Information Technology) has developed the BSCW (Basic Support for Cooperative Work) Shared Workspace system within the last four years with the goal of transforming the Web from a primarily passive information repository to an active cooperation medium. The BSCW system is a Web-based groupware tool for…

  19. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  20. Knowledge and experience sharing practices among health professionals in hospitals under the Addis Ababa health bureau, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemahagn, Mulusew Andualem

    2014-09-24

    Health professionals need updated health information from credible sources to improve their knowledge and provide evidence based health care services. Various types of medical errors have occurred in resource-limited countries because of poor knowledge and experience sharing practices among health professionals. The aim of this study was to assess knowledge-sharing practices and determinants among health professionals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. An institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted among 320 randomly selected health professionals from August12-25/2012. A pretested, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data about different variables. Data entry and analysis were done using Epi-Info version 3.5.4 and SPSS version20 respectively. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses were applied to describe study objectives and identify the determinants of knowledge sharing practices respectively. Odds ratio at 95% CI was used to describe the strength of association between the study and outcome variables. Most of the respondents approved the need of knowledge and experience sharing practices in their routine activities. Nearly half, 152 (49.0%) of the study participants had knowledge and experience sharing practices. A majority, 219 (70.0%) of the respondents showed a willingness to share their knowledge and experiences. Trust on others' knowledge, motivation, supportive leadership, job satisfaction, awareness, willingness and resource allocation are the determinants of knowledge and experience sharing practices. Supportive leadership, resources, and trust on others' knowledge can enhance knowledge and experience sharing by OR = 3.12, 95% CI = [1.89 - 5.78], OR = 2.3, 95% CI = [1.61- 4.21] and OR = 2.78, 95% CI = [1.66 - 4.64] times compared with their counterparts respectively. Even though most of the respondents knew the importance of knowledge and experience sharing practices, only a limited number

  1. Real World SharePoint 2007 Indispensable Experiences From 16 MOSS and WSS MVPs

    CERN Document Server

    Hillier, Scot; Buenz, Adam; Connell, Andrew; Draper, Stacy; Solier Grinda, Luis Du; Klindt, Todd; Medero, Jason; Miller, Dustin; Perran, Shane; Poelmans, Joris; Solomon, Heather; Swan, Nick; Tielens, Jan; Walsh, Mike; Young, Shane

    2011-01-01

    Microsoft recognizes key individuals who contribute significantly to the community of technologists through the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) award. These individuals are active authors, speakers, bloggers, and innovators. They are also skilled network engineers, developers, trainers, designers, and architects. In the SharePoint community, these MVPs are recognized for their expertise in either Windows SharePoint Services (WSS) or Microsoft Office SharePoint Server (MOSS). This book represents the efforts of 16 MVPs in the SharePoint community to present core areas of SharePoint 2

  2. Facilities as teaching tools: A transformative participatory professional development experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric A.

    Resource consumption continues to increase as the population grows. In order to secure a sustainable future, society must educate the next generation to become "sustainability natives." Schools play a pivotal role in educating a sustainability-literate society. However, a disconnect exists between the hidden curriculum of the built environment and the enacted curriculum. This study employs a transformative participatory professional development model to instruct teachers on how to use their school grounds as teaching tools for the purpose of helping students make explicit choices in energy consumption, materials use, and sustainable living. Incorporating a phenomenological perspective, this study considers the lived experience of two sustainability coordinators. Grounded theory provides an interpretational context for the participants' interactions with each other and the professional development process. Through a year long professional development experience - commencing with an intense, participatory two-day workshop -the participants discussed challenges they faced with integrating facilities into school curriculum and institutionalizing a culture of sustainability. Two major needs were identified in this study. For successful sustainability initiatives, a hybrid model that melds top-down and bottom-up approaches offers the requisite mix of administrative support, ground level buy-in, and excitement vis-a-vis sustainability. Second, related to this hybrid approach, K-12 sustainability coordinators ideally need administrative capabilities with access to decision making, while remaining connected to students in a meaningful way, either directly in the classroom, as a mentor, or through work with student groups and projects.

  3. Supporting Shared Resource Usage for a Diverse User Community: the OSG Experience and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzoglio, Gabriele; Levshina, Tanya; Rynge, Mats; Sehgal, Chander; Slyz, Marko

    2012-12-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) supports a diverse community of new and existing users in adopting and making effective use of the Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) model. The LHC user community has deep local support within the experiments. For other smaller communities and individual users the OSG provides consulting and technical services through the User Support area. We describe these sometimes successful and sometimes not so successful experiences and analyze lessons learned that are helping us improve our services. The services offered include forums to enable shared learning and mutual support, tutorials and documentation for new technology, and troubleshooting of problematic or systemic failure modes. For new communities and users, we bootstrap their use of the distributed high throughput computing technologies and resources available on the OSG by following a phased approach. We first adapt the application and run a small production campaign on a subset of “friendly” sites. Only then do we move the user to run full production campaigns across the many remote sites on the OSG, adding to the community resources up to hundreds of thousands of CPU hours per day. This scaling up generates new challenges - like no determinism in the time to job completion, and diverse errors due to the heterogeneity of the configurations and environments - so some attention is needed to get good results. We cover recent experiences with image simulation for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), small-file large volume data movement for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), civil engineering simulation with the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES), and accelerator modeling with the Electron Ion Collider group at BNL. We will categorize and analyze the use cases and describe how our processes are evolving based on lessons learned.

  4. Performance-Based Risk-Sharing Arrangements: U.S. Payer Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Joseph A; Ung, Brian; van Boemmel-Wegmann, Sascha; Navarro, Robert P; Parece, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    As a result of global concern about rising drug costs, many U.S. payers and European agencies such as the National Health Service have partnered with pharmaceutical companies in performance-based risk-sharing arrangements (PBRSAs) by which manufacturers share financial risk with health care purchasing entities and authorities. However, PBRSAs present many administrative and legal challenges that have minimized successful contract experiences in the United States. To (a) identify drug and disease characteristics and contract components that contribute to successful PBRSA experiences and the primary barriers to PBRSA execution and (b) explore solutions to facilitate contract negotiation and execution. A 37-item, web-based survey instrument (Qualtrics), approximately 20 minutes in duration, was open during July and August 2016. The survey was emailed to 90 pharmacy and medical directors of various health care organizations. Statistical analysis included the Kruskal-Wallis test and chi-square tests to examine differences among payer responses. Survey responses were anonymized and data were aggregated. Twenty-seven individuals completed the survey (30% completion rate). The majority of respondents worked for regional health plans (52%, n = 14), covering at least 1 million lives (63%, n = 17), with at least 7 years of managed care experience (81%, n = 22). A total of 51 PBRSAs were active among respondents at the time of the survey. Easily obtainable and evaluable drug data and medical data were the most important drug and disease attributes for successful PBRSAs, respectively. Pharmacy claims and patient demographic data were assessed as "very easy and inexpensive" to collect. Type and amount of manufacturer payment for drug outcome performance failure, endpoint measurement, and necessary clinical data for drug performance measurement were all critical factors for successful PBRSAs. Standardized contract templates and transparent contract financial risk evaluation and

  5. The Experience of Older People in the Shared Decision-Making Process in Advanced Kidney Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This qualitative descriptive study was designed to understand the experiences of older people (>70 years when making a decision about renal replacement therapy. This was a coproduced study, whereby patients and carers were involved in all aspects of the research process. Methods. A Patient and Carer Group undertook volunteer and research training. The group developed the interview questions and interviewed 29 people who had commenced dialysis or made a decision not to have dialysis. Interview data were transcribed and analysed, and common themes were identified. Results. 22 men and 7 women (mean age 77.4 yrs from two hospitals were interviewed. 18 had chosen haemodialysis, 6 peritoneal dialysis, and 5 supportive care. The majority of patients were involved in the dialysis decision. Most were satisfied with the amount of information that they received, although some identified that the quality of the information could be improved, especially how daily living can be affected by dialysis. Conclusion. Our findings show that overall older patients were involved in the dialysis decision along with their families. Our approach is innovative because it is the first time that patients and carers have been involved in a coproduced study about shared decision-making.

  6. Shared experiences of CRNAs who were on duty in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisz-Everson, Marjorie A; Dodd-McCue, Dianne; Bennett, Marsha

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the shared experiences of certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) who were on duty in New Orleans, Louisiana, during Hurricane Katrina as well as to elucidate the psychosocial impact the storm had on them. Ten CRNAs participated in 1 of 3 focus groups that were audio recorded. The audio recordings were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative data analysis computer software (NVivo 8, QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). Six major themes emerged from the study: caught off guard; sense of duty; uncertainty/powerlessness/frustration; group identity and cohesiveness; anger; and life-changing event. The themes represented how the CRNAs appraised and coped with the stressful events surrounding Hurricane Katrina. The psychosocial impact of Hurricane Katrina on the CRNAs resulted mainly in short-term sleep disturbances and increased drinking. Only 2 CRNAs expressed long-term psychosocial effects from the storm. The results of this study should be used to guide policies regarding disaster activation of CRNAs, to educate CRNAs on preparing for disaster duty, and to provide a framework for future disaster studies regarding CRNAs.

  7. "Spaghetti Maneuver": A useful tool in pediatric laparoscopy - Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The laparoscopic "Spaghetti Maneuver" consists in holding an organ by its extremity with a grasper and rolling it up around the tool to keep the organ stable and facilitate its traction within a small space. We describe our experience with the "Spaghetti Maneuver" in some minimally invasive procedures. Materials and Methods: We successfully adopted this technique in 13 patients (5F : 8M aged between 6 and 14 years (average age, 10 on whom we performed 7 appendectomies, 2 ureteral reimplantation and 4 cholecystectomies. In all cases, after the first steps, the appendix, the gallbladder and the ureter were rolled around the grasper and easily isolated; hemostasis was thus induced and the organ was mobilized until removal during cholecystectomy and appendectomy, and before the reimplantation in case of ureteral reimplantation. Results: We found that this technique facilitated significantly the acts of holding, isolating and removing, when necessary, the structures involved, which remained constantly within the visual field of the operator. This allowed a very ergonomic work setting, overcoming the problem of the "blind" zone, which represents a dangerous and invisible area out of the operator′s control during laparoscopy. Moreover the isolation maneuvers resulted easier and reduced operating time. Conclusion: We think that this technique is easy to perform and very useful, because it facilitates the dissection of these organs, by harmonizing and stabilizing the force of traction exercised.

  8. Secondary Preservice Teachers Share Their Writing with Individual Students in School: A Survey of Their Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daisey, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this study was to describe the method, barriers, and positive effects when secondary preservice teachers of diverse subject areas shared their writing with individual middle and high school students in school. (Methodology) secondary preservice teachers (N = 77) shared their writing for two minutes before class each time…

  9. The Basque power-sharing experience: From a destructive to a constructive conflict?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansvelt Beck, J.

    2008-01-01

    Neither the devolution of powers to the Basque Autonomous Community in Spain nor more than a decade of power-sharing within this region has led to a peaceful settlement of the Basque conflict. Combining Kriesberg's approach to conflict resolution and consociational theory, past power-sharing

  10. Children's Perspectives on Everyday Experiences of Shared Residence: Time, Emotions and Agency Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Gry Mette D.

    2010-01-01

    Shared residence is often presented as an arrangement that is in the best interests of the child following the divorce of its parents. Based on in-depth interviews with Norwegian children who have experienced shared residence, this article seeks to explore some dilemmas concerning time, agency and the children's emotions. Three characteristics of…

  11. Pro SharePoint 2010 Search

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, J; Bakman-Mikalski, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Pro SharePoint 2010 Search gives you expert advice on planning, deploying and customizing searches in SharePoint 2010. Drawing on the authors' extensive experience of working with real-world SharePoint deployments, this book teaches everything you'll need to know to create well-designed SharePoint solutions that always keep the end-user's experience in mind. Increase your search efficiency with SharePoint 2010's search functionality: extend the search user interface using third-party tools, and utilize analytics to improve relevancy. This practical hands-on book is a must-have resource for any

  12. ShrimpGPAT: a gene and protein annotation tool for knowledge sharing and gene discovery in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshkari, Parpakron; Vaiwsri, Sirintra; Flegel, Timothy W; Ngamsuriyaroj, Sudsanguan; Sonthayanon, Burachai; Prachumwat, Anuphap

    2014-06-21

    Although captured and cultivated marine shrimp constitute highly important seafood in terms of both economic value and production quantity, biologists have little knowledge of the shrimp genome and this partly hinders their ability to improve shrimp aquaculture. To help improve this situation, the Shrimp Gene and Protein Annotation Tool (ShrimpGPAT) was conceived as a community-based annotation platform for the acquisition and updating of full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs), Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs), transcript contigs and protein sequences of penaeid shrimp and their decapod relatives and for in-silico functional annotation and sequence analysis. ShrimpGPAT currently holds quality-filtered, molecular sequences of 14 decapod species (~500,000 records for six penaeid shrimp and eight other decapods). The database predominantly comprises transcript sequences derived by both traditional EST Sanger sequencing and more recently by massive-parallel sequencing technologies. The analysis pipeline provides putative functions in terms of sequence homologs, gene ontologies and protein-protein interactions. Data retrieval can be conducted easily either by a keyword text search or by a sequence query via BLAST, and users can save records of interest for later investigation using tools such as multiple sequence alignment and BLAST searches against pre-defined databases. In addition, ShrimpGPAT provides space for community insights by allowing functional annotation with tags and comments on sequences. Community-contributed information will allow for continuous database enrichment, for improvement of functions and for other aspects of sequence analysis. ShrimpGPAT is a new, free and easily accessed service for the shrimp research community that provides a comprehensive and up-to-date database of quality-filtered decapod gene and protein sequences together with putative functional prediction and sequence analysis tools. An important feature is its community

  13. Criticality: the experience of developing an interactive educational tool based on board games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Vanessa; Douglas, Margaret

    2013-12-01

    Critical care services have seen many changes over recent years prompted by the seminal paper by the Department of Health (2000) Comprehensive critical care: A review of adult critical care services. This led to the expansion of critical care services with the resultant recruitment of large numbers of nurses new to critical care. Northumbria and other Universities within the UK were commissioned to provide formal education to critical care nurses and developed Foundations in Acute and Critical Care Module to provide nurses new to critical care, or from other acute clinical settings, with the knowledge and skills to manage this complex group of patients. The aim of this paper is to share the authors' experience of developing "Criticality" a board game designed to formatively assess learning amongst critical care nurses following a formal taught module in a Higher Education Institution (HEI) and prior to the summative assessment. Author experience suggests that Criticality is a useful revision tool and also fun and interactive which helped the students to identify strengths and weaknesses in their knowledge base and thus direct their revision prior to summative assessment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Social media, FOAMed in medical education and knowledge sharing: Local experiences with international perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Alper Cevik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Social media, through the Internet and other web-based technologies, have become a means of communication and knowledge-sharing. In this article, we provide details about the social media traffic of various scientific activities, the organizations of which we have played an active role in. We also provide information in our native language through our FOAMed website, which has been published for about 30 months, with us acting as editors. We are comparing these local and limited ventures with examples from the world and aim to remind that social media sources play a very important role in sharing knowledge in medical training and encouraging local initiatives, like ours, with limited resources. Keywords: Medical education, Social media, FOAMed, Knowledge sharing

  15. Social media, FOAMed in medical education and knowledge sharing: Local experiences with international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Arif Alper; Aksel, Gokhan; Akoglu, Haldun; Eroglu, Serkan Emre; Dogan, Nurettin Ozgur; Altunci, Yusuf Ali

    2016-09-01

    Social media, through the Internet and other web-based technologies, have become a means of communication and knowledge-sharing. In this article, we provide details about the social media traffic of various scientific activities, the organizations of which we have played an active role in. We also provide information in our native language through our FOAMed website, which has been published for about 30 months, with us acting as editors. We are comparing these local and limited ventures with examples from the world and aim to remind that social media sources play a very important role in sharing knowledge in medical training and encouraging local initiatives, like ours, with limited resources.

  16. To do, to have, or to share? Valuing experiences over material possessions depends on the involvement of others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprariello, Peter A; Reis, Harry T

    2013-02-01

    Recent evidence indicates that spending discretionary money with the intention of acquiring life experiences-events that one lives through-makes people happier than spending money with the intention of acquiring material possessions-tangible objects that one obtains and possesses. We propose and show that experiences are more likely to be shared with others, whereas material possessions are more prone to solitary use and that this distinction may account for their differential effects on happiness. In 4 studies, we present evidence demonstrating that the inclusion of others is a key dimension of how people derive happiness from discretionary spending. These studies showed that when the social-solitary and experiential-material dimensions were considered simultaneously, social discretionary spending was favored over solitary discretionary spending, whereas experiences showed no happiness-producing advantage relative to possessions. Furthermore, whereas spending money on socially shared experiences was valued more than spending money on either experiences enacted alone or material possessions, solitary experiences were no more valued than material possessions. Together, these results extend and clarify the basic findings of prior research and add to growing evidence that the social context of experiences is critical for their effects on happiness. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Systems and software variability management concepts, tools and experiences

    CERN Document Server

    Capilla, Rafael; Kang, Kyo-Chul

    2013-01-01

    The success of product line engineering techniques in the last 15 years has popularized the use of software variability as a key modeling approach for describing the commonality and variability of systems at all stages of the software lifecycle. Software product lines enable a family of products to share a common core platform, while allowing for product specific functionality being built on top of the platform. Many companies have exploited the concept of software product lines to increase the resources that focus on highly differentiating functionality and thus improve their competitiveness

  18. Towards reusability of computational experiments: Capturing and sharing Research Objects from knowledge discovery processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, A.; Spruit, M.; Omta, W

    2015-01-01

    Calls for more reproducible research by sharing code and data are released in a large number of fields from biomedical science to signal processing. At the same time, the urge to solve data analysis bottlenecks in the biomedical field generates the need for more interactive data analytics solutions.

  19. The marketing and economic implications of the manipulation of share prices: Nigeria stock exchange experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajayi Ezekiel Oluwole

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the marketing and economic effects of the manipulation of share prices in the Nigerian Stock Exchange. The survey research design was adopted. Data collected was analyzed using the regression analysis. Student t- test was used to test the two hypotheses formulated at 0.05 level of significance. The findings of the study revealed that capital market infractions such as fraudulent disposal of investor assets, illegal fund management and the wonder bank syndrome, others are insider dealings, corporate accounting fraud and share price manipulations affects the capital market and the economy .The study concluded that share prices manipulation actually influences the marketing and economic values of the shares being manipulated. It was recommended that the Nigerian government must put in place strong regulatory measures and punish the entire offender that has been found guilty. It was also recommended that for the market to rebound, stockbrokers that accessed margin facility from banks should be provided with certain percentage of their contributions to the loan as cushion to help them move on with their business.

  20. Transformation in Interdisciplinary Research Methodology: The Importance of Shared Experiences in Landscapes of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jill; Laing, Karen; Leat, David; Lofthouse, Rachel; Thomas, Ulrike; Tiplady, Lucy; Woolner, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    Current debates around the concept of boundary crossing stress the importance of boundary objects in bringing people together to share understandings. We argue that the boundary object is of secondary importance, and that what is important for the transformational potential of interdisciplinary understanding is opportunities for "boundary…

  1. Shared Space, Liminal Space: Five Years into a Community-University Place-Based Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Heidi Lasley; Martin, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This article explores shared space at the University of Minnesota's Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach Engagement Center (UROC), located four miles off campus in a community strong in assets, but facing inequality, disinvestment and racism. UROC's mission promotes university-community collaboration to solve critical urban challenges. We…

  2. Using Students' Journals about Death Experiences as a Pedagological Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Kevin; Kereakoglow, Sandra; Sarma, Arti Radhika; Hare, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate a pedagological tool for student's study of death and bereavement. Previous research suggests that students may be more willing to discuss issues associated with death through written correspondence rather than through oral communication. However, despite these efforts there are still students who…

  3. The Solid Earth Research and Teaching Environment, a new software framework to share research tools in the classroom and across disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, K.; Becker, T. W.; Boschi, L.; Sain, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Waterhouse, H.

    2009-12-01

    input structure (e.g., a checkerboard pattern) will be resolved by data for different types of earthquake-receiver geometries. Additionally, Larry3D, a three-dimensional seismic tomography tool contributed by Boschi, and NonLinLoc, a nonlinear earthquake relocation tool by Anthony Lomax, are both under development. The goal of all of the implemented modules is to aid in teaching research techniques, while remaining flexible enough for use in true research applications. In the long run, SEATREE may contribute to new ways of sharing scientific research, making published (numerical) experiments truly reproducible again. SEATREE can be downloaded as a package from http://geosys.usc.edu/projects/seatree/wiki/, and users can also subscribe to our Subversion project page. The software is designed to run on GNU/Linux based platforms and has also been successfully run on Mac OS-X. Our poster will present the four currently implemented modules, along with our design philosophies and implementation details.

  4. The interpersonal dimension of patient forums: How patients share their knowledge and experiences in response to posted questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Butler, Antoinette Mary; Nisbeth Jensen, Matilde

    Abstract: The interpersonal dimension of patient forums: How patients share their knowledge and experiences in response to posted questions Antoinette Fage-Butler & Matilde Nisbeth Jensen The internet has revolutionized the way that patients acquire medical information, freeing them of reliance o...... therapy decision-making. Patient Education and Counseling, 77, 369-378. Timimi, F.K. (2012). Medicine, morality and health care social media. BMC medicine, 10(1), 83.......Abstract: The interpersonal dimension of patient forums: How patients share their knowledge and experiences in response to posted questions Antoinette Fage-Butler & Matilde Nisbeth Jensen The internet has revolutionized the way that patients acquire medical information, freeing them of reliance...... on their doctor; seeking out health information online is now the third most popular activity after internet searches and e-mail (Timimi 2012). This paper examines one of these sources of online information, namely, the patient forum where patients provide other patients with information and support...

  5. Tool for Experimenting with Concepts of Mobile Robotics as Applied to Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Jojoa, E. M.; Bravo, E. C.; Bacca Cortes, E. B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a tool for experimenting with mobile robotics concepts, primarily for use by children and teenagers, or by the general public, without previous experience in robotics. This tool helps children learn about science in an approachable and interactive way, using scientific research principles in…

  6. A TOOL FOR EMOTIONAL USER EXPERIENCE ASSESSMENT OF WEB-BASED MEDICAL SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Nikov; Tramaine Alaina Gumaia

    2016-01-01

    Emotional User Experience Design (eUXD) has become increasingly important for web-based services. The primary objective of this study is to enable users to use websites that are easy to understand and operate and pleasing to use. A checklist tool for an emotional user experience (eUX) assessment that supports web-based medical services is proposed. This tool measures user moods while using medical services’ websites. The tool allocates emotive design-oriented problems and thus defines relevan...

  7. Learning from staff to share knowledge and inform decision-making: the Contra Costa County experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to increase staff engagement and opportunities for greater two-way communication between managers and staff, a strategic plan was developed involving administration of an agency-wide staff satisfaction survey. A comprehensive survey was administered to nearly 1700 employees throughout the agency, which encompasses several diverse bureaus ranging from child and family services, aging and adult services, and a workforce investment board. The online survey included 36 questions aimed at gathering staff perspectives on job satisfaction, work expectations, supervision, and information sharing within the agency. 825 employees responded to the survey, and findings were analyzed and shared agency-wide. Results of the survey have been used to inform ongoing agency change and to facilitate continued engagement of staff in organizational goals and initiatives. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  8. Creating Memorable Experiences: How hotels can fight back against Airbnb and other sharing economy providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarand Mody

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available No one can deny that the hotel industry has a fight on its hands when it comes to the peer-to-peer accommodation market. Following a series of acquisitions, Airbnb is the undoubtedly the hotel industry's biggest competitor. While much of the discussion that follows uses Airbnb as an example, the underlying logic applies to the broader concept of the sharing economy and its implications for the hotel industry.

  9. Nasa's Experiences Enabling the Capture and Sharing of Technical Expertise Through Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topousis, Daria E.; Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Lebsock, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-01

    Historically, engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had few opportunities or incentives to share their technical expertise across the Agency. Its center- and project-focused culture often meant that knowledge never left organizational and geographic boundaries. The need to develop a knowledge sharing culture became critical as a result of increasingly complex missions, closeout of the Shuttle Program, and a new generation of engineers entering the workforce. To address this need, the Office of the Chief Engineer established communities of practice on the NASA Engineering Network. These communities were strategically aligned with NASA's core competencies in such disciplines as avionics, flight mechanics, life support, propulsion, structures, loads and dynamics, human factors, and guidance, navigation, and control. This paper is a case study of NASA's implementation of a system that would identify and develop communities, from establishing simple websites that compiled discipline-specific resources to fostering a knowledge-sharing environment through collaborative and interactive technologies. It includes qualitative evidence of improved availability and transfer of knowledge. It focuses on capabilities that increased knowledge exchange such as a custom-made Ask An Expert system, community contact lists, publication of key resources, and submission forms that allowed any user to propose content for the sites. It discusses the peer relationships that developed through the communities and the leadership and infrastructure that made them possible.

  10. Challenges in Getting Building Performance Monitoring Tools for Everyday Use: User Experiences with A New Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Ihasalo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for building performance monitoring because it is common that buildings do not perform as intended. A number of advanced tools for the purpose have been developed within the last tens of years. However, these tools have not been widely adopted in real use. A new tool presented here utilizes building automation data and transforms the data into a set of performance metrics, and is capable of visualizing building performance from energy, indoor conditions, and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning system perspectives. The purpose of this paper is to study the users’ perceptions of the use of tool. The research method was semi-structured interviews. Although the users were satisfied with the solution in general, it was not taken into operative use. The main challenges with the use of the solution were related to accessibility, trust, and management practices. The interviewees were struggling to manage with numerous information systems and therefore had problems in finding the solution and authenticating to it. All the interviewees did not fully trust the solution, since they did not entirely understand what the performance metrics meant or because the solution had limitations in assessing building performance. Management practices are needed to support the performance measurement philosophy.

  11. A beer game simulation model for studying the impact of information sharing to diminish the bullwhip effect in supply chains: an educational support tool in supply chain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éder Vasco Pinheiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper simulates the Beer Distribution Game using object oriented simulation software. A five echelon supply chain with bidirectional relationships is reproduced, employing simulation to demonstrate the impact of information on the generation of the bullwhip effect. In doing so, this study intends to provide a simple didactic tool to assist academically in supply chain management. As the result of the simulations, it was possible to demonstrate the occurrence of the bullwhip effect and how information sharing can diminish it.

  12. The SARE tool for rabies control: Current experience in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzer, A; Kidane, A H; Bekele, M; Hundera, A D; Pieracci, E G; Shiferaw, M L; Wallace, R; Nel, L H

    2016-11-01

    The Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination (SARE) tool was developed through a joint effort of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the Global Alliance for Rabies Control (GARC), to provide a standard mechanism for countries to assess their rabies situation and measure progress in eliminating the disease. Because the African continent has the highest per capita death rate from rabies, and Ethiopia is estimated to have the second largest number of rabies deaths of all African countries, Ethiopia undertook a self-assessment by means of the Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination (SARE) tool. In February 2016, the Ethiopian government hosted an intersectoral consultative meeting in an effort to assess the progress that has been made towards the control and elimination of canine rabies. The SARE assessment identified a number of critical gaps, including poor inter-sectoral collaboration and limited availability and access to dog vaccine, while the existence of a surveillance system for rabies and legislation for outbreak declaration and response were among the strengths identified. The SARE tool enabled key criteria to be prioritized, thereby accelerating the National Strategy and ensuring that Ethiopia will progress rapidly in line with the goals set by the global community for the elimination of human rabies deaths by 2030. Although the analysis showed that Ethiopia is still in the early stages of rabies control (Stage 0.5/5), the country shows great promise in terms of developing a SARE-guided National Rabies Prevention and Control Strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Technological tools for library user education: one library's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Stephanie C

    2007-01-01

    In today's world, library users are confronted with almost too many options for using information because of the ubiquitousness of technology. Yet, libraries can harness the power of the same technologies to help users find the information they need at the time it is needed. The tools described in this article represent a starting point for librarians looking for technologies that are easy to use, inexpensive, and have a reasonable learning curve. Technologies addressed include classroom technologies such as audience response systems and Web-based technologies, including Web tutorials and screencasting. These technologies enhance and offer flexibility and variety in many educational settings.

  14. The tissue microarray data exchange specification: A community-based, open source tool for sharing tissue microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgerton Mary E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue Microarrays (TMAs allow researchers to examine hundreds of small tissue samples on a single glass slide. The information held in a single TMA slide may easily involve Gigabytes of data. To benefit from TMA technology, the scientific community needs an open source TMA data exchange specification that will convey all of the data in a TMA experiment in a format that is understandable to both humans and computers. A data exchange specification for TMAs allows researchers to submit their data to journals and to public data repositories and to share or merge data from different laboratories. In May 2001, the Association of Pathology Informatics (API hosted the first in a series of four workshops, co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, to develop an open, community-supported TMA data exchange specification. Methods A draft tissue microarray data exchange specification was developed through workshop meetings. The first workshop confirmed community support for the effort and urged the creation of an open XML-based specification. This was to evolve in steps with approval for each step coming from the stakeholders in the user community during open workshops. By the fourth workshop, held October, 2002, a set of Common Data Elements (CDEs was established as well as a basic strategy for organizing TMA data in self-describing XML documents. Results The TMA data exchange specification is a well-formed XML document with four required sections: 1 Header, containing the specification Dublin Core identifiers, 2 Block, describing the paraffin-embedded array of tissues, 3Slide, describing the glass slides produced from the Block, and 4 Core, containing all data related to the individual tissue samples contained in the array. Eighty CDEs, conforming to the ISO-11179 specification for data elements constitute XML tags used in the TMA data exchange specification. A set of six simple semantic rules describe the complete data exchange

  15. Open Data Strategies and Experiences to Improve Sharing and Publication of Public Sector Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura María Gutiérrez Medina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Canary Islands receive 10 million tourists every year. Tourism represents a key sector for economic development in the Canaries. This work presents the benefits of open data usages in the tourism sector both in municipalities and in the island government. These public institutions have valuable information that should be shared with other institutions: 600 hotels and apartments, 10,000 bars and restaurants, and more than 15,000 retail businesses. This article describes an open data project to validate and to publish such data across multiple administrations. The main benefits for the public sector are the improvement of the data quality and the interoperability between different administrations.

  16. Collaborative development for setup, execution, sharing and analytics of complex NMR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Alistair G.; Slynko, Vadim; Nikolaev, Yaroslav; Senthamarai, Russell R. P.; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2014-02-01

    Factory settings of NMR pulse sequences are rarely ideal for every scenario in which they are utilised. The optimisation of NMR experiments has for many years been performed locally, with implementations often specific to an individual spectrometer. Furthermore, these optimised experiments are normally retained solely for the use of an individual laboratory, spectrometer or even single user. Here we introduce a web-based service that provides a database for the deposition, annotation and optimisation of NMR experiments. The application uses a Wiki environment to enable the collaborative development of pulse sequences. It also provides a flexible mechanism to automatically generate NMR experiments from deposited sequences. Multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins and other macromolecules consume significant resources, in terms of both spectrometer time and effort required to analyse the results. Systematic analysis of simulated experiments can enable optimal allocation of NMR resources for structural analysis of proteins. Our web-based application (http://nmrplus.org) provides all the necessary information, includes the auxiliaries (waveforms, decoupling sequences etc.), for analysis of experiments by accurate numerical simulation of multidimensional NMR experiments. The online database of the NMR experiments, together with a systematic evaluation of their sensitivity, provides a framework for selection of the most efficient pulse sequences. The development of such a framework provides a basis for the collaborative optimisation of pulse sequences by the NMR community, with the benefits of this collective effort being available to the whole community.

  17. Video as a Medium for Sharing Experience. Opportunities to Learn No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Educational Communications and Technology, Washington, DC.

    Satellite telecasts and videotape are discussed in this two-part paper, which is based on the preliminary experiences of Project BEST (Basic Education Skills through Technology), a dissemination project for communicating about the use of technology in teaching basic skills, and providing functional experience with new information communication…

  18. Support for Cooperative Experiments in e-Science: From Scientific Workflows to Knowledge Sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belloum, A.S.Z.; Cushing, R.; Koulouzis, S.; Korkhov, V.; Vasunin, D.; Guevara-Masis, V.; Zhao, Z.; Bubak, M.; Roterman-Konieczna, I.

    2013-01-01

    The term e-Science describes computational and data-intensive science. It has become a complementary experiment paradigm alongside the traditional in vivo and in vitro experiment paradigms. e-Science opens new doors for scientists and with it, it exposes a number of challenges such as how to

  19. Hospital-Based Nurses’ Perceptions of the Adoption of Web 2.0 Tools for Knowledge Sharing, Learning, Social Interaction and the Production of Collective Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Web 2.0 provides a platform or a set of tools such as blogs, wikis, really simple syndication (RSS), podcasts, tags, social bookmarks, and social networking software for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in a virtual environment. Web 2.0 is also becoming increasingly popular in e-learning and e-social communities. Objectives The objectives were to investigate how Web 2.0 tools can be applied for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in the nursing domain and to investigate what behavioral perceptions are involved in the adoption of Web 2.0 tools by nurses. Methods The decomposed technology acceptance model was applied to construct the research model on which the hypotheses were based. A questionnaire was developed based on the model and data from nurses (n = 388) were collected from late January 2009 until April 30, 2009. Pearson’s correlation analysis and t tests were used for data analysis. Results Intention toward using Web 2.0 tools was positively correlated with usage behavior (r = .60, P collective intelligence. PMID:22079851

  20. Hospital-based nurses' perceptions of the adoption of Web 2.0 tools for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction and the production of collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Adela S M

    2011-11-11

    Web 2.0 provides a platform or a set of tools such as blogs, wikis, really simple syndication (RSS), podcasts, tags, social bookmarks, and social networking software for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in a virtual environment. Web 2.0 is also becoming increasingly popular in e-learning and e-social communities. The objectives were to investigate how Web 2.0 tools can be applied for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in the nursing domain and to investigate what behavioral perceptions are involved in the adoption of Web 2.0 tools by nurses. The decomposed technology acceptance model was applied to construct the research model on which the hypotheses were based. A questionnaire was developed based on the model and data from nurses (n = 388) were collected from late January 2009 until April 30, 2009. Pearson's correlation analysis and t tests were used for data analysis. Intention toward using Web 2.0 tools was positively correlated with usage behavior (r = .60, P r = .72, P r = .58, P r = .45, P r = .7, P r = .64, P r = .60,P r = .004, P r = .47, P r = .24,P r = .45, P r = .41,P r = .69,P learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence.

  1. Using a shared governance structure to evaluate the implementation of a new model of care: the shared experience of a performance improvement committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Mary; Parchen, Debra; Geraci, Marilla; Brenholtz, Roger; Knisely-Carrigan, Denise; Hastings, Clare

    2013-10-01

    Sustaining change in the behaviors and habits of experienced practicing nurses can be frustrating and daunting, even when changes are based on evidence. Partnering with an active shared governance structure to communicate change and elicit feedback is an established method to foster partnership, equity, accountability, and ownership. Few recent exemplars in the literature link shared governance, change management, and evidence-based practice to transitions in care models. This article describes an innovative staff-driven approach used by nurses in a shared governance performance improvement committee to use evidence-based practice in determining the best methods to evaluate the implementation of a new model of care.

  2. Drawing and acting as user experience research tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleury, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of participant-generated drawings and drama workshops as user experience research methods. In spite of the lack of background literature on how drawings can generate useful insights on HCI issues, drawings have been successfully used in other research fields....... On the contrary, drama workshops seem to be increasingly popular in recent participatory design research. After briefly introducing such previous work, three case studies are presented, illustrating the use of drawing and drama workshops when investigating the relationship between media technology users and two...

  3. Support for cooperative experiments in VL-e: from scientific workflows to knowledge sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Z.; Belloum, A.; Bubak, M.; Hertzberger, B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in Internet and Grid technologies have greatly enhanced processes in scientific experiments; not only computing and data intensive tasks become feasible, but also large scale collaborations between resources and users are now possible. Scientific workflows encode intelligence of

  4. The Dockstore: enabling modular, community-focused sharing of Docker-based genomics tools and workflows [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. O'Connor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As genomic datasets continue to grow, the feasibility of downloading data to a local organization and running analysis on a traditional compute environment is becoming increasingly problematic. Current large-scale projects, such as the ICGC PanCancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG, the Data Platform for the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, and the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Center for Translational Genomics, are using cloud-based infrastructure to both host and perform analysis across large data sets. In PCAWG, over 5,800 whole human genomes were aligned and variant called across 14 cloud and HPC environments; the processed data was then made available on the cloud for further analysis and sharing. If run locally, an operation at this scale would have monopolized a typical academic data centre for many months, and would have presented major challenges for data storage and distribution. However, this scale is increasingly typical for genomics projects and necessitates a rethink of how analytical tools are packaged and moved to the data. For PCAWG, we embraced the use of highly portable Docker images for encapsulating and sharing complex alignment and variant calling workflows across highly variable environments. While successful, this endeavor revealed a limitation in Docker containers, namely the lack of a standardized way to describe and execute the tools encapsulated inside the container. As a result, we created the Dockstore (https://dockstore.org, a project that brings together Docker images with standardized, machine-readable ways of describing and running the tools contained within. This service greatly improves the sharing and reuse of genomics tools and promotes interoperability with similar projects through emerging web service standards developed by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH.

  5. A pedagogical design pattern framework for sharing experiences and enhancing communities of practice within online and blended learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Neutszky-Wulff, Chresteria; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    for teachers at the University of Copenhagen a new and simpler pedagogical design pattern framework was developed for interfaculty sharing of experiences and enhancing communities of practice in relation to online and blended learning across the university. The framework of pedagogical design patterns were...... applied to describe the learning design in four online and blended learning courses within different academic disciplines: Classical Greek, Biostatistics, Environmental Management in Europe, and Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation. Future perspectives for using the framework for developing...... new E-learning patterns for online and blended learning courses are discussed....

  6. Optimization of tau identification in ATLAS experiment using multivariate tools

    CERN Document Server

    Wolter, M

    2007-01-01

    In elementary particle physics the efficient analysis of huge amount of collected data require the use of sophisticated selection and analysis algorithms. We have implemented a Support Vector Machine (SVM) integrated with the CERN TMVA/ROOT package. SVM approach to signal and background separation is based on building a separating hyperplane defined by the support vectors. The margin between them and the hyperplane is maximized. The extensions to a non-linear separation is performed by mapping the input vectors into a high dimensional space, in which data can be linearly separated. The use of kernel functions allows to perform computations in a high dimension feature space without explicitly knowing a mapping function. Our SVM implementation is based on Platt's Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO) algorithm and includes various kernel functions like a linear function, polynomial and Gaussian. The identification of hadronic decays of tau leptons in the ATLAS experiment using a tau1P3P package is performed usi...

  7. Experience of Integrating Various Technological Tools into the Study and Future Teaching of Mathematics Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorev, Dvora; Gurevich-Leibman, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents our experience of integrating technological tools into our mathematics teaching (in both disciplinary and didactic courses) for student-teachers. In the first cycle of our study, a variety of technological tools were used (e.g., dynamic software, hypertexts, video and applets) in teaching two disciplinary mathematics courses.…

  8. Terrestrial perturbation experiments as an environmental assessment tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1980-08-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was initially interpreted as requiring full disclosure of the environmental impacts of a federal action. Because of the limitations of time, money, and manpower, this requirement that all impacts be considered has led to superficial analysis of many important impacts. The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has provided a solution to this problem by reinterpreting NEPA as requiring analysis of those impacts which have significant bearing on decision making. Because assessment resources can now be concentrated on a few critical issues, it should be possible to perform field perturbation experiments to provide direct evidence of the effects of a specific mixture of pollutants or physical disturbances on the specific receiving ecosystem. Techniques are described for field simulation of gaseous and particulate air pollution, soil pollutants, disturbance of the earth's surface, and disturbance of wildlife. These techniques are discussed in terms of their realism, cost, and the restrictions which they place on the measurement of ecological parameters.

  9. Building collaboration through shared actions: The experience of the Global Network for Disaster Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Gibson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article asks how the emergent Global Network for Disaster Reduction has built collaboration and impact. Observation of the network’s journey nuanced the researcher’s initial hypothesis in marked ways. A ‘reflective practitioner’ perspective is adopted, locating action within two relevant theoretical frameworks to aid understanding and define future progress. Development showed an early emphasis on a ‘community of practice’ model. However, this appeared ineffective in creating the intended collaboration and led to the recognition of the power of shared action. This observation is framed within the thinking of Freire (1996 on action and reflection as a means of empowerment. The political dimension of the network’s activity is recognised, and is related to Gaventa’s (1980 thinking on the creation of political space. The article attempts to show that combining cycles of action and reflection in the network’s activity (i.e. creating a practitioner focus with a wider investigation of relevant literature and thinking can be helpful in framing understanding and determining future strategy. It concludes by suggesting that a proposed framework of ‘communities of praxis’ may have a broader application in the development of networks.

  10. The Shared Experiences: Facilitating Successful Transfer of Women and Underrepresented Minorities in STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dimitra Lynette; Starobin, Soko S.; Laanan, Frankie Santos

    2013-01-01

    This chapter addresses critical issues related to the transfer success of women and underrepresented minorities (URMs) in STEM disciplines and will highlight implications for fostering a successful transfer experience for these populations. For the purposes of this chapter, URMs is defined by the National Science Foundation to include African…

  11. Experiencing Experiments: A Multiplayer Game for Sharing Ideas--Crusoe Gives Way to Gulliver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Martin; Formica, Piero

    2012-01-01

    In this latest in a series of articles on the innovative use of experimental business laboratories for high-expectation entrepreneurs, the authors focus on the networking benefits of business lab experiments. Distinguishing between "Robinson Crusoe" types, whose tendency is to operate in isolation, and "Lemuel Gulliver" types, who rely on…

  12. Learning from the experiences of others: four forest landowner cooperatives share their stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela Jakes

    2006-01-01

    For a community or group investigating the appropriateness of a cooperative as a means for organizing local landowners to accomplish forest management or marketing objectives, it is useful to hear about the experiences of other communities or cooperatives. For the conference, we put together a series of video case studies, summarizing the stories of four forest...

  13. High modulus asphalt (EME) technology transfer to South Africa and Australia: shared experiences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes experiences with the implementation of French enrobés à module élevé (EME) (high modulus asphalt) technology in South Africa and Australia. Tentative performance specifications for EME mixes were set in the two countries based...

  14. Experiential and Outdoor Education: The Participant Experience Shared through Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirásek, Ivo; Plevová, Irena; Jirásková, Miroslava; Dvorácková, Adéla

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of mind maps capturing the experiences of the participants in an experiential and outdoor education course. The method of mind mapping is usually limited to a quantitative scoring analysis and comparative content analysis of concepts. As a consequence, the visual elements of the information are usually ignored, but…

  15. Incorporating Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability into a Business Course: A Shared Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Obeua

    2012-01-01

    The author discusses how corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability were incorporated into a business course by using 4 assignments, a project with a CSR question, 7 ethics cases, and 17 ethics scenarios tied to a corporate code of ethics. The author also discusses student evaluation of CSR learning experience, strengths and…

  16. Braille and Tactile Graphics: Youths with Visual Impairments Share Their Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, L. Penny; Herzberg, Tina S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Data were collected from youths with visual impairment about their experiences with tactile graphics and braille materials used in mathematics and science classes. Methods: Youths answered questions and explored four tactile graphics made using different production methods. They located specific information on each graphic and shared…

  17. Professors' and students' perceptions and experiences of computational simulations as learning tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magana de Leon, Alejandra De Jesus

    Computational simulations are becoming a critical component of scientific and engineering research, and now are becoming an important component for learning. This dissertation provides findings from a multifaceted research study exploring the ways computational simulations have been perceived and experienced as learning tools by instructors and students. Three studies were designed with an increasing focus on the aspects of learning and instructing with computational simulation tools. Study One used a student survey with undergraduate and graduate students whose instructors enhanced their teaching using online computational tools. Results of this survey were used to identify students' perceptions and experiences with these simulations as learning tools. The results provided both an evaluation of the instructional design and an indicator of which instructors were selected in Study Two. Study Two used a phenomenographic research design resulting in a two dimensional outcome space with six qualitatively different ways instructors perceived their learning outcomes associated with using simulation tools as part of students' learning experiences. Results from this work provide a framework for identifying major learning objectives to promote learning with computational simulation tools. Study Three used a grounded theory methodology to expand on instructors' learning objectives to include their perceptions of formative assessment and pedagogy. These perceptions were compared and contrasted with students' perceptions associated with learning with computational tools. The study is organized around three phases and analyzed as a collection of case studies focused on the instructors and their students' perceptions and experiences of computational simulations as learning tools. This third study resulted in a model for using computational simulations as learning tools. This model indicates the potential of integrating the computational simulation tools into formal learning

  18. Variations of Reasoning in Equal Sharing of Children Who Experience Low Achievement in Mathematics: Competence in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hunt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For children with persistent mathematics difficulties, research and practice espouses that an altered kind of mathematics instruction is necessary due to sustained performance differences. Yet, a critical issue in mathematics education rests in the question of why research locates the problem within these children. In this paper, we challenge a longstanding assumption about the type of mathematics children with low achievement in mathematics “need” along with how these children are positioned in terms of mathematical thinking and reasoning. Our aim in this work is to identify ways of reasoning evident in the partitioning activity of 43 fifth-grade children as they solved equal sharing situations independent of instruction over ten sessions. Results reveal three themes of reasoning that show a resemblance between these children’s reasoning and existing frameworks of reasoning in equal sharing problems found in prior research among children who did not show low achievement in mathematics. We discuss the results in terms of the problem of a continued conceptualization of low achieving students’ need for specific kinds of teaching and learning experiences and/or detached instructional experiences in school. We advocate for an increase in research that examines how teachers can support participation of these children in mathematics classrooms such that children might develop powerful mathematics conceptions.

  19. Elective surgical referral guidelines - background educational material or essential shared decision making tool? A survey of GPs' in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Steven

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate general practitioners' (GPs' attitudes to guidelines for elective surgical referral in England. To understand their use of guidelines, and attitudes to shared decision making in the referral decision. Methods A questionnaire was developed which investigated attitudes to and use of guidelines. It was given to a stratified random sample 30% (n = 310 drawn from GP lists of 10 English health districts (primary care trusts (PCTs. GPs were invited to respond online, by telephone, fax or post. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and backwards stepwise logistic regression. Results Responses were representative of GPs in England, but (despite up to 6 contacts per non-responder the overall response rate was 41.6% (n = 129; with the range across PCTs of 25-61%. Most responding GPs indicated support for referral guidelines but 18% reported that they had never used them. Less than three per cent reported use for most or all referral decisions. The odds of using guidelines decreased with increasing age, with a ten year increase in age associated with halving odds of use (OR = 0.53, 95%CI = 0.29-0.90. Over 50% of GPs wanted good access to electronic guidelines with expert information and advice on guideline availability. Almost all (>89% GPs agreed with sharing referral decisions with patients. Female doctors (OR = 5.2, 95%CI: 1.02-26.3 were more likely to agree with this than male GPs as were those working in larger compared to small or single handed practices (OR = 5.3, 95%CI: 1.4-19.9. Conclusions This group of responding GPs was supportive of guidelines but used them in different ways. Referral guidelines should have an educational component for background reading; include key messages for internalisation and application; and incorporate mechanisms to facilitate accessibility and appropriate shared decision making with patients.

  20. Elective surgical referral guidelines--background educational material or essential shared decision making tool? A survey of GPs' in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Naomi; Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Spitzer, David; Martin, Steven; Forde, Ian; Clarke, Aileen

    2011-08-30

    To investigate general practitioners' (GPs') attitudes to guidelines for elective surgical referral in England. To understand their use of guidelines, and attitudes to shared decision making in the referral decision. A questionnaire was developed which investigated attitudes to and use of guidelines. It was given to a stratified random sample 30% (n = 310) drawn from GP lists of 10 English health districts (primary care trusts (PCTs)). GPs were invited to respond online, by telephone, fax or post. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and backwards stepwise logistic regression. Responses were representative of GPs in England, but (despite up to 6 contacts per non-responder) the overall response rate was 41.6% (n = 129; with the range across PCTs of 25-61%). Most responding GPs indicated support for referral guidelines but 18% reported that they had never used them. Less than three per cent reported use for most or all referral decisions. The odds of using guidelines decreased with increasing age, with a ten year increase in age associated with halving odds of use (OR = 0.53, 95%CI = 0.29-0.90). Over 50% of GPs wanted good access to electronic guidelines with expert information and advice on guideline availability. Almost all (>89%) GPs agreed with sharing referral decisions with patients. Female doctors (OR = 5.2, 95%CI: 1.02-26.3) were more likely to agree with this than male GPs as were those working in larger compared to small or single handed practices (OR = 5.3, 95%CI: 1.4-19.9). This group of responding GPs was supportive of guidelines but used them in different ways. Referral guidelines should have an educational component for background reading; include key messages for internalisation and application; and incorporate mechanisms to facilitate accessibility and appropriate shared decision making with patients.

  1. Materials and creation in design and architecture: sharing experiences for a creative economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Dantas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Entre 5 e 23 de setembro de 2016 a Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo da Universidade de São Paulo sediou o evento Materiais e Criação em Design e Arquitetura: compartilhando experiências para a economia criativa. Este evento foi organizado em parceria entre o LabDesign FAU USP e o Materiali e Design, do Politecnico di Milano, como parte das atividades do projeto Pesquisa em materiais e inovação para aplicação nas indústrias criativas nos campos do design e da arquitetura: a experiência do Politecnico di Milano trazida para o contexto brasileiro. As atividades contaram com a presença da Profa. Dra. Barbara Del Curto, docente e pesquisadora na área de materiais para o design e coordenadora do acervo Materiali e Design, materioteca na mesma instituição em funcionamento desde o ano 2000.

  2. Experiences in the war zone, shared narratives, and shifting identities:systematic review of qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Kim V.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review examines qualitative research into the mental health issues encountered by military veteran personnel deployed to a combat zone. A small number of researchers have examined the often information-rich and complex experiences of returning personnel using a qualitative approach to data collection and analysis. However, qualitative studies have not often been appraised or synthesized. Using a qualitative method for conducting systematic review, the objectives of this articl...

  3. Shared responsibility: school nurses' experience of collaborating in school-based interprofessional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuterswärd, Marina; Hylander, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    The Swedish Education Act (2011) mandated a new combination of services to boost students' physical health, their mental health and special education through interprofessional pupil health and well-being (PH) teams. For Swedish school nurses, providing these services presents new challenges. To describe how Swedish school nurses experience their work and collaboration within the interprofessional PH teams. Twenty-five school nurses (SNs) were interviewed in five focus groups. Content analysis was used to examine the data and to explore SNs' workplace characteristics by using the components of the sense of coherence (SOC) framework. SNs' experiences of work and collaboration within PH teams can be described using three domains: the expectations of others regarding SNs' roles, SNs' contributions to pupils' health and well-being, and collaboration among SNs within PH teams. The results indicate a discrepancy between SNs' own experiences of their contribution and their experiences of other professionals' expectations regarding those contributions. Some duties were perceived as expected, comprehensible, manageable and meaningful, while other duties - though expected - were perceived as less meaningful, taking time away from school-related matters. Other duties that were not explicitly expected - promoting general health and creating safety zones for pupils, teachers and parents, for example - were nonetheless perceived as meaningful. Collaboration within PH teams was considered meaningful, comprehensible and manageable only if the objectives of the team meetings were clear, if other professionals were available and if professional roles on the team were clearly communicated. The SNs reported a lack of clarity regarding their role in PH and its implementation in schools, indicating that professionals in PH teams need to discuss collaboration so as to find their niche given the new conditions. SOC theory emerged as a useful framework for discussing concrete work

  4. Shared Etiology of Psychotic Experiences and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavos, Helena M S; Eley, Thalia C; McGuire, Philip; Plomin, Robert; Cardno, Alastair G; Freeman, Daniel; Ronald, Angelica

    2016-09-01

    Psychotic disorders and major depression, both typically adult-onset conditions, often co-occur. At younger ages psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms are often reported in the community. We used a genetically sensitive longitudinal design to investigate the relationship between psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms in adolescence. A representative community sample of twins from England and Wales was employed. Self-rated depressive symptoms, paranoia, hallucinations, cognitive disorganization, grandiosity, anhedonia, and parent-rated negative symptoms were collected when the twins were age 16 (N = 9618) and again on a representative subsample 9 months later (N = 2873). Direction and aetiology of associations were assessed using genetically informative cross-lagged models. Depressive symptoms were moderately correlated with paranoia, hallucinations, and cognitive disorganization. Lower correlations were observed between depression and anhedonia, and depression and parent-rated negative symptoms. Nonsignificant correlations were observed between depression and grandiosity. Largely the same genetic effects influenced depression and paranoia, depression and hallucinations, and depression and cognitive disorganization. Modest overlap in environmental influences also played a role in the associations. Significant bi-directional longitudinal associations were observed between depression and paranoia. Hallucinations and cognitive disorganization during adolescence were found to impact later depression, even after controlling for earlier levels of depression. Our study shows that psychotic experiences and depression, as traits in the community, have a high genetic overlap in mid-adolescence. Future research should test the prediction stemming from our longitudinal results, namely that reducing or ameliorating positive and cognitive psychotic experiences in adolescence would decrease later depressive symptoms. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  5. Sharing problem gamblers’ experiences: a text analysis of gambling stories via online forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Caputo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored some common thematic domains which characterised problem gambling experiences of adult Italian participants with the aim of understanding motivations and expectations of problem gamblers and thus promoting better psychological interventions. Emotional Text Analysis was performed on 24 problem gambling stories collected via online forum in order to detect the main themes (cluster analysis and latent factors (correspondence analysis emerging in gamblers’ narratives. Five themes emerged which respectively refer to guilt (16.15%, obsession (27.60%, disease (30.77%, risk taking (15.89% and emotion regulation (4.17%. In addition, four synthetic dimensions were detected which consent to account the variability of problem gambling experience based on: struggle against compulsion (F1, ambivalent acceptance of gambling (F2, interpersonal detachment (F3 and illusion of control (F4. From the emotional experience shaping the problem gamblers’ narratives, this research study allows the identification of some factors which can contribute to quality research on problem gambling and which can provide some useful suggestion for treatment.

  6. Evaluation of the Families SHARE workbook: an educational tool outlining disease risk and healthy guidelines to reduce risk of heart disease, diabetes, breast cancer and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehly, Laura M; Morris, Bronwyn A; Skapinsky, Kaley; Goergen, Andrea; Ludden, Amanda

    2015-11-13

    Common diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer are etiologically complex with multiple risk factors (e.g., environment, genetic, lifestyle). These risk factors tend to cluster in families, making families an important social context for intervention and lifestyle-focused disease prevention. The Families Sharing Health Assessment and Risk Evaluation (SHARE) workbook was designed as an educational tool outlining family health history based risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer. The current paper describes the steps taken to develop and evaluate the workbook employing a user-centered design approach. The workbook was developed in four steps, culminating in an evaluation focusing on understanding and usability of the tool. The evaluation was based on two Phases of data collected from a sample of mothers of young children in the Washington, D.C., area. A baseline assessment and follow-up approximately two weeks after receipt of the workbook were conducted, as well as focus groups with participants. The design of the workbook was refined in response to participant feedback from the first evaluation Phase and subsequently re-evaluated with a new sample. After incorporating user-based feedback and revising the workbook, Phase 2 evaluation results indicated that understanding of the workbook components improved for all sections (from 6.26 to 6.81 on a 7-point scale). In addition, 100% of users were able to use the algorithm to assess their disease risk and over 60% used the algorithm to assess family members' disease risk. At follow-up, confidence to increase fruit, vegetable and fiber intake improved significantly, as well. The Families SHARE workbook was developed and evaluated resulting in a family health history tool that is both understandable and usable by key stakeholders. This educational tool will be used in intervention studies assessing the effectiveness of family genomics health educators who use the Families

  7. Perceived Benefits, Harms, and Views About How to Share Data Responsibly: A Qualitative Study of Experiences With and Attitudes Toward Data Sharing Among Research Staff and Community Representatives in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Tangseefa, Decha; Somsaman, Aimatcha; Chunsuttiwat, Tri; Nosten, François; Day, Nicholas P J; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The Thailand Major Overseas Programme coordinates large multi-center studies in tropical medicine and generates vast amounts of data. As the data sharing movement gains momentum, we wanted to understand attitudes and experiences of relevant stakeholders about what constitutes good data sharing practice. We conducted 15 interviews and three focus groups discussions involving 25 participants and found that they generally saw data sharing as something positive. Data sharing was viewed as a means to contribute to scientific progress and lead to better quality analysis, better use of resources, greater accountability, and more outputs. However, there were also important reservations including potential harms to research participants, their communities, and the researchers themselves. Given these concerns, several areas for discussion were identified: data standardization, appropriate consent models, and governance. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Developing Ethical Practices for Public Health Research Data Sharing in South Africa: The Views and Experiences From a Diverse Sample of Research Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Spencer G; Silaigwana, Blessing; Wassenaar, Douglas; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The abundance of South African clinical and public health research data has the potential to unlock important and valuable future advances in biomedical science. Amid increasing calls for more effective sharing of individual-level data, commitment to promote access to research data is evident within South Africa's public research sector, but national guidance and regulation are absent. This qualitative study examined the perceptions, experiences and concerns of 32 research stakeholders about data-sharing practices. There was consensus about the utility of data sharing in publicly funded health research. However, disparate views emerged about the possible harms and benefits of sharing data and how these should be weighed. The relative dearth of policies governing data-sharing practices needs to be addressed and a framework of support developed that incentivizes data-sharing practices for researchers that are both ethical and effective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Sharing Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Refslund Christensen, Dorthe

    (s) displaying photographs, poetry, stories and expressions of grief and longing. They take part in expressions of empathy for others by lighting candles for other people's loved ones, they share their personal experiences in different chatrooms and the site offers services as a calendar displaying anniversaries...... allowing creating unique and editable profiles, adding personal content and sharing it with other people in your network(s) AND systems for publishing your own life: becoming visible to others, being connected and being observed. More and more sites turn up on the Internet that facilitates the process...

  10. Learning Science in the 21st century - a shared experience between schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tânia; Soares, Rosa; Ruas, Fátima

    2015-04-01

    Problem Based Learning is considered an innovative teaching and learning inquiry methodology that is student centered, focused in the resolution of an authentic problem and in which the teacher acts like a facilitator of the work in small groups. In this process, it is expected that students develop attitudinal, procedural and communication skills, in addition to the cognitive typically valued. PBL implementation also allows the use of multiple educational strategies, like laboratorial experiments, analogue modeling or ICT (video animations, electronic presentations or software simulations, for instance), which can potentiate a more interactive environment in the classroom. In this study, taken in three schools in the north of Portugal, which resulted from the cooperation between three science teachers, with a 75 individuals sample, were examined students' opinions about the main difficulties and strengths concerning the PBL methodology, having as a common denominator the use of a laboratorial experiment followed by an adequate digital software as educational resource to interpret the obtained results and to make predictions (e.g. EarthQuake, Virtual Quake, Stellarium). The data collection methods were based on direct observation and questionnaires. The results globally show that this educational approach motivates students' towards science, helping them to solve problems from daily life and that the use of software was relevant, as well as the collaborative working. The cognitive strand continues to be the most valued by pupils.

  11. Expanding the Horizon: A Journey to Explore and Share Effective Geoscience Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Indian Natural Resource Science and Engineering Program (INRSEP) has worked diligently over the past 40 + years to ensure the success of Tribal, Indigenous and Underrepresented undergraduate and graduate students in geoscience and natural resources fields of study. Central to this success has been the development of cultural relevant research opportunities directed by Tribal people. The research experiences have been initiated to address culturally relevant challenges on Tribal and non-Tribal lands. It has become critically important to ensure students have multiple research experiences across North America as well as throughout the continent. The INRSEP community has found creating and maintaining relationships with organizations like the Geoscience Alliance, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MSPHD's) and the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program has greatly improved the success of students matriculating to graduate STEM programs. These relationships also serve an immense capacity in tracking students, promoting best practices in research development and assessing outcomes. The presentation will highlight lessons learned on how to 1) Develop a diverse cohort or 'community' of student researchers; 2) Evolve intergenerational mentoring processes and outcomes; 3) Tether to related research and programs; and Foster the broader impact of geoscience research and outcomes.

  12. Using Web-based Technologies and Tools in Future Choreographers’ Training: British Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidyuk Dmytro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the problem of using effective web-based technologies and tools in teaching choreography in British higher education institutions has been discussed. Researches on the usage of web-based technologies and tools for practical dance courses in choreographers’ professional training at British higher education institutions by such British scholars as L. Bracey, J. Buckroyd, J. Butterworth, B. Cohen, A. Green Gilbert, R. Lakes, L. Lavender, G. Morris, S. Popat, J. Smith-Autard, E. Warburton, D. Watson and others have been studied. The list of web-based technologies and tools used to improve the educational process, inspire and encourage both teachers and students to develop their critical thinking and reveal their potential has been presented. The most common of them have been characterized. They are: The Dance Designer, Wholodance, The Choreographer’s Notebook, Multimodal Video Annotator and DanceForms. It has been found out that one of the possible ways how to overcome the problems while incorporating web-based technologies and tools into the traditional system of education and teaching choreography, in particular, is the balanced combination of web-technologies and tools with a participative approach to teacher-student interaction. It has been concluded that web-based technologies and tools can be categorized as motivational methods appealing to students’ cognitive, emotional and behavioural engagement characterized by such attributes as innovation, easy usage and sharing, content control, motivational appeal, etc.

  13. Experiences of Playscan: Interviews with users of a responsible gambling tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Forsström

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Online gambling, encompassing a wide variety of activities and around-the-clock access, can be a potential risk factor for gamblers who tend to gamble excessively. Yet, the advent of online gambling has enabled responsible gambling (RG features that may help individuals to limit their gambling behaviour. One of these features is RG tools that track gamblers' behaviour, performs risk assessments and provides advice to gamblers. This study investigated users' views and experiences of the RG tool Playscan from a qualitative perspective using a semi-structured interview. The tool performs a risk assessment on a three-step scale (low, medium and high risk. Users from every risk category were included. Twenty interviews were carried out and analysed using thematic analysis. Two main themes with associated sub-themes were identified: “Usage of Playscan and the gambling site” and “Experiences of Playscan”. Important experiences in the sub-themes were lack of feedback from the tool and confusion when signing up to use Playscan. These experiences counteracted positive attitudes that should have promoted usage of the tool. Providing more feedback directly to users is a suggested solution to increase usage of the RG tool.

  14. Human performance tools in nuclear power plants. Introduction, implementation and experiences; Human Performance Tools in Kernkraftwerken. Einfuehrung, Umsetzung und Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexheimer, Kai; Bassing, Gerd [Dexcon Consulting GmbH, Neuhausen (Switzerland); Kreuzer, Peter [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Essenbach (Germany). Kernkraftwerk Isar

    2015-06-01

    The basis of safe nuclear power plant operation (NPP) and a strong safety culture is the professional application of Human Performance Optimisation Tools (HPO). HPO trainings have been carried out by German NPPs for a number of years and recently also by Swiss NPPs. This article describes the origination, the bases, experiences and thereby the special features of the HPO training programme applied by German NPP operators. Moreover, this article provides an outlook on future developments - in particular when considering the requirements of the ongoing phase out of nuclear energy in Germany.

  15. Customer convergence: patients, physicians, and employees share in the experience and evaluation of healthcare quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul Alexander; Wolosin, Robert J; Gavran, Goran

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the interrelationships between three categories of service quality in healthcare delivery organizations: patient, employee, and physician satisfaction. Using the largest and most representative national databases available, the study compares the evaluations of hospital care by more than 2 million patients, 150,000 employees, and 40,000 physicians. The results confirm the relationship connecting employees' satisfaction and loyalty to their patients' satisfaction and loyalty. Patients' satisfaction and loyalty were also strongly associated with medical staff physicians' evaluations of overall satisfaction and loyalty to the hospital. Similarly, hospital employees' satisfaction and loyalty were related to the medical staff physicians' satisfaction with and loyalty to the hospital. Based upon the strength of the interrelationships, individual measures and subscales can serve as leverage points for improving linked outcomes. Patients, physicians, and employees, the three co-creators of health, agree on the evaluation of the quality of that service experience. The results demonstrate that promoting patient-centeredness, enhancing medical staff relations, and improving the satisfaction and loyalty of employees are not necessarily three separate activities in competition for hospital resources and marketing leadership attention.

  16. John Dewey in Mexico: A Shared Experience in the Rural World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xóchil Taylor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the influence of John Dewey’s ideas on the Mexican pedagogical theories and rural schools in the first decades of the twentieth century, and Dewey’s own experience in Mexico. We look at how Deweyan thought was expressed mainly through educational ideas that shaped the design of policies aimed at improving schooling in rural areas, promoting practices based on community-based «active learning». One of John Dewey’s peculiarities is that the American pedagogue had the opportunity to see how some of his main ideas were appropriated and implemented in the real world, generally in situations fuelled by the desire for social change. In the Mexican context in particular, such change was impelled by the social ideology of the Mexican Revolution, and the life stories of the protagonists of the ensuing pedagogical transformation, the conditions furthering the possibility of new education policies, and above all, the communities who participated in the material and symbolic construction of a new form of schooling are discussed.

  17. A Pilot study of the Sharing Risk Information Tool (ShaRIT) for Families with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Individuals who carry deleterious BRCA mutations face significantly elevated risks of breast, ovarian, and other cancers. These individuals are also responsible for informing relatives of their increased risk for carrying the family BRCA mutation. Few interventions have been developed to facilitate this family communication process. Methods We developed the Sharing Risk Information Tool (ShaRIT), a personalized educational intervention, to support BRCA carriers as they discuss BRCA positive results and their implications with relatives. We conducted a pilot study of 19 BRCA carriers identified through the University of California San Francisco Cancer Risk Program. Our study had two aims: 1) to assess the feasibility and acceptability of ShaRIT, and 2) describe characteristics associated with increased family communication and BRCA testing. Participants in our study were divided into two groups: those who had not received ShaRIT as part of their genetic counseling protocol (control group, n = 10) and those who received ShaRIT (n = 9). Results All 9 women who received ShaRIT reported that it was a useful resource. Characteristics associated with increased sharing and testing included: female gender, degree of relationship, and frequency of communication. Increased pedigree knowledge showed a trend toward higher rates of sharing. Conclusions Both participants and genetic counselors considered ShaRIT a well-received, comprehensive tool for disseminating individual risk information and clinical care guidelines to Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome families. Because of this, ShaRIT has been incorporated as standard of care at our institution. In the future we hope to evaluate the effects of ShaRIT on family communication and family testing in larger populations of BRCA positive families. PMID:22494806

  18. Creating, curating, and sharing online faculty development resources: the medical education in cases series experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Teresa M; Thoma, Brent; Lin, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    It is difficult to engage clinicians in continuing medical education that does not focus on clinical expertise. Evolving online technologies (e.g., massive open online courses [MOOCs]) are disrupting and transforming medical education, but few online nonclinical professional development resources exist. In August 2013, the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine Web site launched the Medical Education in Cases (MEdIC) series to engage clinicians in an online professional development exercise. Each month, a complex, realistic scenario featuring a nonclinical medical education dilemma is published with accompanying discussion questions. A weeklong discussion is moderated on Twitter and the Web site. This discussion is curated to create a community commentary, which is published alongside presolicited expert responses. Case resources are available for download. The first six MEdIC cases (published August 2013-January 2014) emphasized different CanMEDS and/or Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education competencies. Median reader engagement metrics (interquartile range 25%-75%) in the first week following publication were 861 (634-1,114) pageviews, 767 (518-953) unique visitors from 326 (218-405) cities in 45 (32-50) countries, 30 (24-39) comments, 52 (40-56) tweets, 17 (13-30) Facebook Likes, and 5 (5-7) Google Plus +1s. The MEdIC series is proof of concept that online activities can engage clinicians in nonclinical professional development. The early experience suggests the connectivist nature of MEdIC allows for crowdsourcing solutions to ill-defined problems via the wisdom of readers. This methodology may also be effective for other nonclinical and medical education topics.

  19. Building Shared Experience to Advance Practical Application of Pathway-Based Toxicology: Liver Toxicity Mode-of-Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Catherine; Rae, Jessica Caverly; Goyak, Katy O.; Minsavage, Gary; Westmoreland, Carl; Andersen, Melvin; Avigan, Mark; Duché, Daniel; Harris, Georgina; Hartung, Thomas; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Kleensang, Andre; Landesmann, Brigitte; Martos, Suzanne; Matevia, Marilyn; Toole, Colleen; Rowan, Andrew; Schultz, Terry; Seed, Jennifer; Senior, John; Shah, Imran; Subramanian, Kalyanasundaram; Vinken, Mathieu; Watkins, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Summary A workshop sponsored by the Human Toxicology Project Consortium (HTPC), “Building Shared Experience to Advance Practical Application of Pathway-Based Toxicology: Liver Toxicity Mode-of-Action” brought together experts from a wide range of perspectives to inform the process of pathway development and to advance two prototype pathways initially developed by the European Commission Joint Research Center (JRC): liver-specific fibrosis and steatosis. The first half of the workshop focused on the theory and practice of pathway development; the second on liver disease and the two prototype pathways. Participants agreed pathway development is extremely useful for organizing information and found that focusing the theoretical discussion on a specific AOP is helpful. It is important to include several perspectives during pathway development, including information specialists, pathologists, human health and environmental risk assessors, and chemical and product manufacturers, to ensure the biology is well captured and end use is considered. PMID:24535319

  20. Complementary knowledge sharing: Experiences of nursing students participating in an educational exchange program between Madagascar and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoflåt, Ingrid; Razaonandrianina, Julie; Karlsen, Bjørg; Hansen, Britt Sætre

    2017-02-01

    To describe how Malagasy and Norwegian nursing students experience an educational exchange program in Madagascar. Previous studies show that nursing students participating in an educational exchange program enhanced their cultural knowledge and experienced personal growth. However, few studies have described two-way exchange programs, including experiences from both the hosts' and the guest students' perspectives. This study applies a descriptive qualitative design. Data were collected in 2015 by means of five semi-structured interviews with Malagasy students and two focus group interview sessions with Norwegian students. They were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The study was conducted in Madagascar. The data analyses revealed one main theme and two sub-themes related to the Malagasy and Norwegian nursing students' experiences. Main theme: complementary knowledge sharing; sub-themes: (1) learning from each other and (2) challenges of working together. The findings indicate that both the Malagasy and Norwegian nursing students experienced the exchange program as valuable and essential in exchanging knowledge. They also highlighted challenges, linked mainly to language barriers and the lack of available resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Are similar ones different? Determinant characteristics of management tool usage within companies sharing the same institutional environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele do Prado Daciê

    Full Text Available Abstract Technical literature describes local productive arrangements (LPAs as an institution. It also states that existing interaction links within their members foster them to act quite similarly. However, entrepreneurs and their characteristic attributes tend to distinguish their decisions. Therefore, according to such, this research examined if entrepreneur psychological characteristics would be able to influence management practices and the performance of companies sharing the same institutional environment. This study follows such objectives via an epistemologically positivist approach – quantitative view – and data gathering through forms used in 121 firms from clothing industry LPA in Parana Northwest. The research model has been tested through structural equation modelling techniques. Amongst findings, it may be observed management control practices have a 46.42% positive effect on company performance. Characteristics of entrepreneurial orientation have been able to positively influence the usage of management controls in 38.38%, and company performance in 14.90%. However, no statistical inferences regarding the individual's metacognitive ability of predicting the variables of entrepreneurial orientation, management controls and company performance have been carried out.

  2. Games Design as Learning Tool for Science: the Photonics Games Competition Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Chiarello, Fabio; Castellano, Maria Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Board Games have proved to be effective motivational and learning tools, in particular for Science and for STEM in general (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). In the ambit of the EU Project Photonics4All and of the UNESCO "2015 International Year of Light" we exploited not only the playing experience but also the process of creation of original board games with the objective to foster interest in Science among youth and general public and as learning tool for c...

  3. Experience Before Construction: An Immersive Virtual Reality Design Tool for Architectural Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Freiberg, Jacob B

    2015-01-01

    In architectural design, understanding and communicating how a building will be experienced is an ongoing challenge. However, recent developments in Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR) technology are revealing a new design representation tool capable of providing realistic experiences of computer-generated spaces. Still, the question of how such design representation tools should be designed is a subject of ongoing debate. Here we first outline potential usage scenarios and system requirements ba...

  4. DataUp: A tool to help researchers describe and share tabular data [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/48u

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly Strasser

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific datasets have immeasurable value, but they lose their value over time without proper documentation, long-term storage, and easy discovery and access. Across disciplines as diverse as astronomy, demography, archeology, and ecology, large numbers of small heterogeneous datasets (i.e., the long tail of data are especially at risk unless they are properly documented, saved, and shared. One unifying factor for many of these at-risk datasets is that they reside in spreadsheets. In response to this need, the California Digital Library (CDL partnered with Microsoft Research Connections and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to create the DataUp data management tool for Microsoft Excel. Many researchers creating these small, heterogeneous datasets use Excel at some point in their data collection and analysis workflow, so we were interested in developing a data management tool that fits easily into those work flows and minimizes the learning curve for researchers. The DataUp project began in August 2011. We first formally assessed the needs of researchers by conducting surveys and interviews of our target research groups: earth, environmental, and ecological scientists. We found that, on average, researchers had very poor data management practices, were not aware of data centers or metadata standards, and did not understand the benefits of data management or sharing. Based on our survey results, we composed a list of desirable components and requirements and solicited feedback from the community to prioritize potential features of the DataUp tool. These requirements were then relayed to the software developers, and DataUp was successfully launched in October 2012.

  5. Preceptors' experiences of using a competence assessment tool to assess undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Eimear; Kelly, Marcella; Byrne, Evelyn; Ui Chiardha, Toni; Mc Nicholas, Miriam; Montgomery, Adrienne

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Irish preceptors' experience of using a competence tool to assess undergraduate nursing students' clinical competence. This study used a mixed methods design. This study was conducted in two phases, the qualitative phase involved six focus group interviews to ascertain preceptors' experiences of using an assessment tool to assess clinical competence. The quantitative phase involved a descriptive survey measuring preceptors (N = 843) attitudes linked with the use of the assessment tool. The key themes that emerged from qualitative analysis were challenges of using the assessment tool, recognising competence and valuing adult learners. The challenges of using the tool included negotiating complex language and time constraints in completing assessments. Recognising competence revealed the use of intuition and subjectivity. While valuing adult learners acknowledged the reciprocal learning process between the preceptor and the learner. These findings reveal the inherent skills of preceptors to intuitively and subjectively recognise competence. The quantitative findings revealed merits and challenges for the preceptors using the assessment tool. In particular the complexity of the language was highlighted as an issue. A key recommendation from this research is the need to revise the assessment tool to support objective and subjective measurement of competence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving dementia care in nursing homes: experiences with a palliative care symptom-assessment tool (MIDOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Norbert; Larkin, Philip; Connolly, Michael; Rode, Peter; Elsner, Frank

    2014-04-01

    In the past decade, the palliative care approach has been used in the care of frail older people living with debilitating chronic conditions, including dementia. To describe health professionals' experiences of assessing the symptoms of people with dementia using a cancer-patient-oriented symptom-assessment tool from a palliative care context. This was a qualitative study that used semi-structured interviews (n=13) with clinical staff in three nursing homes prior to and following the implementation of the Minimal Documentation system for Palliative care (MIDOS) tool for assessing symptoms over a period of 6 weeks. Baseline interviews showed specific concerns about symptom assessment, such as uncertainty about underlying symptoms in residents who appeared to be in distress. After the implementation of the MIDOS tool, participants reported that daily use of the tool was perceived as helpful in evaluating symptoms other than pain and improved internal communication between staff regarding clinical decision making. The MIDOS tool was perceived as a helpful and valuable complement to existing tools. Participants expressed some concerns regarding the subjective nature of perceiving symptoms and clinical decision making. The use of tools such as the MIDOS tool has the potential to enhance the quality of palliative care in dementia care.

  7. BFPTool: a software tool for analysis of Biomembrane Force Probe experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmít, Daniel; Fouquet, Coralie; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Pincet, Frédéric; Trembleau, Alain; Zapotocky, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The Biomembrane Force Probe is an approachable experimental technique commonly used for single-molecule force spectroscopy and experiments on biological interfaces. The technique operates in the range of forces from 0.1 pN to 1000 pN. Experiments are typically repeated many times, conditions are often not optimal, the captured video can be unstable and lose focus; this makes efficient analysis challenging, while out-of-the-box non-proprietary solutions are not freely available. This dedicated tool was developed to integrate and simplify the image processing and analysis of videomicroscopy recordings from BFP experiments. A novel processing feature, allowing the tracking of the pipette, was incorporated to address a limitation of preceding methods. Emphasis was placed on versatility and comprehensible user interface implemented in a graphical form. An integrated analytical tool was implemented to provide a faster, simpler and more convenient way to process and analyse BFP experiments.

  8. A shared experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Rosemary

    2001-10-01

    Rey, Hilda and Agnes arrived from the Philippines to work in our nursing home in Carrickfergus last year. The senior staff at Tamlaght were keen to make sure the nurses were not too homesick and, although the bitterly cold Northern Irish winter was a long way from the warm climate of their home country, the natural warmth of the Irish hospitality helped, and they enjoyed the 'craic' with other young members of staff.

  9. Enhancements to the Image Analysis Tool for Core Punch Experiments and Simulations (vs. 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogden, John Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-06

    A previous paper (Hogden & Unal, 2012, Image Analysis Tool for Core Punch Experiments and Simulations) described an image processing computer program developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This program has proven useful so developement has been continued. In this paper we describe enhacements to the program as of 2014.

  10. Liverpool's Discovery: A University Library Applies a New Search Tool to Improve the User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This article features the University of Liverpool's arts and humanities library, which applies a new search tool to improve the user experience. In nearly every way imaginable, the Sydney Jones Library and the Harold Cohen Library--the university's two libraries that serve science, engineering, and medical students--support the lives of their…

  11. Board Games and Board Game Design as Learning Tools for Complex Scientific Concepts: Some Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Fabio; Castellano, Maria Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the authors report different experiences in the use of board games as learning tools for complex and abstract scientific concepts such as Quantum Mechanics, Relativity or nano-biotechnologies. In particular we describe "Quantum Race," designed for the introduction of Quantum Mechanical principles, "Lab on a chip,"…

  12. Classical Experiments Revisited: Smartphones and Tablet PCs as Experimental Tools in Acoustics and Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, P.; Hirth, M.; Gröber, S.; Kuhn, J.; Müller, A.

    2014-01-01

    Smartphones and tablets are used as experimental tools and for quantitative measurements in two traditional laboratory experiments for undergraduate physics courses. The Doppler effect is analyzed and the speed of sound is determined with an accuracy of about 5% using ultrasonic frequency and two smartphones, which serve as rotating sound emitter…

  13. Teacher Perceptions and Experiences Using the Apple iPad as an Instructional Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Carlos Raul, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The number of iPads in classrooms throughout the country is growing at a staggering rate. Educators and school districts are implementing iPad initiatives to enhance instruction. The purpose of this study was to examine high school teachers' experiences and perceptions after using the Apple iPad as an instructional tool in the classroom. An…

  14. Design and Development Tools for the Systems Engineering Experience Accelerator - Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-29

    Development Tools for the Systems Engineering Experience Accelerator – Part 3 Technical Report SERC-2017-TR-107 April 29, 2017 Principal...Stevens Institute of Technology: Peizhu Zhang Sponsor: Office of the DASD ( Systems Engineering ) Report No. SERC-2017-TR-107...April 29, 2017 ii Copyright © 2017 Stevens Institute of Technology, Systems Engineering

  15. Classroom-to-Home Connections: Young Children's Experiences with a Technology-Based Parent Involvement Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Bridget A.; Cromer, Heidi; Weigel, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: DVD classroom newsletters are one proposed technology tool to promote classroom-to-home connections. The present study explored the experiences of prekindergarten children from predominantly Spanish-speaking homes with bilingual (English and Spanish) DVD classroom newsletters. On average, parents reported that children watched…

  16. 'Your experiences were your tools'. How personal experience of mental health problems informs mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, J; Drey, N; Jones, J

    2017-09-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: 'Expertise by experience' has become an increasingly valued element of service design and delivery by mental health service providers. The extent and influence of mental health professionals' personal experience of mental ill health on clinical practice has seldom been interrogated in depth. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: We investigate how mental health nurses' own personal experience of mental ill health informs their mental health nursing practice with particular reference to direct work with service users. Participants said that personal experience could impact on work in three positive ways: to develop their relationship with service users, to enhance their understanding of service users and as a motivation for potential mental health nurses to join the profession. This study moves the discussion of the state of mental health nurses' mental health further towards the recovery and well-being focus of contemporary mental health care, where 'expertise by experience' is highly valued. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: We must address the taboo of disclosure within clinical nursing practice and debate the extent to which personal and professional boundaries are negotiated during clinical encounters. Introduction 'Expertise by experience' is a highly valued element of service delivery in recovery-oriented mental health care, but is unacknowledged within the mental health nursing literature. Aim To explore the extent and influence of mental health professionals' personal experience of mental ill health on clinical practice. Method Twenty-seven mental health nurses with their own personal experience of mental ill health were interviewed about how their personal experience informed their mental health nursing practice, as part of a sequential mixed methods study. Results The influence of personal experience in nursing work was threefold: first, through overt disclosure; second, through the 'use of the self as a tool

  17. msBiodat analysis tool, big data analysis for high-throughput experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Torres, Pau M; Rokć, Filip; Belužic, Robert; Grbeša, Ivana; Vugrek, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) are a group of a high-throughput techniques used to increase knowledge about biomolecules. They produce a large amount of data which is presented as a list of hundreds or thousands of proteins. Filtering those data efficiently is the first step for extracting biologically relevant information. The filtering may increase interest by merging previous data with the data obtained from public databases, resulting in an accurate list of proteins which meet the predetermined conditions. In this article we present msBiodat Analysis Tool, a web-based application thought to approach proteomics to the big data analysis. With this tool, researchers can easily select the most relevant information from their MS experiments using an easy-to-use web interface. An interesting feature of msBiodat analysis tool is the possibility of selecting proteins by its annotation on Gene Ontology using its Gene Id, ensembl or UniProt codes. The msBiodat analysis tool is a web-based application that allows researchers with any programming experience to deal with efficient database querying advantages. Its versatility and user-friendly interface makes easy to perform fast and accurate data screening by using complex queries. Once the analysis is finished, the result is delivered by e-mail. msBiodat analysis tool is freely available at http://msbiodata.irb.hr.

  18. A shared genetic propensity underlies experiences of bullying victimization in late childhood and self-rated paranoid thinking in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; McGuire, Phillip; Cardno, Alastair G; Freeman, Daniel; Plomin, Robert; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-05-01

    Bullying is a risk factor for developing psychotic experiences (PEs). Whether bullying is associated with particular PEs, and the extent to which genes and environments influence the association, are unknown. This study investigated which specific PEs in adolescence are associated with earlier bullying victimization and the genetic and environmental contributions underlying their association. Participants were 4826 twin pairs from a longitudinal community-based twin study in England and Wales who reported on their bullying victimization at the age of 12 years. Measures of specific PEs (self-rated Paranoia, Hallucinations, Cognitive disorganization, Grandiosity, Anhedonia, and parent-rated Negative Symptoms) were recorded at age of 16 years. Childhood bullying victimization was most strongly associated with Paranoia in adolescence (r = .26; P bullying victimization and Paranoia were both heritable (35% and 52%, respectively) with unique environmental influences (39% and 48%, respectively), and bullying victimization showed common environmental influences (26%). The association between bullying victimization and Paranoia operated almost entirely via genetic influences (bivariate heritability = 93%), with considerable genetic overlap (genetic correlation = .55). In contrast to the assumed role of bullying victimization as an environmental trigger, these data suggest that bullying victimization in late childhood is particularly linked to self-rated Paranoia in adolescence via a shared genetic propensity. Clinically, individuals with a history of bullying victimization are predicted to be particularly susceptible to paranoid symptoms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  19. A Shared Genetic Propensity Underlies Experiences of Bullying Victimization in Late Childhood and Self-Rated Paranoid Thinking in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; McGuire, Phillip; Cardno, Alastair G.; Freeman, Daniel; Plomin, Robert; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying is a risk factor for developing psychotic experiences (PEs). Whether bullying is associated with particular PEs, and the extent to which genes and environments influence the association, are unknown. This study investigated which specific PEs in adolescence are associated with earlier bullying victimization and the genetic and environmental contributions underlying their association. Method: Participants were 4826 twin pairs from a longitudinal community-based twin study in England and Wales who reported on their bullying victimization at the age of 12 years. Measures of specific PEs (self-rated Paranoia, Hallucinations, Cognitive disorganization, Grandiosity, Anhedonia, and parent-rated Negative Symptoms) were recorded at age of 16 years. Results: Childhood bullying victimization was most strongly associated with Paranoia in adolescence (r = .26; P bullying victimization and Paranoia were both heritable (35% and 52%, respectively) with unique environmental influences (39% and 48%, respectively), and bullying victimization showed common environmental influences (26%). The association between bullying victimization and Paranoia operated almost entirely via genetic influences (bivariate heritability = 93%), with considerable genetic overlap (genetic correlation = .55). Conclusion: In contrast to the assumed role of bullying victimization as an environmental trigger, these data suggest that bullying victimization in late childhood is particularly linked to self-rated Paranoia in adolescence via a shared genetic propensity. Clinically, individuals with a history of bullying victimization are predicted to be particularly susceptible to paranoid symptoms. PMID:25323579

  20. ENGLISH LEARNING TASKS MEDIATED BY THE INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARD: THE MOTIVATIONAL EFFECTS ON PROBLEM-SOLVING AND SHARING PERSONAL EXPERIENCES TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samara Freitas OLIVEIRA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some authors have already suggested that different learning tasks influence L2 learners motivation in distinct ways. In this article, we seek (a to understand how English learners motivation varies along two Problem-solving and Sharing Personal Experiences tasks mediated by the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB and (b to analyze what may have caused the variability of these learners motivation. We consider the diachronic, situational and complex dimension of motivation based on the concepts of the Process-oriented model of L2 motivation by Dörnyei and Ottó (1998, the motivational basis of tasks (JULKÜNEN, 2001; DÖRNYEI; TSENG, 2009 and the IWB as a motivating element in L2 classes (BEELAND JR., 2002; MERCER; HENNESSY; WARWICK, 2010. This cross-sectional mixed methods study was carried out in a private language school with 29 English learners. We used observation notes during the learning tasks and Situational Scales as instruments of data collection. Results indicate, for instance, that tasks have different situational motivation patterns in consequence of the choice of the task topic, the teacher support, (insufficient self-regulatory strategies to sustain motivation, among others.

  1. Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing for Emergency Management-Related Public Health: Exploring the Experiences of Tribes and Counties in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen A. Wimsatt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Each American Indian tribe is unique in several ways, including in its relationships with local governments and risk for emergencies. Cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS arrangements are encouraged between tribes and counties for emergency management-related population health, but researchers have not yet explored CJS experiences of tribes and counties for emergency management. This investigation used collaboration theory and a CJS spectrum framework to assess the scope and prevalence of tribe–county CJS arrangements for emergency management in California as well as preconditions to CJS. Mixed-methods survey results indicate that tribes and counties have varied CJS arrangements, but many are informal or customary. Preconditions to CJS include tribe–county agreement about having CJS, views of the CJS relationship, barriers to CJS, and jurisdictional strengths and weaknesses in developing CJS arrangements. Areas for public health intervention include funding programs that build tribal capacity in emergency management, reduce cross-jurisdictional disagreement, and promote ongoing tribe–county relationships as a precursor to formal CJS arrangements. Study strengths, limitations, and future directions are also discussed.

  2. Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing for Emergency Management-Related Public Health: Exploring the Experiences of Tribes and Counties in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimsatt, Maureen A

    2017-01-01

    Each American Indian tribe is unique in several ways, including in its relationships with local governments and risk for emergencies. Cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) arrangements are encouraged between tribes and counties for emergency management-related population health, but researchers have not yet explored CJS experiences of tribes and counties for emergency management. This investigation used collaboration theory and a CJS spectrum framework to assess the scope and prevalence of tribe-county CJS arrangements for emergency management in California as well as preconditions to CJS. Mixed-methods survey results indicate that tribes and counties have varied CJS arrangements, but many are informal or customary. Preconditions to CJS include tribe-county agreement about having CJS, views of the CJS relationship, barriers to CJS, and jurisdictional strengths and weaknesses in developing CJS arrangements. Areas for public health intervention include funding programs that build tribal capacity in emergency management, reduce cross-jurisdictional disagreement, and promote ongoing tribe-county relationships as a precursor to formal CJS arrangements. Study strengths, limitations, and future directions are also discussed.

  3. MPRAnator: a web-based tool for the design of massively parallel reporter assay experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos-Soares, Ilias; Jain, Naman; Gray, Jesse M; Hemberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid advances in DNA synthesis and sequencing technologies and the continuing decline in the associated costs, high-throughput experiments can be performed to investigate the regulatory role of thousands of oligonucleotide sequences simultaneously. Nevertheless, designing high-throughput reporter assay experiments such as massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) and similar methods remains challenging. We introduce MPRAnator, a set of tools that facilitate rapid design of MPRA experiments. With MPRA Motif design, a set of variables provides fine control of how motifs are placed into sequences, thereby allowing the investigation of the rules that govern transcription factor (TF) occupancy. MPRA single-nucleotide polymorphism design can be used to systematically examine the functional effects of single or combinations of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at regulatory sequences. Finally, the Transmutation tool allows for the design of negative controls by permitting scrambling, reversing, complementing or introducing multiple random mutations in the input sequences or motifs. MPRAnator tool set is implemented in Python, Perl and Javascript and is freely available at www.genomegeek.com and www.sanger.ac.uk/science/tools/mpranator The source code is available on www.github.com/hemberg-lab/MPRAnator/ under the MIT license. The REST API allows programmatic access to MPRAnator using simple URLs. igs@sanger.ac.uk or mh26@sanger.ac.ukSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Joint action of a pair of rowers in a race: Shared experiences of effectiveness are shaped by interpersonal mechanical states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi eR'kiouak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand how a single pair of expert individual rowers experienced their crew functioning in natural conditions when asked to practice a joint movement for the first time. To fulfill this objective, we conducted a field study of interpersonal coordination that combined phenomenological and mechanical data from a coxless pair activity, to analyze the dynamics of the (intersubjective experience compared with the dynamics of the team coordination. Using an enactivist approach to social couplings, these heterogeneous data were combined to explore the salience (and accuracy of individuals’ shared experiences of their joint action. First, we determined how each rower experienced the continuous crew functioning states (e.g., feelings of the boat’s glide. Second, the phenomenological data helped us to build several categories of oar strokes (i.e., cycles, experienced by the rowers as either detrimentally or effectively performed strokes. Third, the mechanical signatures that correlated with each phenomenological category were tracked at various level of organization (i.e., individual-, interpersonal-, and boat-levels. The results indicated that (a the two rowers did not pay attention to their joint action during most of the cycles, (b some cycles were simultaneously lived as a salient, meaningful experience of either a detrimental (n= 15 cycles or an effective (n=18 cycles joint action, and (c the mechanical signatures diverged across the delineated phenomenological categories, suggesting that the way in which the cycles were experienced emerged from the variance in some mechanical parameters (i.e., differences in peak force level and mean force. Notably, the mechanical measures that helped to explain differences within the phenomenological categories were found at the interpersonal level of analysis, thus suggesting an intentional inter-personal mode of regulation of their joint action. This result is further

  5. Enriching the Web of Data with Educational Information Using We-Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Calleja, Adolfo; Asensio-Pérez, Juan I.; Vega-Gorgojo, Guillermo; Gómez-Sánchez, Eduardo; Bote-Lorenzo, Miguel L.; Alario-Hoyos, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents We-Share, a social annotation application that enables educators to publish and retrieve information about educational ICT tools. As a distinctive characteristic, We-Share provides educators data about educational tools already available on the Web of Data while allowing them to enrich such data with their experience using…

  6. Decision boxes for clinicians to support evidence-based practice and shared decision making: the user experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giguere Anik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This project engages patients and physicians in the development of Decision Boxes, short clinical topic summaries covering medical questions that have no single best answer. Decision Boxes aim to prepare the clinician to communicate the risks and benefits of the available options to the patient so they can make an informed decision together. Methods Seven researchers (including four practicing family physicians selected 10 clinical topics relevant to primary care practice through a Delphi survey. We then developed two one-page prototypes on two of these topics: prostate cancer screening with the prostate-specific antigen test, and prenatal screening for trisomy 21 with the serum integrated test. We presented the prototypes to purposeful samples of family physicians distributed in two focus groups, and patients distributed in four focus groups. We used the User Experience Honeycomb to explore barriers and facilitators to the communication design used in Decision Boxes. All discussions were transcribed, and three researchers proceeded to thematic content analysis of the transcriptions. The coding scheme was first developed from the Honeycomb’s seven themes (valuable, usable, credible, useful, desirable, accessible, and findable, and included new themes suggested by the data. Prototypes were modified in light of our findings. Results Three rounds were necessary for a majority of researchers to select 10 clinical topics. Fifteen physicians and 33 patients participated in the focus groups. Following analyses, three sections were added to the Decision Boxes: introduction, patient counseling, and references. The information was spread to two pages to try to make the Decision Boxes less busy and improve users’ first impression. To try to improve credibility, we gave more visibility to the research institutions involved in development. A statement on the boxes’ purpose and a flow chart representing the shared decision

  7. Radiology education 2.0--on the cusp of change: part 2. eBooks; file sharing and synchronization tools; websites/teaching files; reference management tools and note taking applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Puneet; Dhand, Sabeen; Lackey, Amanda E; Pandey, Tarun; Moshiri, Mariam; Jambhekar, Kedar

    2013-03-01

    Increasing use of smartphones and handheld computers is accompanied by a rapid growth in the other related industries. Electronic books have revolutionized the centuries-old conventional books and magazines markets and have simplified publishing by reducing the cost and processing time required to create and distribute any given book. We are now able to read, review, store, and share various types of documents via several electronic tools, many of which are available free of charge. Additionally, this electronic revolution has resulted in an explosion of readily available Internet-based educational resources for the residents and has paved the path for educators to reach out to a larger and more diverse student population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Experiences of graduate students: Using Cabri as a visualization tool in math education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Gül

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the use of graphic calculators and dynamic software running on computers and mobile devices, students can learn complex algebraic concepts. The purpose of this study is to investigate the experiences of graduate students using Cabri as a visualization tool in math education. The qualitative case study was used in this study. Five students from graduate students studying at the non-thesis math program of a university located in the Blacksea region were the participant of the study. As a dynamic learning tool, Cabri provided participants an environment where participants visually discovered the geometry. It was concluded that dynamic learning tools like Cabri has a huge potential for teaching visually the challenging concepts that students struggle to image. Further research should investigate the potential plans for integrating the use of dynamic learning software into the math curriculum

  9. Making the Middle Count: Three Tools to Improve Throughput for a Better Patient Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbenshade, Angie

    2015-01-07

    This article discusses three ways in which dramatic improvements in middle flow, or examination-to-disposition time, can be driven by emergency department (ED) nursing leadership. By operationalizing a "results pending" area, low-acuity patients who are unlikely to be admitted can await diagnostic results or be actively monitored by a dedicated nurse, ED rooms and beds may be reserved for higher acuity patients. Monthly operational stakeholder meetings can provide a consistent opportunity to track, monitor, and improve flow while also celebrating successes and identifying needed performance improvements based on objective metrics for shared goals. Internal customer rounding is a process that serves as effective follow-up from the stakeholder meeting to ensure aligned behaviors to meet identified goals. Frequency of rounding is identified during the stakeholder meeting. By using these three tools, ED stakeholders can effectively focus on solutions instead of barriers to improving middle flow.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  10. Danish experience with the EDIP tool for environmental design of industrial products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Alting, Leo

    1999-01-01

    Since its publication in, 1996, the Danish method and tools for the environmental design of industrial products (EDIP) have been used in companies in Denmark and abroad, and experience has been gained with a variety of product categories such as electronics, electromechanical products, furniture...... by companies working with the EDIP tools. The paper presents examples from pumps, refrigerator, high pressure cleaners audio/video products, book shelves and moulded cardboards. A questionnaire investigation of the experience with life cycle assessment (LCA) and ecodesign within the Danish pioneer companies...... in the area was made in November 1997. A total of 39 companies, known to have worked more or less with LCA and ecodesign, were contacted, and 26 companies volunteered to participate. The investigation covered from small (8 employees) to large (>7000 employees) companies having from very little to several...

  11. Orthogonal experiment and analysis of power spectral density on process parameters of pitch tool polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Kai; Wan, Yongjian; Wu, Fan; Shen, Lijun; Wu, Hsing-Yu

    2017-02-01

    Mid to high spatial frequency error (MSFR and HSFR) should be strictly controlled in modern optical systems. Pitch tool polishing (PTP) is an effective ultra-smoothing surface manufacturing method to control MSFR and HSFR. But it is difficult to control because it is affected by a lot of factors. The present paper describes the pitch tool polishing study based on eighteen well-planned orthogonal experiments (OA18 matrix). Five main process factors (abrasive particle size, slurry concentration, pad rotation speed, acidity and polishing time) in pitch tool polishing process were investigated. In this study, power spectral density (PSD) based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data obtained by white light interferometer was used as the results of orthogonal experiments instead of material removal rate and surface roughness. A normalization method of PSD was proposed as the range analysis rule. Three parts of spatial frequency bandwidth were selected and discussed. Acidity is the most important factor in part 1 and slurry concentration is the most significant one in part 2; while acidity is the least influenced one in part 3. The result in each part was explained by two-step material removal mechanism. At last, suggestions in low and high spatial frequency are given for pitch tool polishing.

  12. Initial experience with a risk-sharing in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer program with novel features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassart, Jacques P; Bayless, Romaine B; Casey, Colleen L; Phipps, William R

    2011-06-01

    To describe outcomes of the first 100 consecutive infertility patients participating in a risk-sharing program with uncomplicated eligibility requirements. The program included the costs of FSH-containing gonadotropin preparations and provided a full payment refund if no birth occurred that resulted in a normal infant surviving to an age of 1 month. Retrospective cohort study. Private IVF center. Infertility patientsrisk-sharing program with uncomplicated eligibility requirements are very likely to have a successful pregnancy. Other centers may wish to incorporate some of the described program's features into their own risk-sharing IVF programs. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. FluxSuite: a New Scientific Tool for Advanced Network Management and Cross-Sharing of Next-Generation Flux Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, G. G.; Johnson, D.; Velgersdyk, M.; Beaty, K.; Forgione, A.; Begashaw, I.; Allyn, D.

    2015-12-01

    Significant increases in data generation and computing power in recent years have greatly improved spatial and temporal flux data coverage on multiple scales, from a single station to continental flux networks. At the same time, operating budgets for flux teams and stations infrastructure are getting ever more difficult to acquire and sustain. With more stations and networks, larger data flows from each station, and smaller operating budgets, modern tools are needed to effectively and efficiently handle the entire process. This would help maximize time dedicated to answering research questions, and minimize time and expenses spent on data processing, quality control and station management. Cross-sharing the stations with external institutions may also help leverage available funding, increase scientific collaboration, and promote data analyses and publications. FluxSuite, a new advanced tool combining hardware, software and web-service, was developed to address these specific demands. It automates key stages of flux workflow, minimizes day-to-day site management, and modernizes the handling of data flows: Each next-generation station measures all parameters needed for flux computations Field microcomputer calculates final fully-corrected flux rates in real time, including computation-intensive Fourier transforms, spectra, co-spectra, multiple rotations, stationarity, footprint, etc. Final fluxes, radiation, weather and soil data are merged into a single quality-controlled file Multiple flux stations are linked into an automated time-synchronized network Flux network manager, or PI, can see all stations in real time, including fluxes, supporting data, automated reports, and email alerts PI can assign rights, allow or restrict access to stations and data: selected stations can be shared via rights-managed access internally or with external institutions Researchers without stations could form "virtual networks" for specific projects by collaborating with PIs from

  14. Five shared decision-making tools in 5 months: use of rapid reviews to develop decision boxes for seniors living with dementia and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawani, Moulikatou Adouni; Valéra, Béatriz; Fortier-Brochu, Émilie; Légaré, France; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues; Côté, Luc; Voyer, Philippe; Kröger, Edeltraut; Witteman, Holly; Rodriguez, Charo; Giguere, Anik M C

    2017-03-15

    Decision support tools build upon comprehensive and timely syntheses of literature. Rapid reviews may allow supporting their development by omitting certain components of traditional systematic reviews. We thus aimed to describe a rapid review approach underlying the development of decision support tools, i.e., five decision boxes (DB) for shared decision-making between seniors living with dementia, their caregivers, and healthcare providers. We included studies based on PICO questions (Participant, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome) describing each of the five specific decision. We gave priority to higher quality evidence (e.g., systematic reviews). For each DB, we first identified secondary sources of literature, namely, clinical summaries, clinical practice guidelines, and systematic reviews. After an initial extraction, we searched for primary studies in academic databases and grey literature to fill gaps in evidence. We extracted study designs, sample sizes, populations, and probabilities of benefits/harms of the health options. A single reviewer conducted the literature search and study selection. The data extracted by one reviewer was verified by a second experienced reviewer. Two reviewers assessed the quality of the evidence. We converted all probabilities into absolute risks for ease of understanding. Two to five experts validated the content of each DB. We conducted descriptive statistical analyses on the review processes and resources required. The approach allowed screening of a limited number of references (range: 104 to 406/review). For each review, we included 15 to 26 studies, 2 to 10 health options, 11 to 62 health outcomes and we conducted 9 to 47 quality assessments. A team of ten reviewers with varying levels of expertise was supported at specific steps by an information specialist, a biostatistician, and a graphic designer. The time required to complete a rapid review varied from 7 to 31 weeks per review (mean ± SD, 19 ± 10

  15. Development of a tool to measure user experience following electronic health record implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Montgomery, Donna Cook; Philpot, Lindsey M; Barnes, Sunni A; Compton, Jan; Kennerly, Donald

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a survey tool to assess electronic health record (EHR) implementation to guide improvement initiatives. Survey tools are needed for ongoing improvement and have not been developed for aspects of EHR implementation. The Baylor EHR User Experience (UX) survey was developed to capture 5 concept domains: training and competency, usability, infrastructure, usefulness, and end-user support. Validation efforts included content validity assessment, a pilot study, and analysis of 606 nurse respondents. The revised tool was sent to randomly sampled EHR nurse-users in 11 acute care facilities. A total of 1,301 nurses responded (37%). Internal consistency of the survey tool was excellent (Cronbach's α = .892). Survey responses including 1,819 open comments were used to identify and prioritize improvement efforts in areas such as education, support, optimization of EHR functions, and vendor change requests. The Baylor EHR UX survey was a valid tool that can be useful for prioritizing improvement efforts in relation to EHR implementation.

  16. Efficiency in Shared Services

    OpenAIRE

    Prachýl, Lukáš

    2010-01-01

    The thesis describes and analyzes shared services organizations as a management tool to achieve efficiency in the organizations' processes. Paper builds on established theoretical principles, enhance them with up-to-date insights on the current situation and development and create a valuable knowledge base on shared services organizations. Strong emphasis is put on concrete means on how exactly efficiency could be achieved. Major relevant topics such as reasons for shared services, people man...

  17. Robust optimal design of experiments for model discrimination using an interactive software tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Stegmaier

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of biochemical processes significantly contributes to a better understanding of biological functionality and underlying dynamic mechanisms. To support time consuming and costly lab experiments, kinetic reaction equations can be formulated as a set of ordinary differential equations, which in turn allows to simulate and compare hypothetical models in silico. To identify new experimental designs that are able to discriminate between investigated models, the approach used in this work solves a semi-infinite constrained nonlinear optimization problem using derivative based numerical algorithms. The method takes into account parameter variabilities such that new experimental designs are robust against parameter changes while maintaining the optimal potential to discriminate between hypothetical models. In this contribution we present a newly developed software tool that offers a convenient graphical user interface for model discrimination. We demonstrate the beneficial operation of the discrimination approach and the usefulness of the software tool by analyzing a realistic benchmark experiment from literature. New robust optimal designs that allow to discriminate between the investigated model hypotheses of the benchmark experiment are successfully calculated and yield promising results. The involved robustification approach provides maximally discriminating experiments for the worst parameter configurations, which can be used to estimate the meaningfulness of upcoming experiments. A major benefit of the graphical user interface is the ability to interactively investigate the model behavior and the clear arrangement of numerous variables. In addition to a brief theoretical overview of the discrimination method and the functionality of the software tool, the importance of robustness of experimental designs against parameter variability is demonstrated on a biochemical benchmark problem. The software is licensed under the GNU

  18. Strategic Environmental Assessment of Port Plans in Italy: Experiences, Approaches, Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale De Toro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation is increasingly important in decision-making processes for the sustainable planning and design of port plans. It acts as a support for plan preparation, for making values, interests and needs explicit, and for exploring the components of the decision-making process itself. Evaluation can be likened to an “implicit tool” that can integrate approaches, methodologies and models, adapting to the many needs revealed during the decision-making process. New sustainability challenges call for new approaches to creating frameworks for the analysis and evaluation of plans and projects that allow the integration of multidimensional goals and values. Utilizing some selected case studies of port plans in six Italian cities, this paper explores how environmental assessment can become a tool for dialog and interaction among different fields of expertise to support dynamic learning processes, knowledge management and the creation of shared choices, using suitable approaches and tools. In this view, Integrated Spatial Assessment (ISA can be useful in supporting decision-making processes on different scales and institutional levels to stimulate dialog between technical and political evaluations, referring to complex values that are part of conflicting and changing realities in which it has become imperative to operate according to sustainability principles.

  19. Urban sharing culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjalland, Emmy Laura Perez

    In urban areas sharing cultures, services and economies are rising. People share, rent and recycle their homes, cars, bikes, rides, tools, cloths, working space, knowhow and so on. The sharing culture can be understood as mobilities (Kesselring and Vogl 2013) of goods, values and ideas reshaping...... problems and side effects from concentration of consumption and contamination; and due to the shift from ownership to access it change our basic social cultural norms (Sayer 2005; Sayer 2011) about the ‘good’ life and social status (Freudendal-Pedersen 2007), commons and individuality, responsibility...... and trust. (Thomsen 2013; Bauman 2000; Beck 1992; Giddens 1991). The sharing economy is currently hyper trendy but before claiming capitalism as dead we need to understand the basics of the sharing economies and cultures asking who can share and what will we share. Furthermore it is crucial to study what...

  20. The Experiment Data Depot: A Web-Based Software Tool for Biological Experimental Data Storage, Sharing, and Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morell, William C.; Birkel, Garrett W.; Forrer, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Although recent advances in synthetic biology allow us to produce biological designs more efficiently than ever, our ability to predict the end result of these designs is still nascent. Predictive models require large amounts of high quality data to be parametrized and tested, which are not gener......Although recent advances in synthetic biology allow us to produce biological designs more efficiently than ever, our ability to predict the end result of these designs is still nascent. Predictive models require large amounts of high quality data to be parametrized and tested, which...

  1. Experience with case tools in the design of process-oriented software

    CERN Document Server

    Novakov, O

    1993-01-01

    In Accelerator systems such as the CERN PS complex, process equipment has a life time which may exceed the typical life cycle of its related software. Taking in account the variety of such equipment, it is important to keep the analysis and design of the software in a system- independent form. This paper discusses the experience gathered in using commercial CASE tools for analysis, design and reverse engineering of different process- oriented software modules, with a principal emphasis on maintaining the initial analysis in a standardized form. Such tools are in existence for several years, but this paper shows that they are not entirely adapted to our needs.In particular, the paper stresses the problems of integrating such a tool in an existing data-base-dependent development chain, the lack of real-time simulation tools and of object-oriented concepts in existing commercial packages. Finally, the paper attempts to show a broader view of software engineering needs in our particular context.

  2. A general-purpose Java tool for action dispatching and supervision in nuclear fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barana, O.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Taliercio, C.

    2002-04-01

    In nuclear fusion experiments, the plasma discharge requires a preparation sequence followed by a data acquisition phase. During these phases, the control and data acquisition system is required to carry out a sequence of operations for set up of the various devices, data readout, and on-line computation. An action dispatcher tool must comply with several requirements such as the support for a distributed and heterogeneous environment, a comprehensive user interface for the supervision of the whole sequence, and the need for web-based support. The paper describes the architecture of a general-purpose Java-based tool for action dispatching. The use of the platform-independent Java framework, combined with the generic approach in the architecture definition, satisfies the above requirements. The Java framework has been chosen for the implementation because of its platform-independence, network, and multithreading support. The architecture of the tool has been kept quite generic, thus making the tool adaptable to a variety of operating environments with minimal changes in the application code.

  3. A concept for a research tool for experiments with cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, L; Wouters, J

    2000-12-01

    APEX, an acronym for computer Application for Psycho-Electrical eXperiments, is a user friendly tool used to conduct psychophysical experiments and to investigate new speech coding algorithms with cochlear implant users. Most common psychophysical experiments can be easily programmed and all stimuli can be easily created without any knowledge of computer programing. The pulsatile stimuli are composed off-line using custom-made MATLAB (Registered trademark of The Mathworks, Inc., http://www.mathworks.com) functions and are stored on hard disk or CD ROM. These functions convert either a speech signal into a pulse sequence or generate any sequence of pulses based on the parameters specified by the experimenter. The APEX personal computer (PC) software reads a text file which specifies the experiment and the stimuli, controls the experiment, delivers the stimuli to the subject through a digital signal processor (DSP) board, collects the responses via a computer mouse or a graphics tablet, and writes the results to the same file. At present, the APEX system is implemented for the LAURA (Registered trademark of Philips Hearing Implants) cochlear implant. However, the concept-and many parts of the system-is portable to any other device. Also, psycho-acoustical experiments can be conducted by presenting the stimuli acoustically through a sound card.

  4. Sharing experiences: towards an evidence based model of dengue surveillance and outbreak response in Latin America and Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing frequency and intensity of dengue outbreaks in endemic and non-endemic countries requires a rational, evidence based response. To this end, we aimed to collate the experiences of a number of affected countries, identify strengths and limitations in dengue surveillance, outbreak preparedness, detection and response and contribute towards the development of a model contingency plan adaptable to country needs. Methods The study was undertaken in five Latin American (Brazil, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Peru) and five in Asian countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Vietnam). A mixed-methods approach was used which included document analysis, key informant interviews, focus-group discussions, secondary data analysis and consensus building by an international dengue expert meeting organised by the World Health Organization, Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (WHO-TDR). Results Country information on dengue is based on compulsory notification and reporting (“passive surveillance”), with laboratory confirmation (in all participating Latin American countries and some Asian countries) or by using a clinical syndromic definition. Seven countries additionally had sentinel sites with active dengue reporting, some also had virological surveillance. Six had agreed a formal definition of a dengue outbreak separate to seasonal variation in case numbers. Countries collected data on a range of warning signs that may identify outbreaks early, but none had developed a systematic approach to identifying and responding to the early stages of an outbreak. Outbreak response plans varied in quality, particularly regarding the early response. The surge capacity of hospitals with recent dengue outbreaks varied; those that could mobilise additional staff, beds, laboratory support and resources coped best in comparison to those improvising a coping strategy during the outbreak. Hospital outbreak management plans

  5. "Thanks for Letting Us All Share Your Mammogram Experience Virtually": Developing a Web-Based Hub for Breast Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpin, Adam; Meredith, Joanne; Ure, Cathy; Robinson, Leslie

    2017-10-27

    The decision around whether to attend breast cancer screening can often involve making sense of confusing and contradictory information on its risks and benefits. The Word of Mouth Mammogram e-Network (WoMMeN) project was established to create a Web-based resource to support decision making regarding breast cancer screening. This paper presents data from our user-centered approach in engaging stakeholders (both health professionals and service users) in the design of this Web-based resource. Our novel approach involved creating a user design group within Facebook to allow them access to ongoing discussion between researchers, radiographers, and existing and potential service users. This study had two objectives. The first was to examine the utility of an online user design group for generating insight for the creation of Web-based health resources. We sought to explore the advantages and limitations of this approach. The second objective was to analyze what women want from a Web-based resource for breast cancer screening. We recruited a user design group on Facebook and conducted a survey within the group, asking questions about design considerations for a Web-based breast cancer screening hub. Although the membership of the Facebook group varied over time, there were 71 members in the Facebook group at the end point of analysis. We next conducted a framework analysis on 70 threads from Facebook and a thematic analysis on the 23 survey responses. We focused additionally on how the themes were discussed by the different stakeholders within the context of the design group. Two major themes were found across both the Facebook discussion and the survey data: (1) the power of information and (2) the hub as a place for communication and support. Information was considered as empowering but also recognized as threatening. Communication and the sharing of experiences were deemed important, but there was also recognition of potential miscommunication within online

  6. Preliminary experience of shared clinical management between Milan and Pointe Noire using the INteractive TeleConsultation Network for Worldwide HealthcAre Services (INCAS): telemedicine between Milan and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacarne, Mara; Lesma, Alessandro; Madera, Angelo; Malfatti, Eugenio; Castelli, Alberto; Lucini, Daniela; Pizzinelli, Paolo; Pagani, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary experience in shared clinical management of patients located in Pointe Noire, Africa, and a referral center, Sacco University Hospital, located in Milan, Italy. The employed infrastructure INteractive TeleConsultation Network for Worldwide HealthcAre Services (INCAS) jointly developed by CEFRIEL (Center of Excellence For Research, Innovation, Education & Industrial Labs partnership) and ENI (Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi) is based on commercial off-the-shelf technology. This minimizes maintenance problems, while permitting a simple and friendly sharing of data using the telephone and e-mail for store-and-forward applications. The critical aspect of the flow of events comprising the exchange of information is discussed. In 60% of cases, only one telemedicine consultation was required. In the remainder 40%, a number of telemedicine consultations were required for appropriate management of clinical cases. The project demonstrated flexibility as documented by the wide range of pathologies that can be dealt with it. Finally the possibility of using shared clinical management as a learning tool is highlighted by the steep and rising learning curve. We conclude, however, that the patient, although handled in a "virtual" manner, should be viewed as very "real," as some of them elected to close the gap physically between Pointe Noire and Milan, and chose to be treated at the referral site.

  7. Guide Picker is a comprehensive design tool for visualizing and selecting guides for CRISPR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Soren H; Kancleris, Kris; Brody, Leigh; Humphryes-Kirilov, Neil; Wolanski, Joseph; Dunaway, Keith; Ajetunmobi, Ayokunmi; Dillard, Victor

    2017-03-14

    Guide Picker ( https://www.deskgen.com/guide-picker/ ) serves as a meta tool for designing CRISPR experiments by presenting ten different guide RNA scoring functions in one simple graphical interface. It allows investigators to simultaneously visualize and sort through every guide targeting the protein-coding regions of any mouse or human gene. Utilizing a multidimensional graphical display featuring two plots and four axes, Guide Picker can analyze all guides while filtering based on four different criteria at a time. Guide Picker further facilitates the CRISPR design process by using pre-computed scores for all guides, thereby offering rapid guide RNA generation and selection. The ease-of-use of Guide Picker complements CRISPR itself, matching a powerful and modular biological system with a flexible online web tool that can be used in a variety of genome editing experimental contexts.

  8. Web-based monitoring tools for Resistive Plate Chambers in the CMS experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. S.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Qian, S.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D.; Goh, J.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kang, J. W.; Kang, M.; Kwon, J. H.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. K.; Park, S. K.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Chudasama, R.; Singh, J. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Mehta, A.; Kumar, R.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Costantini, S.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Ocampo, A.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Doninck, W. V.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro, L.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Avila, C.; Ahmad, A.; Muhammad, S.; Shoaib, M.; Hoorani, H.; Awan, I.; Ali, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Shahzad, H.; Sayed, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Elkafrawy, T.; Sharma, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Merola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, O. M.; Braghieri, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Vai, I.; Magnani, A.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Hadjiiska, R.; Ibargüen, H. S.; Morales, M. I. P.; Bernardino, S. C.; Bagaturia, I.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Crotty, I.

    2014-10-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) are used in the CMS experiment at the trigger level and also in the standard offline muon reconstruction. In order to guarantee the quality of the data collected and to monitor online the detector performance, a set of tools has been developed in CMS which is heavily used in the RPC system. The Web-based monitoring (WBM) is a set of java servlets that allows users to check the performance of the hardware during data taking, providing distributions and history plots of all the parameters. The functionalities of the RPC WBM monitoring tools are presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of growing luminosity and environmental conditions that are tracked over time.

  9. Web-based monitoring tools for Resistive Plate Chambers in the CMS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Min Suk

    2014-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) are used in the CMS experiment at the trigger level and also in the standard offline muon reconstruction. In order to guarantee the quality of the data collected and to monitor online the detector performance, a set of tools has been developed in CMS which is heavily used in the RPC system. The Web-based monitoring (WBM) is a set of java servlets that allows users to check the performance of the hardware during data taking, providing distributions and history plots of all the parameters. The functionalities of the RPC WBM monitoring tools are presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of growing luminosity and environmental conditions that are tracked over time.

  10. IMPROVING EXPERIMENT DESIGN SKILLS: USING THE JOKO TINGKIR PROGRAM AS A LEARNING TOOL OF TSUNAMI TOPIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlazim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Students are rarely given an opportunity to think deeply about experimental design or asked to develop experimental skills on their own. Without participating in these endeavors, they are often unaware of the many decisions necessary to construct a precise methodology. This article describes the Joko Tingkir Program as an Early Warning Tsunami, and how we have used this program as a learning tool for physics teacher candidates to improve their experimental design skills. The Joko Tingkir computer program has implemented a Tsunami Faulting Model (TFM. The TFM uses the principle that the tsunami is affected by the length and width of earthquake rupture. Both can be represented by the duration of rupture (Tdur or Exceed 50 second duration (T50Ex and the dominant period (Td. The TFM has been implemented by the Joko Tingkir computer program. When students are given a simple method using the Joko Tingkir program - such as the tutorial, observation of seismic station distribution, seismograms of the earthquake, equipment and software for this experiment, measurement of P time onset and determination of Tdur, Td and T50Ex - it allows them to focus exclusively on improving experiment design skills as indicated by significantly improved gain scores. Based on the gain analysis it can be inferred that the experiment design skills can be improved by implementation of Joko Tingkir Program as a Learning Tool of Tsunami Warning in the learning process

  11. Going beyond "two-getherness": Nurse managers' experiences of working together in a leadership model where more than two share the same chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döös, Marianne; Vinell, Helene; von Knorring, Mia

    2017-12-01

    To explore nurse manager experiences of working in leadership constellations where more than two managers share leadership, and to compare this multilateral sharing form to what is known about experiences of working in joint leadership in pairs. A qualitative design based on semi-structured interviews with nurse managers in two multilaterally shared leadership constellations at two intensive care units at an emergency hospital in Sweden. Data were analysed using a thematic and comparative approach. The comparative analysis identified four aspects that differ decisively from the positive picture in the literature on joint pair leadership: the perception of mandate with reduced decision-making power and reduced access to forums, the way of working with a strict division of tasks and a rotating schedule, a need to cope with the increasing number of internal relations and a feeling of doubt concerning trust. Shared leadership between nurse managers has gone from being a tight collaboration based on a feeling of "two-getherness", to being an organisational solution multilateral in character. In this transformation, a weakening of leadership qualities has occurred. Further research is necessary on how this new organisational solution impacts the nurse managers, their staff and the care provided in healthcare organisations generally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Board Games and Board Game Design as Learning Tools for Complex Scientific Concepts: Some Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Chiarello, Fabio; Castellano, Maria Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the authors report different experiences in the use of board games as learning tools for complex and abstract scientific concepts such as Quantum Mechanics, Relativity or nano-biotechnologies. In particular we describe “Quantum Race”, designed for the introduction of Quantum Mechanical principles, “Lab on a chip”, concerning the immune system and the nano-biotechnologies, “Time Race”, created to explain Relativistic concepts such as time dilation. The main idea is to choose a co...

  13. An Experiment with Using Google Tools for Project Supervision at Tertiary Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Problem oriented project pedagogy is an alternative educational approach which often provides a strong natural motivation for the students' work. On the other hand, it requires certain coordination and cooperation skills in communication inside the project group as well as between the group and i...... supervisor. We study the use of content and coordination management tools for the support of group work. An experiment using a combination of Google Groups/Docs/Calendar services was carried out at Aalborg University in Denmark and we report here on the outcomes of the trial....

  14. Gender variations in access, choice to use and cleaning of shared latrines; experiences from Kampala Slums, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiringira, Japheth; Atekyereza, Peter; Niwagaba, Charles; Günther, Isabel

    2014-11-19

    Sanitation is one of the most intimate issues that affect women, especially in slums of developing countries. There are few studies that have paid attention to the gender variations in access, choice to use and cleaning of shared latrines in slums. This paper draws on qualitative data from a cross sectional study conducted between 2012 and 2013 in six slums of Kampala City, Uganda. The study involved both women and men. Data were collected from 12 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), 15 Key informant interviews; community transects and photographs of shared latrines. Location of a shared latrine facility, distance, filthy, narrow and irregular paths; the time when a facility is visited (day or night), privacy and steep inclines were gender 'filters' to accessing shared latrines. A full latrine pit was more likely to inhibit access to and choice of a facility for women than men. Results indicate that the available coping mechanisms turned out to be gendered, with fewer options available for women than men. On the whole, women sought for privacy, easy reach, self-respect and esteem, cleanliness and privacy than men. While men like women also wanted clean facilities for use; they (men) were not keen on cleaning these facilities. The cleaning of shared latrines was seen by both women and men as a role for women. The presence of sanitation facilities as the first step in the access, choice, use, and cleaning by both women and men has distinct motivations and limitations along gender lines. The study confirms that the use and cleaning of latrines is regulated by gender in daily living. Using a latrine for women was much more than relieving oneself: it involved security, intimacy and health concerns.

  15. Secret Shopping is an Effective Tool for Identifyings in Library User Experience Local Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Wadson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Boyce, C. M. (2015. Secret shopping as user experience assessment tool. Public Services Quarterly, 11(4, 237-253. doi:10.1080/15228959.2015.1084903 Objective – To assess library user experience (UX at two entry-level service desks to determine the need for, and inform the aspects in which to improve, services and staff training. Design – Observational study using secret shopping. Setting – A small, private university in Illinois, United States of America. Subjects – Library employees, comprised primarily of student assistants; and 11 secret shoppers, comprised of 5 faculty members, 4 staff members, and 2 first-year students from the university.

  16. Public health tools for holding self-regulators accountable: lessons from the alcohol experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, David H

    2011-05-01

    Self-regulation is a common strategy used by industries to avoid or supplement statutory health and safety regulation of their products and practices. The public health experience with self-regulation in the alcohol industry provides methods and lessons relevant to health educators and advocates working in other public health fields. Methods for and examples and limitations of monitoring content and placement of marketing messages are described. The alcohol experience shows that, although self-regulation has many drawbacks in terms of protecting the health of the public, there are tools available for valid monitoring of self-regulated activities that, when combined with aggressive dissemination of results to media and policy makers, can make self-regulation more accountable and build an evidence base for effective measures to be taken.

  17. The individualized service plan as a clinical integration tool: qualitative analysis in the Quebec PRISMA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Somme

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One aspect of clinical integration involves case managers' tools and particularly the individualized service plan. Methods: We examined individualized service plan content and use in the PRISMA experiment. We analyzed 50 charts, and conducted and recorded interviews regarding individualized service plan use with all the case managers concerned (n=13. Results: Delays between starting case management and writing the individualized service plan were long and varied (0–596 days, mean: 117 days. During the interviews, the individualized service plan was described as the ‘last step’ once the active planning phase was over. The reasons for formulating plans were mainly administrative. From a clinical viewpoint, individualized service plans were used as memoranda and not to describe services (842 interventions not mentioned in the plans or needs (694 active problems not mentioned. Case managers felt uncomfortable with the individualized planning task and expected a tool more adapted to their needs. Conclusion: Although a majority of the case managers' charts contained an individualized service plan, implementation of this tool seems tenuous. Because of the discrepancy between the potential usefulness expected by case managers and their actual use, a working committee was created to develop proposals for modifying the instrument.

  18. The Experience of Implementing Urban HEART Barcelona: a Tool for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Ana M; Pérez, Glòria; Espelt, Albert; Echave, Cynthia; de Olalla, Patricia G; Calvo, M Jesús; Pasarín, Maribel; Diez, Èlia; Borrell, Carme; Calvo, M Jesús; Cormenzana, Berta; Cortés, Imma; Diez, Èlia; Echave, Cynthia; Espelt, Albert; de Olalla, Patrícia G; Gòmez, Josep; Novoa, Ana M; Pallarès, Montserrat; Pérez, Glòria; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica

    2017-10-16

    Urban Health Equity Assessment and Response Tool (HEART) is a tool developed by the World Health Organization whose objective is to provide evidence on urban health inequalities so as to help to decide the best interventions aimed to promote urban health equity. The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of implementing Urban HEART in Barcelona city, both the adaptation of Urban HEART to the city of Barcelona, its use as a means of identifying and monitoring health inequalities among city neighbourhoods, and the difficulties and barriers encountered throughout the process. Although ASPB public health technicians participated in the Urban HEART Advisory Group, had large experience in health inequalities analysis and research and showed interest in implementing the tool, it was not until 2015, when the city council was governed by a new left-wing party for which reducing health inequalities was a priority that Urban HEART could be used. A provisional matrix was developed, including both health and health determinant indicators, which allowed to show how some neighbourhoods in the city systematically fare worse for most of the indicators while others systematically fare better. It also allowed to identify 18 neighbourhoods-those which fared worse in most indicators-which were considered a priority for intervention, which entered the Health in the Barcelona Neighbourhoods programme and the Neighbourhoods Plan. This provisional version was reviewed and improved by the Urban HEART Barcelona Working Group. Technicians with experience in public health and/or in indicator and database management were asked to indicate suitability and relevance from a list of potential indicators. The definitive Urban HEART Barcelona version included 15 indicators from the five Urban HEART domains and improved the previous version in several requirements. Several barriers were encountered, such as having to estimate indicators in scarcely populated areas or finding adequate

  19. The impact of services that offer individualised funds, shared management, person-centred relationships, and self-direction on the lived experiences of consumers with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sunila; Buchanan, Angus; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    Mental health service providers across Australia, including Western Australia (WA), have begun to offer individualised funds, shared management, person-centred and self-directed (SPS) services. No research exists on the impact of SPS services on the lived experiences of these particular consumers. This study explored the impact of a SPS service offered for the first time in WA to consumers with mental illness. Data on sixteen consumers' lived experiences were analysed using an abbreviated grounded theory approach. These data had been developed by the consumers, Guides (staff) and an independent evaluator, and most of it had been collected in the past prior to the commencement of the study. Three over-arching categories, and related subcategories, emerged indicating that 1) access to individualised funds enabled practical and psychological benefits to consumers; 2) consistent contact in shared management and person-centred relationships enhanced the provision of timely and meaningful staff support to consumers; and 3) high quality shared management and person-centred relationships with staff and the opportunity to self-direct enabled consumers' change and growth. SPS services enhanced consumers' lived experiences and enabled staff to provide and consumers to experience timely access to recovery resources, consistent contact, responsive and high quality support, and self-direction of services. In this, consumers changed, grew and achieved desired recovery experiences. The overall impact of the SPS service seemed to be founded on the goodness of fit between person characteristics of staff and consumers, which enabled rich support that provided for corrective emotional experiences. This enabled consumers to build meaningful and hopeful lives where they started to live with, and beyond, their mental illness.

  20. The Real Time Mission Monitor: A Situational Awareness Tool For Managing Experiment Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Richard; Hall, John; Goodman, Michael; Parker, Philip; Freudinger, Larry; He, Matt

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a situational awareness tool that integrates satellite, airborne and surface data sets; weather information; model and forecast outputs; and vehicle state data (e.g., aircraft navigation, satellite tracks and instrument field-of-views) for field experiment management RTMM optimizes science and logistic decision-making during field experiments by presenting timely data and graphics to the users to improve real time situational awareness of the experiment's assets. The RTMM is proven in the field as it supported program managers, scientists, and aircraft personnel during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses experiment during summer 2006 in Cape Verde, Africa. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible through data acquisition systems, network communication links and network server resources built and managed by collaborators at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). RTMM is evolving towards a more flexible and dynamic combination of sensor ingest, network computing, and decision-making activities through the use of a service oriented architecture based on community standards and protocols.

  1. Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marton, Attila; Constantiou, Ioanna; Thoma, Antonela

    De spite the hype the notion of the sharing economy is surrounded by, our understanding of sharing is surprisingly undertheorized. In this paper, we make a first step towards rem edying this state of affairs by analy sing sharing as a s ocial practice. Based on a multi ple - case study, we analyse...

  2. Shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: The experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, Vincent Israel Opoku

    2012-04-17

    Objective. The study aims to explore the views of General Practitioners in Ireland on shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care. Method. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 400 randomly selected General Practitioners working in Ireland. Results. Of the respondents, 189 (94%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialised psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 124 (61.4%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: a concern that primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (113, 53.2%); a concern this would result in increased financial burden on some patients (89, 48.8%); a lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialised mental health services (84, 41.8%); a concern that some patients may lack confidence in GP care (55, 27.4%); and that primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (29, 14.4% ). Conclusion. The majority of GPs in Ireland would support a policy of shared care of psychiatric patients; however they raise significant concerns regarding practical implications of such a policy in Ireland.

  3. Shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: the experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent Israel Opoku; Jabbar, Faiza; Conway, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Objective. The study aims to explore the views of General Practitioners in Ireland on shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care. Method. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 400 randomly selected General Practitioners working in Ireland. Results. Of the respondents, 189 (94%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialised psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 124 (61.4%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: a concern that primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (113, 53.2%); a concern this would result in increased financial burden on some patients (89, 48.8%); a lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialised mental health services (84, 41.8%); a concern that some patients may lack confidence in GP care (55, 27.4%); and that primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (29, 14.4% ). Conclusion. The majority of GPs in Ireland would support a policy of shared care of psychiatric patients; however they raise significant concerns regarding practical implications of such a policy in Ireland.

  4. Sharing City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This magazine offers an insight into the growing commercial innovation, civic movements, and political narratives surrounding sharing economy services, solutions and organisational types. It presents a cross-section of the manifold sharing economy services and solutions that can be found in Denmark....... Solutions of sharing that seeks to improve our cities and local communities in both urban and rural environments. 24 sharing economy organisations and businesses addressing urban and rural issues are being portrayed and seven Danish municipalities that have explored the potentials of sharing economy....... Moreover, 15 thought leading experts - professionals and academic - have been invited to give their perspective on sharing economy for cities. This magazine touches upon aspects of the sharing economy as mobility, communities, sustainability, business development, mobility, and urban-rural relation....

  5. New tools and technology for the study of human performance in simulator experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droeivoldsmo, Asgeir

    2003-07-01

    This thesis suggests that new tools and technology can be used for production of relevant data and insights from the study of human performance in simulator and field experiments. It examines some of the theoretical perspectives behind data collection and human performance assessment, and argues for a high resemblance of the real world and use of subject matter expertise in simulator studies. A model is proposed, suggesting that human performance measurement should be tightly coupled to the topic of study and have a close connection to the time line. This coupling requires new techniques for continuous data collection, and eye movement tracking has been identified as a promising basis for this type of measures. One way of improving realism is to create virtual environments allowing for controlling more of the environment surrounding the test subjects. New application areas for virtual environments are discussed for use in control room and field studies. The combination of wearable computing, virtual and augmented (the use of computers to overlay virtual information onto the real world) reality provides many new possibilities to present information to operators. In two experiments, virtual and augmented reality techniques were used to visualise radiation fields for operators in a contaminated nuclear environment. This way the operators could train for and execute their tasks in a way that minimised radiation exposure to the individual operator. Both experiments were successful in proving the concept of radiation visualisation. Virtual environments allow for early end-user feedback in the design and refurbishment of control room man-machine interfaces. The practical usability of VR in the control room setting was tested in two control room design experiments. The results show that with the right tools for solving the tasks under test, even desktop presentations of the virtual environment can provide sufficient resemblance of the real world. Computerised data

  6. The Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS): a useful tool in workplace health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Petra; Andersson, H Ingemar; Ejlertsson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    To present validity data for the Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS), an instrument measuring multifaceted work experience from a salutogenic health resource perspective as a contrast to the more common pathogenic risk perspective, by exploring WEMS relationship to established measurements that are positively related to health and work. A salutogenic perspective focuses on finding conditions and resources in life, for example at work, that can enhance the individual's health and strength, instead of those causing illness and weakness. This study was carried out in 2009 at a Swedish hospital with a web-based survey (WEMS) to 770 employees. Different occupational groups at the hospital participated. Additional questionnaires used at the same time were the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9), the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS), the General Self-Efficacy scale (GSE), and three questions about self-rated health, general well-being, and quality of life. Cronbach's Alpha of WEMS sub-indices were in the interval of 0.85-0.96. Convergent validity and discriminant validity of WEMS and its sub-indices were shown to be satisfying by correlations. In addition, WEMS demonstrated the ability to discriminate between groups. WEMS sub-indices discriminated even better between groups than the total index. The WEMS proved to be a workplace health promotion questionnaire that was able to measure experiences of work from a salutogenic perspective. The WEMS has a potential of being a useful tool in workplace health promotion to enhance positive human capabilities and resources to improve work performance.

  7. Shared care between specialized psychiatric services and primary care: the experiences and expectations of consultant psychiatrists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O; Conway, Catherine; Guerandel, Allys

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, there has been a growing interest in the pursuit of collaborative forms of care for patients with enduring mental health difficulties. The study aims to explore the views of consultant psychiatrists in Ireland on shared care between specialized psychiatric services and primary care for patients with mental health difficulties. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 470 consultant psychiatrists who are members of the College of Psychiatry of Ireland. Stamped self-addressed envelopes were included for the return of completed questionnaires. Overall, 213 questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate of 45%. Of the respondents, 194 (91%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialized psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 181 (85%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: increased financial burden on some patients (141, 66%); some patients may lack confidence in GP care (100, 47%); primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (128, 60%); primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (111, 52%); and lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialized mental health services (96, 45%). The Irish government and the Colleges of General Practitioners and Psychiatrists in Ireland need to work together to remove the bottlenecks that hinder the active involvement of primary care in the management of patients with enduring mental health difficulties. Also, the health care systems need to be organized along a shared care model to facilitate effective collaboration between primary and specialized psychiatric services.

  8. How to increase the market share of public transportation? Experiences from the city of Göteborg.

    OpenAIRE

    Hadasch, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on measures for a process of increasing the market share of public transportation in the case of the city of Göteborg. Based on a general discussion of the question how people behave in terms of traveling by public transportation or car and the theoretical framework sorting different groups of measures of push and pull factors, a presentation of the use of measures in the case of the city of Göteborg leads to the development of possible first steps. Literature about travel b...

  9. Coupling Flux Towers and Networks with Proximal and Remote Sensing Data: New Tools to Collect and Share Time-Synchronized Hourly Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, George; Avenson, Tom; Burkart, Andreas; Gamon, John; Guan, Kaiyu; Julitta, Tommaso; Pastorello, Gilberto; Sakowska, Karolina

    2017-04-01

    Multiple hundreds of flux towers are presently operational as standalone projects and as parts of larger networks. However, the vast majority of these towers do not allow straight-forward coupling with satellite data, and even fewer have optical sensors for validation of satellite products and upscaling from field to regional levels. In 2016, new tools to collect, process, and share time-synchronized flux data from multiple towers were developed and deployed globally. Originally designed to automate site and data management, these new tools can also be effective in coupling tower data with satellite data due to the following present capabilities: Fully automated FluxSuite system combines hardware, software and web-services, and does not require an expert to run it It can be incorporated into a new flux station or added to a present station, using weatherized remotely-accessible microcomputer, SmartFlux2 It utilizes EddyPro software to calculate fully-processed fluxes and footprints in near-realtime, alongside radiation, optical, weather and soil data All site data are merged into a single quality-controlled file timed using PTP time protocol Data from optical sensors can be integrated into this complete dataset via compatible dataloggers Multiple stations can be linked into time-synchronized network with automated reports and email alerts visible to PIs in real-time Remote sensing researchers without stations can form "virtual networks" of stations by collaborating with tower PIs from different physical networks The present system can then be utilized to couple ground data with satellite data via the following proposed concept: GPS-driven PTP protocol will synchronize instrumentation within the station, different stations with each other, and all of these to satellite data to precisely align optical and flux data in time Footprint size and coordinates computed and stored with flux data will help correctly align footprints and satellite motion to precisely align

  10. Understanding experiences of and rationales for sharing crack-smoking equipment: A qualitative study with persons who smoke crack in Montréal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliquin, Hélène; Bertrand, Karine; Flores-Aranda, Jorge; Roy, Élise

    2017-10-01

    The distribution of safer crack-smoking equipment has been implemented in several Canadian cities to reduce potential health risks such as transmission of blood borne viruses (BBV). Little is known about the perspectives of persons who smoke crack (PWSC) on sharing crack-smoking materials or using in settings where safer crack-smoking equipment is provided. This paper presents data from the perspective of PWSC in Montréal on their experiences of, and rationales for, sharing crack-smoking equipment, in light of the risks of BBV transmission. This qualitative study is based on analyses of BBV risk behaviours among people who use cocaine. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted in low-threshold community centres for persons who use drugs. Twenty-six interviewees who used cocaine also smoked crack, and constitute a subsample for analyses. Interview transcripts were coded inductively and analyzed thematically from a symbolic interactionist perspective. Participants demonstrated personal agency by adopting strategies to minimise sharing of smoking equipment. These included being firm in refusal to share, smoking alone, and keeping an extra pipe to give to others. Nonetheless, sharing seemed to be commonplace and was attributed to contextual and personal factors. These were linked to the social dynamics among smokers; economic reasons such as wanting to keep the accumulated crack resin; practical reasons such as lacking own smoking equipment; being ashamed to purchase or acquire crack pipes; fatalism; poor personal agency; and ambivalence or scepticism towards BBV transmission risks. To reinforce harm reduction for PWSC, interventions aimed at reducing barriers to safer smoking practices should be developed at both structural and individual levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Innovation in Multi-Level Governance for Energy Efficiency. Sharing experience with multi-level governance to enhance energy efficiency. Information paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jollands, Nigel; Gasc, Emilien; Pasquier, Sara Bryan

    2009-12-15

    Despite creating a plethora of national and international regulations and voluntary programmes to improve energy efficiency, countries are far from achieving full energy efficiency potential across all sectors of the economy. One major challenge, among numerous barriers, is policy implementation. One strategy that many national governments and international organisations have used to address the implementation issue is to engage regional and local authorities. To that end, many programmes have been created that foster energy efficiency action and collaboration across levels of government. The aim of this report is to identify trends and detail recent developments in multi-level governance in energy efficiency (MLGEE). By sharing lessons learned from daily practitioners in the field, the IEA hopes energy efficiency policy makers at all levels of government will be able to identify useful multilevel governance (MLG) practices across geographical and political contexts and use these to design robust programmes; modify existing programmes, and connect and share experiences with other policy makers in this field.

  12. Shared reality of the abusive and the vulnerable: the experience of aging for parents living with abusive adult children coping with mental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band-Winterstein, Tova; Smeloy, Yael; Avieli, Hila

    2014-11-01

    Increasing numbers of aging parents are finding themselves in the role of caregiver for their mentally ill adult child due to global deinstitutionalization policy. The aim of this paper is to describe the daily aging experience of parents abused by an adult child with mental disorder and the challenges confronting them in this shared reality. Data collection was performed through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 16 parents, followed by content analysis. Three major themes emerged: (a) old age as a platform for parent's vulnerability facing ongoing abuse; (b) "whose needs come first?" in a shared reality of abusive and vulnerable protagonists; (c) changes in relationship dynamics. Old age becomes an arena for redefined relationships combining increased vulnerability, needs of both sides, and its impact on the well-being of the aging parents. This calls for better insights and deeper understanding in regard to intervention with such families.

  13. MIKE's PET: A participant-based experiment tracking tool for HCI practitioners using mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamedally, Dean; Edlich, Stefan; Klaus, Enrico; Zaphiris, Panayiotis

    2006-02-01

    Knowledge Elicitation (KE) methods are an integral part of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) practices. They are a key aspect to the synthesis of psychology empirical methods with requirements engineering, User Centred Design (UCD) and user evaluations. Examples of these methods include prototyping, focus groups, interviews, surveys and direct video observation. The MIKE project (Mobile Interactive Knowledge Elicitation) at the Centre for HCI Design, City University London, UK provides mobile cyberscience capabilities for HCI practitioners conducting such research while at stakeholder locations. This paper reports on the design and development of a new MIKE based tool, named PET, a Participant-based Experiment Tracking tool for HCI practitioners using Java-based (J2ME) mobile devices. PET integrates its user tracking techniques with the development of the second generation implementation of the CONKER (COllaborative Non-linear Knowledge Elicitation Repository) Web Service. We thus report further on CONKER v2.0's new capabilities developed to enable tighter collaboration and empirical data management between HCI practitioners, considering their UCD needs. The visualisation, tracking and recording of HCI participant-based datasets via PET is explored with close connectivity with the CONKER v2.0 Web Service, in order to provide mobile-web cyberscience for remote and local HCI practitioners.

  14. Thinking outside the Box Office: Using Movies to Build Shared Experiences and Student Engagement in Online or Hybrid Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresse, William; Watland, Kathleen Hanold

    2016-01-01

    Movies and films are widely recognized as valuable pedagogical tools. Motion pictures provide concrete and illustrative examples of important concepts and can improve students' understanding of course material as well as increase their satisfaction with courses. Online learning is becoming an increasing dominant facet of higher education. Online…

  15. FEATnotator: A tool for integrated annotation of sequence features and variation, facilitating interpretation in genomics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podicheti, Ram; Mockaitis, Keithanne

    2015-06-01

    As approaches are sought for more efficient and democratized uses of non-model and expanded model genomics references, ease of integration of genomic feature datasets is especially desirable in multidisciplinary research communities. Valuable conclusions are often missed or slowed when researchers refer experimental results to a single reference sequence that lacks integrated pan-genomic and multi-experiment data in accessible formats. Association of genomic positional information, such as results from an expansive variety of next-generation sequencing experiments, with annotated reference features such as genes or predicted protein binding sites, provides the context essential for conclusions and ongoing research. When the experimental system includes polymorphic genomic inputs, rapid calculation of gene structural and protein translational effects of sequence variation from the reference can be invaluable. Here we present FEATnotator, a lightweight, fast and easy to use open source software program that integrates and reports overlap and proximity in genomic information from any user-defined datasets including those from next generation sequencing applications. We illustrate use of the tool by summarizing whole genome sequence variation of a widely used natural isolate of Arabidopsis thaliana in the context of gene models of the reference accession. Previous discovery of a protein coding deletion influencing root development is replicated rapidly. Appropriate even in investigations of a single gene or genic regions such as QTL, comprehensive reports provided by FEATnotator better prepare researchers for interpretation of their experimental results. The tool is available for download at http://featnotator.sourceforge.net. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Professional tools and a personal touch - experiences of physical therapy of persons with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutberg, Stina; Kostenius, Catrine; Öhrling, Kerstin

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to explore the lived experience of physical therapy of persons with migraine. Data were collected by conducting narrative interviews with 11 persons with migraine. Inspired by van Manen, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used to analyse the experiences of physical therapy which these persons had. Physical therapy for persons with migraine meant making an effort in terms of time and energy to improve their health by meeting a person who was utilising his or her knowledge and skill to help. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist were highlighted aspects. The analysis revealed a main theme, "meeting a physical therapist with professional tools and a personal touch". The main theme included four sub-themes, "investing time and energy to feel better", "relying on the competence of the physical therapist", "wanting to be treated and to become involved as an individual" and "being respected in a trustful relationship". The therapeutic relationship with the physical therapist is important and the findings of this study can increase awareness about relational aspects of physical therapy and encourage thoughtfulness among physical therapists and other healthcare professionals interacting with persons with migraine. Physical therapists use both professional tools and a personal touch in their interaction with persons with migraine and this article can increase physical therapists' awareness and encourage thoughtfulness in their professional practice. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist are important aspects of the therapeutic relationship and indicate a need for patient-centred care. By making the effort of spending the time and energy required, physical therapy could be a complement or an alternative to medication to ease the consequences of migraine.

  17. Adult English Language Learners Constructing and Sharing Their Stories and Experiences: The Cultural and Linguistic Autobiography Writing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    This article is the culmination of the Cultural and Linguistic Autobiography (CLA) writing project, which details narrative descriptions of adult English language learners' (ELLs') cultural and linguistic experiences and how those experiences may have influenced the ways in which these learners constructed and reconstructed their identities.…

  18. Global resource sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Frederiksen, Linda; Nance, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Written from a global perspective, this book reviews sharing of library resources on a global scale. With expanded discovery tools and massive digitization projects, the rich and extensive holdings of the world's libraries are more visible now than at any time in the past. Advanced communication and transmission technologies, along with improved international standards, present a means for the sharing of library resources around the globe. Despite these significant improvements, a number of challenges remain. Global Resource Sharing provides librarians and library managers with a comprehensive

  19. Sharing City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This magazine offers an insight into the growing commercial innovation, civic movements, and political narratives surrounding sharing economy services, solutions and organisational types. It presents a cross-section of the manifold sharing economy services and solutions that can be found in Denmark....... Moreover, 15 thought leading experts - professionals and academic - have been invited to give their perspective on sharing economy for cities. This magazine touches upon aspects of the sharing economy as mobility, communities, sustainability, business development, mobility, and urban-rural relation....

  20. Shared processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Auxiliadora Gálvez Pérez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe comparison between the creative processes in dance and architecture constitute a panorama, which is able to fi gure out reality with different and intense perceptive connotations. It is about a reality where the important thing is the immersion into the spatial-temporal phenomena, the contact of the space of our body and the spatial essence that is outside our skin limits. Under an architectonical point of view, dance would be a key  discipline, a laboratory where it is possible to freely explore the concepts related to the body-space system, consequently it is also a good frame to seek the necessary tools to work with them. One of the most important examples of this laboratory consolidated in the intersection of choreographical, and architectonical processes is the collaboration betweenLawrence Halprin, landscape architect, and Anna Halprin, choreographer. Through the direct experience of the body in space, they will develop notations and creative cycles able to work with the material of this expanded perception of reality. The review of these creative cycles tested mainly in the sixties is nowadays specially appropriated, when diverse branches of philosophy rooted in phenomenology are interested precisely in dance and architecture as key territories. It seems that it is the opportune moment to expand the architectonical tools, which have been implemented till now, following phenomenological concerns.

  1. A social program for adolescent and young adult survivors of pediatric brain tumors: The power of a shared medical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptak, Cori; Brinkman, Tara; Bronson, Amanda; Delaney, Brian; Chordas, Christine; Brand, Sarah; Patenaude, Andrea Farkas; Muriel, Anna C; Manley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Survivors of pediatric brain tumors experience several medical and psychosocial late effects including deficits in social competence. This mixed methods study investigated the experience of 19 adolescent and young adult survivors of pediatric brain tumors and 17 parents who participated in a social support program. Qualitative results demonstrated a significant social isolation that was compounded by medical late effects. Survivors perceived social support and acceptance from interactions with peers who have similar medical backgrounds as a key aspect of the group experience. Parents reported increased social confidence among survivors, although they did not report that social gains generalized beyond the group setting. Interventions to promote the transfer of specific social skills are needed.

  2. [Biosensors as a tool to use in the experiments on blood and selected blood proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Ziewiecki, Rafał; Czerchawski, Leszek; Krotkiewski, Hubert; Gancarz, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Over last few years, biosensors have become increasingly used as a research tool. Using innovative techniques of detection and estimation of the strength of intermolecular bonds, is particularly important in biochemical processes, including the study of mechanisms of interactions between plasma proteins in the circulatory system. With the numerous enhancements biosensors have become extremely sensitive devices, allowing for analysis of diverse biological material. Moreover, the use of immobilization techniques enables to use sample repeatedly, which significantly reduces costs and the ability to monitor tests in real-time shorten the time of experiment. The presented work discusses examples of the usage of biosensors in the research on the mechanisms of the interactions of blood plasma proteins. The experiments on cancer biomarkers present in the blood circulation system, protein C deficiency causing non-controlled hemorrhagic accidents, and on the level of fibrinogen, as well as 20S proteasome concentration in plasma, are just some examples of biosensors usage in the analyses of blood. They are also applicable in the research work performed the project WROVASC--Integrated Cardiovascular Center, concerning the mechanisms of anticoagulant activity in blood plasma of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide macromolecules of plant origin.

  3. Professional tools and a personal touch – experiences of physical therapy of persons with migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenius, Catrine; Öhrling, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to explore the lived experience of physical therapy of persons with migraine. Method: Data were collected by conducting narrative interviews with 11 persons with migraine. Inspired by van Manen, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used to analyse the experiences of physical therapy which these persons had. Results: Physical therapy for persons with migraine meant making an effort in terms of time and energy to improve their health by meeting a person who was utilising his or her knowledge and skill to help. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist were highlighted aspects. The analysis revealed a main theme, “meeting a physical therapist with professional tools and a personal touch”. The main theme included four sub-themes, “investing time and energy to feel better”, “relying on the competence of the physical therapist”, “wanting to be treated and to become involved as an individual” and “being respected in a trustful relationship”. Conclusions: The therapeutic relationship with the physical therapist is important and the findings of this study can increase awareness about relational aspects of physical therapy and encourage thoughtfulness among physical therapists and other healthcare professionals interacting with persons with migraine. PMID:23311671

  4. Quality tools and techniques, EFQM experience and strategy formation. Is there any relationship? The particular case of Spanish service firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Revuelto-Taboada

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of the application of quality tools and techniques has been broadly covered by the specialist literature. To a lesser extent, the literature has analysed the strategic capability of the EFQM model, that is, its capacity to facilitate integrative (rational and emergent strategy formation processes. But, the study of how the application of this model may affect how firms apply quality tools and techniques remain unexplored. Taking this gap in the literature as a starting point, our research goal is threefold: first of all, we intend to study the relationship between the use of tools and techniques and the experience of a firm in the application of quality management and the EFQM Excellence Model; secondly, we have the intention of studying the extent to which quality tools and techniques may affect rationality and/or emergence in the strategy formation process; and thirdly, we try to analyse the effect of the experience in the use of the EFQM model on this relationship. We employed a quantitative research methodology to try to reach these goals. As a consequence, some interesting results have come up. As an example, the experience in the application of the EFQM model has a moderating effect on how companies use quality tools and techniques. Concretely, a great experience in the employment of this model make firms to apply quality tools and techniques in a more participative way combined with high levels of formalisation and planning. Also, some other conclusions and implications have been drawn up

  5. File sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.

    2011-01-01

    ‘File sharing’ has become generally accepted on the Internet. Users share files for downloading music, films, games, software etc. In this note, we have a closer look at the definition of file sharing, the legal and policy-based context as well as enforcement issues. The economic and cultural

  6. Metadata based management and sharing of distributed biomedical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Liu, Peiya

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research data sharing is becoming increasingly important for researchers to reuse experiments, pool expertise and validate approaches. However, there are many hurdles for data sharing, including the unwillingness to share, lack of flexible data model for providing context information, difficulty to share syntactically and semantically consistent data across distributed institutions, and high cost to provide tools to share the data. SciPort is a web-based collaborative biomedical data sharing platform to support data sharing across distributed organisations. SciPort provides a generic metadata model to flexibly customise and organise the data. To enable convenient data sharing, SciPort provides a central server based data sharing architecture with a one-click data sharing from a local server. To enable consistency, SciPort provides collaborative distributed schema management across distributed sites. To enable semantic consistency, SciPort provides semantic tagging through controlled vocabularies. SciPort is lightweight and can be easily deployed for building data sharing communities. PMID:24834105

  7. Shared leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Müller, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, this paper comprehensively will review the conceptual and empirical literature to identify such critical underlying mechanisms which enable shared or collective leadership. Second, this article identifies the antecedents and outcomes of shared leadership...... according to the literature review to develop a re-conceptualised and synthesized framework for managing the organizational issues associated with shared leadership on various organizational levels. The paper rectifies this by identifying the critical factors and mechanisms which enable shared leadership...... and its antecedents and outcomes, and to develop a re-conceptualized and synthesized framework of shared leadership. The paper closes with a brief discussion of avenues for future research and implications for managers....

  8. Data sharing in neuroimaging research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste ePoline

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant resources around the world have been invested in neuroimaging studies of brain function and disease. Easier access to this large body of work should have profound impact on research in cognitive neuroscience and psychiatry, leading to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological disease. A trend toward increased sharing of neuroimaging data has emerged in recent years. Nevertheless, a number of barriers continue to impede momentum. Many researchers and institutions remain uncertain about how to share data or lack the tools and expertise to participate in data sharing. The use of electronic data capture methods for neuroimaging greatly simplifies the task of data collection and has the potential to help standardize many aspects of data sharing. We review here the motivations for sharing neuroimaging data, the current data sharing landscape, and the sociological or technical barriers that still need to be addressed. The INCF Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing, in conjunction with several collaborative groups around the world, has started work on several tools to ease and eventually automate the practice of data sharing. It is hoped that such tools will allow researchers to easily share raw, processed, and derived neuroimaging data, with appropriate metadata and provenance records, and will improve the reproducibility of neuroimaging studies. By providing seamless integration of data sharing and analysis tools within a commodity research environment, the Task Force seeks to identify and minimize barriers to data sharing in the field of neuroimaging.

  9. Cancer Risk Information Sharing: The Experience of Individuals Receiving Genetic Counseling for BRCA1/2 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Ishveen; Kelly, Kimberly M

    2017-02-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for familial cancer is a unique context for the communication of risk information in the family. This study utilized a theoretical framework based on the family systems perspective to understand intrafamilial cancer risk communication patterns in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Individuals (n = 120) at an elevated risk for BRCA1/2 mutations were included. Change in communication patterns over time was assessed using McNemar tests. Associations with communication patterns were assessed with multivariable logistic regression. Overall, the proportion of participants encouraged by others significantly (p risk perception were more likely to be encouraged by others for genetic testing. Participant's intent to encourage family members for genetic testing from before counseling to after receipt of genetic test results decreased by 16.7%. Participants who had no personal history of cancer and had informative test results for a BRCA1/2 mutation were more likely to encourage other family members for genetic testing. In addition, qualitative findings suggested that closeness among family members, concern for family, especially future generations, and cognizance about cancer risk facilitate information sharing and encouragement for genetic testing. Our findings indicate that intrafamilial cancer risk communication varies with the structure of family relationships and that genetic counseling can play an important role in improving intrafamilial cancer risk communication.

  10. Comparing Traditional Journal Writing with Journal Writing Shared over E-mail List Serves as Tools for Facilitating Reflective Thinking: A Study of Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Diane S.; Rupley, William H.; Sparks, Joanne; Holcomb, Angelia

    2007-01-01

    To determine the conditions that would best encourage reflection in journal writing of preservice teachers in field-based reading internships, the degree of reflective content found in self-contained traditional journals was compared to the reflective content found in journal entries shared over e-mail list serves. Participants were 56 preservice…

  11. Drama as a pedagogical tool for practicing death notification-experiences from Swedish medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Anna; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Grysell, Tomas

    2011-09-28

    One of the toughest tasks in any profession is the deliverance of death notification. Marathon Death is an exercise conducted during the fourth year of medical school in northern Sweden to prepare students for this responsibility. The exercise is designed to enable students to gain insight into the emotional and formal procedure of delivering death notifications. The exercise is inspired by Augusto Boal's work around Forum Theatre and is analyzed using video playback. The aim of the study was to explore reflections, attitudes and ideas toward training in delivering death notifications among medical students who participate in the Marathon Death exercise based on forum play. After participation in the Marathon Death exercise, students completed semi-structured interviews. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using the principles of qualitative content analysis including a deductive content analysis approach with a structured matrix based on Bloom's taxonomy domains. The Marathon Death exercise was perceived as emotionally loaded, realistic and valuable for the future professional role as a physician. The deliverance of a death notification to the next of kin that a loved one has died was perceived as difficult. The exercise conjured emotions such as positive expectations and sheer anxiety. Students perceived participation in the exercise as an important learning experience, discovering that they had the capacity to manage such a difficult situation. The feedback from the video playback of the exercise and the feedback from fellow students and teachers enhanced the learning experience. The exercise, Marathon Death, based on forum play with video playback is a useful pedagogical tool that enables students to practice delivering death notification. The ability to practice under realistic conditions contributes to reinforce students in preparation for their future professional role.

  12. Drama as a pedagogical tool for practicing death notification-experiences from Swedish medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fjellman-Wiklund Anncristine

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the toughest tasks in any profession is the deliverance of death notification. Marathon Death is an exercise conducted during the fourth year of medical school in northern Sweden to prepare students for this responsibility. The exercise is designed to enable students to gain insight into the emotional and formal procedure of delivering death notifications. The exercise is inspired by Augusto Boal's work around Forum Theatre and is analyzed using video playback. The aim of the study was to explore reflections, attitudes and ideas toward training in delivering death notifications among medical students who participate in the Marathon Death exercise based on forum play. Methods After participation in the Marathon Death exercise, students completed semi-structured interviews. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using the principles of qualitative content analysis including a deductive content analysis approach with a structured matrix based on Bloom's taxonomy domains. Results The Marathon Death exercise was perceived as emotionally loaded, realistic and valuable for the future professional role as a physician. The deliverance of a death notification to the next of kin that a loved one has died was perceived as difficult. The exercise conjured emotions such as positive expectations and sheer anxiety. Students perceived participation in the exercise as an important learning experience, discovering that they had the capacity to manage such a difficult situation. The feedback from the video playback of the exercise and the feedback from fellow students and teachers enhanced the learning experience. Conclusions The exercise, Marathon Death, based on forum play with video playback is a useful pedagogical tool that enables students to practice delivering death notification. The ability to practice under realistic conditions contributes to reinforce students in preparation for their future professional role.

  13. Reflections on Using Pinhole Photography as a Pedagogical and Methodological Tool with Adolescents in Wild Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, Teresa; Potter, Tom; Potter, Stephanie; Jickling, Bob

    2016-01-01

    This paper shares our experiences using pinhole photography with adolescents as both a pedagogical tool to support and deepen adolescent experiences in wild nature, and as a visual methodological tool to elucidate their experiences. Reflecting on a journey that explored the nature-based experiences of two adolescents on a family canoe trip in…

  14. Exploring the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    Despite the growing interest on the part of proponents and opponents - ranging from business, civil society, media, to policy-makers alike - there is still limited knowledge about the working mechanisms of the sharing economy. The thesis is dedicated to explore this understudied phenomenon...... and to provide a more nuanced understanding of the micro- and macro-level tensions that characterize the sharing economy. This thesis consists of four research papers, each using different literature, methodology, and data sets. The first paper investigates how the sharing economy is diffused and is ‘talked......-level tensions experience by sharing platforms by looking at the case of mobile fashion reselling and swapping markets. The final paper combines the perspectives of different sharing economy stakeholders and outlines some of the micro and macro tensions arising in and influencing the organization of these multi...

  15. Can abstract screening workload be reduced using text mining? User experiences of the tool Rayyan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Hanna; Brolund, Agneta; Hellberg, Christel; Silverstein, Rebecca; Stenström, Karin; Österberg, Marie; Dagerhamn, Jessica

    2017-09-01

    One time-consuming aspect of conducting systematic reviews is the task of sifting through abstracts to identify relevant studies. One promising approach for reducing this burden uses text mining technology to identify those abstracts that are potentially most relevant for a project, allowing those abstracts to be screened first. To examine the effectiveness of the text mining functionality of the abstract screening tool Rayyan. User experiences were collected. Rayyan was used to screen abstracts for 6 reviews in 2015. After screening 25%, 50%, and 75% of the abstracts, the screeners logged the relevant references identified. A survey was sent to users. After screening half of the search result with Rayyan, 86% to 99% of the references deemed relevant to the study were identified. Of those studies included in the final reports, 96% to 100% were already identified in the first half of the screening process. Users rated Rayyan 4.5 out of 5. The text mining function in Rayyan successfully helped reviewers identify relevant studies early in the screening process. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    The concept of knowledge management has, indeed, become a buzzword that every single organization is expected to practice and live by. Knowledge management is about managing the organization's knowledge for the common good of the organization -but practicing knowledge management is not as simple...... as that. This article focuses on knowledge sharing as the process seeking to reduce the resources spent on reinventing the wheel.The article introduces the concept of time sensitiveness; i.e. that knowledge is either urgently needed, or not that urgently needed. Furthermore, knowledge sharing...... is considered as either a push or pull system. Four strategies for sharing knowledge - help, post-it, manuals and meeting, and advice are introduced. Each strategy requires different channels for sharing knowledge. An empirical analysis in a production facility highlights how the strategies can be practiced....

  17. Bonobos Share with Strangers

    OpenAIRE

    Jingzhi Tan; Brian Hare

    2013-01-01

    Humans are thought to possess a unique proclivity to share with others ? including strangers. This puzzling phenomenon has led many to suggest that sharing with strangers originates from human-unique language, social norms, warfare and/or cooperative breeding. However, bonobos, our closest living relative, are highly tolerant and, in the wild, are capable of having affiliative interactions with strangers. In four experiments, we therefore examined whether bonobos will voluntarily donate food ...

  18. Sharing Neuron Data: Carrots, Sticks, and Digital Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2015-10-01

    Routine data sharing is greatly benefiting several scientific disciplines, such as molecular biology, particle physics, and astronomy. Neuroscience data, in contrast, are still rarely shared, greatly limiting the potential for secondary discovery and the acceleration of research progress. Although the attitude toward data sharing is non-uniform across neuroscience subdomains, widespread adoption of data sharing practice will require a cultural shift in the community. Digital reconstructions of axonal and dendritic morphology constitute a particularly "sharable" kind of data. The popularity of the public repository NeuroMorpho.Org demonstrates that data sharing can benefit both users and contributors. Increased data availability is also catalyzing the grassroots development and spontaneous integration of complementary resources, research tools, and community initiatives. Even in this rare successful subfield, however, more data are still unshared than shared. Our experience as developers and curators of NeuroMorpho.Org suggests that greater transparency regarding the expectations and consequences of sharing (or not sharing) data, combined with public disclosure of which datasets are shared and which are not, may expedite the transition to community-wide data sharing.

  19. Sharing Neuron Data: Carrots, Sticks, and Digital Records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio A Ascoli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Routine data sharing is greatly benefiting several scientific disciplines, such as molecular biology, particle physics, and astronomy. Neuroscience data, in contrast, are still rarely shared, greatly limiting the potential for secondary discovery and the acceleration of research progress. Although the attitude toward data sharing is non-uniform across neuroscience subdomains, widespread adoption of data sharing practice will require a cultural shift in the community. Digital reconstructions of axonal and dendritic morphology constitute a particularly "sharable" kind of data. The popularity of the public repository NeuroMorpho.Org demonstrates that data sharing can benefit both users and contributors. Increased data availability is also catalyzing the grassroots development and spontaneous integration of complementary resources, research tools, and community initiatives. Even in this rare successful subfield, however, more data are still unshared than shared. Our experience as developers and curators of NeuroMorpho.Org suggests that greater transparency regarding the expectations and consequences of sharing (or not sharing data, combined with public disclosure of which datasets are shared and which are not, may expedite the transition to community-wide data sharing.

  20. Taking advantage of HTML5 browsers to realize the concepts of session state and workflow sharing in web-tool applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suftin, I.; Read, J. S.; Walker, J.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists prefer not having to be tied down to a specific machine or operating system in order to analyze local and remote data sets or publish work. Increasingly, analysis has been migrating to decentralized web services and data sets, using web clients to provide the analysis interface. While simplifying workflow access, analysis, and publishing of data, the move does bring with it its own unique set of issues. Web clients used for analysis typically offer workflows geared towards a single user, with steps and results that are often difficult to recreate and share with others. Furthermore, workflow results often may not be easily used as input for further analysis. Older browsers further complicate things by having no way to maintain larger chunks of information, often offloading the job of storage to the back-end server or trying to squeeze it into a cookie. It has been difficult to provide a concept of "session storage" or "workflow sharing" without a complex orchestration of the back-end for storage depending on either a centralized file system or database. With the advent of HTML5, browsers gained the ability to store more information through the use of the Web Storage API (a browser-cookie holds a maximum of 4 kilobytes). Web Storage gives us the ability to store megabytes of arbitrary data in-browser either with an expiration date or just for a session. This allows scientists to create, update, persist and share their workflow without depending on the backend to store session information, providing the flexibility for new web-based workflows to emerge. In the DSASWeb portal ( http://cida.usgs.gov/DSASweb/ ), using these techniques, the representation of every step in the analyst's workflow is stored as plain-text serialized JSON, which we can generate as a text file and provide to the analyst as an upload. This file may then be shared with others and loaded back into the application, restoring the application to the state it was in when the session file

  1. OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED PRACTICAL EXAMINATION AS A LEARNING AND EVALUATION TOOL FOR BIOCHEMISTRY- FIRST EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyabati Devi Rajkumari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Assessment plays an important role in helping learners identify their own learning needs. The objective structured practical examination assesses practical skills in an objective and structured manner with direct observation of the students’ performance during planned clinical test. The aim of the study is to evaluate OSPE as a method of learning and formative assessment to the practical skill and to explore faculty perception of OSPE as a learning and assessment tool. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 98 students of first year MBBS student admitted for 2015-16 batch of Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, were the subjects for the study. Day one- Group A (1-50 students were evaluated by OSPE method of assessment. Day two- Group B (51-98 were evaluated by standard practical examination. To avoid examiners Bias on Day 3- Group C (51- 98 who were evaluated by SPE were evaluated by OSPE with minor variations. Group A underwent OSPE. Questionnaire was given to students after the assessment on the fourth day to get the feedback. RESULTS Independent sample t-test comparing mean percent scores of OSPE and SPE between the groups. There is no statistically significant difference in the mean percent scores for OSPE and SPE among the two groups. Paired sample t-test comparing mean percent scores of OSPE and SPE of group B students. The mean percentage score for OSPE is higher than the percentage scores obtained in SPE among the group B students, but the difference was not found to be statistically significant. The feedback from the students showed that more than 80% agreed that OSPE was less stressful to perform that it was a more objective assessment. CONCLUSION In conclusion, OSPE has several distinct advantages. From our first experience, we found that OSPE was more objective, measured practical skills better and eliminated examiner bias.

  2. Experiences from Blended Learning, Net-based Learning and Mind Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvid Staupe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available My experiences described in this article are based on lecturing at the intermediate level at Department of Computer and Information Science (IDI at NTNU. The primary cause for initiating the research projects, which lasted several years and with a gradual increase in the use of ICT, was the tenfold increase in number of students over only a few years, from barely 20 to more than 250. Two positive results were a significant improvement in grades and a large increase in the proportion of students completing the course compared to earlier years, despite a strong increase in number of students and a decline of resources. Seventy percent of the students registered for the course completed and passed the exam, compared to forty nine percent the year before. For two other similar courses the completion percentages for this pilot year were thirty two percent and forty five percent, respectively. The average final grade improved from 3.2 to 2.5, where 1 is the highest grade in a scale from 1 to 6. The course was structured applying blended learning, net-based learning, and mind tools. The course was comprehensively evaluated with an external examiner and the results were compared to corresponding courses within the program with more traditional formats, and also to a more traditional format within the course itself. A traditional format includes lectures in an auditorium and approved/not approved when it comes to exercises in an obligatory exercise arrangement. The course was organized with a subject teacher, an exercise teacher (assistant teacher, and student assistants. There was one student assistant for each exercise group of 30 students.

  3. HappyFace as a generic monitoring tool for HEP experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Gen; Magradze, Erekle; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Quadt, Arnulf; Rzehorz, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The importance of monitoring on HEP grid computing systems is growing due to a significant increase in their complexity. Computer scientists and administrators have been studying and building effective ways to gather information on and clarify a status of each local grid infrastructure. The HappyFace project aims at making the above-mentioned workflow possible. It aggregates, processes and stores the information and the status of different HEP monitoring resources into the common database of HappyFace. The system displays the information and the status through a single interface. However, this model of HappyFace relied on the monitoring resources which are always under development in the HEP experiments. Consequently, HappyFace needed to have direct access methods to the grid application and grid service layers in the different HEP grid systems. To cope with this issue, we use a reliable HEP software repository, the CernVM File System. We propose a new implementation and an architecture of HappyFace, the so-called grid-enabled HappyFace. It allows its basic framework to connect directly to the grid user applications and the grid collective services, without involving the monitoring resources in the HEP grid systems. This approach gives HappyFace several advantages: Portability, to provide an independent and generic monitoring system among the HEP grid systems. Eunctionality, to allow users to perform various diagnostic tools in the individual HEP grid systems and grid sites. Elexibility, to make HappyFace beneficial and open for the various distributed grid computing environments. Different grid-enabled modules, to connect to the Ganga job monitoring system and to check the performance of grid transfers among the grid sites, have been implemented. The new HappyFace system has been successfully integrated and now it displays the information and the status of both the monitoring resources and the direct access to the grid user applications and the grid collective

  4. ISS-studio: a prototype for a user-friendly tool for designing interactive experiments in problem solving environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Z.; van Albada, G.D.; Tirado-Ramos, A.; Zajac, K.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In Problem Solving Environments (PSE), Interactive Simulation Systems (ISS) are an important interactive mode for studying complex scientific problems. But efficient and user-friendly tools for designing interactive experiments lack in many PSEs. Mechanisms, such as data flow and control flow

  5. Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). The Evaluation of an Innovative Competency-Based Assessment Experience in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Georgeta; Cano, Elena; Cabrera, Nati

    2016-01-01

    This article examines an innovation in teaching-learning and assessment processes through the use of a platform called the Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). It allows for the tracking of student blogs with the objective of improving self-reflective processes and providing feedback. The experiment was carried out in six universities in Catalonia,…

  6. Using Web-Based Technologies and Tools in Future Choreographers' Training: British Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidyuk, Dmytro

    2016-01-01

    In the paper the problem of using effective web-based technologies and tools in teaching choreography in British higher education institutions has been discussed. Researches on the usage of web-based technologies and tools for practical dance courses in choreographers' professional training at British higher education institutions by such British…

  7. Portfolio as a learning strategy and a tool for assessment - a Danish experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Arne

    A short presentation of some Danish expereriences using portfolio in maths teaching in primary and lower secondary schools as a learning strategy AND a tool for assessment.......A short presentation of some Danish expereriences using portfolio in maths teaching in primary and lower secondary schools as a learning strategy AND a tool for assessment....

  8. Under the watchful eye of 'a benevolent dictator' - general practitioner and patient experiences of hepatitis C treatment initiation and shared-care in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Max; Treloar, Carla

    2013-12-01

    Innovative models of hepatitis C treatment delivery are needed to increase treatment uptake. A qualitative evaluation of the Australasian Society for HIV Medicine's Initiation of Hepatitis C Treatment in General Practice Pilot was conducted between November 2010 and June 2012. Structured interview schedules collected data on the treatment experiences of seven general practitioners (GPs) and eight of their patients. GPs were satisfied with the process of initiating hepatitis C treatment. They were generally positive about the support they had experienced under shared-care arrangements with tertiary clinics and they saw few barriers to initiating treatment. Similarly, patients appreciated the continuity of care that this treatment model affords, the convenience of accessing treatment from their GP and being treated by a GP they trusted. The initiation of hepatitis C treatment through general practice is a viable model that could increase the number of people accessing hepatitis C treatment.

  9. Shared control of a medical robot with haptic guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfei; Chng, Chin Boon; Chui, Chee Kong; Yu, Peiwu; Li, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Tele-operation of robotic surgery reduces the radiation exposure during the interventional radiological operations. However, endoscope vision without force feedback on the surgical tool increases the difficulty for precise manipulation and the risk of tissue damage. The shared control of vision and force provides a novel approach of enhanced control with haptic guidance, which could lead to subtle dexterity and better maneuvrability during MIS surgery. The paper provides an innovative shared control method for robotic minimally invasive surgery system, in which vision and haptic feedback are incorporated to provide guidance cues to the clinician during surgery. The incremental potential field (IPF) method is utilized to generate a guidance path based on the anatomy of tissue and surgical tool interaction. Haptic guidance is provided at the master end to assist the clinician during tele-operative surgical robotic task. The approach has been validated with path following and virtual tumor targeting experiments. The experiment results demonstrate that comparing with vision only guidance, the shared control with vision and haptics improved the accuracy and efficiency of surgical robotic manipulation, where the tool-position error distance and execution time are reduced. The validation experiment demonstrates that the shared control approach could help the surgical robot system provide stable assistance and precise performance to execute the designated surgical task. The methodology could also be implemented with other surgical robot with different surgical tools and applications.

  10. Description and operational experience of the Stern Labs flux detector removal tool system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simons, B.; Hadaller, G. [Stern Laboratories, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Merrifield, K. [KLM Nuclear Solutions, Port Elgin, Ontario (Canada); Ballantyne, B. [Intoo (Innovating Tooling) Solutions, Kincardine, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    The Flux Detector Removal Tool (Chopper Tool) is a system for removing and compacting Single Individually Replaceable (SIR) In-Core Flux Detectors (ICFD) from a CANDU®1 reactor. The Chopper Tool was produced in response to customer demand for a portable, modular system suitable for use with either Vertical or Horizontal Flux Detector (VFD or HFD) housings that could allow multiple ICFDs to be replaced in a single shift without modifications to the primary containment boundary. The system was developed in several phases, funded by a CANDU Owner's Group (COG) joint project, and has been successfully used at multiple CANDU® stations, most recently to remove 9 vertical ICFDs at the Darlington NGS. This paper reviews the original design constraints, outlines the final system. design, and details the tests required for factory acceptance of each tool system. Some problems with earlier versions of the Chopper Tool, and the research and development required to resolve them are highlighted. Finally the results of the most recent ICFD removal campaign are presented. The successful implementation of the Chopper Tool demonstrates Stern Laboratories' ability to research and develop new reactor maintenance tooling, and reflects well on the COG framework for pooling expertise and resources amongst CANDU® utilities. (author)

  11. Experiences of using the GMP audit preparation tool in pharmaceutical contract manufacturer audits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linna, Anu; Korhonen, Mirka; Airaksinen, Marja; Juppo, Anne Mari

    2010-06-01

    Use of external contractors is nowadays inevitable in the pharmaceutical industry. Therefore the amount of current good manufacturing practice audits has been increasing. During the audit, a large amount of items should be covered in a limited amount of time. Consequently, pharmaceutical companies should have systematic and effective ways to manage and prepare for the audits. This study is a continuation to the earlier study, where a tool for the preparation of cGMP audit was developed and its content was validated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the developed tool in audit preparation and during the actual cGMP audit. Three qualitative research methods were used in this study (observation, interviews, and opinion survey). First, the validity of the information given through the tool was examined by comparing the responses to the actual conditions observed during the contract manufacturer audits (n = 15). Additionally the opinions of the contract manufacturers of the tool were gathered (n = 10) and the auditors were interviewed (n = 2). The developed tool was proven to be useful in audit preparation phase from both the auditor's and the contract manufacturers' point of view. Furthermore, using the tool can also save some time when performing the audit. The results show that using the tool can give significant support in audit preparation phase and also during the actual audit.

  12. Shared Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Daniel; Cole, Shelbi; Ostien, Deborah; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Staples, Megan; Susla, Patricia; Truxaw, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a process by which seven educators collaboratively engaged in developing a shared language to describe the mathematics pedagogy used to guide whole-class discussions as well as the products of their work. Suggestions are made for how others might engage in similarly productive professional development activities. (Contains 3…

  13. On sustainability assessment of technical systems. Experience from systems analysis with the ORWARE and Ecoeffect tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assefa, Getachew [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-06-15

    alternatives at the same time, and carrying out the assessment of the three dimensions independently. It should give way to transparent system where the level of quality of input data can be comprehended. The assessment approach should focus on a selected number of key input data, tested calculation procedures, and comprehensible result presentation. The challenge in developing and applying this approach is the complexity of method integration and information processing. The different parts to be included in the same platform come in with additional uncertainties hampering result interpretations. The hitherto tendency of promoting disciplinary lines will continue to challenge further developments of such interdisciplinary approaches. The thesis draws on the experience from ORWARE, a Swedish technology assessment tool applied in the assessment of waste management systems and energy systems; and from the EcoEffect tool used in the assessment of building properties; all assessed as components of a larger system. The thesis underlines the importance of sustainability considerations beginning from the research and development phase of technical systems. The core message of this thesis is that technical systems should be researched as indivisible parts of a complex whole that includes society and the natural environment. Results from such researches can then be transformed into design codes and specifications for use in the research and development, planning and structuring, and implementation and management of technical systems.

  14. A novel image toggle tool for comparison of serial mammograms: automatic density normalization and alignment-development of the tool and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Fukuda, Wataru; Saida, Yukihisa

    2014-12-01

    The purpose is to develop a new image toggle tool with automatic density normalization (ADN) and automatic alignment (AA) for comparing serial digital mammograms (DMGs). We developed an ADN and AA process to compare the images of serial DMGs. In image density normalization, a linear interpolation was applied by taking two points of high- and low-brightness areas. The alignment was calculated by determining the point of the greatest correlation while shifting the alignment between the current and prior images. These processes were performed on a PC with a 3.20-GHz Xeon processor and 8 GB of main memory. We selected 12 suspected breast cancer patients who had undergone screening DMGs in the past. Automatic processing was retrospectively performed on these images. Two radiologists subjectively evaluated them. The process of the developed algorithm took approximately 1 s per image. In our preliminary experience, two images could not be aligned approximately. When they were aligned, image toggling allowed detection of differences between examinations easily. We developed a new tool to facilitate comparative reading of DMGs on a mammography viewing system. Using this tool for toggling comparisons might improve the interpretation efficiency of serial DMGs.

  15. A validation study of existing neutronics tools against ZPPR-21 and ZPPR-15 critical experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W.S.; Kim, S.J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2007-09-30

    A study was performed to validate the existing tools for fast reactor neutronics analysis against previous critical experiments. The six benchmark problems for the ZPPR-21 critical experiments phases A through F specified in the Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments were analyzed. Analysis was also performed for three loading configurations of the ZPPR-15 Phase A experiments. As-built core models were developed in XYZ geometries using the reactor loading records and drawer master information. Detailed Monte Carlo and deterministic transport calculations were performed, along with various modeling sensitivity analyses. The Monte Carlo simulations were carried out with the VIM code with continuous energy cross sections based on the ENDF/B-V.2 data. For deterministic calculations, region-dependent 230-group cross sections were generated using the ETOE-2/MC-2/SDX code system, again based on the ENDF/B-V.2 data. Plate heterogeneity effects were taken into account by SDX unit cell calculations. Core calculations were performed with the TWODANT discrete ordinate code for the ZPPR-21 benchmarks, and with the DIF3D nodal transport option for the ZPPR-15 experiments. For all six ZPPR-21 configurations where the Pu-239 concentration varies from 0 to 49 w/o and the U-235 concentration accordingly varies from 62 to 0 w/o, the core multiplication factor determined with a 230-group TWODANT calculation agreed with the VIM Monte Carlo solution within 0.20 %{Delta}k, and there was no indication of any systematic bias. The quality of principal cross sections generated with the MC-2 code was comparable to that of VIM cross sections. The overall reactivity effect due to the errors in the 230-group principal cross sections was estimated to be less than 0.05 %{Delta}k. The statistics of the differences between calculated values and specified benchmark experimental values showed similar bias (from -0.28 %{Delta}k to 0.33 %{Delta}k) for MC{sup 2}-2/TWODANT and VIM

  16. Assessing the role of learning devices and geovisualisation tools for collective action in natural resource management: Experiences from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castella, Jean-Christophe

    2009-02-01

    In northern Vietnam uplands the successive policy reforms that accompanied agricultural decollectivisation triggered very rapid changes in land use in the 1990s. From a centralized system of natural resource management, a multitude of individual strategies emerged which contributed to new production interactions among farming households, changes in landscape structures, and conflicting strategies among local stakeholders. Within this context of agrarian transition, learning devices can help local communities to collectively design their own course of action towards sustainable natural resource management. This paper presents a collaborative approach combining a number of participatory methods and geovisualisation tools (e.g., spatially explicit multi-agent models and role-playing games) with the shared goal to analyse and represent the interactions between: (i) decision-making processes by individual farmers based on the resource profiles of their farms; (ii) the institutions which regulate resource access and usage; and (iii) the biophysical and socioeconomic environment. This methodological pathway is illustrated by a case study in Bac Kan Province where it successfully led to a communication platform on natural resource management. In a context of rapid socioeconomic changes, learning devices and geovisualisation tools helped embed the participatory approach within a process of community development. The combination of different tools, each with its own advantages and constraints, proved highly relevant for supporting collective natural resource management.

  17. Like, comment, share and all that jazz : social media as communication and marketing tool case: Social media marketing approaches used by MaiJazz music festival

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaskovic, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in International hotel and tourism management Social networks have become an integral part of everyday life for many. With an increasing number of companies using social media to communicate and build relationships with their customers, social media might be considered as the newest element of the marketing mix. The thesis’ objective is to explore the use of social media communication tools used by the jazz music festival, MaiJazz, in Stavanger, to define key...

  18. Like, comment, share and all that jazz : social media as communication and marketing tool case: Social media marketing approaches used by MaiJazz music festival

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaskovic, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Social networks have become an integral part of everyday life for many. With an increasing number of companies using social media to communicate and build relationships with their customers, social media might be considered as the newest element of the marketing mix. The thesis’ objective is to explore the use of social media communication tools used by the jazz music festival, MaiJazz, in Stavanger, to define key social media objectives and to develop metrics or indicators ...

  19. SU-F-P-35: A Multi-Institutional Plan Quality Checking Tool Built On Oncospace: A Shared Radiation Oncology Database System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, M; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Wong, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Phillips, M [University Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hendrickson, K; Evans, K [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Severna Park, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Late toxicity from radiation to critical structures limits the possible dose in Radiation Therapy. Perfectly conformal treatment of a target is not realizable, so the clinician must accept a certain level of collateral radiation to nearby OARs. But how much? General guidelines exist for healthy tissue sparing which guide RT treatment planning, but are these guidelines good enough to create the optimal plan given the individualized patient anatomy? We propose a means to evaluate the planned dose level to an OAR using a multi-institutional data-store of previously treated patients, so a clinician might reconsider planning objectives. Methods: The tool is built on Oncospace, a federated data-store system, which consists of planning data import, web based analysis tools, and a database containing:1) DVHs: dose by percent volume delivered to each ROI for each patient previously treated and included in the database.2) Overlap Volume Histograms (OVHs): Anatomical measure defined as the percent volume of an ROI within a given distance to target structures.Clinicians know what OARs are important to spare. For any ROI, Oncospace knows for which patients’ anatomy that ROI was harder to plan in the past (the OVH is less). The planned dose should be close to the least dose of previous patients. The tool displays the dose those OARs were subjected to, and the clinician can make a determination about the planning objectives used.Multiple institutions contribute to the Oncospace Consortium, and their DVH and OVH data are combined and color coded in the output. Results: The Oncospace website provides a plan quality display tool which identifies harder to treat patients, and graphically displays the dose delivered to them for comparison with the proposed plan. Conclusion: The Oncospace Consortium manages a data-store of previously treated patients which can be used for quality checking new plans. Grant funding by Elekta.

  20. PageMan: An interactive ontology tool to generate, display, and annotate overview graphs for profiling experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Matthew A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has become a widely accepted and standardized tool in biology. The first microarray data analysis programs were developed to support pair-wise comparison. However, as microarray experiments have become more routine, large scale experiments have become more common, which investigate multiple time points or sets of mutants or transgenics. To extract biological information from such high-throughput expression data, it is necessary to develop efficient analytical platforms, which combine manually curated gene ontologies with efficient visualization and navigation tools. Currently, most tools focus on a few limited biological aspects, rather than offering a holistic, integrated analysis. Results Here we introduce PageMan, a multiplatform, user-friendly, and stand-alone software tool that annotates, investigates, and condenses high-throughput microarray data in the context of functional ontologies. It includes a GUI tool to transform different ontologies into a suitable format, enabling the user to compare and choose between different ontologies. It is equipped with several statistical modules for data analysis, including over-representation analysis and Wilcoxon statistical testing. Results are exported in a graphical format for direct use, or for further editing in graphics programs. PageMan provides a fast overview of single treatments, allows genome-level responses to be compared across several microarray experiments covering, for example, stress responses at multiple time points. This aids in searching for trait-specific changes in pathways using mutants or transgenics, analyzing development time-courses, and comparison between species. In a case study, we analyze the results of publicly available microarrays of multiple cold stress experiments using PageMan, and compare the results to a previously published meta-analysis. PageMan offers a complete user's guide, a web-based over-representation analysis as

  1. Once More unto the Breaching Experiment: Reconsidering a Popular Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Instructors frequently utilize breaching experiments in an attempt to "bring sociology to life." However, an uncritical embrace of breaching experiments obscures the complexity of their possible effects on participants and subjects. These experiments have real potential to inflict deleterious consequences on individuals and groups.…

  2. i-Review: Sharing Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Kubilius

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF. GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  3. Culture Sharing: A Northern Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Egan, Chris

    1988-01-01

    This article takes the form of a hypothetical letter written by a nurse practitioner stationed in an Inuit community to a referral physician in the “south”. The author explores an authentic health-care dilemma in transcultural terms, discussing a case of incest brought to light by a patient's unsuccessful attempt at suicide. The sensitivity of the health-care professional to the cultural environment is of central importance to the provision of holistic health care.

  4. A new methodology for advanced engineering design: Lessons from experimenting C-K Theory driven tools

    OpenAIRE

    Hooge, Sophie; Agogué, Marine; Gillier, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This research shows that C-K Design Theory provides fruitful connections between New Product Development and Knowledge Management issues. Our purpose is to go a step further on the benefits of C-K Theory-based design tools for managing the upstream phases of innovative design processes. Based on 14 industrial case studies conducted between 2009 and 2011, we find that C-K Theory-based design tools enable practitioners to generate and explore various design paths while c...

  5. Experiences in enhancing existing BPM Tools with BPEL Import and Export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendling, Jan; Lassen, Kristian Bisgaard; Zdun, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    utilize graph-based BPM languages such as EPCs, Workflow Nets, UML Activity Diagrams, and BPMN in their modeling component while BPEL is rather a block-oriented language inspired by process calculi. In this paper we identify transformation strategies as reusable solutions for mapping control flow between...... graph-based BPM tools and BPEL. Furthermore, we present a case study in which we have applied these strategies in an industry project. This case study shows that transformation strategies are helpful for implementing import and export interfaces in a systematic way, and that they can easily be extended...... to address vendor-specific aspects of a graph-based BPM tool....

  6. vFitness: a web-based computing tool for improving estimation of in vitro HIV-1 fitness experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeter Lisa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The replication rate (or fitness between viral variants has been investigated in vivo and in vitro for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. HIV fitness plays an important role in the development and persistence of drug resistance. The accurate estimation of viral fitness relies on complicated computations based on statistical methods. This calls for tools that are easy to access and intuitive to use for various experiments of viral fitness. Results Based on a mathematical model and several statistical methods (least-squares approach and measurement error models, a Web-based computing tool has been developed for improving estimation of virus fitness in growth competition assays of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. Conclusions Unlike the two-point calculation used in previous studies, the estimation here uses linear regression methods with all observed data in the competition experiment to more accurately estimate relative viral fitness parameters. The dilution factor is introduced for making the computational tool more flexible to accommodate various experimental conditions. This Web-based tool is implemented in C# language with Microsoft ASP.NET, and is publicly available on the Web at http://bis.urmc.rochester.edu/vFitness/.

  7. Interactions between the fluid and an isolation tool in a pipe: laboratory experiments and numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A remote-control tether-less isolation tool is a mechanical device that is normally used in pipelines to block the flow at a given position by transforming a blocking module. In this study, the interactions between the fluid and the plug module of the isolation tool were investigated. Simulations of the plug process and particle image velocimetry measurements were performed to study the flow characteristics. Numerical solutions for the continuity, momentum, and energy equations were obtained by using commercial software based on finite-volume techniques. Box–Behnken design was applied, and response surface methodology (RSM-based CFD simulation analysis was conducted. The dynamic model in the plug process was built by RSM and used to evaluate the influences of the main mechanical parameters on the pressure during the plug process. The diameter of the isolation tool and the diameter of the plug module have strong influences on the process, and the length of the isolation tool has only a little influence on the plug process.

  8. Tool Integration: Experiences and Issues in Using XMI and Component Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Christian Heide; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Thomsen, Michael

    2000-01-01

    of conflicting data models, and provide architecture for doing so, based on component technology and XML Metadata Interchange. As an example, we discuss the implementation of an electronic whiteboard tool, Knight, which adds support for creative and collaborative object-oriented modeling to existing Computer...

  9. Interactive RadioEpidemiological Program (IREP): a web-based tool for estimating probability of causation/assigned share of radiogenic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, David C; Apostoaei, A Iulian; Henshaw, Russell W; Hoffman, F Owen; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Stancescu, Daniel O; Thomas, Brian A; Trabalka, John R; Gilbert, Ethel S; Land, Charles E

    2008-07-01

    The Interactive RadioEpidemiological Program (IREP) is a Web-based, interactive computer code that is used to estimate the probability that a given cancer in an individual was induced by given exposures to ionizing radiation. IREP was developed by a Working Group of the National Cancer Institute and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and was adopted and modified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for use in adjudicating claims for compensation for cancer under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. In this paper, the quantity calculated in IREP is referred to as "probability of causation/assigned share" (PC/AS). PC/AS for a given cancer in an individual is calculated on the basis of an estimate of the excess relative risk (ERR) associated with given radiation exposures and the relationship PC/AS = ERR/ERR+1. IREP accounts for uncertainties in calculating probability distributions of ERR and PC/AS. An accounting of uncertainty is necessary when decisions about granting claims for compensation for cancer are made on the basis of an estimate of the upper 99% credibility limit of PC/AS to give claimants the "benefit of the doubt." This paper discusses models and methods incorporated in IREP to estimate ERR and PC/AS. Approaches to accounting for uncertainty are emphasized, and limitations of IREP are discussed. Although IREP is intended to provide unbiased estimates of ERR and PC/AS and their uncertainties to represent the current state of knowledge, there are situations described in this paper in which NIOSH, as a matter of policy, makes assumptions that give a higher estimate of the upper 99% credibility limit of PC/AS than other plausible alternatives and, thus, are more favorable to claimants.

  10. Redes Sociais e as Gerações X e Y: Disseminação e Compartilhamento de Experiências de Turismo / Social Networks and Generations X and Y: Dissemination and Tourism Experience Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Claret Guerra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo identificar a contribuição de redes sociais on-line (OSN para o processo de disseminação e compartilhamento de experiências de turismo das gerações X e Y. A pesquisa realizada tem natureza exploratória e abordagem qualitativa, sendo os dados obtidos por entrevistas semiestruturadas. A análise de conteúdo (Bardin, 2009 foi a técnica usada para a análise dos dados coletados. Procurou-se, dessa forma, investigar vários aspectos ligados ao tema proposto: se as OSN são uma inovação tecnológica que impactou o setor de viagens; sua importância para o desenvolvimento e manutenção de relacionamentos das gerações X e Y com mídias sociais on-line; a interface de cocriação de produtos turísticos; sua contribuição para a formação de preferências e intenções de compra. Entre as conclusões do estudo, verifica-se que os entrevistados concordam que as OSN impactam o setor e o consumidor busca benefícios ao utilizá-las, destacando a praticidade, comodidade, segurança, troca de informações e experiências. Foi citado, ainda, que as OSN divulgam roteiros turísticos competitivos e acessíveis, que antes da era digital eram relativamente pouco conhecidos do grande público. Palavras-chave: Turismo. Experiência Turística. Redes Sociais On-line. Gerações X e Y. Social Networks and Generations X and Y: Dissemination and Tourism Experience Sharing - This article aims to identify the on-line social network (OSN contribution to the X and Y generations´ tourism experiences of dissemination and sharing process. The content analysis (Bardin, 2008 was the technique used to analyses the data obtained through semi structured interviews. It was sought to investigate the OSN as technological innovation, its significance for the X and y generations relationships development, co-creation and formation of purchase intentions interface. Among the conclusions is the actual benefit of the OSN impact on the

  11. The Role of Flow Experience and CAD Tools in Facilitating Creative Behaviours for Architecture Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoud, Husameddin M.; Al-Samarraie, Hosam; Zaqout, Fahed

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of flow experience in intellectual activity with an emphasis on the relationship between flow experience and creative behaviour in design using CAD. The study used confluence and psychometric approaches because of their unique abilities to depict a clear image of creative behaviour. A cross-sectional study…

  12. Using workload measurement tools in diverse care contexts: the experience of staff in mental health and learning disability inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanneran, T; Brimblecombe, N; Bradley, E; Gregory, S

    2015-12-01

    What is known on the subject? Difficulties with the recruitment and retention of qualified nursing staff have resulted in nursing shortages worldwide with a consequential impact on the quality of care. It is increasingly recommended that evidence-based staffing levels are central to the development of workforce plans. Due to a paucity of empirical research in mental health and learning disability services the staffing needs and requirements for these settings are undefined and the availability of tools to aid staffing decisions is limited. What this paper adds to existing knowledge? This paper provides a valuable insight into the practical uses of these tools as perceived by staff members with day-to-day experience of the requirements of mental health and learning disability wards. It reveals that while workload measurement tools are considered a valuable aid for the development of workforce plans, they are limited in their ability to capture all aspects of care provision in these settings. It further emphasizes the inapplicability of a one-shoe-fits-all approach for determining nurse staffing levels and the need for individual and customized workforce plans. What are the implications for practice? This study demonstrates that the development of tools for use in mental health and learning disability services is in its infancy, yet no tool that has been validated as such. It highlights the potential for workload measurement tools to aid staffing decisions; however, a more holistic approach that considers additional factors is needed to ensure robust workforce planning models are developed for these services. The critical challenge of determining the correct level and skill mix of nursing staff required to deliver safe and effective health care has become an international concern. It is recommended that evidence-based staffing decisions are central to the development of future workforce plans. Workforce planning in mental health and learning disability nursing is

  13. Sharing the dance -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jing; Ravn, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    to the highly specialized field of elite sports dance, we aim at exploring the way in which reciprocity unfolds in intensive deliberate practices of movement. In our analysis, we specifically argue that the ongoing dynamics of two separate flows of movement constitute a shared experience of dancing together....... In this sense, moving together, in sports dance, is a practical way of understanding each other. In agreement with Zahavi, our analysis emphasizes the bi-directed nature of sharing. However, at the same time, we contribute to Zahavi’s ongoing endeavour as the special case of sports dance reveals how reciprocity...

  14. [Accepted Manuscript] Optimizing tubal ligation service delivery: a prospective cohort study to measure the task-sharing experience of Marie Stopes International Ethiopia.

    OpenAIRE

    Nuccio, O.; Sendek, B.; Park, M.H.; Mesele, T; Okello, F.O.; Gordon-Maclean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Ethiopian government implements a progressive task-sharing policy for health services as a strategy to address shortages of highly skilled providers and increase access to critical services, such as family planning. Since 2009, Marie Stopes International Ethiopia has trained health officers to provide tubal ligations, a permanent method of family planning, as part of its task-sharing strategy. The objectives of this research were to evaluate task-sharing tubal ligations to health officers...

  15. Social identities and shared realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Michael A; Rinella, Mark J

    2017-11-04

    People are fundamentally motivated to establish a shared reality with others to validate their identity and experiences. Guided by social identity theory, we examine how social identity processes, such as self-categorization and depersonalization, create a shared identity and a sense of shared reality. Research demonstrates that internal states such as attitudes, feelings, and emotions are often shared among members of a group. Furthermore, research has shown that self-uncertainty motivates people to establish shared realities through group identification, often with highly entitative groups that are associated with a self-saturating reality that is shared absolutely. Finally, we review research on how group-defining norms that serve as the bases of these identity-related shared realities are constructed and communicated through group-membership based influence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Learning from CDM SD tool experience for Article 6.4 in the Paris Agreement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Holm; Arens, Christof; Mersmann, Florian

    2017-01-01

    are achieved in an integrated fashion and trade-offs avoided. Article 6.4 of the PA introduces a new Sustainable Mitigati on Mechanism (SMM) with the dual aim to contribute to the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and foster SD. The Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) has a similar...... objective and in 2014, the CDM SD tool was launched by the Executive Board of the CDM to highlight the SD benefits of CDM activities. This article analyses the usefulness of the CDM SD tool for stakeholders and compares the SD tool’s SD reporting requirements against other flexible mechanisms...... point to develop rules, modalities and procedures for SD assessment in Article 6.4 as well as for other cooperative mitigation approaches....

  17. Inductive knowledge acquisition experience with commercial tools for space shuttle main engine testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesitt, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1984, an effort has been underway at Rocketdyne, manufacturer of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), to automate much of the analysis procedure conducted after engine test firings. Previously published articles at national and international conferences have contained the context of and justification for this effort. Here, progress is reported in building the full system, including the extensions of integrating large databases with the system, known as Scotty. Inductive knowledge acquisition has proven itself to be a key factor in the success of Scotty. The combination of a powerful inductive expert system building tool (ExTran), a relational data base management system (Reliance), and software engineering principles and Computer-Assisted Software Engineering (CASE) tools makes for a practical, useful and state-of-the-art application of an expert system.

  18. ORIOLE, in the Search for Evidence of OER in Teaching. Experiences in the Use, Re-use and the Sharing and Influence of Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Santos-Hermosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study presented here aims to gather useful information on the use, re-reuse and sharing of resources in Education and also the influence of repositories, to better understand the perspective of individual practitioners and suggest future areas of debate for researchers. Open Resources: Influence on Learners and Educators (ORIOLE project, was based within the Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University (OU from 2009-2013 and focused on investigating, understanding and disseminating about use and reuse of open resources in learning and teaching. This paper focuses on the second survey activity of this project. During 2011 (Pegler, 2012, an extensive online survey about reuse of educational resources was conducted through (mainly UK-based practitioner communities. In 2013, a more international version was created (available in English and Spanish and circulated during that year (http://bit.ly/OERsurvey_2013. The ORIOLE Survey 2013 collected information about the contexts in which open resource use may occur, looking particularly at attitudes about reuse of educational resources (OER in teaching. What influences open resources in education is a topic of relevance to anyone taking on forward engagement with open education and the answers lie with those who are working directly in the delivery of learning and teaching, and those who support this work. It is hoped that this qualitative analysis will provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the motivation to engage with OER and the shifts in experience and expectations across diverse contexts.

  19. Shared decision-making at the end of life: A focus group study exploring the perceptions and experiences of multi-disciplinary healthcare professionals working in the home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Paula; Hasson, Felicity; McIlfatrick, Sonja

    2018-01-01

    Globally recommended in healthcare policy, Shared Decision-Making is also central to international policy promoting community palliative care. Yet realities of implementation by multi-disciplinary healthcare professionals who provide end-of-life care in the home are unclear. To explore multi-disciplinary healthcare professionals' perceptions and experiences of Shared Decision-Making at end of life in the home. Qualitative design using focus groups, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. A total of 43 participants, from multi-disciplinary community-based services in one region of the United Kingdom, were recruited. While the rhetoric of Shared Decision-Making was recognised, its implementation was impacted by several interconnecting factors, including (1) conceptual confusion regarding Shared Decision-Making, (2) uncertainty in the process and (3) organisational factors which impeded Shared Decision-Making. Multiple interacting factors influence implementation of Shared Decision-Making by professionals working in complex community settings at the end of life. Moving from rhetoric to reality requires future work exploring the realities of Shared Decision-Making practice at individual, process and systems levels.

  20. Enhancers and tools to improve luxury customer experience: hotel managers’ perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Veríssimo, M; Loureiro, S. M. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore how luxury hotels create hospitality experiences in order to examine consistency of manager’s statements. To this end, the study included a literature review to understand the major approaches used in creating customer experiences. Following this, thirty in-depth interviews were prepared and carried out with thirty international luxury hotel managers in both Brazil and Portugal. The findings reveal that personalized service, brand image, service quality, client cont...

  1. User observations on information sharing (corporate knowledge and lessons learned)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Ronald A.; Gregg, Lawrence A.; Martin, Shirley A.; Underwood, Leroy H.; Mcgee, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The sharing of 'corporate knowledge' and lessons learned in the NASA aerospace community has been identified by Johnson Space Center survey participants as a desirable tool. The concept of the program is based on creating a user friendly information system that will allow engineers, scientists, and managers at all working levels to share their information and experiences with other users irrespective of location or organization. The survey addresses potential end uses for such a system and offers some guidance on the development of subsequent processes to ensure the integrity of the information shared. This system concept will promote sharing of information between NASA centers, between NASA and its contractors, between NASA and other government agencies, and perhaps between NASA and institutions of higher learning.

  2. The characteristics to consider in municipal shared spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkoe, Rikke; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2017-01-01

    to establishing a shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio, created in collaboration between researchers and practitioners. It provides an introduction to the topic and outlines a number of tasks that must be completed in different parts of a project, thereby providing a tool which practitioners can use......Purpose The purpose of this study is through collaboration with practitioners to identify key characteristics of municipal shared spaces and, based on these, developing a guide for establishing a shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio. Design/methodology/approach This paper builds...... on existing theory on the subject of shared space as well as the practical experience of professionals within the fields of property management, space management and facilities management. The guide presented is the result of data collected through case studies, interviews, surveys and literature reviews...

  3. Making SharePoint® Chemically Aware™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallapragada, Kartik; Chewning, Joseph; Kombo, David; Ludwick, Beverly

    2012-01-12

    The use of SharePoint® collaboration software for content management has become a critical part of today's drug discovery process. SharePoint 2010 software has laid a foundation which enables researchers to collaborate and search on various contents. The amount of data generated during a transition of a single compound from preclinical discovery to commercialization can easily range in terabytes, thus there is a greater demand of a chemically aware search algorithm that supplements SharePoint which enables researchers to query for information in a more intuitive and effective way. Thus by supplementing SharePoint with Chemically Aware™ features provides a great value to the pharmaceutical and biotech companies and makes drug discovery more efficient. Using several tools we have integrated SharePoint with chemical, compound, and reaction databases, thereby improving the traditional search engine capability and enhancing the user experience. This paper describes the implementation of a Chemically Aware™ system to supplement SharePoint. A Chemically Aware SharePoint (CASP) allows users to tag documents by drawing a structure and associating it with the related content. It also allows the user to search SharePoint software content and internal/external databases by carrying out substructure, similarity, SMILES, and IUPAC name searches. Building on traditional search, CASP takes SharePoint one step further by providing a intuitive GUI to the researchers to base their search on their knowledge of chemistry than textual search. CASP also provides a way to integrate with other systems, for example a researcher can perform a sub-structure search on pdf documents with embedded molecular entities. A Chemically Aware™ system supplementing SharePoint is a step towards making drug discovery process more efficient and also helps researchers to search for information in a more intuitive way. It also helps the researchers to find information which was once difficult to find

  4. Making SharePoint® Chemically Aware™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tallapragada Kartik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of SharePoint® collaboration software for content management has become a critical part of today's drug discovery process. SharePoint 2010 software has laid a foundation which enables researchers to collaborate and search on various contents. The amount of data generated during a transition of a single compound from preclinical discovery to commercialization can easily range in terabytes, thus there is a greater demand of a chemically aware search algorithm that supplements SharePoint which enables researchers to query for information in a more intuitive and effective way. Thus by supplementing SharePoint with Chemically Aware™ features provides a great value to the pharmaceutical and biotech companies and makes drug discovery more efficient. Using several tools we have integrated SharePoint with chemical, compound, and reaction databases, thereby improving the traditional search engine capability and enhancing the user experience. Results This paper describes the implementation of a Chemically Aware™ system to supplement SharePoint. A Chemically Aware SharePoint (CASP allows users to tag documents by drawing a structure and associating it with the related content. It also allows the user to search SharePoint software content and internal/external databases by carrying out substructure, similarity, SMILES, and IUPAC name searches. Building on traditional search, CASP takes SharePoint one step further by providing a intuitive GUI to the researchers to base their search on their knowledge of chemistry than textual search. CASP also provides a way to integrate with other systems, for example a researcher can perform a sub-structure search on pdf documents with embedded molecular entities. Conclusion A Chemically Aware™ system supplementing SharePoint is a step towards making drug discovery process more efficient and also helps researchers to search for information in a more intuitive way. It also helps the

  5. Development and evaluation of tools for measuring the quality of experience (QoE) in mHealth applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Candelas-Plasencia, Sonia; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The rapid spread of smartphones and tablets in the last years has created a new software industry whose fast growth has propitiated numerous low-quality applications to be revised and improved. The main aim of this paper is to develop a tool to assess the Quality of Experience (QoE) of mobile Health (mHealth) applications in order to improve the quality of the existing apps and the ones to be released. Firstly, a review of the applications of mHealth has been done in order to obtain a general classification. Secondly, the tool for measuring the QoE is developed in the form of a survey with the help of psychologists. Finally, this tool is evaluated using a sample of applications selected with the aid of the classification obtained. A survey with 21 questions using the Likert scale and destined to users has been successfully created, and its evaluation has been positive, resulting in a good method for measuring the QoE of the different features that the applications in the field of health care usually have. The tool created can be very useful for developers in order to assess the quality of their health care apps, indicating their positive aspects and the ones which must be revised and improved, avoiding the releasing of low-quality apps.

  6. Simulation Modeling of Lakes in Undergraduate and Graduate Classrooms Increases Comprehension of Climate Change Concepts and Experience with Computational Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Cayelan C.; Gougis, Rebekka Darner

    2017-02-01

    Ecosystem modeling is a critically important tool for environmental scientists, yet is rarely taught in undergraduate and graduate classrooms. To address this gap, we developed a teaching module that exposes students to a suite of modeling skills and tools (including computer programming, numerical simulation modeling, and distributed computing) that students apply to study how lakes around the globe are experiencing the effects of climate change. In the module, students develop hypotheses about the effects of different climate scenarios on lakes and then test their hypotheses using hundreds of model simulations. We taught the module in a 4-hour workshop and found that participation in the module significantly increased both undergraduate and graduate students' understanding about climate change effects on lakes. Moreover, participation in the module also significantly increased students' perceived experience level in using different software, technologies, and modeling tools. By embedding modeling in an environmental science context, non-computer science students were able to successfully use and master technologies that they had previously never been exposed to. Overall, our findings suggest that modeling is a powerful tool for catalyzing student learning on the effects of climate change.

  7. What linear programming contributes: world food programme experience with the "cost of the diet" tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frega, Romeo; Lanfranco, Jose Guerra; De Greve, Sam; Bernardini, Sara; Geniez, Perrine; Grede, Nils; Bloem, Martin; de Pee, Saskia

    2012-09-01

    Linear programming has been used for analyzing children's complementary feeding diets, for optimizing nutrient adequacy of dietary recommendations for a population, and for estimating the economic value of fortified foods. To describe and apply a linear programming tool ("Cost of the Diet") with data from Mozambique to determine what could be cost-effective fortification strategies. Based on locally assessed average household dietary needs, seasonal market prices of available food products, and food composition data, the tool estimates the lowest-cost diet that meets almost all nutrient needs. The results were compared with expenditure data from Mozambique to establish the affordability of this diet by quintiles of the population. Three different applications were illustrated: identifying likely "limiting nutrients," comparing cost effectiveness of different fortification interventions at the household level, and assessing economic access to nutritious foods. The analysis identified iron, vitamin B2, and pantothenic acid as "limiting nutrients." Under the Mozambique conditions, vegetable oil was estimated as a more cost-efficient vehicle for vitamin A fortification than sugar; maize flour may also be an effective vehicle to provide other constraining micronutrients. Multiple micronutrient fortification of maize flour could reduce the cost of the "lowest-cost nutritious diet" by 18%, but even this diet can be afforded by only 20% of the Mozambican population. Within the context of fortification, linear programming can be a useful tool for identifying likely nutrient inadequacies, for comparing fortification options in terms of cost effectiveness, and for illustrating the potential benefit of fortification for improving household access to a nutritious diet.

  8. Learning management system and e-learning tools: an experience of medical students' usage and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, David A; Behringer, Florian; Haberstroh, Nicole; Ehlers, Jan P; Sostmann, Kai; Peters, Harm

    2016-08-20

    To investigate medical students´ utilization of and problems with a learning management system and its e-learning tools as well as their expectations on future developments. A single-center online survey has been carried out to investigate medical students´ (n = 505) usage and perception concerning the learning management system Blackboard, and provided e-learning tools. Data were collected with a standardized questionnaire consisting of 70 items and analyzed by quantitative and qualitative methods. The participants valued lecture notes (73.7%) and Wikipedia (74%) as their most important online sources for knowledge acquisition. Missing integration of e-learning into teaching was seen as the major pitfall (58.7%). The learning management system was mostly used for study information (68.3%), preparation of exams (63.3%) and lessons (54.5%). Clarity (98.3%), teaching-related contexts (92.5%) and easy use of e-learning offers (92.5%) were rated highest. Interactivity was most important in free-text comments (n = 123). It is desired that contents of a learning management system support an efficient learning. Interactivity of tools and their conceptual integration into face-to-face teaching are important for students. The learning management system was especially important for organizational purposes and the provision of learning materials. Teachers should be aware that free online sources such as Wikipedia enjoy a high approval as source of knowledge acquisition. This study provides an empirical basis for medical schools and teachers to improve their offerings in the field of digital learning for their students.

  9. Initial experience with a new quantitative assessment tool for fluorescent imaging in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieß, Henrik Christian; Duprée, Anna; Behrendt, Christian-Alexander; Kölbel, Tilo; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Russ, Detlef; Wipper, Sabine

    2017-08-01

    Perioperative evaluation in peripheral artery disease (PAD) by common vascular diagnostic tools is limited by open wounds, medial calcinosis or an altered collateral supply of the foot. Indocyanine green fluorescent imaging (ICG-FI) has recently been introduced as an alternative tool, but so far a standardized quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion in vascular surgery has not been performed for this purpose. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate a new software for quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion in patients with PAD using indocyanine green fluorescent imaging (ICG-FI) before and after peripheral bypass grafting. Indocyanine green fluorescent imaging was performed in seven patients using the SPY Elite system before and after peripheral bypass grafting for PAD (Rutherford III-VI). Visual and quantitative evaluation of tissue perfusion was assessed in an area of low perfusion (ALP) and high perfusion (AHP), each by three independent investigators. Data assessment was performed offline using a specially customized software package (Institute for Laser Technology, University Ulm, GmbH). Slope of fluorescent intensity (SFI) was measured as time-intensity curves. Values were compared to ankle-brachial index (ABI), slope of oscillation (SOO), and time to peak (TTP) obtained from photoplethysmography (PPG). All measurements before and after surgery were successfully performed, showing that ABI, TTP, and SOO increased significantly compared to preoperative values, all being statistically significant (P < 0.05), except for TTP (p = 0.061). Further, SFI increased significantly in both ALP and AHP (P < 0.05) and correlated considerably with ABI, TTP, and SOO (P < 0.05). In addition to ABI and slope of oscillation (SOO), the ICG-FI technique allows visual assessment in combination with quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion in patients with PAD. Ratios related to different perfusion patterns and SFI seem to be useful tools to reduce factors

  10. Designing for Sharing in Local Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Light, Ann; Fitzpatrick, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    The Sharing Economy has brought new attention to the everyday practice of sharing. Digital tools are changing both what we can do together across neighbourhoods and how we think about sharing our time, materials and skills. It is possible to design to boost resource management, economic wellbeing...

  11. Photon-HDF5: Open Data Format and Computational Tools for Timestamp-based Single-Molecule Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Laurence, Ted; Boutelle, Robert; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2016-02-13

    Archival of experimental data in public databases has increasingly become a requirement for most funding agencies and journals. These data-sharing policies have the potential to maximize data reuse, and to enable confirmatory as well as novel studies. However, the lack of standard data formats can severely hinder data reuse. In photon-counting-based single-molecule fluorescence experiments, data is stored in a variety of vendor-specific or even setup-specific (custom) file formats, making data interchange prohibitively laborious, unless the same hardware-software combination is used. Moreover, the number of available techniques and setup configurations make it difficult to find a common standard. To address this problem, we developed Photon-HDF5 (www.photon-hdf5.org), an open data format for timestamp-based single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Building on the solid foundation of HDF5, Photon-HDF5 provides a platform- and language-independent, easy-to-use file format that is self-describing and supports rich metadata. Photon-HDF5 supports different types of measurements by separating raw data (e.g. photon-timestamps, detectors, etc) from measurement metadata. This approach allows representing several measurement types and setup configurations within the same core structure and makes possible extending the format in backward-compatible way. Complementing the format specifications, we provide open source software to create and convert Photon-HDF5 files, together with code examples in multiple languages showing how to read Photon-HDF5 files. Photon-HDF5 allows sharing data in a format suitable for long term archival, avoiding the effort to document custom binary formats and increasing interoperability with different analysis software. We encourage participation of the single-molecule community to extend interoperability and to help defining future versions of Photon-HDF5.

  12. Transformation Rubric for Engaged Learning: A Tool and Method for Measuring Life-Changing Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springfield, Emily; Gwozdek, Anne; Smiler, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    ePortfolios and other engaged learning experiences can have extensive impact on students in many facets of their lives, such as subject-area learning, skill and competence development, perspectives on "how the world works," and even students' own identities, confidence, and needs. Assessing these various impacts can be a challenge for…

  13. Interactive Online Tools for Enhancing Student Learning Experiences in Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Karen E.; Boitshwarelo, Bopelo; Phinn, Stuart R.; Hill, Greg J. E.; Kelly, Gail D.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth in Information and Communications Technologies usage in higher education has provided immense opportunities to foster effective student learning experiences in geography. In particular, remote sensing lends itself to the creative utilization of multimedia technologies. This paper presents a case study of a remote sensing computer…

  14. User experience of academic staff in the use of a learning management system tool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Kock, E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available using a LMS and to improve our understanding of the experience of the academic and the practical challenges involved for academics that have to facilitate learning in an online environment. The findings should be of interest to developers of LMSs...

  15. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  16. Sharing the "Current Events" in Children's Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passe, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about two elementary classroom activities used as teaching tools, namely "Show and Tell" and "Sharing Time." As a teaching tool, Sharing Time has several advantages over Show and Tell. It avoids children bringing valuable items to school, reduces emphasis on materialism, allows opportunities for extended oral…

  17. Working together – Using social media tools / enterprise tools (Sharepoint, Blogs, Wikis, Google Docs/Drive) to enhance staff collaboration – The KAUST library experience

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the tools implemented by KAUST library to enhance collaboration among library staff. Highlights the features / functionalities of the implemented tools and their related success / constraints in achieving the desired targets.

  18. Sharing values, sharing a vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Teamwork, partnership and shared values emerged as recurring themes at the Third Technology Transfer/Communications Conference. The program drew about 100 participants who sat through a packed two days to find ways for their laboratories and facilities to better help American business and the economy. Co-hosts were the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where most meetings took place. The conference followed traditions established at the First Technology Transfer/Communications Conference, conceived of and hosted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in May 1992 in Richmond, Washington, and the second conference, hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in January 1993 in Golden, Colorado. As at the other conferences, participants at the third session represented the fields of technology transfer, public affairs and communications. They came from Department of Energy headquarters and DOE offices, laboratories and production facilities. Continued in this report are keynote address; panel discussion; workshops; and presentations in technology transfer.

  19. Internet-Based Learning Tools:Development and Learning Psychology (DLP Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tavares

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The project aims to establish a deeper involvement of students and teachers in the learning process by using the ICT in higher education. We will try to address the following two questions: "how can the use of ICT help educators to accomplishing their academic goals and how do the students use the ICT to develop their academic skills?" The work team constituted by four teaching staff and two researchers at the University of Aveiro has developed a project on the 'Development and Learning Psychology' course. The course follows the traditional style of lecturing but with a Web site as a supporting tool aiming at increasing the involvement and responsibility of the students in the class.

  20. Community health workers' experiences of using video teaching tools during home visits-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Bronwyné; Kohrman, Hannah; Tomlinson, Mark; Mbewu, Nokwanele; Le Roux, Ingrid; Adam, Maya

    2017-09-05

    Innovations in health, such as the use of tablet computers, show promise in broadening the scope of work of community health workers (CHWs), and play an important role in keeping CHWs and their clients up to date with advancements in health. While the use of mobile phones and tablets is innovative, the applicability of these technologies in different contexts remains poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known about the acceptability and feasibility of the use of video teaching tools on such devices across diverse contexts. In this study, we aimed to explore the acceptability and feasibility of using tablets with teaching videos (about HIV, alcohol, nutrition and breastfeeding) to support the health promotion efforts of 24 CHWs who work with pregnant mothers and mothers of young children in an urban township in South Africa. Between November 2015 and May 2016, we conducted focus groups and identified four key themes (with several sub-themes) that demonstrated factors related to the acceptability and feasibility of these devices and their content. Focus group transcripts were analysed thematically using qualitative data analysis software. The findings indicated that while the devices contained several supportive features (such as lightening the workload, and stimulating interest in their work), they also contained several restrictive features (safety and confidentiality). CHWs considered the video content an important tool to engage not only their clients but also family members and the community at large. Issues surrounding safety, privacy and confidentiality of using these devices require careful consideration prior to implementation in large-scale studies. Furthermore, stigma associated with household visits by CHWs and the nature of their work also need to be addressed by researchers and programme implementers. Overall, CHWs deemed the devices and the video content an acceptable and feasible means with which to provide health promotion and education among

  1. Teaching Tools for Pedagogy at the Nanoscale: Towards the Understanding of Concepts Through Experience and Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Marc Nicholas

    The field of nanochemistry is at the forefront of the physical sciences, and is increasingly finding diverse applications. As such, there is a need to allow this frontier to be explored thoroughly in undergraduate chemistry curricula. The development of new instructional materials is necessary, as the existing literature in undergraduate nanochemistry education does not provide instructors with adequate resources to help students make connections between core scientific concepts and those pertinent to the nanoscale. As such, we aim to treat nanoscale phenomena not as a niche subject but as an educationally rich portion of chemistry at the interface of discrete and bulk structures. To accomplish this, we have developed and tested instructional materials that are designed to fit directly into the chemistry curriculum and provide instructors with the flexibility to incorporate them in their courses. These teaching tools/modules have been designed using a theoretical framework for analogy and similarity coupled with a bridging framework in order to reinforce students' physical and chemical concepts and facilitate their recognition of such in the context of nanochemistry. Our approach is to construct concepts related to nanochemistry by tethering them directly, through the use of analogy and similarity, to material commonly covered within the courses, rather than present them in an unrelated fashion or completely outside the students' current frame of reference. Assessment of these tools has been carried out through a qualitative analysis incorporating a discourse analytical framework applied to individual student interviews and small group discussions. A coding scheme was devised and utilized for consistent characterization of students' responses and discussions. Results are discussed critically and pedagogical implications for each activity and the project as a whole are provided.

  2. Developing SharePoint applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rupnik, Gašper

    2011-01-01

    The thesis includes a research on SharePoint 2010 programming capabilities and a display of products created by this knowledge. The introduction part includes background information on how the topic was chosen and how the thesis was developed. The second chapter presents the SharePoint platform, which includes a description of its structure, function and usability. The third chapter focuses solely on the programming of the platform. First, some of the most useful software tools for i...

  3. CERN Open Data Portal - Improving usability and user experience of CMS Open Data research tools.

    CERN Document Server

    Hirvonsalo, Harri

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the work I have done during my assignment as participant of CERN Summer Students 2015 programme. Main goal of my Summer Student project was to lower the bar for people to start utilizing open data that CMS experiment has released in November 2014 to CERN Open Data Portal (http://opendata.cern.ch). Project included various working packages and tasks, such as: -Determine the obstacles that potential users of CMS research oriented open data who don’t have previous knowledge about internal workflow of analysis tasks at CMS experiment would run into. -Produce more introductory material and tutorials for conducting basic physics analyses with CMSSW to CERN Open Data Portal. -Study the feasibility of podio-framework (https://github.com/hegner/podio) for CMS Open Data users. The project work was done under the supervision of Kati Lassila-Perini whom I thank greatly for her help, patience and support.

  4. A Blended Learning Experience in Statistics for Psychology Students Using the Evaluation as a Learning Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto VALENTÍN CENTENO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching statistics course Applied Psychology, was based on different teaching models that incorporate active teaching methodologies. In this experience have combined approaches that prioritize the use of ICT with other where evaluation becomes an element of learning. This has involved the use of virtual platforms to support teaching that facilitate learning and activities where no face-to-face are combined. The design of the components of the course is inspired by the dimensions proposed by Carless (2003 model. This model uses evaluation as a learning element. The development of this experience has shown how the didactic proposal has been positively interpreted by students. Students recognized that they had to learn and deeply understand the basic concepts of the subject, so that they can teach and assess their peers.

  5. Telemedicine as a Tool for Europe-Africa Cooperation: A Practical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Manuel; Santiago, Fernando; Silva, Luís; Ferreira, Ricardo; Machado, José; Castela, Eduardo

    This paper presents the experience of an Europe-Africa telemedicine network, focused on the pediatric area, and involving hospitals located in Luanda (Angola), Benguela (Angola), Praia (Cape Verde) and Coimbra (Portugal). In the scope of this network, the cooperation between these hospitals goes beyond the teleconsultation sessions. Tele-training, clinical experience exchange, patient transfer agreements and health staff training to local development of new medical capabilities are some of the involved activities. It is therefore agreed that this kind of technical and knowledge network could also be expanded to other African countries with clear benefits to the local citizens, overcoming the digital-divide and improving the cooperation between developed and developing countries.

  6. Qualitative insights into the experience of teaching shared decision making within adult education health literacy programmes for lower-literacy learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Danielle M; Morony, Suzanne; Smith, Sian K; Shepherd, Heather L; Dhillon, Haryana M; Hayen, Andrew; Trevena, Lyndal; Luxford, Karen; Nutbeam, Don; McCaffery, Kirsten J

    2017-12-01

    Enhancing health literacy can play a major role in improving healthcare and health across the globe. To build higher-order (communicative/critical) health literacy skills among socially disadvantaged Australians, we developed a novel shared decision making (SDM) training programme for adults with lower literacy. The programme was delivered by trained educators within an adult basic education health literacy course. To explore the experience of teaching SDM within a health literacy programme and investigate whether communicative/critical health literacy content meets learner needs and teaching and institutional objectives. Qualitative interview study with 11 educators who delivered the SDM programme. Transcripts were analysed using the Framework approach; a matrix-based method of thematic analysis. Teachers noted congruence in SDM content and the institutional commitment to learner empowerment in adult education. The SDM programme was seen to offer learners an alternative to their usual passive approach to healthcare decision making by raising awareness of the right to ask questions and consider alternative test/treatment options. Teachers valued a structured approach to training building on foundational skills, with language reinforcement and take-home resources, but many noted the need for additional time to develop learner understanding and cover all aspects of SDM. Challenges for adult learners included SDM terminology, computational numerical risk tasks and understanding probability concepts. SDM programmes can be designed in a way that both supports teachers to deliver novel health literacy content and empowers learners. Collaboration between adult education and healthcare sectors can build health literacy capacity of those most in need. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. New tools for scientific learning in the EduSeis project: the e-learning experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zollo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Educational Seismological Project (EduSeis is a scientific and educational project, the main aim of which is the development and implementation of new teaching methodologies in Earth Sciences, using seismology as a vehicle for scientific learning and awareness of earthquake risk. Within this framework, we have recently been experimenting with new learning and information approaches that are mainly aimed at a high school audience. In particular, we have designed, implemented and tested a model of an e-learning environment in a high school located in the surroundings of the Mt. Vesuvius volcano. The proposed e-learning model is built on the EduSeis concepts and educational materials (web-oriented, and is based on computer-supported collaborative learning. Ten teachers from different disciplines and fifty students at the I.T.I.S. “Majorana” technical high school (Naples have been taking part in a cooperative e-learning experiment in which the students have been working in small groups (communities. The learning process is assisted and supervised by the teachers. The evaluation of the results from this cooperative e-learning experiment has provided useful insights into the content and didactic value of the EduSeis modules and activities. The use of network utilities and the “Learning Community” approach promoted the exchange of ideas and expertises between students and teachers and allowed a new approach to the seismology teaching through a multidisciplinary study.

  8. Professional SharePoint 2013 development

    CERN Document Server

    Alirezaei, Reza; Ranlett, Matt; Hillier, Scot; Wilson, Brian; Fried, Jeff; Swider, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thorough coverage of development in SharePoint 2013 A team of well-known Microsoft MVPs joins forces in this fully updated resource, providing you with in-depth coverage of development tools in the latest iteration of the immensely popular SharePoint. From building solutions to building custom workflow and content management applications, this book shares field-tested best practices on all aspect of SharePoint 2013 development. Offers a thorough look at Windows Azure and SharePoint 2013Includes new chapters on Application Life Cycle Management, developing apps in ShareP

  9. Classroom virtual lab experiments as teaching tools for explaining how we understand planetary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C. N.; Schools, H.; Research Team Members

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will report on a classroom pilot study in which we teamed with school teachers in four middle school classes to develop and deploy course modules that connect the real-world to virtual forms of laboratory experiments.The broad goal is to help students realize that seemingly complex Earth system processes can be connected to basic properties of the planet and that this can be illustrated through idealized experiment. Specifically the presentation will describe virtual modules based on on-demand cloud computing technologies that allow students to test the notion that pole equator gradients in radiative forcing together with rotation can explain characteristic patterns of flow in the atmosphere. The module developed aligns with new Massachusetts science standard requirements regarding understanding of weather and climate processes. These new standards emphasize an appreciation of differential solar heating and a qualitative understanding of the significance of rotation. In our preliminary classroom pilot studies we employed pre and post evaluation tests to establish that the modules had increased student knowledge of phenomenology and terms. We will describe the results of these tests as well as results from anecdotal measures of student response. This pilot study suggests that one way to help make Earth science concepts more tractable to a wider audience is through virtual experiments that distill phenomena down, but still retain enough detail that students can see the connection to the real world. Modern computer technology and developments in research models appear to provide an opportunity for more work in this area. We will describe some follow-up possibilities that we envisage.

  10. Experiences from Blended Learning, Net-based Learning and Mind Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Arvid Staupe

    2010-01-01

    My experiences described in this article are based on lecturing at the intermediate level at Department of Computer and Information Science (IDI) at NTNU. The primary cause for initiating the research projects, which lasted several years and with a gradual increase in the use of ICT, was the tenfold increase in number of students over only a few years, from barely 20 to more than 250. Two positive results were a significant improvement in grades and a large increase in the proportion of stude...

  11. Experiences and Results of Applying Tools for Assessing the Quality of a mHealth App Named Heartkeeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    Currently, many incomplete mobile apps can be found in the commercial stores, apps with bugs or low quality that needs to be seriously improved. The aim of this paper is to use two different tools for assessing the quality of a mHealth app for the self-management of heart diseases by the own patients named Heartkeeper. The first tool measures the compliance with the Android guidelines given by Google and the second measures the users' Quality of Experience (QoE). The results obtained indicated that Heartkeeper follows in many cases the Android guidelines, especially in the structure, and offers a satisfactory QoE for its users, with special mention to aspects such as the learning curve, the availability and the appearance. As a result, Heartkeeper has proved to be a satisfactory app from the point of view of Google and the users. The conclusions obtained are that the type of tools that measure the quality of an app can be very useful for developers in order to find aspects that need improvements before releasing their apps. By doing this, the number of low-quality applications released will decrease dramatically, so these techniques are strongly recommended for all the app developers.

  12. Shared Value

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Mette; Kampmann, Hack; Nielsen, Michalis; Larsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    This project investigates the kind of value being presented when two seemingly different organisations - Red Bull and The Royal Theatre (Det Kongelige Teater) comes together to collaborate and present the Red Bull Cliff Diving 2015 series in Copenhagen in June 2015. The project draws on theories on Axiology, Experience Economy, Branding and Content Marketing, Culture Theory and Public Private Partnerships, all in relation to Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimers’ theory of “Cultural Industry: En...

  13. Filtration Characterization Method as Tool to Assess Membrane Bioreactor Sludge Filterability—The Delft Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lousada-Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and removal of fouling is often the most energy intensive process in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs, responsible for 40% to 50% of the total specific energy consumed in submerged MBRs. In the past decade, methods were developed to quantify and qualify fouling, aiming to support optimization in MBR operation. Therefore, there is a need for an evaluation of the lessons learned and how to proceed. In this article, five different methods for measuring MBR activated sludge filterability and critical flux are described, commented and evaluated. Both parameters characterize the fouling potential in full-scale MBRs. The article focuses on the Delft Filtration Characterization method (DFCm as a convenient tool to characterize sludge properties, namely on data processing, accuracy, reproducibility, reliability, and applicability, defining the boundaries of the DFCm. Significant progress was made concerning fouling measurements in particular by using straight forward approaches focusing on the applicability of the obtained results. Nevertheless, a fouling measurement method is still to be defined which is capable of being unequivocal, concerning the fouling parameters definitions; practical and simple, in terms of set-up and operation; broad and useful, in terms of obtained results. A step forward would be the standardization of the aforementioned method to assess the sludge filtration quality.

  14. Development and application of a microarray meter tool to optimize microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouse Richard JD

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful microarray experimentation requires a complex interplay between the slide chemistry, the printing pins, the nucleic acid probes and targets, and the hybridization milieu. Optimization of these parameters and a careful evaluation of emerging slide chemistries are a prerequisite to any large scale array fabrication effort. We have developed a 'microarray meter' tool which assesses the inherent variations associated with microarray measurement prior to embarking on large scale projects. Findings The microarray meter consists of nucleic acid targets (reference and dynamic range control and probe components. Different plate designs containing identical probe material were formulated to accommodate different robotic and pin designs. We examined the variability in probe quality and quantity (as judged by the amount of DNA printed and remaining post-hybridization using three robots equipped with capillary printing pins. Discussion The generation of microarray data with minimal variation requires consistent quality control of the (DNA microarray manufacturing and experimental processes. Spot reproducibility is a measure primarily of the variations associated with printing. The microarray meter assesses array quality by measuring the DNA content for every feature. It provides a post-hybridization analysis of array quality by scoring probe performance using three metrics, a a measure of variability in the signal intensities, b a measure of the signal dynamic range and c a measure of variability of the spot morphologies.

  15. Gage cookbook: Tools and techniques to measure stresses and motions on explosive experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Technology Dept.

    1996-01-01

    Tools and techniques developed to measure stresses and motions on underground nuclear and high explosive tests in the tuff geologies at the Nevada Test Site are described in this document. The thrust of the measurements was to understand containment phenomenology. The authors concentrate on the fluid-coupled ytterbium gage; it was fielded to measure dynamic stress in the 0.2 to 20 kilobar range and the subsequent, low amplitude residual stress. Also described are accelerometer packages; their traces were integrated to obtain particle motion. Various cable survival techniques were investigated with field measurements for they wished to extend the measurements to late-time. Field measurements were also made to address the gage inclusion problem. Work to date suggests that the problem is a minimum when the stress level is above the yield strength of the host rock and grout. Below the yield level stress amplitudes in the grouted hole can range from 60 to 200% of the stress in the host rock.

  16. Experiences and shared meaning of teamwork and interprofessional collaboration among health care professionals in primary health care settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaleti, Carine; Schveitzer, Mariana Cabral; Peduzzi, Marina; Zoboli, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone; Soares, Cassia Baldini

    2017-11-01

    During the last decade, teamwork has been addressed under the rationale of interprofessional practice or collaboration, highlighted by the attributes of this practice such as: interdependence of professional actions, focus on user needs, negotiation between professionals, shared decision making, mutual respect and trust among professionals, and acknowledgment of the role and work of the different professional groups. Teamwork and interprofessional collaboration have been pointed out as astrategy for effective organization of health care services as the complexity of healthcare requires integration of knowledge and practices from differente professional groups. This integration has a qualitative dimension that can be identified through the experiences of health professionals and to the meaning they give to teamwork. The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the best available evidence on the experiences of health professionals regarding teamwork and interprofessional collaboration in primary health care settings. The populations included were all officially regulated health professionals that work in primary health settings: dentistry, medicine, midwifery, nursing, nutrition, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical education, physiotherapy, psychology, social work and speech therapy. In addition to these professionals, community health workers, nursing assistants, licensed practical nurses and other allied health workers were also included. The phenomena of interest were experiences of health professionals regarding teamwork and interprofessional collaboration in primary health care settings. The context was primary health care settings that included health care centers, health maintenance organizations, integrative medicine practices, integrative health care, family practices, primary care organizations and family medical clinics. National health surgery as a setting was excluded. The qualitative component of the review considered studies that

  17. Exploring the potential implementation of a tool to enhance shared decision making (SDM) in mental health services in the United Kingdom: a qualitative exploration of the views of service users, carers and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Helen; Harris, Kamelia; Bee, Penny; Lovell, Karina; Rogers, Anne; Drake, Richard

    2017-01-01

    As a response to evidence that mental health service users and carers expect greater involvement in decisions about antipsychotic medication choice and prescribing, shared decision-making (SDM) has increasingly come to be viewed as an essential element of person-centred care and practice. However, this aspiration has yet to be realised in practice, as service users and carers continue to feel alienated from healthcare services. Existing understanding of the factors affecting the use of tools to support SDM is limited to inter-individual influences and wider factors affecting potential implementation are underexplored. To explore the potential use of a tool designed to enhance collaborative antipsychotic prescribing from the perspectives of secondary care mental health service users, carers and professionals. We conducted a qualitative study (semi-structured interviews and focus groups) using a convenience sample of 33 participants (10 mental health service users, 10 carers and 13 professionals) involved in antipsychotic prescribing in one Trust in the North of England. Participants were asked about the potential implementation of a tool to support SDM within secondary mental health services. Framework analysis incorporating the use of constant comparative method was used to analyse the data. The study identified a divergence in the views of service users and professionals, including a previously undocumented tendency for stakeholder groups to blame each other for potential implementation failure. This dissonance was shaped by meso and macro level influences relating to paternalism, legislative frameworks, accountability and lack of resources. Participants did not identify any macro level (policy or structural) facilitators to the use of the tool highlighting the negative impact of mental health contexts. Our study indicated that inter-individual factors are likely to be most important to implementation, given their potential to transcend meso and macro level

  18. Space Shuttle Debris Impact Tool Assessment Using the Modern Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Richard; Rayos, Elonsio M.; Campbell, Charles H.; Rickman, Steven L.; Larsen, Curtis E.

    2007-01-01

    Complex computer codes are used to estimate thermal and structural reentry loads on the Shuttle Orbiter induced by ice and foam debris impact during ascent. Such debris can create cavities in the Shuttle Thermal Protection System. The sizes and shapes of these cavities are approximated to accommodate a code limitation that requires simple "shoebox" geometries to describe the cavities -- rectangular areas and planar walls that are at constant angles with respect to vertical. These approximations induce uncertainty in the code results. The Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE) has recently been applied to develop a series of resource-minimal computational experiments designed to generate low-order polynomial graduating functions to approximate the more complex underlying codes. These polynomial functions were then used to propagate cavity geometry errors to estimate the uncertainty they induce in the reentry load calculations performed by the underlying code. This paper describes a methodological study focused on evaluating the application of MDOE to future operational codes in a rapid and low-cost way to assess the effects of cavity geometry uncertainty.

  19. NEMO: a tool for analyzing gene and chromosome territory distributions from 3D-FISH experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuccelli, E; Mompart, F; Gellin, J; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Yerle, M; Boudier, T

    2010-03-01

    Three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) is used to study the organization and the positioning of chromosomes or specific sequences such as genes or RNA in cell nuclei. Many different programs (commercial or free) allow image analysis for 3D-FISH experiments. One of the more efficient open-source programs for automatically processing 3D-FISH microscopy images is Smart 3D-FISH, an ImageJ plug-in designed to automatically analyze distances between genes. One of the drawbacks of Smart 3D-FISH is that it has a rather basic user interface and produces its results in various text and image files thus making the data post-processing step time consuming. We developed a new Smart 3D-FISH graphical user interface, NEMO, which provides all information in the same place so that results can be checked and validated efficiently. NEMO gives users the ability to drive their experiments analysis in either automatic, semi-automatic or manual detection mode. We also tuned Smart 3D-FISH to better analyze chromosome territories. NEMO is a stand-alone Java application available for Windows and Linux platforms. The program is distributed under the creative commons licence and can be freely downloaded from https://www-lgc.toulouse.inra.fr/nemo

  20. Documentary film as a tool for social work – the experience of social worker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, I present, on the basis of my own experiences, how a documentary film could be used in the field of social work. A documentary film as a medium gets wider audience. It reaches, not only the client of the social welfare and its milieu, but also society which he lives in. It is not easy to introduce changes in the area of mental health and in the life of persons with psychosocial disability if no social transformation on thinking about this problem is observed. If we, persons without disability, will continue to believe that the ill persons are dangerous and aggressive, even the most excellent modification in this field will not lead to important changes in their lives. They will continue to be excluded and not welcome in the company of “normals”. Concerning this, the activities of the social workers should be focused on the changes of social awareness, imaginations and stereotypes. Based on my own experiences in the article it is shown how social workers could change social awareness using a documentary film.

  1. The anisosphere as a new tool for interpreting Foucault pendulum experiments. Part I: harmonic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, René

    2017-08-01

    In an attempt to explain the tendency of Foucault pendula to develop elliptical orbits, Kamerlingh Onnes derived equations of motion that suggest the use of great circles on a spherical surface as a graphical illustration for an anisotropic bi-dimensional harmonic oscillator, although he did not himself exploit the idea any further. The concept of anisosphere is introduced in this work as a new means of interpreting pendulum motion. It can be generalized to the case of any two-dimensional (2-D) oscillating system, linear or nonlinear, including the case where coupling between the 2 degrees of freedom is present. Earlier pendulum experiments in the literature are revisited and reanalyzed as a test for the anisosphere approach. While that graphical method can be applied to strongly nonlinear cases with great simplicity, this part I is illustrated through a revisit of Kamerlingh Onnes' dissertation, where a high performance pendulum skillfully emulates a 2-D harmonic oscillator. Anisotropy due to damping is also described. A novel experiment strategy based on the anisosphere approach is proposed. Finally, recent original results with a long pendulum using an electronic recording alidade are presented. A gain in precision over traditional methods by 2-3 orders of magnitude is achieved.

  2. EMS-45 Tool Steels Hardenability Experiment using Jominy ASTM A255 Test Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamsul Hadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hardenability of steels is an important way to determine heat treatment and material properties that produce component products. Jominy test is one of the method to know hardenability of steels. The Jominy ASTM A255 in used as a method for carriying out and this reseach. Parameter such as austenite temperature, holding time, cooling rate and then the results is dedicated by the prediction result, with Non Linear Numerical Equation Method. Based on test, it’s known, increasing austenite temperature, longer holding time and high cooling rate, will increase hardenability of steels. The different between the results and the prediction result done by Sonh Yue-Peng[15], Matja equation[14] and Zehtab equation[10], about 5 % -10 %. The data obtained from this experiment can be used to determine the appropriated heat treatment in order to get the desired mechanical properties, as well as to avoid distortion.

  3. Private–Public Partnership as a Tool to Promote Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Development: WWP Torrearte Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio De Los Ríos-Carmenado

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the ability of both private–public partnerships and entrepreneurship to promote sustainable rural development. This research outlines the historical chronology and the importance of the PPP (Private Public Partnership for rural entrepreneurship; the complexity of PPP management dimensions is also analyzed. In addition, this research is based on an empiric study of a PPP for entrepreneurship in sustainable development in the North Highland of Madrid’s community, with more than 20 years of experience. This PPP is managed according to the Working With People (WWP model, which is for the management of complex projects in the sustainable rural development field, and aims to promote the development of competences amongst the parties involved. The results show the positive effects in terms of entrepreneurship’s competences for sustainable rural development and the parties involved who create the PPP management model for entrepreneurship and the Torrearte Project.

  4. Analysis of the Source Physics Experiment SPE4 Prime Using State-Of Parallel Numerical Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, O.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.; Glenn, L.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes a methodology used for large scale modeling of wave propagation from underground chemical explosions conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) fractured granitic rock. We show that the discrete natures of rock masses as well as the spatial variability of the fabric of rock properties are very important to understand ground motions induced by underground explosions. In order to build a credible conceptual model of the subsurface we integrated the geological, geomechanical and geophysical characterizations conducted during recent test at the NNSS as well as historical data from the characterization during the underground nuclear test conducted at the NNSS. Because detailed site characterization is limited, expensive and, in some instances, impossible we have numerically investigated the effects of the characterization gaps on the overall response of the system. We performed several computational studies to identify the key important geologic features specific to fractured media mainly the joints characterized at the NNSS. We have also explored common key features to both geological environments such as saturation and topography and assess which characteristics affect the most the ground motion in the near-field and in the far-field. Stochastic representation of these features based on the field characterizations has been implemented into LLNL's Geodyn-L hydrocode. Simulations were used to guide site characterization efforts in order to provide the essential data to the modeling community. We validate our computational results by comparing the measured and computed ground motion at various ranges for the recently executed SPE4 prime experiment. We have also conducted a comparative study between SPE4 prime and previous experiments SPE1 and SPE3 to assess similarities and differences and draw conclusions on designing SPE5.

  5. 3_IS: New Tools for Sharing Knowledge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caporali, Maurizio; Rizzo, Antonio; Rubegni, Elisa

    2004-01-01

    ... so that each strand of the process could inform the others. The 3_is system consists of a presence environment, the physical classroom in which the lectures take place, and a remote environment, the Web platform, both managed by a modular architecture...

  6. New beam monitoring tool for radiobiology experiments at the cyclotron ARRONAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwob, L; Koumeir, C; Servagent, N; Cherel, M; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Métivier, V; Michel, N; Poirier, F; Rahmani, A; Varmenot, N

    2015-09-01

    The ARRONAX cyclotron is able to deliver alpha particles at 68 MeV. In the frame of radiological research, a new method is studied to infer in situ the deposited dose: it is based on the online measurement of the bremsstrahlung (>1 keV) produced by the interaction of the incident particle with the medium. Experiments are made using bombarded poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-equivalent water targets in order to characterise this continuous X-ray spectrum. The intensity of the bremsstrahlung spectrum allows for the beam monitoring. A simulation code of the bremsstrahlung has been built, and a good agreement is found with the experimental spectra. With this simulation, it is possible to predict the sensibility of this method: it varies with the target thickness, showing a good sensibility for thin target (<1000 µm) and saturation for thicker ones. Bremsstrahlung spectrum also shows a sensibility on the target's chemical composition. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The informatics as tool of inclusion: The UNIVASF experience with family farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Marisy Souza Ribeiro de Oliveira

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this report is to socialize experiences carried out by UNIVASF - Federal University of the Valley of São Francisco on the inclusion of family farmers in the computational language through scientific literacy and integrated actions, taking into account the ethical, social, political, cultural, economic and Environmental education through educational processes. The action methodology contemplated the involvement of teachers and students of UNIVASF and the Federal Institute of Sertão Pernambucano in the promotion and animation of participatory strategies, capable of contributing to the construction of territorial development and the strengthening of family agriculture. The emphasis was on the pedagogy of practice, on the generation and collective appropriation of knowledge, where the starting point was reality and local knowledge. In practice, this has translated into the rescue of history, problem identification, prioritization, and planning of actions to achieve objectives compatible with the interests, needs, and possibilities of results in the replicability of solutions found for similar situations in different environments. The results show the feasibility of bringing to the interior of the academy the historically neglected populations, so that there is the exchange of popular and scientific knowledge, resulting in new ways of teaching and learning.

  8. Water Information as a Tool to Enhance Sustainable Water Management—The Australian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Horne

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many countries and regions have struggled to put in place adequate water information systems to assist with sustainable water management. This article describes and assesses the key components of Australia’s water information and data systems, with particular reference to rural and regional Australia, focusing on progress with strengthening these systems at a national level since 2007. Through the early part of the period, much of Australia was experiencing a crisis in water availability. The article concludes with ongoing challenges for Australia and lessons from the Australian experience for other countries embarking on upgrading their water information and data systems. Upgrading a nation’s water information systems is a long-term task, but an important one in a world of climate change and increased climate variability. Substantial progress is likely to take five to 10 years to materialize. From the outset, upgrading information systems needs to be focused on data series that will facilitate answering key policy questions, assist water users in making significant decisions more effectively, and allow businesses and government to better address risks from water-related events. As always, political support matters. To sustain investments in information, its coverage must facilitate illuminating key questions and issues. Custodians of information systems must ensure that the value proposition is clear to all.

  9. HappyFace as a monitoring tool for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367045; Yahyapour, Ramin

    The importance of monitoring on HEP grid computing systems is growing due to a significant increase in their complexity. Computer scientists and administrators have been studying and building effective ways to gather information on and clarify a status of each local grid infrastructure. The HappyFace project aims at making the above-mentioned workflow possible. It aggregates, processes and stores the informa- tion and the status of different HEP monitoring resources into the common database of HappyFace. The system displays the information and the status through a single interface. However, this model of HappyFace relied on the monitoring resources which are al- ways under development in the HEP experiments. Consequently, HappyFace needed to have direct access methods to the grid application and grid service layers in the dif- ferent HEP grid systems. To cope with this issue, we use a reliable HEP software repos- itory, the CernVM File System. We propose a new implementation and an architecture of HappyFace, ...

  10. End-of-life care communications and shared decision-making in Norwegian nursing homes--experiences and perspectives of patients and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Lillemoen, Lillian; Førde, Reidun; Pedersen, Reidar

    2015-08-19

    Involving nursing home patients and their relatives in end-of-life care conversations and treatment decisions has recently gained increased importance in several Western countries. However, there is little knowledge about how the patients themselves and their next-of-kin look upon involvement in end-of-life care decisions. The purpose of this paper is to explore nursing home patients' and next-of-kin's experiences with- and perspectives on end-of-life care conversations, information and shared decision-making. The study has a qualitative and explorative design, based on a combination of individual interviews with 35 patients living in six nursing homes and seven focus group interviews with 33 relatives. The data was analysed applying a "bricolage" approach". Participation was based on informed consent, and the study was approved by the Regional Committees for Medical and Health Research Ethics. Few patients and relatives had participated in conversations about end-of-life care. Most relatives wanted such conversations, while the patients' opinions varied. With some exceptions, patients and relatives wanted to be informed about the patient's health condition. The majority wanted to be involved in the decision-making process, but leave the final decisions to the health professionals. Among the patients, the opinion varied; some patients wanted to leave the decisions more or less completely to the nursing home staff. Conversations about end-of-life care issues are emotionally challenging, and very few patients had discussed these questions with their family. The relatives' opinions of the patient's preferences were mainly based on assumptions; they had seldom talked about this explicitly. Both patients and relatives wanted the staff to raise these questions. Nursing home staff should initiate conversations about preferences for end-of-life care, assisting patients and relatives in talking about these issues, while at the same time being sensitive to the diversity in

  11. Sharing the dance -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jing; Ravn, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    to the highly specialized field of elite sports dance, we aim at exploring the way in which reciprocity unfolds in intensive deliberate practices of movement. In our analysis, we specifically argue that the ongoing dynamics of two separate flows of movement constitute a shared experience of dancing together....... In this sense, moving together, in sports dance, is a practical way of understanding each other. In agreement with Zahavi, our analysis emphasizes the bi-directed nature of sharing. However, at the same time, we contribute to Zahavi’s ongoing endeavour as the special case of sports dance reveals how reciprocity...... can be deliberately shaped through the mutual coordination and affective bound dynamics of movement. Our article thus both pursues the methodological point that qualitative research of expert competences can constructively enrich phenomenological analysis and indicates how movement can be fundamental...

  12. Preferences and experiences of chronically ill and disabled patients regarding shared decision-making: does the type of care to be decided upon matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Rijken, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: (1) To describe the importance chronically ill and disabled patients attach to involvement in decision-making when various care types are considered, and (2) to analyse the degree to which these patients are involved in shared decision-making (SDM) regarding these care types, and whether

  13. The collaborative dictionary as a tool in the learning process of translation students: an experience of knowledge sharing within the field of economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anne Lise; Duvå, Grete

    2002-01-01

    The learning process of the translation student involves a progressive acquisition of knowledge within a range of subject matters representing the scope of LSP-texts which the student is likely to meet in his or her future work as a professional translator. Traditionally, one of the specific resu...... achieved during a semester of the French and Spanish translation studies at the Aarhus School of Business. The project is carried out at two different levels, i.e. an inferior level (bachelor level) and a superior level (master level). The subject domain of the project is economics....

  14. A process evaluation exploring the lay counsellor experience of delivering a task shared psycho-social intervention for perinatal depression in Khayelitsha, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munodawafa, Memory; Lund, Crick; Schneider, Marguerite

    2017-07-01

    Task sharing of psycho-social interventions for perinatal depression has been shown to be feasible, acceptable and effective in low and middle-income countries. This study conducted a process evaluation exploring the perceptions of counsellors who delivered a task shared psycho-social counselling intervention for perinatal depression in Khayelitsha, Cape Town together with independent fidelity ratings. Post intervention qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with six counsellors from the AFrica Focus on Intervention Research for Mental health (AFFIRM-SA) randomised controlled trial on their perceptions of delivering a task shared psycho-social intervention for perinatal depression. Themes were identified using the framework approach and were coded and analysed using Nvivo v11. These interviews were supplemented with fidelity ratings for each counsellor and supervision notes. Facilitating factors in the delivery of the intervention included intervention related factors such as: the content of the intervention, ongoing training and supervision, using a counselling manual, conducting counselling sessions in the local language (isiXhosa) and fidelity to the manual; counsellor factors included counsellors' confidence and motivation to conduct the sessions; participant factors included older age, commitment and a desire to be helped. Barriers included contextual factors such as poverty, crime and lack of space to conduct counselling sessions and participant factors such as the nature of the participant's problem, young age, and avoidance of contact with counsellors. Fidelity ratings and dropout rates varied substantially between counsellors. These findings show that a variety of intervention, counsellor, participant and contextual factors need to be considered in the delivery of task sharing counselling interventions. Careful attention needs to be paid to ongoing supervision and quality of care if lay counsellors are to deliver good quality task shared

  15. Sharing Power in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Amato, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that be sharing power in the classroom teachers allow the development of participatory classrooms in which all students can thrive. Examines participatory teaching and critical pedagogy, components of the participatory learning experience, manifestations of participatory teaching, an application of the language experience approach,…

  16. Shared consultant physician posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, J; Molefe, C; Carew, S; Finucane, P; Clinch, D

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the acceptability and cost-efficiency of shared consultancy posts. Two consultant physicians worked alternate fortnights for a period of twelve months. Questionnaires were distributed to general practitioners, nurses, consultants and junior doctors affected by the arrangement. Patients or their next of kin were contacted by telephone. 1/17 of consultants described the experience as negative. 14/19 junior doctors reported a positive experience. 11 felt that training had been improved while 2 felt that it had been adversely affected. 17/17 GPs were satisfied with the arrangement. 1/86 nurses surveyed reported a negative experience. 1/48 patients were unhappy with the arrangement. An extra 2.2 (pposts can be broadly acceptable and cost efficient in Ireland.

  17. Using Modern Solid-State Analytical Tools for Investigations of an Advanced Carbon Capture Material: Experiments for the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriedt, Mario; Sculley, Julian P.; Aulakh, Darpandeep; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2016-01-01

    A simple and straightforward synthesis of an ultrastable porous metal-organic framework (MOF) based on copper(II) and a mixed N donor ligand system is described as a laboratory experiment for chemistry undergraduate students. These experiments and the resulting analysis are designed to teach students basic research tools and procedures while…

  18. Shared consultant physician posts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    Our aim was to assess the acceptability and cost-efficiency of shared consultancy posts. Two consultant physicians worked alternate fortnights for a period of twelve months. Questionnaires were distributed to general practitioners, nurses, consultants and junior doctors affected by the arrangement. Patients or their next of kin were contacted by telephone. 1\\/17 of consultants described the experience as negative. 14\\/19 junior doctors reported a positive experience. 11 felt that training had been improved while 2 felt that it had been adversely affected. 17\\/17 GPs were satisfied with the arrangement. 1\\/86 nurses surveyed reported a negative experience. 1\\/48 patients were unhappy with the arrangement. An extra 2.2 (p<0.001) patients were seen per clinic. Length of stay was shortened by 2.49 days (p<0.001). A saving of 69,212 was made due to decreased locum requirements. We present data suggesting structured shared consultancy posts can be broadly acceptable and cost efficient in Ireland.

  19. 'To use or not to use': a qualitative study to evaluate experiences of healthcare providers and patients with the assessment of burden of COPD (ABC) tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slok, Annerika H M; Twellaar, Mascha; Jutbo, Leslie; Kotz, Daniel; Chavannes, Niels H; Holverda, Sebastiaan; Salomé, Philippe L; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Schuiten, Denise; In 't Veen, Johannes C C M; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2016-11-17

    In the management of chronic conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there is a shift from doctor-driven care to patient-centred integrated care with active involvement of and self-management by the patient. A recently developed tool, the assessment of burden of COPD (ABC) tool, can be used in this transition to facilitate self-management support and shared decision-making. We performed a qualitative study, in which we collected and analysed the data using the methods of conventional content analyses. We performed in-depth interviews consisting of mainly open questions. Fifteen healthcare providers and 21 patients were interviewed who had worked with the ABC tool in daily care. In general, participants responded positively to the tool. Healthcare providers felt the visual representation provided was effective and comprehensible for patients and provided them with insight into their disease, a finding that patients confirmed. If patients were allowed to choose between a consultation with or without the ABC tool, the majority would prefer using the tool: it provides them with an overview and insight, which makes it easier to discuss all relevant topics related to COPD. The tool can provide structure in consultations, and is compatible with the concepts of 'motivational interviewing' and 'individualised care-planning'. Suggestions for improvement related to content and layout. So far, the tool has only been available as a stand-alone online program, that is not connected to the electronic medical record systems. It was therefore suggested that the tool be integrated into the systems to enhance its usability and its uptake by healthcare providers.

  20. A plant resource and experiment management system based on the Golm Plant Database as a basic tool for omics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selbig Joachim

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For omics experiments, detailed characterisation of experimental material with respect to its genetic features, its cultivation history and its treatment history is a requirement for analyses by bioinformatics tools and for publication needs. Furthermore, meta-analysis of several experiments in systems biology based approaches make it necessary to store this information in a standardised manner, preferentially in relational databases. In the Golm Plant Database System, we devised a data management system based on a classical Laboratory Information Management System combined with web-based user interfaces for data entry and retrieval to collect this information in an academic environment. Results The database system contains modules representing the genetic features of the germplasm, the experimental conditions and the sampling details. In the germplasm module, genetically identical lines of biological material are generated by defined workflows, starting with the import workflow, followed by further workflows like genetic modification (transformation, vegetative or sexual reproduction. The latter workflows link lines and thus create pedigrees. For experiments, plant objects are generated from plant lines and united in so-called cultures, to which the cultivation conditions are linked. Materials and methods for each cultivation step are stored in a separate ACCESS database of the plant cultivation unit. For all cultures and thus every plant object, each cultivation site and the culture's arrival time at a site are logged by a barcode-scanner based system. Thus, for each plant object, all site-related parameters, e.g. automatically logged climate data, are available. These life history data and genetic information for the plant objects are linked to analytical results by the sampling module, which links sample components to plant object identifiers. This workflow uses controlled vocabulary for organs and treatments. Unique

  1. Bonobos share with strangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jingzhi; Hare, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Humans are thought to possess a unique proclivity to share with others--including strangers. This puzzling phenomenon has led many to suggest that sharing with strangers originates from human-unique language, social norms, warfare and/or cooperative breeding. However, bonobos, our closest living relative, are highly tolerant and, in the wild, are capable of having affiliative interactions with strangers. In four experiments, we therefore examined whether bonobos will voluntarily donate food to strangers. We show that bonobos will forego their own food for the benefit of interacting with a stranger. Their prosociality is in part driven by unselfish motivation, because bonobos will even help strangers acquire out-of-reach food when no desirable social interaction is possible. However, this prosociality has its limitations because bonobos will not donate food in their possession when a social interaction is not possible. These results indicate that other-regarding preferences toward strangers are not uniquely human. Moreover, language, social norms, warfare and cooperative breeding are unnecessary for the evolution of xenophilic sharing. Instead, we propose that prosociality toward strangers initially evolves due to selection for social tolerance, allowing the expansion of individual social networks. Human social norms and language may subsequently extend this ape-like social preference to the most costly contexts.

  2. Bonobos share with strangers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhi Tan

    Full Text Available Humans are thought to possess a unique proclivity to share with others--including strangers. This puzzling phenomenon has led many to suggest that sharing with strangers originates from human-unique language, social norms, warfare and/or cooperative breeding. However, bonobos, our closest living relative, are highly tolerant and, in the wild, are capable of having affiliative interactions with strangers. In four experiments, we therefore examined whether bonobos will voluntarily donate food to strangers. We show that bonobos will forego their own food for the benefit of interacting with a stranger. Their prosociality is in part driven by unselfish motivation, because bonobos will even help strangers acquire out-of-reach food when no desirable social interaction is possible. However, this prosociality has its limitations because bonobos will not donate food in their possession when a social interaction is not possible. These results indicate that other-regarding preferences toward strangers are not uniquely human. Moreover, language, social norms, warfare and cooperative breeding are unnecessary for the evolution of xenophilic sharing. Instead, we propose that prosociality toward strangers initially evolves due to selection for social tolerance, allowing the expansion of individual social networks. Human social norms and language may subsequently extend this ape-like social preference to the most costly contexts.

  3. Onto-Tools: an ensemble of web-accessible, ontology-based tools for the functional design and interpretation of high-throughput gene expression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Purvesh; Bhavsar, Pratik; Bawa, Gagandeep; Draghici, Sorin

    2004-07-01

    The Onto-Tools suite is composed of an annotation database and five seamlessly integrated web-accessible data mining tools: Onto-Express (OE), Onto-Compare (OC), Onto-Design (OD), Onto-Translate (OT) and Onto-Miner (OM). OM is a new tool that provides a unified access point and an application programming interface for most annotations available. Our database has been enhanced with more than 120 new commercial microarrays and annotations for Rattus norvegicus, Drosophila melanogaster and Carnorhabditis elegans. The Onto-Tools have been redesigned to provide better biological insight, improved performance and user convenience. The new features implemented in OE include support for gene names, LocusLink IDs and Gene Ontology (GO) IDs, ability to specify fold changes for the input genes, links to the KEGG pathway database and detailed output files. OC allows comparisons of the functional bias of more than 170 commercial microarrays. The latest version of OD allows the user to specify keywords if the exact GO term is not known as well as providing more details than the previous version. OE, OC and OD now have an integrated GO browser that allows the user to customize the level of abstraction for each GO category. The Onto-Tools are available online at http://vortex.cs.wayne.edu/Projects.html.

  4. Shared Services – Setting unrealistic expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Yurchenko, Yuliya; Lethbridge, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This report was commissioned by PCS in February 2014 to inform campaigns against the outsourcing of services in the Ministry of Justice. It has been almost a decade since central government started to outsource shared services. This experience should be used to inform future decisions about shared service outsourcing. This report presents some of the evidence about the extent to which shared services can save on costs.\\ud \\ud This report is in six sections: \\ud 1. Overview of shared services ...

  5. Optimizing tubal ligation service delivery: a prospective cohort study to measure the task-sharing experience of Marie Stopes International Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccio, Olivia; Sendek, Birhanu; Park, Min Hae; Mesele, Tesfaye; Okello, Francis Ogojo; Gordon-Maclean, Cristin

    2017-03-01

    The Ethiopian government implements a progressive task-sharing policy for health services as a strategy to address shortages of highly skilled providers and increase access to critical services, such as family planning. Since 2009, Marie Stopes International Ethiopia has trained health officers to provide tubal ligations, a permanent method of family planning, as part of its task-sharing strategy. The objectives of this research were to evaluate task-sharing tubal ligations to health officers at Marie Stopes International Ethiopia, specifically: (a) to investigate safety, as measured by the proportion of major adverse events; (b) to evaluate the feasibility, as measured by adherence to the standard tubal ligation procedure protocol and (c) to investigate acceptability to clients of the tubal ligation procedure provided by health officers. We established a prospective cohort of women aged  ≥18 years presenting for tubal ligation at Marie Stopes International Ethiopia sites in three regions in Ethiopia (March–May 2014). Data on adverse events (incomplete procedure, pain, bleeding, infection, perforation) were collected intra-operatively; peri-operatively (1-h post-procedure); and post-operatively (7 days post-procedure). To measure feasibility, 65% of procedures were selected for ‘audit’, where a nurse observed and scored health officers adherence to standard protocol using an 18-item checklist. To assess acceptability, women were asked about their satisfaction with the procedure. In total, 276 women were enrolled in the study. 97.5% of procedures took place in rural settings. All participants were followed up 7 days post-procedure (100% response rate). The overall proportion of major adverse events was 3% (95% CI 1–6%). The most frequent adverse event was ‘failure to complete the TL’ (2.2%, n = 6). The average score on protocol adherence was 96.9%. Overall, 98.2% (n = 271) of clients would recommend the procedure to a friend. Findings from

  6. PROMOCAT: Experience in the use of the tool in the management of emergencies; PROMOCAT: Experiencia en el uso de la herramienta en la gestion de las emergencias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Fanegas, R.; Bolanos, J.; Gil Cortiella, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper is describes the experience with the use of computer tool PROMOCAT as an important means of support of the Emergency Response Organization (ERO) in CN It Asco. The addition of this new software tool in the CAT CN Asco not only facilitates the process of decision making in emergencies and drills but also has allowed successfully develop and implement a new methodology much more dynamic and effective staff training.

  7. SHARE: Statistical hadronization with resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrieri, G.; Steinke, S.; Broniowski, W.; Florkowski, W.; Letessier, J.; Rafelski, J.

    2005-05-01

    errors are independent, since the systematic error is not a random variable). Aside of χ, the program also calculates the statistical significance [2], defined as the probability that, given a "true" theory and a statistical (Gaussian) experimental error, the fitted χ assumes the values at or above the considered value. In the case that the best fit has statistical significance significantly below unity, the model under consideration is very likely inappropriate. In the limit of many degrees of freedom ( N), the statistical significance function depends only on χ/N, with 90% statistical significance at χ/N˜1, and falling steeply at χ/N>1. However, the degrees of freedom in fits involving ratios are generally not sufficient to reach the asymptotic limit. Hence, statistical significance depends strongly on χ and N separately. In particular, if Nuser perform the minimization effectively, we have added tools to compute the χ contours and profiles. In addition, our program's flexibility allows for many strategies in performing the fit. It is therefore possible, by following the techniques described in Section 3.7, to scan the parameter space and ensure that the minimum found is the true one. Further systematic deviations between the model and experiment can be recognized via the program's output, which includes a particle-by-particle comparison between experiment and theory. Additional comments: In consideration of the wide stream of new data coming out from RHIC, there is an on-going activity, with several groups performing analysis of particle yields. It is our hope that SHARE will allow to create an analysis standard within the community. It can be useful in analyzing the experimental data, verifying simple physical assumptions, evaluating expected yields, as well as allowing to compare various similar models and programs which are currently being used. Typical running time: For the Fortran code, the computation time with the provided default input files is about

  8. Social Media Success for Knowledge Sharing: Instrument Content Validation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setiawan Assegaff; Kurniabudi Kurniabudi; Hendri Hendri

    2016-01-01

    .... This media provides effective and competitive technology tool for knowledge sharing. The aimed of this study is to report the on process research that investigates the success of social media for sharing knowledge among scholars in Indonesia...

  9. Risk sharing relations and enforcement mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barr, A.; Dekker, M.; Fafchamps, M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate whether the set of available enforcement mechanisms affects the formation of risk sharing relations by applying dyadic regression analysis to data from a specifically designed behavioural experiment, two surveys and a genealogical mapping exercise. During the experiment participants

  10. A behavioral view on chimpanzee personality: exploration tendency, persistence, boldness, and tool-orientation measured with group experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massen, Jorg J M; Antonides, Alexandra; Arnold, Anne-Marie K; Bionda, Thomas; Koski, Sonja E

    2013-09-01

    Human and nonhuman animals show personality: temporal and contextual consistency in behavior patterns that vary among individuals. In contrast to most other species, personality of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, has mainly been studied with non-behavioral methods. We examined boldness, exploration tendency, persistence and tool-orientation in 29 captive chimpanzees using repeated experiments conducted in an ecologically valid social setting. High temporal repeatability and contextual consistency in all these traits indicated they reflected personality. In addition, Principal Component Analysis revealed two independent syndromes, labeled exploration-persistence and boldness. We found no sex or rank differences in the trait scores, but the scores declined with age. Nonetheless, there was considerable inter-individual variation within age-classes, suggesting that behavior was not merely determined by age but also by dispositional effects. In conclusion, our study complements earlier rating studies and adds new traits to the chimpanzee personality, thereby supporting the existence of multiple personality traits among chimpanzees. We stress the importance of ecologically valid behavioral research to assess multiple personality traits and their association, as it allows inclusion of ape studies in the comparison of personality structures across species studied behaviorally, and furthers our attempts to unravel the causes and consequences of animal personality. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. How the HYPATIA analysis tool is used as a hands-on experience to introduce HEP to high schools

    CERN Document Server

    Kourkoumelis, C

    2016-01-01

    HYPATIA'' is a tool for interactive analysis of data from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN. It has been created by the authors and has been evolving over a number of years. It is available in a dowloadable version, which is regularly used in the International Masterclasses, and an online version which now exists in the form of a webapp. Furthermore, the data from ATLAS, which are necessary for performing different educational analysis paths, are available online. Such examples of interactive analyses vary from the estimation of the magnetic field of the ATLAS solenoid magnet, to detecting \\textquotedblleft pseudo\\textquotedblright~ Higgs events. These applications have been used in recent years in a large number of schools in the form of a half-day mini local (or even remote) masterclass. These activities have been supported by various European Union outreach programs which give emphasis to promoting science education in schools through new methods based on the inquiry based technique...

  12. Student Veterans' Shared Experience Using Social Media in Higher Education: A Pilot Study with a Hybrid Phenomenological Data Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    This study emphasized understanding how student veterans experience and what they do with social media. Student veterans typically have a much different college experience than nonmilitary students. A qualitative method was used to perform this research. The researcher adapted Colaizzi's and Moustakas's phenomenological methods to create a data…

  13. Knowledge Sharing Strategies for Large Complex Building Projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Bektas

    2013-06-01

    people try to address problems caused by limited knowledge sharing. • The physical setting can play a major role in supporting interaction. Designers and managers will make intentional or spontaneous use of the possibilities that their physical setting affords, even though tools are available that can facilitate distributed work. Thus, tool implementations do not make physical settings obsolete. • Tools provide a technological infrastructure such as creating virtual proximity, handling design and criteria changes, enhancing design representation, or dealing with changes in personnel. However, there is no magic want that cures all problems and challenges of LCBPs. • Procedures refer to formal and informal rules about knowledge sharing. Such rules are important means of creating shared expectations and information exchange, however, procedures can only guide but not dictate the actual behaviour of actors in regard to knowledge sharing. • Social practices form the social infrastructure that enables and facilitates knowledge sharing through the physical setting, tools, and procedures. However, if the project culture has emerged intuitively, these practices may involve rather limited sharing behaviour at various levels (i.e. executive, managerial, and technical. Through my research and recommendations, I have attempted to offer fresh insights to practitioners about the value and necessity of knowledge sharing in large complex building projects. The framework of the Knowledge Diamond is not intended as a magic cure, but it can serve as a guideline for enhancing knowledge sharing by paying explicit attention to all four dimensions and taking advantages of new technologies such as BIM and 3D models. Although the insights of this research are based on only two cases, the conclusions were confirmed by a panel of experts who confirmed similarities with their own experience. This study also contributed to the literature on knowledge sharing and project management. The

  14. Knowledge Sharing Strategies for Large Complex Building Projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Bektas

    2013-06-01

    people try to address problems caused by limited knowledge sharing.• The physical setting can play a major role in supporting interaction. Designers and managers will make intentional or spontaneous use of the possibilities that their physical setting affords, even though tools are available that can facilitate distributed work. Thus, tool implementations do not make physical settings obsolete.• Tools provide a technological infrastructure such as creating virtual proximity, handling design and criteria changes, enhancing design representation, or dealing with changes in personnel. However, there is no magic want that cures all problems and challenges of LCBPs.• Procedures refer to formal and informal rules about knowledge sharing. Such rules are important means of creating shared expectations and information exchange, however, procedures can only guide but not dictate the actual behaviour of actors in regard to knowledge sharing.• Social practices form the social infrastructure that enables and facilitates knowledge sharing through the physical setting, tools, and procedures. However, if the project culture has emerged intuitively, these practices may involve rather limited sharing behaviour at various levels (i.e. executive, managerial, and technical.Through my research and recommendations, I have attempted to offer fresh insights to practitioners about the value and necessity of knowledge sharing in large complex building projects. The framework of the Knowledge Diamond is not intended as a magic cure, but it can serve as a guideline for enhancing knowledge sharing by paying explicit attention to all four dimensions and taking advantages of new technologies such as BIM and 3D models. Although the insights of this research are based on only two cases, the conclusions were confirmed by a panel of experts who confirmed similarities with their own experience.This study also contributed to the literature on knowledge sharing and project management. The Knowledge

  15. Share your Sweets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrnit, Jill; Høgh-Olesen, Henrik; Makransky, Guido

    2015-01-01

    All over the world, humans (Homo sapiens) display resource-sharing behavior, and common patterns of sharing seem to exist across cultures. Humans are not the only primates to share, and observations from the wild have long documented food sharing behavior in our closest phylogenetic relatives...

  16. Can local people also gain from benefit sharing in water resources development? Experiences from dam development in the Orange-Senqu River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokorosi, Palesa Selloane; van der Zaag, Pieter

    The concept of sharing benefits derived from beneficial uses of water is increasingly embraced in numerous international discourses in place of sharing water in volumes among nations riparian to common water bodies. Many benefit-sharing efforts involve building of dams and inter-basin transfer schemes. These infrastructures have been blamed to be posing environmental and social costs and directly affecting local people ( Gupta and van der Zaag, 2007) [Gupta, J., van der Zaag, P., 2007. Inter-basin water transfers and integrated water resources management: Where engineering, science and politics interlock. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth doi:10.1016/j.pce.2007.04.003]. This paper attempts to find attributes that lead towards recognising the rights of affected people and the mechanisms that may ensure access of direct benefits to them. Four theoretical factors are identified as key in recognising the rights of the affected people and were adopted as the analytical framework: a. Appropriate legal and policy framework, b. Public participation, c. Sustainable compensation measures, and d. Equitable access of derived benefits. In order to complement these theoretical factors, the study compared two large water development projects in the Orange-Senqu river basin: the Orange River Development Project and the Lesotho Highlands Water Project. In both projects, several large dams were constructed and water was transferred from one river into another. The following are the findings of the paper: a) the political environment through the legal and institutional framework plays a major role in protecting or marginalising the affected people; b) compensation measures for lost properties left many affected people destitute and food insecure; c) affected people mainly benefited from the indirect benefits of the projects instead of direct benefits. In order to ensure access to direct benefits for the affected people it is recommended that a) the national legislation must support

  17. Unidata: A geoscience e-infrastructure for International Data Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Mohan

    2017-04-01

    The Internet and its myriad manifestations, including the World Wide Web, have amply demonstrated the compounding benefits of a global cyberinfrastructure and the power of networked communities as institutions and people exchange knowledge, ideas, and resources. The Unidata Program recognizes those benefits, and over the past several years it has developed a growing portfolio of international data distribution activities, conducted in close collaboration with academic, research and operational institutions on several continents, to advance earth system science education and research. The portfolio includes provision of data, tools, support and training as well as outreach activities that bring various stakeholders together to address important issues, all toward the goals of building a community with a shared vision. The overarching goals of Unidata's international data sharing activities include: • democratization of access-to and use-of data that describe the dynamic earth system by facilitating data access to a broad spectrum of observations and forecasts • building capacity and empowering geoscientists and educators worldwide by building encouraging local communities where data, tools, and best practices in education and research are shared • strengthening international science partnerships for exchanging knowledge and expertise • Supporting faculty and students at research and educational institutions in the use of Unidata systems building regional and global communities around specific geoscientific themes. In this presentation, I will present Unidata's ongoing data sharing activities in Latin America, Europe, Africa and Antarctica that are enabling linkages to existing and emergent e-infrastructures and operational networks, including recent advances to develop interoperable data systems, tools, and services that benefit the geosciences. Particular emphasis in the presentation will be made to describe the examples of the use of Unidata

  18. Implementing Web 2.0 Tools in the Classroom: Four Teachers' Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalik, Cindy; Kuo, Chia-Ling; Cummins, Megan; Dipzinski, Erin; Joseph, Paula; Laskey, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, four teachers shared their experiences using the following free Web 2.0 tools with their students: Jing, Wix, Google Sites, and Blogger. The teachers found that students reacted positively to lessons in which these tools were used, and also noted improvements they could make when using them in the future.

  19. The Use of Virtual Reality Tools in the Reading-Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, J. Michael; Pilgrim, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    This article presents virtual reality as a tool for classroom literacy instruction. Building on the traditional use of images as a way to scaffold prior knowledge, we extend this idea to share ways virtual reality enables experiential learning through field trip-like experiences. The use of technology tools such Google Street view, Google…

  20. Evidence for a Shared Mechanism in the Formation of Urea-Induced Kinetic and Equilibrium Intermediates of Horse Apomyoglobin from Ultrarapid Mixing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Takuya; Abe, Yukiko; Maki, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the equivalence of the kinetic mechanisms of the formation of urea-induced kinetic folding intermediates and non-native equilibrium states was investigated in apomyoglobin. Despite having similar structural properties, equilibrium and kinetic intermediates accumulate under different conditions and via different mechanisms, and it remains unknown whether their formation involves shared or distinct kinetic mechanisms. To investigate the potential mechanisms of formation, the refolding and unfolding kinetics of horse apomyoglobin were measured by continuous- and stopped-flow fluorescence over a time range from approximately 100 μs to 10 s, along with equilibrium unfolding transitions, as a function of urea concentration at pH 6.0 and 8°C. The formation of a kinetic intermediate was observed over a wider range of urea concentrations (0–2.2 M) than the formation of the native state (0–1.6 M). Additionally, the kinetic intermediate remained populated as the predominant equilibrium state under conditions where the native and unfolded states were unstable (at ~0.7–2 M urea). A continuous shift from the kinetic to the equilibrium intermediate was observed as urea concentrations increased from 0 M to ~2 M, which indicates that these states share a common kinetic folding mechanism. This finding supports the conclusion that these intermediates are equivalent. Our results in turn suggest that the regions of the protein that resist denaturant perturbations form during the earlier stages of folding, which further supports the structural equivalence of transient and equilibrium intermediates. An additional folding intermediate accumulated within ~140 μs of refolding and an unfolding intermediate accumulated in <1 ms of unfolding. Finally, by using quantitative modeling, we showed that a five-state sequential scheme appropriately describes the folding mechanism of horse apomyoglobin. PMID:26244984

  1. Collaborative Reflection Under the Microscope: Using Conversation Analysis to Study the Transition From Case Presentation to Discussion in GP Residents' Experience Sharing Sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Mario; de la Croix, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenon: In higher education, reflection sessions are often used when participants learn in the workplace. In the Netherlands, all General Practitioner training programs include regular meetings called Exchange of Experiences, in which General Practitioner trainees are expected to learn

  2. Collaborative Reflection Under the Microscope: Using Conversation Analysis to Study the Transition From Case Presentation to Discussion in GP Residents' Experience Sharing Sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Veen (Mario); A. de la Croix (Anne)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract_Phenomenon:_ In higher education, reflection sessions are often used when participants learn in the workplace. In the Netherlands, all General Practitioner training programs include regular meetings called Exchange of Experiences, in which General Practitioner trainees are expected

  3. Cancer Data and Statistics Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Cancer Conference Stay Informed Cancer Data and Statistics Tools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir United States Cancer Statistics The United States Cancer Statistics (USCS): Incidence and ...

  4. Bridging Hydroinformatics Services Between HydroShare and SWATShare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, V.; Zhao, L.; Song, C. X.; Tarboton, D. G.; Goodall, J. L.; Stealey, M.; Rajib, A.; Morsy, M. M.; Dash, P. K.; Miles, B.; Kim, I. L.

    2016-12-01

    Many cyberinfrastructure systems in the hydrologic and related domains emerged in the past decade with more being developed to address various data management and modeling needs. Although clearly beneficial to the broad user community, it is a challenging task to build interoperability across these systems due to various obstacles including technological, organizational, semantic, and social issues. This work presents our experience in developing interoperability between two hydrologic cyberinfrastructure systems - SWATShare and HydroShare. HydroShare is a large-scale online system aiming at enabling the hydrologic user community to share their data, models, and analysis online for solving complex hydrologic research questions. On the other side, SWATShare is a focused effort to allow SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) modelers share, execute and analyze SWAT models using high performance computing resources. Making these two systems interoperable required common sign-in through OAuth, sharing of models through common metadata standards and use of standard web-services for implementing key import/export functionalities. As a result, users from either community can leverage the resources and services across these systems without having to manually importing, exporting, or processing their models. Overall, this use case is an example that can serve as a model for the interoperability among other systems as no one system can provide all the functionality needed to address large interdisciplinary problems.

  5. Sharing Space Situational Awareness Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, D.

    2010-09-01

    Department of Defense, has been integrating data from diverse sources for decades. In recent years, more and more commercial entities have been integrating our data into their operations, whether to use General Perturbation (GP) Two-Line Elements (TLEs) to perform a rudimentary form of conjunction assessment (CA) or to provide a new app for the iPhone. For the longest time, the USG was one of the few organizations able to fund and conduct space surveillance using optical telescopes and various types of radar. Unfortunately, despite decades of experience tracking objects in space, we had not matured either our equipment or our processes to the point that we were able to prevent the Iridium-Cosmos collision about 18 months ago. As a result, there are two belts of debris orbiting our planet, today and for years to come. As space has become more congested and budgets have shrunk, the need to integrate data has increased. Fortunately, the number of organizations who have developed or are developing space situational awareness (SSA) capabilities, including analytical tools, has also increased.

  6. Beginning SharePoint Designer 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Windischman, Woodrow W; Rehmani, Asif

    2010-01-01

    Teaching Web designers, developers, and IT professionals how to use the new version of SharePoint Designer. Covering both the design and business applications of SharePoint Designer, this complete Wrox guide brings readers thoroughly up to speed on how to use SharePoint Designer in an enterprise. You'll learn to create and modify web pages, use CSS editing tools to modify themes, use Data View to create interactivity with SharePoint and other data, and much more. Coverage includes integration points with Visual Studio, Visio, and InfoPath.: Shows web designers, developers, and IT professionals

  7. Beginning SharePoint 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Discover how to take advantage of the many new features in SharePoint 2010. SharePoint provides content management (enterprise content management, Web content management, records management, and more), workflow, and social media features, and the new version boasts enhanced capabilities. This introductory-level book walks you through the process of learning, developing, and deploying SharePoint 2010 solutions. You'll leverage your existing skills and tools to grasp the fundamental programming concepts and practices of SharePoint 2010. The author clearly explains how to develop your first appli

  8. Scalable shared-memory multiprocessing

    CERN Document Server

    Lenoski, Daniel E

    1995-01-01

    Dr. Lenoski and Dr. Weber have experience with leading-edge research and practical issues involved in implementing large-scale parallel systems. They were key contributors to the architecture and design of the DASH multiprocessor. Currently, they are involved with commercializing scalable shared-memory technology.

  9. Authors’ reply: Response to “Older cancer patients’ user experiences with web-based health information tools: A think-aloud study"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolle, S.; Romijn, G.; Smets, E.M.A; Loos, E.F.; Kunneman, M.; van Weert, J.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    We greatly appreciate the thoughtful comments of Gokani and colleagues [1] in response to our article “Older Cancer Patients’ User Experiences With Web-Based Health Information Tools: A Think-Aloud Study” [2]. We are happy to elaborate on the points for which they request further clarification.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Nursing Students' Perspectives toward Avatar Learning Modality: Gain Pre-Clinical Experience via Self-Paced Cognitive Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commendador, Kathleen; Chi, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to better understand the nature of nursing students' perspectives toward simulative learning modality for gaining pre-clinical experience via self-paced cognitive tool--Avatar. Findings indicates that participants engaged in synchronous Avatar learning environment had higher levels of appreciation toward Avatar learning…

  11. Authors’ reply: Response to “Older cancer patients’ user experiences with web-based health information tools: A think-aloud study"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolle, S.; Romijn, G.; Smets, E.M.A; Loos, E.F.; Kunneman, M.; van Weert, J.C.M.

    We greatly appreciate the thoughtful comments of Gokani and colleagues [1] in response to our article “Older Cancer Patients’ User Experiences With Web-Based Health Information Tools: A Think-Aloud Study” [2]. We are happy to elaborate on the points for which they request further clarification.

  12. Turkish University Students' Perceptions of the World Wide Web as a Learning Tool: An Investigation Based on Gender, Socio-Economic Background, and Web Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekinarslan, Erkan

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the study is to investigate Turkish undergraduate students' perceptions of the Web as a learning tool and to analyze whether their perceptions differ significantly based on gender, socio-economic background, and Web experience. Data obtained from 722 undergraduate students (331 males and 391 females) were used in the analyses.…

  13. Influences of social reward experience on behavioral responses to drugs of abuse: Review of shared and divergent neural plasticity mechanisms for sexual reward and drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloate, Lauren N; Coolen, Lique M

    2017-12-01

    Different factors influence the development of drug addiction in humans, including social reward experiences. In animals, experience with social rewards, such as sexual behavior, pair bonding, social and environmental enrichment, can be protective. However, loss or lack of social rewards can lead to a vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior. The effects of social reward experience on drug-seeking behavior are associated with changes in the neural pathways that control drug-related behavior. This review will provide an introduction and overview of the mesolimbic pathway and the influence of social reward experience on drug-seeking behavior in rodents. Moreover, the research from our laboratory on effects of sexual experience and loss of sex reward on psychostimulant and opiate reward will be reviewed. Finally, we will review current knowledge of the neural mechanisms that underlie these interactions. Investigations of the neural underpinnings by which social and drug rewards interact contribute to improved understanding of the neural basis of vulnerability for drug addiction and reward-related behaviors in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Display Sharing: An Alternative Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The current Johnson Space Center (JSC) Mission Control Center (MCC) Video Transport System (VTS) provides flight controllers and management the ability to meld raw video from various sources with telemetry to improve situational awareness. However, maintaining a separate infrastructure for video delivery and integration of video content with data adds significant complexity and cost to the system. When considering alternative architectures for a VTS, the current system's ability to share specific computer displays in their entirety to other locations, such as large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and centers must be incorporated into any new architecture. Internet Protocol (IP)-based systems also support video delivery and integration. IP-based systems generally have an advantage in terms of cost and maintainability. Although IP-based systems are versatile, the task of sharing a computer display from one workstation to another can be time consuming for an end-user and inconvenient to administer at a system level. The objective of this paper is to present a prototype display sharing enterprise solution. Display sharing is a system which delivers image sharing across the LAN while simultaneously managing bandwidth, supporting encryption, enabling recovery and resynchronization following a loss of signal, and, minimizing latency. Additional critical elements will include image scaling support, multi -sharing, ease of initial integration and configuration, integration with desktop window managers, collaboration tools, host and recipient controls. This goal of this paper is to summarize the various elements of an IP-based display sharing system that can be used in today's control center environment.

  15. Simulation Modeling of Lakes in Undergraduate and Graduate Classrooms Increases Comprehension of Climate Change Concepts and Experience with Computational Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Cayelan C.; Gougis, Rebekka Darner

    2017-01-01

    Ecosystem modeling is a critically important tool for environmental scientists, yet is rarely taught in undergraduate and graduate classrooms. To address this gap, we developed a teaching module that exposes students to a suite of modeling skills and tools (including computer programming, numerical simulation modeling, and distributed computing)…

  16. Action-Research and Food and Nutrition Security: A School Experience Mediated by Conceptual Graphic Representation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graebner, Ivete Teresinha; de Souza, Elizabeth Maria Tala; Saito, Carlos Hiroo

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the development of a graphic representation tool as a way to support educational planning in an elementary school in the rural area of Brasilia (Brazil's capital), aiming at the implementation of an integrated action-research project focusing on hunger and nutrition. The graphic tool made it possible to promote…

  17. The effects of a digital formative assessment tool on mathematics achievement and student motivation: Results of a randomized experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Janke; Luyten, Johannes W.; Visscher, Arend J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study a randomized experimental design was used to examine the effects of a digital formative assessment tool on mathematics achievement and motivation in grade three primary education (n schools = 79, n students = 1808). Experimental schools used a digital formative assessment tool whereas

  18. Digital Discernment: An E-Commerce Web Site Evaluation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Betsy Page; Boston, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Students entering the business workforce today may well share some responsibility for developing, revising, or evaluating their company's Web site. They may lack the experience, however, to critique their employer's Web presence effectively. The purpose of developing Digital Discernment, an e-commerce Web site evaluation tool, was to prepare…

  19. Equity Audit: A Teacher Leadership Tool for Nurturing Teacher Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    View, Jenice L.; DeMulder, Elizabeth; Stribling, Stacia; Dodman, Stephanie; Ra, Sophia; Hall, Beth; Swalwell, Katy

    2016-01-01

    This is a three-part essay featuring six teacher educators and one classroom teacher researcher. Part one describes faculty efforts to build curriculum for teacher research, scaffold the research process, and analyze outcomes. Part two shares one teacher researcher's experience using an equity audit tool in several contexts: her teaching practice,…

  20. Game development tool essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Berinstein, Paula; Ardolino, Alessandro; Franco, Simon; Herubel, Adrien; McCutchan, John; Nedelcu, Nicusor; Nitschke, Benjamin; Olmstead, Don; Robinet, Fabrice; Ronchi, Christian; Turkowski, Rita; Walter, Robert; Samour, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Offers game developers new techniques for streamlining the critical game tools pipeline. Inspires game developers to share their secrets and improve the productivity of the entire industry. Helps game industry practitioners compete in a hyper-competitive environment.

  1. SharePoint 2010 Six-in-One

    CERN Document Server

    Geier, Chris; Bertram, Becky

    2011-01-01

    A team of SharePoint authorities addresses the six most essential areas of SharePoint 2010. SharePoint enables Web sites to host shared workspaces and is a leading solution for Enterprise Content Management. This book serves as one-stop shopping for concise coverage on six key areas that you need to know in order to get up and running with SharePoint 2010 quickly. After an introduction to the new features of SharePoint 2010, the author team of SharePoint experts walk you through branding and customization, workflow, business connectivity services, social networking and tools, the search functi

  2. If I Experience Formative Assessment Whilst Studying at University, Will I Put It into Practice Later as a Teacher? Formative and Shared Assessment in Initial Teacher Education (ITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamodi, Carolina; López-Pastor, Víctor Manuel; López-Pastor, Ana Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse whether having experience of formative assessment during their initial teacher education courses (ITE) influences graduates' subsequent practice as teachers. That is, if the assessment methods that university students are subject to during their learning process are then actually employed by them during their…

  3. Development of the Korean primary care assessment tool--measuring user experience: tests of data quality and measurement performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Yong-Jun; Sung, Nak Jin; Kim, Soo Young; Chung, Seol Hee; Kim, Jaiyong; Jeon, Tae-Hee; Park, Hoon Ki

    2009-04-01

    To develop a tool for assessing the performance of primary care services in South Korea from the patient's perspective and to test the validity of the tool under the conceptual framework of the recently developed definition of primary care in Korea. Item development for questionnaire and a cross-sectional survey for tool validation at 16 primary care clinics. All family physicians included in this study were required to have practiced at their current clinic for at least 2 years. A nine expert panel was assembled for tool development and patients (or guardians) who had visited their primary care clinic on six or more occasions over a period of more than 6 months participated in the survey. Scores corresponding to each domain of primary care. A total of 722 effective data sets were used for the analysis. Five items were eliminated from the preliminary 30-item tool after expert discussions at two seminars. Another four items were eliminated by principle component analysis. For each of the four domains (comprehensiveness, coordination function, personalized care, and family/community orientation), tests of scaling assumptions were well satisfied by all Likert-scaled measures. On the other hand, 'first contact' turned out to be a composite domain with five independent single-item scales. The Korean primary care assessment tool (version 1) consists of four multi-item scales and one composite scale. Widespread application of this tool will provide an empirical basis for the measurement, monitoring and continuous improvement of primary care in South Korea.

  4. Towards a Theory of Socially Shared Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunst, Katrine; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increased sharing of consumptive practices, experiences and evaluations on social media platforms. Such socially shared consumption can range from electronic word-of-mouth to formal online reviews as well as automated product mentions facilitated by social media applicat......Recent years have seen an increased sharing of consumptive practices, experiences and evaluations on social media platforms. Such socially shared consumption can range from electronic word-of-mouth to formal online reviews as well as automated product mentions facilitated by social media...... understanding and analysing the growing phenomenon of consumers’ social sharing of consumption on social media platforms The taxonomy consists of five dimensions of socially shared consumption: Phase, Automation, Formality, Expressiveness, and Sentiment. The primary contributions of this research...

  5. Share Your Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Share Your Values Page Content Article Body Today, teenagers are bombarded ... mid-twenties. The Most Effective Way to Instill Values? By Example Your words will carry more weight ...

  6. End-of-life care communications and shared decision-making in Norwegian nursing homes - experiences and perspectives of patients and relatives

    OpenAIRE

    Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Lillemoen, Lillian; Førde, Reidun; Pedersen, Reidar

    2015-01-01

    Background Involving nursing home patients and their relatives in end-of-life care conversations and treatment decisions has recently gained increased importance in several Western countries. However, there is little knowledge about how the patients themselves and their next-of-kin look upon involvement in end-of-life care decisions. The purpose of this paper is to explore nursing home patients’ and next-of-kin’s experiences with- and perspectives on end-of-life care conver...

  7. College and combat trauma: an insider's perspective of the post-secondary education experience shared by service members managing neurobehavioral symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Bryan M; Rocke, Maya R; Harrist, Christopher J; Vroman, Kerryellen G

    2014-01-01

    Enrolling in post-secondary education is common among military service members returning from combat deployments, but recent research shows service members who present with neurobehavioral symptoms consistent with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at risk for psychosocial and academic difficulty. This exploratory study was conducted to examine the academic experiences of service members through in-depth qualitative analysis. An initial survey was conducted at a public university to measure self-reported academic achievement and neurobehavioral symptoms experienced by service members (n = 48). Then, follow-up interviews were solicited from a sub-sample (n = 5) of participants to gain an in-depth understanding of their transition, social, and academic experiences. The results revealed both the day-to-day challenges participants faced while adjusting to post-secondary life and how neurobehavioral symptoms associated with combat trauma interacted with their learning experiences. The findings indicated participants did not perceive neurobehavioral symptoms as particularly deleterious to their learning thereby highlighting the potentially integral role of coping strategies and motivation in post-secondary success. This study underscores the importance of understanding not only the adverse impact of neurobehavioral symptoms but the factors that promote resilience among military service members in post-secondary education.

  8. The Sharing Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Kennelly

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Economic games involving allocation of resources have been a useful tool for the study of decision making for both psychologists and economists. In two experiments involving a repeated-trials game over twenty opportunities, undergraduates made choices to distribute resources between themselves and an unseen, passive other either optimally (for themselves but non-competitively, equally but non-optimally, or least optimally but competitively. Surprisingly, whether participants were told that the anonymous other was another student or a computer did not matter. Using such terms as ``game'' and ``player'' in the course of the session was associated with an increased frequency of competitive interaction was found in the first experiment. In agreement with prior research, participants whose resources were backed by monetary incentive acted the most optimally. Overall, equality was the modal strategy employed, although it is clear that motivational context affects the allocation of resources.

  9. Sharing is sparing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.Y. Kocher; U. Gaudenz; P. Troxler; Dr. P. Troxler; P. Wolf

    2014-01-01

    The commitment of the Fab Lab community to participate in processes of commons-based knowledge production thus also includes global knowledge sharing. For sharing back into the global commons, new knowledge needs however to be documented in a way that allows to share it by the means of information

  10. Sharing Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohler, Bryan L.

    2004-09-01

    Workplace safety is inextricably tied to the culture – the leadership, management and organization – of the entire company. Nor is a safety lesson fundamentally different from any other business lesson. With these points in mind, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recast its lessons learned program in 2000. The laboratory retained elements of a traditional lessons learned program, such as tracking and trending safety metrics, and added a best practices element to increase staff involvement in creating a safer, healthier work environment. Today, the Lessons Learned/Best Practices program offers the latest business thinking summarized from current external publications and shares better ways PNNL staff have discovered for doing things. According to PNNL strategic planning director Marilyn Quadrel, the goal is to sharpen the business acumen, project management ability and leadership skills of all staff and to capture the benefits of practices that emerge from lessons learned. A key tool in the PNNL effort to accelerate learning from past mistakes is one that can be easily implemented by other firms and tailored to their specific needs. It is the weekly placement of Lessons Learned/Best Practices articles in the lab’s internal electronic newsletter. The program is equally applicable in highly regulated environments, such as the national laboratories, and in enterprises that may have fewer external requirements imposed on their operations. And it is cost effective, using less than the equivalent of one fulltime person to administer.

  11. Proposal for a data publication and citation framework when sharing biomedical research resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Ganzinger, Matthias; Hurdle, John F; Knaup, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Research data and biospecimen repositories are valuable resources for biomedical investigators. Sharing these resources has great potential benefits including efficient use of resources, avoiding duplicate experiments, gathering adequate sample sizes, and promoting collaboration. However, concerns from data producers about difficulties of getting proper acknowledgement for their data contributions are increasingly becoming obstacles for efficient and large-scale data sharing in reality. In this research project we analyzed the inadequacy of current policy-based solution for promoting data sharing. The recommendations in this paper emphasize data publication and citation. This project aims to promote the acknowledgement of data contributors with realizable informatics tools that augment informal policy-level strategies, and do so in a way that promotes data sharing.

  12. An interprofessional team approach to fall prevention for older home care clients ‘at risk’ of falling: health care providers share their experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Baxter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Providing care for older home care clients ‘at risk’ of falling requires the services of many health care providers due to predisposing chronic, complex conditions. One strategy to ensure that quality care is delivered is described in the integrated care literature; interprofessional collaboration. Engaging in an interprofessional team approach to fall prevention for this group of clients seems to make sense. However, whether or not this approach is feasible and realistic is not well described in the literature. As well, little is known about how teams function in the community when an interprofessional approach is engaged in. The barriers and facilitators of such an approach are also not known. Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of five different health care professionals as they participated in an interprofessional team approach to care for the frail older adult living at home and at risk of falling. Methodology: This study took place in Hamilton, ON, Canada and was part of a randomized controlled trial, the aim of which was to determine the effects and costs of a multifactorial and interdisciplinary team approach to fall prevention for older home care clients ‘at risk’ of falling. The current study utilized an exploratory descriptive design to answer the following research questions: how do interprofessional teams describe their experiences when involved in a research intervention requiring collaboration for a 9-month period of time? What are the barriers and facilitators to teamwork? Four focus groups were conducted with the care-provider teams (n=9 6 and 9 months following group formation. Results: This study revealed several themes which included, team capacity, practitioner competencies, perceived outcomes, support and time. Overall, care providers were positive about their experiences and felt that through an interprofessional approach benefits could be experienced by both

  13. Sharing perspectives and experiences of doctoral fellows in the first cohort of Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa: 2011–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde Adedokun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resolution of public health problems in Africa remains a challenge because of insufficient skilled human resource capacity. The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA was established to enhance capacity in multi-disciplinary health research that will make a positive impact on population health in Africa. Objective: The first cohort of the CARTA program describes their perspectives and experiences during the 4 years of fellowship and puts forward suggestions for future progress and direction of research in Africa. Conclusions: The model of training as shown by the CARTA program is an effective model of research capacity building in African academic institutions. An expansion of the program is therefore warranted to reach out to more African academics in search of advanced research training.

  14. Visual operations management tools applied to the oil pipelines and terminals standardization process: the experience of TRANSPETRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Maria Fatima Ludovico de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio/ITUC), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Tecnologico; Santiago, Adilson; Ribeiro, Kassandra Senra; Arruda, Daniela Mendonca [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the process by which visual operations management (VOM) tools were implemented, concerning standards and operational procedures in TRANSPETRO's Oil Pipelines and Terminals Unit. It provides: a brief literature review of visual operations management tools applied to total quality management and the standardization processes; a discussion of the assumptions from the second level of VOM (visual standards) upon which TRANSPETRO's oil pipelines and terminals business processes and operational procedures are based; and a description of the VOM implementation process involving more than 100 employees and one illustrative example of 'Quick Guides' for right-of- way management activities. Finally, it discusses the potential impacts and benefits of using VOM tools in the current practices in TRANSPETRO's Oil Pipelines and Terminals Unit, reinforcing the importance of such visual guides as vital to implement regional and corporate procedures, focusing on the main operational processes. (author)

  15. Can 3D Gamified Simulations Be Valid Vocational Training Tools for Persons with Intellectual Disability? An Experiment Based on a Real-life Situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Barnekow, Ariel; Bonet-Codina, Núria; Tost, Dani

    2017-03-23

    To investigate if 3D gamified simulations can be valid vocational training tools for persons with intellectual disability. A 3D gamified simulation composed by a set of training tasks for cleaning in hostelry was developed in collaboration with professionals of a real hostel and pedagogues of a special needs school. The learning objectives focus on the acquisition of vocabulary skills, work procedures, social abilities and risk prevention. Several accessibility features were developed to make the tasks easy to do from a technological point-of-view. A pilot experiment was conducted to test the pedagogical efficacy of this tool on intellectually disabled workers and students. User scores in the gamified simulation follow a curve of increasing progression. When confronted with reality, they recognized the scenario and tried to reproduce what they had learned in the simulation. Finally, they were interested in the tool, they showed a strong feeling of immersion and engagement, and they reported having fun. On the basis of this experiment we believe that 3D gamified simulations can be efficient tools to train social and professional skills of persons with intellectual disabilities contributing thus to foster their social inclusion through work.

  16. On the Effect of Previous Technological Experience on the Usability of a Virtual Rehabilitation Tool for the Physical Activation and Cognitive Stimulation of Elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, Alberto L; Ramírez-Fernández, Cristina; Meza-Kubo, Victoria; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe; García-Canseco, Eloísa; Grimaldo, Ana I; Sucar, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    We present and discuss our findings on the identified causes for the differences of the results of two usability studies on the borrowed use of Gesture Therapy, a virtual rehabilitation tool for the cognitive stimulation and physical activation of elders. The studies focused on usability aspects including perceived usefulness, ease of use, intention of use and user experience. In the first study, we used self-report techniques to gather data, and found that previous technological experience had a significant effect on the perceived anxiety of elders; while on the second study, we used indirect observation techniques to gather data, and found that previous technological experience had a significant effect on the perceived enjoyment of elders. After a further analysis of the video recordings of the playing sessions, we identified that elders developed two different approaches to their using the application (explore-and-learn and score-and-compete), which could be related to their previous technological experience, and explain the identified differences. We observed that in the presence of problems, the response of participants was different depending on the adopted behavior. Based on this evidence, we distilled a set of preliminary guidelines to foster or inhibit certain behaviors and outcomes related to the effect of previous experience that were observed during our evaluation studies of virtual tools for the cognitive stimulation and physical activation of the elderly.

  17. The intellectual property management for data sharing in a German liver cancer research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Ganzinger, Matthias; Knaup, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Sharing data in biomedical research networks has great potential benefits including efficient use of resources, avoiding duplicate experiments and promoting collaboration. However, concerns from data producers about difficulties of getting proper acknowledgement for their contributions are becoming obstacles for efficient and network wide data sharing in reality. Effective and convenient ways of intellectual property management and acknowledging contributions to the data producers are required. This paper analyzed the system requirements for intellectual property management in a German liver cancer research network and proposed solutions for facilitating acknowledgement of data contributors using informatics tools instead of pure policy level strategies.

  18. Sharing living and dying: A balancing act between vulnerability and a sense of security. Enrolled nurses' experiences of working in the sitting service for dying patients at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstedt, Birgitta; Benzein, Eva; Andershed, Birgitta

    2011-09-01

    To describe enrolled nurses' (ENs') experiences of working in a sitting service for dying patients at home (SSH). The ENs who participated in this study had permanent jobs in community care/ primary care, but were also employed part time in a special home-sitting service organization in a municipality in the south of Sweden. Data were collected by four focus group interviews with 17 enrolled nurses. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. Care-giving in SSH was a balancing act between a sense of security and a feeling of vulnerability. Feeling secure and valued and that one is developing both professionally and personally, stemmed from working in partnership, whereas a feeling of vulnerability was associated with managing closeness and distance, being a mediator, having responsibility and feeling guilty, feeling hindered from doing good, facing loneliness, and affecting private lives. SSH makes it possible for people who are terminally ill to remain at home until they die. If the SSH organization were not an option for dying patients and their families, the pressure on the healthcare would be dramatically increased.

  19. [The accreditation of a surgical pathology and somatic genetic laboratory (LPCE, CHU of Nice) according to the ISO 15189 norm: Sharing of experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washetine, Kevin; Long, Elodie; Hofman, Véronique; Lassalle, Sandra; Ilie, Marius; Lespinet, Virgine; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Bordone, Olivier; Gavric-Tanga, Virginie; Selva, Eric; Reverso-Meinietti, Julie; Sadoulet, Dominique; Lacour, Laurence; Bille, Yvonne; Lavagna, Richard; Grier, Pascal; Zahaf, Katia; Mari, Mireille; Hofman, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Accreditation is going to be vital and unavoidable in the medium term for medical biology laboratories in France. This accreditation will certainly condition the authorization to conduct biological testing in the health care system. All the biological specialities are now affected by this procedure, including the somatic genetics. The anatomo-pathology, which is a medical speciality in France, may be also concerned by the accreditation. However, the nature and the practices of this specialty increase the complexity of this approach to be implemented according to the standard requested by the authorities, i.e. the ISO 15189 normative standard (standard on "specific requirements for quality and competence for medical biology analysis laboratories"). The present article recounts the experience of a hospital laboratory (LPCE, Nice University Hospital) composed of a surgical pathology and a somatic genetics unit: (1) in the accreditation process according to the ISO 15189 standard, (2) at the time of the audit made by the team of "COFRAC" evaluators, and, (3) in evaluating the strategy implemented following the audit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Real-Time Data Acquisition Using an Excel Spreadsheet in Pendulum Experiment Tool with Light-Based Timer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhitama, Egy; Fauzi, Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a pendulum experimental tool with a light-based timer has been developed to measure the period of a simple pendulum. The obtained data was automatically recorded in an Excel spreadsheet. The intensity of monochromatic light, sensed by a 3DU5C phototransistor, dynamically changes as the pendulum swings. The changed intensity varies…