WorldWideScience

Sample records for experience regulates central

  1. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  2. International Regulation of Central Arctic Ocean Fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, E.J.

    Due in particular to the impacts of climate change, the adequacy of the international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries has come under increasing scrutiny in recent years. As shown in this article, however, international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries is by no means entirely

  3. EXPERIENCE OF UTILIZATION OF CAPACITY BANKS AND SCHEMES OF FREQUENCY REGULATION IN MUNICIPAL CENTRALIZED HEATING SYSTEM OF CHISINAU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHERNEI M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The current paper provides a brief summary of the district heating system of the municipality Chisinau, including heat power sources, heat distribution network, production and consumption development over the past two decades and other data. Also, the priority investment projects realized by JSC "Termocom" are being presented. The company had implemented an automated monitoring system for the heat power production, transportation and distribution. For many years, the company used bellows pipes with polyurethane insulation, ball valves and plate heat exchangers. 14 out of 21 district heating boiler stations were upgraded 10 were completely automated having as a result no further need in full-time duty personnel there. The experience gained in the implementation of capacity banks and frequency inverters, summarizing the benefits and achieved results, is also presented in the current paper. It is to be underlined that in 2011 the company achieved decrease in electricity consumption by about 30% in comparison with 2005.

  4. Initial TMX central-cell ICRH experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Coffield, F.E.; Falabella, S.; Griffin, D.; McVey, B.; Pickles, W.; P.

    1980-01-01

    Four topics are discussed in this report: the feasibility of applying ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the TMX central cell, some applications of heating, the results of preliminary experiments, and plans for further ICRH experiments

  5. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). Design document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The Earth`s climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27{degree}C, but never 31{degree}C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  6. Financial regulation and financial system architecture in Central Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B

    At the beginning of the transition, advice to Central European countries with respect to how to set up their financial systems was based on models used in western economies. This paper analyzes the experiences to set up a financial system in Central Europe. The experience in the first transition

  7. Experience with the 1985 UK ionizing radiation regulations: the regulators' viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bines, W.P.; Beaver, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 achieved UK implementation of the Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive; interim action has taken account of recent revisions of risk estimates and the regulations will not be revised in advance of renegotiation of the Euratom Directive. Wide ranging consultation, central to the development of health and safety legislation in the UK, leads to greater co-operation between regulators and regulated and more acceptable legislation. Examples of co-operation, also of methods of enforcement and the use made of them, are given. The authors conclude that the regulations have stood the test of experience well. (Author)

  8. The central amygdala circuits in fear regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo

    The amygdala is essential for fear learning and expression. The central amygdala (CeA), once viewed as a passive relay between the amygdala complex and downstream fear effectors, has emerged as an active participant in fear conditioning. However, how the CeA contributes to the learning and expression of fear remains unclear. Our recent studies in mice indicate that fear conditioning induces robust plasticity of excitatory synapses onto inhibitory neurons in the lateral subdivision of CeA (CeL). In particular, this plasticity is cell-type specific and is required for the formation of fear memory. In addition, sensory cues that predict threat can cause activation of the somatostatin-positive CeL neurons, which is sufficient to drive freezing behavior. Here I will report our recent findings regarding the circuit and cellular mechanisms underlying CeL function in fear processing.

  9. Regulation of Central Nervous System Myelination in Higher Brain Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Nickel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex are interconnected brain regions, playing central roles in higher brain functions, including learning and memory, planning complex cognitive behavior, and moderating social behavior. The axons in these regions continue to be myelinated into adulthood in humans, which coincides with maturation of personality and decision-making. Myelin consists of dense layers of lipid membranes wrapping around the axons to provide electrical insulation and trophic support and can profoundly affect neural circuit computation. Recent studies have revealed that long-lasting changes of myelination can be induced in these brain regions by experience, such as social isolation, stress, and alcohol abuse, as well as by neurological and psychiatric abnormalities. However, the mechanism and function of these changes remain poorly understood. Myelin regulation represents a new form of neural plasticity. Some progress has been made to provide new mechanistic insights into activity-independent and activity-dependent regulations of myelination in different experimental systems. More extensive investigations are needed in this important but underexplored research field, in order to shed light on how higher brain functions and myelination interplay in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

  10. Central regulation of metabolism by protein tyrosine phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eTsou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs are important regulators of intracellular signaling pathways via the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosyl residues on various receptor and non-receptor substrates. The phosphorylation state of central nervous system (CNS signaling components underlies the molecular mechanisms of a variety of physiological functions including the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the current evidence implicating PTPs as central regulators of metabolism, specifically highlighting their interactions with the neuronal leptin and insulin signaling pathways. We discuss the role of a number of PTPs (PTP1B, SHP2, TCPTP, RPTPe, and PTEN, reviewing the findings from genetic mouse models and in vitro studies which highlight these phosphatases as key central regulators of energy homeostasis.

  11. Regulations for training and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The requirements to become a Corporate Member of the UK Institution of Nuclear Engineers are stated. These include a formal education at degree level, training in the practice of nuclear engineering, and a period of responsible experience in nuclear engineering at professional level. Similar conditions at the appropriate level apply to Associate Membership. (U.K.)

  12. Foreign experience of regulating international trade transactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klymenko L. V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the international experience of state regulating international trade transactions; nature, directions and contradictions of contemporary processes of globalization are defined; components of regulatory and incentive means in system of state supporting foreign trade activity of commodity producers are considered; general provisions for the improvement of state regulation mechanisms of export-import activities in Ukraine are determined.

  13. Brain neuropeptides in central ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation in trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude eLe Mével

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many neuropeptides and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are present within the brain area involved in ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation but only a few mammalian studies have focused on the integrative physiological actions of neuropeptides on these vital cardio-respiratory regulations. Because both the central neuroanatomical substrates that govern motor ventilatory and cardiovascular output and the primary sequence of regulatory peptides and their receptors have been mostly conserved through evolution, we have developed a trout model to study the central action of native neuropeptides on cardio-ventilatory regulation. In the present review, we summarize the most recent results obtained using this non-mammalian model with a focus on PACAP, VIP, tachykinins, CRF, urotensin-1, CGRP, angiotensin-related peptides, urotensin-II, NPY, and PYY. We propose hypotheses regarding the physiological relevance of the results obtained.

  14. Personal Bankruptcy Regulations in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Hetes-Gavra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Countries from Central and Eastern Europe are in different stages of development andimplementation of personal bankruptcy legislation. Austria has regulations comparable to those inWestern Europe, while the Czech Republic and Poland have recently developed regulationsregarding the bankruptcy of individuals. The solutions identified in countries that have followed asimilar path, namely the abandonment of a centrally planned economy and transition to afunctioning market economy, which consequently led to the problem of individual bankruptcy, canalso be applied selectively in Romania in the next period.

  15. Liquidity Regulation, the Central Bank, and the Money Market

    OpenAIRE

    Scheubel, Beatrice; Körding, Julia

    2013-01-01

    As reliance on excessively short-term wholesale funding has been one of the major causes for the 2007-2009 financial crisis, recent advances in global liquidity regulation try to curb the excessive reliance on short-term wholesale funding without being clear on how such an approach will affect the overall equilibrium on money markets. In particular, liquidity regulation may interfere with the central bank's influence on short-term money market rates. This paper tries to fill the gap in unders...

  16. Regulation of Neurotransmitter Responses in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP J’-aminobutyric acid; yclic AM’P; neuromodulation ; brain 1ABTAT(Continue on reverse if necessary and...crucial enzyme for regulating neuromodulation in brain. Given the ultimate goal of developing novel pharmacological agents for N! manipulating...central nervous system function, the discovery of a biochemical response to a neuromodulator can be considered a major step in that direction. Thus, up to

  17. Structural insights into central hypertension regulation by human aminopeptidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Lin, Yi-Lun; Li, Fang

    2013-08-30

    Hypertension is regulated through both the central and systemic renin-angiotensin systems. In the central renin-angiotensin system, zinc-dependent aminopeptidase A (APA) up-regulates blood pressure by specifically cleaving the N-terminal aspartate, but not the adjacent arginine, from angiotensin II, a process facilitated by calcium. Here, we determined the crystal structures of human APA and its complexes with different ligands and identified a calcium-binding site in the S1 pocket of APA. Without calcium, the S1 pocket can bind both acidic and basic residues through formation of salt bridges with the charged side chains. In the presence of calcium, the binding of acidic residues is enhanced as they ligate the cation, whereas the binding of basic residues is no longer favorable due to charge repulsion. Of the peptidomimetic inhibitors of APA, amastatin has higher potency than bestatin by fitting better in the S1 pocket and interacting additionally with the S3' subsite. These results explain the calcium-modulated substrate specificity of APA in central hypertension regulation and can guide the design and development of brain-targeting antihypertensive APA inhibitors.

  18. Structural Insights into Central Hypertension Regulation by Human Aminopeptidase A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Lin, Yi-Lun; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is regulated through both the central and systemic renin-angiotensin systems. In the central renin-angiotensin system, zinc-dependent aminopeptidase A (APA) up-regulates blood pressure by specifically cleaving the N-terminal aspartate, but not the adjacent arginine, from angiotensin II, a process facilitated by calcium. Here, we determined the crystal structures of human APA and its complexes with different ligands and identified a calcium-binding site in the S1 pocket of APA. Without calcium, the S1 pocket can bind both acidic and basic residues through formation of salt bridges with the charged side chains. In the presence of calcium, the binding of acidic residues is enhanced as they ligate the cation, whereas the binding of basic residues is no longer favorable due to charge repulsion. Of the peptidomimetic inhibitors of APA, amastatin has higher potency than bestatin by fitting better in the S1 pocket and interacting additionally with the S3′ subsite. These results explain the calcium-modulated substrate specificity of APA in central hypertension regulation and can guide the design and development of brain-targeting antihypertensive APA inhibitors. PMID:23888046

  19. Central nervous system regulation of intestinal lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Sarah; Taher, Jennifer; Adeli, Khosrow

    2016-02-01

    In response to nutrient availability, the small intestine and brain closely communicate to modulate energy homeostasis and metabolism. The gut-brain axis involves complex nutrient sensing mechanisms and an integration of neuronal and hormonal signaling. This review summarizes recent evidence implicating the gut-brain axis in regulating lipoprotein metabolism, with potential implications for the dyslipidemia of insulin resistant states. The intestine and brain possess distinct mechanisms for sensing lipid availability, which triggers subsequent regulation of feeding, glucose homeostasis, and adipose tissue metabolism. More recently, central receptors, neuropeptides, and gut hormones that communicate with the brain have been shown to modulate hepatic and intestinal lipoprotein metabolism via parasympathetic and sympathetic signaling. Gut-derived glucagon-like peptides appear to be particularly important in modulating the intestinal secretion of chylomicron particles via a novel brain-gut axis. Dysregulation of these pathways may contribute to postprandial diabetic dyslipidemia. Emerging evidence implicates the central and enteric nervous systems in controlling many aspects of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Bidirectional communication between the gut and brain involving neuronal pathways and gut peptides is critical for regulating feeding and metabolism, and forms a neuroendocrine circuit to modulate dietary fat absorption and intestinal production of atherogenic chylomicron particles.

  20. Negative Interest Rates: Central Banks Initiated an Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey N. Burenin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative interest rates appeared as a consequence of economic problems that countries with market economy came across after the crises of2007-2008. The attempts of monetary authorities to stimulate economies with the help of quantitative easing didn't bring the desired result. That's why the central banks once again resorted to a traditional tool of their monetary policy of changing interest rates. But this time they launched an experiment, they used negative interest rates. The European Central Bank, the Swedish Riksbank, the Bank of Japan, and the National Bank of Hungary introduced negative rates in order to stimulate economic growth and fight the threat of deflation, the Danish National Bank and the Swiss National Bank tried to deter appreciation of their currencies. Negative rates of the central banks brought about negative yields of government and nongovernment securities in several countries. The problem acquires an aggravated form due to the fact that negative rates appeared in several European countries simultaneously at the moment when global financial markets were not in crises. Some questions arise concerning the negative rates, for example, how low can central banks bring down the rates in the future, what is their influence on the stock markets, what is the reaction of depositors to the introduction of negative deposit rates by commercial banks, must one consider a negative rate as a rate of interest or payment to store money of the depositor, in which circumstances negative rates can be justified to fight deflation. The last question plays an important role, because recent studies find that positive economic growth is possible during deflation. If central banks don't take this nuance into consideration, they can create economic imbalances by increasing liquidity. Negative rates are not as inoffensive as it may seem at first glance. Not far ago an investor, who tried to averse risk, was buying government securities. Their yields

  1. The central regulation of plant physiology by adenylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geigenberger, Peter; Riewe, David; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2010-02-01

    There have been many recent developments concerning the metabolic, transport and signalling functions of adenylates in plants, suggesting new roles for these compounds as central regulators of plant physiology. For example, altering the expression levels of enzymes involved in the equilibration, salvaging, synthesis and transport of adenylates leads to perturbations in storage, growth and stress responses, implying a role for adenylates as important signals. Furthermore, sensing of the internal energy status involves SNF1-related kinases, which control the expression and phosphorylation of key metabolic enzymes. ATP also acts as an apoplastic signalling molecule to control cell growth and pathogen responses. These new results could shed light on the emerging question of whether energy homeostasis in plant cells differs from mechanisms found in microbes and mammals. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. World and experiences of AIDS orphans in north central Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brug, van der M.

    2007-01-01

    How do young AIDS orphans deal with the loss of their parents and their changed circumstances? This thesis discusses the social environment, experiences and perceptions of fourteen orphans in north central Namibia. The author followed the children for five months from September 2003 until March

  3. Hox gene regulation in the central nervous system of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwar eGummalla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes specify the structures that form along the anteroposterior (AP axis of bilateria. Within the genome, they often form clusters where, remarkably enough, their position within the clusters reflects the relative positions of the structures they specify along the AP axis. This correspondence between genomic organization and gene expression pattern has been conserved through evolution and provides a unique opportunity to study how chromosomal context affects gene regulation. In Drosophila, a general rule, often called posterior dominance, states that Hox genes specifying more posterior structures repress the expression of more anterior Hox genes. This rule explains the apparent spatial complementarity of Hox gene expression patterns in Drosophila. Here we review a noticeable exception to this rule where the more-posteriorly expressed Abd-B hox gene fails to repress the more-anterior abd-A gene in cells of the central nervous system (CNS. While Abd-B is required to repress ectopic expression of abd-A in the posterior epidermis, abd-A repression in the posterior CNS is accomplished by a different mechanism that involves a large 92kb long non-coding RNA (lncRNA encoded by the intergenic region separating abd-A and Abd-B (the iab8ncRNA. Dissection of this lncRNA revealed that abd-A is repressed by the lncRNA using two redundant mechanisms. The 1st mechanism is mediated by a microRNA (mir-iab-8 encoded by intronic sequence within the large iab8-ncRNA. Meanwhile, the second mechanism seems to involve transcriptional interference by the long iab-8 ncRNA on the abd-A promoter. Recent work demonstrating CNS-specific regulation of genes by ncRNAs in Drosophila, seem to highlight a potential role for the iab-8-ncRNA in the evolution of the Drosophila hox complexes

  4. 76 FR 73564 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Updates to Contract Reporting and Central Contractor Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Federal Acquisition Regulation; Updates to Contract Reporting and Central Contractor Registration AGENCIES... Procurement Data System (FPDS). Additionally, changes are proposed for the clauses requiring contractor registration in the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) database and DUNS number reporting. DATES: Interested...

  5. Emotion regulation of events central to identity and their relationship with concurrent and prospective depressive symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Palacio Gonzalez, Adriana; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    ) reported the extent to which they employed a selection of emotion regulation strategies when recalling low- and high-centrality events. Dispositional emotion regulation and depressive symptoms were also assessed. A 7-week follow-up was conducted. High-centrality events were associated with more emotion...... regulation efforts. Greater brooding and expressive suppression in relation to high-centrality memories predicted concurrent depressive symptoms after controlling for event valence and dispostional emotion regulation. Effects were absent for low-centrality memories. Emotion regulation in response to high......-centrality memories did not predict depressive symptoms at follow-up beyond baseline depressive symptoms. Overall, the findings showed that maladaptive emotion regulation in response to memories of high-centrality events is important for explaining depressive symptomatology....

  6. Cholesterol: Its Regulation and Role in Central Nervous System Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Orth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a major constituent of the human brain, and the brain is the most cholesterol-rich organ. Numerous lipoprotein receptors and apolipoproteins are expressed in the brain. Cholesterol is tightly regulated between the major brain cells and is essential for normal brain development. The metabolism of brain cholesterol differs markedly from that of other tissues. Brain cholesterol is primarily derived by de novo synthesis and the blood brain barrier prevents the uptake of lipoprotein cholesterol from the circulation. Defects in cholesterol metabolism lead to structural and functional central nervous system diseases such as Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Niemann-Pick type C disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. These diseases affect different metabolic pathways (cholesterol biosynthesis, lipid transport and lipoprotein assembly, apolipoproteins, lipoprotein receptors, and signaling molecules. We review the metabolic pathways of cholesterol in the CNS and its cell-specific and microdomain-specific interaction with other pathways such as the amyloid precursor protein and discuss potential treatment strategies as well as the effects of the widespread use of LDL cholesterol-lowering drugs on brain functions.

  7. Negative Interest Rates: Central Banks Initiated an Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksey N. Burenin

    2016-01-01

    Negative interest rates appeared as a consequence of economic problems that countries with market economy came across after the crises of2007-2008. The attempts of monetary authorities to stimulate economies with the help of quantitative easing didn't bring the desired result. That's why the central banks once again resorted to a traditional tool of their monetary policy of changing interest rates. But this time they launched an experiment, they used negative interest rates. The European Cent...

  8. The Regulation of GluN2A by Endogenous and Exogenous Regulators in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongjun; Zhan, Liying; Cheng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Linan; Hu, Jie; Gao, Zibin

    2017-04-01

    The NMDA receptor is the most widely studied ionotropic glutamate receptor, and it is central to many physiological and pathophysiological processes in the central nervous system. GluN2A is one of the two main types of GluN2 NMDA receptor subunits in the forebrain. The proper activity of GluN2A is important to brain function, as the abnormal regulation of GluN2A may induce some neuropsychiatric disorders. This review will examine the regulation of GluN2A by endogenous and exogenous regulators in the central nervous system.

  9. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  10. Emotion Regulation of Memories Central to Our Identity: The Relationship with Concurrent and Prospective Psychological Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Palacio Gonzalez, Adriana; Berntsen, Dorthe

    examined. Non-clinical participants (N = 216) identified low and high-centrality events and reported the extent to which they employed a selection of emotion regulation strategies when remembering each event. Dispositional emotion regulation, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic stress symptoms were also...... and posttraumatic stress symptoms beyond event valence and dispositional emotion regulation. Memory suppresion and reflection upon central events were not related to psychological symptoms. None of the emotion regulation strategies employed for low-centrality events were related to psychological symptoms...

  11. Recent TMX-U central cell heating and fueling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Barter, J.; Dimonte, G.; Falabella, S.; Molvik, A.W.; Pincosy, P.; Turner, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments have begun to test new methods of heating and fueling of the TMX-U central cell plasma. Heating is with ICRH and 2kV neutral beams. Fueling is by the 2kV beams and by gas puffing. The ICRH system used for fundamental-frequency slow-wave heating consists of two double half-turn antennas, with one on each side of the central cell midplane at mirror ratios of 1:3 and 1:5. Gas fueling is between these two antennas to ensure that recently ionized particles pass through an ICRH resonance before entering the thermal barrier and cells. In recent gas-fed experiments with 100 to 200kW power on each antenna, the end loss temperature was measured to increase from 30eV to above 150eV with perpendicular (cc) temperatures of >500eV. The TMX-U central cell has been equipped with 10 low energy neutral-beam injectors (LENI). These beams are designed to operate at 2kV (net) accel-voltage and deliver 17 atom amperes each to the TMX-U plasma. This low energy was selected to improve trapping (relative to higher energy) on the initial ICRH heated plasma (2X10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/). At 2keV the beams are predicted to be capable of building up and fueling to 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ density, with ion-ion scattering providing a warm, isotropic ion component in the central cell

  12. Expression of the central growth regulator BIG BROTHER is regulated by multiple cis-elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breuninger Holger

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of the organismal variation we observe in nature is due to differences in organ size. The observation that even closely related species can show large, stably inherited differences in organ size indicates a strong genetic component to the control of organ size. Despite recent progress in identifying factors controlling organ growth in plants, our overall understanding of this process remains limited, partly because the individual factors have not yet been connected into larger regulatory pathways or networks. To begin addressing this aim, we have studied the upstream regulation of expression of BIG BROTHER (BB, a central growth-control gene in Arabidopsis thaliana that prevents overgrowth of organs. Final organ size and BB expression levels are tightly correlated, implying the need for precise control of its expression. BB expression mirrors proliferative activity, yet the gene functions to limit proliferation, suggesting that it acts in an incoherent feedforward loop downstream of growth activators to prevent over-proliferation. Results To investigate the upstream regulation of BB we combined a promoter deletion analysis with a phylogenetic footprinting approach. We were able to narrow down important, highly conserved, cis-regulatory elements within the BB promoter. Promoter sequences of other Brassicaceae species were able to partially complement the A. thaliana bb-1 mutant, suggesting that at least within the Brassicaceae family the regulatory pathways are conserved. Conclusions This work underlines the complexity involved in precise quantitative control of gene expression and lays the foundation for identifying important upstream regulators that determine BB expression levels and thus final organ size.

  13. Complete reconstruction of all annunciator panels and their auxiliary facilities at central regulation office in KURRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Shinji; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Okamoto, Ken-ichi; Maki, Hirotoshi; Kimura, Itsuro.

    1988-08-01

    At the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University (KURRI) which is a joint research center with Kyoto University Reactor KUR and so forth for nation-wide universities, most of important alarm signals from KUR, KUCA and other radiation facilities are concentrated at the central regulation office. Although the function of this office had been kept normal for more than 20 years, it became necessary to reconstruct all of its annunciator panels in order to add new alarm systems, for example a newly built spent fuel storage building and a newly installed cold neutron source in KUR, and to improve the functions of old alarm systems. Thereupon, all of the annunciator panels of this office together with their auxiliary facilities were completely reconstructed in the fiscal year of 1985. Furthermore the room of this office was enlarged and reconstructed thoroughly, since it was rather narrow and inconvenient before. This report describes the reconstruction work in detail: (1) Function of the central regulation office, (2) Outline of this work, (3) Design concept, (4) Method and special cares, (5) Reconstruction of the room, (6) New utility tunnels for cables, (7) Configulation and structure of new annunciator panels, (8) Cables and their reconnection, (9) Annunciator circuits, (10) Function of each panel, (11) Test and performance, and (12) concluding remarks and future plans. This experience may be useful for the case of reconstruction of the control desk and instrumentation panels of KUR in future. (author)

  14. Regulation of Central Nervous System Myelination in Higher Brain Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Nickel, Mara; Gu, Chen

    2018-01-01

    The hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex are interconnected brain regions, playing central roles in higher brain functions, including learning and memory, planning complex cognitive behavior, and moderating social behavior. The axons in these regions continue to be myelinated into adulthood in humans, which coincides with maturation of personality and decision-making. Myelin consists of dense layers of lipid membranes wrapping around the axons to provide electrical insulation and trophic sup...

  15. Humanin: a novel central regulator of peripheral insulin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika H Muzumdar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Decline in insulin action is a metabolic feature of aging and is involved in the development of age-related diseases including Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and Alzheimer's disease (AD. A novel mitochondria-associated peptide, Humanin (HN, has a neuroprotective role against AD-related neurotoxicity. Considering the association between insulin resistance and AD, we investigated if HN influences insulin sensitivity.Using state of the art clamp technology, we examined the role of central and peripheral HN on insulin action. Continuous infusion of HN intra-cerebro-ventricularly significantly improved overall insulin sensitivity. The central effects of HN on insulin action were associated with activation of hypothalamic STAT-3 signaling; effects that were negated by co-inhibition of hypothalamic STAT-3. Peripheral intravenous infusions of novel and potent HN derivatives reproduced the insulin-sensitizing effects of central HN. Inhibition of hypothalamic STAT-3 completely negated the effects of IV HN analog on liver, suggesting that the hepatic actions of HN are centrally mediated. This is consistent with the lack of a direct effect of HN on primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, single treatment with a highly-potent HN analog significantly lowered blood glucose in Zucker diabetic fatty rats. Based upon the link of HN with two age-related diseases, we examined if there were age associated changes in HN levels. Indeed, the amount of detectable HN in hypothalamus, skeletal muscle, and cortex was decreased with age in rodents, and circulating levels of HN were decreased with age in humans and mice.We conclude that the decline in HN with age could play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases including AD and T2DM. HN represents a novel link between T2DM and neurodegeneration and along with its analogues offers a potential therapeutic tool to improve insulin action and treat T2DM.

  16. Operational experience gained from the Central Brae subsea field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapp, S.J.; Gomersall, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    The size of the field discoveries made in the North Sea in recent years has declined dramatically. With the low oil price many small fields are not viable stand alone developments. The North Sea has a large, well developed infrastructure of production facilities and pipelines. With many platforms now operating below optimum production rate, subsea tieback of these small fields utilizing the available processing capacity is the most economically attractive means of development. This paper presents a history of such a field development. The Central Brae field is located within the Brae complex of fields, 155 miles north east of Aberdeen, and has been developed by means of a subsea facility tied back to the Brae Alpha platform. A great deal of experience has been gained through the field development, not only in subsea operations but also in completion and template design and operating philosophy

  17. Early experience in centralized real time energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaywan, Z.; Hernandez, L.; Martin, M.

    2005-01-01

    The current structure of the California Independent System Operator (ISO) was described. The study provided an outline of California's transition from a decentralized pool operation to a forward bilateral market through the implementation of a centralized real time market. Details of the institutional, economic and technological history of the power system were provided. Although the California real time market was implemented in order to simplify the power system, a number of operational challenges were observed. Discontinuities in the energy curve resulted in the implementation of a target price process, which aimed to resolve the overlap in energy bids. The design of the ISO's real time market did not provide a mechanism for bidders to execute real time energy trades. Regulation bidders also internalized energy in their regulation capacity bids. The real time market application (RTMA) provided the ISO with a substantial computer program to determine and account for nearly all aspects of generation unit scheduling and physical characteristics with a multiple ramp rate. The program combined optimal power flow (OPF) logic for energy flows in addition to mixed-integer nonlinear optimization of trading schedules, and system and security constraints. The RTMA used a multi-period security constrained economic dispatch (SCED) function to optimize energy dispatch schedules. Other features of the RTMA included security constrained unit commitment, security constrained economic dispatch, and dispatch schedule post processes. It was concluded that implementation of the RTMA has increased the efficiency of the ISO. A case study of the RTMA during an outage in November 2004 was provided. 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  18. Cholesterol: Its Regulation and Role in Central Nervous System Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Orth; Stefano Bellosta

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol is a major constituent of the human brain, and the brain is the most cholesterol-rich organ. Numerous lipoprotein receptors and apolipoproteins are expressed in the brain. Cholesterol is tightly regulated between the major brain cells and is essential for normal brain development. The metabolism of brain cholesterol differs markedly from that of other tissues. Brain cholesterol is primarily derived by de novo synthesis and the blood brain barrier prevents the uptake of lipoprotein...

  19. Cardiac contractility, central haemodynamics and blood pressure regulation during semistarvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, K H; Breum, L; Astrup, A

    1991-01-01

    pressure (BP) declined. The fall in BP was caused by the reduction in cardiac output as the total peripheral resistance was unchanged. Finally, the decline in total blood volume was not significant. These findings together with a reduction in heart rate indicated that a reduced sympathetic tone via......Eight obese patients were studied before and after 2 weeks of treatment by a very-low-calorie diet (VLCD). Cardiac output and central blood volume (pulmonary blood volume and left atrial volume) were determined by indicator dilution (125I-albumin) and radionuclide angiocardiography (first pass...... and equilibrium technique by [99Tcm]red blood cells). Cardiac output decreased concomitantly with the reduction in oxygen uptake as the calculated systemic arteriovenous difference of oxygen was unaltered. There were no significant decreases in left ventricular contractility indices, i.e. the ejection fraction...

  20. Steroids as central regulators of organismal development and lifespan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu Sylvia Lee

    Full Text Available Larvae of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans must choose between reproductive development and dauer diapause. This decision is based on sensing of environmental inputs and dauer pheromone, a small molecule signal that serves to monitor population density. These signals are integrated via conserved neuroendocrine pathways that converge on steroidal ligands of the nuclear receptor DAF-12, a homolog of the mammalian vitamin D receptor and liver X receptor. DAF-12 acts as the main switch between gene expression programs that drive either reproductive development or dauer entry. Extensive studies in the past two decades demonstrated that biosynthesis of two bile acid-like DAF-12 ligands, named dafachronic acids (DA, controls developmental fate. In this issue of PLoS Biology, Wollam et al. showed that a conserved steroid-modifying enzyme, DHS-16, introduces a key feature in the structures of the DAF-12 ligands, closing a major gap in the DA biosynthesis pathway. The emerging picture of DA biosynthesis in C. elegans enables us to address a key question in the field: how are complex environmental signals integrated to enforce binary, organism-wide decisions on developmental fate? Schaedel et al. demonstrated that pheromone and DA serve as competing signals, and that a positive feedback loop based on regulation of DA biosynthesis ensures organism-wide commitment to reproductive development. Considering that many components of DA signaling are highly conserved, ongoing studies in C. elegans may reveal new aspects of bile acid function and lifespan regulation in mammals.

  1. Central lipid detection and the regulation of feeding behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansell Céline

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The modern abundance of energy-rich foods combined with a shift to more sedentary lifestyles has led to a thermodynamic imbalance in which excessive caloric intake and reduced energy expenditure account for the prevalence of obesity. In particular, exposure to lipid-rich diet is thought to promote metabolic alteration in peripheral tissue associated with obesity-related diseases. The regulation of energy balance depends on the ability of the brain to provide an adaptive response to change in circulating factors of hunger and satiety. The hypothalamus is particularly regarded as key integrative structure but, aside from hypothalamic-mediated homeostatic control, feeding behavior is also modulated by sensory inputs, such as tastes and odors, as well as by affective or emotional states. The reinforcing and motivational aspects of food are closely tied to the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine by the mesolimbic system, which is stimulated by calorie-dense foods as well as by most other objects of desire. Therefore feeding behavior is regulated by homeostatic as well as non-homeostatic inputs from the hypothalamus and the mesolimbic region. Interestingly, these structures expresses several enzymes involved in the processing of triglyceride and fatty acid and the recent literature provide growing evidence that fatty acid metabolism within discrete brain regions can function as sensor of nutrient availability directly control the hedonic and the homeostatic aspect of feeding.

  2. Ion channels in the central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Woo eSohn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability and synaptic function in the brain. Recent evidence suggests that ion channels expressed by neurons within the brain are responsible for regulating energy and glucose homeostasis. In addition, the central effects of neurotransmitters and hormones are at least in part achieved by modifications of ion channel activity. This review focuses on ion channels and their neuronal functions followed by a discussion of the identified roles for specific ion channels in the central pathways regulating food intake, energy expenditure, and glucose balance.

  3. Experience with chemicals regulation - Lessons from the Danish LAS case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Pia Vestergaard; Røpke, Inge

    2006-01-01

    the understanding of how chemicals regulation is being shaped through social and political processes, and which lessons can be drawn regarding the effectiveness of different regulatory measures. We outline briefly the history of the chemicals regulation as a background for the detailed discussion of the case study......Chemicals regulation is under pressure for change, and lessons from former experience are important to inform the process. This paper is based on a case study of the Danish measures towards regulating a specific substance, Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonate (LAS), and the case is used to deepen...

  4. Centralization of a Regional Clinical Microbiology Service: The Calgary Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre L Church

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic laboratory services in Alberta have been dramatically restructured over the past five years. In 1994, Alberta Health embarked on an aggressive laboratory restructuring that cut back approximately 30% of the overall monies previously paid to the laboratory service sector in Calgary. A unique service delivery model consolidated all institutional and community-based diagnostic testing in a company called Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS in late 1996. CLS was formed by a public/private partnership between the Calgary Regional Health Care Authority (CRHA and MDS-Kasper Laboratories. By virtue of its customer service base and scope of testing, CLS provides comprehensive regional laboratory services to the entire populace. Regional microbiology services within CLS have been successfully consolidated over the past three years into a centralized high volume laboratory (HVL. Because the HVL is not located in a hospital, rapid response laboratories (RRLs are operated at each acute care site. Although the initial principle behind the proposed test menus for the RRLs was that only procedures requiring a clinical turnaround time of more than 2 h stay on-site, many other principles had to be used to develop and implement an efficient and clinically relevant RRL model for microbiology. From these guiding principles, a detailed assessment of the needs of each institution and extensive networking with user groups, the functions of the microbiology RRLs were established and a detailed implementation plan drawn up. The experience at CLS with regards to restructuring a regional microbiology service is described herein. A post-hoc analysis provides the pros and cons of directing and operating a regionalized microbiology service.

  5. Regulating the grid-based energies in Central and Eastern Europe: models, status, issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendow, K.

    2000-01-01

    As the electricity, gas and heat industries of the economies in transition move towards more market-oriented frameworks, regulators are established to secure fair competition, protection of the customers and a minimum of public service. The paper describes the various models used or contemplated in the autumn of 2000 in central and eastern Europe and identifies fifteen issues, some falling under the competence of governments, others challenging the regulators, again others relating to international co-operation. (author)

  6. Ion channels in the central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Jong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability and synaptic function in the brain. Recent evidence suggests that ion channels expressed by neurons within the brain are responsible for regulating energy and glucose homeostasis. In addition, the central effects of neurotransmitters and hormones are at least in part achieved by modifications of ion channel activity. This review focuses on ion channels and their neuronal functions followed by a discussion of the identified roles fo...

  7. Women's experiences with medication for menstrual regulation in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Heather M; Biswas, Kamal; Griffin, Risa; Menzel, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Menstrual regulation has been legal in Bangladesh since 1974, but the use of medication for menstrual regulation is new. In this study, we sought to understand women's experiences using medication for menstrual regulation in Bangladesh. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with rural and urban women between December 2013 and February 2014. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, computer recorded and coded for analysis. The majority of women in our study had had positive experiences with medication for menstrual regulation and successful outcomes, regardless of whether they obtained their medication from medicine sellers/pharmacies, doctors or clinics. Women were strongly influenced by health providers when deciding which method to use. There is a need to educate not only women of reproductive age, but also communities as a whole, about medication for menstrual regulation, with a particular emphasis on cost and branding the medication. Continued efforts to improve counselling by providers about the dose, medication and side-effects of medication for menstrual regulation, along with education of the community about medication as an option for menstrual regulation, will help to de-stigmatise the procedure and the women who seek it.

  8. Norwegian support in development of regulations of radioactive waste management in central Asia-threat assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhunussova, Tamara; Sneve, Malgorzata; Liland, Astrid; Strand, Per; Kim, Alexander; Mirsaidov, Ulmas; Tolongutov, Baigabyl

    2011-01-01

    In Central Asia (CA) the radioactive waste comes mainly from uranium mining and milling, nuclear weapon testing and nuclear power development and other ionizing sources. This waste was produced, to a greater extent, by the military-industrial complex and the uranium and non-uranium industry, and, to a lesser extent, by the nuclear industry and in the process of use of isotope products. Exploitation and mining of uranium and thorium deposits produce a large amount of solid and liquid radioactive waste, as well volatile contaminants which need a proper management. In Central Asia the wastes are mainly stored at the surface in large piles and represent a long-term potential health and environmental hazard. The process of remediating legacy sites of the past and reducing the threats is now getting under way, with the design and implementation of remediation activities, partly with international support. However, there is a significant lack in the regulatory basis for carrying out such remediation work, including a lack of relevant radiation and environmental safety norms and standards, licensing procedures and requirements for monitoring etc., as well as expertise to transform such a basis into practice. Accordingly, the objective of the proposed project is to assist the relevant regulatory authorities in Kazakhstan, Kirgizstan and Tajikistan to develop national robust and adequate regulations and procedures, taking into account the international guidance and Norwegian experience with regulatory support projects in Russia. Specific expected results in the project period include: a threat assessment report identifying priority areas for regulatory development, based on the status of current regulatory documents and the hazard presented by the different sites and facilities; development of national radioactive waste management strategies in each country; development of an enhanced regulatory framework for supervision of nuclear matters, and an enhanced safety culture

  9. Determination of the event centrality in the WA97 and NA57 experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Carrer, N; Badalà, A; Barbera, R; Beusch, Werner; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bruno, G; Caliandro, R; Campbell, M; Cantatore, E; Carena, W; De Haas, A P; Di Bari, D; Di Liberto, S; Divià, R; Elia, D; Evans, D; Fanebust, K; Fayazzadeh, F; Fedorisin, J; Feofilov, G A; Fini, R A; Ftácnik, J; Ghidini, B; Grella, G; Gulino, M; Helstrup, H; Henriquez, M; Holme, A K; Huss, D; Jacholkowski, A; Jones, G T; Jovanovic, P; Jusko, A; Kamermans, R; Kinson, J B; Klempt, W; Knudson, K; Kolojvari, A A; Kondratev, V A; Králik, I; Kuijer, P; Lenti, V; Lietava, R; Løvhøiden, G; Lupták, M; Manzari, V; Martinská, G; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Michalon, A; Michalon-Mentzer, M E; Morando, M; Muigg, D; Nappi, E; Navach, F; Norman, P I; Palmeri, A; Pappalardo, G S; Pastircák, B; Pisút, J; Pisútová, N; Posa, F; Quercigh, Emanuele; Riggi, F; Röhrich, D; Romano, G; Safarík, K; Sándor, L; Schillings, E; Segato, G F; Sené, M; Sené, R; Snoeys, W; Staroba, P; Thompson, M; Torrieri, G D; Tulina, T A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Urbán, J; Valiev, F F; Van den Brink, A; Van de Ven, P; Van de Vyvre, P; van Eijndhoven, N; Vannucci, Luigi; Vascotto, Alessandro; Vik, T; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, L I; Virgili, T; Votruba, M F; Vrláková, J; Závada, P

    2001-01-01

    The procedure employed by the WA97 and NA57 experiments to determine the number of wounded nucleons in different Pb+Pb centrality classes is discussed. We will also compare different centrality scales and their influence on the measurement of the centrality dependence of strange particle yields. (14 refs).

  10. The role of the 5-HT1a receptor in central cardiovascular regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H. Dreteler

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the studies describe~ in this thesis is to further clarify the role of the 5- HT1A receptor in central cardiovascular regulation. The hypotensive action of 5-HT1A receptor agonists is mainly due to differential sympatho-inhibition resulting in an increase in total

  11. Central regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis: focus on clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliers, E.; Boelen, A.; van Trotsenburg, A. S. P.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the most prominent brain region involved in setpoint regulation of the thyroid axis. It generates the diurnal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) rhythm, and it plays a central role in the adaptation of the thyroid axis to environmental factors such as caloric deprivation or

  12. Environmental Aesthetics, Social Engagement and Aesthetic Experiences in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the Youth Theatre for Peace (YTP) project in relation to environmental aesthetics and engaged participatory practices towards tolerance building in Central Asia. My main argument is that cultural histories of storytelling, "manas" (an oral and now literary Kyrgyz epic) and trickster tales incorporate ideas and…

  13. CENTRAL BANK INDEPENDENCE AND INFLATION TARGETING - THE BRITISH EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Delia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Known as the ‘Old Lady’ of Threadneedle Street, the Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom. Founded in 1694, the Bank of England is standing at the centre of the United Kingdom’s financial system, and is committed to promoting and maintaining monetary and financial stability as its contribution to a healthy economy. In our opinion, it is very important to analyze the Bank of England’s monetary policy strategy, starting from 1992 – adoption of the inflation target and the evolution of it’s monetary policy strategy, through an important feature – delegating operational accountability regarding the monetary policy in 1997 as well as the appropriate institutional framework. More over, it is important to analyze the Bank of England’s performances before and after granting central bank independence.

  14. Neonatal cholestasis - Single centre experience in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal cholestasis syndrome (NCS is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants. The disorder has rarely been studied in centers from Central India. Objectives: To study the prevalence, clinical presentation and etiology of NCS at a tertiary referral center in Central India. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out at a tertiary referral center in Central India. The study is a descriptive study. The records of all patients with suspected NCS treated in the Department of Pediatrics from 2007−2012 were analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-eight children had a provisional diagnosis of NCS. The complete records of 100 children were available for the study. The median age of presentation was 78 days (range 15−270 days. The male: female ratio was 1.17:1. The clinical features noted were- jaundice (100/100,100%, failure to thrive (73,73%, organomegaly (68, 68%, acholic stools (38,38%, abdominal distention (52,52% and poor feeding (29, 29%. The etiology as confirmed by investigations is as follows- neonatal hepatitis (20,20%, idiopathic neonatal hepatitis (18,18%, biliary atresia (41,41%, sepsis (14,14% and others (7,7%. Conclusions: The proportion of NCS in our group of patients was 1.2 per 1000 patients. Jaundice, organomegaly and failure to thrive are the common presentations. Biliary atresia, neonatal hepatitis and idiopathic neonatal hepatitis were the common etiological factors at our center.

  15. Neonatal Cholestasis - Single Centre Experience in Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mayank; Adkar, Sagar; Waghmare, Chandrashekhar; Jain, Jenisha; Jain, Shikhar; Jain, Kamna; Passi, Gouri Rao; Vinay, Rashmi Shad; Soni, M K

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis syndrome (NCS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants. The disorder has rarely been studied in centers from Central India. To study the prevalence, clinical presentation and etiology of NCS at a tertiary referral center in Central India. The study was carried out at a tertiary referral center in Central India. The study is a descriptive study. The records of all patients with suspected NCS treated in the Department of Pediatrics from 2007-2012 were analyzed. One hundred and sixty-eight children had a provisional diagnosis of NCS. The complete records of 100 children were available for the study. The median age of presentation was 78 days (range 15-270 days). The male: female ratio was 1.17:1. The clinical features noted were- jaundice (100/100,100%), failure to thrive (73,73%), organomegaly (68, 68%), acholic stools (38,38%), abdominal distention (52,52%) and poor feeding (29, 29%). The etiology as confirmed by investigations is as follows- neonatal hepatitis (20,20%), idiopathic neonatal hepatitis (18,18%), biliary atresia (41,41%), sepsis (14,14%) and others (7,7%). The proportion of NCS in our group of patients was 1.2 per 1000 patients. Jaundice, organomegaly and failure to thrive are the common presentations. Biliary atresia, neonatal hepatitis and idiopathic neonatal hepatitis were the common etiological factors at our center.

  16. Rictor/mTORC2 facilitates central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocalis, Heidi E.; Hagan, Scott L.; George, Leena; Turney, Maxine K.; Siuta, Michael A.; Laryea, Gloria N.; Morris, Lindsey C.; Muglia, Louis J.; Printz, Richard L.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Niswender, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) regulates energy balance and peripheral glucose homeostasis. Rictor is a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex and is required for hydrophobic motif site phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473. To examine the contribution of neuronal Rictor/mTORC2 signaling to CNS regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, we utilized Cre-LoxP technology to generate mice lacking Rictor in all neurons, or in either POMC or AgRP expressing...

  17. Multimodal Regulation of Circadian Glucocorticoid Rhythm by Central and Adrenal Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Gi Hoon; Cha, Hyo Kyeong; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2018-05-01

    Adrenal glucocorticoids (GCs) control a wide range of physiological processes, including metabolism, cardiovascular and pulmonary activities, immune and inflammatory responses, and various brain functions. During stress responses, GCs are secreted through activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, whereas circulating GC levels in unstressed states follow a robust circadian oscillation with a peak around the onset of the active period of a day. A recent advance in chronobiological research has revealed that multiple regulatory mechanisms, along with classical neuroendocrine regulation, underlie this GC circadian rhythm. The hierarchically organized circadian system, with a central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and local oscillators in peripheral tissues, including the adrenal gland, mediates periodicities in physiological processes in mammals. In this review, we primarily focus on our understanding of the circadian regulation of adrenal GC rhythm, with particular attention to the cooperative actions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus central and adrenal local clocks, and the clinical implications of this rhythm in human diseases.

  18. Tariffs regulation experiences in the Italian electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, A.

    1997-01-01

    This work tries to explain the tariff regulation experiences in the Italian electricity industry from the end of the second world war to now. These events, shown in the following tables, are divided into four phases: 1) the progressive standardization of electric power prices (1945-61); 2) the price control (1961-74); 3) the 'interferences' in the tariff system (1974-95); 4) the present deregulation (price-cap)

  19. Neuropeptide Y in the central nucleus of amygdala regulates the anxiolytic effect of agmatine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Bharne, Ashish P; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Kokare, Dadasaheb M

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, modulation of anxiolytic action of agmatine by neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) is evaluated employing Vogel's conflict test (VCT) in rats. The intra-CeA administration of agmatine (0.6 and 1.2µmol/rat), NPY (10 and 20pmol/rat) or NPY Y1/Y5 receptors agonist [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY (30 and 60pmol/rat) significantly increased the number of punished drinking licks following 15min of treatment. Combination treatment of subeffective dose of NPY (5pmol/rat) or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY (15pmol/rat) and agmatine (0.3µmol/rat) produced synergistic anxiolytic-like effect. However, intra-CeA administration of selective NPY Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBP3226 (0.25 and 0.5mmol/rat) produced anxiogenic effect. In separate set of experiment, pretreatment with BIBP3226 (0.12mmol/rat) reversed the anxiolytic effect of agmatine (0.6µmol/rat). Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of intraperitoneal injection of agmatine (40mg/kg) on NPY-immunoreactivity in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), lateral part of bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNSTl) and CeA. While agmatine treatment significantly decreased the fibers density in BNSTl, increase was noticed in AcbSh. In addition, agmatine reduced NPY-immunoreactive cells in the AcbSh and CeA. Immunohistochemical data suggest the enhanced transmission of NPY from the AcbSh and CeA. Taken together, this study suggests that agmatine produced anxiolytic effect which might be regulated via modulation of NPYergic system particularly in the CeA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  20. Central neurocytoma: Management recommendations based on a 35-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenstra, James L.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Frechette, Christina M.; Giannini, Caterina; Stafford, Scott L.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Schild, Steven E.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Buckner, Jan C.; Brown, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with histologically confirmed central neurocytomas. Methods and Materials: The data from 45 patients with central neurocytomas diagnosed between 1971 and 2003 were retrospectively evaluated. Various combinations of surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy had been used for treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 10.0 years. The 10-year overall survival and local control rate was 83% and 60%, respectively. Patients whose tumor had a mitotic index of <3 (per 10 high-power fields) experienced a 10-year survival and local control rate of 89% and 74%, respectively, compared with 57% (p = 0.040) and 46% (p = 0.14) for patients with a tumor mitotic index of ≥3. The 10-year survival and local control rate was 90% and 74% for patients with typical tumors compared with 63% (p = 0.055) and 46% (p = 0.41) for those with atypical tumors. A comparison of gross total resection with subtotal resection showed no significant difference in survival or local control. Postoperative RT improved local control at 10 years (75% with RT vs. 51% without RT, p = 0.045); however, this did not translate into a survival benefit. No 1p19q deletions were found in the 19 tumors tested. Conclusion: Although the overall prognosis is quite favorable, one-third of patients experienced tumor recurrence or progression at 10 years, regardless of the extent of the initial resection. Postoperative RT significantly improved local control but not survival, most likely because of the effectiveness of salvage RT. For incompletely resected atypical tumors and/or those with a high mitotic index, consideration should be given to adjuvant RT because of the more aggressive nature

  1. European experience of regulating distance selling of medicines for Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkov, Vitalii; Hrekov, Yevhen; Hrekova, Maryna

    Some countries have already tried and tested mechanisms of regulating distance sales as form of distribution of medicines that have been used more or less effectively for a fairly long time. Herewith, so far, the approach of the competent authorities of some countries including Ukraine can be called prevailing in quantitative terms under which the official prohibition on distance sales of medicines is set. The aim of this study is a detailed examination of the nature of the prohibition of the medicines distance selling in Ukraine, namely the an analysis of advantages and disadvantages of this form of distribution of medicines and identification of appropriate ways for gradual repeal of the prohibition in terms of regulatory reform in Ukraine in the sphere of circulation of medicines due to the process of adaptation of statutory regulation in this area to the EU legislation. This study is based on Ukrainian regulation acts, Council Directives 97/7/EC, 2000/31/EC, 2001/83/EC, scientific works and opinions of progressiveminded people in this sphere. Such methods as dialectical, comparative, analytic, synthetic and comprehensive have been used in the article. Reception of the described experience of regulation in EU will allow a further review of the principles of regulation in Ukraine in the sphere of medicines with a shift in the main emphasis in the direction of ensuring adequate consumer rights in this area and preventing the risks of patients' and public health.

  2. Tachykinin-1 in the central nervous system regulates adiposity in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Chitrang; Shan, Xiaoye; Tung, Yi-Chun Loraine; Kabra, Dhiraj; Holland, Jenna; Amburgy, Sarah; Heppner, Kristy; Kirchner, Henriette; Yeo, Giles S H; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-05-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating hormone that targets the central nervous system to regulate feeding and adiposity. The best-characterized neural system that mediates the effects of ghrelin on energy balance involves the activation of neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide neurons, expressed exclusively in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. However, ghrelin receptors are expressed in other neuronal populations involved in the control of energy balance. We combined laser capture microdissection of several nuclei of the central nervous system expressing the ghrelin receptor (GH secretagoge receptor) with microarray gene expression analysis to identify additional neuronal systems involved in the control of central nervous system-ghrelin action. We identified tachykinin-1 (Tac1) as a gene negatively regulated by ghrelin in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we identified neuropeptide k as the TAC1-derived peptide with more prominent activity, inducing negative energy balance when delivered directly into the brain. Conversely, loss of Tac1 expression enhances the effectiveness of ghrelin promoting fat mass gain both in male and in female mice and increases the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in ovariectomized mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate a role TAC1 in the control energy balance by regulating the levels of adiposity in response to ghrelin administration and to changes in the status of the gonadal function.

  3. Regulation and safety implementation of nanotechnology for chemical enterprises in the Central Europe Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, A.; Hartl, S.; Sinner, F.

    2013-04-01

    As result of the gradually increasing nanotechnology sector there is the necessity of a contemporary analysis of the present regulations used for nanomaterials, to outline the current situation of the nanotechnology sector, to promote international cooperation and research's coordination to overcome disciplinary boundaries, to fill the gap between more and less experienced regions and to turn investments in R&D in industrial innovations. The general objective of the Central Europe project NANOFORCE, which is developed by national and regional chemistry associations and R&D Centres of the Central Europe area, is to foster the innovative nanotechnology-sector networks across Central Europe regions by bringing together public and private organizations to carry out collaborative and interdisciplinary researches on nanomaterials (in the frame of REACH Regulation) and to turn the most promising laboratory results into innovative industrial applications. To build up a legal advisory board for chemical enterprises starting in nanotechnology, a state of the art report on existing safety procedures and nanotech related regulations was produced to give an overview on currently available regulations used by chemical industries and manufacturing companies within the European region to secure their products. The main emphasis was placed on REACH regulation to search for relevant sections concentrating on nanomaterials which are applicable for nanotechnology. In addition, all relevant directives and amendments of REACH were screened with regard to identify gaps where action is still needed and give possible recommendations for the European Commission. Beyond literature research a questionnaire for producers, users, researchers and financiers was developed with the goal to collect information about the nanotechnology sector in the CE region concerning development, financial status, and international cooperation within joint ventures, safety and nanotoxicology.

  4. Regulation and safety implementation of nanotechnology for chemical enterprises in the Central Europe Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, A; Hartl, S; Sinner, F

    2013-01-01

    As result of the gradually increasing nanotechnology sector there is the necessity of a contemporary analysis of the present regulations used for nanomaterials, to outline the current situation of the nanotechnology sector, to promote international cooperation and research's coordination to overcome disciplinary boundaries, to fill the gap between more and less experienced regions and to turn investments in R and D in industrial innovations. The general objective of the Central Europe project NANOFORCE, which is developed by national and regional chemistry associations and R and D Centres of the Central Europe area, is to foster the innovative nanotechnology-sector networks across Central Europe regions by bringing together public and private organizations to carry out collaborative and interdisciplinary researches on nanomaterials (in the frame of REACH Regulation) and to turn the most promising laboratory results into innovative industrial applications. To build up a legal advisory board for chemical enterprises starting in nanotechnology, a state of the art report on existing safety procedures and nanotech related regulations was produced to give an overview on currently available regulations used by chemical industries and manufacturing companies within the European region to secure their products. The main emphasis was placed on REACH regulation to search for relevant sections concentrating on nanomaterials which are applicable for nanotechnology. In addition, all relevant directives and amendments of REACH were screened with regard to identify gaps where action is still needed and give possible recommendations for the European Commission. Beyond literature research a questionnaire for producers, users, researchers and financiers was developed with the goal to collect information about the nanotechnology sector in the CE region concerning development, financial status, and international cooperation within joint ventures, safety and nanotoxicology.

  5. Current experience with central-station nuclear cogeneration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    In considering the potential of the HTGR for nuclear cogeneration, a logical element for investigation is the recent history of nuclear cogeneration experience. Little is found in recent literature; however, the twin nuclear cogeneration plant at Midland is nearing completion and this milestone will no doubt be the basis for a number of reports on the unique cogeneration facility and operating experiences with it. Less well known in the US is the Bruce Nuclear Power Development in Ontario, Canada. Originally designed to cogenerate steam for heavy water production, the Bruce facility is the focus of a major initiative to create an energy park on the shores of Lake Huron. To obtain an improved understanding of the status and implications of current nuclear cogeneration experience, GCRA representatives visited the Ontario Hydro offices in Toronto and subsequently toured the Midland site near Midland, Michigan. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the results of those visits and to develop a series of conclusions regarding the implications for HTGR cogeneration concepts

  6. Central and peripheral des-acyl ghrelin regulates body temperature in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Keiko; Maruyama, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2013-01-04

    In the present study using rats, we demonstrated that central and peripheral administration of des-acyl ghrelin induced a decrease in the surface temperature of the back, and an increase in the surface temperature of the tail, although the effect of peripheral administration was less marked than that of central administration. Furthermore, these effects of centrally administered des-acyl ghrelin could not be prevented by pretreatment with [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 GH secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) antagonists. Moreover, these actions of des-acyl ghrelin on body temperature were inhibited by the parasympathetic nerve blocker methylscopolamine but not by the sympathetic nerve blocker timolol. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that des-acyl ghrelin induced an increase of cFos expression in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO). Additionally, we found that des-acyl ghrelin dilated the aorta and tail artery in vitro. These results indicate that centrally administered des-acyl ghrelin regulates body temperature via the parasympathetic nervous system by activating neurons in the MnPO through interactions with a specific receptor distinct from the GHS-R1a, and that peripherally administered des-acyl ghrelin acts on the central nervous system by passing through the blood-brain barrier, whereas it exerts a direct action on the peripheral vascular system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Cao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  8. Enhancing Experiment Central Service Reliability: from delivery to security and virtualization

    CERN Document Server

    Donno, Flavia; Buzykaev, Alexey; Saiz Santos, Maria Dolores

    2011-01-01

    The four LHC experiments rely on experiment specific services running on machines mainly located at CERN. Some of these services have been rated by the experiments as very critical: any loss or degradation of performance has a major impact on the experiment's production and analysis activities. It is therefore important to provide a reliable and robust operational environment. In this work we describe the strategy based on service deployment, security and virtualization adopted to enhance the reliability of ATLAS and CMS central services.

  9. Splenectomy for hematological diseases: The Qatif Central HospitalExperience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salem, Ahmed H.; Naserullah, Z.; Qaisaruddin, S.; Al-Dabbous, I.; Al-Abkari, H.; Al-Jama, A.; Al-Faraj, A.; Yassin, Yassin M.

    1999-01-01

    In the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, an area known for varioushemoglobinopathies, splenectomy is performed rather frequently. This study isan analysis of our experience with splenectomy performed for varioushematological disorders between 1988 and 1997, outlining the indications,complications and outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of all patientswho had splenectomy at our hospital during this period. One hundred andforty-three patients were treated for various hematological disorders at ourhospital. These disorders included sickle cell disease (SCD) (100 patients),sickle thalassemia (S-B-thalassemia) (13 ITP) (5 patients), Gaucher's disease(2 patients), hereditary spherocytosis (1 patient), autoimmune hemolyticanemia (1 patient), thalssemia intermediate (2 patients) and chronic myeloidleukemia (1 patient). The indications for splenectomy in those with SCD andthalassemia were: hypersplenism (26 patients), major splenic sequestrationcrisis (50 patients), splenic abscess (12 patients), and massive splenicinfarction (2 patients). Splenectomy in these patients was beneficial inreducing their transfusion requirements and its attendant risks, eliminatingthe discomfort from mechanical pressure of the enlarged spleen, avoiding therisks of acute splenic sequestration crisis, and managing splenic abscess.For those with Thalassemia, total splenectomy was beneficial in reducingtheir transfusion requirements, while partial splenectomy was beneficial onlyas a temporary measure, as regrowth of splenic remnant in these patientssubsequently led to increase in their transfusion requirements. Those withITP, hereditary spherocytosis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia showedexcellent response following splenectomy. There was no mortality, and thepostoperative morbidity was 5.6%. With careful perioperative management,splenectomy is both safe and beneficial in a selected group of patients withhematological diseases. (author)

  10. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by definition limited by its reference to future developments which cannot empirically be sustained. Experience in the Netherlands—where a law regulating active euthanasia was accepted in April 2001—may shed...

  11. Rictor/mTORC2 facilitates central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocalis, Heidi E.; Hagan, Scott L.; George, Leena; Turney, Maxine K.; Siuta, Michael A.; Laryea, Gloria N.; Morris, Lindsey C.; Muglia, Louis J.; Printz, Richard L.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Niswender, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) regulates energy balance and peripheral glucose homeostasis. Rictor is a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex and is required for hydrophobic motif site phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473. To examine the contribution of neuronal Rictor/mTORC2 signaling to CNS regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, we utilized Cre-LoxP technology to generate mice lacking Rictor in all neurons, or in either POMC or AgRP expressing neurons. Rictor deletion in all neurons led to increased fat mass and adiposity, glucose intolerance and behavioral leptin resistance. Disrupting Rictor in POMC neurons also caused obesity and hyperphagia, fasting hyperglycemia and pronounced glucose intolerance. AgRP neuron specific deletion did not impact energy balance but led to mild glucose intolerance. Collectively, we show that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling, especially in POMC-expressing neurons, is important for central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. PMID:24944899

  12. Rictor/mTORC2 facilitates central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocalis, Heidi E; Hagan, Scott L; George, Leena; Turney, Maxine K; Siuta, Michael A; Laryea, Gloria N; Morris, Lindsey C; Muglia, Louis J; Printz, Richard L; Stanwood, Gregg D; Niswender, Kevin D

    2014-07-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) regulates energy balance and peripheral glucose homeostasis. Rictor is a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex and is required for hydrophobic motif site phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473. To examine the contribution of neuronal Rictor/mTORC2 signaling to CNS regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, we utilized Cre-LoxP technology to generate mice lacking Rictor in all neurons, or in either POMC or AgRP expressing neurons. Rictor deletion in all neurons led to increased fat mass and adiposity, glucose intolerance and behavioral leptin resistance. Disrupting Rictor in POMC neurons also caused obesity and hyperphagia, fasting hyperglycemia and pronounced glucose intolerance. AgRP neuron specific deletion did not impact energy balance but led to mild glucose intolerance. Collectively, we show that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling, especially in POMC-expressing neurons, is important for central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis.

  13. Gene expression regulation in photomorphogenesis from the perspective of the central dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the environment a young seedling encounters, the developmental program following seed germination could be skotomorphogenesis in the dark or photomorphogenesis in the light. Light signals are interpreted by a repertoire of photoreceptors followed by sophisticated gene expression networks, eventually resulting in developmental changes. The expression and functions of photoreceptors and key signaling molecules are highly coordinated and regulated at multiple levels of the central dogma in molecular biology. Light activates gene expression through the actions of positive transcriptional regulators and the relaxation of chromatin by histone acetylation. Small regulatory RNAs help attenuate the expression of light-responsive genes. Alternative splicing, protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, the formation of diverse transcriptional complexes, and selective protein degradation all contribute to proteome diversity and change the functions of individual proteins.

  14. Lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Juan; Zerbinatti, Celina; Zhan, Yan; Kolber, Benedict J; Herz, Joachim; Muglia, Louis J; Bu, Guojun

    2011-01-11

    Obesity is a growing epidemic characterized by excess fat storage in adipocytes. Although lipoprotein receptors play important roles in lipid uptake, their role in controlling food intake and obesity is not known. Here we show that the lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis. Conditional deletion of the Lrp1 gene in the brain resulted in an obese phenotype characterized by increased food intake, decreased energy consumption, and decreased leptin signaling. LRP1 directly binds to leptin and the leptin receptor complex and is required for leptin receptor phosphorylation and Stat3 activation. We further showed that deletion of the Lrp1 gene specifically in the hypothalamus by Cre lentivirus injection is sufficient to trigger accelerated weight gain. Together, our results demonstrate that the lipoprotein receptor LRP1, which is critical in lipid metabolism, also regulates food intake and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system.

  15. Lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a growing epidemic characterized by excess fat storage in adipocytes. Although lipoprotein receptors play important roles in lipid uptake, their role in controlling food intake and obesity is not known. Here we show that the lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis. Conditional deletion of the Lrp1 gene in the brain resulted in an obese phenotype characterized by increased food intake, decreased energy consumption, and decreased leptin signaling. LRP1 directly binds to leptin and the leptin receptor complex and is required for leptin receptor phosphorylation and Stat3 activation. We further showed that deletion of the Lrp1 gene specifically in the hypothalamus by Cre lentivirus injection is sufficient to trigger accelerated weight gain. Together, our results demonstrate that the lipoprotein receptor LRP1, which is critical in lipid metabolism, also regulates food intake and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system.

  16. Neuronal expression of glucosylceramide synthase in central nervous system regulates body weight and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Viola; Willershäuser, Monja; Herzer, Silke; Rozman, Jan; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Meldner, Sascha; Rothermel, Ulrike; Kaden, Sylvia; Roth, Fabian C; Waldeck, Clemens; Gretz, Norbert; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Draguhn, Andreas; Klingenspor, Martin; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Jennemann, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons are main regulators of energy homeostasis. Neuronal function essentially depends on plasma membrane-located gangliosides. The present work demonstrates that hypothalamic integration of metabolic signals requires neuronal expression of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS; UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase). As a major mechanism of central nervous system (CNS) metabolic control, we demonstrate that GCS-derived gangliosides interacting with leptin receptors (ObR) in the neuronal membrane modulate leptin-stimulated formation of signaling metabolites in hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, ganglioside-depleted hypothalamic neurons fail to adapt their activity (c-Fos) in response to alterations in peripheral energy signals. Consequently, mice with inducible forebrain neuron-specific deletion of the UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase gene (Ugcg) display obesity, hypothermia, and lower sympathetic activity. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated Ugcg delivery to the arcuate nucleus (Arc) significantly ameliorated obesity, specifying gangliosides as seminal components for hypothalamic regulation of body energy homeostasis.

  17. Experience in the implementation of NORM regulations in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrcke, Klaus; Kirchner, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    According to the Directive 96/29/EURATOM the EU Member States are obliged to identify work activities that might lead to a significant increase of exposure due to natural occurring radioactive materials (NORM). In Germany, investigations were carried out that resulted in lists of possibly relevant workplaces on the one hand and residues from industrial processes on the other. These lists are part of the German radiation protection ordinance and form a key element of the regulations on NORM. They reflect the concept of selectivity of radiation protection in this area. Another peculiarity is the fact that the NORM regulations rely to a large extent on self-control of the industries concerned. The responsible authorities play only a limited role, and authorization is generally not required. Since actions are currently in progress to update national and international recommendations and standards we have evaluated and summarized the experience gained from the implementation of the NORM regulations in Germany. Our inquiries allow the conclusion that overall, the concept has proven to work properly. Since most of the industries were confronted with problems of radioactivity and radiation protection for the first time, professional assistance was necessary in the beginning. However, in the long run the concept will help to optimize the efforts on both sides, industry and authorities. Some problems have appeared with regard to the concept of selectivity. For example, certain exposures had been considerably overestimated on the basis of conservative, generic dose assessments that formed the basis of the lists of regulated workplaces and residues. This may not only lead to undue regulatory efforts but also to an unnecessary stigmatization of industries and concerns among workers and the population. Therefore it is necessary to weigh up carefully the conservatism that is to some extent necessary in generic dose assessments and the realism required in on-site assessments

  18. The Central Metabolism Regulator EIIAGlc Switches Salmonella from Growth Arrest to Acute Virulence through Activation of Virulence Factor Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mazé

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Salmonella to cause disease depends on metabolic activities and virulence factors. Here, we show that a key metabolic protein, EIIAGlc, is absolutely essential for acute infection, but not for Salmonella survival, in a mouse typhoid fever model. Surprisingly, phosphorylation-dependent EIIAGlc functions, including carbohydrate transport and activation of adenylate cyclase for global regulation, do not explain this virulence phenotype. Instead, biochemical studies, in vitro secretion and translocation assays, and in vivo genetic epistasis experiments suggest that EIIAGlc binds to the type three secretion system 2 (TTSS-2 involved in systemic virulence, stabilizes its cytoplasmic part including the crucial TTSS-2 ATPase, and activates virulence factor secretion. This unexpected role of EIIAGlc reveals a striking direct link between central Salmonella metabolism and a crucial virulence mechanism.

  19. Regulation of lipid metabolism by energy availability: a role for the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueiras, R; López, M; Diéguez, C

    2010-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is crucial in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Many neuroanatomical studies have shown that the white adipose tissue (WAT) is innervated by the sympathetic nervous system, which plays a critical role in adipocyte lipid metabolism. Therefore, there are currently numerous reports indicating that signals from the CNS control the amount of fat by modulating the storage or oxidation of fatty acids. Importantly, some CNS pathways regulate adipocyte metabolism independently of food intake, suggesting that some signals possess alternative mechanisms to regulate energy homeostasis. In this review, we mainly focus on how neuronal circuits within the hypothalamus, such as leptin- ghrelin-and resistin-responsive neurons, as well as melanocortins, neuropeptide Y, and the cannabinoid system exert their actions on lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues such as WAT, liver or muscle. Dissecting the complicated interactions between peripheral signals and neuronal circuits regulating lipid metabolism might open new avenues for the development of new therapies preventing and treating obesity and its associated cardiometabolic sequelae.

  20. Gravity regulated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (GENARA experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie; Carnero-D&íaz, Eugénie; Medina, Francisco Javier; Gasset, Gilbert; Pereda-Loth, Veronica; Graziana, Annick; Mazars, Christian; Le Disquet, Isabelle; Eche, Brigitte; Grat, Sabine; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette

    2012-07-01

    In higher plants, post-embryonic development is possible through the expression of a set of genes constituting the morphogenetic program that contribute to the production of tissues and organs during the whole plant life cycle. Plant development is mainly controlled by internal factors such as phytohormones, as well as by environmental factors, among which gravity plays a key role (gravi-morphogenetic program). The GENARA space experiment has been designed with the goal of contributing to a better understanding of this gravi-morphogenetic program through the identification and characterization of some gravity regulated proteins (GR proteins) by using quantitative proteomic methods, and through the study of the impact of plant hormones on the expression of this program. Among plant hormones, auxin is the major regulator of organogenesis. In fact, it affects numerous plant developmental processes, e.g. cell division and elongation, autumnal loss of leaves, and the formation of buds, roots, flowers and fruits. Furthermore, it also plays a key role in the mechanisms of different tropisms (including gravitropism) that modulate fundamental features of plant growth. The expression of significant genes involved in auxin transport and in auxin signal perception in root cells is being studied in space-grown seedlings and compared with the corresponding ground controls. This experiment was scheduled to be performed in The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), a new facility for plant cultivation and Plant Molecular Biology studies, at ISS. However only one aspect of this experiment was flown and concerns the qualitative and quantitative changes in membrane proteins supposed to be mainly associated with cell signaling and has been called GENARA A. The second part dealing with the function of auxin in the gravi-morphogenetic program and the alterations induced by microgravity will be studied through mutants affected on biosynthesis, transport or perception of auxin in a

  1. After the slippery slope: Dutch experiences on regulating active euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Theo A

    2003-01-01

    "When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward." If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery slope argument, however, is by definition limited by its reference to future developments which cannot empirically be sustained. Experience in the Netherlands--where a law regulating active euthanasia was accepted in April 2001--may shed light on the strengths as well as the weaknesses of the slippery slope argument in the context of the euthanasia debate. This paper consists of three parts. First, it clarifies the Dutch legislation on euthanasia and explains the cultural context in which it originated. Second, it looks at the argument of the slippery slope. A logical and an empirical version are distinguished, and the latter, though philosophically less interesting, proves to be most relevant in the discussion on euthanasia. Thirdly, it addresses the question whether Dutch experiences in the process of legalizing euthanasia justify the fear of the slippery slope. The conclusion is that Dutch experiences justify some caution.

  2. Chronic central administration of Ghrelin increases bone mass through a mechanism independent of appetite regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jin Choi

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a critical role in the central regulation of bone mass. Ghrelin counteracts leptin. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin on bone mass in Sprague-Dawley rats (1.5 μg/day for 21 days. Rats were divided into control, ghrelin ad libitum-fed (ghrelin ad lib-fed, and ghrelin pair-fed groups. Ghrelin intracerebroventricular infusion significantly increased body weight in ghrelin ad lib-fed rats but not in ghrelin pair-fed rats, as compared with control rats. Chronic intracerebroventricular ghrelin infusion significantly increased bone mass in the ghrelin pair-fed group compared with control as indicated by increased bone volume percentage, trabecular thickness, trabecular number and volumetric bone mineral density in tibia trabecular bone. There was no significant difference in trabecular bone mass between the control group and the ghrelin ad-lib fed group. Chronic intracerebroventricular ghrelin infusion significantly increased the mineral apposition rate in the ghrelin pair-fed group as compared with control. In conclusion, chronic central administration of ghrelin increases bone mass through a mechanism that is independent of body weight, suggesting that ghrelin may have a bone anabolic effect through the central nervous system.

  3. Central regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis: focus on clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliers, E; Boelen, A; van Trotsenburg, A S P

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the most prominent brain region involved in setpoint regulation of the thyroid axis. It generates the diurnal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) rhythm, and it plays a central role in the adaptation of the thyroid axis to environmental factors such as caloric deprivation or infection. Many studies, including studies in human post-mortem tissue samples, have confirmed a key role for the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neuron in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in thyroid axis regulation. In addition to their negative feedback action on TRH neurons in the hypothalamus, intrahypothalamic thyroid hormones can also modulate metabolism in adipose tissue and the liver via the autonomic nervous system. Congenital or acquired dysfunction of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland may result in central hypothyroidism (CeH). In the Netherlands, the prevalence of permanent congenital CeH as detected by neonatal screening is approximately 1 in 18000. In most neonates congenital CeH is accompanied by additional anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies, and many show clear morphological abnormalities such as a small anterior gland, a thin or absent pituitary stalk, or an ectopic posterior pituitary gland. Recently, a mutation in the immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 (IGSF1) gene was reported as a novel cause of X-linked, apparently isolated CeH occurring in neonates, children and adults. In adults, the most frequent cause of acquired CeH is a pituitary macroadenoma, usually accompanied by other pituitary hormone deficiencies. Central hyperthyroidism is a rare disorder, especially in children. In adults, it is mostly caused by a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nuclear engineering laboratory self regulated power oscillation experiments at the Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Bailiff, E.G.; Woody, N.D.; Gardner, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    Self regulated power oscillation experiments with a variety of initial conditions have been performed with the ORNL Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) by undergraduate nuclear engineering students from The University of Tennessee for several years. These experiments demonstrate the coupling between reactor kinetics and heat transfer and show how the temperature coefficient of reactivity affects reactor behavior. A model that consists of several coupled first order nonlinear differential equations is used to calculate the temperature of the core center and surface and power as a function of time which are compared with the experimental data; also, the model is also used to study the effects of various model parameters and initial conditions on the amplitude, frequency and damping of the power and temperature oscillations. A previous paper presented some limited experimental results and demonstrated the correspondence between a simple point model and the experimental data. This paper presents the results of experiments for: (1) the initial power fixed at 9 kW with central core temperatures of 300 0 F and 500 0 F, annd (2) the initial central core temperature fixed at 500 0 F with initial powers of 6 and 8 kW

  5. Central genomic regulation of the expression of oestrous behaviour in dairy cows: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelders, H; van der Lende, T; Kommadath, A; te Pas, M F W; Smits, M A; Kaal, L M T E

    2014-05-01

    The expression of oestrous behaviour in Holstein Friesian dairy cows has progressively decreased over the past 50 years. Reduced oestrus expression is one of the factors contributing to the current suboptimal reproductive efficiency in dairy farming. Variation between and within cows in the expression of oestrous behaviour is associated with variation in peripheral blood oestradiol concentrations during oestrus. In addition, there is evidence for a priming role of progesterone for the full display of oestrous behaviour. A higher rate of metabolic clearance of ovarian steroids could be one of the factors leading to lower peripheral blood concentrations of oestradiol and progesterone in high-producing dairy cows. Oestradiol acts on the brain by genomic, non-genomic and growth factor-dependent mechanisms. A firm base of understanding of the ovarian steroid-driven central genomic regulation of female sexual behaviour has been obtained from studies on rodents. These studies have resulted in the definition of five modules of oestradiol-activated genes in the brain, referred to as the GAPPS modules. In a recent series of studies, gene expression in the anterior pituitary and four brain areas (amygdala, hippocampus, dorsal hypothalamus and ventral hypothalamus) in oestrous and luteal phase cows, respectively, has been measured, and the relation with oestrous behaviour of these cows was analysed. These studies identified a number of genes of which the expression was associated with the intensity of oestrous behaviour. These genes could be grouped according to the GAPPS modules, suggesting close similarity of the regulation of oestrous behaviour in cows and female sexual behaviour in rodents. A better understanding of the central genomic regulation of the expression of oestrous behaviour in dairy cows may in due time contribute to improved (genomic) selection strategies for appropriate oestrus expression in high-producing dairy cows.

  6. Retail experience in the de-regulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the experience gained to date in the de-regulated electricity market through an examination of the commercial market. In 2001, chaos provided opportunity, while in 2002 the emphasis was on operations. In 2003, the landscape reflected hyper-competition, selling second services, and a changing landscape. A discussion followed on the residential market with a look at market structure, economics, and uncertainty concerning the future. The following components were identified as working well: wholesale market, commercial market, market model/data, and innovation in offerings and green supply. Areas requiring further improvement were also identified. It was suggested that the residential de-regulated roadmap should be clarified and retail friendly transactions should be imposed. Other improvements involve education and operations/system capabilities. The author concluded that the deregulated electricity market is still an immature market, where progress is being made in the commercial market. The residential market is in a critical period, with a market model still evolving. figs

  7. A role of melanin-concentrating hormone producing neurons in the central regulation of paradoxical sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salin Paul

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidergic neurons containing the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and the hypocretins (or orexins are intermingled in the zona incerta, perifornical nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area. Both types of neurons have been implicated in the integrated regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight. Hypocretin neurons have also been involved in sleep-wake regulation and narcolepsy. We therefore sought to determine whether hypocretin and MCH neurons express Fos in association with enhanced paradoxical sleep (PS or REM sleep during the rebound following PS deprivation. Next, we compared the effect of MCH and NaCl intracerebroventricular (ICV administrations on sleep stage quantities to further determine whether MCH neurons play an active role in PS regulation. Results Here we show that the MCH but not the hypocretin neurons are strongly active during PS, evidenced through combined hypocretin, MCH, and Fos immunostainings in three groups of rats (PS Control, PS Deprived and PS Recovery rats. Further, we show that ICV administration of MCH induces a dose-dependant increase in PS (up to 200% and slow wave sleep (up to 70% quantities. Conclusion These results indicate that MCH is a powerful hypnogenic factor. MCH neurons might play a key role in the state of PS via their widespread projections in the central nervous system.

  8. Polo kinase Cdc5 is a central regulator of meiosis I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attner, Michelle A.; Miller, Matthew P.; Ee, Ly-sha; Elkin, Sheryl K.; Amon, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation yield four haploid gametes from one diploid cell. The Polo kinase Cdc5 is required for meiotic progression, but how Cdc5 coordinates multiple cell-cycle events during meiosis I is not understood. Here we show that CDC5-dependent phosphorylation of Rec8, a subunit of the cohesin complex that links sister chromatids, is required for efficient cohesin removal from chromosome arms, which is a prerequisite for meiosis I chromosome segregation. CDC5 also establishes conditions for centromeric cohesin removal during meiosis II by promoting the degradation of Spo13, a protein that protects centromeric cohesin during meiosis I. Despite CDC5’s central role in meiosis I, the protein kinase is dispensable during meiosis II and does not even phosphorylate its meiosis I targets during the second meiotic division. We conclude that Cdc5 has evolved into a master regulator of the unique meiosis I chromosome segregation pattern. PMID:23918381

  9. Centralizing the Experiences of LGB People of Color in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie; DeBlaere, Cirleen; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the Major Contribution on centralizing the experiences of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people of color in counseling psychology. The roles of LGB people of color in LGB sociopolitical movements and their invisibility in the psychological literature are discussed as a context for this series of articles. This article…

  10. One half of the central detector for the Axial Field Spectrometer (AFS)experiment R807

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    This experiment was setup at the ISR intersection I-8 by the Brookhaven-CERN-Copenhagen-Lund-Rutherford Lab.-Tel Aviv Collaboration to study large transverse momentum phenomena (see Annual Report 1979 p. 69). The central detector (here shown for a part) was a cylindrical drift chamber with fine azimuthal segmentation.

  11. Central dopaminergic circuitry controlling food intake and reward: implications for the regulation of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetic, Zivjena; Reyes, Teresa M

    2010-01-01

    Prevalence of obesity in the general population has increased in the past 15 years from 15% to 35%. With increasing obesity, the coincident medical and social consequences are becoming more alarming. Control over food intake is crucial for the maintenance of body weight and represents an important target for the treatment of obesity. Central nervous system mechanisms responsible for control of food intake have evolved to sense the nutrient and energy levels in the organism and to coordinate appropriate responses to adjust energy intake and expenditure. This homeostatic system is crucial for maintenance of stable body weight over long periods of time of uneven energy availability. However, not only the caloric and nutritional value of food but also hedonic and emotional aspects of feeding affect food intake. In modern society, the increased availability of highly palatable and rewarding (fat, sweet) food can significantly affect homeostatic balance, resulting in dysregulated food intake. This review will focus on the role of hypothalamic and mesolimbic/mesocortical dopaminergic (DA) circuitry in coding homeostatic and hedonic signals for the regulation of food intake and maintenance of caloric balance. The interaction of dopamine with peripheral and central indices of nutritional status (e.g., leptin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y), and the susceptibility of the dopamine system to prenatal insults will be discussed. Additionally, the importance of alterations in dopamine signaling that occur coincidently with obesity will be addressed.

  12. FOREIGN EXPERIENCE OF STATE REGULATION OF MIGRATION PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Nikolaevna Tarasenko

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available International migration of population has existed for centuries, as it has activated as a result of globalization. Share the non-economic causes of international migration (causes related to wars, political and religious persecution, the desire to explore new spaces, the desire for family reunification, natural disasters and economic problems (the search for a new job in the absence of the opportunity to find a job in their own country, the search for more paid or creative work, a higher quality of life. Recently, the main reason for migration is economic reasons, on the basis of which the popular migration corridors and the leading directions of migration of labor personnel are identified. Analyzed the main centers of attraction of migration, namely, the United States of America, Federal Republic of Germany and the Russian Federation. Noted that the means and methods of implementation of the State migration policy vary depending on the specific situation on the labor market. So, given the shortage of labor in some European countries, such as Germany, used methods of stimulating immigration. When there is a need to reduce the level of immigration, as in the case of the United States, government regulation sets barriers to a new influx of foreign workers. Revealed, the dynamics of migration primarily due to social phenomena. Adverse external conditions: the deterioration of the economic, environmental or political situation in the country of residence is becoming an important factor in the readiness of potential migrants for forced migration. However, migrants have different socio-economic characteristics, and so they choose the wrong country for migration that they will be closer to social and psychological features. However, migrants have different socio-economic characteristics, and so they choose the wrong country for migration that they will be closer to social and psychological features. The purpose is to study international experience of

  13. Cannabinoid Receptor Signaling in Central Regulation of Feeding Behavior: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Koch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids are lipid messengers that modulate a variety of physiological processes and modify the generation of specific behaviors. In this regard, the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 represents the most relevant target molecule of cannabinoids so far. One main function of central CB1 signaling is to maintain whole body energy homeostasis. Thus, cannabinoids functionally interact with classical neurotransmitters in neural networks that control energy metabolism and feeding behavior. The promotion of CB1 signaling can increase appetite and stimulate feeding, while blockade of CB1 suppresses hunger and induces hypophagia. However, in order to treat overeating, pharmacological blockade of CB1 by the inverse agonist rimonabant not only suppressed feeding but also resulted in psychiatric side effects. Therefore, research within the last decade focused on deciphering the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of central cannabinoid signaling that control feeding and other behaviors, with the overall aim still being the identification of specific targets to develop safe pharmacological interventions for the treatment of obesity. Today, many studies unraveled the subcellular localization of CB1 and the function of cannabinoids in neurons and glial cells within circumscribed brain regions that represent integral parts of neural circuitries controlling feeding behavior. Here, these novel experimental findings will be summarized and recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of CB1-dependent cannabinoid signaling being relevant for central regulation of feeding behavior will be highlighted. Finally, presumed alternative pathways of cannabinoids that are not driven by CB1 activation but also contributing to control of feeding behavior will be introduced.

  14. Central and peripheral mechanisms of the NPY system in the regulation of bone and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Chuan; Baldock, Paul A

    2012-02-01

    Skeletal research is currently undergoing a period of marked expansion. The boundaries of "bone" research are being re-evaluated and with this, a growing recognition of a more complex and interconnected biology than previously considered. One aspect that has become the focus of particular attention is the relationship between bone and fat homeostasis. Evidence from a number of avenues indicates that bone and adipose regulation are both related and interdependent. This review examines the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system, known to exert powerful control over both bone and fat tissue. The actions of this system are characterized by signaling both within specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and also the target tissues, mediated predominantly through two G-protein coupled receptors (Y1 and Y2). In bone tissue, elevated NPY levels act consistently to repress osteoblast activity. Moreover, both central Y2 receptor and osteoblastic Y1 receptor signaling act similarly to repress bone formation. Conversely, loss of NPY expression or receptor signaling induces increased osteoblast activity and bone mass in both cortical and cancellous envelopes. In fat tissue, NPY action is more complex. Energy homeostasis is powerfully altered by elevations in hypothalamic NPY, resulting in increases in fat accretion and body-wide energy conservation, through the action of locally expressed Y1 receptors, while local Y2 receptors act to inhibit NPY-ergic tone. Loss of central NPY expression has a markedly reduced effect, consistent with a physiological drive to promote fat accretion. In fat tissue, NPY and Y1 receptors act to promote lipogenesis, consistent with their roles in the brain. Y2 receptors expressed in adipocytes also act in this manner, showing an opposing action to their role in the hypothalamus. While direct investigation of these processes has yet to be completed, these responses appear to be interrelated to some degree. The starvation-based signal of elevated central NPY inducing

  15. Central thalamic deep brain stimulation for support of forebrain arousal regulation in the minimally conscious state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Nicholas D

    2013-01-01

    This chapter considers the use of central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT/DBS) to support arousal regulation mechanisms in the minimally conscious state (MCS). CT/DBS for selected patients in a MCS is first placed in the historical context of prior efforts to use thalamic electrical brain stimulation to treat the unconscious clinical conditions of coma and vegetative state. These previous studies and a proof of concept result from a single-subject study of a patient in a MCS are reviewed against the background of new population data providing benchmarks of the natural history of vegetative and MCSs. The conceptual foundations for CT/DBS in selected patients in a MCS are then presented with consideration of both circuit and cellular mechanisms underlying recovery of consciousness identified from empirical studies. Directions for developing future generalizable criteria for CT/DBS that focus on the integrity of necessary brain systems and behavioral profiles in patients in a MCS that may optimally response to support of arousal regulation mechanisms are proposed. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR): a central regulator of male fertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Tito T; Oliveira, Pedro F; Sousa, Mário; Cheng, C Yan; Alves, Marco G

    2017-06-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cellular metabolic phenotype and is involved in virtually all aspects of cellular function. It integrates not only nutrient and energy-sensing pathways but also actin cytoskeleton organization, in response to environmental cues including growth factors and cellular energy levels. These events are pivotal for spermatogenesis and determine the reproductive potential of males. Yet, the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR signaling acts in male reproductive system remain a matter of debate. Here, we review the current knowledge on physiological and molecular events mediated by mTOR in testis and testicular cells. In recent years, mTOR inhibition has been explored as a prime strategy to develop novel therapeutic approaches to treat cancer, cardiovascular disease, autoimmunity, and metabolic disorders. However, the physiological consequences of mTOR dysregulation and inhibition to male reproductive potential are still not fully understood. Compelling evidence suggests that mTOR is an arising regulator of male fertility and better understanding of this atypical protein kinase coordinated action in testis will provide insightful information concerning its biological significance in other tissues/organs. We also discuss why a new generation of mTOR inhibitors aiming to be used in clinical practice may also need to include an integrative view on the effects in male reproductive system.

  17. 78 FR 12316 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Central Contractor Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ...; Information Collection; Central Contractor Registration AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD), General... collection requirement concerning the Central Contractor Registration database. A notice was published in the... Information Collection 9000- 0159, Central Contractor Registration, by any of the following methods...

  18. 77 FR 43078 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Central Contractor Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ...; Information Collection; Central Contractor Registration AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD), General Services... requirement concerning the Central Contractor Registration database. Public comments are particularly invited... Information Collection 9000- 0159, Central Contractor Registration, by any of the following methods...

  19. Noradrenergic Activation of Hypoglossal Nucleus Modulates the Central Regulation of Genioglossus in Chronic Intermittent Hypoxic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular compensation of the genioglossus muscle can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH in obstructive sleep apnea to maintain upper airway stability. Noradrenergic activation of hypoglossal nucleus plays a critical role in the central control of the genioglossus. However, it remains unknown whether norepinephrine takes part in the central regulation of the genioglossus during CIH. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 32 were studied to explore the influence of noradrenergic activation of hypoglossal nucleus on the central control of the genioglossus at different stages of CIH. The rats were divided into four groups: normal control or normoxic (NO group, CIH group, CIH + normal saline (NS group, and CIH + prazosin (PZ, α1-adrenergic antagonist group. PZ (0.2 mM, 60 nl and NS (0.9%, 60 nl were microinjected into the hypoglossal nucleus. The responses of the genioglossus corticomotor area to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS were recorded on the 1st, 7th, 14th, and 21st day of CIH. The CIH group showed significantly shorter TMS latencies on days 1, 7, and 14 (3.85 ± 0.37 vs. 4.58 ± 0.42, 3.93 ± 0.17 vs. 4.49 ± 0.55, 3.79 ± 0.38 vs. 4.39 ± 0.30 ms, P < 0.05, and higher TMS amplitudes on day 1 (2.74 ± 0.87 vs. 1.60 ± 0.52 mV, P < 0.05 of CIH than the NO group. Compared to the CIH + NS group, the CIH + PZ group showed decreased TMS responses (longer latencies and lower amplitudes only on the 14th day of CIH (3.99 ± 0.28 vs. 4.61 ± 0.48 ms, 2.51 ± 0.67 vs. 1.18 ± 0.62 mV, P < 0.05. These results indicated that noradrenergic activation of the hypoglossal nucleus played a role in the central compensation of genioglossus through α1-adrenoceptor on the 14th day of CIH.

  20. Performance of centrality determination in heavy-ion collisions with CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klochkov, Viktor; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The goal of the CBM experiment at FAIR is to investigate the properties of compressed baryonic matter. The measurement of physics observables in heavy-ion collisions requires information about event geometry. A magnitude of the impact parameter, which is among the most important parameters to describe collision geometry, cannot be measured directly in experiment. One can estimate it by measuring produced particle's multiplicities or energy of the spectator fragments. Typically, the collisions are divided into centrality classes which corresponds to the ranges of impact parameter with e.g. centrality class 0-5% corresponds to most central events, and 95-100% to the most peripheral collisions. Sensitivity to the range of impact parameters with the Silicon Tracking System (STS) and Projectile Spectator Detector (PSD) to select centrality classes in the CBM experiment will be presented. The STS is measuring the multiplicity of the particles produced in the nuclei overlap zone and different areas of the PSD are sensitive to both spectator fragments and produced particles. Supported by the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung.

  1. Fusimotor control of spindle sensitivity regulates central and peripheral coding of joint angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ning; He, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Proprioceptive afferents from muscle spindles encode information about peripheral joint movements for the central nervous system (CNS). The sensitivity of muscle spindle is nonlinearly dependent on the activation of gamma (γ) motoneurons in the spinal cord that receives inputs from the motor cortex. How fusimotor control of spindle sensitivity affects proprioceptive coding of joint position is not clear. Furthermore, what information is carried in the fusimotor signal from the motor cortex to the muscle spindle is largely unknown. In this study, we addressed the issue of communication between the central and peripheral sensorimotor systems using a computational approach based on the virtual arm (VA) model. In simulation experiments within the operational range of joint movements, the gamma static commands (γ(s)) to the spindles of both mono-articular and bi-articular muscles were hypothesized (1) to remain constant, (2) to be modulated with joint angles linearly, and (3) to be modulated with joint angles nonlinearly. Simulation results revealed a nonlinear landscape of Ia afferent with respect to both γ(s) activation and joint angle. Among the three hypotheses, the constant and linear strategies did not yield Ia responses that matched the experimental data, and therefore, were rejected as plausible strategies of spindle sensitivity control. However, if γ(s) commands were quadratically modulated with joint angles, a robust linear relation between Ia afferents and joint angles could be obtained in both mono-articular and bi-articular muscles. With the quadratic strategy of spindle sensitivity control, γ(s) commands may serve as the CNS outputs that inform the periphery of central coding of joint angles. The results suggest that the information of joint angles may be communicated between the CNS and muscles via the descending γ(s) efferent and Ia afferent signals.

  2. The Navruz experiment. Cooperative monitoring for radionuclides and metals in Central Asia transboundary rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.S.; Betsill, J.D.; Mohagheghi, A.H.; Passell, H.D.; Yuldashev, B.; Salikhbaev, U.; Djuraev, A.; Vasiliev, I.; Solodukhin, V.

    2005-01-01

    In March of 2000, scientists from four nuclear physics research institutes in the Central Asia Republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan, and the U.S. Sandia National Laboratories embarked on a three-year cooperative transboundary river monitoring experiment. The experiment, named Navruz (meaning 'new beginning'), uses standardized methods to monitor basic water quality parameters, radionuclides, and metals in the Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers. Overall, the project addresses three main goals: (1) to help increase capabilities in Central Asian nations for sustainable water resources management; (2) to provide a scientific basis for supporting nuclear transparency and non-proliferation in the region; and (3) to help reduce the threat of conflict in Central Asia over water resources. Contamination of these rivers is a result of growing population, urbanization, agricultural uses, and radioactive and metals contamination from a legacy of uranium mining, industry, and other activities of the former Soviet Union. The project focuses on waterborne radionuclides and metals because of the importance of these contaminants to public health and political stability in Central Asia. Moreover, the method of enabling scientists from bordering countries to study a transboundary problem, can lead to a greater scientific understanding, consensus on necessary mitigation steps, and ultimately the political resolution of the issue. The project scope, approach, and preliminary results are presented. (author)

  3. Differential Effects of Two Fermentable Carbohydrates on Central Appetite Regulation and Body Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Glenn R.; Tuohy, Kieran M.; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Swann, Jonathan R.; Deaville, Eddie R.; Sleeth, Michele L.; Thomas, E. Louise; Holmes, Elaine; Bell, Jimmy D.; Frost, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is rising at an alarming rate globally. Different fermentable carbohydrates have been shown to reduce obesity. The aim of the present study was to investigate if two different fermentable carbohydrates (inulin and β-glucan) exert similar effects on body composition and central appetite regulation in high fat fed mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty six C57BL/6 male mice were randomized and maintained for 8 weeks on a high fat diet containing 0% (w/w) fermentable carbohydrate, 10% (w/w) inulin or 10% (w/w) β-glucan individually. Fecal and cecal microbial changes were measured using fluorescent in situ hybridization, fecal metabolic profiling was obtained by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), colonic short chain fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography, body composition and hypothalamic neuronal activation were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI), respectively, PYY (peptide YY) concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay, adipocyte cell size and number were also measured. Both inulin and β-glucan fed groups revealed significantly lower cumulative body weight gain compared with high fat controls. Energy intake was significantly lower in β-glucan than inulin fed mice, with the latter having the greatest effect on total adipose tissue content. Both groups also showed an increase in the numbers of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus-Enterococcus in cecal contents as well as feces. β- glucan appeared to have marked effects on suppressing MEMRI associated neuronal signals in the arcuate nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, periventricular nucleus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius, suggesting a satiated state. Conclusions/Significance Although both fermentable carbohydrates are protective against increased body weight gain, the lower body fat content induced by inulin may be metabolically advantageous. β-glucan appears to suppress neuronal

  4. Differential effects of two fermentable carbohydrates on central appetite regulation and body composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Arora

    Full Text Available Obesity is rising at an alarming rate globally. Different fermentable carbohydrates have been shown to reduce obesity. The aim of the present study was to investigate if two different fermentable carbohydrates (inulin and β-glucan exert similar effects on body composition and central appetite regulation in high fat fed mice.Thirty six C57BL/6 male mice were randomized and maintained for 8 weeks on a high fat diet containing 0% (w/w fermentable carbohydrate, 10% (w/w inulin or 10% (w/w β-glucan individually. Fecal and cecal microbial changes were measured using fluorescent in situ hybridization, fecal metabolic profiling was obtained by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1H NMR, colonic short chain fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography, body composition and hypothalamic neuronal activation were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI, respectively, PYY (peptide YY concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay, adipocyte cell size and number were also measured. Both inulin and β-glucan fed groups revealed significantly lower cumulative body weight gain compared with high fat controls. Energy intake was significantly lower in β-glucan than inulin fed mice, with the latter having the greatest effect on total adipose tissue content. Both groups also showed an increase in the numbers of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus-Enterococcus in cecal contents as well as feces. β-Glucan appeared to have marked effects on suppressing MEMRI associated neuronal signals in the arcuate nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, periventricular nucleus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius, suggesting a satiated state.Although both fermentable carbohydrates are protective against increased body weight gain, the lower body fat content induced by inulin may be metabolically advantageous. β-Glucan appears to suppress neuronal activity in the hypothalamic appetite centers. Differential

  5. Developing Young Children's Self-Regulation through Everyday Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Ida Rose

    2011-01-01

    Every child is different. Some have difficulty expressing their ideas verbally. Some struggle to get along with peers or follow classroom routines. In each case, however, one thing is the same: improved learning and behavior requires strong self-regulation skills. Children develop foundational skills for self-regulation in the first five years of…

  6. Role of orexins in the central and peripheral regulation of glucose homeostasis: Evidences & mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Monika; Kumar, Raghuvansh; Krishan, Pawan

    2018-04-01

    Orexins (A & B), neuropeptides of hypothalamic origin, act through G-protein coupled receptors, orexin 1 receptor (OX 1 R) and orexin 2 receptor (OX 2 R). The wide projection of orexin neurons in the hypothalamic region allows them to interact with the other neurons and regulate food intake, emotional status, sleep wake cycle and energy metabolism. The autonomic nervous system plays an important regulatory role in the energy metabolism as well as glucose homeostasis. Orexin neurons are also under the control of GABAergic neurons. Emerging preclinical as well as clinical research has reported the role of orexins in the glucose homeostasis since orexins are involved in hypothalamic metabolism circuitry and also rely on sensing peripheral metabolic signals such as gut, adipose derived and pancreatic peptides. Apart from the hypothalamic origin, integration and control in various physiological functions, peripheral origin in wide organs, raises the possibility of use of orexins as a therapeutic biomarker in the management of metabolic disorders. The present review focuses the central as well as peripheral roles of orexins in the glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A role for central nervous system PPAR-γ in the regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Karen K; Li, Bailing; Grayson, Bernadette E; Matter, Emily K; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J

    2011-05-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is a nuclear receptor that is activated by lipids to induce the expression of genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism, thereby converting nutritional signals into metabolic consequences. PPAR-γ is the target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of insulin-sensitizing drugs, which have been widely prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. A common side effect of treatment with TZDs is weight gain. Here we report a previously unknown role for central nervous system (CNS) PPAR-γ in the regulation of energy balance. We found that both acute and chronic activation of CNS PPAR-γ, by either TZDs or hypothalamic overexpression of a fusion protein consisting of PPAR-γ and the viral transcriptional activator VP16 (VP16-PPAR-γ), led to positive energy balance in rats. Blocking the endogenous activation of CNS PPAR-γ with pharmacological antagonists or reducing its expression with shRNA led to negative energy balance, restored leptin sensitivity in high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed rats and blocked the hyperphagic response to oral TZD treatment. These findings have implications for the widespread clinical use of TZD drugs and for understanding the etiology of diet-induced obesity.

  8. Central tracker for BM@N experiment based on double side Si-microstrip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Yu.; Kapishin, M.; Khabarov, S.; Shafronovskaia, A.; Tarasov, O.; Makankin, A.; Zamiatin, N.; Zubarev, E.

    2017-07-01

    Design of central tracker system based on Double-Sided Silicon Detectors (DSSD) for BM@N experiment is described. A coordinate plane with 10240 measuring channels, pitch adapter, reading electronics was developed. Each element was tested and assembled into a coordinate plane. The first tests of the plane with 106Ru source were carried out before installation for the BM@N experiment. The results of the study indicate that noisy channels and inefficient channels are less than 3%. In general, single clusters 87% (one group per module of consecutive strips) and 75% of clusters with a width equal to one strip.

  9. The Development of a Framework for Target Diagnostic Centralized Control System (TDCCS) in ICF Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Wang Jian; Yu Xiaoqi; Yang Dong

    2008-01-01

    A framework for target diagnostic centralized control system (TDCCS) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment has been developed. The developed framework is based on the common object request broker architecture (CORBA) standard and part of the concept from the ICFRoot (a framework based on ROOT for ICF experiments) framework design. This framework is of a component architecture, including a message bus, command executer, status processor, parser and proxy. To test the function of the framework, a simplified prototype of the TDCCS has been developed as well.

  10. Early experience with 'new federalism' in health insurance regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, K; Tapay, N; Hadley, E; Specht, J

    2000-01-01

    The authors monitored the implementation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) from 1997 to 1999. Regulators in all states and relevant federal agencies were interviewed and applicable laws and regulations studied. The authors found that HIPAA changed legal protections for consumers' health coverage in several ways. They examine how the process of regulating such coverage was affected at the state and federal levels and under an emerging partnership of the two. Despite some early implementation challenges, HIPAA's successes have been significant, although limited by the law's incremental nature.

  11. Maternal stress and diet may influence affective behavior and stress-response in offspring via epigenetic regulation of central peptidergic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsell, Annika; Nätt, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that maternal stress and malnutrition, or experience of other adverse events, during the perinatal period may alter susceptibility in the adult offspring in a time-of-exposure dependent manner. The mechanism underlying this may be epigenetic in nature. Here, we summarize some recent findings on the effects on gene-regulation following maternal malnutrition, focusing on epigenetic regulation of peptidergic activity. Numerous neuropeptides within the central nervous system are crucial components in regulation of homeostatic energy-balance, as well as affective health (i.e. health events related to affective disorders, psychiatric disorders also referred to as mood disorders). It is becoming evident that expression, and function, of these neuropeptides can be regulated via epigenetic mechanisms during fetal development, thereby contributing to the development of the adult phenotype and, possibly, modulating disease susceptibility. Here, we focus on two such neuropeptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), both involved in regulation of endocrine function, energy homeostasis, as well as affective health. While a number of published studies indicate the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in CRH-dependent regulation of the offspring adult phenotype, NPY has been much less studied in this context and needs further work.

  12. Towards a three-dimensional framework of centrally regulated and goal-directed exercise behaviour: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venhorst, Andreas; Micklewright, Dominic; Noakes, Timothy D

    2017-08-23

    The Central Governor Model (CGM) ignited a paradigm shift from concepts of catastrophic failure towards central regulation of exercise performance. However, the CGM has focused on the central integration of afferent feedback in homeostatic control. Accordingly, it neglected the important role of volitional self-regulatory control and the integration of affective components inherently attached to all physiological cues. Another limitation is the large reliance on the Gestalt phenomenon of perceived exertion. Thus, progress towards a comprehensive multidimensional model of perceived fatigability and exercise regulation is needed. Drawing on Gate Control Theory of pain, we propose a three-dimensional framework of centrally regulated and goal-directed exercise behaviour, which differentiates between sensory, affective and cognitive processes shaping the perceptual milieu during exercise. We propose that: (A) perceived mental strain and perceived physical strain are primary determinants of pacing behaviour reflecting sensory-discriminatory processes necessary to align planned behaviour with current physiological state, (B) core affect plays a primary and mediatory role in exercise and performance regulation, and its underlying two dimensions hedonicity and arousal reflect affective-motivational processes triggering approach and avoidance behaviour, and (C) the mindset-shift associated with an action crisis plays a primary role in volitional self-regulatory control reflecting cognitive-evaluative processes between further goal-pursuit and goal-disengagement. The proposed framework has the potential to enrich theory development in centrally regulated and goal-directed exercise behaviour by emphasising the multidimensional dynamic processes underpinning perceived fatigability and provides a practical outline for investigating the complex interplay between the psychophysiological determinants of pacing and performance during prolonged endurance exercise. © Article author

  13. Implicit Beliefs about Emotion Regulation and Their Relations with Emotional Experiences among Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xinmei; Sang, Biao; Chen, Xinyin

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding how beliefs about emotion regulation are related to individual emotional experiences. Extant studies have mainly focused on explicit beliefs about emotion regulation among individuals in Western societies. The current study examined implicit emotion regulation and explored their contributions to emotional…

  14. Improved plasma confinement characteristics and central magnetohydrodynamic activity in pellet fuelled HL-1M experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yi; Guo Gancheng; Zhong Yunze; Xiao Zhenggui

    1998-11-01

    In HL-1M experiment, multiple pellets were injected into Ohmic discharge, good results for plasma confinement have been achieved. The energy confinement is enhanced by up to 30% over that of usual gas fuelled discharges after a series of pellet injections. The improvement is characterized by a pressure profile that peaks strongly around the central region. It was found that the peakedness depends strongly on penetration length of the pellets, and the characteristics of MHD activity changes with peakedness of pressure profile produced by pellet injection. On the other hand, the central MHD activity plays a key role in limiting the available peaking degree. The improved discharges characterized by a highly peaked pressure profile inside q =1 surface degrade suddenly by a large sawtooth collapse. For deep penetration case, the pressure gradient in the central area becomes steep, the central magnetohydrodynamics activities are strongly affected by pellet injection. The large sawtooth crash tends to have more ideal-like characteristics in magnetic structure, which is usually observed in discharges of higher density and pressure values. The most conspicuous feature is that just at the early stage of the crash, the m = 1 continuous oscillation merges into a very localized pressure perturbation

  15. The Future of Electricity Distribution Regulation. Lessons from International Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nillesen, P.H.L.

    2008-12-03

    This thesis contains five essays on the regulation of electricity distribution networks, each presenting a different point of view. Two essays use US data to demonstrate that incentive-based regulation has valuable application within a management setting and can lead to gaming behaviour within a regulatory setting. One essay discusses the lessons that can be drawn from the failed first electricity distribution price control review in the Netherlands. One essay presents the views of 75 international regulation managers and gives recommendations on ways to improve the regulatory quality and process. The final essay analyses the economic consequences of the forced ownership unbundling of the electricity distribution networks in 1998 in New Zealand, and draws lessons for future structural remedies that may be sought in other countries.

  16. The Future of Electricity Distribution Regulation. Lessons from International Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nillesen, P.H.L.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains five essays on the regulation of electricity distribution networks, each presenting a different point of view. Two essays use US data to demonstrate that incentive-based regulation has valuable application within a management setting and can lead to gaming behaviour within a regulatory setting. One essay discusses the lessons that can be drawn from the failed first electricity distribution price control review in the Netherlands. One essay presents the views of 75 international regulation managers and gives recommendations on ways to improve the regulatory quality and process. The final essay analyses the economic consequences of the forced ownership unbundling of the electricity distribution networks in 1998 in New Zealand, and draws lessons for future structural remedies that may be sought in other countries

  17. Central nervous system: a conductor orchestrating metabolic regulations harmed by both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2010-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the brain has a key role in the control of energy metabolism, body fat content and glucose metabolism. Neuronal systems, which regulate energy intake, energy expenditure, and endogenous glucose production, sense and respond to input from hormonal and nutrient-related signals that convey information regarding both body energy stores and current energy availability. In response to this input, adaptive changes occur that promote energy homeostasis and the maintenance of blood glucose levels in the normal range. Defects in this control system are implicated in the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The central nervous system may be considered the conductor of an orchestra involving many peripheral organs involved in these homeostatic processes. However, the brain is mainly a glucose-dependent organ, which can be damaged by both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia. Hypoglycaemia unawareness is a major problem in clinical practice and is associated with an increased risk of coma. Stroke is another acute complication associated with diabetes mellitus, especially in elderly people, and the control of glucose level in this emergency situation remains challenging. The prognosis of stroke is worse in diabetic patients and both its prevention and management in at-risk patients should be improved. Finally, chronic diabetic encephalopathies, which may lead to cognitive dysfunction and even dementia, are also recognized. They may result from recurrent hypoglycaemia and/or from chronic hyperglycaemia leading to cerebral vascular damage. Functional imaging is of interest for exploring diabetes-associated cerebral abnormalities. Thus, the intimate relationship between the brain and diabetes is increasingly acknowledged in both research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus sarA regulates inflammation and colonization during central nervous system biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N Snowden

    Full Text Available Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1β were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined.

  19. [European Marketing Authorisation: a long process. Experiences of small biotech companies with the ATMP regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljovčić, Z

    2011-07-01

    On 30 December 2008, the Regulation (EC) 1394/2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) entered into force. Herewith the first EU-wide regulatory framework for ATMPs was established. It requires a central marketing authorisation application to the EMA (European Medicinal Agency). This new framework especially changes the code of regulatory practice for tissue engineered products (TEPs), as no registration procedure had been previously required for autologous TEPs. This also meant that no clinical proof of efficacy achieved by a pivotal clinical trial was necessary. Difficulties and their background as well as the vast requirements for product development that have to be addressed by small companies within a very short time frame are presented. Hereby, it is obvious that regulatory experience which is required to identify and implement the resulting implications was not in place yet and still had to be established. The lack of regulatory experience also resulted in difficulties with scientific advice preparation, expectations toward regulatory agencies, consultants, and transformation of regulatory requirements. Addressing the regulatory requirements within the transition period is even more difficult for entrepreneurs with products which are assigned for indications resulting in complex challenges to the trial design. Due to the enormous time pressure to generate data and due to the implied financial pressure, different adaptation strategies are evolving. In Germany the "hospital exemption" according to §4b AMG (German Medicinal Products Law) is of major importance. A reorientation toward acellular products and a slow down in development of new ATMP products is expected.

  20. Central production of two-pseudoscalar meson systems at the COMPASS experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austregesilo, Alexander

    2014-10-20

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS which recorded a data set with an incident proton beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target in order to study the central production of light scalar mesons. We select events with two protons and two pseudo-scalar mesons in the final state and decompose their angular distribution in terms of partial-wave amplitudes. Fits to the mass-dependence of these amplitudes are used to determine the Breit-Wigner parameters of scalar resonances.

  1. U.S. Experience and practices associated with the use of centralized rad waste processing centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, James D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the experience and current practices employed within the United States (US) associated with the use of Centralized Rad waste Processing Centers for the processing of Low Level Radioactive Wastes (LLRW). Information is provided on the methods, technologies, and practices employed by Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (SEG), which is the worlds largest processor of LLRW. SEG processes over 80,000 cubic meters of waste annually and achieves an overall volume reduction of 12 : 1. LLRW processing in the United States is currently performed primarily at Centralized Rad waste Processing Centers, such as SEG's Central Volume Reduction Facility (CVRF) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This is primarily due to the superior economical application of advanced waste processing technologies, equipment, and personnel maintained at these centers. Information is provided on how SEG uses supercompaction, incineration, metals recycling, vitrification, and various other waste processing techniques to process both dry and wet wastes from over 90 commercial nuclear power plants, government operated facilities, hospitals, universities, and various small generators of radioactive waste

  2. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arabi, Mohammad, E-mail: marabi2004@hotmail.com; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Division of Endovascular Interventional Radiology, Department of Medical Imaging (Saudi Arabia); Ahmed, Dildar; Aslam, Naveed [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Department of Nephrology (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeWe report our institutional experience with sharp central venous recanalization in chronic hemodialysis patients who failed standard techniques.Materials and MethodsSince January 2014, a series of seven consecutive patients (four males and three females), mean age 35 years (18–65 years), underwent sharp central venous recanalization. Indications included obtaining hemodialysis access (n = 6) and restoration of superior vena cava (SVC) patency to alleviate occlusion symptoms and restore fistula function (n = 1). The transseptal needle was used for sharp recanalization in six patients, while it could not be introduced in one patient due to total occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Instead, transmediastinal SVC access using Chiba needle was obtained.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all cases. SVC recanalization achieved symptoms’ relief and restored fistula function in the symptomatic patient. One patient underwent arteriovenous fistula creation on the recanalized side 3 months after the procedure. The remaining catheters were functional at median follow-up time of 9 months (1–14 months). Two major complications occurred including a right hemothorax and a small hemopericardium, which were managed by covered stent placement across the perforated SVC.ConclusionSharp central venous recanalization using the transseptal needle is feasible technique in patients who failed standard recanalization procedures. The potential high risk of complications necessitates thorough awareness of anatomy and proper technical preparedness.

  3. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single-Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabi, Mohammad; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Ahmed, Dildar; Aslam, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWe report our institutional experience with sharp central venous recanalization in chronic hemodialysis patients who failed standard techniques.Materials and MethodsSince January 2014, a series of seven consecutive patients (four males and three females), mean age 35 years (18–65 years), underwent sharp central venous recanalization. Indications included obtaining hemodialysis access (n = 6) and restoration of superior vena cava (SVC) patency to alleviate occlusion symptoms and restore fistula function (n = 1). The transseptal needle was used for sharp recanalization in six patients, while it could not be introduced in one patient due to total occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Instead, transmediastinal SVC access using Chiba needle was obtained.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all cases. SVC recanalization achieved symptoms’ relief and restored fistula function in the symptomatic patient. One patient underwent arteriovenous fistula creation on the recanalized side 3 months after the procedure. The remaining catheters were functional at median follow-up time of 9 months (1–14 months). Two major complications occurred including a right hemothorax and a small hemopericardium, which were managed by covered stent placement across the perforated SVC.ConclusionSharp central venous recanalization using the transseptal needle is feasible technique in patients who failed standard recanalization procedures. The potential high risk of complications necessitates thorough awareness of anatomy and proper technical preparedness.

  4. Growth curves of clients' emotional experience and their association with emotion regulation and symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Hadar; Atzil-Slonim, Dana; Bar-Kalifa, Eran; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Peri, Tuvia

    2017-12-06

    Emotional experience during psychotherapy is considered a core mechanism of change. Yet the sheer experience itself may not necessarily be beneficial; instead, the trajectories of emotional experience need to be explored as possible predictors of treatment outcomes. This study investigated whether clients' pre-treatment levels of emotion regulation and symptoms predicted patterns of session-to-session change in emotional experience. We also explored which patterns better predict clients' improvement in emotion regulation and symptoms from pre- to post treatment. One-hundred and seven clients undergoing psychodynamic psychotherapy completed questionnaires on their symptoms and emotion regulation at pre- and post- treatment. They also reported their level of emotional experience at the end of each session. Pre-treatment symptoms and difficulties in emotion regulation predicted greater instability in emotional experience. Higher mean levels of emotional experience during treatment were associated with an improvement in emotion regulation, and greater stability during treatment was associated with improvement in emotion regulation and symptoms. These findings lend weight to the idea that experiencing emotion in the therapeutic environment has significant implications for clients' ability to manage their emotions outside the session. However, emotions experienced in an unstable manner within therapy are associated with poorer outcomes. Clinical and methodological significance of this article: Therapists can benefit from observing the patterns and not only the level of their clients' emotional experiences. The identification of clients' difficulties early in treatment may help therapists guide clients through the delicate process of carefully attending to their emotions.

  5. The particularities of vegetative regulation of central haemodynamic at children living in condition of chronic radiation and chemical influence in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherko, O.M.

    2000-01-01

    398 children 7-16 years old living in condition of environmental threats have been examined. The most essential changes of the vegetative regulation of central haemodynamic have been found at children 7-13 years old. The distortion of vegetative regulation of the central haemodynamic have been revealed: sympatcotonia in case of arterial hypotensia and deficiency of sympathetic regulation of arterial hypertensia. Level of hormones of the sympatoadrenality system was fall. (authors)

  6. Refining animal experiments: the first Brazilian regulation on animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de A e Tréz, Thales

    2010-06-01

    The very first law on animal experimentation has been approved recently in Brazil, and now is part of a set of the legal instruments that profile the Brazilian government's attitude toward the use of animals in experiments. Law 11794/08 establishes a new legal instrument that will guide new methods of conduct for ethics committees, researchers and representatives of animal protection societies. This comment aims to analyse critically the implications that this law brings to Brazilian reality. The link between it and the Russell and Burch's Three Rs concept is defined, and certain problems are identified. The conclusion is that the body of the law emphasises the refinement of animal experiments, but gives little importance to the principles of reduction and replacement.

  7. Centralized vs. decentralized thermal IR inspection policy: experience from a major Brazilian electric power company

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Laerte; da Costa Bortoni, Edson; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Araujo, Reyler A.

    2005-03-01

    Furnas Centrais Elétricas S.A is one of the greatest companies of the Brazilian electric power sector and a pioneer in using infrared thermography. In the early 70s, the maintenance policy used was a centralized approach, with only one inspection team to cover all the company"s facilities. In the early 90s, FURNAS decided to decentralize the thermography inspections creating several inspection teams. This new maintenance policy presented several advantages when compared to the previous one. However the credibility of the results obtained with the thermal inspection was frequently being questioned, in part due to the lack of a detailed planning to carry out the transition from the centralized inspection to the decentralized one. In some areas of the company it was suggested the inactivation of the thermography. This paper presents the experience of FURNAS with these different maintenance policies and details the procedures which have been taken that nowadays the infrared thermal inspection has become one of the most important techniques of predictive maintenance in the company.

  8. Diagnostic, evaluation and handling of the tumors of soft tissues. Experience in the Central Military Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda Acero, Gustavo Adolfo; Torres Quintero, Pio

    2001-01-01

    With the purpose of analyzing the experience of the orthopedics service and traumatology of the central military hospital in the treatment of the tumors of soft tissues, it carries out a descriptive observational study, type series of cases and retrospective. The incidence of the tumors of soft tissues compared with carcinomas and other neoplasia, constitutes less than 1% of all cancerous and the benign ones are more common than the wicked ones in a range of 100:1. The knowledge of the classification, stadification, evaluation strategies, previous biopsy, surgical treatment, radiotherapy y/o chemotherapy is vital for a good final result. 29 clinical histories were included of patient with tumoral lesions in the soft tissues, valued in the central military hospital between March of 1996 and March of 2001. The age average was of 39 years and the pursuit of 24 months. In most of the cases the anatomical commitment belonged to the inferior members (93%), 79% for benign tumors and 21% for wicked tumors. To avoid incorrect diagnoses and inappropriate treatments it is necessary the coordinated evaluation of all multidisciplinary team

  9. Structural analysis of a superconducting central solenoid for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) concept design uses superconducting coils to accomplish magnetic confinement. The central solenoid (CS) magnet is divided vertically into 8 equal segments which are powered independently. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is too high for a case type construction; therefore, a open-quotes no caseclose quotes design has been chosen. This open-quotes no caseclose quotes design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation as a structural adhesive. This electrical insulation is the open-quotes weak linkclose quotes in the coil winding pack structure and needs to be modeled in detail. A global finite element model with smeared winding pack properties was used to study the CS magnet structural behavior. The structural analysis results and peak stresses will be presented

  10. Flooding in central Switzerland - Crisis management, experience gained and lessons learned; Hochwasser in der Zentralschweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresch, F.

    2006-07-01

    This comprehensive article discusses how the Central Switzerland gas, water and power utility ewl, which was stricken in August 2005 by heavy precipitation, flooding and landslides, dealt with the crises thus triggered. Drinking-water pump stations were flooded, a local river tore away a bridge with a natural-gas pipeline and three hydro-power stations had to be powered down. The experience gained in handling this situation was analysed and led to the development of a package of know-how and measures to be taken under similar circumstances. This illustrated article describes the events that happened in detail, with details on the disruption of service and how improvisation helped return supplies of gas, electricity and water to the affected areas as soon as possible. Finally, the article discusses crisis-management aspects and the lessons learned from the disaster.

  11. Cadherin 5 is Regulated by Corticosteroids and Associated with Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Carl; Pryds, Anders; Zeng, Shemin

    2014-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is characterized by leakage of fluid from the choroid into the subretinal space and, consequently, loss of central vision. The disease is triggered by endogenous and exogenous corticosteroid imbalance and psychosocial stress and is much more prevalent in men...... endothelium, was downregulated by corticosteroids which may increase permeability of choroidal vasculature, leading to fluid leakage under the retina. We found a significant association of four common CDH5 SNPs with CSC in male patients in both cohorts. Two common intronic variants, rs7499886:A>G and rs...

  12. Msx2 Plays a central Role in Regulating Branching Morphogenesis During Mammary Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the role of a transcriptional factor, Msx2, in regulating branching events in the development of the mouse mammary gland To define the function of Msx2 gene...

  13. VanT, a central regulator of quorum sensing signalling in Vibrio anguillarum

    OpenAIRE

    Croxatto, Antony

    2006-01-01

    Many bacteria produce signal molecules that serve in a cell-to-cell communication system termed quorum sensing. This signalling system allows a bacterial population to co-ordinately regulate functions according to their cell number in a defined environment. As bacterial growth progresses towards the stationary phase, signalling molecules accumulate in the growth medium and, above a certain threshold level, regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse functions. Most of the functions m...

  14. First experiences with NORM regulations in the Austrian legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauke, Michael; Katzlberger, C.; Haider, W.; Ringer, W.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This paper gives a brief overview of important aspects of the recently implemented NORM ordinance in the Austrian Radiation Protection Legislation. It describes first experiences from pilot studies and dose assessments in this field. The field of application of this ordinance is defined by a list of work activities which might cause a significant increase in the exposure of workers and of members of the public. This list includes work activities, which potentially increase the exposure due to radon or uranium, thorium and their progenies and work activities, where residues with elevated levels of natural radionuclides may lead to a significant increase in the exposure of workers and the public. The first level of a dose assessment is the determination of activity concentrations in materials. It is assumed that the dose of workers does not exceed 1 mSv per year, if the activity concentrations of natural radionuclides are below 1 Bq/g. A notification of the workplace to the radiation protection authority is sufficient in this case. Otherwise a detailed dose assessment considering all relevant exposure pathways has to be performed as well as radiation protection measures and organisational measures, if needed. If the results of the dose assessment show higher levels than 6 mSv per year, radiation protection measures like personal dosimeters and periodical medical examination and reporting to the radiation protection authority are obligatory. A similar dose assessment procedure has to be applied for residues. The residues are allowed to be disposed as conventional waste, as long as the dose assessment shows a dose lower than 1 mSv per year. Otherwise the residues have to be treated as radioactive waste. Only accredited or certified institutions may perform authorised dose assessments. The Austrian Agency for Food and Health Safety performed pilot studies in this field for getting more experience in the field of dose assessment and to get an overview of the

  15. Protein phosphatase 2A regulates central sensitization in the spinal cord of rats following intradermal injection of capsaicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hind paw of rats induces spinal cord central sensititzation, a process in which the responsiveness of central nociceptive neurons is amplified. In central sensitization, many signal transduction pathways composed of several cascades of intracellular enzymes are involved. As the phosphorylation state of neuronal proteins is strictly controlled and balanced by the opposing activities of protein kinases and phosphatases, the involvement of phosphatases in these events needs to be investigated. This study is designed to determine the influence of serine/threonine protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A on the central nociceptive amplification process, which is induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Results In experiment 1, the expression of PP2A protein in rat spinal cord at different time points following capsaicin or vehicle injection was examined using the Western blot method. In experiment 2, an inhibitor of PP2A (okadaic acid, 20 nM or fostriecin, 30 nM was injected into the subarachnoid space of the spinal cord, and the spontaneous exploratory activity of the rats before and after capsaicin injection was recorded with an automated photobeam activity system. The results showed that PP2A protein expression in the spinal cord was significantly upregulated following intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Capsaicin injection caused a significant decrease in exploratory activity of the rats. Thirty minutes after the injection, this decrease in activity had partly recovered. Infusion of a phosphatase inhibitor into the spinal cord intrathecal space enhanced the central sensitization induced by capsaicin by making the decrease in movement last longer. Conclusion These findings indicate that PP2A plays an important role in the cellular mechanisms of spinal cord central sensitization induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats, which may have implications in

  16. The crosstalk between the kidney and the central nervous system: the role of renal nerves in blood pressure regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Erika E; Bergamaschi, Cássia T; Campos, Ruy R

    2015-04-20

    What is the topic of this review? This review describes the role of renal nerves as the key carrier of signals from the kidneys to the CNS and vice versa; the brain and kidneys communicate through this carrier to maintain homeostasis in the body. What advances does it highlight? Whether renal or autonomic dysfunction is the predominant contributor to systemic hypertension is still debated. In this review, we focus on the role of the renal nerves in a model of renovascular hypertension. The sympathetic nervous system influences the renal regulation of arterial pressure and body fluid composition. Anatomical and physiological evidence has shown that sympathetic nerves mediate changes in urinary sodium and water excretion by regulating the renal tubular water and sodium reabsorption throughout the nephron, changes in the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate by regulating the constriction of renal vasculature, and changes in the activity of the renin-angiotensin system by regulating the renin release from juxtaglomerular cells. Additionally, renal sensory afferent fibres project to the autonomic central nuclei that regulate blood pressure. Hence, renal nerves play a key role in the crosstalk between the kidneys and the CNS to maintain homeostasis in the body. Therefore, the increased sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney and the renal afferent nerve activity to the CNS may contribute to the outcome of diseases, such as hypertension. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  17. Proceedings of the 1. Energy regulation and investment conference for Central/Eastern Europe and CIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy Regulators Regional Association ERRA

    2002-01-01

    The conference's topics are: Privatization and competition in the on energy issues in Central and Eastern Europe, in Southeast Europe, in the Commonwealth of Independent States; Pricing and investment policies in the regions; Electricity and district heating; Natural gas; Regional electricity trade, 15 papers were indexed and abstracted for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  18. Central Gi(2) proteins, sympathetic nervous system and blood pressure regulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zicha, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 216, č. 3 (2016), s. 258-259 ISSN 1748-1708 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : inhibitory G proteins * sympathetic nervous system * central blood pressure control Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.867, year: 2016

  19. 77 FR 69715 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Updates to Contract Reporting and Central Contractor Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... Contractor Registration AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD), General Services Administration (GSA), and... changes the clauses requiring contractor registration in the Central Contractor Registration (CCR... unique identifier for contractors. It is used (1) to uniquely identify a contractor entity, and (2) to...

  20. Manipulating central nervous mechanisms of food intake and body weight regulation by intranasal administration of neuropeptides in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallschmid, Manfred; Benedict, Christian; Born, Jan; Fehm, Horst-Lorenz; Kern, Werner

    2004-10-30

    Maintaining a stable body weight set-point is assumed to rely on a homeostatic central nervous system (CNS) regulation of body fat with the particular involvement of hypothalamic pathways. The peripheral adiposity signals insulin and leptin convey information on the amount of energy stored as body fat to the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, where anabolic/orexigenic and catabolic/anorexigenic pathways interact to regulate food intake and energy expenditure. One of the most prominent orexigenic messengers is neuropeptide Y (NPY), whereas melanocortins, including alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), are essential for inducing anorexigenic effects. The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4-R) plays the most important role in mediating catabolic effects of alpha-MSH. In this review, we present a series of own studies on NPY, insulin and MSH/ACTH4-10, an MC4-R agonist. The studies were all based on the intranasal route of administration which enables a direct access of the peptides to hypothalamic functions. NPY acutely attenuated electrocortical signs of meal-related satiety. Prolonged intranasal administration of insulin as well as of MSH induced weight loss in healthy human subjects. However, overweight subjects did not lose body fat after MSH administration. The results corroborate in humans the significance of all three messengers for the central nervous regulation of adiposity and might contribute to the future development of medical strategies against body-weight-related disorders.

  1. Multidisciplinary Observations of Subduction (MOOS) Experiment in South-Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, D.; Abers, G.; Freymueller, J.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic and geodetic data are being collected in the Kenai Peninsula and surrounding area of south central Alaska as part of the PASSCAL experiment MOOS. A total of 34 broadband seismic stations were deployed between the summers of 2007 and 2008. Seventeen of these stations continue to operate for an additional year and are scheduled to be removed in the summer of 2009. Numerous GPS campaign sites have and will be visited during the same time period. The MOOS seismic deployment provides coverage across the interplate coupled zone and adjacent transition zone in the shallow parts of the Alaskan subduction zone. It is a southern extension of an earlier broadband deployment BEAAR (Broadband Experiment Across the Alaska Range) to the north. When integrated with the previous BEAAR experiment, these data will allow high-resolution broadband imaging along a 600 km long transect over the Alaska subduction zone, at 10-15 km station spacing. The MOOS deployment allows us to test several hypotheses relating to the postulated subduction of the Yakutat Block and the nature of the coupled zone which ruptured in the great 1964 earthquake. The seismic and geodetic stations cover an area that includes part of the 1964 main asperity and the adjacent, less coupled, region to the southwest. Data gathered from this experiment will shed light on the nature of this boundary from both a geodetic and seismic (or earth structure) perspective. Shallow seismicity recorded by this network greatly improves the catalog of events in this area and helps to delineate active features in the subduction complex. Preliminary results from this project will be presented.

  2. Plasma current start-up experiments without the central solenoid in the TST-2 spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Y.; Ejiri, A.; Shiraiwa, S.; Adachi, Y.; Ishii, N.; Kasahara, H.; Nuga, H.; Ono, Y.; Oosako, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shimada, Y.; Sumitomo, N.; Taguchi, I.; Tojo, H.; Tsujimura, J.; Ushigome, M.; Yamada, T.; Hanada, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Idei, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Sasaki, K.; Sato, K.N.; Zushi, H.; Nishino, N.; Mitarai, O.

    2006-01-01

    Several techniques for initiating the plasma current without the use of the central solenoid are being developed in TST-2. While TST-2 was temporarily located at Kyushu University, two types of start-up scenarios were demonstrated. (1) A plasma current of 4 kA was generated and sustained for 0.28 s by either electron cyclotron wave or electron Bernstein wave, without induction. (2) A plasma current of 10 kA was obtained transiently by induction using only outboard poloidal field coils. In the second scenario, it is important to supply sufficient power for ionization (100 kW of EC power was sufficient in this case), since the vertical field during start-up is not adequate to maintain plasma equilibrium. In addition, electron heating experiments using the X-B mode conversion scenario were performed, and a heating efficiency of 60% was observed at a 100 kW RF power level. TST-2 is now located at the Kashiwa Campus of the University of Tokyo. Significant upgrades were made in both magnetic coil power supplies and RF systems, and plasma experiments have restarted. RF power of up to 400 kW is available in the high-harmonic fast wave frequency range around 20 MHz. Four 200 MHz transmitters are now being prepared for plasma current start-up experiments using RF power in the lower-hybrid frequency range. Preparations are in progress for a new plasma merging experiment (UTST) aimed at the formation and sustainment of ultra-high β ST plasmas

  3. Sensory experience regulates cortical inhibition by inducing IGF1 in VIP neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardinly, A R; Spiegel, I; Patrizi, A; Centofante, E; Bazinet, J E; Tzeng, C P; Mandel-Brehm, C; Harmin, D A; Adesnik, H; Fagiolini, M; Greenberg, M E

    2016-03-17

    Inhibitory neurons regulate the adaptation of neural circuits to sensory experience, but the molecular mechanisms by which experience controls the connectivity between different types of inhibitory neuron to regulate cortical plasticity are largely unknown. Here we show that exposure of dark-housed mice to light induces a gene program in cortical vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons that is markedly distinct from that induced in excitatory neurons and other subtypes of inhibitory neuron. We identify Igf1 as one of several activity-regulated genes that are specific to VIP neurons, and demonstrate that IGF1 functions cell-autonomously in VIP neurons to increase inhibitory synaptic input onto these neurons. Our findings further suggest that in cortical VIP neurons, experience-dependent gene transcription regulates visual acuity by activating the expression of IGF1, thus promoting the inhibition of disinhibitory neurons and affecting inhibition onto cortical pyramidal neurons.

  4. One year's experience by COGEMA logistics of application of the new modal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesys, P.

    2002-01-01

    International transport of radioactive materials is regulated by international and regional modal regulations that apply to all dangerous goods. The requirements for radioactive materials in the modal regulations are based on those of the 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' set forth by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The last edition of the IAEA regulations was published in 1996 (TS-R-1 (ST-1, Revised)), then incorporated in the modal regulations, and finally implemented, with various transitional periods throughout 2001. As a final result, since 1 January 2002 it has been mandatory, for all modes, to perform transports in accordance with the 1996 edition of the IAEA transport regulations. In the mean time, all the international and regional regulations have also been reformatted, and each of them has now adopted the unified format of the United Nations 'Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods - Model Regulations', often referred to as the Orange Book. This paper presents the experience of COGEMA Logistics with the application of this new set of regulations to design of packages, transport operations, and administrative matters. Both the advantages provided by these new regulations and the difficulties which were (and are still being) met are presented. (author)

  5. Emotional Experience, Expression, and Regulation of High-Quality Japanese Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosotani, Rika; Imai-Matsumura, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the emotional experience, expression, and regulation processes of high-quality Japanese elementary school teachers while they interact with children, in terms of teachers' emotional competence. Qualitative analysis of interview data demonstrated that teachers had various emotional experiences including self-elicited…

  6. Ethanol sensitivity: a central role for CREB transcription regulation in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswal Shyam

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lowered sensitivity to the effects of ethanol increases the risk of developing alcoholism. Inbred mouse strains have been useful for the study of the genetic basis of various drug addiction-related phenotypes. Inbred Long-Sleep (ILS and Inbred Short-Sleep (ISS mice differentially express a number of genes thought to be implicated in sensitivity to the effects of ethanol. Concomitantly, there is evidence for a mediating role of cAMP/PKA/CREB signalling in aspects of alcoholism modelled in animals. In this report, the extent to which CREB signalling impacts the differential expression of genes in ILS and ISS mouse cerebella is examined. Results A training dataset for Machine Learning (ML and Exploratory Data Analyses (EDA was generated from promoter region sequences of a set of genes known to be targets of CREB transcription regulation and a set of genes whose transcription regulations are potentially CREB-independent. For each promoter sequence, a vector of size 132, with elements characterizing nucleotide composition features was generated. Genes whose expressions have been previously determined to be increased in ILS or ISS cerebella were identified, and their CREB regulation status predicted using the ML scheme C4.5. The C4.5 learning scheme was used because, of four ML schemes evaluated, it had the lowest predicted error rate. On an independent evaluation set of 21 genes of known CREB regulation status, C4.5 correctly classified 81% of instances with F-measures of 0.87 and 0.67 respectively for the CREB-regulated and CREB-independent classes. Additionally, six out of eight genes previously determined by two independent microarray platforms to be up-regulated in the ILS or ISS cerebellum were predicted by C4.5 to be transcriptionally regulated by CREB. Furthermore, 64% and 52% of a cross-section of other up-regulated cerebellar genes in ILS and ISS mice, respectively, were deemed to be CREB-regulated. Conclusion These

  7. Central roles of iron in the regulation of oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Ryo; Mizobuchi, Shogo; Nakashima, Maya; Miki, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Dai; Fujii, Michihiko

    2017-10-01

    Oxygen is essential for aerobic organisms but causes cytotoxicity probably through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we screened for the genes that regulate oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and found that expression of CTH2/TIS11 caused an increased resistance to ROS. CTH2 is up-regulated upon iron starvation and functions to remodel metabolism to adapt to iron starvation. We showed here that increased resistance to ROS by CTH2 would likely be caused by the decreased ROS production due to the decreased activity of mitochondrial respiration, which observation is consistent with the fact that CTH2 down-regulates the mitochondrial respiratory proteins. We also found that expression of CTH1, a paralog of CTH2, also caused an increased resistance to ROS. This finding supported the above view, because mitochondrial respiratory proteins are the common targets of CTH1 and CTH2. We further showed that supplementation of iron in medium augmented the growth of S. cerevisiae under oxidative stress, and expression of CTH2 and supplementation of iron collectively enhanced its growth under oxidative stress. Since CTH2 is regulated by iron, these findings suggested that iron played crucial roles in the regulation of oxidative stress in S. cerevisiae.

  8. Central Production of Two-Pseudoscalar Meson Systems at the COMPASS Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, Alexander; Mallot, Gerhard

    The question of the existence of glueballs is one of the unsolved problems in modern particle physics and can be regarded as a stringent test for quantum chromodynamics. Especially the supernumerous states in the light scalar meson spectrum are candidates for the observation of mixing effects between $q\\bar q$ mesons and pure gluonic bound states. On the other hand, the existence and the properties of many resonances in this sector are disputed. The COMPASS experiment was proposed to make significant contributions to this field. COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS which focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the data taking periods in 2008 and 2009. A world-leading data set was collected with a $190\\,\\mathrm{GeV}/c$ hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target in order to study, inter alia, the central production of glueball candidates in the light meson sector. Especially the double-Pomeron exchange mechanism is well suited for the production of mesons without valenc...

  9. Centralized Monitoring of the Microsoft Windows-based computers of the LHC Experiment Control Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela Rodriguez, F

    2011-01-01

    The control system of each of the four major Experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is distributed over up to 160 computers running either Linux or Microsoft Windows. A quick response to abnormal situations of the computer infrastructure is crucial to maximize the physics usage. For this reason, a tool was developed to supervise, identify errors and troubleshoot such a large system. Although the monitoring of the performance of the Linux computers and their processes was available since the first versions of the tool, it is only recently that the software package has been extended to provide similar functionality for the nodes running Microsoft Windows as this platform is the most commonly used in the LHC detector control systems. In this paper, the architecture and the functionality of the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) client developed to provide centralized monitoring of the nodes running different flavour of the Microsoft platform, as well as the interface to the SCADA software of the control systems are presented. The tool is currently being commissioned by the Experiments and it has already proven to be very efficient optimize the running systems and to detect misbehaving processes or nodes.

  10. Centralized Monitoring of the Microsoft Windows-based computers of the LHC Experiment Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela Rodriguez, F.

    2011-12-01

    The control system of each of the four major Experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is distributed over up to 160 computers running either Linux or Microsoft Windows. A quick response to abnormal situations of the computer infrastructure is crucial to maximize the physics usage. For this reason, a tool was developed to supervise, identify errors and troubleshoot such a large system. Although the monitoring of the performance of the Linux computers and their processes was available since the first versions of the tool, it is only recently that the software package has been extended to provide similar functionality for the nodes running Microsoft Windows as this platform is the most commonly used in the LHC detector control systems. In this paper, the architecture and the functionality of the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) client developed to provide centralized monitoring of the nodes running different flavour of the Microsoft platform, as well as the interface to the SCADA software of the control systems are presented. The tool is currently being commissioned by the Experiments and it has already proven to be very efficient optimize the running systems and to detect misbehaving processes or nodes.

  11. Commentary: Europe needs a central, transparent, and evidence based regulation process for devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikermaan, Michaela; Gluud, Christian; Perleth, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Last September, the European Commission published proposals to update regulations for medical devices in order to improve patient safety.1 The proposals are being discussed by the European parliament where critical debate is being led by the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety...

  12. CD1-dependent regulation of chronic central nervous system inflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teige, Anna; Teige, Ingrid; Lavasani, Shahram

    2004-01-01

    (s). When immunized with CFA before T cell transfer, the CD1-/- mice again developed an augmented EAE compared with CD1+/+ mice. We suggest that CD1 exerts its function during CFA-mediated activation, regulating development of EAE both through enhancing TGF-beta1 production and through limiting autoreactive...

  13. Neutrophils that infiltrate the central nervous system regulate T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Brickman, Cristina; Bourbonnière, Lyne

    2005-01-01

    Regulation of inflammatory responses is critical to progression of organ-specific autoimmune disease. Although many candidate cell types have been identified, immunoregulatory activity has rarely been directly assayed and never from the CNS. We have analyzed the regulatory capability of Gr-1high ...

  14. Central regulation of glucose metabolism : Effects of nutrients, serotonin and dopamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnsburger, M.

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a serious health condition, characterized by overconsumption of (calorie dense) nutrients, and is turning into epidemic numbers. Since body weight regulation is orchestrated by the brain, the understanding of the interaction between nutrients and the brain is essential to unravel the

  15. Oxytocin differently regulates pressor responses to stress in WKY and SHR rats: the role of central oxytocin and V1a receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wsol, A; Szczepanska-Sadowska, E; Kowalewski, S; Puchalska, L; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, A

    2014-01-01

    The role of central oxytocin in the regulation of cardiovascular parameters under resting conditions and during acute stress was investigated in male normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY; n = 40) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR; n = 28). In Experiment 1, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded in WKY and SHR rats at rest and after an air-jet stressor during intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusions of vehicle, oxytocin or oxytocin receptor (OTR) antagonist. In Experiment 2, the effects of vehicle, oxytocin and OTR antagonist were determined in WKY rats after prior administration of a V1a vasopressin receptor (V1aR) antagonist. Resting MABP and HR were not affected by any of the ICV infusions either in WKY or in SHR rats. In control experiments (vehicle), the pressor response to stress was significantly higher in SHR. Oxytocin enhanced the pressor response to stress in the WKY rats but reduced it in SHR. During V1aR blockade, oxytocin infusion entirely abolished the pressor response to stress in WKY rats. Combined blockade of V1aR and OTR elicited a significantly greater MABP response to stress than infusion of V1a antagonist and vehicle. This study reveals significant differences in the regulation of blood pressure in WKY and SHR rats during alarming stress. Specifically, the augmentation of the pressor response to stress by exogenous oxytocin in WKY rats is caused by its interaction with V1aR, and endogenous oxytocin regulates the magnitude of the pressor response to stress in WKY rats by simultaneous interaction with OTR and V1aR.

  16. Provider Preferences and Experiences With a Countywide Centralized Collaborative Reminder/Recall for Childhood Immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Alison W; Gurfinkel, Dennis; Sevick, Carter; Beaty, Brenda; Dickinson, L Miriam; Kempe, Allison

    2016-01-01

    To assess among providers in 7 Colorado counties where a collaborative centralized reminder/recall (CC-R/R) using the Colorado Immunization Information System (CIIS) was performed: 1) preferences about CC-R/R conducted by the public health department (PHD); 2) preferences for future CC-R/R for different vaccines with and without practice names; and 3) experiences with including their name on CC-R/R notices. A mailed survey was sent to all primary care sites where CC-R/R had been previously conducted. Respondents self-identified as the "the person in charge of immunization policy within the practice." Overall response rate was 69.9% (160 of 229). Twenty-one were removed because they did not provide immunizations to children. Among respondents, 65.0% were from family medicine and 26.3% from pediatric practices; 32.1% physicians or midlevel providers; 34.3% nurses or medical assistants; and 33.6% office managers. Taking into account all issues, 57.6% were "okay" with either the PHD or their practice conducting recall; 27.3% preferred the PHD; and 14.4% preferred their practice conduct R/R. Fifty-six percent of active CIIS practices (n = 95) included their practice's name on CC-R/R notices. Interest in future CC-R/R for different ages and vaccines was strongly related to whether reminders included the practice name: 77.8% for routine immunizations in 4- to 6-year-olds; 74.8% for immunizations for 0- to 3-year-olds; 73.3% for vaccines administered to adolescents; and 59.7% for influenza (P < .001). Most practices are accepting of the PHD centrally conducting R/R, but most prefer collaboration that includes their name. Given the success and support of this method, it should be more widely adopted. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Both acyl and des-acyl ghrelin regulate adiposity and glucose metabolism via central nervous system ghrelin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, Kristy M; Piechowski, Carolin L; Müller, Anne; Ottaway, Nickki; Sisley, Stephanie; Smiley, David L; Habegger, Kirk M; Pfluger, Paul T; Dimarchi, Richard; Biebermann, Heike; Tschöp, Matthias H; Sandoval, Darleen A; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogue receptors (GHSRs) in the central nervous system (CNS) mediate hyperphagia and adiposity induced by acyl ghrelin (AG). Evidence suggests that des-AG (dAG) has biological activity through GHSR-independent mechanisms. We combined in vitro and in vivo approaches to test possible GHSR-mediated biological activity of dAG. Both AG (100 nmol/L) and dAG (100 nmol/L) significantly increased inositol triphosphate formation in human embryonic kidney-293 cells transfected with human GHSR. As expected, intracerebroventricular infusion of AG in mice increased fat mass (FM), in comparison with the saline-infused controls. Intracerebroventricular dAG also increased FM at the highest dose tested (5 nmol/day). Chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of AG or dAG increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Subcutaneously infused AG regulated FM and GSIS in comparison with saline-infused control mice, whereas dAG failed to regulate these parameters even with doses that were efficacious when delivered intracerebroventricularly. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular dAG failed to regulate FM and induce hyperinsulinemia in GHSR-deficient (Ghsr(-/-)) mice. In addition, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp suggests that intracerebroventricular dAG impairs glucose clearance without affecting endogenous glucose production. Together, these data demonstrate that dAG is an agonist of GHSR and regulates body adiposity and peripheral glucose metabolism through a CNS GHSR-dependent mechanism.

  18. Back to basics: a naturalistic assessment of the experience and regulation of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiy, Jane E; Cheavens, Jennifer S

    2014-10-01

    Emotion regulation research links regulatory responding to important outcomes in psychological well-being, physical health, and interpersonal relations, but several fundamental questions remain. As much of the previous research has addressed generalized regulatory habits, far less is known about the ways in which individuals respond to emotions in daily life. The literature is particularly sparse in explorations of positive emotion regulation. In the current study, we provide an assessment of naturalistic experiences and regulation of emotion, both positive and negative in valence. Using an electronic experience sampling methodology, participants reported on their use of 40 regulatory strategies in response to 14 emotions for 10 consecutive days. On average, participants used 15 different regulatory strategies in response to negative emotions over this time, most frequently relying on acceptance, behavioral activation, and rumination. Participants used a similarly large repertoire of strategies, approximately 16 total, in response to positive emotions, particularly savoring, future focus, and behavioral activation. Participants' mood ratings following strategy use, however, indicated that the most frequently used strategies were often not the most effective strategies. The results of this study provide estimates of the frequency and effectiveness of a large number of emotion regulation strategies in response to both negative and positive emotions. Such findings characterize naturalistic emotion regulation, and estimates of normative emotion regulation processes are imperative to determining the ways in which deviations (e.g., small emotion regulation repertoires, insufficient attention to regulation of positive emotions) impact emotional functioning. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Split core experiments; Part I. Axial neutron flux distribution measurements in the reactor core with a central horizontal reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strugar, P; Raisic, N; Obradovic, D; Jovanovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1965-05-01

    A series of critical experiments were performed on the RB reactor in order to determine the thermal neutron flux increase in the central horizontal reflector formed by a split reactor core. The objectives of these experiments were to study the possibilities of improving the thermal neutron flux characteristics of the neutron beam in the horizontal beam tube of the RA research reactor. The construction of RA reactor enables to split the core in two, to form a central horizontal reflector in front of the beam tube. This is achieved by replacing 2% enriched uranium slugs in the fuel channel by dummy aluminium slugs. The purpose of the first series of experiments was to study the gain in thermal neutron component inside the horizontal reflector and the loss of reactivity as a function of the lattice pitch and central reflector thickness.

  20. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.

    2003-01-01

    The coastal upwelling system off central Namibia is one of the most productive regions of the oceans and is characterized by frequently occurring shelf anoxia with severe effects for the benthic life and fisheries. We present data on water column dissolved oxygen, sulfide, nitrate and nitrite, pore......-depleted bottom waters, the oxygen minimum zone on the continental slope, and the lower continental slope below the oxygen minimum zone. High concentrations of dissolved sulfide, up to 22 mM, in the near-surface sediments of the inner shelf result from extremely high rates of bacterial sulfate reduction...

  1. Systems assessment of transcriptional regulation on central carbon metabolism by Cra and CRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyuk; Seo, Sang Woo; Gao, Ye; Nam, Hojung; Guzman, Gabriela I; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2018-04-06

    Two major transcriptional regulators of carbon metabolism in bacteria are Cra and CRP. CRP is considered to be the main mediator of catabolite repression. Unlike for CRP, in vivo DNA binding information of Cra is scarce. Here we generate and integrate ChIP-exo and RNA-seq data to identify 39 binding sites for Cra and 97 regulon genes that are regulated by Cra in Escherichia coli. An integrated metabolic-regulatory network was formed by including experimentally-derived regulatory information and a genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction. Applying analysis methods of systems biology to this integrated network showed that Cra enables optimal bacterial growth on poor carbon sources by redirecting and repressing glycolysis flux, by activating the glyoxylate shunt pathway, and by activating the respiratory pathway. In these regulatory mechanisms, the overriding regulatory activity of Cra over CRP is fundamental. Thus, elucidation of interacting transcriptional regulation of core carbon metabolism in bacteria by two key transcription factors was possible by combining genome-wide experimental measurement and simulation with a genome-scale metabolic model.

  2. GSK-3α is a central regulator of age-related pathologies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jibin; Freeman, Theresa A; Ahmad, Firdos; Shang, Xiying; Mangano, Emily; Gao, Erhe; Farber, John; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Xin-Liang; Woodgett, James; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Lal, Hind; Force, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Aging is regulated by conserved signaling pathways. The glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) family of serine/threonine kinases regulates several of these pathways, but the role of GSK-3 in aging is unknown. Herein, we demonstrate premature death and acceleration of age-related pathologies in the Gsk3a global KO mouse. KO mice developed cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction as well as sarcomere disruption and striking sarcopenia in cardiac and skeletal muscle, a classical finding in aging. We also observed severe vacuolar degeneration of myofibers and large tubular aggregates in skeletal muscle, consistent with impaired clearance of insoluble cellular debris. Other organ systems, including gut, liver, and the skeletal system, also demonstrated age-related pathologies. Mechanistically, we found marked activation of mTORC1 and associated suppression of autophagy markers in KO mice. Loss of GSK-3α, either by pharmacologic inhibition or Gsk3a gene deletion, suppressed autophagy in fibroblasts. mTOR inhibition rescued this effect and reversed the established pathologies in the striated muscle of the KO mouse. Thus, GSK-3α is a critical regulator of mTORC1, autophagy, and aging. In its absence, aging/senescence is accelerated in multiple tissues. Strategies to maintain GSK-3α activity and/or inhibit mTOR in the elderly could retard the appearance of age-related pathologies.

  3. Use of quality assurance criteria in the work of the regulating body: Cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabia Molina, I.

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows experiences obtained by CNSN, a competent organization in charge of radiological nuclear security and accounting and control of nuclear materials in the Republic of Cuba. It analyses quality assurance criteria while carrying out functions and responsibilities entrusted to it by the regulation in force. This paper also shows main advantages and disadvantages derived from the use of quality assurance methods in the regulation and control as well as on its evolution in time and also in the near future

  4. A review of central production experiments at the CERN Omega spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The non-Abelian nature of QCD suggests that particles that have a gluon constituent, such as glueballs or hybrids, should exist. This paper presents a study of central meson production in the fixed target experiments WA76, WA91 and WA102 at the CERN Omega spectrometer at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s} = 12.7$, 23.8 and 29~GeV. A study of the resonance production cross section as a function of $\\sqrt{s}$ shows which states are compatible with being produced by Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE). In these DPE processes, the difference in the transverse momentum between the exchange particles ($dP_T)$ can be used to select out known $q\\overline q$ states from non-$q \\overline q$ candidates. The distribution of the azimuthal angle ($\\phi$) between the two exchange particles suggests that the Pomeron transforms like a non-conserved vector current. Finally there is evidence from an analysis of the the decay modes of the scalar states observed, that the lightest scalar glueball manifests itself through the mixing w...

  5. Sensitivity experiments of a regional climate model to the different convective schemes over Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand J, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, version 4 of the regional climate model (RegCM4) is used to perform 6 years simulation including one year for spin-up (from January 2001 to December 2006) over Central Africa using four convective schemes: The Emmanuel scheme (MIT), the Grell scheme with Arakawa-Schulbert closure assumption (GAS), the Grell scheme with Fritsch-Chappell closure assumption (GFC) and the Anthes-Kuo scheme (Kuo). We have investigated the ability of the model to simulate precipitation, surface temperature, wind and aerosols optical depth. Emphasis in the model results were made in December-January-February (DJF) and July-August-September (JAS) periods. Two subregions have been identified for more specific analysis namely: zone 1 which corresponds to the sahel region mainly classified as desert and steppe and zone 2 which is a region spanning the tropical rain forest and is characterised by a bimodal rain regime. We found that regardless of periods or simulated parameters, MIT scheme generally has a tendency to overestimate. The GAS scheme is more suitable in simulating the aforementioned parameters, as well as the diurnal cycle of precipitations everywhere over the study domain irrespective of the season. In JAS, model results are similar in the representation of regional wind circulation. Apart from the MIT scheme, all the convective schemes give the same trends in aerosols optical depth simulations. Additional experiment reveals that the use of BATS instead of Zeng scheme to calculate ocean flux appears to improve the quality of the model simulations.

  6. Incentive regulation of electricity distribution networks: Lessons of experience from Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent experience of the UK electricity distribution sector under incentive regulation. The UK has a significant and transparent history in implementing incentive regulation in the period since 1990. We demonstrate the successes of this period in reducing costs, prices, and energy losses while maintaining quality of service. We also draw out the lessons for other countries in implementing distribution sector reform. We conclude by discussing the place of incentive regulation of networks within the wider reform context, the required legislative framework, the need for appropriate unbundling, the importance of quality of service incentives, the regulatory information requirements, and the role of sector rationalisation. (author)

  7. Physical protection of nuclear materials: Experience in regulation, implementation and operations. Proceedings of a conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The conference was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 10 to 14 November 1997. It was attended by 162 registered participants from 42 countries and eight international organizations. The 58 papers presented dealt with the experience of regulators, designers and facility operators, including response forces, in meeting the demands and requirements in this changing area of physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for each of the papers. Topics covered include contemporary and emerging issues, experience in regulation, implementation at facilities, program assessment and cooperation, hardware and software, illicit trafficking in nuclear materials, and transportation

  8. Norepinephrine release from Locus Ceruleus:a central regulator for the CNS spatio-temporal activation pattern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Atzori

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine (NE is synthesized in the Locus Coeruleus (LC of the brainstem, from where it is released by axonal varicosities throughout the brain via volume transmission. A wealth of data from clinics and from animal models indicates that this catecholamine coordinates the activity of the central nervous system and of the whole organism by modulating cell function in a vast number of brain areas in a coordinated manner. The ubiquity of NE receptors, the daunting number of cerebral areas regulated by the catecholamine, as well as the variety of cellular effects and of their timescales have contributed so far to defeat the attempts to integrate central adrenergic function into a unitary and coherent framework.Since three main families of NE receptors are represented – in decreasing order of affinity for the catecholamine – by: 2 adrenoceptors (2Rs, high affinity, 1 adrenoceptors (1Rs, intermediate affinity, and  adrenoceptors (Rs, low affinity, on a pharmacological basis, and on the ground of recent studies on cellular and systemic central noradrenergic effects, we propose that an increase in LC tonic activity promotes the emergence of four global states covering the whole spectrum of brain activation: 1 sleep: virtual absence of NE, 2 quiet wake: activation of 2Rs, 3 active wake/physiological stress: activation of 2- and 1Rs, 4 distress: activation of 2-, 1-, and Rs.We postulate that excess intensity and/or duration of states 3 and 4 may lead to maladaptive plasticity, causing – in turn – a variety of neuropsychiatric illnesses including depression, schizophrenic psychoses, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit. The interplay between tonic and phasic LC activity identified in the LC in relationship with behavioral response is of critical importance in defining the short- and long-term biological mechanisms associated with the basic states postulated for the central nervous system. While the model

  9. How the Monte Carlo production of a wide variety of different samples is centrally handled in the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Corti, G; Clemencic, M; Closier, J; Couturier, B; Kreps, M; Mathe, Z; O'Hanlon, D; Robbe, P; Romanovsky, V; Stagni, F; Zhelezov, A

    2015-01-01

    In the LHCb experiment a wide variety of Monte Carlo simulated samples needs to be produced for the experiment's physics program. Monte Carlo productions are handled centrally similarly to all massive processing of data in the experiment. In order to cope with the large set of different types of simulation samples, necessary procedures based on common infrastructures have been set up with a numerical event type identification code used throughout. The various elements in the procedure, from writing a configuration for an event type to deploying them on the production environment, from submitting and processing a request to retrieving the sample produced as well as the conventions established to allow their interplay will be described. The choices made have allowed a high level of automation of Monte Carlo productions that are handled centrally in a transparent way with experts concentrating on their specific tasks. As a result the massive Monte Carlo production of the experiment is efficiently processed on a ...

  10. A central role for GRB10 in regulation of islet function in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Prokopenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Variants in the growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (GRB10 gene were in a GWAS meta-analysis associated with reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D if inherited from the father, but inexplicably reduced fasting glucose when inherited from the mother. GRB10 is a negative regulator of insulin signaling and imprinted in a parent-of-origin fashion in different tissues. GRB10 knock-down in human pancreatic islets showed reduced insulin and glucagon secretion, which together with changes in insulin sensitivity may explain the paradoxical reduction of glucose despite a decrease in insulin secretion. Together, these findings suggest that tissue-specific methylation and possibly imprinting of GRB10 can influence glucose metabolism and contribute to T2D pathogenesis. The data also emphasize the need in genetic studies to consider whether risk alleles are inherited from the mother or the father.

  11. A central role for R7bp in the regulation of itch sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Mritunjay; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Mishra, Santosh K; Adikaram, Poorni R; Harris, Benjamin; Kahler, John F; Loshakov, Anna; Sholevar, Roxanne; Genis, Allison; Kittock, Claire; Kabat, Juraj; Ganesan, Sundar; Neubig, Richard R; Hoon, Mark A; Simonds, William F

    2017-05-01

    Itch is a protective sensation producing a desire to scratch. Pathologic itch can be a chronic symptom of illnesses such as uremia, cholestatic liver disease, neuropathies and dermatitis, however current therapeutic options are limited. Many types of cell surface receptors, including those present on cells in the skin, on sensory neurons and on neurons in the spinal cord, have been implicated in itch signaling. The role of G protein signaling in the regulation of pruriception is poorly understood. We identify here 2 G protein signaling components whose mutation impairs itch sensation. R7bp (a.k.a. Rgs7bp) is a palmitoylated membrane anchoring protein expressed in neurons that facilitates Gαi/o -directed GTPase activating protein activity mediated by the Gβ5/R7-RGS complex. Knockout of R7bp diminishes scratching responses to multiple cutaneously applied and intrathecally-administered pruritogens in mice. Knock-in to mice of a GTPase activating protein-insensitive mutant of Gαo (Gnao1 G184S/+) produces a similar pruriceptive phenotype. The pruriceptive defect in R7bp knockout mice was rescued in double knockout mice also lacking Oprk1, encoding the G protein-coupled kappa-opioid receptor whose activation is known to inhibit itch sensation. In a model of atopic dermatitis (eczema), R7bp knockout mice showed diminished scratching behavior and enhanced sensitivity to kappa opioid agonists. Taken together, our results indicate that R7bp is a key regulator of itch sensation and suggest the potential targeting of R7bp-dependent GTPase activating protein activity as a novel therapeutic strategy for pathological itch.

  12. Reaction to the Special Issue on Centralizing the Experiences of LGB People of Color in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea, Maria Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    This reaction article comments on the Major Contribution "Centralizing the Experiences of LGB People of Color in Counseling Psychology." The content analysis of the published literature on lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people of color from 1998 to 2007 provides much-needed information that will help psychologists set future research agendas and…

  13. Twenty years of experience with central softening in The Netherlands : Water quality – Environmental benefits – Costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, J.A.M.H.; Kramer, O.J.I.; van der Hoek, J.P.; Nederlof, M; Groenendijk, M

    2006-01-01

    Central softening has been utilized by the Dutch water utilities since the late 1970s. It was introduced in the water treatment process as a method to supply water with an optimum water composition to prevent lead and copper release and to prevent excessive scaling. Twenty years of experience show

  14. Wives' Attitudes toward Gender Roles and Their Experience of Intimate Partner Violence by Husbands in Central Province, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilleke, Achini; Poudel, Krishna C.; Sakisaka, Kayako; Yasuoka, Junko; Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra; Jimba, Masamine

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a community based, cross-sectional study to describe the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) by husbands and the association between wives' attitudes toward gender roles and their experience of IPV in Central Province, Sri Lanka. This article included a representative sample of 624 wives between 15 and 49 years of…

  15. Centralization and Experimentation in the Implementation of a National Monitoring and Evaluation System: The Experience of Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useem, Michael; Chipande, Graham

    1991-01-01

    To identify general principles of implementing a system of evaluation, the experience of Malawi in building a national system for agriculture is described. Applying principles of both centralization and decentralization and principles of trial and error has helped translate theories of evaluation into practice in Malawi. (SLD)

  16. Combining focus group discussions and choice experiments for economic valuation of peatland restoration : A case study in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, M.; van Beukering, P. J.H.; Oskolokaite, I.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the benefits of combining results of qualitative focus group discussions (FGDs) with a quantitative choice experiment (CE) in a low-income country context. The assessment addresses the compensation needed by local communities in Central Kalimantan to cooperate in peatland

  17. Central Nervous Insulin Signaling in Sleep-Associated Memory Formation and Neuroendocrine Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Gordon B; Wilhem, Ines; Benedict, Christian; Rüdel, Benjamin; Klameth, Corinna; Born, Jan; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2016-05-01

    The neurochemical underpinnings of sleep's contribution to the establishment and maintenance of memory traces are largely unexplored. Considering that intranasal insulin administration to the CNS improves memory functions in healthy and memory-impaired humans, we tested whether brain insulin signaling and sleep interact to enhance memory consolidation in healthy participants. We investigated the effect of intranasal insulin on sleep-associated neurophysiological and neuroendocrine parameters and memory consolidation in 16 men and 16 women (aged 18-30 years), who learned a declarative word-pair task and a procedural finger sequence tapping task in the evening before intranasal insulin (160 IU) or placebo administration and 8 h of nocturnal sleep. On the subsequent evening, they learned interfering word-pairs and a new finger sequence before retrieving the original memories. Insulin increased growth hormone concentrations in the first night-half and EEG delta power during the second 90 min of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Insulin treatment impaired the acquisition of new contents in both the declarative and procedural memory systems on the next day, whereas retrieval of original memories was unchanged. Results indicate that sleep-associated memory consolidation is not a primary mediator of insulin's acute memory-improving effect, but that the peptide acts on mechanisms that diminish the subsequent encoding of novel information. Thus, by inhibiting processes of active forgetting during sleep, central nervous insulin might reduce the interfering influence of encoding new information.

  18. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  19. Phosphodiesterase 9A regulates central cGMP and modulates responses to cholinergic and monoaminergic perturbation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Robin J; Chapin, Douglas S; Christoffersen, Curt; Freeman, Jody; Fonseca, Kari R; Geoghegan, Kieran F; Grimwood, Sarah; Guanowsky, Victor; Hajós, Mihály; Harms, John F; Helal, Christopher J; Hoffmann, William E; Kocan, Geralyn P; Majchrzak, Mark J; McGinnis, Dina; McLean, Stafford; Menniti, Frank S; Nelson, Fredrick; Roof, Robin; Schmidt, Anne W; Seymour, Patricia A; Stephenson, Diane T; Tingley, Francis David; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Verhoest, Patrick R; Schmidt, Christopher J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are critical regulators of synaptic plasticity and participate in requisite signaling cascades implicated across multiple neurotransmitter systems. Phosphodiesterase 9A (PDE9A) is a high-affinity, cGMP-specific enzyme widely expressed in the rodent central nervous system. In the current study, we observed neuronal staining with antibodies raised against PDE9A protein in human cortex, cerebellum, and subiculum. We have also developed several potent, selective, and brain-penetrant PDE9A inhibitors and used them to probe the function of PDE9A in vivo. Administration of these compounds to animals led to dose-dependent accumulation of cGMP in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid, producing a range of biological effects that implied functional significance for PDE9A-regulated cGMP in dopaminergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic neurotransmission and were consistent with the widespread distribution of PDE9A. In vivo effects of PDE9A inhibition included reversal of the respective disruptions of working memory by ketamine, episodic and spatial memory by scopolamine, and auditory gating by amphetamine, as well as potentiation of risperidone-induced improvements in sensorimotor gating and reversal of the stereotypic scratching response to the hallucinogenic 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A agonist mescaline. The results suggested a role for PDE9A in the regulation of monoaminergic circuitry associated with sensory processing and memory. Thus, PDE9A activity regulates neuronal cGMP signaling downstream of multiple neurotransmitter systems, and inhibition of PDE9A may provide therapeutic benefits in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases promoted by the dysfunction of these diverse neurotransmitter systems.

  20. Clinical Experience With Radiation Therapy in the Management of Neurofibromatosis-Associated Central Nervous System Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentworth, Stacy; Pinn, Melva; Bourland, J. Daniel; Guzman, Allan F. de; Ekstrand, Kenneth; Ellis, Thomas L.; Glazier, Steven S.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael; Stieber, Volker W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Shaw, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with neurofibromatosis (NF) develop tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Radiation therapy (RT) is used to treat these lesions. To better define the efficacy of RT in these patients, we reviewed our 20-year experience. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with NF with CNS tumors were treated from 1986 to 2007. Median follow-up was 48 months. Progression was defined as growth or recurrence of an irradiated tumor on serial imaging. Progression-free survival (PFS) was measured from the date of RT completion to the date of last follow-up imaging study. Actuarial rates of overall survival (OS) and PFS were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Eighty-two tumors in 18 patients were irradiated, with an average of five tumors/patient. Median age at treatment was 25 years (range, 4.3-64 years). Tumor types included acoustic neuroma (16%), ependymoma (6%), low-grade glioma (11%), meningioma (60%), and schwanomma/neurofibroma (7%). The most common indication for treatment was growth on serial imaging. Most patients (67%) received stereotactic radiosurgery (median dose, 1,200 cGy; range, 1,000-2,400 cGy). The OS rate at 5 years was 94%. Five-year PFS rates were 75% (acoustic neuroma), 100% (ependymoma), 75% (low-grade glioma), 86% (meningioma), and 100% (schwanomma/neurofibroma). Thirteen acoustic neuromas had a local control rate of 94% with a 50% hearing preservation rate. Conclusions: RT provided local control, OS, and PFS rates similar to or better than published data for tumors in non-NF patients. Radiation therapy should be considered in NF patients with imaging progression of CNS tumors

  1. Maladaptive Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Emotion Experience and Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrea C.; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Lee, Ihno A.; Phillips, Jennifer M.; Gross, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive behavior is common in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). However, the factors that give rise to maladaptive behavior in this context are not well understood. The present study examined the role of emotion experience and emotion regulation in maladaptive behavior in individuals with ASD and typically developing (TD) participants.…

  2. Field Experience from Li-Ion BESS Delivering Primary Frequency Regulation in the Danish Energy Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Lærke, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    In this paper it is presented the practical experience from operating a 1.6 MW/ 0.4 MWh lithium ion battery energy storage system, which is providing primary frequency regulation service on the Danish energy market. Aspects of the battery system requirements and the used control strategy...

  3. Hands-on Experiments on Glycemia Regulation and Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingueneau, M.; Chaix, A.; Scotti, N.; Chaix, J.; Reynders, A.; Hammond, C.; Thimonier, J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we describe a 3-day experimental workshop on glycemia regulation and type 1 diabetes that engages students in open-ended investigations and guided experiments leading to results that are not already known to them. After an initial questioning phase during which students observe PowerPoint slides depicting the glycemia…

  4. Regulation of distribution grid prices at the beginning of market liberalisation - Experience in Norway and Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippini, M.; Wind, J.; Luchsinger, C.

    2001-01-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reviews the experience gained in the deregulation of electricity distribution grids in Norway and Sweden and compares it with the possible options for Switzerland. The report looks at the requirements placed on the future Swiss regulation of electricity distribution grids and the various regulation models such as Rate-of-Return, Price-Cap, Revenue-Cap and Benchmarking that could be used in the short and long term. The choice of Sweden and Norway from the list of countries with liberalised electricity markets is discussed. The results of the study of the two countries are discussed individually, including the structure of the sector, the various stages of deregulation, the main characteristics encountered at the start of deregulation, regulation of grid prices at the beginning of liberalisation and experience gained in each case. The report is supplemented by a comprehensive list of the sources used

  5. Sphingosine kinase-1 is central to androgen-regulated prostate cancer growth and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Dayon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1 is an oncogenic lipid kinase notably involved in response to anticancer therapies in prostate cancer. Androgens regulate prostate cancer cell proliferation, and androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care in the management of patients with advanced disease. Here, we explored the role of SphK1 in the regulation of androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth and survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Short-term androgen removal induced a rapid and transient SphK1 inhibition associated with a reduced cell growth in vitro and in vivo, an event that was not observed in the hormono-insensitive PC-3 cells. Supporting the critical role of SphK1 inhibition in the rapid effect of androgen depletion, its overexpression could impair the cell growth decrease. Similarly, the addition of dihydrotestosterone (DHT to androgen-deprived LNCaP cells re-established cell proliferation, through an androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt dependent stimulation of SphK1, and inhibition of SphK1 could markedly impede the effects of DHT. Conversely, long-term removal of androgen support in LNCaP and C4-2B cells resulted in a progressive increase in SphK1 expression and activity throughout the progression to androgen-independence state, which was characterized by the acquisition of a neuroendocrine (NE-like cell phenotype. Importantly, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway--by negatively impacting SphK1 activity--could prevent NE differentiation in both cell models, an event that could be mimicked by SphK1 inhibitors. Fascinatingly, the reversability of the NE phenotype by exposure to normal medium was linked with a pronounced inhibition of SphK1 activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the first evidence that androgen deprivation induces a differential effect on SphK1 activity in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell models. These results also suggest that SphK1 activation upon chronic androgen deprivation may serve as a

  6. Prospects for regulated competition in the health care system: what can China learn from Russia's experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiwei; Sheiman, Igor; van de Ven, Wynand P M M; Zhang, Wei

    2011-05-01

    As China explores new directions to reform its health care system, regulated competition among both insurers and providers of care might be one potential model. The Russian Federation in 1993 implemented legislation intended to stimulate such regulated competition in the health care sector. The subsequent progress and lessons learned over these 17 years can shed light on and inform the future evolution of the Chinese system. In this paper, we list the necessary pre-conditions for reaping the benefits of regulated competition in the health care sector. We indicate to what extent these conditions are being fulfilled in the post-reform Russian and current Chinese health care systems. We draw lessons from the Russian experience for the Chinese health care system, which shares a similar economic and political background with the pre-reform Russian health care system in terms of the starting point of the reform, and analyse the prospects for regulated competition in China.

  7. Maternal obesity induced by diet in rats permanently influences central processes regulating food intake in offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shona L Kirk

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic systems which regulate appetite may be permanently modified during early development. We have previously reported hyperphagia and increased adiposity in the adult offspring of rodents fed an obesogenic diet prior to and throughout pregnancy and lactation. We now report that offspring of obese (OffOb rats display an amplified and prolonged neonatal leptin surge, which is accompanied by elevated leptin mRNA expression in their abdominal white adipose tissue. At postnatal Day 30, before the onset of hyperphagia in these animals, serum leptin is normal, but leptin-induced appetite suppression and phosphorylation of STAT3 in the arcuate nucleus (ARC are attenuated; the level of AgRP-immunoreactivity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH, which derives from neurones in the ARC and is developmentally dependent on leptin, is also diminished. We hypothesise that prolonged release of abnormally high levels of leptin by neonatal OffOb rats leads to leptin resistance and permanently affects hypothalamic functions involving the ARC and PVH. Such effects may underlie the developmental programming of hyperphagia and obesity in these rats.

  8. Analysis of the Development and Regulation of Crypto-currency: Foreign and Russian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Babkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: carrying out the analysis of the regulation of the crypto-currency, its legal provisions and risks, which will allow us to study this phenomenon more deeply for the purpose of Russia's financial security in the modern world financial system, taking into account the essence of the nature of the crypto-currency. Methods: when studying the role of state regulation of electronic money (crypto-currency, a dialectical method of scientific cognition was applied. Calculating and analytical methods of observing, measuring, analyzing and comparing indicators characterizing the state regulation of crypto-currencies in the Russian Federation, strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats to use and regulate crypto currency. Results: the authors conducted the analysis of the crypto-currency market, studied the experience and peculiarities of the state regulation of the crypto-currencies, examined and proposed strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats to use and regulate crypto-currencies. Conclusions and Relevance: in the process of studying the experience of regulating crypto currency in foreign countries, we found some similar features. First, each country seeks to create a favorable climate for the development of new technologies (detached and sees a high potential for using technology not only in the private sector, but also in the public sector. Secondly, the crypto-currency market is growing at a high pace, and the state, without adapting the tax code to the modern challenges of the digital economy, receives less revenue in the budget, since the crypto-currencies are out of legal jurisdiction. Thirdly, today there are more than 1 thousand different crypto-currencies, therefore, it is necessary to develop common standards for the regulation of crypto-currencies. 

  9. Assessing the impact of sinus-saving modifications of carotid endarterectomy on autonomic regulation and central hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Фокин

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSuch complications as myocardial infarction, hyperperfusion syndrome and its effects, postoperative hematomes constitute a life-threatening event during early follow-up of carotid surgery. One of the main risk factors for these complications is a variation of central hemodynamics, especially that leading to arterial hypertension.ObjectiveThe study aimed to evaluate the safety of carotid sinus surgery as a way of preventing arterial hypertension after carotid artery reconstructions. The other objective was to compare the resultant data with the heart rate variations obtained during rhythmocardiography.MethodsThe study focused on central hemodynamics indicators and included 290 cases. All patients were broken down in two groups. 167 patients of the first group underwent dissection of carotid sinus nerves. The carotid sinus nerves of patients from the second group (123 patients were kept intact. Analysis of autonomic regulation of 13 patients from the first group and 17 patients from the other one was then carried out, with the heart rate variations accurately estimated at the neurocardiological laboratory.ResultsOn the first postoperative day all hemodynamic indicators (such as SBP, DBP, pulse pressure, heart rate in the second group were lower than those in the first group of patients (p<0.05, while tending to recover by the third day. This fact kept postoperative complications to a minimum. The patients from the second group also demonstrated a lower activity of the sympathetic nervous system and a higher activity of the parasympathetic one. These results explain the difference between the central hemodynamic indicators in two groups.ConclusionCarotid sinus-saving surgery decreases the risk of early postoperative complications caused by arterial hypertension. 

  10. Acute central effects of alarin on the regulation on energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Alexandra; Füredi, Nóra; Tenk, Judit; Rostás, Ildikó; Soós, Szilvia; Solymár, Margit; Székely, Miklós; Balaskó, Márta; Brunner, Susanne M; Kofler, Barbara; Pétervári, Erika

    2017-08-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides influence the main components of energy balance: metabolic rate, food intake, body weight as well as body temperature, by exerting either an overall anabolic or catabolic effect. The contribution of alarin, the most recently discovered member of the galanin peptide family to the regulation of energy metabolism has been suggested. Our aim was to analyze the complex thermoregulatory and food intake-related effects of alarin in rats. Adult male Wistar rats received different doses of alarin (0.3; 1; 3 and 15μg corresponding approximately to 0.1, 0.33, 1, and 5 nmol, respectively) intracerebroventricularly. Regarding thermoregulatory analysis, oxygen consumption (indicating metabolic rate), core temperature and heat loss (assessed by tail skin temperature) were recorded in an Oxymax indirect calorimeter system complemented with thermocouples and Benchtop thermometer. In order to investigate potential prostaglandin-mediated mechanisms of the hyperthermic effect of alarin, effects of intraperitoneally applied non-selective (indomethacin, 2mg/kg) or selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor (COX-2 inhibitor meloxicam, 1; 2mg/kg) were tested. Effects of alarin on daytime and nighttime spontaneous food intake, as well as, 24-h fasting-induced re-feeding were recorded in an automated FeedScale system. Alarin increased oxygen consumption with simultaneous suppression of heat loss leading to a slow coordinated rise in core temperature. Both applied COX-inhibitors suppressed this action. Alarin failed to induce daytime food intake, but suppressed spontaneous nighttime and also fasting-induced re-feeding food intake. Alarin appears to elicit a slow anorexigenic and prostaglandin-mediated, fever-like hyperthermic response in rats. Such a combination would characterize a catabolic mediator. The potential involvement of alarin in sickness behavior may be assumed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Benthic disturbance and impact experiments in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.; Valsangkar, A.B.; Parthiban, G.; Sivakholundu, K.M.; Walker, G.A.

    As a part of the Environmental Impact Assessment studies for nodule mining, a long-term program has been initiated in the Central Indian Basin. Multidisciplinary studies on geological, biological, physical and chemical parameters were carried out...

  12. Benthic disturbance and monitoring experiment in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.

    Environmental impact assessment studies for deep-sea manganese nodule mining have been initiated in the Central indian Ocean Basin since 1995. As a part of the first phase for collecting the benthic baseline data, echosounding, subbottom profiling...

  13. Regulation and function of the alpha2 adrenergic autoreceptor in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spengler, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether changes observed in the number of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in the brain as measured by radioligand binding experiments reflect changes in the function of alpha 2 autoregulatory receptors which are located on noradrenergic nerve terminals. Inhibition by clonidine of field stimulated 3 H-norepinephrine ( 3 H-NE) release from rat hippocampal slices before and after several drug treatments was analyzed to investigate changes in alpha 2 adrenergic receptor function. Clonidine in a concentration-dependent manner inhibited 3 H-NE release. The effect of clonidine was blocked by the specific alpha 2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, idazoxan. The cumulative administration of clonidine generated a smooth and well-fitted log-concentration-effect curve. Results are presented which demonstrate that this technique can be employed to investigate the role of changes in the function of the alpha 2 autoregulatory receptor. The present investigation also examined representatives of four drug classes which have been shown to alter the specific binding of 3 H-clonidine to neural membranes to determine whether changes in the alpha 2 autoregulatory receptor function also occur

  14. Tropical forest recovery from logging: a 24 year silvicultural experiment from Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Mortier, Frédéric; Fayolle, Adeline; Baya, Fidèle; Ouédraogo, Dakis; Bénédet, Fabrice; Picard, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Large areas of African moist forests are being logged in the context of supposedly sustainable management plans. It remains however controversial whether harvesting a few trees per hectare can be maintained in the long term while preserving other forest services as well. We used a unique 24 year silvicultural experiment, encompassing 10 4 ha plots established in the Central African Republic, to assess the effect of disturbance linked to logging (two to nine trees ha⁻¹ greater than or equal to 80 cm DBH) and thinning (11-41 trees ha⁻¹ greater than or equal to 50 cm DBH) on the structure and dynamics of the forest. Before silvicultural treatments, above-ground biomass (AGB) and timber stock (i.e. the volume of commercial trees greater than or equal to 80 cm DBH) in the plots amounted 374.5 ± 58.2 Mg ha⁻¹ and 79.7 ± 45.9 m³ ha⁻¹, respectively. We found that (i) natural control forest was increasing in AGB (2.58 ± 1.73 Mg dry mass ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹) and decreasing in timber stock (-0.33 ± 1.57 m³ ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹); (ii) the AGB recovered very quickly after logging and thinning, at a rate proportional to the disturbance intensity (mean recovery after 24 years: 144%). Compared with controls, the gain almost doubled in the logged plots (4.82 ± 1.22 Mg ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹) and tripled in the logged + thinned plots (8.03 ± 1.41 Mg ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹); (iii) the timber stock recovered slowly (mean recovery after 24 years: 41%), at a rate of 0.75 ± 0.51 m³ ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹ in the logged plots, and 0.81 ± 0.74 m³ ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹ in the logged + thinned plots. Although thinning significantly increased the gain in biomass, it had no effect on the gain in timber stock. However, thinning did foster the growth and survival of small- and medium-sized timber trees and should have a positive effect over the next felling cycle.

  15. Barriers to access to opioid medicines for patients with opioid dependence: a review of legislation and regulations in eleven central and eastern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranken, Marjolein J M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Jünger, Saskia; Radbruch, Lukas; Scholten, Willem; Lisman, John A; Subataite, Marija; Schutjens, Marie-Hélène D B

    2017-06-01

    Barriers linked to drug control systems are considered to contribute to inequitable access to controlled medicines, leaving millions of people in pain and suffering. Most studies focus on access to opioids for the treatment of severe (cancer) pain. This study aims to identify specific access barriers for patients with opioid dependence in legislation and regulations of 11 central and eastern European countries. This study builds on a previous analysis of legislation and regulations as part of the EU 7th Framework Access To Opioid Medication in Europe (ATOME) project. An in-depth analysis was undertaken to determine specific barriers for patients with opioid dependence in need of opioid analgesics or opioid agonist therapy (OAT). For each country, the number and nature of specific potential barriers for these patients were assessed according to eight categories: prescribing; dispensing; manufacturing; usage; trade and distribution; affordability; penalties; and other. An additional keyword search was conducted to minimize the omission of barriers. Barriers in an additional category, language, were recorded qualitatively. Countries included Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Turkey. Ten of the 11 countries (all except Estonia) showed specific potential barriers in their legislation and regulations. The total number of barriers varied from two (Slovenia) to 46 (Lithuania); the number of categories varied from one (Slovenia) to five (Lithuania). Most specific potential barriers were shown in the categories 'prescribing', 'usage' and 'other'. The total number in a single category varied from one to 18 (Lithuania, prescribing). Individual differences between countries in the same specific potential barrier were shown; for example, variation in minimum age criteria for admission to OAT ranging from 15 (Lithuania, in special cases) to 20 years (Greece). All countries had stigmatizing language in their legislation

  16. Regulation of lean mass, bone mass, and exercise tolerance by the central melanocortin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore P Braun

    Full Text Available Signaling via the type 4-melanocortin receptor (MC4R is an important determinant of body weight in mice and humans, where loss of function mutations lead to significant obesity. Humans with mutations in the MC4R experience an increase in lean mass. However, the simultaneous accrual of fat mass in such individuals may contribute to this effect via mechanical loading. We therefore examined the relationship of fat mass and lean mass in mice lacking the type-4 melanocortin receptor (MC4RKO. We demonstrate that MC4RKO mice display increased lean body mass. Further, this is not dependent on changes in adipose mass, as MC4RKO mice possess more lean body mass than diet-induced obese (DIO wild type mice with equivalent fat mass. To examine potential sources of the increased lean mass in MC4RKO mice, bone mass and strength were examined in MC4RKO mice. Both parameters increase with age in MC4RKO mice, which likely contributes to increases in lean body mass. We functionally characterized the increased lean mass in MC4RKO mice by examining their capacity for treadmill running. MC4R deficiency results in a decrease in exercise performance. No changes in the ratio of oxidative to glycolytic fibers were seen, however MC4RKO mice demonstrate a significantly reduced heart rate, which may underlie their impaired exercise performance. The reduced exercise capacity we report in the MC4RKO mouse has potential clinical ramifications, as efforts to control body weight in humans with melanocortin deficiency may be ineffective due to poor tolerance for physical activity.

  17. Different regulatory strategies in regulation of nuclear power projects: An Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sohail Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory strategy needed for management of safety and safety culture involves careful planning and use of engineering concepts keeping in mind feasibility to implement certain safety requirements. It also requires adequate attention on working environment and mental conditions of designers, operating and maintenance staff and regulators. Different strategies followed during safety review and regulatory inspection of nuclear power projects for improving status of safety management and safety cultures have given certain results. The present paper brings out certain experience gained during regulation of Indian Nuclear Power Projects by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board of India in the area of management of safety and safety culture. (author)

  18. Multiple myeloma and central nervous system involvement: experience of a Brazilian center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Miranda Silva Dias

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The estimated involvement of the central nervous system in patients with multiple myeloma is rare at about 1%. The infiltration can be identified at the time multiple myeloma is diagnosed or during its progression. However, it is more common in refractory disease or during relapse. Methods: This retrospective cohort study reviewed data from medical records of patients followed up at the Gammopathy Outpatient Clinic of Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo from January 2008 to December 2016. Results: Twenty patients were included, with a median follow-up of 33.5 months after central nervous system infiltration. The prevalence was 7%. The median age at diagnosis of multiple myeloma was 56.1 years, with 70% of participants being female. Sixteen patients had central nervous system infiltration at diagnosis of multiple myeloma. Seventeen patients had exclusive osteodural lesions and three had infiltrations of the leptomeninge, of which one had exclusive involvement and two had associated osteodural lesions. The median overall survival was 40.3 months after central nervous system involvement. The median overall survival in the group with central nervous system infiltration at relapse was 7.4 months. The patients with leptomeningeal involvement had a median overall survival of 5.8 months. Conclusion: Central nervous system infiltration is a rare condition, but it should be considered as a possibility in patients with multiple myeloma and neurological symptoms. The best treatment regimen for this condition remains unknown and, in most cases, the prognosis is unfavorable. Keywords: Central nervous system, Multiple myeloma, Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy, Prognosis

  19. Actual measurement, hygrothermal response experiment and growth prediction analysis of microbial contamination of central air conditioning system in Dalian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang; Hu, Guangyao; Wang, Chunyang; Yuan, Wenjie; Wei, Shanshan; Gao, Jiaoqi; Wang, Boyuan; Song, Fangchao

    2017-04-03

    The microbial contamination of central air conditioning system is one of the important factors that affect the indoor air quality. Actual measurement and analysis were carried out on microbial contamination in central air conditioning system at a venue in Dalian, China. Illumina miseq method was used and three fungal samples of two units were analysed by high throughput sequencing. Results showed that the predominant fungus in air conditioning unit A and B were Candida spp. and Cladosporium spp., and two fungus were further used in the hygrothermal response experiment. Based on the data of Cladosporium in hygrothermal response experiment, this paper used the logistic equation and the Gompertz equation to fit the growth predictive model of Cladosporium genera in different temperature and relative humidity conditions, and the square root model was fitted based on the two environmental factors. In addition, the models were carried on the analysis to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the established model equation.

  20. Multiple myeloma and central nervous system involvement: experience of a Brazilian center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ana Luiza Miranda Silva; Higashi, Fabiana; Peres, Ana Lúcia M; Cury, Pricilla; Crusoé, Edvan de Queiroz; Hungria, Vânia Tietsche de Moraes

    The estimated involvement of the central nervous system in patients with multiple myeloma is rare at about 1%. The infiltration can be identified at the time multiple myeloma is diagnosed or during its progression. However, it is more common in refractory disease or during relapse. This retrospective cohort study reviewed data from medical records of patients followed up at the Gammopathy Outpatient Clinic of Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo from January 2008 to December 2016. Twenty patients were included, with a median follow-up of 33.5 months after central nervous system infiltration. The prevalence was 7%. The median age at diagnosis of multiple myeloma was 56.1 years, with 70% of participants being female. Sixteen patients had central nervous system infiltration at diagnosis of multiple myeloma. Seventeen patients had exclusive osteodural lesions and three had infiltrations of the leptomeninge, of which one had exclusive involvement and two had associated osteodural lesions. The median overall survival was 40.3 months after central nervous system involvement. The median overall survival in the group with central nervous system infiltration at relapse was 7.4 months. The patients with leptomeningeal involvement had a median overall survival of 5.8 months. Central nervous system infiltration is a rare condition, but it should be considered as a possibility in patients with multiple myeloma and neurological symptoms. The best treatment regimen for this condition remains unknown and, in most cases, the prognosis is unfavorable. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  1. New effects observed in central production by experiment WA102 at the CERN Omega Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, A

    2000-01-01

    A partial wave analysis of the centrally produced KK and pipi systems shows that the fJ(1710) has J = 0. In addition, a study of central meson production as a function of the difference in transverse momentum (dPT) of the exchanged particles shows that undisputed qqbar mesons are suppressed at small dPT whereas the glueball candidates are enhanced and that the production cross section for different resonances depends strongly on the azimuthal angle between the two outgoing protons.

  2. Applicable regulations and development of surveillance experiments of criticality approach in the TRIGA III Mark reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, J.L.; Aguilar H, F.; Rivero G, T.; Sainz M, E.

    2000-01-01

    In the procedure elaborated to repair the vessel of TRIGA III Mark reactor is required to move toward two tanks of temporal storage the fuel elements which are in operation and the spent fuel elements which are in decay inside the reactor pool. The National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS) has requested as protection measure that it is carried out a surveillance of the criticality approach of the temporal storages. This work determines the main regulation aspects that entails an experiment of criticality approach, moreover, informing about the results obtained in the developing of this experiments. The regulation aspects are not exclusives for this work in the TRIGA Mark III reactor but they also apply toward any assembling of fissile material. (Author)

  3. Influence of Student Learning Experience on Academic Performance: The Mediator and Moderator Effects of Self-Regulation and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hoi Kwan; Downing, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the mediator and moderator roles of self-regulation and motivation constructs in the relationship between learning experience and academic success. Self-reported measures of learning experience, self-regulation and motivation were obtained from 384 undergraduate students from a university in Hong Kong. Structural equation…

  4. [Emotional experience and regulation across the adult lifespan: comparative analysis in three age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-González, María; Izal Fernández de Trocóniz, María; Montorio Cerrato, Ignacio; Losada Baltar, Andrés

    2008-11-01

    The studies focused on age-related differences in emotional experience are still scarce, and most of them have been conducted with North-American samples. This study explores the presence of age-related differences in some facets of emotional experience (subjective well-being and emotional intensity), as well as in variables related to emotion regulation (subjective emotional control and three emotion-regulation mechanisms: situation selection, emotion suppression, rumination) in the Spanish population. One hundred and sixty people from three age groups (younger, middle-aged and older adults) participated in the study. Older participants reported lower levels of life satisfaction and positive emotional intensity than younger ones, as well as higher levels of perceived emotional control, emotional maturity and leveling of positive affect, and more use of emotion suppression. The results partially support the emotional maturity hypothesis of emotional functioning in old age, but also suggest that older adults' emotional regulation may present important peculiarities which have not yet been addressed in the extant literature, such as the moderation or limitation of emotional experience, especially positive emotions.

  5. Foreign exchange intervention and central bank independence: The Latin American experience

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Mauricio; Da Silva, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Employing data from 13 Latin American countries, we find that greater central bank independence is associated with lesser intervention in the foreign exchange market, and also with leaning-against-the-wind intervention. We also find that the structural reforms that occurred in Latin America mostly in the 1990s helped to reduce the need for foreign exchange intervention.

  6. Final height after gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist treatment for central precocious puberty : The Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, D; Oostdijk, W; Otten, BJ; Rouwe, C; Jansen, M; Delemarre-van de Waal, HA; Waelkens, JJJ; Drop, SLS

    Final height (FH) data of 96 children (87 girls) treated with GnRH agonist for central precocious puberty were studied. In girls mean FH exceeded initial height prediction by 7.4 (5.7) cm (p <0.001); FH was significantly lower than target height, but still in the genetic target range. When treatment

  7. New effects observed in central production by the WA102 experiment at the CERN Omega Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, A

    2000-01-01

    A study of central meson production as a function of the difference in transverse momentum (dPT) of the exchanged particles shows that undisputed qqbar mesons are suppressed at small dPT whereas the glueball candidates are enhanced. In addition, the production cross section for different resonances depends strongly on the azimuthal angle between the two outgoing protons.

  8. The CDF Central Electromagnetic Calorimeter for Proton - Anti-proton Collision Experiment at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamon, Teruki [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    1986-06-01

    The CDF central electromagnetic calorimeter modules were calibrated with test beam and cosmic ray muons. It is found that (a) the modules are identical to each other by 1 % on the response map and (b) the uncertaity on the measurement of the energy of showering particle is better than 1.1 % in the 85 % of whole area.

  9. Psychology of democracy and democratization: Experience from Central and Eastern Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klicperová-Baker, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, Supplement (2012), s. 694-694 ISSN 0020-7594. [International Congress of Psychology /30./. 22.07.2012-27.07.2012, Cape Town] Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : political psychology * democratization * Central and Eastern Europe Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  10. Central serotonergic neurons activate and recruit thermogenic brown and beige fat and regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlashon, Jacob M; Gorecki, Michelle C; Kozlowski, Amanda E; Thirnbeck, Caitlin K; Markan, Kathleen R; Leslie, Kirstie L; Kotas, Maya E; Potthoff, Matthew J; Richerson, George B; Gillum, Matthew P

    2015-05-05

    Thermogenic brown and beige adipocytes convert chemical energy to heat by metabolizing glucose and lipids. Serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the CNS are essential for thermoregulation and accordingly may control metabolic activity of thermogenic fat. To test this, we generated mice in which the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) was selectively expressed in central 5-HT neurons. Treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) eliminated 5-HT neurons and caused loss of thermoregulation, brown adipose tissue (BAT) steatosis, and a >50% decrease in uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) expression in BAT and inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT). In parallel, blood glucose increased 3.5-fold, free fatty acids 13.4-fold, and triglycerides 6.5-fold. Similar BAT and beige fat defects occurred in Lmx1b(f/f)ePet1(Cre) mice in which 5-HT neurons fail to develop in utero. We conclude 5-HT neurons play a major role in regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis, in part through recruitment and metabolic activation of brown and beige adipocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system: 20 years' experience in a referral hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, A L; Pacheco-Calleros, J; Castelán-Maldonado, E; Nocedal-Rustrián, F C

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) are rare neoplasms. AIM. To study the clinical aspects and the immuno-phenotype of all cases of PCNSL in a 20 years lapse in a referral hospital in Northeastern Mexico. From January 1986 to December 2005 all PCNSL histologically confirmed were studied. The primary lymphomas were 1% of malignant central nervous system neoplasms. 21 cases were studied (ages from 9-70 years) with male predominance (2:1). 24% patients had immuno-suppression. The more frequent clinical data were: papilledema (71%), headache (62%), paresis (48%) and seizures (33%). 33% of patients died during the first six months after diagnosis. The T lymphomas were 19% of cases and corresponded to small cell type. PCNSL are still a diagnostic challenge. Multicenter studies are required in order to determine the best treatment protocol.

  12. Towards an understanding of the mechanisms of weak central coherence effects: experiments in visual configural learning and auditory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisted, Kate; Saksida, Lisa; Alcántara, José; Weisblatt, Emma

    2003-01-01

    The weak central coherence hypothesis of Frith is one of the most prominent theories concerning the abnormal performance of individuals with autism on tasks that involve local and global processing. Individuals with autism often outperform matched nonautistic individuals on tasks in which success depends upon processing of local features, and underperform on tasks that require global processing. We review those studies that have been unable to identify the locus of the mechanisms that may be responsible for weak central coherence effects and those that show that local processing is enhanced in autism but not at the expense of global processing. In the light of these studies, we propose that the mechanisms which can give rise to 'weak central coherence' effects may be perceptual. More specifically, we propose that perception operates to enhance the representation of individual perceptual features but that this does not impact adversely on representations that involve integration of features. This proposal was supported in the two experiments we report on configural and feature discrimination learning in high-functioning children with autism. We also examined processes of perception directly, in an auditory filtering task which measured the width of auditory filters in individuals with autism and found that the width of auditory filters in autism were abnormally broad. We consider the implications of these findings for perceptual theories of the mechanisms underpinning weak central coherence effects. PMID:12639334

  13. Encountering Heidi: meeting others as a central aspect of the river experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilian Jonas; Kevin Larkin

    2000-01-01

    Over the past few decades, numerous studies have investigated relationships between encounters and the backcountry recreation experience. Although academics and professionals may recognize that meeting others in backcountry areas could result in positive interactions that are beneficial to the experience, research directed at the positive aspects of intergroup...

  14. An expectancy-value model of emotion regulation: implications for motivation, emotional experience, and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Maya; Bigman, Yochanan E; Rhodes, Emily; Salerno, James; Schreier, Jenna

    2015-02-01

    According to expectancy-value models of self-regulation, people are motivated to act in ways they expect to be useful to them. For instance, people are motivated to run when they believe running is useful, even when they have nothing to run away from. Similarly, we propose an expectancy-value model of emotion regulation, according to which people are motivated to emote in ways they expect to be useful to them, regardless of immediate contextual demands. For instance, people may be motivated to get angry when they believe anger is useful, even when there is nothing to be angry about. In 5 studies, we demonstrate that leading people to expect an emotion to be useful increased their motivation to experience that emotion (Studies 1-5), led them to up-regulate the experience of that emotion (Studies 3-4), and led to emotion-consistent behavior (Study 4). Our hypotheses were supported when we manipulated the expected value of anxiety (Study 1) and anger (Studies 2-5), both consciously (Studies 1-4) and unconsciously (Study 5). We discuss the theoretical and pragmatic implications of the proposed model. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Experiences with Railway Regulation in Great Britain and the Czech Republic – Round Table Report1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nash Chris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the Round Table was to compare British and Czech experiences with railway regulation and competition introduction and to determine which lessons can be learnt. Special attention was paid to the question of whether the very complex British reform can be an inspiration for further liberalisation of the railway sector in the Czech Republic or whether there are any reform mistakes that are best avoided. Based on two introductory presentations and subsequent plenary discussion, some consensus emerged. The participants agreed that there is no one-size-fits-all solution to railway regulation and that the introduction of competition should take into account the different circumstances of a particular country. Franchising in passenger operations in Britain successfully stimulated demand but also increased costs to the industry, so its implementation should be completed with care. It seems very unlikely that open-access competition would be a viable solution for the whole passenger rail market because it is limited to a few commercially attractive routes, and as Czech experience suggests, it creates many new problems. Finally, it was confirmed that a strong and dedicated regulator is needed in a newly liberalised environment in order to solve many emerging conflicts and disputes.

  16. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Central Venous Stenosis among Prevalent Hemodialysis Patients, a Single Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Osama O; El-Magzoub, Abdul-Rahman A; Elamin, Sarra

    2014-01-01

    Central vein stenosis (CVS) is a common complication of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. In this study we evaluated the prevalence and risk factors of CVS among hemodialysis (HD) patients in a single center in Sudan, using Doppler ultrasound as a screening tool. The study included 106 prevalent HD patients. For every patient, we performed Duplex Doppler for the right and left jugular, subclavian and femoral veins. A patient was considered to have hemodynamically significant stenosis if the pre-stenosis to the post-stenosis velocities ratio was ≥ 2.5 or they had complete vein occlusion. Overall, 28.3% of patients had Doppler detected CVS, including 25.5% with hemodynamically significant stenosis and 2.8% with compromised flow. The prevalence of CVS was 68.4% among symptomatic patients compared to 19.5% in asymptomatic patients. The prevalence of CVS among patients with history of 0-1, 2-3 and ≥ 4 central venous catheters was 3.4%, 29.4% and 53.8% respectively (p=0.00). CVS was not more common in patients with history of previous/current jugular or femoral vein catheterization compared to no catheter placement in these veins (28.3% vs 28.6% and 35% vs 26.7% respectively; p >0.1). However, CVS was significantly more common in patients with previous/ current subclavian vein catheterization compared to no catheter placement in this vein (47.8% vs 22.9%, p = 0.02). CVS is highly prevalent among studied HD patients, particularly in the presence of suggestive clinical signs. The number of HD catheter placements and subclavian vein utilization for dialysis access impose a significantly higher risk of CVS.

  17. Acrolein contributes to TRPA1 up-regulation in peripheral and central sensory hypersensitivity following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghyuck; Zheng, Lingxing; Acosta, Glen; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Chen, Zhe; Muratori, Breanne; Cao, Peng; Shi, Riyi

    2015-12-01

    Acrolein, an endogenous aldehyde, has been shown to be involved in sensory hypersensitivity after rat spinal cord injury (SCI), for which the pathogenesis is unclear. Acrolein can directly activate a pro-algesic transient receptor protein ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel that exists in sensory neurons. Both acrolein and TRPA1 mRNA are elevated post SCI, which contributes to the activation of TRPA1 by acrolein and consequently, neuropathic pain. In the current study, we further showed that, post-SCI elevation of TRPA1 mRNA exists not only in dorsal root ganglias but also in both peripheral (paw skin) and central endings of primary afferent nerves (dorsal horn of spinal cord). This is the first indication that pain signaling can be over-amplified in the peripheral skin by elevated expressions of TRPA1 following SCI, in addition over-amplification previously seen in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. Furthermore, we show that acrolein alone, in the absence of physical trauma, could lead to the elevation of TRPA1 mRNA at various locations when injected to the spinal cord. In addition, post-SCI elevation of TRPA1 mRNA could be mitigated using acrolein scavengers. Both of these attributes support the critical role of acrolein in elevating TRPA1 expression through gene regulation. Taken together, these data indicate that acrolein is likely a critical causal factor in heightening pain sensation post-SCI, through both the direct binding of TRPA1 receptor, and also by boosting the expression of TRPA1. Finally, our data also further support the notion that acrolein scavenging may be an effective therapeutic approach to alleviate neuropathic pain after SCI. We propose that the trauma-mediated elevation of acrolein causes neuropathic pain through at least two mechanisms: acrolein stimulates the production of transient receptor protein ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in both central and peripheral locations, and it activates TRPA1 channels directly. Therefore, acrolein appears to be a critical

  18. SURVEY OF DEMAND AND SUPPLY BALANCE IN LOAN MARKETS: CENTRAL BANK'S EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Naumenkova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the existing Bank Lending Survey (BLS approaches to the assessment of the non-price lending conditions' impact on the credit market balance. BLS responses provided domestic central banks an early and reliable signal about the deterioration of financing conditions and the financial access. The monitoring pattern stipulate by using the core indicators: net percentage, diffusion index, Bank Lending Tightness (BLT. The priority tasks for National Bank of Ukraine for Bank Lending Survey were put forward by author. Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey (SLOOS on Bank Lending Practices address changes in the supply of, and demand for, bank loans to businesses and households over the past months.

  19. Sensorimotor body-environment interaction serves to regulate emotional experience and exploratory behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dobricki

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Almost all living species regularly explore environments that they experience as pleasant, aversive, arousing or frightening. We postulate that such exploratory behavior and emotional experience both are regulated based on the interdependent perception of one’s body and stimuli that collectively define a spatial context such as a cliff. Here we examined this by testing if the interaction of the sensory input on one’s gait and the sensory input on the spatial context is modulating both the emotional experience of the environment and its exploration through head motion. To this end, we asked healthy humans to explore a life-sized Virtual Reality simulation of a forest glade by physically walking around in this environment on two narrow rectangular platforms connected by a plank. The platforms and the plank were presented such that they were either placed on ground or on the top of two high bridge piers. Hence, the forest glade was presented either as a “ground” or as a “height” context. Within these two spatial contexts the virtual plank was projected either on the rigid physical floor or onto a bouncy physical plank. Accordingly, the gait of our participants while they crossed the virtual plank was either “smooth” or “bouncy.” We found that in the height context bouncy gait compared to smooth gait increased the orientation of the head below the horizon and intensified the experience of the environment as negative. Whereas, within the ground context bouncy gait increased the orientation of the head towards and above the horizon and made that the environment was experienced as positive. Our findings suggest that the brain of healthy humans is using the interaction of the sensory input on their gait and the sensory input on the spatial context to regulate both the emotional experience of the environment and its exploration through head motion. Keywords: Neuroscience, Psychology

  20. The new institutionalist approaches to health care reform: lessons from reform experiences in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Michał

    2010-08-01

    This article discusses the applicability of the new institutionalism to the politics of health care reform in postcommunist Central Europe. The transition to a market economy and democracy after the fall of communism has apparently strengthened the institutional approaches. The differences in performance of transition economies have been critical to the growing understanding of the importance of institutions that foster democracy, provide security of property rights, help enforce contracts, and stimulate entrepreneurship. From a theoretical perspective, however, applying the new institutionalist approaches has been problematic. The transitional health care reform exposes very well some inherent weaknesses of existing analytic frameworks for explaining the nature and mechanisms of institutional change. The postcommunist era in Central Europe has been marked by spectacular and unprecedented radical changes, in which the capitalist system was rebuilt in a short span of time and the institutions of democracy became consolidated. Broad changes to welfare state programs were instituted as well. However, the actual results of the reform processes represent a mix of change and continuity, which is a challenge for the theories of institutional change.

  1. Central venous catheter placement by an interventional radiology unit: an australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. K. S.; Mossop, P. J.; Vrazas, J. I.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) placement carried out by an interventional radiology unit. A review of our hospital records identified 331 consecutive patients who underwent insertion of a tunnelled or non-tunnelled CVC between January 2000 and December 2004. Key outcome measures included the technical success rate of CVC insertion and the percentage of immediate ( 30 days) complications. A total of 462 CVCs were placed under radiological guidance, with an overall success rate of 98.9%. Immediate complications included one pneumothorax, which was diagnosed 7 days after subclavian CVC insertion, and eight episodes of significant haematoma or bleeding within 24 h of CVC insertion. No cases were complicated by arterial puncture or air embolus. Catheter-related sepsis occurred in 2% of non-tunnelled CVC and 8.9% of tunnelled CVC. The overall incidence of catheter-related sepsis was 0.17 per 100 catheter days. As the demand for chemotherapy and haemodialysis grows with our ageing population, interventional radiology suites are well placed to provide a safe and reliable service for the placement of central venous access devices

  2. NRC's experiment with plant personnel training: the acid test of self-regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, N.S.

    1985-01-01

    In February 1985, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an experiment with a form of nuclear utility self-regulation. The commissioners unanimously endorsed the nuclear utility industry's commitment to achieve self-improvement voluntarily in the area of training and qualification of nuclear plant personnel, and accepted that commitment as a basis for deferring rulemaking. In taking this action, the Commission may have signaled a marked departure from the post-Three Mile Island (TMI) era of prescriptive (and occasionally pedantic) regulatory practices to a new era of increased cooperation with nuclear utilities

  3. Arthroplasty of hip resection, handling with external fixation - Experience in the central military hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satizabal Azuero, Carlos E; Calderon Uribe, Oscar; Naquira Escobar, Luis F

    2006-01-01

    This is an observational retrospective study series of cases carried out between January 1998 and July 2004 in the central military hospital, 13 patients were treated with Girdlestone arthroplasty with external fixation, with a pursuit average of 53 months. Function, return to the daily activities and associate complications was evaluated. They were as complication; pain in the fixator site, osteitis, and fixator broke. All patients report at the end of the treatment no pain in the hip. Shortening in the patient without lenghting was 3,5 cm and in the group with lenghting was 1.5 cm. the obtained results demonstrate that Girdlestone arthroplasty with external fixation, is option, to improve the patient's pain and function of the hip

  4. Diffusion MR imaging with PSIF and SPLICE. Experiences in phantom studies and the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikoshi, Masato; Ueda, Takashi; Kaji, Yasushi

    2001-01-01

    Studies have shown that diffusion MR imaging is a reliable method for the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases, especially acute cerebral infarction. Although echo planar imaging (EPI) is a promising tool for that purpose, it is vulnerable to susceptibility artifacts that are responsible for image distortion or signal loss. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion MR imaging with PSIF (reversed fast imaging SSFP) and split acquisition of fast-spin-echo signals for diffusion imaging (SPLICE) in the central nervous system (CNS). First, PSIF and SPLICE were applied to the phantoms. Each phantom, including acetone, acetic acid, and water, was analyzed for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) based on SPLICE and for diffusion-related coefficient (DRC) based on PSIF. The ADCs based on SPLICE were 4.36±0.89 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, 1.25±0.04 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, and 2.35±0.04 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, and the DRCs based on PSIF were 0.353±0.25, 0.178±0.07, and 0.273±0.018 for acetone, acetic acid, and water, respectively. These calculated ADCs based on SPLICE were well correlated with known diffusion coefficients, showing a correlation coefficient of 0.995. Second, PSIF and SPLICE were applied to the CNS. The advantage of PSIF and SPLICE was that susceptibility artifacts were reduced in the images of spinal cord and brain stem. PSIF was especially useful for diffusion MR imaging in the spinal cord. The disadvantage of SPLICE was the decreased SN ratio. We conclude that PSIF or SPLICE may be helpful when EPI diffusion MR imaging is insufficient. (author)

  5. Involvement of Gaba and Cannabinoid Receptors in Central Food Intake Regulation in Neonatal Layer Chicks: Role of CB1 and Gabaa Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zendehdel

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Feeding behavior is regulated via a complex network which interacts via diverse signals from central and peripheral tissues. Endocannabinoids modulate release of GABA in a variety of regions of the central nervous system. Endocannabinoids and GABAergic system have an important role in the central regulation of appetite. Thus, the present study examines the possible interaction of central canabinoidergic and GABAergic systems on food intake in 3-h food-deprived (FD3 neonatal layer-type chicks. The results of this study showed that intracerebroventricular (ICV injection of 2-AG (2-Arachidonoylglycerol, selective CB1 receptors agonist, 2µg significantly increased food intake and this effect of 2-AG was attenuated by Picrotoxin (GABAA antagonist, 0.5µg (P0.05. Also, hyperphagic effect of CB65 (CB2 receptors agonist, 1.25µg was not affected by Picrotoxin or CGP54626 (p>0.05. Moreover, the food intake of chicks was significantly increased by ICV injection of GABAA agonist (Gaboxadol, 0.2 µg and SR141716A (CB1 receptors antagonist, 6.25µg significantly decreased Gaboxadol-induced hyperphagia (P0.05. These data showed there might be an interaction between central cannabinoidergic and GABAergic systems via CB1 and GABAA receptors in control of food intake in neonatal layer chicks.

  6. The calibration of the central electromagnetic calorimeter of UA1 proton-antiproton experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malosse, J.J.

    1987-03-01

    The most important result of the UA1 experiment at CERN has been the discovery of the weak intermediate vector bosons W + , W - and Z 0 . We describe the calibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter, which gives the signature of the electronic mode of desintegration of the intermediate bosons and measures their masses. We shall discuss this process and give some experimental results [fr

  7. The role of the regulator in promoting and evaluating safety culture. Operating experience feedback programme approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, S.

    2002-01-01

    Promoting and Evaluating Safety Culture (S.C.) in Operating Organizations must be one of the main Nuclear Regulator goals to achieve. This can be possible only if each and every one of the regulatory activities inherently involves S.C. It can be seen throughout attitudes, values, uses and practices in both individuals and the whole regulatory organization. One among all the regulatory tools commonly used by regulators to promote and evaluate the commitment of the licensees with safety culture as a whole involves organizational factors and particular attention is directed to the operating organization. This entailed a wide range of activities, including all those related with management of safety performance. Operating Experience Feedback Programme as a tool to enhance safety operation is particularly useful for regulators in the evaluation of the role of S.C. in operating organization. Safety Culture is recognized as a subset of the wider Organizational Culture. Practices that improve organizational effectiveness can also contribute to enhance safety. An effective event investigation methodology is a specific practice, which contributes to a healthy Safety Culture. (author)

  8. The GeoFlow experiment-spherical Rayleigh-Benard convection under the influence of an artificial central force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellert, M; Beltrame, P; Egbers, C

    2005-01-01

    Spherical Rayleigh-Benard convection under the influence of an artificial central force field produced by the so-called dielectrophoretic effect is studied as a simplified model of the flow in the outer earth core. The fluid motion there is most probably driving the earth's dynamo and the energy source for the earth's magnetic field. Studying convective flows in earth-like geometry could lead to a deeper understanding of the basics of these processes. This research is a preparatory study for the experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). A bifurcation-theoretical approach shows the existence of heteroclinic cycles between spherical modes (l, l + 1) for the non-rotating system. This behavior depends strong on the radius ratio of the spheres and will be hard to detect in the experiment. For slow rotations interactions of the azimuthal modes (m, m + 1) found in numerical simulations for supercritical states are supposed to be experimentally observable

  9. Production cavity and central optics for a light shining through a wall experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodajerdi, Reza

    2015-02-01

    The unexplained nature of dark matter and dark energy is a prominent reason for investigating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics (SM). Some extensions of the SM propose weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs). In an attempt to prove the existence of these particles, Light shining through the wall (LSW) experiments explore a very weak coupling between WISPs and photons (and viceversa). LSW experiments employ high-power lasers that provide a well defined flux of photons for the WISP-Photon conversion. The ALPS-I experiment at DESY in Hamburg was the first successful experiment with a high finesse optical resonator to enhance the laser power in a strong magnetic field in order to increase the photon to WISP conversion probability. The ALPS-II experimental concept adds a second optical cavity to also increase the reconversion probability. Both cavities are separated by a wall, amplify light at 1064 nm and share a common optical axis. Operating these two cavities inside 20 straightened HERA superconducting dipole magnets and using a transition edge sensor (TES) as a single photon detector will make the ALPS-II experiment almost three orders of magnitude more sensitive than its predecessor. Since photons, originating from reconverted WISPs in the regeneration cavity (RC) have 1064 nm wavelengths, the RC has to be locked to the production cavity (PC) with light of a different wavelength. Therefore frequency doubled PCs light will be used to lock the RC. This 532 nm light shall not arrive at the TES to prevent background noise. To achieve this, an optical attenuation system for wavelengths different from 1064 nm is required. In my thesis, the required attenuation was estimated and an optical setup was proposed and constructed and tested. It attenuates green photons by a factor of of 10 -18 and transmits 85% of the infrared photons. Furthermore the high finesse production cavity of ALPS-IIa was set up and characterized during this thesis. The PC reached

  10. [Central American migrants' sexual experiences and rights in their transit to the USA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, César; Silván, Rubén; Caballero, Marta; Campero, Lourdes

    2013-07-01

    To explore the causes and circumstances that determine the way in which migrants experience their sexuality and how this impacts their sexual rights. Qualitative study conducted between April 2009 and July 2010 in Chiapas, Oaxaca, San Luis Potosí, and Tamaulipas. We conducted 22 in-depth interviews to migrants in transit and to ten different key actors. For the analysis we used elements of grounded theory. Migrants know and identify the risks they may encounter in their transit but have scarce access to services to effectively exercise their sexual and reproductive rights. Their vulnerability makes them internalize and accept the violence enacted on them as part of their destiny and as what they must suffer in order to reach the USA. Violence, including sexual violence, determines much of the experiences of their transit through Mexico. Differences between groups and between male and female migrants are determined by gender inequalities and power.

  11. Experience in connecting the power generating units of thermal power plants to automatic secondary frequency regulation within the united power system of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A. V.; Komarov, A. N.; Safronov, A. N.; Barsukov, I. V.

    2009-01-01

    The principles of central control of the power generating units of thermal power plants by automatic secondary frequency and active power overcurrent regulation systems, and the algorithms for interactions between automatic power control systems for the power production units in thermal power plants and centralized systems for automatic frequency and power regulation, are discussed. The order of switching the power generating units of thermal power plants over to control by a centralized system for automatic frequency and power regulation and by the Central Coordinating System for automatic frequency and power regulation is presented. The results of full-scale system tests of the control of power generating units of the Kirishskaya, Stavropol, and Perm GRES (State Regional Electric Power Plants) by the Central Coordinating System for automatic frequency and power regulation at the United Power System of Russia on September 23-25, 2008, are reported.

  12. Job resources and recovery experiences to face difficulties in emotion regulations at work: a diary study among nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco-Donoso, L.M.; Garrosa, E.; Demerouti, E.; Moreno-Jiménez, B.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examines the role of daily difficulties in emotion regulation at work in nurse’s daily well-being and how certain job resources and recovery experiences influence this relationship. We hypothesized that daily difficulties to regulate emotions at work would be significantly and

  13. [LEGAL REGULATION OF TRANSPLANTOLOGY AT THE PRESENT STAGE: UKRAINIAN ISSUE AND EXPERIENCE OF FOREIGN STATES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovgyria, O

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the research is to analyze the legal regulation in the transplantology field at the present stage in Ukraine. To address identified challenges, the author investigates the foreign countries experience and suggests ways of improving certain mechanism for legal regulation in the field of organ transplantation and anatomical materials. The empiric material of the study included a wide range of legal instruments regulating this sphere of legal relationships, information regarding the problems of their application, statistics, expert analysis of Ukrainian and foreign researchers. Methodological mechanism of current research includes such methods: systematic, logical and formal, structural-functional, comparative. The research found that the most world's successful model for the organization of transplantation is in Spain. Additionally, the criteria for the reception of such a model are singled out as well as certain aspects of their application in Ukraine are analyzed. Particularly, the most important criteria are: universal and general territorial proliferation of national health systems; relevant economic resources (special attention is paid to the fact that transplantation is not a medicine of luxury, and an adequate compensation to hospitals for transplantation operations should serve as a main economic aspect); an adequate and necessary number of doctors and nurses; the availability of advanced technical options for medical mechanical ventilation (air conditioning of dead bodies). The research led to the following overall findings. Due to the rapid development of medical and biological sciences, there is an urgent need on further investigation of legal, moral and ethical, general medical aspects of transplantation with subsequent proposals for improving legislation in the field of human organs transplantation and other anatomical materials. At the same time, development of appropriate legislation by complex groups of cross-disciplinary specialists

  14. Experience of using heat citric acid disinfection method in central dialysis fluid delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Koji; Uchiumi, Nobuko; Sato, Sumihiko; Aida, Nobuhiko; Ishimatsu, Taketo; Igoshi, Tadaaki; Kodama, Yoshihiro; Hotta, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    We applied the heat citric acid disinfection method in the main part of the central dialysis fluid delivery system (MPCDDS), which consists of a multiple-patient dialysis fluid supply unit, dialysis console units, and dialysis fluid piping. This disinfection method has been used for single-patient dialysis machines, but this is the first trial in the MPCDDS. We examined, by points of safety and disinfection effect, whether this disinfection method is comparable to conventional disinfection methods in Japan. The conventional disinfection method is a combination of two disinfectants, sodium hypochlorite and acetic acid, used separately for protein removal and decalcification. Consequently, total microbial counts and endotoxin concentrations fully satisfied the microbiological requirements for standard dialysis fluid of ISO 11663. From our results and discussion, this heat citric acid disinfection method is proved to be safe and reliable for MPCDDS. However, to satisfy the microbiological requirements for ultrapure dialysis fluid, further consideration for this method in MPCDDS including the reverse osmosis device composition and piping is necessary.

  15. Central nervous system immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS: experience of a Mexican neurological centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Silva, Erik A; Ramírez-Crescencio, María A; Soto-Hernández, José Luís; Cárdenas, Graciela

    2012-09-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) restores the inflammatory immune response in AIDS patients and it may unmask previous subclinical infections or paradoxically exacerbate symptoms of opportunistic infections. Up to 25% of patients receiving HAART develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). We describe six patients with IRIS central nervous system (CNSIRIS) manifestations emphasizing the relevance of CSF cultures and neuroimaging in early diagnosis and management. Patients with CNSIRIS were identified among hospitalized HIV-infected patients that started HAART from January 2002 through December 2007 at a referral neurological center in Mexico. One-hundred and forty-two HIV-infected patients with neurological signs were hospitalized, 64 of which had received HAART, and six (9.3%) developed CNSIRIS. Five patients were male. Two cases of tuberculosis, two of cryptococcosis, one of brain toxoplasmosis, and one possible PML case were found. IRIS onset occurred within 12 weeks of HAART in five patients. Anti-infective therapy was continued. In one case, HAART was temporarily suspended. In long-term follow-up the clinical condition improved in all patients. CNSIRIS associated to opportunistic infections appeared in 9% of patients receiving HAART. Interestingly, no cases of malignancy or neoplasm IRIS-related were found. Frequent clinical assessment and neuroimaging studies supported diagnosis and treatment. Risk factors were similar to those found in other series. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pattern of Maxillofacial fracture in Western and Central Nepal: An experience in 3 tertiary level health institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Subedi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are only few studies regarding the pattern and causes of maxillofacial fractures till date in Nepal and no such study in western and central Nepalese population has been conducted. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to describe the causes and the pattern of maxillofacial fractures in western and central part of Nepal over the period of 5 years. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective analysis of maxillofacial fractures was conducted on 328 patients who were treated in the department of maxillofacial surgery. Data was extracted and analyzed based on age, sex, cause of injury and anatomic location. RESULT Young males of 3rd decade of life most commonly sustained the maxillofacial trauma. The commonest site involved was the zygomatic complex (42% when only mid face fractures was considered and parasymphysis (32% when only mandible was considered.The most common cause of injuries was road traffic accidents (289 patients; 88.1% followed by interpersonal violence (25 patients; 7.6 % and falls accounting for 4.2% of the all injuries. CONCLUSION The findings of this study suggest the need for expansion of the motorway network, ensuring compliance of strict traffic rules and regulations, replacing old vehicles without safety measures and implement school education in alcohol abuse.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i3.12771 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol-10, No-3, 8-13

  17. Comparison between the European Central Bank as a New Monetary Experiment and other Major - Central Banks - US Federal Reserve and Bank of Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tache I.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to make a survey of three major central banks practices and to emphasize both the different national characteristics and the similarities derived from the global changes of financial environment. Using a descriptive methodology, the comparison will concern the central banks’ goals, the institutional and organizational structures, strategies and tools of monetary policy

  18. Neurobiology of mother-infant interactions: experience and central nervous system plasticity across development and generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A S; O'Day, D H; Kraemer, G W

    1999-05-01

    The optimal coordination between the new mammalian mother and her young involves a sequence of behaviors on the part of each that ensures that the young will be adequately cared for and show healthy physical, emotional, and social development. This coordination is accomplished by each member of the relationship having the appropriate sensitivities and responses to cues that characterize the other. Among many mammalian species, new mothers are attracted to their infants' odors and some recognize them based on their odors; they also respond to their infants' vocalizations, thermal properties, and touch qualities. Together these cues ensure that the mother will nurse and protect the offspring and provide them with the appropriate physical and stimulus environment in which to develop. The young, in turn, orient to the mother and show a suckling pattern that reflects a sensitivity to the mothers odor, touch, and temperature characteristics. This article explores the sensory, endocrine, and neural mechanisms that underlie this early mother-young relationship, from the perspective of, first, the mother and, then, the young, noting the parallels between them. It emphasizes the importance of learning and plasticity in the formation and maintenance of the mother-young relationship and mediation of these experience effects by the brain and its neurochemistry. Finally, it discusses ways in which the infants' early experiences with their mothers (or the absence of these experiences) may come to influence how they respond to their own infants when they grow up, providing a psychobiological mechanism for the inter-generational transmission of parenting styles and responsiveness.

  19. French experience of regulation and operation on reprocessing facilities of LWR spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, J P [DES/SESUL (France)

    1992-02-01

    This presentation describes the French experience of regulation and operation on reprocessing facilities: how the safety assessment was made of UP3-A plant of the La Hague establishment for the building permit and operating license within the context of French nuclear regulations and the national debate on the need for reprocessing. Other factors discussed are how the public was involved, how the regulations were improved in the process and what the different stages of commissioning consisted of. In the design studies of a reprocessing facility, three complementary approaches are used: - observance of regulations born of technical considerations, and good practice, - analysis of the hazards, using deterministic and probabilistic methods, within the framework of a safety report, - review of experience feedback from such a facility or like plants. The design of the facility must permit the prevention of accidents and limit their consequences. Moreover, during all foreseeable cases (normal operating, incidents and accidents), the safety of the staff, the public and the environment with regard to consequences of radioactive releases and ionising radiations must be ensured. In the evaluation of these consequences, the approach used is voluntarily pessimistic in order to take into account every possible case. It is based on the main following principles: definition of the events considered for the dimensioning of the facility; redundancy and diversification; defense in depth which consists of the multiplication of the barriers. The experience feedback comes, on the one hand from operator's findings aiming at improving its facility, on the other hand from incidents, the lessons of which being taken into account after careful analysis. These incidents are analyzed by the Safety Authority upon presentation of the data by the operator and on site findings of inspections. In other respects, the aim of inspections is to check that the plant and its operating practices are

  20. Caries experience and use of dental services in rural and urban adults and older adults from central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, Maria E; Cáceres, Dante D; Soto, Alex; Mariño, Rodrigo J; Giacaman, Rodrigo A

    2014-10-01

    To determine whether there is a relationship between the use of dental services and caries experience in adults and older adults from central Chile. A sample of 453 adults, 35-44 years of age, and 438 older adults, 65-74 years of age, was interviewed and examined using World Health Organisation (WHO) methods. Sociodemographic variables were also registered. Caries experience was assessed using the Decayed, Missing and Filled teeth (DMFT) index. Multiple linear regression models were used to determine whether there was an association between the independent variables and caries experience. Caries prevalence was 99.6% for adults [DMFT score = 14.89 (±6.16)] and 99.8% for older adults [DMFT score = 25.68 (±6.49)]. Less than half of the population - 41.7% of adults and 31.5% of older adults - received dental care. Regardless of the age group, there were no differences in the DMFT score between those who received and those who did not receive attention (P > 0.05). When the DMFT findings were analysed in greater detail, people who received dental care and urban participants had more fillings (P dental damage from caries. Although rurality and use of services do not seem to affect caries experience, they are associated with differences in fillings and missing teeth. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  1. Wives' attitudes toward gender roles and their experience of intimate partner violence by husbands in Central Province, Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilleke, Achini; Poudel, Krishna C; Sakisaka, Kayako; Yasuoka, Junko; Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra; Jimba, Masamine

    2011-02-01

    The authors conducted a community based, cross-sectional study to describe the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) by husbands and the association between wives' attitudes toward gender roles and their experience of IPV in Central Province, Sri Lanka. This article included a representative sample of 624 wives between 15 and 49 years of age and examined the prevalence of physical, psychological, and sexual abuse. Then, using multivariate logistic regression analysis, the authors examined the association between wives' attitudes toward gender roles and IPV. Of the 624 wives, 36% had experienced at least one episode of physical, psychological, or sexual abuse by their husbands during their life time (ever abuse), and 19% had experienced such abuse during the past 12 months (current abuse). The wives were less likely to experience current abuse by husbands if they believed that "outsiders should not intervene to protect abused wives." They were more likely to experience ever and current isolated psychological abuse by husbands if they did not believe that "a good wife always obeys her husband." This study suggests that the prevalence of IPV is high in Sri Lanka. Although several published studies on IPV suggest that traditional gender role attitudes tend to increase women's vulnerability to IPV, this study suggests that in Sri Lanka, the wives who respect cultural norms tend to experience less IPV by husbands.

  2. Long-Term Experience with First-Generation Implantable Neurostimulation Device in Central Sleep Apnea Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Henrik; Bitter, Thomas; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) are associated with shorter survival in patients with heart failure. A novel treatment method for this patient group is unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation by the remedē® system (Respicardia Inc., Minnetonka, MN, USA), a transvenously implantable neurostimulation device, which has recently been studied in a large randomized, controlled trial. Previous literature has shown efficacy and safety of the treatment with this first-generation device, but hardly any data are available on long-term clinical parameters, the remedē® device's battery lifetime, device exchangeability, lead position stability, surgical accessibility, and manageability. We performed remedē® device replacements in consecutive patients for battery depletion, and documented clinical parameters, longevity, operation procedure, complications, and difficulties. All patients were on neurostimulation treatment by phrenic nerve neurostimulation when device replacement became necessary. Apnea-hypopnea index (from 45 ± 4/h to 9 ± 4/h), oxygen-desaturation index (from 35 ± 7/h to 7 ± 6/h), and time spent with oxygen saturation of ray documentation of stable lead positions in a long-term setting, no radiation or contrast dye usage was needed and no major complications occurred. In addition, clinical exercise capacity and sleepiness symptoms improved. Novel remedē® device shows sustained therapy efficacy and safety in terms of stable lead positions over 4 years. Long-term phrenic nerve neurostimulation therapy for central SDB/CSR appears feasible in a clinical routine setting. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Postfire responses of the woody flora of Central Chile: Insights from a germination experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-González, Susana; Paula, Susana; Cavieres, Lohengrin A; Pausas, Juli G

    2017-01-01

    Fire is a selective agent shaping plant traits and community assembly in fire-prone ecosystems. However, in ecosystems with no fire history, it can be a cause of land degradation when it is suddenly introduced by humans, as plant species may not be able to respond to such novel disturbance. Unlike other Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTE) of the world, natural fires have not been frequent during the Quaternary in the matorral of Central Chile, and thus, plant adaptive responses are expected to be uncommon. We evaluated the effect of heat shock on seed survival and germination of 21 native woody plants of the Chilean matorral and compiled information on smoke-stimulation and resprouting, to evaluate the importance of fire-adaptive responses in the context of the other MTE. We found that in the Chilean woody flora negative seed responses to fire cues were more frequent than positive responses. Although resprouting is a relatively widespread trait, fire-stimulated germination is not as common in the Chilean matorral as in other MTE. The seeds of seven endemic species were strongly damaged by fire cues and this should be considered in post-fire restoration planning. However, our results also showed that many species were resistant to elevated doses of heat shock and in some, germination was even stimulated. Thus, future research should focus on the evolutionary causes of these responses. These findings could help to develop strategies for fire management in the Chilean matorral. In addition, they will improve our understanding of the evolutionary forces that shaped this plant community and to better frame this region among the other MTE worldwide.

  4. Postfire responses of the woody flora of Central Chile: Insights from a germination experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Gómez-González

    Full Text Available Fire is a selective agent shaping plant traits and community assembly in fire-prone ecosystems. However, in ecosystems with no fire history, it can be a cause of land degradation when it is suddenly introduced by humans, as plant species may not be able to respond to such novel disturbance. Unlike other Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTE of the world, natural fires have not been frequent during the Quaternary in the matorral of Central Chile, and thus, plant adaptive responses are expected to be uncommon. We evaluated the effect of heat shock on seed survival and germination of 21 native woody plants of the Chilean matorral and compiled information on smoke-stimulation and resprouting, to evaluate the importance of fire-adaptive responses in the context of the other MTE. We found that in the Chilean woody flora negative seed responses to fire cues were more frequent than positive responses. Although resprouting is a relatively widespread trait, fire-stimulated germination is not as common in the Chilean matorral as in other MTE. The seeds of seven endemic species were strongly damaged by fire cues and this should be considered in post-fire restoration planning. However, our results also showed that many species were resistant to elevated doses of heat shock and in some, germination was even stimulated. Thus, future research should focus on the evolutionary causes of these responses. These findings could help to develop strategies for fire management in the Chilean matorral. In addition, they will improve our understanding of the evolutionary forces that shaped this plant community and to better frame this region among the other MTE worldwide.

  5. Characteristics of breast cancer patients with central nervous system metastases: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harputluoglu, Hakan; Dizdar, Omer; Aksoy, Sercan; Kilickap, Saadettin; Dede, Didem S; Ozisik, Yavuz; Guler, Nilufer; Barista, Ibrahim; Gullu, Ibrahim; Hayran, Mutlu; Selek, Ugur; Cengiz, Mustafa; Zorlu, Faruk; Tekuzman, Gulten; Altundag, Kadri

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of breast cancer patients with central nervous system (CNS) metastases and factors associated with survival after development of CNS metastasis. One-hundred-forty-four patients with brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Median age at the time of brain metastasis diagnosis was 48.9. Median time between initial diagnosis and development of brain metastasis was 36 months. Fourteen cases had leptomeningeal involvement. Twenty-two patients (15.3%) had single metastasis. Ten percent of the patients had surgery, 94% had radiotherapy and 63% had chemotherapy. Median survival after development of brain metastasis was 7.4 months. Survival of patients with single metastasis was significantly longer than those with multiple metastases (33.5 vs. 6.5 months, p = 0.0006). Survival of patients who received chemotherapy was significantly longer than those who received radiotherapy alone (9.9 vs. 2 months, p < 0.0001). In multivariate Cox regression analyses, presence of single metastasis and application of chemotherapy were the only significant factors associated with better survival (p = 0.047 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Age at initial diagnosis or at the time of brain metastasis, time from initial diagnosis to development of brain metastasis, menopausal status, tumor stage, grade, hormone receptor or HER2 status individually were not associated with survival. In this study, survival after the diagnosis of CNS metastases appeared to be affected by patient characteristics rather than biologic characteristics of the tumor. This is probably secondary to the lack of effective treatment options in these patients and overall poor prognosis.

  6. Manufacturing of central control system of 'JT-60' a plasma feasibility experiment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Ikuo; Kimura, Toyoaki; Murai, Katsuji; Iba, Daizo; Takemaru, Koichi.

    1984-01-01

    For constructing a critical-plasma-experiment apparatus JT-60, it was necessary to develop a new control system which enables to operate safely and smoothly a large scale nuclear fusion apparatus and to carry out efficient experiment. For the purpose, the total system control facility composed of such controllers as CAMAC system, timing system and protective interlock panel with multi-computer system as the core was developed. This system generalizes, keeps watch on and controls the total facilities as the key point of the control system of JT-60, and allows flexible operation control corresponding to the diversified experimental projects. At the same time, it carries out the fast real-time control of high temperature, high density plasma. In this paper, the system constitution, function and the main contents of development of the total system control facility are reported. JT-60 is constructed to attain the critical plasma condition as the premise of nuclear fusion reactors and to scientifically verify controlled nuclear fusion. Plasma expe riment will be started in April, 1985. The real-time control of plasma for carrying out high beta operation is planned, intending to develop future economical practical reactors. (Kako, I.)

  7. Central Administration of 1-Deoxynojirimycin Attenuates Hypothalamic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulates Food Intake and Body Weight in Mice with High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jongwan; Yun, Eun-Young; Quan, Fu-Shi; Park, Seung-Won; Goo, Tae-Won

    2017-01-01

    The α-glucosidase inhibitor, 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), is widely used for its antiobesity and antidiabetic effects. Researchers have demonstrated that DNJ regulates body weight by increasing adiponectin levels, which affects energy intake and prevents diet-induced obesity. However, the mechanism by which centrally administered DNJ exerts anorexigenic effects has not been studied until now. We investigated the effect of DNJ in the hypothalamus of mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity. Result...

  8. Oxytocin Signaling in Basolateral and Central Amygdala Nuclei Differentially Regulates the Acquisition, Expression, and Extinction of Context-Conditioned Fear in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Smith, Emma J.; Holmes, Nathan M.; Lingawi, Nura W.; Panayi, Marios C.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated how oxytocin (OT) signaling in the central (CeA) and basolateral (BLA) amygdala affects acquisition, expression, and extinction of context-conditioned fear (freezing) in rats. In the first set of experiments, acquisition of fear to a shocked context was impaired by a preconditioning infusion of synthetic OT into the…

  9. Male involvement in reproductive health among scheduled tribe: experience from Khairwars of central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kalyan B; Singh, Neeru; Chatterjee Saha, Uma; Roy, Jyotirmoy

    2007-01-01

    Indian tribal men's lack of participation in reproductive health not only damages their own health, but also contributes to the reproductive ill health of their female partners and children. In India the involvement of men in such matters is a new concept. There is a paucity of data particularly on Scheduled tribesmen's knowledge and the extent of their participation in reproductive health. This inhibits planning. The present study aims to understand the involvement of Scheduled tribesmen in reproductive health and the barriers to their involvement by generating a database from the Khairwar tribe of Central India. A door-to-door survey on knowledge, attitude and practice relating to aspects of reproductive health was conducted by canvassing a pre-designed interview schedule among 15-40 year old, currently married Khairwar males in the Sidhi district of Madhya Pradesh, India. As far as reproductive morbidity is concerned, only 17% of the respondents had heard of HIV/AIDS, and most had no proper knowledge of its transmission. Although 74% of the respondents had heard about reproductive tract infections, the majority of them were unaware of the mechanism of transmission and seriousness of the problem. The duel role of condoms, both as a method of family planning and a protective measure against sexually transmitted infections, was also unknown to them. Approximately 59% of the males were aware of family planning but only 13% were using any method (mostly female sterilization) at the time of survey. Their view on the ideal number of children (3.56) exceeded the actual number of children born and living. High infant and child mortality influenced their preference for higher fertility. Very few among them (29%) had knowledge of antenatal care. They expressed faulty knowledge, myths and unhelpful attitudes towards sexual health matters. The study revealed the male Scheduled tribe population's lack of knowledge and misinformation regarding male sexual health issues, the

  10. Experience in well logging study of Eocene deposits at the territory of Central and West Azerbaijan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, G.Ya.; Makhmudova, V.M.; Agabekova, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    Experience of investigation of Eocene deposits in Azerbaijan by well-logging methods (WLM), including gamma-logging (GL), neutron gamma-logging (NGL), gamma-gamma logging (GGL), is generalized. Clay rocks are characterized by the maximal NGL and GL values, tuff sandstones - by the average NGL values. NGL and GGL data are used to determine porosity of strata. Complex interpretation of WLM data enables to obtain reliable evaluations of lithology, porosity and oil saturation of Eocene rocks. Algorithm of quantitative interpretation of WLM materials is suggested. Efficiency of WLM interpretation was equal to 95 %. Since the suggested algorithm is formalized completely, it can be realized in systems of complex WLM interpretation by computer

  11. Responding to abuse: Children's experiences of child protection in a central district, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Jennifer Christine; Naker, Dipak; Horton, Jennifer; Walakira, Eddy Joshua; Devries, Karen M

    2014-10-01

    Part of a comprehensive response to violence against children involves child protection systems, but there are few data available on such systems in low-income countries. This study describes the characteristics and help seeking behavior of children referred to local child protection services and the quality of the first-line response in one district in Uganda. Participants included 3,706 children from 42 primary schools who participated in a baseline survey on violence as part of the Good Schools Study (NCT01678846, clinicaltrial.gov). Children who disclosed violence were referred according to predefined criteria based on the type, severity, and timeframe of their experiences. Children were followed up to 4 months after the study ended. First-line responses by receiving agencies were classified into 3 categories: plan for action only, some action taken, and no plan and no action taken. Appropriateness of responses was based on which agency responded, timeliness of the response, quality of the documentation, and final status of the case. From the baseline survey, 529 children (14%) were referred. Girls were more likely to be referred and to meet the criteria for a serious case (9% girls, 4% boys). In total, 104 referrals (20%) had some kind of concrete action taken, but only 20 (3.8%) cases met all criteria for having received an adequate response. Nearly half (43%) of referred children had ever sought help by disclosing their experiences of violence prior to the baseline survey. In our study areas, the first-line response to children's reports of abuse was poor even though some referral structures are in place. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Developmental consequences of early parenting experiences: self-recognition and self-regulation in three cultural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Heidi; Yovsi, Relindis; Borke, Joern; Kärtner, Joscha; Jensen, Henning; Papaligoura, Zaira

    2004-01-01

    This study relates parenting of 3-month-old children to children's self-recognition and self-regulation at 18 to 20 months. As hypothesized, observational data revealed differences in the sociocultural orientations of the 3 cultural samples' parenting styles and in toddlers' development of self-recognition and self-regulation. Children of Cameroonian Nso farmers who experience a proximal parenting style develop self-regulation earlier, children of Greek urban middle-class families who experience a distal parenting style develop self-recognition earlier, and children of Costa Rican middle-class families who experience aspects of both distal and proximal parenting styles fall between the other 2 groups on both self-regulation and self-recognition. Results are discussed with respect to their implications for culturally informed developmental pathways.

  13. Nursing and midwifery regulation and HIV scale-up: establishing a baseline in East, Central and Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carey F; Voss, Joachim; Verani, Andre R; Vidot, Peggy; Salmon, Marla E; Riley, Patricia L

    2013-03-25

    Shifting HIV treatment tasks from physicians to nurses and midwives is essential to scaling-up HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa. Updating nursing and midwifery regulations to include task shifting and pre-service education reform can help facilitate reaching new HIV targets. Donor-supported initiatives to update nursing and midwifery regulations are increasing. However, there are gaps in our knowledge of current practice and education regulations and a lack of information to target and implement regulation strengthening efforts. We conducted a survey of national nursing and midwifery councils to describe current nursing and midwifery regulations in 13 African countries. A 30-item survey was administered to a convenience sample of 13 national nursing and midwifery regulatory body leaders in attendance at the PEPFAR-supported African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative meeting in Nairobi, Kenya on 28 February, 2011. The survey contained questions on task shifting and regulations such as registration, licensure, scope of practice, pre-service education accreditation, continuing professional development and use of international guidelines. Survey data were analyzed to present country-level, comparative and regional findings. Task shifting to nurses and midwives was reported in 11 of the 13 countries. Eight countries updated their scope of practice within the last five years; only one reported their regulations to reflect task shifting. Countries vary with regard to licensure, pre-service accreditation and continuing professional development regulations in place. There was no consistency in terms of what standards were used to design national practice and education regulations. Many opportunities exist to assist countries to modernise regulations to incorporate important advancements from task shifting and pre-service reform. Appropriate, revised regulations can help sustain successful health workforce strategies and contribute to further scale-up HIV services

  14. Challenges in understanding, modelling, and mitigating Lake Outburst Flood Hazard: experiences from Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergili, Martin; Schneider, Demian; Andres, Norina; Worni, Raphael; Gruber, Fabian; Schneider, Jean F.

    2010-05-01

    Lake Outburst Floods can evolve from complex process chains like avalanches of rock or ice that produce flood waves in a lake which may overtop and eventually breach glacial, morainic, landslide, or artificial dams. Rising lake levels can lead to progressive incision and destabilization of a dam, to enhanced ground water flow (piping), or even to hydrostatic failure of ice dams which can cause sudden outflow of accumulated water. These events often have a highly destructive potential because a large amount of water is released in a short time, with a high capacity to erode loose debris, leading to a powerful debris flow with a long travel distance. The best-known example of a lake outburst flood is the Vajont event (Northern Italy, 1963), where a landslide rushed into an artificial lake which spilled over and caused a flood leading to almost 2000 fatalities. Hazards from the failure of landslide dams are often (not always) fairly manageable: most breaches occur in the first few days or weeks after the landslide event and the rapid construction of a spillway - though problematic - has solved some hazardous situations (e.g. in the case of Hattian landslide in 2005 in Pakistan). Older dams, like Usoi dam (Lake Sarez) in Tajikistan, are usually fairly stable, though landsildes into the lakes may create floodwaves overtopping and eventually weakening the dams. The analysis and the mitigation of glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) hazard remains a challenge. A number of GLOFs resulting in fatalities and severe damage have occurred during the previous decades, particularly in the Himalayas and in the mountains of Central Asia (Pamir, Tien Shan). The source area is usually far away from the area of impact and events occur at very long intervals or as singularities, so that the population at risk is usually not prepared. Even though potentially hazardous lakes can be identified relatively easily with remote sensing and field work, modeling and predicting of GLOFs (and also

  15. MOLE: A Multidisciplinary Observatory and Laboratory of Experiments in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Dresen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure and mechanics of active Low Angle Normal Faults (LANFs have for decades b s been posing questions—in particular, if low angle normal faults accommodate crustal extension, and if they generate large magnitude earthquakes, or if they move aseismically. To shed new light on these challenging questions, MOLE intends to drill (down to 4–5 km an active LANF in the Umbria-Marche sector of the northern Apennines (Fig. 1 and to establish a deep borehole observatory. The target site offers a unique opportunity to reach a LANF at drillable seismogenic depth to unravel the “low angle normal fault mechanical paradox” (Wernicke, 1995; Axen, 2007. In order to discuss the scientific background and plan the MOLE project, ixty-two scientists from various research fields attended an international workshop in Spoleto, Italy, on 5–8 May 2008. The workshop focused on the following goals that need to be achieved: (I to collect new observational data at depth for constraining the fault zone structure; (II to perform laboratory experiments with gouge and fault zone materials to understand frictional properties and weakeningmechanisms; (III to record microearthquakes at distance comparable to the source radius, and (IV to obtain stress and strain measurements and geochemical data in and near the fault zone at depth to understand the mechanics of earthquakes and faulting.

  16. Patient Experiences of Decentralized HIV Treatment and Care in Plateau State, North Central Nigeria: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace O. Kolawole

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Decentralization of care and treatment for HIV infection in Africa makes services available in local health facilities. Decentralization has been associated with improved retention and comparable or superior treatment outcomes, but patient experiences are not well understood. Methods. We conducted a qualitative study of patient experiences in decentralized HIV care in Plateau State, north central Nigeria. Five decentralized care sites in the Plateau State Decentralization Initiative were purposefully selected. Ninety-three patients and 16 providers at these sites participated in individual interviews and focus groups. Data collection activities were audio-recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were inductively content analyzed to derive descriptive categories representing patient experiences of decentralized care. Results. Patient participants in this study experienced the transition to decentralized care as a series of “trade-offs.” Advantages cited included saving time and money on travel to clinic visits, avoiding dangers on the road, and the “family-like atmosphere” found in some decentralized clinics. Disadvantages were loss of access to ancillary services, reduced opportunities for interaction with providers, and increased risk of disclosure. Participants preferred decentralized services overall. Conclusion. Difficulty and cost of travel remain a fundamental barrier to accessing HIV care outside urban centers, suggesting increased availability of community-based services will be enthusiastically received.

  17. INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS OF STATE REGULATION OF SOCIO-ECONOMIC RESPONSIBILITY OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP: EXPERIENCE FOR UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Batchenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the study is the socio-economic aspects of the social responsibility of business (CSR in 4 countries. The purpose of the article is to study the experience in regulating the socio-economic responsibility of entrepreneurship in the United States, Sweden, India, and China to determine the direction of formation of the state mechanism of socio-economic responsibility of entrepreneurship (SERE in Ukraine. The methodology of the article became theoretical researches of foreign scientists, their synthesis, systematization, and analysis for the development of the application of experience in Ukrainian realities. The analysis showed how different states of CSR policy differ in each of these countries and made it possible to draw conclusions about the application in Ukraine. So, the experience of Sweden is useful in reviewing the social reporting obligation, as well as the experience of China. In the case of the USA, the role of the state in regulating CSRs in enterprises should be noted but, at the same time, the significant social consciousness of American entrepreneurs as recognized philanthropists, who are actively introducing ethical codes and key stewards from the implementation of CSR, are seen by society and aimed at improving the well-being of society. In China, the government plays an important role in the implementation of CSR for state-owned enterprises. In addition, laws are adopted to improve the rights of employees, to equalize gender differences, to increase the level of production, quality of products, which leads to an improvement in the quality of life of the country’s population. All this becomes relevant for Ukraine and can be used in our country as well. Indian experience draws attention through the adoption of a unique decision on the indifference of charity activities by Indian companies with a certain level of profit and the adoption of them by the rules of corporate social responsibility. In entrepreneurship

  18. The central drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector - implementation into the experiment and study of its properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    At the Bonn accelerator facility ELSA the large solid angle detector SAPHIR was built for the investigation of photon induced reactions. A main component of SAPHIR is the central drift chamber (CDC) matching the magneto gap of 1m 3 . The diameter of the in total 1828 hexagonal drift cells is about 18 mm. The subject of this paper is the implementation of the CDC in the experiment. After the description of the hardware follows the presentation of the software tools for filtering and monitoring the data, which have been developed and tested. An algorithm for extracting the space time relationship is presented. The properties of the chamber with an improved gas mixture (Helium/Neon/Isobutane8 21.25:63.75:15) have been investigated. A spatial resolution of about 200 μm was achieved. The efficiency of the chamber is 97% at a tagged photon of 5x10 4 per second crossing the chamber. (orig.) [de

  19. EU Enlargement: Migration flows from Central and Eastern Europe into the Nordic countries - exploiting a natural experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.; Pytlikova, Mariola

    In this paper we look at migration flows from 10 Central and Eastern European Countries (CEEC) to 5 Nordic countries over the years 1985 - 2007. We exploit a natural experiment that arose from the fact that while Sweden opened its labour market from the day one of the 2004 EU enlargement......, and Finland and Iceland from year 2006, the other Nordic countries chose a transition period in relation to the "new" EU members. The results based on a differences-in-differences estimator show that the estimated effect of the opening of the Swedish, Finnish and Icelandic labour markets on migration from...... the CEECs that entered the EU in 2004 is not significantly different from zero. However, the effect of the opening of the Swedish and Finnish labour markets in 2007 on migration from the 2007 EU entrants, Bulgaria and Romania, is significantly positive. Further, we are interested in the overall effect...

  20. EU Enlargement: Migration flows from Central and Eastern Europe into the Nordic countries - exploiting a natural experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pytlikova, Mariola; Pedersen, Peder J.

    We look at migration flows from 8 Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs) to 5 Nordic countries over the years 1985 - 2005 and we can exploit a natural experiment that arose from the fact that while Sweden opened its labour market from the day one of the 2004 EU enlargement, the other Nordic...... countries chose a transition period in relation to the "new" EU members. We employ a differences-in-differences estimator in our analysis. The results show that the estimated effect of the opening of Swedish labour market in 2004 on migration is insignificantly different from zero. Further, we...... are interested in the overall effect of the "EU entry" on migration. Therefore we look at migration flows from CEECs during the first round EU enlargement towards CEECs in 2004 and compare them with migration flows from Bulgaria and Romania. We again used a DD estimator in our analysis. The estimated effect...

  1. Report on the Regulators Experience of NDT Qualification for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    In November 1992, the Nuclear Regulators Working Group (NRWG) decided to set up a task force on qualification of non-destructive testing (NDT) systems for pre and in-service inspection of light water reactors. The first task was to agree on the philosophy and principles governing the qualification of techniques, equipment, software, procedures, and personnel for NDT to be used for the inspection of structural components that are important to safety in nuclear power plants; and to establish a common view on essential aspects of NDT qualifications. The first task, which also included a comparison of the common views of the European regulators with the qualification approach outlined in Appendix VIII to Section XI of the ASME Code, was completed in 1996. The result was published in the report ''Common position of European regulators on qualification of NDT systems for pre- and in-service inspection of light water reactor components''2. In parallel, the European nuclear power industries had set up a working group, the European Network for Inspection Qualification (ENIQ), to discuss and agree on how to perform inspection qualifications. In 1995, ENIQ finalized its first version of ''European methodology for qualification of non-destructive tests''3. A second version 4 was then published in 1997. This second version is in relatively close agreement with the principles given in the regulators common position document. With these two basic documents, a platform was established for the further development of qualification strategies in the European countries. The second task of the NRWG Task Force was to follow and evaluate the first ENIQ pilot study from a regulatory point of view. The objective of this pilot study was to explore ways of how to apply the European qualification methodology and to test its feasibility. The pilot study commenced late 1996 and was planned to be finalized a year later. Depending on unforeseen difficulties, the pilot study has been delayed

  2. Regulation of glycogen metabolism by the CRE-1, RCO-1 and RCM-1 proteins in Neurospora crassa. The role of CRE-1 as the central transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Virgilio, Stela; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Candido, Thiago de Souza; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2015-04-01

    The transcription factor CreA/Mig1/CRE-1 is a repressor protein that regulates the use of alternative carbon sources via a mechanism known as Carbon Catabolite Repression (CCR). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mig1 recruits the complex Ssn6-Tup1, the Neurospora crassa RCM-1 and RCO-1 orthologous proteins, respectively, to bind to promoters of glucose-repressible genes. We have been studying the regulation of glycogen metabolism in N. crassa and the identification of the RCO-1 corepressor as a regulator led us to investigate the regulatory role of CRE-1 in this process. Glycogen content is misregulated in the rco-1(KO), rcm-1(RIP) and cre-1(KO) strains, and the glycogen synthase phosphorylation is decreased in all strains, showing that CRE-1, RCO-1 and RCM-1 proteins are involved in glycogen accumulation and in the regulation of GSN activity by phosphorylation. We also confirmed the regulatory role of CRE-1 in CCR and its nuclear localization under repressing condition in N. crassa. The expression of all glycogenic genes is misregulated in the cre-1(KO) strain, suggesting that CRE-1 also controls glycogen metabolism by regulating gene expression. The existence of a high number of the Aspergillus nidulans CreA motif (5'-SYGGRG-3') in the glycogenic gene promoters led us to analyze the binding of CRE-1 to some DNA motifs both in vitro by DNA gel shift and in vivo by ChIP-qPCR analysis. CRE-1 bound in vivo to all motifs analyzed demonstrating that it down-regulates glycogen metabolism by controlling gene expression and GSN phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Review of operational experience with the gas-cooled Magnox reactors of the United Kingdom Central Electricity Generating Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cave, L.; Clarke, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper provides a review, which is mainly of a statistical nature, of 260 reactor years of operating experience which the (United Kingdom) Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has obtained with its gas-cooled, graphite moderated Magnox reactors. The main emphasis in the review is on safety rather than on availability. Data are provided on the overall incidence and frequencies of faults and it is shown that the plant items which are predominantly responsible for recorded faults are the gas circulators and the turbo-alternators. Analysis of the reactor trip experience shows that the incidence of events which necessitate an automatic shutdown of the reactor has been about one per reactor year and that of other events leading to a reactor trip has not been much higher (1.4 per reactor year). As would be expected from the length of the operating experience, some relatively rare events have occurred (expected frequency 10 -2 per reactor year, or less) but on each occasion the reactor shutdown system and decay heat removal systems functioned satisfactorily. No overheating of, or damage to, the fuel occurred as a result of these rare events or of other, more frequent, faults. Analysis of the trend of failure rates has shown an improvement with time in nearly all safety-related items and external inspection of the primary coolant circuits has shown no significant deterioration with time. However, some derating of the reactors has been necessary to reduce the effects of oxidation of mild steel in CO 2 , in order to obtain optimum service lives. In spite of major differences between the systems, a comparison of the failure rates of analogous systems and plant items in PWRs and the Magnox reactors show a considerable similarity. Overall, the review of CEGB's operational experience with its Magnos reactors has shown that the frequencies of faults in systems and plant items has been satisfyingly low. (author)

  4. Investigations of the role of nonlinear couplings in structure formation and transport regulation: Experiment, simulation, and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, C.; Kim, E.J.; Champeaux, S.; Gurcan, O.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Diamond, P.H.; Tynan, G.R.; Nevins, W.; Candy, J.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the physics of shear flow and structure formation in plasmas is a central problem for the advancement of magnetic fusion because of the roles such flows are believed to play in regulating turbulence and transport levels. In this paper, we report on integrated experimental, computational, and theoretical studies of sheared zonal flows and radially extended convective cells, with the aim of assessing the results of theory experiment and theory-simulation comparisons. In particular, simulations are used as test beds for verifying analytical predictions and demonstrating the suitability of techniques such as bispectral analysis for isolating nonlinear couplings in data. Based on intriguing initial results suggesting increased levels of nonlinear coupling occur during L-H transitions, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of bispectral quantities in fluid and gyrokinetic simulations, and compared these results with theoretical expectations. Topics of study include locality and directionality of energy transfer, amplitude scaling, and parameter dependences. Techniques for inferring nonlinear coupling coefficients from data are discussed, and initial results from experimental data are presented. Future experimental studies are motivated. We also present work investigating the role of structures in transport. Analysis of simulation data indicates that the turbulent heat flux can be represented as an ensemble of 'heat pulses' of varying sizes, with a power law distribution. The slope of the power law is shown to determine global transport scaling (i.e. Bohm or gyro-Bohm). Theoretical work studying the dynamics of the largest cells (termed 'streamers') is presented, as well as results from ongoing analysis studying connections between heat pulse distribution and bispectral quantities. (author)

  5. BolA Is Required for the Accurate Regulation of c-di-GMP, a Central Player in Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Ricardo N.; Dressaire, Clémentine; Barahona, Susana; Galego, Lisete; Kaever, Volkhard; Jenal, Urs; Arraiano, Cecília M.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is a nearly ubiquitous intracellular signaling molecule involved in the transition from the motile to the sessile/biofilm state in bacteria. C-di-GMP regulates various cellular processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. BolA is a transcription factor that promotes survival in different stresses and is also involved in biofilm formation. Both BolA and c-di-GMP participate in the regulation of motility mechanisms...

  6. Eliciting preferences for waterpipe tobacco smoking using a discrete choice experiment: implications for product regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Maziak, Wasim; Hammond, David; Nakkash, Rima; Islam, Farahnaz; Cheng, Xi; Thrasher, James F

    2015-09-09

    Waterpipe smoking is highly prevalent among university students, and has been increasing in popularity despite mounting evidence showing it is harmful to health. The aim of this study was to measure preferences for waterpipe smoking and determine which product characteristics are most important to smokers. A large university in the Southeastern USA. Adult waterpipe smokers attending the university (N=367). Participants completed an Internet-based discrete choice experiment to reveal their preferences for, and trade-offs between, the attributes of hypothetical waterpipe smoking sessions. Participants were presented with waterpipe lounge menus, each with three fruit-flavoured options and one tobacco flavoured option, in addition to an opt out option. Nicotine content and price were provided for each choice. Participants were randomised to either receive menus with a text-only health-warning message or no message. Multinomial and nested logit models were used to estimate the impact on consumer choice of attributes and between-subject assignment of health warnings respectively. On average, participants preferred fruit-flavoured varieties to tobacco flavour. They were averse to options labelled with higher nicotine content. Females and non-smokers of cigarettes were more likely than their counterparts to prefer flavoured and nicotine-free varieties. Participants exposed to a health warning were more likely to opt out. Fruit-flavoured tobacco and lower nicotine content labels, two strategies widely used by the industry, increase the demand for waterpipe smoking among young adults. Waterpipe-specific regulation should limit the availability of flavoured waterpipe tobacco and require accurate labelling of constituents. Waterpipe-specific tobacco control regulation, along with research to inform policy, is required to curb this emerging public health threat. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  7. The central governor model of exercise regulation teaches us precious little about the nature of mental fatigue and self-control failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eInzlicht

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-control is considered broadly important for many domains of life. One of its unfortunate features, however, is that it tends to wane over time, with little agreement about why this is the case. Recently, there has been a push to address this problem by looking to the literature in exercise physiology, specifically the work on the central governor model of physical fatigue. Trying to explain how and why mental performance wanes over time, the central governor model suggests that exertion is throttled by some central nervous system mechanism that receives information about energetic bodily needs and motivational drives to regulate exertion and, ultimately, to prevent homeostatic breakdown, chiefly energy depletion. While we admire the spirit of integration and the attempt to shed light on an important topic in psychology, our concern is that the central governor model is very controversial in exercise physiologists, with increasing calls to abandon it altogether, making it a poor fit for psychology. Our concerns are threefold. First, while we agree that preservation of bodily homeostasis makes for an elegant ultimate account, the fact that such important homeostatic concerns can be regularly overturned with even slight incentives (e.g., a smile renders the ultimate account impotent and points to other ultimate functions for fatigue. Second, despite the central governor being thought to take as input information about the metabolic needs of the body, there is no credible evidence that mental effort actually consumes inordinate amounts of energy that are not already circulating in the brain. Third, recent modifications of the model make the central governor appear like an all-knowing homunculus and unfalsifiable in principle, thus contributing very little to our understanding of why people tend to disengage from effortful tasks over time. We note that the latest models in exercise physiology have actually borrowed concepts and models from

  8. Transplanting a Western-Style Journalism Education to the Central Asian Republics of the Former Soviet Union: Experiences and Challenges at the American University of Central Asia in Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skochilo, Elena; Toralieva, Gulnura; Freedman, Eric; Shafer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Western standards of journalism education, as well as western professional journalistic practices, have had difficulty taking root in the five independent countries of formerly Soviet Central Asia. This essay examines the experience of one university's Department of Journalism and Mass Communication since 1997 and the challenges it faces,…

  9. Central Administration of 1-Deoxynojirimycin Attenuates Hypothalamic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulates Food Intake and Body Weight in Mice with High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwan; Yun, Eun-Young; Quan, Fu-Shi; Park, Seung-Won; Goo, Tae-Won

    2017-01-01

    The α -glucosidase inhibitor, 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), is widely used for its antiobesity and antidiabetic effects. Researchers have demonstrated that DNJ regulates body weight by increasing adiponectin levels, which affects energy intake and prevents diet-induced obesity. However, the mechanism by which centrally administered DNJ exerts anorexigenic effects has not been studied until now. We investigated the effect of DNJ in the hypothalamus of mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity. Results showed that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DNJ reduced hypothalamic ER stress, which activated the leptin-induced Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway to cause appetite suppression. We conclude that DNJ may reduce obesity by moderating feeding behavior and ER stress in the hypothalamic portion of the central nervous system (CNS).

  10. Central Administration of 1-Deoxynojirimycin Attenuates Hypothalamic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulates Food Intake and Body Weight in Mice with High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongwan Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The α-glucosidase inhibitor, 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ, is widely used for its antiobesity and antidiabetic effects. Researchers have demonstrated that DNJ regulates body weight by increasing adiponectin levels, which affects energy intake and prevents diet-induced obesity. However, the mechanism by which centrally administered DNJ exerts anorexigenic effects has not been studied until now. We investigated the effect of DNJ in the hypothalamus of mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity. Results showed that intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of DNJ reduced hypothalamic ER stress, which activated the leptin-induced Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3 signaling pathway to cause appetite suppression. We conclude that DNJ may reduce obesity by moderating feeding behavior and ER stress in the hypothalamic portion of the central nervous system (CNS.

  11. Regulation of Say on Pay: Engineering Incentives for Executives and Directors – Experiences from the United States and Implications for Regulation in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    The debate about the compensation of executives and directors is a discussion about incentives and agency costs. This article analyzes basic tools to reduce agency costs and also assesses the ongoing debate about the future regulation of the compensation of executives and directors. It draws upon legislative experience from the United States. Recently proposed legislation in Switzerland attempts to empower shareholders with the draft of the Swiss Code of Obligations (CO). The main motivation ...

  12. GP supervisors' experience in supporting self-regulated learning: a balancing act

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagasser, M.H.; Kramer, A.W.M.; Weel, C. van; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Self-regulated learning is essential for professional development and lifelong learning. As self-regulated learning has many inaccuracies, the need to support self-regulated learning has been recommended. Supervisors can provide such support. In a prior study trainees reported on the variation in

  13. GP Supervisors' Experience in Supporting Self-Regulated Learning: A Balancing Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H.; Kramer, Anneke W. M.; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Self-regulated learning is essential for professional development and lifelong learning. As self-regulated learning has many inaccuracies, the need to support self-regulated learning has been recommended. Supervisors can provide such support. In a prior study trainees reported on the variation in received supervisor support. This study aims at…

  14. CREB Regulates Experience-Dependent Spine Formation and Enlargement in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabella Pignataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience modifies synaptic connectivity through processes that involve dendritic spine rearrangements in neuronal circuits. Although cAMP response element binding protein (CREB has a key function in spines changes, its role in activity-dependent rearrangements in brain regions of rodents interacting with the surrounding environment has received little attention so far. Here we studied the effects of vibrissae trimming, a widely used model of sensory deprivation-induced cortical plasticity, on processes associated with dendritic spine rearrangements in the barrel cortex of a transgenic mouse model of CREB downregulation (mCREB mice. We found that sensory deprivation through prolonged whisker trimming leads to an increased number of thin spines in the layer V of related barrel cortex (Contra in wild type but not mCREB mice. In the barrel field controlling spared whiskers (Ipsi, the same trimming protocol results in a CREB-dependent enlargement of dendritic spines. Last, we demonstrated that CREB regulates structural rearrangements of synapses that associate with dynamic changes of dendritic spines. Our findings suggest that CREB plays a key role in dendritic spine dynamics and synaptic circuits rearrangements that account for new brain connectivity in response to changes in the environment.

  15. BolA Is Required for the Accurate Regulation of c-di-GMP, a Central Player in Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ricardo N; Dressaire, Clémentine; Barahona, Susana; Galego, Lisete; Kaever, Volkhard; Jenal, Urs; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2017-09-19

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is a nearly ubiquitous intracellular signaling molecule involved in the transition from the motile to the sessile/biofilm state in bacteria. C-di-GMP regulates various cellular processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. BolA is a transcription factor that promotes survival in different stresses and is also involved in biofilm formation. Both BolA and c-di-GMP participate in the regulation of motility mechanisms leading to similar phenotypes. Here, we establish the importance of the balance between these two factors for accurate regulation of the transition between the planktonic and sessile lifestyles. This balance is achieved by negative-feedback regulation of BolA and c-di-GMP. BolA not only contributes directly to the motility of bacteria but also regulates the expression of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases. This expression modulation influences the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP, while this signaling metabolite has a negative influence in bolA mRNA transcription. Finally, we present evidence of the dominant role of BolA in biofilm, showing that, even in the presence of elevated c-di-GMP levels, biofilm formation is reduced in the absence of BolA. C-di-GMP is one of the most important bacterial second messengers involved in several cellular processes, including virulence, cell cycle regulation, biofilm formation, and flagellar synthesis. In this study, we unravelled a direct connection between the bolA morphogene and the c-di-GMP signaling molecule. We show the important cross-talk that occurs between these two molecular regulators during the transition between the motile/planktonic and adhesive/sessile lifestyles in Escherichia coli This work provides important clues that can be helpful in the development of new strategies, and the results can be applied to other organisms with relevance for human health. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cells have evolved several

  16. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  17. S6K1 in the central nervous system regulates energy expenditure via MC4R/CRH pathways in response to deprivation of an essential amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tingting; Cheng, Ying; Zhang, Qian; Xiao, Fei; Liu, Bin; Chen, Shanghai; Guo, Feifan

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that the central nervous system (CNS), especially the hypothalamus, plays an important role in regulating energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism. We have previously shown that hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is critical for stimulating fat loss in response to dietary leucine deprivation. The molecular mechanisms underlying the CNS regulation of leucine deprivation-stimulated fat loss are, however, still largely unknown. Here, we used intracerebroventricular injection of adenoviral vectors to identify a novel role for hypothalamic p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), a major downstream effector of the kinase mammalian target of rapamycin, in leucine deprivation stimulation of energy expenditure. Furthermore, we show that the effect of hypothalamic S6K1 is mediated by modulation of Crh expression in a melanocortin-4 receptor-dependent manner. Taken together, our studies provide a new perspective for understanding the regulation of energy expenditure by the CNS and the importance of cross-talk between nutritional control and regulation of endocrine signals.

  18. In Their Own Words: Young Adults' Menthol Cigarette Initiation, Perceptions, Experiences and Regulation Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Evans, Kiameesha R; Harrell, Melissa B; Loukas, Alexandra; Lewis, M Jane; Delnevo, Cristine D; Perry, Cheryl L

    2017-02-17

    Menthol cigarettes are disproportionately used by young people and have been called smoking starter products. However, limited qualitative research exists on young adults' perceptions of and experiences with these products, with much of it based on document reviews of the tobacco industry's research. We conducted six focus groups with young adult (ages 18-24) menthol smokers in New Jersey (half with black smokers) between December 2014 and March 2015. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their menthol smoking initiation, preference reasons, substitution behaviors, and perceptions of menthol cigarette risks and regulation. Participants' menthol cigarette initiation and preference were influenced by their perceived popularity, brand recognition, taste, smoothness, satisfaction and access (including as "loosies," typically available for Newport). Some believed menthol cigarettes were less harmful than non-menthol cigarettes when initiating smoking. Many currently believed menthol cigarettes were more harmful because they contained extra "additives," were stronger (ie, requiring fewer cigarettes to feel satisfied), and/or based on hearsay. Many had tried new brand Camel Crush, which was perceived to be especially minty, fun, and attractive for newer smokers. While some used non-menthol cigarettes when menthols were unavailable, many said they would never or almost never substitute. Many acknowledged a menthol cigarettes ban would likely help them quit smoking, even though they did not support the idea. Menthol cigarette initiation is influenced by an interplay of multiple factors including their sensory properties, marketing, perceived popularity and availability. The FDA should continue to pursue closing this flavored cigarette loophole. In this first qualitative study of menthol cigarette use among young adults, we found further evidence that menthol cigarettes can act as starter products because they are perceived as easier to smoke and taste and smell

  19. Robustness studies of the photomultipliers reading out TileCal, the central hadron calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Di Gregorio, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs), located in the outer part of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells, each one being read out by two PMTs in parallel. The detector readout geometry will not be changed for the Phase II of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) operation. A challenging goal is to understand whether the full sample of PMTs installed at the beginning of the ATLAS detector operation can be used until completion of the HL-LHC program or not. For this reason, a reliable study of the PMT robustness against ageing is required. Detailed studies modelling the PMT response variation as a function of the integrated anode charge were done. The PMT response evoluti...

  20. Recent ORNL experience in site performance prediction: the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Landfill and the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Central Waste Disposal Facility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste was evaluated using pathways analyses. For these evaluations, a conservative approach was selected; that is, conservatism was built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events had to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics existed. Data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations were used in developing the conceptual and numerical models that served as the basis for the numerical simulations of the long-term transport of contamination to man. However, the analyses relied on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Maximum potential doses to man were calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. Even under this conservative framework, the sites were found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations and conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability were drawn. Our experience through these studies has shown that in reaching conclusions in such studies, some consideration must be given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and to quantitatively determine the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed

  1. Market regulation in Central America and Bit-Energy.CEL as tool for improving the self regulating forces for a liberalised market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisinger, H.; Reuter, A.; Dulle, H.

    2002-01-01

    establishment of regional spot and contracts market comprising 6 Central American countries; 3. the introduction of a retail market, allowing auto generation for industrial consumers; 4. the introduction of a renewable and rural electrification support scheme; 5. the introduction of the stochastic planning tool Bit-Energy.CEL for making offers for the spot market less predictable and more flexible. The proposed paper will show more details on the history of market liberalisation in Central America, summarise ongoing activities for improving market efficiency and explain in more detail which role Bit-Energy.CEL plays in this process. (author)

  2. Simulating Results of Experiments on Gene Regulation of the Lactose Operon in Escherichia coli; a Problem-Solving Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchen, Trevor; Metcalfe, Judith

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simulation of the results of real experiments which use different strains of Escherichia coli. Provides an inexpensive practical problem-solving exercise to aid the teaching and understanding of the Jacob and Monod model of gene regulation. (Author/CW)

  3. How effective is aeration with vortex flow regulators? Pilot scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Patryk; Szlachta, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    Vortex flow regulators (VFR) are used in urban drainage systems as a replacement for traditional flow throttling devices. Vortex regulators are not only very efficient energy dissipators but also atomizers which are beneficial for sewer aeration. A deficit of dissolved oxygen can be a problem in both natural waters and sewerage. Hydrodynamic flow regulators can boost oxygen concentration preventing putrefaction and improving treatment of stormwater and wastewater. We were first to investigate the aeration efficiency of semi-commercial scale cylindrical vortex flow regulators to determine the potential of their application in environmental engineering and to propose modification to enhance the aeration capacity of basic designs. Different device geometries and arrangements of active outlets for both single and double discharge vortex regulators were tested in a recirculating system. In this study, we present a concise review of the current state of our extensive research on the aeration efficiency of vortex flow regulators and their application in sewerage systems.

  4. Methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine interact with central nicotinic receptors and induce their up-regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rates, Sara; Camarasa, Jordi; Escubedo, Elena; Pubill, David

    2007-01-01

    Previous work from our group indicated that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChR) potentially play a role in methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) neurotoxicity. The aims of the present study were two-fold: (1) to demonstrate the interaction of METH and MDMA with homomeric α7 nAChR ([ 3 H]methyllycaconitine binding) and other heteromeric subtypes ([ 3 H]epibatidine binding); and (2) to show the effects of amphetamine derivative pretreatment on the density of binding sites. METH and MDMA displaced [ 3 H]methyllycaconitine and [ 3 H]epibatidine binding in membranes from NGF-differentiated PC 12 cells and mouse brain, with K i values in the micromolar range, MDMA revealing a greater affinity than METH. In addition, METH and MDMA induced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in [ 3 H]methyllycaconitine and [ 3 H]epibatidine binding; which had already been apparent after 6 h of pretreatment, and which peaked in differentiated PC 12 cells after 48 h. The highest increases were found in [ 3 H]epibatidine binding, with MDMA inducing higher increases than METH. Treatment with METH and MDMA increased B max of high-affinity sites for both radioligands without affecting K d . The heightened binding was inhibited by pretreatment with cycloheximide, suggesting the participation of newly synthesised proteins while inhibition of protein trafficking to plasma membrane did not block up-regulation. The effects of protein kinase and cyclophilin inhibitors on such up-regulation were explored, revealing a rapid, differential and complex regulation, similar to that described for nicotinic ligands. All of these results demonstrate that METH and MDMA have affinity for, and can interact with, nAChR, inducing their up-regulation, specially when higher doses are used. Such effects may have a role in METH- and MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, cholinergic neurotransmission, and in processes related to addiction and dependence

  5. Assessing risks and regulating safety standards in the oil and gas industry: the Peruvian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Leonardo Vásquez Cordano; Julio Salvador Jácome; Raúl Lizardo García Carpio; Victor Fernández Guzman

    2013-01-01

    Environmental regulation has usually focused on controlling continuous sources of pollution such as CO2 emissions through carbon taxes. However, the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has shown that accidents associated to safety failures can also generate bursts of pollution with serious environmental consequences. Regulating safety conditions to prevent accidents in the oil and gas industry is challenging because public regulators cannot perfectly observe whether firms comply with safety ...

  6. Central dopamine D2 receptors regulate growth-hormone-dependent body growth and pheromone signaling to conspecific males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noaín, Daniela; Pérez-Millán, M Inés; Bello, Estefanía P; Luque, Guillermina M; Casas Cordero, Rodrigo; Gelman, Diego M; Peper, Marcela; Tornadu, Isabel García; Low, Malcolm J; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2013-03-27

    Competition between adult males for limited resources such as food and receptive females is shaped by the male pattern of pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion that determines body size and the production of urinary pheromones involved in male-to-male aggression. In the brain, dopamine (DA) provides incentive salience to stimuli that predict the availability of food and sexual partners. Although the importance of the GH axis and central DA neurotransmission in social dominance and fitness is clearly appreciated, the two systems have always been studied unconnectedly. Here we conducted a cell-specific genetic dissection study in conditional mutant mice that selectively lack DA D2 receptors (D2R) from pituitary lactotropes (lacDrd2KO) or neurons (neuroDrd2KO). Whereas lacDrd2KO mice developed a normal GH axis, neuroDrd2KO mice displayed fewer somatotropes; reduced hypothalamic Ghrh expression, pituitary GH content, and serum IGF-I levels; and exhibited reduced body size and weight. As a consequence of a GH axis deficit, neuroDrd2KO adult males excreted low levels of major urinary proteins and their urine failed to promote aggression and territorial behavior in control male challengers, in contrast to the urine taken from control adult males. These findings reveal that central D2Rs mediate a neuroendocrine-exocrine cascade that controls the maturation of the GH axis and downstream signals that are critical for fitness, social dominance, and competition between adult males.

  7. The implementation of the international experience of regulation of contruction risk insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Melko

    2017-03-01

    In general, governmental regulation of insurance activity in construction area is implemented in such forms as: the formation of the legal framework, the implementation of insurance supervision and control, the registration and licensing of the insurance. The regulation of the insurance sector is diverse in its nature. Processes of the regulation of the insurance business have to consider a number of diverse interests of both insurers and insurance holders. The effectiveness of the regulation depends on the fullness of consideration of long-term market factors.

  8. Effect of an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience on Medication Therapy Management Services in a Centralized Retail Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Griend, Joseph P; Rodgers, Melissa; Nuffer, Wesley

    2017-05-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) delivery is increasingly important in managed care. Successful delivery positively affects patient health and improves Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services star ratings, a measure of health plan quality. As MTM services continue to grow, there is an increased need for efficient and effective care models. The primary objectives of this project were to describe the delivery of MTM services by fourth-year Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) students in a centralized retail pharmacy system and to evaluate and quantify the clinical and financial contributions of the students. The secondary objective was to describe the engagement needed to complete comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) and targeted interventions. From May 2015 to December 2015, thirty-five APPE students from the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy provided MTM services at Albertsons Companies using the OutcomesMTM and Mirixa platforms. Students delivered patient care services by phone at the central office and provided face-to-face visits at pharmacies in the region. With implementation of the MTM APPE in 2015, the team consisted of 2 MTM pharmacists and pharmacy students, as compared with 1 MTM pharmacist in 2014. The number of CMRs and targeted interventions completed and the estimated additional revenue generated during the 2015 time period were compared with those completed from May through December 2014. The patient and provider engagement needed to complete the CMRs and targeted interventions was summarized. 125 CMRs and 1,918 targeted interventions were billed in 2015, compared with 13 CMRs and 767 targeted interventions in 2014. An estimated $16,575-$49,272 of additional revenue was generated in 2015. To complete the interventions in 2015, the team engaged in 1,714 CMR opportunities and 4,686 targeted intervention opportunities. In this MTM rotation, students provided real-life care to patients, resulting in financial and clinical

  9. Linking learning contexts: The relationship between students’ civic and political experiences and their self-regulation in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eMalafaia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the relationship between self-regulation strategies and youth civic and political experiences, assuming that out-of-school learning can foster metacognition. The study is based on a sample of 732 Portuguese students from grades 8 and 11. Results show that the quality of civic and political participation experiences, together with academic self-efficacy, are significant predictors of young people’s self-regulation, particularly regarding cognitive and metacognitive strategies (elaboration and critical thinking. Such effects surpass even the weight of family cultural and school variables, such as the sense of school belonging. There-fore, we argue that the pedagogical value of non-formal civic and political experiences is re-lated to learning in formal pedagogical contexts. This is because civic and political participa-tion with high developmental quality can stimulate higher-order cognitive engagement and, thus, contribute to the development of learning strategies that promote academic success.

  10. Linking Learning Contexts: The Relationship between Students’ Civic and Political Experiences and Their Self-Regulation in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafaia, Carla; Teixeira, Pedro M.; Neves, Tiago; Menezes, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between self-regulation strategies and youth civic and political experiences, assuming that out-of-school learning can foster metacognition. The study is based on a sample of 732 Portuguese students from grades 8 and 11. Results show that the quality of civic and political participation experiences, together with academic self-efficacy, are significant predictors of young people’s self-regulation, particularly regarding cognitive and metacognitive strategies (elaboration and critical thinking). Such effects surpass even the weight of family cultural and school variables, such as the sense of school belonging. Therefore, we argue that the pedagogical value of non-formal civic and political experiences is related to learning in formal pedagogical contexts. This is because civic and political participation with high developmental quality can stimulate higher-order cognitive engagement and, thus, contribute to the development of learning strategies that promote academic success. PMID:27199812

  11. Linking Learning Contexts: The Relationship between Students' Civic and Political Experiences and Their Self-Regulation in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafaia, Carla; Teixeira, Pedro M; Neves, Tiago; Menezes, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between self-regulation strategies and youth civic and political experiences, assuming that out-of-school learning can foster metacognition. The study is based on a sample of 732 Portuguese students from grades 8 and 11. Results show that the quality of civic and political participation experiences, together with academic self-efficacy, are significant predictors of young people's self-regulation, particularly regarding cognitive and metacognitive strategies (elaboration and critical thinking). Such effects surpass even the weight of family cultural and school variables, such as the sense of school belonging. Therefore, we argue that the pedagogical value of non-formal civic and political experiences is related to learning in formal pedagogical contexts. This is because civic and political participation with high developmental quality can stimulate higher-order cognitive engagement and, thus, contribute to the development of learning strategies that promote academic success.

  12. A modeling experiment on the grounding of an ice shelf in the central Arctic Ocean during MIS 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, M.; Siegert, M.; Paton, M.

    2003-12-01

    High-resolution chirp sonar subbottom profiles from the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean, acquired from the Swedish icebreaker Oden in 1996, revealed large-scale erosion of the ridge crest down to depths of 1000 m below present sea level [Jakobsson, 1999]. Subsequent acoustic mapping during the SCICEX nuclear submarine expedition in 1999 showed glacial fluting at the deepest eroded areas and subparallel ice scours from 950 m water depth to the shallowest parts of the ridge crest [Polyak et al., 2001]. The directions of the mapped glaciogenic bed-forms and the redeposition of eroded material on the Amerasian side of the ridge indicate ice flow from the Barents-Kara Sea area. Core studies revealed that sediment drape the eroded areas from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5.5 and, thus, it was proposed that the major erosional event took place during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 [Jakobsson et al., 2001]. Glacial geological evidence suggests strongly that the Late Saalian (MIS 6) ice sheet margin reached the shelf break of the Barents-Kara Sea [Svendsen et al. in press] and this gives us two possible ways to explain the ice erosional features on the Lomonosov Ridge. One is the grounding of a floating ice shelf and the other is the scouring from large deep tabular iceberg. Here we apply numerical ice sheet modeling to test the hypothesis that an ice shelf emanating from the Barents/Kara seas grounded across part of the Lomonsov Ridge and caused the extensive erosion down to a depth of around 1000 m below present sea level. A series of model experiments was undertaken in which the ice shelf mass balance (surface accumulation and basal melting) and ice shelf strain rates were adjusted. Grounding of the Lomonosov Ridge was not achieved when the ice shelf strain rate was 0.005 yr-1 (i.e. a free flowing ice shelf). However this model produced two interesting findings. First, with basal melt rates of up to 50 cm yr-1 an ice shelf grew from the St. Anna Trough ice stream

  13. Financial Regulations and the Diversification of Funding Sources in Higher Education Institutions: Selected European Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak-Kudla, Monika; Kudla, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the financial regulations' impact on the share of private financing in higher education institutions (HEIs). The authors postulate the trade-off between the size and stability of public financing and the regulations fostering stability of HEIs' funds. If the public sources are insufficient then the regulations…

  14. Phosphatase control of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state is central for glycolytic regulation of retinal protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas W; Abcouwer, Steven F; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Fort, Patrice E

    2015-09-15

    Control of protein synthesis in insulin-responsive tissues has been well characterized, but relatively little is known about how this process is regulated in nervous tissues. The retina exhibits a relatively high protein synthesis rate, coinciding with high basal Akt and metabolic activities, with the majority of retinal ATP being derived from aerobic glycolysis. We examined the dependency of retinal protein synthesis on the Akt-mTOR signaling and glycolysis using ex vivo rat retinas. Akt inhibitors significantly reduced retinal protein synthesis but did not affect glycolytic lactate production. Surprisingly, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) markedly inhibited Akt1 and Akt3 activities, as well as protein synthesis. The effects of 2-DG, and 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (2-FDG) on retinal protein synthesis correlated with inhibition of lactate production and diminished ATP content, with all these effects reversed by provision of d-mannose. 2-DG treatment was not associated with increased AMPK, eEF2, or eIF2α phosphorylation; instead, it caused rapid dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1. 2-DG reduced total mTOR activity by 25%, but surprisingly, it did not reduce mTORC1 activity, as indicated by unaltered raptor-associated mTOR autophosphorylation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was largely prevented by inhibition of PP1/PP2A phosphatases with okadaic acid and calyculin A, and inhibition of PPM1 phosphatases with cadmium. Thus, inhibition of retinal glycolysis diminished Akt and protein synthesis coinciding with accelerated dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 independently of mTORC1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating protein synthesis in the retina involving an mTORC1-independent and phosphatase-dependent regulation of 4E-BP1. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Central serotonergic neurons activate and recruit thermogenic brown and beige fat and regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGlashon, Jacob M; Gorecki, Michelle C; Kozlowski, Amanda E

    2015-01-01

    Thermogenic brown and beige adipocytes convert chemical energy to heat by metabolizing glucose and lipids. Serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the CNS are essential for thermoregulation and accordingly may control metabolic activity of thermogenic fat. To test this, we generated mice in which the human...... adipose tissue (WAT). In parallel, blood glucose increased 3.5-fold, free fatty acids 13.4-fold, and triglycerides 6.5-fold. Similar BAT and beige fat defects occurred in Lmx1b(f/f)ePet1(Cre) mice in which 5-HT neurons fail to develop in utero. We conclude 5-HT neurons play a major role in regulating...

  16. CENTRALIZATION OF SERVICE MANAGEMENT WORK EXPERIENCE OJSC «BSW – MANAGEMENT COMPANY OF HOLDING «BMC»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tsidrenkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages and disadvantages of centralization of the labor service division in the enterprise are considered in the article. Optimization of the number of labor service division of enterprise, tasks of the centralization of labor service are studied. 

  17. Emotion experience and regulation in China and the United States: how do culture and gender shape emotion responding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth; Greenberger, Ellen; Charles, Susan; Chen, Chuansheng; Zhao, Libo; Dong, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Culture and gender shape emotion experience and regulation, in part because the value placed on emotions and the manner of their expression is thought to vary across these groups. This study tested the hypothesis that culture and gender would interact to predict people's emotion responding (emotion intensity and regulatory strategies). Chinese (n=220; 52% female) and American undergraduates (n=241; 62% female) viewed photos intended to elicit negative emotions after receiving instructions to either "just feel" any emotions that arose (Just Feel), or to "do something" so that they would not experience any emotion while viewing the photos (Regulate). All participants then rated the intensity of their experienced emotions and described any emotion-regulation strategies that they used while viewing the photos. Consistent with predictions, culture and gender interacted with experimental condition to predict intensity: Chinese men reported relatively low levels of emotion, whereas American women reported relatively high levels of emotion. Disengagement strategies (especially distancing) were related to lower emotional intensity and were reported most often by Chinese men. Taken together, findings suggest that emotion-regulation strategies may contribute to differences in emotional experience across Western and East Asian cultures.

  18.  The discovery of neuromedin U and its pivotal role in the central regulation of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kirsz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  Neuromedin U (NMU is a structurally highly conserved neuropeptide and has been paired with the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs NMUR1 and NMUR2, which were formerly classified in the orphan receptor family. Activation of the G protein Gq/11 subunit causes a pertussis toxin (PTX-insensitive activation of both phospholipase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP, and activation of the Go subunit causes a PTX-sensitive inhibition of adenyl cyclase. Additionally, NMU selectively inhibits L-type high-voltage-gated Ca2 channels in mouse hippocampus, as well as low-voltage-activated T-type Ca2 channels in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG. NMU peptide and its receptors are predominantly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and specific structures within the brain, reflecting its major role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. A novel neuropeptide, neuromedin S (NMS, is structurally related to NMU. They share a C-terminal core structure and both have been implicated in the regulation of food intake, as well as the circadian rhythms. The acute anorectic and weight-reducing effects of NMU and NMS are mediated by NMUR2. This suggests that NMUR2-selective agonists may be useful for the treatment of obesity.

  19. Interleukin-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) as a central regulator of the protective immune response against Giardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerewijck, Oonagh; Maertens, Brecht; Dreesen, Leentje; Van Meulder, Frederik; Peelaers, Iris; Ratman, Dariusz; Li, Robert W; Lubberts, Erik; De Bosscher, Karolien; Geldhof, Peter

    2017-08-17

    The protozoan parasite Giardia is a highly prevalent intestinal pathogen with a wide host range. Data obtained in mice, cattle and humans revealed the importance of IL-17A in the development of a protective immune response against Giardia. The aim of this study was to further unravel the protective effector mechanisms triggered by IL-17A following G. muris infection in mice, by an RNA-sequencing approach. C57BL/6 WT and C57BL/6 IL-17RA KO mice were orally infected with G. muris cysts. Three weeks post infection, intestinal tissue samples were collected for RNA-sequencing, with samples from uninfected C57BL/6 WT and C57BL/6 IL-17RA KO animals serving as negative controls. Differential expression analysis showed that G. muris infection evoked the transcriptional upregulation of a wide array of genes, mainly in animals with competent IL-17RA signaling. IL-17RA signaling induced the production of various antimicrobial peptides, such as angiogenin 4 and α- and β-defensins and regulated complement activation through mannose-binding lectin 2. The expression of the receptor that regulates the secretion of IgA into the intestinal lumen, the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, was also dependent on IL-17RA signaling. Interestingly, the transcriptome data showed for the first time the involvement of the circadian clock in the host response following Giardia infection.

  20. Adverse Life Experience and Psychological Distress in Adolescence: Moderating and Mediating Effects of Emotion Regulation and Rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Mark E; Hasking, Penelope A; Martin, Graham

    2016-10-01

    The current study tested whether emotion regulation and rumination moderated and/or mediated the relationship between accumulated adverse life experience and psychological distress in adolescence. In class, Australian high school students (n = 2637, 12-18 years, 68% female) from 41 schools completed well-validated measures of adverse life experience, emotion regulation, rumination and psychological distress, and were followed up 1 year later (n = 1973, 75% retention rate). Adjusting for age, gender and baseline psychological distress, adverse life experience predicted psychological distress 1 year later. Expressive suppression and rumination were positively associated with psychological distress. Cognitive reappraisal was negatively associated with psychological distress and moderated the relationship between adverse life experience and psychological distress. This relationship was also partially mediated by cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression and rumination. Promoting cognitive reappraisal and minimizing expressive suppression and rumination may be useful strategies to improve mental health for adolescents who have experienced adverse life events. Future research should examine whether adolescents who have experienced adverse life events can be trained in effective emotion regulation strategies and whether this training can prevent development of psychological maladjustment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Analysis of experience-regulated transcriptome and imprintome during critical periods of mouse visual system development reveals spatiotemporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chi-Lin; Chou, Chih-Hsuan; Huang, Shih-Chuan; Lin, Chia-Yi; Lin, Meng-Ying; Tung, Chun-Che; Lin, Chun-Yen; Lai, Ivan Pochou; Zou, Yan-Fang; Youngson, Neil A; Lin, Shau-Ping; Yang, Chang-Hao; Chen, Shih-Kuo; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Huang, Hsien-Sung

    2018-03-15

    Visual system development is light-experience dependent, which strongly implicates epigenetic mechanisms in light-regulated maturation. Among many epigenetic processes, genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism through which monoallelic gene expression occurs in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. It is unknown if genomic imprinting contributes to visual system development. We profiled the transcriptome and imprintome during critical periods of mouse visual system development under normal- and dark-rearing conditions using B6/CAST F1 hybrid mice. We identified experience-regulated, isoform-specific and brain-region-specific imprinted genes. We also found imprinted microRNAs were predominantly clustered into the Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted locus with light experience affecting some imprinted miRNA expression. Our findings provide the first comprehensive analysis of light-experience regulation of the transcriptome and imprintome during critical periods of visual system development. Our results may contribute to therapeutic strategies for visual impairments and circadian rhythm disorders resulting from a dysfunctional imprintome.

  2. Central and Peripheral GABA(A) Receptor Regulation of the Heart Rate Depends on the Conscious State of the Animal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Intuitively one might expect that activation of GABAergic inhibitory neurons results in bradycardia. In conscious animals the opposite effect is however observed. GABAergic neurons in nucleus ambiguus hold the ability to control the activity of the parasympathetic vagus nerve that innervates...... the heart. Upon GABA activation the vagus nerve will be inhibited leaving less parasympathetic impact on the heart. The picture is however blurred in the presence of anaesthesia where both the concentration and type of anaesthetics can result in different effects on the cardiovascular system. This paper...... reviews cardiovascular outcomes of GABA activation and includes own experiments on anaesthetized animals and isolated hearts. In conclusion, the impact of changes in GABAergic input is very difficult to predict in these settings, emphasizing the need for experiments performed in conscious animals when...

  3. Central and Peripheral GABAA Receptor Regulation of the Heart Rate Depends on the Conscious State of the Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hjorth Bentzen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intuitively one might expect that activation of GABAergic inhibitory neurons results in bradycardia. In conscious animals the opposite effect is however observed. GABAergic neurons in nucleus ambiguus hold the ability to control the activity of the parasympathetic vagus nerve that innervates the heart. Upon GABA activation the vagus nerve will be inhibited leaving less parasympathetic impact on the heart. The picture is however blurred in the presence of anaesthesia where both the concentration and type of anaesthetics can result in different effects on the cardiovascular system. This paper reviews cardiovascular outcomes of GABA activation and includes own experiments on anaesthetized animals and isolated hearts. In conclusion, the impact of changes in GABAergic input is very difficult to predict in these settings, emphasizing the need for experiments performed in conscious animals when aiming at determining the cardiovascular effects of compounds acting on GABAergic neurons.

  4. Apolipoprotein A5 deficiency aggravates high-fat diet-induced obesity due to impaired central regulation of food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Sjoerd A A; Heemskerk, Mattijs M; Geerling, Janine J; van Klinken, Jan-Bert; Schaap, Frank G; Bijland, Silvia; Berbée, Jimmy F P; van Harmelen, Vanessa J A; Pronk, Amanda C M; Schreurs, Marijke; Havekes, Louis M; Rensen, Patrick C N; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) have been associated with hypertriglyceridemia in humans and mice. This has been attributed to a stimulating role for APOA5 in lipoprotein lipase-mediated triglyceride hydrolysis and hepatic clearance of lipoprotein remnant particles. However, because of the low APOA5 plasma abundance, we investigated an additional signaling role for APOA5 in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Wild-type (WT) and Apoa5(-/-) mice fed a chow diet showed no difference in body weight or 24-h food intake (Apoa5(-/-), 4.5±0.6 g; WT, 4.2±0.5 g), while Apoa5(-/-) mice fed an HFD ate more in 24 h (Apoa5(-/-), 2.8±0.4 g; WT, 2.5±0.3 g, Pcentral regulation of food intake.

  5. Enhancing Student Success in Online Learning Experiences through the Use of Self-Regulation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Laurie A.; Sharp, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    Online learning experiences have greatly changed the landscape of instruction. Many courses in postsecondary environments incorporate some type of technological enhancement, which holds benefits for both postsecondary institutions and learners. However, online learning experiences require different pedagogical characteristics than traditional…

  6. Processes regulating pCO2 in the surface waters of the central eastern Gotland Sea: a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Schneider

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a one-dimensional simulation of the seasonal changes in CO2 partial pressure (pCO2. The results of the model were constrained using data from observations, which improved the model's ability to estimate nitrogen fixation in the central Baltic Sea and allowed the impact of nitrogen fixation on the ecological state of the Baltic Sea to be studied. The model used here is the public domain water-column model GOTM (General Ocean Turbulence Model, which in this study was coupled with a modifed Baltic Sea ecosystem model, ERGOM (The Baltic Sea Research Institute's ecosystem model. To estimate nitrogen fixation rates in the Gotland Sea, the ERGOM model was modified by including an additional cyanobacteria group able to fix nitrogen from March to June. Furthermore, the model was extended by a simple CO2 cycle. Variable C:P and N:P ratios, controlled by phosphate concentrations in ambient water, were used to represent cyanobacteria, detritus and sediment detritus. This approach improved the model's ability to reproduce sea-surface phosphate and pCO2 dynamics. The resulting nitrogen fixation rates in 2005 for the two simulations, with and without the additional cyanobacteria group, were 259 and 278 mmol N m-2 year-1respectively.

  7. The experience on public consultation in the elaboration of nuclear regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Iara A.; Pitta, Maria Adelia R.; Pereira, Enneite S.; Wieland, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the process of public consultation followed by the regulatory body, Nuclear Energy National Commission (CNEN), during the elaboration of nuclear regulations. In this paper, the due legislation on federal administration, law n. 9784/99, is referred to and the procedures established by CNEN for the elaboration of a nuclear regulation are described. The public consultation has the objective of improving the democratization of nuclear regulations elaboration process, allowing the participation of interested parties such as professional associations directly involved, organizations interested in its application and the general public. During the process of elaboration of a nuclear regulation, the basic text is, first of all, discussed and improved by a task group. This group is composed by CNEN's officials and representatives of organizations, enterprises and public agencies involved in the related area. Once the first version of the proposed regulation is ready, it is formally open to consultation and posted at CNEN website for a period of time. The suggestions, therein presented on-line, are analyzed by the task group and the conclusions are also posted at the site; those considered pertinent are incorporated to proposed regulation. As an example, the public consultation results obtained in 2008 with the revision of the CNEN-NN-6.02: Licensing of Radioactive Facilities regulation, are presented. Such results cover two aspects: the analysis of the participants profile and the analysis of the contributions. Public participation in the elaboration of nuclear regulations is a new way for CNEN to know the licensees and public demands, doubts and needs. This tool has demonstrated usefulness and therefore must be maintained by the regulatory body. (author)

  8. Transnational Dynamics Amid Poor Regulations: Taiwan’s Asbestos Ban Actions and Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Yi-Jui Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the history of the asbestos use regulation process in Taiwan and the associated factors leading to its total ban in 2018. Despite the long history of asbestos mining and manufacturing since the Japanese colonial period, attempts to understand the impact of asbestos on the health of the population and to control its use did not emerge until the early 1980s. We attempted to investigate the driving forces and obstructions involved in asbestos regulations by reviewing available public sources and scientific journal articles and conducting interviews with key propagators of the asbestos regulation and ban. Correlation between asbestos exposure and asbestos-related diseases has already been established; however, authorities have been unable to effectively regulate the extensive application of asbestos in various light industries that support economic growth since the 1960s. More stringent regulations on asbestos use in industries and an eventual ban were caused indirectly by appeals made by visionary scholars and healthcare professionals but also due to the subsidence of asbestos-related industries. With the elucidation of factors that affect asbestos regulation and ban, a thorough long-term healthcare plan for the neglected victims of asbestos-related diseases and upstream measures for policy change must be developed.

  9. La Venta wind power plant, seven months operating experience and growth perspectives; Central eolica La Venta, siete meses de operacion y perspectivas de crecimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadena Tovar, Roberto; Lopez Rios, Serafin [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico)

    1995-01-01

    The capacity factor achieved for La Venta Wind Power Plant in Oaxaca State, Mexico was 63.8% during its first seven operating months. There is not similar experience around the world for a wind plant. This paper presents performance plant details and its capacity growth perspectives. [Espanol] En la central eolica La Venta, Oaxaca, Mexico se ha obtenido un factor de planta de 63.8% durante sus primeros siete meses de operacion, no existiendo precedente similar en las centrales eolicas actualmente en operacion en el mundo. En este documento se describen detalles de su comportamiento y se efectua un bosquejo general de las posibilidades de crecimiento del proyecto.

  10. Identification of top-down forces regulating cotton aphid population growth in transgenic Bt cotton in central China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Han

    Full Text Available The cotton aphid Aphis gossypii Glover is the main aphid pest in cotton fields in the Yangtze River Valley Cotton-planting Zone (YRZ in central China. Various natural enemies may attack the cotton aphid in Bt cotton fields but no studies have identified potential specific top-down forces that could help manage this pest in the YRZ in China. In order to identify possibilities for managing the cotton aphid, we monitored cotton aphid population dynamics and identified the effect of natural enemies on cotton aphid population growth using various exclusion cages in transgenic Cry1Ac (Bt+CpTI (Cowpea trypsin inhibitor cotton field in 2011. The aphid population growth in the open field (control was significantly lower than those protected or restricted from exposure to natural enemies in the various exclusion cage types tested. The ladybird predator Propylaea japonica Thunberg represented 65% of Coccinellidae predators, and other predators consisted mainly of syrphids (2.1% and spiders (1.5%. The aphid parasitoids Aphidiines represented 76.7% of the total count of the natural enemy guild (mainly Lysiphlebia japonica Ashmead and Binodoxys indicus Subba Rao & Sharma. Our results showed that P. japonica can effectively delay the establishment and subsequent population growth of aphids during the cotton growing season. Aphidiines could also reduce aphid density although their impact may be shadowed by the presence of coccinellids in the open field (likely both owing to resource competition and intraguild predation. The implications of these results are discussed in a framework of the compatibility of transgenic crops and top-down forces exerted by natural enemy guild.

  11. Duke Surgery Research Central: an open-source Web application for the improvement of compliance with research regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Ricardo; Shah, Anand; Kuo, Paul; Harker, Matthew; McCready, Mariana; Butler, Christeen; Martins, Henrique; Moorman, C T; Jacobs, Danny O

    2006-07-27

    Although regulatory compliance in academic research is enforced by law to ensure high quality and safety to participants, its implementation is frequently hindered by cost and logistical barriers. In order to decrease these barriers, we have developed a Web-based application, Duke Surgery Research Central (DSRC), to monitor and streamline the regulatory research process. The main objective of DSRC is to streamline regulatory research processes. The application was built using a combination of paper prototyping for system requirements and Java as the primary language for the application, in conjunction with the Model-View-Controller design model. The researcher interface was designed for simplicity so that it could be used by individuals with different computer literacy levels. Analogously, the administrator interface was designed with functionality as its primary goal. DSRC facilitates the exchange of regulatory documents between researchers and research administrators, allowing for tasks to be tracked and documents to be stored in a Web environment accessible from an Intranet. Usability was evaluated using formal usability tests and field observations. Formal usability results demonstrated that DSRC presented good speed, was easy to learn and use, had a functionality that was easily understandable, and a navigation that was intuitive. Additional features implemented upon request by initial users included: extensive variable categorization (in contrast with data capture using free text), searching capabilities to improve how research administrators could search an extensive number of researcher names, warning messages before critical tasks were performed (such as deleting a task), and confirmatory e-mails for critical tasks (such as completing a regulatory task). The current version of DSRC was shown to have excellent overall usability properties in handling research regulatory issues. It is hoped that its release as an open-source application will promote improved

  12. Duke Surgery Research Central: an open-source Web application for the improvement of compliance with research regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Henrique

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although regulatory compliance in academic research is enforced by law to ensure high quality and safety to participants, its implementation is frequently hindered by cost and logistical barriers. In order to decrease these barriers, we have developed a Web-based application, Duke Surgery Research Central (DSRC, to monitor and streamline the regulatory research process. Results The main objective of DSRC is to streamline regulatory research processes. The application was built using a combination of paper prototyping for system requirements and Java as the primary language for the application, in conjunction with the Model-View-Controller design model. The researcher interface was designed for simplicity so that it could be used by individuals with different computer literacy levels. Analogously, the administrator interface was designed with functionality as its primary goal. DSRC facilitates the exchange of regulatory documents between researchers and research administrators, allowing for tasks to be tracked and documents to be stored in a Web environment accessible from an Intranet. Usability was evaluated using formal usability tests and field observations. Formal usability results demonstrated that DSRC presented good speed, was easy to learn and use, had a functionality that was easily understandable, and a navigation that was intuitive. Additional features implemented upon request by initial users included: extensive variable categorization (in contrast with data capture using free text, searching capabilities to improve how research administrators could search an extensive number of researcher names, warning messages before critical tasks were performed (such as deleting a task, and confirmatory e-mails for critical tasks (such as completing a regulatory task. Conclusion The current version of DSRC was shown to have excellent overall usability properties in handling research regulatory issues. It is hoped that its

  13. Activity-Dependent NPAS4 Expression and the Regulation of Gene Programs Underlying Plasticity in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Maya-Vetencourt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The capability of the brain to change functionally in response to sensory experience is most active during early stages of development but it decreases later in life when major alterations of neuronal network structures no longer take place in response to experience. This view has been recently challenged by experimental strategies based on the enhancement of environmental stimulation levels, genetic manipulations, and pharmacological treatments, which all have demonstrated that the adult brain retains a degree of plasticity that allows for a rewiring of neuronal circuitries over the entire life course. A hot spot in the field of neuronal plasticity centres on gene programs that underlie plastic phenomena in adulthood. Here, I discuss the role of the recently discovered neuronal-specific and activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 as a critical mediator of plasticity in the nervous system. A better understanding of how modifications in the connectivity of neuronal networks occur may shed light on the treatment of pathological conditions such as brain damage or disease in adult life, some of which were once considered untreatable.

  14. Action of specific thyroid hormone receptor α(1) and β(1) antagonists in the central and peripheral regulation of thyroid hormone metabolism in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beeren, Hermina C; Kwakkel, Joan; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2012-12-01

    The iodine-containing drug amiodarone (Amio) and its noniodine containing analogue dronedarone (Dron) are potent antiarrhythmic drugs. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the major metabolite of Amio, desethylamiodarone, acts as a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α(1) and β(1) antagonist, whereas the major metabolite of Dron debutyldronedarone acts as a selective TRα(1) antagonist. In the present study, Amio and Dron were used as tools to discriminate between TRα(1) or TRβ(1) regulated genes in central and peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism. Three groups of male rats received either Amio, Dron, or vehicle by daily intragastric administration for 2 weeks. We assessed the effects of treatment on triiodothyronine (T(3)) and thyroxine (T(4)) plasma and tissue concentrations, deiodinase type 1, 2, and 3 mRNA expressions and activities, and thyroid hormone transporters monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), monocarboxylate transporter 10 (MCT10), and organic anion transporter 1C1 (OATP1C1). Amio treatment decreased serum T(3), while serum T(4) and thyrotropin (TSH) increased compared to Dron-treated and control rats. At the central level of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, Amio treatment decreased hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) expression, while increasing pituitary TSHβ and MCT10 mRNA expression. Amio decreased the pituitary D2 activity. By contrast, Dron treatment resulted in decreased hypothalamic TRH mRNA expression only. Upon Amio treatment, liver T(3) concentration decreased substantially compared to Dron and control rats (50%, p<0.01), but liver T(4) concentration was unaffected. In addition, liver D1, mRNA, and activity decreased, while the D3 activity and mRNA increased. Liver MCT8, MCT10, and OATP1C1 mRNA expression were similar between groups. Our results suggest an important role for TRα1 in the regulation of hypothalamic TRH mRNA expression, whereas TRβ plays a dominant role in pituitary and liver thyroid

  15. Emotion experience and regulation in China and the United States: How do culture and gender shape emotion responding?

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, E; Greenberger, E; Charles, S; Chen, C; Zhao, L; Dong, Q

    2012-01-01

    Culture and gender shape emotion experience and regulation, in part because the value placed on emotions and the manner of their expression is thought to vary across these groups. This study tested the hypothesis that culture and gender would interact to predict people's emotion responding (emotion intensity and regulatory strategies). Chinese (n = 220; 52% female) and American undergraduates (n = 241; 62% female) viewed photos intended to elicit negative emotions after receiving instructions...

  16. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  17. An exploratory study of the health harms and utilisation of health services of frequent legal high users under the interim regulated legal high market in central Auckland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Chris; Prasad, Jitesh; Wong, K C; Rychert, Marta; Graydon-Guy, Thomas

    2016-03-11

    To explore health problems and the accessing of health services by frequent legal high users under an interim regulated legal market in central Auckland. Frequent legal high users (monthly+) were recruited from outside eight randomly-selected, licensed, legal high stores in central Auckland from 23 April-7 May, 2014. Eligible participants were emailed a unique invitation to complete an on-line survey; 105 completed the survey. Twenty-seven percent had suffered mental illness during their lifetimes. Eighty percent used synthetic cannabinoids (SC), and 20% 'party pills'. Forty-seven percent of SC users used daily or more often. Other drugs used included alcohol (80%), cannabis (59%), 'ecstasy' (18%) and methamphetamine (15%). Fifty-eight percent of SC users were classified as SC dependent. The most common problems reported from SC use were: insomnia (29%); 'vomiting/nausea' (25%); 'short temper/agitation' (21%); 'anxiety' (21%); 'strange thoughts' (16%); and 'heart palpitations' (14%). The health services most commonly accessed by SC users were: a 'doctor/GP' (9%); 'counsellor' (9%); 'DrugHelp/MethHelp' websites (7%); 'Alcohol & Drug Helpline' (4%); 'ambulance' (3%); 'A&E' (3%); and hospitalisation (3%). Frequent use of interim licensed SC products was associated with health problems, including dependency. Further research is required to determine the health risks of these products.

  18. Adapting to climate variability and change: experiences from cereal-based farming in the central rift and Kobo Valleys, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassie, Belay Tseganeh; Hengsdijk, Huib; Rötter, Reimund; Kahiluoto, Helena; Asseng, Senthold; Van Ittersum, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Small-holder farmers in Ethiopia are facing several climate related hazards, in particular highly variable rainfall with severe droughts which can have devastating effects on their livelihoods. Projected changes in climate are expected to aggravate the existing challenges. This study examines farmer perceptions on current climate variability and long-term changes, current adaptive strategies, and potential barriers for successful further adaptation in two case study regions-the Central Rift Valley (CRV) and Kobo Valley. The study was based on a household questionnaire, interviews with key stakeholders, and focus group discussions. The result revealed that about 99 % of the respondents at the CRV and 96 % at the Kobo Valley perceived an increase in temperature and 94 % at CRV and 91 % at the Kobo Valley perceived a decrease in rainfall over the last 20-30 years. Inter-annual and intraseasonal rainfall variability also has increased according to the farmers. The observed climate data (1977-2009) also showed an increasing trend in temperature and high inter-annual and intra-seasonal rainfall variability. In contrast to farmers' perceptions of a decrease in rainfall totals, observed rainfall data showed no statistically significant decline. The interaction among various bio-physical and socio-economic factors, changes in rainfall intensity and reduced water available to crops due to increased hot spells, may have influenced the perception of farmers with respect to rainfall trends. In recent decades, farmers in both the CRV and Kobo have changed farming practices to adapt to perceived climate change and variability, for example, through crop and variety choice, adjustment of cropping calendar, and in situ moisture conservation. These relatively low-cost changes in farm practices were within the limited adaptation capacity of farmers, which may be insufficient to deal with the impacts of future climate change. Anticipated climate change is expected to impose new

  19. Adapting to Climate Variability and Change: Experiences from Cereal-Based Farming in the Central Rift and Kobo Valleys, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassie, Belay Tseganeh; Hengsdijk, Huib; Rötter, Reimund; Kahiluoto, Helena; Asseng, Senthold; Van Ittersum, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Small-holder farmers in Ethiopia are facing several climate related hazards, in particular highly variable rainfall with severe droughts which can have devastating effects on their livelihoods. Projected changes in climate are expected to aggravate the existing challenges. This study examines farmer perceptions on current climate variability and long-term changes, current adaptive strategies, and potential barriers for successful further adaptation in two case study regions—the Central Rift Valley (CRV) and Kobo Valley. The study was based on a household questionnaire, interviews with key stakeholders, and focus group discussions. The result revealed that about 99 % of the respondents at the CRV and 96 % at the Kobo Valley perceived an increase in temperature and 94 % at CRV and 91 % at the Kobo Valley perceived a decrease in rainfall over the last 20-30 years. Inter-annual and intraseasonal rainfall variability also has increased according to the farmers. The observed climate data (1977-2009) also showed an increasing trend in temperature and high inter-annual and intra-seasonal rainfall variability. In contrast to farmers’ perceptions of a decrease in rainfall totals, observed rainfall data showed no statistically significant decline. The interaction among various bio-physical and socio-economic factors, changes in rainfall intensity and reduced water available to crops due to increased hot spells, may have influenced the perception of farmers with respect to rainfall trends. In recent decades, farmers in both the CRV and Kobo have changed farming practices to adapt to perceived climate change and variability, for example, through crop and variety choice, adjustment of cropping calendar, and in situ moisture conservation. These relatively low-cost changes in farm practices were within the limited adaptation capacity of farmers, which may be insufficient to deal with the impacts of future climate change. Anticipated climate change is expected to impose new

  20. Npas4 Regulates Mdm2 and thus Dcx in Experience-Dependent Dendritic Spine Development of Newborn Olfactory Bulb Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei-ichi Yoshihara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensory experience regulates the development of various brain structures, including the cortex, hippocampus, and olfactory bulb (OB. Little is known about how sensory experience regulates the dendritic spine development of OB interneurons, such as granule cells (GCs, although it is well studied in mitral/tufted cells. Here, we identify a transcription factor, Npas4, which is expressed in OB GCs immediately after sensory input and is required for dendritic spine formation. Npas4 overexpression in OB GCs increases dendritic spine density, even under sensory deprivation, and rescues reduction of dendrite spine density in the Npas4 knockout OB. Furthermore, loss of Npas4 upregulates expression of the E3-ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which ubiquitinates a microtubule-associated protein Dcx. This leads to reduction in the dendritic spine density of OB GCs. Together, these findings suggest that Npas4 regulates Mdm2 expression to ubiquitinate and degrade Dcx during dendritic spine development in newborn OB GCs after sensory experience.

  1. Auxin and ABA act as central regulators of developmental networks associated with paradormancy in Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense)

    KAUST Repository

    Anderson, James V.

    2012-05-13

    Abstract Dormancy in underground vegetative buds of Canada thistle, an herbaceous perennial weed, allows escape from current control methods and contributes to its invasive nature. In this study, ∼65 % of root sections obtained from greenhouse propagated Canada thistle produced new vegetative shoots by 14 days post-sectioning. RNA samples obtained from sectioned roots incubated 0, 24, 48, and 72 h at 25°C under 16:8 h light-dark conditions were used to construct four MID-tagged cDNA libraries. Analysis of in silico data obtained using Roche 454 GS-FLX pyrosequencing technologies identified molecular networks associated with paradormancy release in underground vegetative buds of Canada thistle. Sequencing of two replicate plates produced ∼2.5 million ESTs with an average read length of 362 bases. These ESTs assembled into 67358 unique sequences (21777 contigs and 45581 singlets) and annotation against the Arabidopsis database identified 15232 unigenes. Among the 15232 unigenes, we identified processes enriched with transcripts involved in plant hormone signaling networks. To follow-up on these results, we examined hormone profiles in roots, which identified changes in abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA metabolites, auxins, and cytokinins post-sectioning. Transcriptome and hormone profiling data suggest that interaction between auxin- and ABA-signaling regulate paradormancy maintenance and release in underground adventitious buds of Canada thistle. Our proposed model shows that sectioning-induced changes in polar auxin transport alters ABA metabolism and signaling, which further impacts gibberellic acid signaling involving interactions between ABA and FUSCA3. Here we report that reduced auxin and ABA-signaling, in conjunction with increased cytokinin biosynthesis post-sectioning supports a model where interactions among hormones drives molecular networks leading to cell division, differentiation, and vegetative outgrowth. ©Springer-Verlag (outside the USA) 2012.

  2. Learning from the experiences of others: the development of energy regulation in UK and Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, R.; Rose, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper I have described how regulation of the energy sector has developed in two member states of the European Union. I have taken as my examples the UK and Greece. As the first country in the EU to advance to full market liberalisation the UK has already been through many phases of development in the energy sector and the process of regulation has had to adapt to deal with changing circumstances. Greece finds itself at a much earlier stage of development and regulation is a much newer factor in its energy market. It is hoped that by choosing two countries at different stages of developing their energy markets valuable examples can be found for challenges which are now being met in Croatia.(author)

  3. ONE YEAR'S EXPERIENCE IN REGULATING BYPRODUCT, SOURCE, AND SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL IN THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C L

    1963-06-15

    On March 26, 1962, Kentucky assumed regulatory control for the licensing of subcritical nuclear materials within its boundaries. The administration of the state radiological health program is described, and the manpower, fiscal, and equipment requirements are outlined. The licensing activity of the state is also described. Results are reported of preliminary studies of state-owned land for low-level radioactive waste disposal. The procedures for inspection of licensees are described. Proposed changes in the Radiological Health regulations of Kentucky in order to bring about compatibility with AEC's code of Federal Regulations are outlined. (D.L.C.)

  4. Experience-Dependent Regulation of Presynaptic NMDARs Enhances Neurotransmitter Release at Neocortical Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Wen, Jing A.; Parekh, Puja K.; Barth, Alison L.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory experience can selectively alter excitatory synaptic strength at neocortical synapses. The rapid increase in synaptic strength induced by selective whisker stimulation (single-row experience/SRE, where all but one row of whiskers has been removed from the mouse face) is due, at least in part, to the trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs)…

  5. Experience in adjusting of the level regulation system of steam generators of the Rovno NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patselyuk, S.N.; Sokolov, A.G.; Kazakov, V.I.; Dorosh, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    A system of feed water level control in steam generators at the Rovno NPP with WWER-440 reactors which comprises start-up as well as main regulators is described. The start-up regulator (single-pulsed with a signal by the level) keeps the level in the steam generator at loadings up to 30% of the nominal reactor power Nsub(nom.) The main regulator is connected in the three-pulsed circuit and it receives signals by steam and water flow rate and by the level in the steam generator. The main regulator has been started only at loadings above 40% Nsub(nom.). After reconstruction it was used in the 15-100% Nsub(nom.) range. Characteristics of the level control system in the steam generator at perturbations intoduced by the main circulating pump (MCP) and turbine disconnection as well as change in feed water flow rate have been studied. The studies have revealed that the system ensures necessary quality of control in stationary modes. The system operates stably at perturbations of feed water flow rate up to 50% Nsub(nom.). Perturbations by MCP connections and disconnections is most difficult for control system

  6. The improvement of nuclear safety regulation : American, European, Japanese, and South Korean experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byung Sun

    2005-01-01

    Key concepts in South Korean nuclear safety regulation are safety and risk. Nuclear regulation in South Korea has required reactor designs and safeguards that reduce the risk of a major accident to less than one in a million reactor-years-a risk supposedly low enough to be acceptable. To data, in South Korean nuclear safety regulation has involved the establishment of many technical standards to enable administration enforcement. In scientific lawsuits in which the legal issue is the validity of specialized technical standards that are used for judge whether a particular nuclear power plant is to be licensed, the concept of uncertainty law is often raised with regard to what extent the examination and judgement by the judicial power affects a discretion made by the administrative office. In other words, the safety standards for nuclear power plants has been adapted as a form of the scientific technical standards widely under the idea of uncertainty law. Thus, the improvement of nuclear safety regulation in South Korea seems to depend on the rational lawmaking and a reasonable, judicial examination of the scientific standards on nuclear safety

  7. The Experience of Anger and Sadness in Everyday Problems Impacts Age Differences in Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Fields, Fredda; Coats, Abby Heckman

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined regulation of the discrete emotions anger and sadness in adolescents through older adults in the context of describing everyday problem situations. The results support previous work; in comparison to younger age groups, older adults reported that they experienced less anger and reported that they used more passive and fewer…

  8. The role of horizontal thermal advection in regulating wintertime mean and extreme temperatures over the central United States during the past and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Vavrus, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    Horizontal temperature advection plays an especially prominent role in affecting winter climate over continental interiors, where both climatological conditions and extreme weather are strongly regulated by transport of remote air masses. Central North America is one such region, and it experienced a major cold-air outbreak (CAO) a few years ago that some have related to amplified Arctic warming. Despite the known importance of dynamics in shaping the winter climate of this sector and the potential for climate change to modify heat transport, limited attention has been paid to the regional impact of thermal advection. Here, we use a reanalysis product and output from the Community Earth System Model's Large Ensemble to quantify the roles of zonal and meridional temperature advection over the central U. S. during winter, both in the late 20th and 21st centuries. We frame our findings as a "tug of war" between opposing influences of the two advection components and between these dynamical forcings vs. thermodynamic changes under greenhouse warming. For example, Arctic amplification leads to much warmer polar air masses, causing a moderation of cold-air advection into the central U. S., yet the model also simulates a wavier mean circulation and stronger northerly flow during CAOs, favoring lower regional temperatures. We also compare the predominant warming effect of zonal advection and overall cooling effect of meridional temperature advection as an additional tug of war. During both historical and future periods, zonal temperature advection is stronger than meridional advection over the Central U. S. The model simulates a future weakening of both zonal and meridional temperature advection, such that westerly flow provides less warming and northerly flow less cooling. On the most extreme warm days in the past and future, both zonal and meridional temperature advection have positive (warming) contributions. On the most extreme cold days, meridional cold air advection

  9. Indian deep-sea environment experiment (INDEX): Monitoring the restoration of marine enviroment after artificial disturbance to simulate deep-sea mining in central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    the restoration of marine environment after artificial disturbance to simulate deep-sea mining in Central Indian Basin Guest Editor Rahul Sharma Note from guest editor A special issue on Indian Deep-sea Environment Experiment (INDEX) conducted by the scientists... in Geochemical Associations in Artificially Disturbed Deep-Sea Sediments B. Nagender Nath, G. Parthiban, S. Banaulikar, and Subhadeep Sarkar Marine Georesources and Geotechnology, 24:61–62, 2006 Copyright # Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1064-119X print/1521...

  10. 'Oh my god, we're not doing nothing': young people's experiences of spatial regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Debra; Manning, Rachel

    2014-12-01

    Social psychologists have become increasingly concerned with examining the ways in which social practices are interrelated with their location. Critical perspectives have highlighted the traditional lack of attention given to both the collective aspects of spatial identities, together with the discursive practices that construct the relationships between people and places. In this article, we draw together the developing discursive work on place with work on children's geographies, in order to examine young people's accounts of spatial regulation. Adopting a discursive approach to the analysis of focus group discussion, we illustrate a variety of concerns managed in relation to spatial practices by 41 young people living in a large city in the South of England. Our findings suggest that everyday use of public space by young people is constructed at a nexus of competing concerns around childhood/adulthood, freedom, and citizenship, and illustrate the dynamic nature of place, and its regulation, as a resource for constructing identities. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Transports of radioactive materials. Legal regulations, safety and security concepts, experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Guenther

    2012-01-01

    In Germany, approximately 650,000 to 750,000 units containing radioactive materials for scientific, medical and technical applications are shipped annually by surface, air and water transports. Legally speaking, radioactive materials are dangerous goods which can cause hazards to life, health, property and the environment as a result of faulty handling or accidents in transit. For protection against these hazards, their shipment therefore is regulated in extensive national and international rules of protection and safety. The article contains a topical review of the international and national transport regulations and codes pertaining to shipments of radioactive materials, and of the protection concepts underlying these codes so as to ensure an adequate standard of safety and security in shipping radioactive materials in national and international goods traffic. (orig.)

  12. How to Assist Formalization of NL Regulations: Lessons from Business Rules Acquisition Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Nazarenko , Adeline

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Decision systems usually rely on a set of business rules that describe the expected behavior of a system or an organization and that determine the decisions to be taken in different situations. However, rule acquisition is often the bottleneck that hinders the development of decision systems. When these rules are based on regulations written in Natural Language (NL), one solution is to derive formal business rules from the source documents. This approach also allows ch...

  13. Science and public participation in regulating genetically-engineered food: Franch an American experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Diabanna L. Post; Jérôme M. Da Ros

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes three cases of government-led efforts in France and the United States to bring stakeholders into the regulatory process for genetically-modified food. We analyze how government regulators, scientists, and members of the public interacted in these three different settings, and conclude that public participation is not linked with a regulatory outcome; in other words, for various reasons which we consider, public participation did not have a substantive impact on government...

  14. [Prevalence of central nervous system tumours and histological identification in the operated patient: 20 years of experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Delgadillo, Gustavo; de Juambelz-Cisneros, Pedro Pablo; Fernández-Alvarado, Basilio; Pazos-Gómez, Fernando; Velasco-Torre, Andrea; Revuelta-Gutiérrez, Rogelio

    Central nervous system tumours comprise a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with great histological diversity. Despite the rising prevalence of these tumours in developing countries, some places like Mexico and Latin America have no representative studies that show the real impact of these tumours in our population. To describe the characteristics of the primary and secondary tumours of the central nervous system in the last 20 years in a Mexican institution. Patients with histopathological diagnosis from 1993 to 2013 in our institution, grouping them according to WHO classification 2007, characterising them by age group, gender, and anatomical location. There were a total of 511 tumours of the central nervous system. Of those, 292 were women and 219 men, with a ratio 1.3: 1, and a mean age of 49.3 years. Tumours with higher prevalence were: Meningeal tumours, 171 (33%), followed by neuroepithelial, 121 (24%). Astrocytoma had the highest prevalence in paediatric patients, whereas in those older than 20 years it was the meningioma. The supratentorial location was the most involved. This is the first study of a series of cases in Mexico that is performed by taking into account benign and malignant tumours of the central nervous system, with patients of all age groups with a range of 20 years. While this work only represents a retrospective analysis of an institution, it can be a strong indication of the epidemiology of these tumours in our environment. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  15. Cultural differences in emotion regulation during self-reflection on negative personal experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, William; Lau, Anna S

    2013-01-01

    Reflecting on negative personal experiences has implications for mood that may vary as a function of specific domains (e.g., achievement vs. interpersonal) and cultural orientation (e.g., interdependence vs. independence). This study investigated cultural differences in the social-cognitive and affective processes undertaken as Easterners and Westerners reflected on negative interpersonal and performance experiences. One hundred Asian Americans and 92 European-American college students were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: interpersonal rejection, achievement failure, or a control condition. Results revealed that Asian Americans experienced greater distress than European Americans after self-reflecting over a failed interpersonal experience, suggesting cultural sensitivity in the relational domain. Consistent with theoretical predictions, analysis of the social cognitive and affective processes that participants engaged in during self-reflection provided some evidence that self-enhancement may buffer distress for European Americans, while emotion suppression may be adaptive for Asian Americans.

  16. The dependency on central government funding of decentralised health systems: experiences of the challenges and coping strategies in the Kongwa District, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumence, Gasto; Nyamhanga, Tumaini; Mwangu, Mughwira; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2014-01-25

    Decentralised health systems in Tanzania depend largely on funding from the central government to run health services. Experience has shown that central funding in a decentralised system is not an appropriate approach to ensure the effective and efficient performance of local authorities due to several limitations. One of the limitations is that funds from the central government are not disbursed on a timely basis, which in turn, leads to the serious problem of shortage of financial resources for Council Health Management Teams (CHMT). This paper examines how dependency on central government funding in Tanzania affects health activities in Kongwa district council and the strategies used by the CHMT cope with the situation. The study adopted a qualitative approach and data were collected using semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions. One district in the central region of Tanzania was strategically selected. Ten key informants involved in the management of health service delivery at the district level were interviewed and one focus group discussion was held, which consisted of members of the council health management team. The data generated were analysed for themes and patterns. The results showed that late disbursement of funds interrupts the implementation of health activities in the district health system. This situation delays the implementation of some activities, while a few activities may not be implemented at all. However, based on their prior knowledge of the anticipated delays in financial disbursements, the council health management team has adopted three main strategies to cope with this situation. These include obtaining supplies and other services on credit, borrowing money from other projects in the council, and using money generated from cost sharing. Local government authorities (LGAs) face delays in the disbursement of funds from the central government. This has necessitated introduction of informal coping strategies to deal with the

  17. Australian Experience in Implementing Transport Safety Regulations and Transport Security Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Australian transport safety and security regulatory framework is governed by Commonwealth, State and Territory legislations. There are eleven competent authorities in Australia that includes three Commonwealth authorities, six states and two territory authorities. IAEA Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS-R-1, 2005 edition) is applied through Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) Code of Practice for Transport of Radioactive Material 2008 by road, rail and waterways not covered by marine legislations. All states and territories apply this Transport Code through their regulatory system. For air transport, the Civil Aviation Act 1988 adopts the requirements of the ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air DOC 9284, which also adopts TS-R-1. The security of radioactive material in air transport is achieved via the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004. For sea transport Australian Marine Order 41 applies the requirements of IMDG (International Maritime Dangerous Goods) Code which also adopts TS-R-1. The security of radioactive material (nuclear material) is governed by two Commonwealth Agencies namely, ARPANSA and ASNO (Australian Safeguards and Non-proliferation Office) . ARPANSA regulates the security of radioactive sources through ARPANSA Code of Practice for the Security of Radioactive Sources 2007 which is based on the IAEA Draft Security Series. ASNO regulates security of nuclear material including U, Th and Pu through the Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act, and the object of which is to give effect to certain obligations that Australia has as a party to the NPT, Australia’s safeguards agreement with the IAEA, and other bilateral safeguards agreements and certain obligations that Australia has as a party to the Convention for the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (CPPNM). This paper presents the effectiveness of regulatory approaches for safe and secure

  18. Liberalisation and Market Opening Versus Energy Policy and Regulation Proposals: the German Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieners, J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998 the German electricity market became fully liberalised for competition. Prices for all consumer groups recorded a considerable drop. Service centres accepted measures for cost reduction, new strategies resulted in mergers. However, in view of economic efficiency, the German Government set life surroundings as the primary task. With new electricity market regulation numerous grants were introduced into renewable energy sources as well as the combined production of heat and electricity, which had a destabilising effect on all price savings on the part of the competition.(author)

  19. Central {sup 112}Sn + {sup 58}Ni, {sup 124}Sn + {sup 64}Ni collisions in the Reverse Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraci, E.; Bruno, M.; D' Agostino, M.; Vannini, G. [Bologna Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Baran, V.; Bonasera, A.; Cavallaro, S.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Giustolisi, F.; Iacono-Manno, M.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Porto, F.; Russotto, P.; Maiolino, C.; Sperduto, M.I. [Catania Univ., INFN-LNS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Alderighi, M.; Bartolucci, M.; Sechi, G. [INFN and Istituto di Fisica Cosmica, CNR, Milano (Italy); Auditore, L.; Trifiro, A.; Rimarchi, M. [Messina Univ., INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Berceanu, I.; Petrovici, M.; Simion, S. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Guazzoni, P.; Russo, S.; Manfredi, G.; Zetta, L. [Milano Univ., INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Blicharska, J.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Kowalski, S.; Paduszynski, T.; Zipper, W. [Silesia Univ., Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Borderie, B.; Le Neindre, N.; Rivet, M.F. [Institut de Physique nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 91 - Orsay (France); Bougault, B.R.; Steckmeyer, J.C. [Caen Univ., LPC, ENSI, 14 (France); Brzychczyk, J.; Majka, Z. [Jagellonian Univ., M.Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Cardella, G.; Filippo, E. de; Lanzano, G.; Li, S.; Lo Nigro, S.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G. [Catania Univ., INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Chbihi, A.; Wieleczko, J.P. [GANIL, CEA, IN2P3-CNRS, 14 - Caen (France); Cibor, J. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracov (Poland); Guinet, D. [Institut de Physique nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 69 - Lyon (France); Wu, H.; Xiao, Z. [Institute of Modern Physics Lanzhou (China); Piasecki, E. [Warsaw Univ., Institute of Experimental Physics (Poland); Rosato, E.; Vigilante, M. [Napoli Univ., INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Wilczynski, J. [Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2003-07-01

    {sup 112}Sn + {sup 58}Ni and {sup 124}Sn + {sup 64}Ni reactions at 35 AMeV incident energy were studied using the 688 Si-CsI(Tl) telescopes of the forward part (1 {<=} {theta} {<=} 30 degrees) of CHIMERA multi-detector. The most central part of the total measured cross section was selected by means of a multidimensional analysis of the experimental observables. The characteristics of the source formed in the central collisions, as size, temperature and volume, were inspected. The detected isotopes of light fragments (3 {<=} Z {<=} 8) provided information on breakup temperatures of the emitting sources. The space-time structure of these sources was deduced from the two-fragment velocity correlation functions. Isotope yield ratios were used to extract the freeze-out unbound relative neutron and proton densities and the neutron to proton density of both studied reactions, indicating for a possible isospin distillation mechanism. (authors)

  20. Experiences of HIV stigma: the role of visible symptoms, HIV centrality and community attachment for people living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Loren; Callander, Denton; Slavin, Sean; de Wit, John

    2013-01-01

    For many people living with HIV (PLHIV), disclosure or concealment of their HIV status may be under their personal control; however, for PLHIV with visible symptoms of their illness, disclosure may no longer be a choice. Previous research suggests that those with visible HIV symptoms have poorer mental and physical health than those without visible HIV symptoms. This study aimed to extend these findings and assess the role of perceived centrality of HIV in the lives of PLHIV as well as the role of attachment to an HIV-positive community in understanding the negative effects on health and well-being for PLHIV with visible HIV symptoms. Participants were 697 PLHIV who completed an online survey that assessed symptom visibility, HIV-status disclosure, perceived stigma, health and well-being, how central HIV was to identity and HIV community attachment. Results indicate that those with visible symptoms experienced more HIV-related stigma and had poorer outcomes on a range of psychological and mental health measures than those who were able to conceal their stigma. These effects remained after controlling for length of time since diagnosis, time on HIV treatment, perceived health satisfaction and age. PLHIV with visible symptoms also reported that HIV was more central to their identity and reported greater attachment to an HIV-positive community. Furthermore, findings suggest that while HIV centrality appears to increase the negative effects of having visible symptoms associated with HIV, greater community attachment seems to ameliorate these effects. This suggests the need for a nuanced understanding of the implications of visible HIV symptoms for PLHIV. The study also highlights the potential benefits of HIV-positive community attachment in buffering PLHIV from the negative effect of visible HIV symptoms on their health and well-being.

  1. The Independence of the Nuclear Regulator: Notes from the Canadian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, B.

    2010-01-01

    The firing of Linda Keen as president and chief executive Officer of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission provoked considerable debate within Canada and internationally about the independence of the canadian nuclear regulator. ms. Keen was dismissed from her position from her position at the height of the crisis over a world-wide shortage of medical isotopes caused by the shutdown of the research reactor in Chalk river, Ontario. Under the terms of its licence, the reactor was required to have cooling pumps connected to an emergency power supply as a backup in case of a power outage caused by an event such an earthquake. In november 2007, after it was discovered that the pumps were not connected, the reactor was shut down. As panic over the shortage of medical isotopes grew, the government took three extraordinary measures: first, it issued a directive; second, it introduced emergency legislation in Parliament; and finally, it fired Linda Keen as President of the Commission. This paper examines those three measures and whether they constituted an unwarranted interference with the independence of the Canadian nuclear regulator. (N.C.)

  2. A phospho-sugar binding domain homologous to NagB enzymes regulates the activity of the central glycolytic genes repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Thierry; Martin, Laetitia; Zorrilla, Silvia; Chaix, Denis; Aymerich, Stéphane; Labesse, Gilles; Declerck, Nathalie

    2008-06-01

    CggR belongs to the SorC family of bacterial transcriptional regulators which control the expression of genes and operons involved in carbohydrate catabolism. CggR was first identified in Bacillus subtilis where it represses the gapA operon encoding the five enzymes that catalyze the central part of glycolysis. Here we present a structure/function study demonstrating that the C-terminal region of CggR regulates the DNA binding activity of this repressor in response to binding of a phosphorylated sugar. Molecular modeling of CggR revealed a winged-helix DNA-binding motif followed by a C-terminal domain presenting weak but significant homology with glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminases from the NagB family. In silico ligand screening suggested that the CggR C-terminal domain would bind preferentially bi-phosphorylated compounds, in agreement with previous studies that proposed fructuose-1,6-biphosphate (FBP) as the inducer metabolite. In vitro, FBP was the only sugar compound capable of interfering with CggR cooperative binding to DNA. FBP was also found to protect CggR against trypsin degradation at two arginine residues predicted to reside in a mobile loop forming the active site lid of the NagB enzymes. Replacement of residues predicted to interact with FBP led to mutant CggR with altered repressor activity in vivo but retaining their structural integrity and DNA binding activity in vitro. Interestingly, some of the mutant repressors responded with different specificity towards mono- and di-phospho-fructosides. Based on these results, we propose that the activity of the CggR-like repressors is controlled by a phospho-sugar binding (PSB) domain presenting structural and functional homology with NagB enzymes. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Periodic Safety Review in Interim Storage Facilities - Current Regulation and Experiences in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neles, Julia Mareike; Schmidt, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Periodic safety reviews in nuclear power plants in Germany have been performed since the end of the 1980's as an indirect follow-up of the accident in Chernobyl and, in the meantime, are formally required by law. During this process the guidelines governing this review were developed in stages and reached their final form in 1996. Interim storage facilities and other nuclear facilities at that time were not included, so the guidelines were solely focused on the specific safety issues of nuclear power plants. Following IAEA's recommendations, the Western European Nuclear Regulator Association (WENRA) introduced PSRs in its safety reference levels for storage facilities (current version in WGWD report 2.1 as of Feb 2011: SRLs 59 - 61). Based on these formulations, Germany improved its regulation in 2010 with a recommendation of the Nuclear Waste Management Commission (Entsorgungskommission, ESK), an expert advisory commission for the federal regulatory body BMU. The ESK formulated these detailed requirements in the 'ESK recommendation for guides to the performance of periodic safety reviews for interim storage facilities for irradiated fuel elements and heat-generating radioactive waste'. Before finalization of the guideline a test phase was introduced, aimed to test the new regulation in practice and to later include the lessons learned in the final formulation of the guideline. The two-year test phase started in October 2011 in which the performance of a PSR will be tested at two selected interim storage facilities. Currently these recommendations are discussed with interested/concerned institutions. The results of the test phase shall be considered for improvements of the draft and during the final preparation of guidelines. Currently the PSR for the first ISF is in an advanced stage, the second facility just started the process. Preliminary conclusions from the test phase show that the implementation of the draft guideline requires interpretation. The aim of a

  4. Local adaptations to frost in marginal and central populations of the dominant forest tree Fagus sylvatica L. as affected by temperature and extreme drought in common garden experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Juergen; Buhk, Constanze; Backhaus, Sabrina; Hallinger, Martin; Huber, Gerhard; Huber, Lukas; Jentsch, Anke; Konnert, Monika; Thiel, Daniel; Wilmking, Martin; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2014-03-01

    Local adaptations to environmental conditions are of high ecological importance as they determine distribution ranges and likely affect species responses to climate change. Increased environmental stress (warming, extreme drought) due to climate change in combination with decreased genetic mixing due to isolation may lead to stronger local adaptations of geographically marginal than central populations. We experimentally observed local adaptations of three marginal and four central populations of Fagus sylvaticaL., the dominant native forest tree, to frost over winter and in spring (late frost). We determined frost hardiness of buds and roots by the relative electrolyte leakage in two common garden experiments. The experiment at the cold site included a continuous warming treatment; the experiment at the warm site included a preceding summer drought manipulation. In both experiments, we found evidence for local adaptation to frost, with stronger signs of local adaptation in marginal populations. Winter frost killed many of the potted individuals at the cold site, with higher survival in the warming treatment and in those populations originating from colder environments. However, we found no difference in winter frost tolerance of buds among populations, implying that bud survival was not the main cue for mortality. Bud late frost tolerance in April differed between populations at the warm site, mainly because of phenological differences in bud break. Increased spring frost tolerance of plants which had experienced drought stress in the preceding summer could also be explained by shifts in phenology. Stronger local adaptations to climate in geographically marginal than central populations imply the potential for adaptation to climate at range edges. In times of climate change, however, it needs to be tested whether locally adapted populations at range margins can successfully adapt further to changing conditions.

  5. Analysis of technologies and experiences for reducing occupational radiation dose and study for applying to regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hyun; Park, Moon Soo; Lee, Un Jang; Song, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Byeong Soo; Kim, Chong Uk [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-15

    To reduce Occupational Radiation Dose (ORD) effectively and enhance the radiological safety, the comprehensive assessment of the experiences to reduce ORD should be made by regulatory body as well as utilities. Hence, the objective of this study is to assess the experiences for reducing ORD from the regulatory viewpoint. With the research objective, the followings are performed in this research; analysis of occupational dose trends at domestic and foreign NPPs, identification of the effective technologies for reducing ORD, examination of the effects of the technologies for reducing ORD, derivation of the regulatory means for implementing he research results. From this study, the regulatory means for effective reduction of ORD are derived. Hence, the results can be utilized as a basic materials for ALARA requirements.

  6. Qualification of class 1e equipment: regulation, technological margins and test experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasco, Y.; Le Meur, M.; Henry, J.Y.; Droger, J.P.; Morange, E.; Roubault, J.

    1986-10-01

    French regulation requires licensee to qualify electrical equipment important to safety for service in nuclear power plants to ensure that the equipment can perform its safety function under the set of plausible operating conditions. The French regulatory texts entitled Fundamental safety rules have classified safety related electrical equipment in three main categories: k1, k2, k3, according to their location and operating conditions. The definition of a design basis accident test profile must account for margins applied to thermal hydraulic code outputs. Specific safety margins was added to cover uncertainties in qualification test representativity. Up to now, accidental sequence studies have shown the validity of such a qualification test profile. On the other hand, the results from post accident simulation tests have shown that it is useful not only to validate post accident operating life but also to reveal failures initiated during previous tests [fr

  7. Preliminary results of ERTS-investigations by W-German investigations. [multidisciplinary geoscientific experiments in central Germany and hydrogeology of Argentina Pampas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlfeld, R.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of West German investigations into multidisciplinary geoscientific experiments in central Germany and the Alps, and hydrogeological investigations in the Pampa of Argentina based on ERTS-1 data. The main goals of the investigation were achieved. The studies have given a good idea of the possibilities and limitations of ERTS imagery depending on the objectives in question and on the geographical conditions of the areas under investigation. Even in the well known region of central Europe, ERTS has proven its ability of improving present knowledge. In fields such as pollution monitoring and regional planning the satellite techniques should have distinct practical value. For any regional study of less known areas, the value of ERTS imagery can hardly be overestimated.

  8. Central coordination as an alternative for local coordination in a multicenter randomized controlled trial: the FAITH trial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zielinski Stephanie M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons in the Netherlands, Canada and the US participate in the FAITH trial (Fixation using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip fractures. Dutch sites are managed and visited by a financed central trial coordinator, whereas most Canadian and US sites have local study coordinators and receive per patient payment. This study was aimed to assess how these different trial management strategies affected trial performance. Methods Details related to obtaining ethics approval, time to trial start-up, inclusion, and percentage completed follow-ups were collected for each trial site and compared. Pre-trial screening data were compared with actual inclusion rates. Results Median trial start-up ranged from 41 days (P25-P75 10-139 in the Netherlands to 232 days (P25-P75 98-423 in Canada (p = 0.027. The inclusion rate was highest in the Netherlands; median 1.03 patients (P25-P75 0.43-2.21 per site per month, representing 34.4% of the total eligible population. It was lowest in Canada; 0.14 inclusions (P25-P75 0.00-0.28, representing 3.9% of eligible patients (p Conclusions In this trial, a central financed trial coordinator to manage all trial related tasks in participating sites resulted in better trial progression and a similar follow-up. It is therefore a suitable alternative for appointing these tasks to local research assistants. The central coordinator approach can enable smaller regional hospitals to participate in multicenter randomized controlled trials. Circumstances such as available budget, sample size, and geographical area should however be taken into account when choosing a management strategy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00761813

  9. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Jamie Ryan, Kevin M. Ward, Ryan Porter, Susan Beck, George Zandt, Lara Wagner, Estela Minaya, and Hernando Tavera The University of Arizona The University of North Carolina San Calixto Observatorio, La Paz, Bolivia IGP, Lima, Peru In order to investigate the interplay between crustal shortening, lithospheric removal, and surface uplift we have deployed 50 broadband seismometers in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru as part of the interdisciplinary Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project. The morphotectonic units of the central Andes from west to east, consist of the Western Cordillera, the active volcanic arc, the Altiplano, an internally drained basin (~4 km elevation), the Eastern Cordillera, the high peaks (~6 km elevation) of an older fold and thrust belt, the Subandean zone, the lower elevation active fold and thrust belt, and the foreland Beni basin. Between northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, the Altiplano pinches out north of Lake Titicaca as the Andes narrow northward. The CAUGHT seismic instruments were deployed between 13° to 18° S latitudes to investigate the crust and mantle lithosphere of the central Andes in this transitional zone. In northwest Bolivia, perpendicular to the strike of the Andes, there is a total of 275 km of documented upper crustal shortening (15° to 17°S) (McQuarrie et al, 2008). Associated with the shortening is crustal thickening and possibly lithospheric removal as the thickening lithospheric root becomes unstable. An important first order study is to compare upper crustal shortening estimates with present day crustal thickness. To estimate crustal thickness, we have calculated receiver functions using an iterative deconvolution method and used common conversion point stacking along the same profile as the geologically based shortening estimates. In our preliminary results, we observed a strong P to S conversion corresponding to the Moho at approximately 60-65 km depth underneath the

  10. Monitoring and enforcement of environmental regulations. Lessons from a natural field experiment in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telle, Kjetil

    2012-07-01

    Relying on a small natural field experiment with random assignment of treatments, I estimate effects of three core elements of most monitoring and enforcement practices: self-reporting, audit frequency and specific deterrence. I find evidence of evasive reporting of violations in self-audits, as more violations are detected in on-site audits than in self-audits. Announcing the increased audit frequency has no effect on compliance, but an audit raises the firm's subsequent compliance substantially.(Author)

  11. Experience with the once-yearly histrelin (GnRHa subcutaneous implant in the treatment of central precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Lewis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine A Lewis, Erica A EugsterDepartment of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, USAAbstract: In 2007, a hydrogel histrelin implant was approved for the treatment of children with central precocious puberty (CPP. Children with CPP commonly have reduced height potential due to premature closure of the epiphyseal growth plates from exposure to sex steroids. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa treatment halts puberty and allows for improvement of adult height. A hydrogel implant delivery system utilizing the potent GnRHa, histrelin, was first developed for use in men with prostate cancer. A once yearly histrelin subcutaneous implant was subsequently developed for the treatment of children with CPP. Studies to date have demonstrated safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of this treatment option in patients treated up to 2 years. The most common adverse effects of the implant relate to implant site pain or bruising. Cost of this treatment seems comparable to somewhat higher than the commonly used GnRHa treatment option, depot leuprolide. While long term studies are needed to establish continued efficacy and safety beyond 2 years of treatment, the histrelin implant appears to be an attractive option for GnRHa treatment in patients with CPP.Keywords: central precocious puberty, histrelin, implant, gonadotropin-releasing-hormone analogs

  12. Experiences in the last amendment of radiation regulation laws in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numakunai, T.

    2004-01-01

    In the deliberation on the introduction of the ICRP recommendation to the radiation regulation laws in Japan, the Radiation Council opened the meetings and the draft report to the public, and requested comments. Submitted comments were reflected in the deliberation. As for the following three subjects, that is, dose limit of occupational exposure for women, classification of workplaces and limitations of the occupational exposure in the emergency, a lot of opinions were expressed in the process of the deliberation on the council, and there were a lot of various opinions of the genera( public to the draft. These opinions were the opinions from each standpoint where benefit conflicted with damage, opinions based on different ideas, and opinions from a socially different standpoints. The Council drew the conclusion after having examined that the grounds of argument had been well verified in a scientific manner and the conclusion of each subject maintained the correspondence in the whole system of law. In order to improve the current comment requesting system, it was pointed out that further discussions by open system among authors, experts and submitted general publics who had the responsible opinion is desirable. (author)

  13. Operating Experience with Indian Point Nuclear Electric Generating Station; Experience d'exploitation de la centrale nucleaire d'Indian point; Opyt ehkspluatatsii Indian-pojntskoj yadernoj ehlektrostantsii; Experiencia adquirida con la explotacion de la central nucleoelectrica de Indian point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, W. C.; Freyberg, R. H. [Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    1963-10-15

    predicted performance for the reactor. Further testing of response to load transients is to continue into the Spring of 1963. The Indian Point Station has proved to the satisfaction of our Company the feasibility of a combination nuclear and oil-fired plant to produce competitive power. The United States Atomic Energy Commission has been requested to issue a construction permit for the Company to build another nuclear plant, similar in design, but of 1000 MW capacity, to be located at Ravenswood which is within the corporate limits of the City of New York. Our Company is prepared to finance the venture with its own funds without subsidy of any kind as was the case with our Indian Point Station. (author) [French] La centrale No. 1 d'Indian Point se compose d'un reacteur a eau sous pression de 585 MWt, quatre circuits de refroidissement primaires avec des echangeurs de chaleur horizontaux, deux surchauffeurs au mazout de 500 000 kg/h et un turbogenerateur de 275 000 kW. Le combustible du reacteur est un melange d'oxyde d'uranium completement enrichi en {sup 235}U et d'oxyde de {sup 232}Th. L'installation se trouve au bord de l'Hudson a une quarantaine de kilometres au nord de New York. En raison de la proximite de cette ville, on a prevu des dispositifs de securite intrinseques exceptionnels contre le risque d'un emballement du reacteur et contre les rayonnements qui pourraient en resulter. La construction a ete terminee en mai 1962. Le combustible a ete charge en juin et le reacteur est entre en divergence pour la premiere fois le 2 aout 1962. On a ensuite procede, dans le courant du mois d'aout, a des essais a faible puissance (jusqu'a 5 MWt), a la temperature ambiante et a .des temperatures elevees. Le turbogenerateur aeteintegre pour la premiere fois au reseau de la ''Consolidated Edison'', le 16 septembre 1962. Les essais aux puissances allant jusqu'a 50% de la puissance theorique se sont prolonges jusqu'en novembre et ont ete marques par de frequents arrets automatiques

  14. Menstrual experiences and beliefs: a multicountry study of relationships with fertility and fertility regulating methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severy, L J; Thapa, S; Askew, I; Glor, J

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge is needed about what women generally experience (behavior and beliefs about sexual, personal, social, and dietary factors) during menstruation as baseline data. Data were obtained from a WHO non nationally representative sample of 5322 parous women from 14 cultural groups between 1973 to 1980 and a subsample of 500 women with detailed daily diaries from 10 countries (Egypt, India, Indonesia, jamaica, Korea, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, UK, and Yugoslavia). This study identified and analyzed 1) critical variables through principal component analysis and varimax rotation, 2) clusters of types of women with particular menstrual experiences and particular beliefs, and 3) the relationship between demographic variables and the 2 resultant cluster and the relationship between beliefs and experiences. Factor analysis resulted in the identification of 6 factors and 13 variables which accounted for more than 65% of the variance: amount of bleeding, activity during the last menstrual period, mood during last menstrual period, discomfort during last menstrual period, predictability, and blood characteristics (smell and color). Beliefs that explained more than 53% of the estimated variance were bathing behavior during menstruation, fertility and femininity issues, interpretations and implications of menstruation, and beliefs about not washing hair or body during menstruation. Alpha estimates of reliability for the belief ranged from .33 to .73, and for behavior the range was .40 to .59. The cluster analysis of type of persons identified 3 groups of women: type I (26.4%) who experienced low blood loss the first day and had a long duration of bleeding; type II (52.3%) who had a short duration of bleeding; and type III (21.2%) who had the heaviest bleeding and longest duration of bleeding. The cluster analysis of women's belief types indicated 9 profiles. For instance, Type 2 women tended to believe that menstruation is dirty but prefer more blood loss. Belief Profiles

  15. Experiences of how fishers grab opportunities in (more) free regulation of gear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist Eliasen, Søren; Mortensen, Lars O.; Ulrich, Clara

    In the Minidisc project 14 vessels fished under conditions corresponding to free choose of gear. Based on the skippers initial idea of gear adjustment and a subsequent interview 6 months later the experiences of the skippers´ choice of “free” gear, the process for adjusting it and the tools...... for evaluating the efficiency and selectivity are discussed. Only incremental development using elements from previous used gear and other fisheries were found. Gear development took place in an interaction between the skipper and trawl maker, while no research was involved. This indicates that free choice...... of gear (under monitored discard ban) would lead to incremental adjustments. Parts of the fleet would have difficulties in evaluating the gear and subsequently optimise by adjusting. This would leave a need for support for development of evaluation procedures, especially among the small vessels. Radical...

  16. Regulation and Device Development: Tips for Optimizing Your Experience With the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Steven S

    2017-06-01

    Physician-inventors are in a unique position to identify unserved patient needs, and innovate solutions to clinical problems. These solutions may also have associated commercial opportunities. The logistics of developing these medical products, however, can seem a daunting task. One of the primary barriers in the United States is the regulatory process of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In this article, we will explore the risk-based approach used by the FDA which forms a framework to consider the regulatory pathway and the process to gain regulatory clearance or approval for medical devices. Inherent device properties and the procedural risk of the devices will determine the rigor with which they are scrutinized by FDA, and the evidentiary requirements to legally market them. Data and evidentiary development will vary depending on risk and regulatory precedent and may or may not require clinical data This regulatory paradigm will determine into which risk-based device class they fit, and whether they are regulated under the 510(k) or premarket approval application pathways. The FDA, although gatekeeper of the US market and tasked with determining which products are safe and effective, can be a powerful ally for product development. They have significant scientific and medical expertise, and mechanisms to both provide guidance, and also to consider novel approaches to product development and evidence development. Early interaction for routine and novel products alike can result in expedited and efficient development. This collaborative approach can be best practice to most expeditiously develop the next generation of products, getting them into the hands of US doctors and into the treatment of US patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Radial space potential measurements in the central cell of the tandem mirror experiment with a heavy-ion-beam probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallock, G.A.

    1983-04-11

    Spatial and temporal profiles of the space potential in the central-cell midplane of TMX have been obtained with a heavy-ion-beam probe. The absolute accuracy of measurements is +- 25 volts (with respect to the machine vacuum walls) with a resolution of approx. 2 volts. During moderate fueling with the gas boxes (i/sub gas/ approx. = 1200 Atom-Amperes D/sub 2/), the plasma potential is parabolic to at least 25 cm radius, with phi/sub e/ approx. = phi/sub max/(1-(r/32)/sup 2/) and 300 < phi/sub max/ <450 volts. With puffer-valve fueling, the space potential is relatively flat to at least 27 cm radius, with 250 < phi/sub e/ < 350 volts.

  18. Radial space potential measurements in the central cell of the tandem mirror experiment with a heavy-ion-beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of the space potential in the central-cell midplane of TMX have been obtained with a heavy-ion-beam probe. The absolute accuracy of measurements is +- 25 volts (with respect to the machine vacuum walls) with a resolution of approx. 2 volts. During moderate fueling with the gas boxes (i/sub gas/ approx. = 1200 Atom-Amperes D 2 ), the plasma potential is parabolic to at least 25 cm radius, with phi/sub e/ approx. = phi/sub max/[1-(r/32) 2 ] and 300 < phi/sub max/ <450 volts. With puffer-valve fueling, the space potential is relatively flat to at least 27 cm radius, with 250 < phi/sub e/ < 350 volts

  19. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome--experience using surgical decompression with open-door expansile cervical laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan; Green, Barth A; Vanni, Steven; Moza, Kapil; Guest, James D; Levi, Allan D

    2005-06-01

    Open-door expansile cervical laminoplasty (ODECL) is an effective surgical technique in the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. In the present study, we reviewed the safety and short-term neurological outcome after expansile cervical laminoplasty in the treatment of acute central cord syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed our database over a 3-year period (January 1997-January 2001) and identified 69 surgically treated cervical spinal cord injuries, including 29 cases of acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS). Fifteen of these patients underwent expansile cervical laminoplasty, whereas 14 did not because of radiographic evidence of sagittal instability. We collected data on the preoperative and the immediate postoperative and 3-month neurological examinations. Neurological function was assessed using the Asia Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grading system. We also reviewed the occurrence of complications and short-term radiological stability after the index procedure. The median age was 56 years. All patients had hyperextension injuries with underlying cervical spondylosis and stenosis in the absence of overt fracture or instability. The average delay from injury to surgery was 3 days. The preoperative ASIA grade scale was grade C, 8 patients, and grade D, 7 patients. There were no cases of immediate postoperative deterioration or at 3 months follow-up. Neurological outcome: 71.4% (10/14) of patients improved 1 ASIA grade when examined 3 months post injury. Surgical intervention consisting of ODECL can be safely applied in the subset of patients with ATCCS without instability who have significant cervical spondylosis/stenosis. Open-door expansile cervical laminoplasty is a safe, low-morbidity, decompressive procedure, and in our patients did not produce neurological deterioration.

  20. Theory of gastric CO2 ventilation and its control during respiratory acidosis: implications for central chemosensitivity, pH regulation, and diseases causing chronic CO2 retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Jay B

    2011-02-15

    The theory of gastric CO(2) ventilation describes a previously unrecognized reflex mechanism controlled by neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) for non-alveolar elimination of systemic CO(2) during respiratory acidosis. Neurons in the cSC, which is a site of CO(2) chemosensitivity for cardiorespiratory control, also control various gastroesophageal reflexes that remove CO(2) from blood. CO(2) is consumed in the production of gastric acid and bicarbonate in the gastric epithelium and then reconstituted as CO(2) in the stomach lumen from the reaction between H(+) and HCO(3)(-). Respiratory acidosis and gastric CO(2) distension induce cSC/vagovagal mediated transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter to vent gastric CO(2) upwards by bulk flow along an abdominal-to-esophageal (=intrapleural) pressure gradient the magnitude of which increases during abdominal (gastric) compression caused by increased contractions of respiratory muscles. Esophageal distension induces cSC/nucleus ambiguus/vagovagal reflex relaxation of the upper esophageal sphincter and CO(2) is vented into the pharynx and mixed with pulmonary gas during expiration or, alternatively, during eructation. It is proposed that gastric CO(2) ventilation provides explanations for (1) the postprandial increase in expired CO(2) and (2) the negative P(blood - expired)CO₂difference that occurs with increased inspired CO(2). Furthermore, it is postulated that gastric CO(2) ventilation and alveolar CO(2) ventilation are coordinated under dual control by CO(2) chemosensitive neurons in the cSC. This new theory, therefore, presupposes a level of neural control and coordination between two previously presumed dissimilar organ systems and supports the notion that different sites of CO(2) chemosensitivity address different aspects of whole body pH regulation. Consequently, not all sites of central chemosensitivity are equal regarding the mechanism(s) activated for CO(2) elimination. A distributed CO(2

  1. Acute up-regulation of the rat brain somatostatin receptor-effector system by leptin is related to activation of insulin signaling and may counteract central leptin actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perianes-Cachero, A; Burgos-Ramos, E; Puebla-Jiménez, L; Canelles, S; Frago, L M; Hervás-Aguilar, A; de Frutos, S; Toledo-Lobo, M V; Mela, V; Viveros, M P; Argente, J; Chowen, J A; Arilla-Ferreiro, E; Barrios, V

    2013-11-12

    Leptin and somatostatin (SRIF) have opposite effects on food seeking and ingestive behaviors, functions partially regulated by the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus. Although it is known that the acute suppression of food intake mediated by leptin decreases with time, the counter-regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Our aims were to analyze the effect of acute central leptin infusion on the SRIF receptor-effector system in these areas and the implication of related intracellular signaling mechanisms in this response. We studied 20 adult male Wister rats including controls and those treated intracerebroventricularly with a single dose of 5 μg of leptin and sacrificed 1 or 6h later. Density of SRIF receptors was unchanged at 1h, whereas leptin increased the density of SRIF receptors at 6h, which was correlated with an elevated capacity of SRIF to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in both areas. The functional capacity of SRIF receptors was unaltered as cell membrane levels of αi1 and αi2 subunits of G inhibitory proteins were unaffected in both brain areas. The increased density of SRIF receptors was due to enhanced SRIF receptor subtype 2 (sst2) protein levels that correlated with higher mRNA levels for this receptor. These changes in sst2 mRNA levels were concomitant with increased activation of the insulin signaling, c-Jun and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB); however, activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was reduced in the cortex and unchanged in the hippocampus and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 remained unchanged in these areas. In addition, the leptin antagonist L39A/D40A/F41A blocked the leptin-induced changes in SRIF receptors, leptin signaling and CREB activation. In conclusion, increased activation of insulin signaling after leptin infusion is related to acute up-regulation of the SRIF receptor-effector system that may antagonize short-term leptin actions in the rat brain

  2. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Baer

    Full Text Available Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs at the injury site, which are 50-100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair.

  3. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs) in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Matthew L; Henderson, Scott C; Colello, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs) at the injury site, which are 50-100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair.

  4. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Paul J; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5-2.5 mg per kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg per kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg per kg per infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg per kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 microM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1-10 ng per side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug.

  5. Increasing Use of Postpartum Family Planning and the Postpartum IUD: Early Experiences in West and Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleah, Tsigue; Hyjazi, Yolande; Austin, Suzanne; Diallo, Abdoulaye; Dao, Blami; Waxman, Rachel; Karna, Priya

    2016-08-11

    A global resurgence of interest in the intrauterine device (IUD) as an effective long-acting reversible contraceptive and in improving access to a wide range of contraceptive methods, as well as an emphasis on encouraging women to give birth in health care facilities, has led programs to introduce postpartum IUD (PPIUD) services into postpartum family planning (PPFP) programs. We describe strategic, organizational, and technical elements that contributed to early successes of a regional initiative in West and Central Africa to train antenatal, maternity, and postnatal care providers in PPFP counseling for the full range of available methods and in PPIUD service delivery. In November 2013, the initiative provided competency-based training in Guinea for providers from the main public teaching hospital in 5 selected countries (Benin, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Niger, and Senegal) with no prior PPFP counseling or PPIUD capacity. The training was followed by a transfer-of-learning visit and monitoring to support the trained providers. One additional country, Togo, replicated the initiative's model in 2014. Although nascent, this initiative has introduced high-quality PPFP and PPIUD services to the region, where less than 1% of married women of reproductive age use the IUD. In total, 21 providers were trained in PPFP counseling, 18 of whom were also trained in PPIUD insertion. From 2014 to 2015, more than 15,000 women were counseled about PPFP, and 2,269 women chose and received the PPIUD in Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Niger, Senegal, and Togo. (Introduction of PPIUD services in Chad has been delayed.) South-South collaboration has been central to the initiative's accomplishments: Guinea's clinical centers of excellence and qualified trainers provided a culturally resonant example of a PPFP/PPIUD program, and trainings are creating a network of regional trainers to facilitate expansion. Two of the selected countries (Benin and Niger) have expanded their PPFP/PPUID training

  6. Local community opinions regarding the socio-environmental aspects of lignite surface mining: Experiences from central Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badera, Jarosław; Kocoń, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Surface lignite mining covers large areas and usually generates social conflicts which pose one of several energy security threats to certain states. Therefore, defining the social conditions determines the success of a mining project. Two communes were chosen for a public opinion study: Kleszczów, where the Bełchatów mine is located, and Złoczew, where a lignite deposit will soon be developed. The analysis shows, as opposed to other areas in Poland that have been projected for development, that both local communities are characterised by a high level of acceptance for lignite mining. In both cases, awareness about the profits was stronger than anxiety about the investment's negative effects. However, most inhabitants could not assess the mining company's diligence concerning its responsibility for mining damages as well as the diligence of external experts assessing the environmental impacts of excavation. Most respondents also could not assess if the legal regulations of public participation in the decision process were sufficient, but the negative opinions outweighed the positive ones. From the perspective of the energy policy, dialogue-type social communication is needed for every case of a new energy-mining project. Research on local public opinion should be the first step to opening up a social debate. - Highlights: • Lignite mining can generate social conflicts, which may threaten energy security. • Examined communes are characterised by a high level of acceptance for lignite mining. • Inhabitants cannot assess if the legal regulations of mining activity are sufficient. • From the perspective of the energy policy, broader social communication is needed. • Research on the public opinion should be the first step to open up a social debate

  7. ["Let me tell you about my little box": phenomenological study on the experience of living with a totally implantable central venous catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Carolina; Fumagalli, Anna; Monni, Pierina; Rancati, Stefania; Rosi, Ivana Maria

    2016-01-01

    . "Let me tell you about my little box": phenomenological study on the experience of living with a totally implantable central venous catheter. Many variables impact on the choice to implant a totally implantable long-term central venous catheter's (Port), in spite of its proven efficacy. The patients' perception is pivotal, and only few qualitative studies dig deep into patients' feelings and experiences. To understand if, and how, the Port affects the patient's life. Qualitative phenomenological study based on semi-structured interviews on a convenience sample of patients implanted a Port, selected in an oncohematology Day Hospital in Milan. The analysis was carried out by three researchers with a phenomenological method. Four main themes, and sub-themes, emerged from twenty interviews. Relief, both physical and psychological; the process of the choice of inserting the Port and the importance of thinking about its positioning since the beginning of the treatment course; the symbol- the device reminds of the disease and its removal is of utmost importance; the technology progresses- the need of trust in the health care personnel and in their competences. The Port improved the patients' quality of life. The study allows some reflections on the need of considering the actual and future conditions of the patient to make a shared and informed choice.

  8. Varicella zoster virus infection of the central nervous system – 10 year experience from a tertiary hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Albert Benton Carey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Varicella zoster virus is an exclusively human neurotrophic virus. The primary infection with the virus causes varicella. The virus remains latent in nervous tissue and upon secondary activation causes a variety of syndromes involving the central nervous system (CNS including meningoencephalitis and cerebellitis. Materials and Methods: In this study, we looked at the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory features, and outcomes of patients who were admitted with varicella zoster of the CNS from 2005 to 2014. Results: There were 17 patients. Fever was present in 13 patients, seizures in 9 patients and headache and vomiting in 4 patients each. A generalized varicella rash was present in 8 out of 17 patients. A single dermatomal herpes zoster was present in seven patients. Two patients had no rash. Varicella zoster polymerase chain reaction (PCR in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was done in 5 patients of which 4 were positive and 1 was negative. Nine patients had diabetes with an average glycated hemoglobin of 8.6%. Total number of deaths was five. Conclusions: Patients with diabetes who develop varicella or herpes zoster may be at risk for CNS complications. The diagnosis of varicella encephalitis has to rest on a combination of clinical findings and CSF PCR, as neither the rash nor the PCR is sensitive enough to diagnose all the cases with varicella encephalitis.

  9. Centralized Analysis of Local Data, With Dollars and Lives on the Line: Lessons From The Home Radon Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, PhillipN.; Gelman, Andrew

    2014-11-24

    In this chapter we elucidate four main themes. The first is that modern data analyses, including "Big Data" analyses, often rely on data from different sources, which can present challenges in constructing statistical models that can make effective use of all of the data. The second theme is that although data analysis is usually centralized, frequently the final outcome is to provide information or allow decision-making for individuals. Third, data analyses often have multiple uses by design: the outcomes of the analysis are intended to be used by more than one person or group, for more than one purpose. Finally, issues of privacy and confidentiality can cause problems in more subtle ways than are usually considered; we will illustrate this point by discussing a case in which there is substantial and effective political opposition to simply acknowledging the geographic distribution of a health hazard. A researcher analyzes some data and learns something important. What happens next? What does it take for the results to make a difference in people's lives? In this chapter we tell a story - a true story - about a statistical analysis that should have changed government policy, but didn't. The project was a research success that did not make its way into policy, and we think it provides some useful insights into the interplay between locally-collected data, statistical analysis, and individual decision making.

  10. Health literacy of older drivers and the importance of health experience for self-regulation of driving behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent-Cox, K A; Windsor, T; Walker, J; Anstey, K J

    2011-05-01

    This study provides much needed information on the education level of older drivers regarding the impact of health conditions and medications on personal driving safety, where they source this information, and how this knowledge influences self-regulation of driving. Random and convenience sampling secured 322 Australian drivers (63.9% males) aged 65 years and over (M = 77.35 years, SD = 7.35) who completed a telephone interview. The majority of respondents (86%) had good knowledge about health conditions (health knowledge) and driving safety, however more than 50% was classified as having poor knowledge on the effects of certain medications (medication knowledge) and driving safety. Poorer health knowledge was associated with a reduced likelihood of driving over 100 km in adjusted models. Being older and having more than one medical condition was found to increase the likelihood of self-regulation of driving. Results indicate that health knowledge was less important for predicting driving behaviour than health experience. Of great interest was that up to 85.7% of respondents reported not receiving advice about the potential impact of their medical condition and driving from their doctor. The findings indicate a need for improved dissemination of evidence-based health information and education for older drivers and their doctors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Robustness studies of the photomultipliers reading out TileCal, the central hadron calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Di Gregorio, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    TileCal, the hadron calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment in LHC, is a 10000 channel detector readout by photomultipliers (PMTs). A challenging goal is to understand whether the full sample of PMTs installed at the beginning of the ATLAS detector operation can be used until completion of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) program or not. For this reason, a reliable study of the PMT robustness against ageing is required. Detailed studies modelling the PMT response variation as a function of the integrated anode charge were done.

  12. On the Development of Multi-Hazard Early Warning Networks: Practical experiences from North and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencin, David; Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Braun, John; Meertens, Charles; Mattioli, Glen; Phillips, David; Blume, Fredrick; Berglund, Henry; Fox, Otina; Feaux, Karl

    2015-04-01

    The GAGE facility, managed by UNAVCO, maintains and operates about 1300 GNSS stations distributed across North and Central America as part of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and the Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network (COCONet). UNAVCO has upgraded about 450 stations in these networks to real-time and high-rate (RT-GNSS) and included surface meteorological instruments. The majority of these streaming stations are part of the PBO but also include approximately 50 RT-GNSS stations in the Caribbean and Central American region as part of the COCONet and TLALOCNet projects. Based on community input UNAVCO has been exploring ways to increase the capability and utility of these resources to improve our understanding in diverse areas of geophysics including seismic, volcanic, magmatic and tsunami deformation sources, extreme weather events such as hurricanes and storms, and space weather. The RT-GNSS networks also have the potential to profoundly transform our ability to rapidly characterize geophysical events, provide early warning, as well as improve hazard mitigation and response. Specific applications currently under development with university, commercial, non-profit and government collaboration on national and international scales include earthquake and tsunami early warning systems and near real-time tropospheric modeling of hurricanes and precipitable water vapor estimate assimilation. Using tsunami early warning as an example, an RT-GNSS network can provide multiple inputs in an operational system starting with rapid assessment of earthquake sources and associated deformation which informs the initial modeled tsunami. The networks can then can also provide direct measurements of the tsunami wave heights and propagation by tracking the associated ionospheric disturbance from several 100's of km away as the waves approaches the shoreline. These GNSS based constraints can refine the tsunami and inundation models and potentially

  13. Is banking supervision central to central banking?

    OpenAIRE

    Joe Peek; Eric S. Rosengren; Geoffrey M. B. Tootell

    1997-01-01

    Whether central banks should play an active role in bank supervision and regulation is being debated both in the United States and abroad. While the Bank of England has recently been stripped of its supervisory responsibilities and several proposals in the United States have advocated removing bank supervision from the Federal Reserve System, other countries are considering enhancing central bank involvement in this area. Many of the arguments for and against these proposals hinge on the effe...

  14. Criptococose do sistema nervoso central: experiência atual do Serviço de Neurologia da Escola Paulista de Medicina Central nervous system cryptococcosis: experience of the Neurological Department of Escola Paulista de Medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante R. Giorgi

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores ressaltam a importância da pesquisa de criptococo em todos os pacientes com quadro clínico de meningite, meningo-encefalite ou hipertensão intracraniana não identificados, associados a um quadro inflamatório no líquido cefalorraqueano. Procedendo sistematicamente esta pesquisa pelo exame a fresco, pelo método da tinta china, no líquido cefalorraqueano, os autores fizeram o diagnóstico em vida de 35 pacientes, durante o período 1953-1972. Além destes, foi observado um outro caso com a forma granulomatosa pura, o que perfaz 36 observações. A distribuição cronológica destes casos no correr destes 20 anos de observação foi relativamente uniforme, não se justificando a hipótese de um aumento de sua incidência. As idades dos pacientes estavam compreendidas entre 11 e 59 anos, a maioria entre 30 e 50; apenas 8 pertenciam ao sexo feminino. Dos primeiros 12 pacientes da época em que não se dispunha de meios terapêuticos, apenas um sobreviveu para se beneficiar ulteriormente. Com o advento da Anfotericina B tornou-se possível o tratamento de 24 destes pacientes que apresentavam a forma de meningite ou meningo-encefalite. Foi obtida a cura, com normalização clínica e do líquido cefalorraqueano, de 11 pacientes; 8 pacientes não completaram o tratamento, tendo se retirado do Hospital depois das primeiras melhorias, ignorando-se, por isso, a evolução final; 5 pacientes faleceram. A 5-fluorocitosina foi experimentada em um dos últimos pacientes desta série, em asso- ciação com a Anfotericina B, de modo que os autores não têm experiência sobre o valor real deste novo medicamento.The authors emphasize the importance of the search of cryptococcus in every patient with signs and symptoms of meningitis, meningo-encephalitis or intracranial hypertension and with inflammatory changes in the spinal fluid. With this idea in mind, they have performed the India ink test in the spinal fluid of every patient in the 1953

  15. Initial Experience in Colombia in Patients with PET/CT-FDG Studies of the Central Nervous System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucros, Gonzalo; Bernal, Patricia; Bermudez Sonia

    2009-01-01

    To describe the experience of patients who underwent a brain PET-CT during sixteen consecutive months. Method: 41 studies were made using flourodeoxiglucose (FDG) and registered with computed tomography. Results: These studies correspond to 5% of all PET studies performed at our institution. The age of patients ranged from 11 to 74 years. The main indications were: search for an epileptic focus (34%), cognitive disorder (32%), tumor evaluation (22%) and others (12%). Conclusion: The main applications of the brain PETCT FDG in our patients were: evaluation of untreatable epileptic patients thinking of undergoing surgery, evaluation of patients with cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's and other related dementias and finally, evaluation of patients with residual or primary brain tumors. It is among these patients in which this diagnostic modality has better diagnostic utility with abnormal findings, useful for their management.

  16. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  17. CENTRAL BANKING IN THE NEW ERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Bagis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the evolution of central banking, and in particular the American experience of central banking. It provides projections for the future of central banking in the new era of post 2008. The paper initially demonstrates recent improvements in the financial and banking sectors, regulations and different measures of monetary and financial rules both in the USA and the rest of the advanced economies. Then, it claims institutions, such as central banks, will gain new objectives and more significance in this new era and thus will be given new roles, over time and along with the improvements and deepening in the financial system. The paper argues centuries long central bank evolution is not complete yet and that more objectives should be expected to come forward. In that line, there is need for a shift in the conventional policy measures. New trends in central banking such as the helicopter money, popular nominal GDP targeting regime and the retro developmental central banking are all critically analyzed. The paper provides a breakdown of financial development and central banking activities in a historical context and provides a rationale and a new basis for possible future innovations.

  18. Regulatory Issues and Challenges in Preparing for the Regulation of New Reactor Siting: Malaysia's Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jais, Azlina Mohammad; Hassan, Halimah; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Roslan, Ridha

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at giving an overview about the issues and challenges facing regulatory authority, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) in ensuring nuclear safety, security and safeguards (3S's) and other relevant authorities to meet an impending nuclear power programme post-2020, in particular at the beginning stage of preparation for the regulation of nuclear power reactor siting. A comparison with an international framework and guidelines of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and other countries' practice was made to get an overview of the present adequacy of Malaysia's nuclear regulatory framework in preparation for Malaysia to consider and perhaps decide for a safe, secure and peaceful nuclear power project in Malaysia, in utilising nuclear power in a quest for energy diversity and security. The important stage in the development of a nuclear power project is the evaluation of a suitable site to establish the site-related design inputs for the NPP. The evaluation of suitable site is the result of a process to ensure adequate protection of workers, public and the environment from the undue risk of ionizing radiation arising from NPP taking into account impact to the social communities and public acceptance, thus it will depend on the regulators to ensure a high level safety standards and security are met, in addition to its peaceful uses. Development of regulatory criteria for the site evaluation is a pre-initiatives licensing work for a possible nuclear power plant to performing effective nuclear safety and security reviews in an efficient and timely manner regardless whether Malaysia embarks on a nuclear power programme with anticipating challenges, learning from others' experiences in preparing for the demands for new licensing processes by collaborating internationally, in an expanding global environment

  19. [Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Fen; Yu, Kang-Ying; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-25

    The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) is an important approach for regulating arterial blood pressure homeostasis instantaneously and physiologically. Activation of the central histaminergic or cholinergic systems results in CSR functional inhibitory resetting. However, it is unclear whether two systems at the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) level display cross interaction to regulate the CSR or not. In the present study, the left or right carotid sinus region was isolated from the systemic circulation in Sprague-Dawley rats (sinus nerve was reserved) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Respective intubation was conducted into one side isolated carotid sinus and into the femoral artery for recording the intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) simultaneously with pressure transducers connection in vivo. ISP was set at the level of 0 mmHg to eliminate the effect of initial internal pressure of the carotid sinus on the CSR function. To trigger CSR, the ISP was quickly elevated from 0 mmHg to 280 mmHg in a stepwise manner (40 mmHg) which was added at every step for over 4 s, and then ISP returned to 0 mmHg in similar steps. The original data of ISP and corresponding MAP were fitted to a modified logistic equation with five parameters to obtain the ISP-MAP, ISP-Gain relationship curves and the CSR characteristic parameters, which were statistically compared and analyzed separately. Under the precondition of no influence on the basic levels of the artery blood pressure, the effects and potential regulatory mechanism of preceding microinjection with different cholinoceptor antagonists, the selective cholinergic M1 receptor antagonist, i.e., pirenzepine (PRZ), the M2 receptor antagonist, i.e., methoctramine (MTR) or the N1 receptor antagonist, i.e., hexamethonium (HEX) into the NTS on the changes in function of CSR induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) in rats were observed. Meanwhile, the actions and

  20. A test of the compensatory mortality hypothesis in mountain lions: a management experiment in West-Central Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hugh S.; Desimone, Richard; Hartway, Cynthia; Gude, Justin A.; Thompson, Michael J.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Hebblewhite, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Mountain lions (Puma concolor) are widely hunted for recreation, population control, and to reduce conflict with humans, but much is still unknown regarding the effects of harvest on mountain lion population dynamics. Whether human hunting mortality on mountain lions is additive or compensatory is debated. Our primary objective was to investigate population effects of harvest on mountain lions. We addressed this objective with a management experiment of 3 years of intensive harvest followed by a 6-year recovery period. In December 2000, after 3 years of hunting, approximately 66% of a single game management unit within the Blackfoot River watershed in Montana was closed to lion hunting, effectively creating a refuge representing approximately 12% (915 km2) of the total study area (7,908 km2). Hunting continued in the remainder of the study area, but harvest levels declined from approximately 9/1,000 km2 in 2001 to 2/1,000 km2 in 2006 as a result of the protected area and reduced quotas outside. We radiocollared 117 mountain lions from 1998 to 2006. We recorded known fates for 63 animals, and right-censored the remainder. Although hunting directly reduced survival, parameters such as litter size, birth interval, maternity, age at dispersal, and age of first reproduction were not significantly affected. Sensitivity analysis showed that female survival and maternity were most influential on population growth. Life-stage simulation analysis (LSA) demonstrated the effect of hunting on the population dynamics of mountain lions. In our non-hunted population, reproduction (kitten survival and maternity) accounted for approximately 62% of the variation in growth rate, whereas adult female survival accounted for 30%. Hunting reversed this, increasing the reliance of population growth on adult female survival (45% of the variation in population growth), and away from reproduction (12%). Our research showed that harvest at the levels implemented in this study did not

  1. Relationships between the quality of blended learning experience, self-regulated learning, and academic achievement of medical students: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Salah Eldin; Al-Shafei, Ahmad I; Salem, Abdel Halim; Otoom, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between the different aspects of students' course experience, self-regulated learning, and academic achievement of medical students in a blended learning curriculum. Perceptions of medical students (n=171) from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Medical University of Bahrain (RCSI Bahrain), on the blended learning experience were measured using the Student Course Experience Questionnaire (SCEQ), with an added e-Learning scale. In addition, self-regulated learning was measured using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Academic achievement was measured by the scores of the students at the end of the course. A path analysis was created to test the relationships between the different study variables. Path analysis indicated that the perceived quality of the face-to-face component of the blended experience directly affected the motivation of students. The SCEQ scale "quality of teaching" directly affected two aspects of motivation: control of learning and intrinsic goal orientation. Furthermore, appropriate course workload directly affected the self-efficacy of students. Moreover, the e-Learning scale directly affected students' peer learning and critical thinking but indirectly affected metacognitive regulation. The resource management regulation strategies, time and study environment, and effort regulation directly affected students' examination scores (17% of the variance explained). However, there were no significant direct relationships between the SCEQ scales and cognitive learning strategies or examination scores. The results of this study will have important implications for designing blended learning courses in medical schools.

  2. Experiences, opportunities and challenges of implementing task shifting in underserved remote settings: the case of Kongwa district, central Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munga Michael A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanzania is experiencing acute shortages of Health Workers (HWs, a situation which has forced health managers, especially in the underserved districts, to hastily cope with health workers’ shortages by adopting task shifting. This has however been due to limited options for dealing with the crisis of health personnel. There are on-going discussions in the country on whether to scale up task shifting as one of the strategies for addressing health personnel crisis. However, these discussions are not backed up by rigorous scientific evidence. The aim of this paper is two-fold. Firstly, to describe the current situation of implementing task shifting in the context of acute shortages of health workers and, secondly, to provide a descriptive account of the potential opportunities or benefits and the likely challenges which might ensue as a result of implementing task shifting. Methods We employed in-depth interviews with informants at the district level and supplemented the information with additional interviews with informants at the national level. Interviews focussed on the informants’ practical experiences of implementing task shifting in their respective health facilities (district level and their opinions regarding opportunities and challenges which might be associated with implementation of task shifting practices. At the national level, the main focus was on policy issues related to management of health personnel in the context of implementation of task shifting, in addition to seeking their opinions and perceptions regarding opportunities and challenges of implementing task shifting if formally adopted. Results Task shifting has been in practice for many years in Tanzania and has been perceived as an inevitable coping mechanism due to limited options for addressing health personnel shortages in the country. Majority of informants had the concern that quality of services is likely to be affected if appropriate policy

  3. The First Two Years of Operating Experience of the Kahl Nuclear Power Station; Experience acquise pendant les deux premieres annees de fonctionnement de la centrale nucleaire de Kahl; Opyt pervykh dvukh let ehkspluatatsii atomnoj ehlektrostantsii v Kale; Experiencia adquirida en los primeros cuatro anos de funcionamiento de la central nucleoelectrica de Kahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchner, H. J. [Aeg-Kernenergieanlagen, Frankfurt-am-Main (Germany); Weckesser, A. [Versuchs-Atomkraftwerk Kahl Gmbh, Kahl (Germany)

    1963-10-15

    Kahl, being the first European private atomic power station, has been operating at load since June 1961. Kahl is equipped with a boiling-water reactor, operating in an indirect cycle and with natural circulation. Its electrical net capacity is 15 MW, and the power produced until February 1963 amounts to 140 million kWh. In the paper the operating experience, particularly the extensive testing programme such as concerning transient behaviour and gammascanning, will be reviewed. Results about the operating performance of certain plant components such as control-rod-drive system, off-gas system and turbine will be presented. After this testing programme the plant has been operated at base load for some time in order to obtain realistic experience on fuel performance. After completion of the base-load phase of operation a nuclear superheating test loop will be installed and run in the Kahl reactor. (author) [French] La centrale de Kahl, la premiere en Europe dont l'exploitation soit assuree par une entreprise privee, alimente le secteur depuis juin 1961. Elle est equipee d'un reacteur a eau bouillante, en cycle indirect, a circulation naturelle. Avec une puissance electrique nette de 15 MW, elle avait produit, jusqu'a fevrier 1963, 140 millions de kWh. Le memoire rend compte de l'experience acquise concernant le fonctionnement de la centrale, notamment du programme etendu des essais effectues sur son comportement en regime transitoire et sur la detection gamma. Il donne, en particulier, des renseignements sur le fonctionnement de certains elements de la centrale tels que le mecanisme de commande des barres de controle, le dispositif d'echappement des gaz et la turbine. A la suite de ce programme d'essais, on fait fonctionner depuis quelque temps la centrale comme centrale de base afin de rassembler des donnees pratiques sur les performances du combustible. A l'expiration de la periode prevue pour le fonctionnement comme centrale de base, on amenagera, dans le reacteur

  4. Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

  5. That’s not funny! – But it should be: effects of humorous emotion regulation on emotional experience and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Lisa; Kuhbandner, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that humorous reappraisal can reduce elicited negative emotions, suggesting that humor may be a functional strategy to cope with emotionally negative situations. However, the effect of humorous reappraisal on later memory about the emotion-eliciting situation is currently unknown, although this is crucial for more adaptive responding in future situations. To address this issue, we examined the effects of humorous reappraisal on both emotional experience and memory, compared to non-humorous rational reappraisal and a non-reappraisal control condition. Replicating previous findings, humorous reappraisal reduced evoked negative valence and arousal levels very effectively, and the down-regulation of experienced negative emotions was even more pronounced after humorous compared to rational reappraisal. Regarding later memory for emotion-eliciting stimuli, both humorous and rational reappraisal reduced free recall, but recognition memory was unaffected, with memory strength being stronger after humorous than after rational reappraisal. These results indicate that humor seems to be indeed an optimal strategy to cope with negative situations because humor can help us to feel better when confronted with negative stimuli, but still allows us to retrieve stimulus information later when afforded to do so by the presence of appropriate contextual features. PMID:26379608

  6. That's not funny! - But it should be: effects of humorous emotion regulation on emotional experience and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Lisa; Kuhbandner, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that humorous reappraisal can reduce elicited negative emotions, suggesting that humor may be a functional strategy to cope with emotionally negative situations. However, the effect of humorous reappraisal on later memory about the emotion-eliciting situation is currently unknown, although this is crucial for more adaptive responding in future situations. To address this issue, we examined the effects of humorous reappraisal on both emotional experience and memory, compared to non-humorous rational reappraisal and a non-reappraisal control condition. Replicating previous findings, humorous reappraisal reduced evoked negative valence and arousal levels very effectively, and the down-regulation of experienced negative emotions was even more pronounced after humorous compared to rational reappraisal. Regarding later memory for emotion-eliciting stimuli, both humorous and rational reappraisal reduced free recall, but recognition memory was unaffected, with memory strength being stronger after humorous than after rational reappraisal. These results indicate that humor seems to be indeed an optimal strategy to cope with negative situations because humor can help us to feel better when confronted with negative stimuli, but still allows us to retrieve stimulus information later when afforded to do so by the presence of appropriate contextual features.

  7. That’s Not Funny! – But It Should Be: Effects of Humorous Emotion Regulation on Emotional Experience and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eKugler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that humorous reappraisal can reduce elicited negative emotions, suggesting that humor may be a functional strategy to cope with emotionally negative situations. However, the effect of humorous reappraisal on later memory about the emotion-eliciting situation is currently unknown, although this is crucial for more adaptive responding in future situations. To address this issue, we examined the effects of humorous reappraisal on both emotional experience and memory, compared to non-humorous rational reappraisal and a non-reappraisal control condition. Replicating previous findings, humorous reappraisal reduced evoked negative valence and arousal levels very effectively, and the down-regulation of experienced negative emotions was even more pronounced after humorous compared to rational reappraisal. Regarding later memory for emotion-eliciting stimuli, both humorous and rational reappraisal reduced free recall, but recognition memory was unaffected, with memory strength being stronger after humorous than after rational reappraisal. These results indicate that humor seems to be indeed an optimal strategy to cope with negative situations because humor can help us to feel better when confronted with negative stimuli, but still allows us to retrieve stimulus information later when afforded to do so by the presence of appropriate contextual features.

  8. Blowing loop in the EL-4 reactor: CO{sub 2} flow control analogue study; Boucle de soufflage de la centrale EL-4 - regulation du debit CO{sub 2} - etude analogique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chazal, G; Merle, J P; Guillemard, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Leroy, C; Robin, L; Jacquin, J C; Cornudet, A [Societe INDATOM, France (France)

    1966-07-01

    This report describes one study which contributed to the construction of the Monts d'Arree nuclear power station: EL-4. The reactor is cooled by a CO{sub 2} current provided by 3 turbo-blower groups. The priming vapour for the turbines is taken at the exit of the main CO{sub 2} - H{sub 2}O exchangers. The operation of EL 4 is based on a high degree of centralization of the controls which attributes an important role to the general regulation circuits. This general regulation includes in particular an internal blowing loop which controls the CO{sub 2} flow. The study of the control of this CO{sub 2} flow is made up of 3 parts: - analogue representation of the reactors cooling circuit and of the turbo blower unit. - first test campaign using the analogue computer describing the natural behaviour of the system in the absence of control. theoretical determination of the regulation factors; definition of the regulation using an analogue computer and second test campaign for recording the performances of the blowing loop. The 4. part of the report deals with the analogue study: analogue equations - development. (authors) [French] Ce rapport prend place parmi les etudes de realisation de la Centrale des Monts d'Arree EL-4. Le reacteur est refroidi par une circulation de CO{sub 2} assuree par 3 groupes turbosoufflantes. La vapeur d'entrainement des turbines est prelevee a la sortie des echangeurs principaux CO{sub 2} - H{sub 2}O. L'exploitation de EL-4 repose sur une centralisation poussee des moyens de controle-commande qui attribue un role essentiel aux circuits de regulation generale. Cette regulation generale comporte en particulier une boucle interne de soufflage qui realise un asservissement du debit de CO{sub 2}. L'etude de cette regulation du debit CO{sub 2} comprend 3 parties: - representation analogique du circuit de refroidissement du reacteur et de l'ensemble turbine-soufflante. - premiere campagne d'essais sur calculateur analogique decrivant le comportement

  9. Quality control in environmental radioactivity measurements: experience of the Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiation, acting as International Reference Center Of the World Health Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, M L; Gahinet, M E; Moroni, J P; De Zertucha, J; Pellerin, P [Service Central de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - Le Vesinet (France)

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to make known the experiences in the Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (SCPRI) in two fields: (i)in relation to the survey of, and research on, environmental radiation in France for 15 years, and (ii) as the International Reference Center (IRC), a responsibility which has been assigned to it by the World Health Organisation (WHO) for more than 7 years. The SCPRI has no permanent activity in pure metrology but the control which it exerts on a national scale (more than 30,000 environmental samples analyzed each year) and the periodic intercomparisons which it organizes with a large number of foreign Public Health Laboratories have led to the development of a strict quality control program for the techniques of preparation and verification of standard sources and reference samples which are essential in the use of counters, the application and development of spectrometric and radiochemical analytical methods and in the distribution of samples for intercomparison purposes. A description is given of practical experience of quality control in the preparation of standards and in international inter-comparisons organized under the sponsorship of the World Health Organization.

  10. 'It was like I had to fit into a category': Care-seekers' experiences of gender regulation in the Swedish trans-specific healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linander, Ida; Alm, Erika; Goicolea, Isabel; Harryson, Lisa

    2017-05-01

    The few previous studies investigating regulation of gender in trans-specific healthcare are mainly based on text material and interviews with care-providers or consist solely of theoretical analyses. There is a lack of studies analysing how the regulation of gender is expressed in the care-seeker's own experiences, especially in a Nordic context. The aim of this study is to analyse narratives of individuals with trans experiences (sometimes called transgender people) to examine how gender performances can be regulated in trans-specific care in Sweden. The conceptual framework is inspired by trans studies, a Foucauldian analysis of power, queer phenomenology and the concept of cisnormativity. Fourteen interviews with people with trans experiences are analysed with constructivist grounded theory. The participants' experiences indicate that gender is constructed as norm-conforming, binary and stable in trans-specific healthcare. This gendered position is resisted, negotiated and embraced by the care-seekers. Norms and discourses both inside and outside trans-specific care contribute to the regulation and limit the room for action for care-users. We conclude that a trans-specific care that has a confirming approach to its care-users, instead of the current focus on gender norm conformity, has the potential to increase the self-determination of gender performance and increase the quality of care.

  11. Regulation of distribution grid prices at the beginning of market liberalisation - Experience in Norway and Sweden; Regulierung der Verteilnetzpreise zu Beginn der Marktoeffnung. Erfahrung in Norwegen und Schweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippini, M.; Wind, J.; Luchsinger, C.

    2001-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reviews the experience gained in the deregulation of electricity distribution grids in Norway and Sweden and compares it with the possible options for Switzerland. The report looks at the requirements placed on the future Swiss regulation of electricity distribution grids and the various regulation models such as Rate-of-Return, Price-Cap, Revenue-Cap and Benchmarking that could be used in the short and long term. The choice of Sweden and Norway from the list of countries with liberalised electricity markets is discussed. The results of the study of the two countries are discussed individually, including the structure of the sector, the various stages of deregulation, the main characteristics encountered at the start of deregulation, regulation of grid prices at the beginning of liberalisation and experience gained in each case. The report is supplemented by a comprehensive list of the sources used.

  12. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  13. Central nervous system neuropeptide Y regulates mediators of hepatic phospholipid remodeling and very low-density lipoprotein triglyceride secretion via sympathetic innervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojas, Jennifer M; Bruinstroop, E.; Printz, Richard L; Alijagic-Boers, Aldijana; Foppen, E.; Turney, Maxine K; George, Leena; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Kalsbeek, A.; Niswender, Kevin D

    OBJECTIVE: Elevated very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride (TG) secretion from the liver contributes to an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is associated with obesity, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Numerous models of obesity and diabetes are characterized by increased central nervous

  14. Central nervous system neuropeptide Y regulates mediators of hepatic phospholipid remodeling and very low-density lipoprotein triglyceride secretion via sympathetic innervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojas, Jennifer M.; Bruinstroop, Eveline; Printz, Richard L.; Alijagic-Boers, Aldijana; Foppen, Ewout; Turney, Maxine K.; George, Leena; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Niswender, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Elevated very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride (TG) secretion from the liver contributes to an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is associated with obesity, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Numerous models of obesity and diabetes are characterized by increased central nervous

  15. The Impacts of Network Centrality and Self-Regulation on an E-Learning Environment with the Support of Social Network Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Huang, Hsieh-Hong; Chuang, Yuh-Shy

    2015-01-01

    An e-learning environment that supports social network awareness (SNA) is a highly effective means of increasing peer interaction and assisting student learning by raising awareness of social and learning contexts of peers. Network centrality profoundly impacts student learning in an SNA-related e-learning environment. Additionally,…

  16. Experiences in certification of packages for transportation of fresh nuclear fuel in the context of new safety requirements established by IAEA regulations (IAEA-96 regulations, ST-1) for air transportation of nuclear materials (requirements to C-type packages)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudai, V.I.; Kovtun, A.D.; Matveev, V.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Nilulin, V.M.; Shapovalov, V.I.; Yakushev, V.A.; Bobrovsky, V.S.; Rozhkov, V.V.; Agapov, A.M.; Kolesnikov, A.S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' MSZ' ' , Electrostal (Russian Federation)]|[JSC ' ' NPCC' ' , Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Minatom of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Gosatomnadzor of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Every year in Russia, a large amount of domestic and international transportation of fresh nuclear fuel (FNF) used in Russian and foreign energy and research atomic reactors and referred to fissile materials based on IAEA Regulations is performed. Here, bulk transportation is performed by air, and it concerns international transportation in particular. According to national ''Main Regulations for Safe Transport and physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (OPBZ- 83)'' and ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Regulations), nuclear and radiation security under normal (accident free) and accident conditions of transport must be completely provided by the package design. In this context, high requirements to fissile packages exposed to heat and mechanical loads in transport accidents are imposed. A long-standing experience in accident free transportation of FM has shown that such approach to provide nuclear and radiation security pays for itself completely. Nevertheless, once in 10 years the International Atomic Energy Agency on every revision of the ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' places more stringent requirements upon the FM and transportation thereof, resulting from the objectively increasing risk associated with constant rise in volume and density of transportation, and also strained social and economical situation in a number of regions in the world. In the new edition of the IAEA Regulations (ST-1), published in 1996 and brought into force in 2001 (IAEA-96 Regulations), the requirements to FM packages conveyed by aircraft were radically changed. These requirements are completely presented in new Russian ''Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials'' (PBTRM- 2004) which will be brought into force in the time ahead.

  17. Developmental Consequences of Early Parenting Experiences: Self-Recognition and Self-Regulation in Three Cultural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Heidi; Yovsi, Relindis; Borke, Joern; Krtner, Joscha; Jensen, Henning; Papaligoura, Zaira

    2004-01-01

    This study relates parenting of 3-month-old children to children's self-recognition and self-regulation at 18 to 20 months. As hypothesized, observational data revealed differences in the sociocultural orientations of the 3 cultural samples' parenting styles and in toddlers' development of self-recognition and self-regulation. Children of…

  18. The State Regulation of External Labor Migration: the Experience of the EU, France, Germany and the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Андрей Георгиевич Иванов

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The given article is devoted to the actual problem of the state regulation of external labor migration. It's based on examples of developed western countries. The author makes a conclusion about the importance of the state regulation of migration processes, warning that narrow understanding of migration policy as restriction of external migration flows is insufficient nowadays.

  19. How Early Experiences in a Kindergarten Classroom Shape the Development of Self-Regulation Skills of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Eloisa; Sarette, Sarah; Boghigian, Anna; Martin, Marley

    2017-01-01

    Providing the support that children need to build self-regulation skills has come to the forefront for educators today. This study investigated how kindergarten students (N=19) improved their self-regulation skills through direct instruction and effective scaffolding techniques. Selfregulated instruction was adapted to behavior activities for…

  20. The effects of a learning-goal orientation training on self-regulation: A field experiment among unemployed job seekers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, G.; van Hooft, E.A.J.; van Mierlo, H.; van Dam, A.; Born, M.Ph.

    2013-01-01

    Finding reemployment after job loss is a complex and difficult task that requires extensive motivation and self-regulation. This study aimed to examine whether improving unemployed job seekers’ cognitive self-regulation can increase reemployment probabilities. Based on the goal orientation

  1. Universal salt iodization in the Central and Eastern Europe, Commonwealth of Independent States (CEE/CIS) Region during the decade 2000-09: experiences, achievements, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Haar, Frits; Gerasimov, Gregory; Tyler, Vilma Qahoush; Timmer, Arnold

    2011-12-01

    By 2000, the global track record on universal salt iodization (USI) indicated 26% access to adequately iodized salt in the Central and Eastern Europe, Commonwealth of Independent States (CEE/ CIS) Region. Aimed at extracting lessons learned, this study examined experiences, achievements, and outcomes of USI strategies in CEE/CIS countries during the subsequent decade. Information from the design, timing, execution, outputs, multi-sector management and results of actions by national stakeholders yielded 20 country summaries. Analysis across countries used a LogFrame Analysis typical for public nutrition development. By 2009, USI strategies had reached the target and population iodine nutrition shown adequate levels in 9 countries, while in 6 others, USI was close and/or population iodine status showed only minor imperfection. True USI, i.e., iodization of salt destined both for the food industry and the household, had been made mandatory in 13 of these 15 countries. In the Balkan area, USI and iodine nutrition advanced more than in CIS. Of the 20 sample countries, 17 (85%) had exceeded the mark of 50% adequate access, while the overall regional score reached 55% by 2010. Experience from this region suggests that strong partnership collaboration, a new concept in post-Soviet societies, was a major success factor. Voluntary iodization or focusing on household salt alone was less likely conducive for success. Achieving optimum iodine nutrition required the setting of proper iodine standard Weak political leadership insistence in the Russian Federation and Ukraine to embrace USI is the main factor why the region remains behind in the global progress.

  2. Do qualitative methods validate choice experiment-results? A case study on the economic valuation of peatland restoration in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaafsma, M.; Van Beukering, P.J.H.; Davies, O.; Oskolokaite, I.

    2009-05-15

    This study explores the benefits of combining independent results of qualitative focus group discussions (FGD) with a quantitative choice experiment (CE) in a developing country context. The assessment addresses the compensation needed by local communities in Central Kalimantan to cooperate in peatland restoration programs by using a CE combined with a series of FGD to validate and explain the CE-results. The main conclusion of this study is that a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods is necessary to assess the economic value of ecological services in monetary terms and to better understand the underlying attitudes and motives that drive these outcomes. The FGD not only cross-validate results of the CE, but also help to interpret the differences in preferences of respondents arising from environmental awareness and ecosystem characteristics. The FGD confirms that the CE results provide accurate information for ecosystem valuation. Additional to the advantages of FGD listed in the literature, this study finds that FGD provide the possibility to identify the specific terms and conditions on which respondents will accept land-use change scenarios. The results show that FGD may help to address problems regarding the effects of distribution of costs and benefits over time that neo-classical economic theory poses for the interpretation of economic valuation results in the demand it puts on the rationality of trade-offs and the required calculations.

  3. In-situ hydrodynamic characterization of a soil by means of an infiltration experiment. Application to a sandy soil in the central zone of Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkamp, R.; Hamon, G.; Vauclin, M.; Vachaud, G.

    1979-01-01

    A new method is presented for predicting the hydraulic conductivity curve of an unsaturated soil from the relation between effective pressure and water content and the law of cumulative infiltration. With this method, which is based on the conceptual model proposed by Mualem (1976), it is possible to determine the parameter n as a function of the type of soil by fitting the cumulative infiltration law obtained numerically by solution of the Richards equation to that obtained experimentally. This approach is tested on experimental results obtained using the internal drainage method on sandy soil in the Central Zone of Senegal. It is shown that the moisture profiles calculated with the aid of the predicted hydraulic conductivity curve are in very good agreement with the measured profiles. This method seems well suited for studying the spatial variability of hydrodynamic characteristics since it is simple to set up and precise, and a large number of experiments can be performed in a short space of time. (author)

  4. Central control of body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate the behavioral and autonomic repertoire that maintains body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and alters body temperature during the inflammatory response and behavioral states and in response to declining energy homeostasis. This review summarizes the central nervous system circuit mechanisms controlling the principal thermoeffectors for body temperature regulation: cutaneous vasoconstriction regulating heat loss and shivering and brown adipose tissue for thermogenesis. The activation of these thermoeffectors is regulated by parallel but distinct efferent pathways within the central nervous system that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The model for the neural circuit mechanism underlying central thermoregulatory control provides a useful platform for further understanding of the functional organization of central thermoregulation, for elucidating the hypothalamic circuitry and neurotransmitters involved in body temperature regulation, and for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to modulating body temperature and energy homeostasis.

  5. The Effectiveness of Building Permit Regulation for Green Open Space at Housing Estates: Case Study of Kendal Regency, Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, Wiwik; Hadi, Sudharto P.

    2018-02-01

    Increasing demand for settlements steamed by population growth declines the quality of the environment specifically at urban area. The existing spatial planning could not able to prevent the change of land use for settlement and other infrastructures. The Act no. 26 of 2007 on spatial planning stipulates that green open space must reach 30% of the total area, consisting of 20% public open space and 10% private open space. The existing condition of urban area at Kendal Regency reach 245,6 million m2 with 88.145,5 m2 green open space or 0,036% out of total area. An effort to increase green open space in urban areas taken by the Government of Kendal Regency is by promulgating a local regulation stipulating that each housing developer request a building permit is obliged to provide a green open space at least 10 percent of the total housing area. This paper reviews the effectiveness of building permit regulation, the problems encountered and the concept proposed to make the local regulation work. The area of sample taken is three urban districts out of five urban districts, the resource persons chosen are those from relevant offices (Dinas) involved at the implementation of the local regulation. The data collection techniques employed are the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), Geographic Information System (GIS) technology, social observation and informal interview. The data gathered will be analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively.

  6. The Effectiveness of Building Permit Regulation for Green Open Space at Housing Estates: Case Study of Kendal Regency, Central Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulianti Wiwik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for settlements steamed by population growth declines the quality of the environment specifically at urban area. The existing spatial planning could not able to prevent the change of land use for settlement and other infrastructures. The Act no. 26 of 2007 on spatial planning stipulates that green open space must reach 30% of the total area, consisting of 20% public open space and 10% private open space. The existing condition of urban area at Kendal Regency reach 245,6 million m2 with 88.145,5 m2 green open space or 0,036% out of total area. An effort to increase green open space in urban areas taken by the Government of Kendal Regency is by promulgating a local regulation stipulating that each housing developer request a building permit is obliged to provide a green open space at least 10 percent of the total housing area. This paper reviews the effectiveness of building permit regulation, the problems encountered and the concept proposed to make the local regulation work. The area of sample taken is three urban districts out of five urban districts, the resource persons chosen are those from relevant offices (Dinas involved at the implementation of the local regulation. The data collection techniques employed are the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP, Geographic Information System (GIS technology, social observation and informal interview. The data gathered will be analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively.

  7. Angiotensin II Type 1 receptor (AT1) signaling in astrocytes regulates synaptic degeneration-induced leukocyte entry to the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füchtbauer, L; Groth-Rasmussen, Maria; Holm, Thomas Hellesøe

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes are the major cellular component of the blood-brain barrier glia limitans and act as regulators of leukocyte infiltration via chemokine expression. We have studied angiotensin-II receptor Type 1 (AT1) and related NF-κB signaling in astrocytes. Angiotensin II derives from cleavage of an...

  8. Orexinergic innervation of urocortin1 and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript neurons in the midbrain centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerzaal, T.L.; Doelen, R.H.A. van der; Roubos, E.W.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2013-01-01

    Orexin is a neuropeptide that has been implicated in several processes, such as induction of appetite, arousal and alertness and sleep/wake regulation. Multiple lines of evidence also suggest that orexin is involved in the stress response. When orexin is administered intracerebroventricular it

  9. Transferring Knowledge Gained From a Field Experience in Tierra del Fuego, the Uttermost Part of the Earth, to Central Texas Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, C.; Dovzak, N.; Anderson, S.; Perry, E.; Ellins, K.; Tingle, D.; Knettel, P.; Redding, S.; Odle, K.

    2005-12-01

    As part of the UTIG's Teachers in the Field program, we, three teachers from Boerne High School in south-central Texas, and four of our students, collaborated with an international team of geoscientists studying the tectonic and climatic evolution of the Lago Fagnano region in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, in March 2005. This unique field experience allowed us to participate in all aspects of the scientific process: the consideration of research questions, development of a research plan, collection of field data and observations, and synthesis and presentation of results. In addition to field work and reconnaissance tied directly to the project objectives, we characterized the modern chemical/physical soil and water parameters (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, NH4 content, etc.) and isotopic (18O and D) composition of the Lago Fagnano watershed. These data are now integrated into an existing database of comparable chemical/physical information gathered for North American sites through our summer field courses. We will utilize this rich data set to make Texas-Tierra del Fuego ecosystem comparisons with our classes. The level of mentoring, preparation and follow-up provided by an NSF GK-12 Fellow was a key factor contributing to the success of our experience and an important element in helping us transfer components of this challenging experience to our students. Before, during, and following a two-week field season at Lago Fagnano, we and our students were actively engaged as learners and as scientists. We acquired concepts and skills that are readily applicable in a classroom setting: geologic mapping, GIS applications, isotopic data collection and analysis, tectonics concepts, and a general understanding of how science is truly conducted. Other factors that contributed to a positive experience included the team of dynamic scientists, who encouraged, helped and inspired us, the strong support that we received from our high school campus and district level

  10. Establishment and maintenance of regulating ecosystem services in a dryland area of Central Asia: the Kökyar Protection Forest, Aksu, NW China, as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missall, S.; Welp, M.; Thevs, N.; Abliz, A.; Halik, Ü.

    2014-12-01

    The city of Aksu, situated at the northern fringe of the Taklimakan Desert in the northwest of China, is exposed to periodic severe dust and sand storms. In 1986, local authorities decided to establish a peri-urban shelterbelt plantation, the so-called Kökyar Protection Forest. It was realised as a patchwork of poplar shelterbelts and orchards. The total area of the plantation reached 3800 ha in 2005. This endeavour was made possible by the annual mass mobilisation of Aksu citizens, based on the Chinese regulation of the "National Compulsory Afforestation Campaigns". Establishment costs amounted to ca. CNY 60 000 ha-1 (ca. USD 10 000 ha-1). The regulating ecosystem services provided by Kökyar Protection Forest clearly reduce dust and sand storm impacts on Aksu City. Permanent maintenance of the plantation is facilitated by leasing orchard plots to private fruit farmers. This system ensures forest tending, reduces government expenses, and provides incomes to farmers. From the perspective of the local economy, annual farming net benefits generated by Kökyar fruit farmers more than compensate annual government grants for maintenance, resulting in an overall monetary net benefit of at least CNY 10 500 ha-1 (ca. USD 1600 ha-1) on the long-term average. The intended regulating ecosystem services can thus be provided to the citizens of Aksu without payments for ecosystem services or other financial burdens. For a more complete understanding of Kökyar Protection Forest, future research should be directed towards quantifying the effect of its regulating ecosystem services, and on investigating the negative downstream consequences of its water consumption.

  11. Analysis of experience of legal regulation in the sphere of public administration of sanatorium providing of children in the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko T.Yu.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Motherhood and childhood are one of the main priorities of the government social policy for any country. The Ukrainian state, its President and government are keeping under scrutiny issues of improving quality of life and health of population, in particular, health of women and children. Continuing study of problems of Public Administration in the sphere of health resort services for children in Ukraine, in her previous scientific publications the author drew attention to insufficient scope of researches and weak grounds of theoretical justification of possible organizational changes in this sphere. This very fact stipulates the necessity to continue thorough scientific research and study, first of all, a positive experience of foreign countries as to implementing reforms in the sphere of health resort services for children. The share of separate factors of different nature, impacting indicators of public health depends on age, sex and individual-typological characteristics of a person. However, the greatest impact on a human health is made by his lifestyle that may be attributed to conditionally controlled process. In this case, it is appropriate to note that the controlled impact on lifestyle can be made both by internal factors (e.g., motivation, and external factors. One of the most powerful external factors of controlled impact on the public health is health resort provision. The experience of the Russian Federation in this area is extremely useful for the Ukrainian state, which is actively promoting the idea of the health system modernization in the domestic market as the area in need of such changes. Now, 1997 health resorts are operating in the Russian Federation, annually serving approximately 6 million people. The jurisdiction of the Ministry of Health and Social Development of the Russian Federation encompasses 51 health resort facilities (HRF providing a wide range of health-improving services. The laws, government regulations

  12. Identifying Societal Preferences for River Restoration in a Densely Populated Urban Environment: Evidence from a Discrete Choice Experiment in Central Brussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wendy Y.; Liekens, Inge; Broekx, Steven

    2017-08-01

    One of the major challenges facing river restoration in densely populated urban areas has been the disparity between the expectations of policy-makers and societal preferences. This study aimed to elicit public preferences and elucidate underlying sources of preference heterogeneity, using the Zenne River in central Brussels, Belgium, as a case study. A discrete choice experiment was administered to a representative sample of the Brussels population. Five attributes were specified, including water quality, ecological status, hydromorphological features of channels, recreational opportunities, and monetary cost. Our econometric analysis based on mixed logit models revealed that overall public would like to have a more natural river (open and naturalized channel, good water quality, and with rich species diversity), while achieving good water quality was the most preferred attribute. Respondents categorized as male, non-Belgian citizen, or not being a member of an environmental organization constituted an inclination to prefer the status quo. Belgian citizens showed a pronounced preference for good biodiversity, and being a member of an environmental organization could moderate the strong preference for good water quality. This study provided insights into the relative attractiveness of key attributes pertaining to river restoration, in general, and served as a useful input to the ongoing discussion concerning the future plan for the Zenne River in Brussels, specifically. Possible implications also exist for other urban river restorations in the rest of Europe, where the Water Framework Directive has become a major impetus for the expansion of freshwater ecosystem restoration from rural and peri-urban areas to densely populated urban areas. Particularly, the cultural heterogeneity of societal preferences should be tested and accounted for to compare the welfare impacts of river restoration and to facilitate benefit transfer, within and between river basins, in the

  13. Comparison of Arundo donax L. and Miscanthus x giganteus in a long-term field experiment in Central Italy: Analysis of productive characteristics and energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, Luciana G.; Ceccarini, Lucia; Nassi o Di Nasso, Nicoletta; Bonari, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus (miscanthus) and Arundo donax L. (giant reed) are two perennial crops which have been received particular attention during the last decade as bioenergy crops. The main aim of the present study was to compare the above-ground biomass production and the energy balance of these perennial rhizomatous grasses in a long-term field experiment. The crops were cultivated from 1992 to 2003 in the temperate climate of Central Italy with 20,000 plants ha -1 , 100-100-100 kg N, P 2 O 5 , K 2 O per hectare, and without irrigation supply. For each year of trial, biomass was harvested in autumn to estimate biometric characteristics and productive parameters. Besides, energy analysis of biomass production was carried out determining energy output, energy input, energy efficiency (output/input) and net energy yield (output-input). Results showed high above-ground biomass yields over a period of 10 years for both species, with better productive performances in giant reed than in miscanthus (37.7 t DM ha -1 year -1 vs 28.7 t DM ha -1 year -1 averaged from 2 to 12 years of growth). Such high yields resulted positively correlated to number of stalks (miscanthus), plant height and stalk diameter (giant reed). Moreover, these perennial species are characterised by a favourable energy balance with a net energy yield of 467 and 637 GJ ha -1 (1-12 year mean) for miscanthus and giant reed respectively. With such characteristics, both grasses could be proposed as biomass energy crops in Southern Europe with a significant and environmentally compatible contribution to energy needs

  14. Comparison of Arundo donax L. and Miscanthus x giganteus in a long-term field experiment in Central Italy: Analysis of productive characteristics and energy balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, Luciana G.; Ceccarini, Lucia; Nassi o Di Nasso, Nicoletta [University of Pisa, Dipartimento di Agronomia e Gestione dell' Agroecosistema, Via S. Michele degli Scalzi 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Bonari, Enrico [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Piazza Martiri della Liberta, 33, 56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    Miscanthus x giganteus (miscanthus) and Arundo donax L. (giant reed) are two perennial crops which have been received particular attention during the last decade as bioenergy crops. The main aim of the present study was to compare the above-ground biomass production and the energy balance of these perennial rhizomatous grasses in a long-term field experiment. The crops were cultivated from 1992 to 2003 in the temperate climate of Central Italy with 20,000 plants ha{sup -1}, 100-100-100 kg N, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, K{sub 2}O per hectare, and without irrigation supply. For each year of trial, biomass was harvested in autumn to estimate biometric characteristics and productive parameters. Besides, energy analysis of biomass production was carried out determining energy output, energy input, energy efficiency (output/input) and net energy yield (output-input). Results showed high above-ground biomass yields over a period of 10 years for both species, with better productive performances in giant reed than in miscanthus (37.7 t DM ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}vs 28.7 t DM ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} averaged from 2 to 12 years of growth). Such high yields resulted positively correlated to number of stalks (miscanthus), plant height and stalk diameter (giant reed). Moreover, these perennial species are characterised by a favourable energy balance with a net energy yield of 467 and 637 GJ ha{sup -1} (1-12 year mean) for miscanthus and giant reed respectively. With such characteristics, both grasses could be proposed as biomass energy crops in Southern Europe with a significant and environmentally compatible contribution to energy needs. (author)

  15. Experiences of nurse case managers within a central discharge planning role of collaboration between physicians, patients and other healthcare professionals: A sociocultural qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Jorun E; Waite, Marion A

    2018-03-01

    To gain knowledge of nurse case managers' experiences within the German acute care context of collaboration with patients and physicians in a discharge planning role; further to learn about patients' assignment to the management of the nurse case managers; and explicitly to explore critical incidences of interactions between nurse case managers, patients and healthcare practitioner in discharge planning to understand the factor that contributes to effective collaboration. The defined role of nurse case managers in many contexts is a patient-centred responsibility for a central task of discharge management of patients with complex physical and social needs. Some studies have indicated that the general impact of the role reduces readmission rates. Given the necessity to work interprofessionally to achieve a safe discharge, little is known about how nurse case managers achieve this collaboratively. A qualitative case study within a German teaching hospital of nurse case managers (N = 8). Data were collected through semi-structured interviews prompted by a critical incident technique and rigorously analysed through the lenses of sociocultural theory. Consistent object being worked upon was a safe and effective discharge from hospital with a focus on patient advocacy. Significant themes were a self-value or recognition by others of professional expertise, reciprocal value on the capabilities of others thorough relational expertise and negotiation with patients and an identification of case trajectories. More continuity of nurse case managers' care and management, clarity of role and transparency to peers, physicians and other professionals would be beneficial in ensuring appropriate referral of complex patients to nurse case managers responsibility. Clearer role description and benefit realisation of the nurse case managers could be achieved by interventions that are interprofessional and focus on the tasks that matter from a collaborative perspective. This could lead

  16. Identifying Societal Preferences for River Restoration in a Densely Populated Urban Environment: Evidence from a Discrete Choice Experiment in Central Brussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wendy Y; Liekens, Inge; Broekx, Steven

    2017-08-01

    One of the major challenges facing river restoration in densely populated urban areas has been the disparity between the expectations of policy-makers and societal preferences. This study aimed to elicit public preferences and elucidate underlying sources of preference heterogeneity, using the Zenne River in central Brussels, Belgium, as a case study. A discrete choice experiment was administered to a representative sample of the Brussels population. Five attributes were specified, including water quality, ecological status, hydromorphological features of channels, recreational opportunities, and monetary cost. Our econometric analysis based on mixed logit models revealed that overall public would like to have a more natural river (open and naturalized channel, good water quality, and with rich species diversity), while achieving good water quality was the most preferred attribute. Respondents categorized as male, non-Belgian citizen, or not being a member of an environmental organization constituted an inclination to prefer the status quo. Belgian citizens showed a pronounced preference for good biodiversity, and being a member of an environmental organization could moderate the strong preference for good water quality. This study provided insights into the relative attractiveness of key attributes pertaining to river restoration, in general, and served as a useful input to the ongoing discussion concerning the future plan for the Zenne River in Brussels, specifically. Possible implications also exist for other urban river restorations in the rest of Europe, where the Water Framework Directive has become a major impetus for the expansion of freshwater ecosystem restoration from rural and peri-urban areas to densely populated urban areas. Particularly, the cultural heterogeneity of societal preferences should be tested and accounted for to compare the welfare impacts of river restoration and to facilitate benefit transfer, within and between river basins, in the

  17. Sustainable biochar effects for low carbon crop production: A 5-crop season field experiment on a low fertility soil from Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar's effects on improving soil fertility, enhancing crop productivity and reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission from croplands had been well addressed in numerous short-term experiments with biochar soil amendment (BSA) mostly in a single crop season / cropping year. However, the persistence of these effects, after a single biochar application, has not yet been well known due to limited long-term field studies so far. Large scale BSA in agriculture is often commented on the high cost due to large amount of biochar in a single application. Here, we try to show the persistence of biochar effects on soil fertility and crop productivity improvement as well as GHGs emission reduction, using data from a field experiment with BSA for 5 crop seasons in central North China. A single amendment of biochar was performed at rates of 0 (C0), 20 (C20) and 40 t ha-1 (C40) before sowing of the first crop season. Emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O were monitored with static closed chamber method throughout the crop growing season for the 1st, 2nd and 5th cropping. Crop yield was measured and topsoil samples were collected at harvest of each crop season. BSA altered most of the soil physic-chemical properties with a significant increase over control in soil organic carbon (SOC) and available potassium (K) content. The increase in SOC and available K was consistent over the 5 crop seasons after BSA. Despite a significant yield increase in the first maize season, enhancement of crop yield was not consistent over crop seasons without corresponding to the changes in soil nutrient availability. BSA did not change seasonal total CO2 efflux but greatly reduced N2O emissions throughout the five seasons. This supported a stable nature of biochar carbon in soil, which played a consistent role in reducing N2O emission, which showed inter-annual variation with changes in temperature and soil moisture conditions. The biochar effect was much more consistent under C40 than under C20 and with

  18. Channeling the Central Dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Ronald L

    2014-05-21

    How do neurons and networks achieve their characteristic electrical activity, regulate this activity homeostatically, and yet show population variability in expression? In this issue of Neuron, O'Leary et al. (2014) address some of these thorny questions in this theoretical analysis that starts with the Central Dogma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Krogh’s principle or a multiple fish model approach to phosphate balance: is there a centrally regulated intestinal-skeletal-renal axis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Miguel Guerreiro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic phosphate (Pi is a crucial ion for vertebrate life. In addition to many physiological roles it is, together with calcium, the major element forming the internal skeleton and Pi balance has been considered a secondary consequence of calciotropic endocrine factors. However, contrary to calcium which can be readily obtained from even Ca-poor environments, Pi is not available in water, and fish can only obtain it via the food. Intestinal absorption drives Pi into the blood stream, but a central part of Pi balance is renal excretion and conservation. Recently, several Pi specific regulatory factors have been brought to light, and we use fish models to investigate their role and the hypothesis of a centrally controlled intestinal-skeletal-renal Pi axis. Using tissues mounted in Ussing chambers under symmetrical and asymmetrical short-circuited conditions we measure unidirectional 33Pi fluxes and test PTHrP, but also STC and FGF23 as regulatory factors, as well as specific drugs to unveil the functional transporting mechanisms. Pi absorption is modified in starved and fed sea bass, an effect dependent on Pi availability in diet, which modifies gene expression of uptake mechanisms. Phosphate secretion across flounder primary renal cell cultures is increased by PTHrP, which reduces the expression of reabsorption mechanisms such as NaPiII and evokes an increase in GFR in cannulated fish, thus resulting in net Pi excretion. A similar effect occurs in the toadfish urinary bladder, which displays moderate Pi transport that is abolished by the drug ouabain and modified by endocrines. Finally we used the shark choroid plexus (CP to show active CSF-to-blood transport with biochemical properties consistent with PiT Na+-dependent transporters. RT-PCR revealed the PiT1/2, but no NaPiII gene expression and we localized PiT2 in CP apical membranes while PiT1 occurred in vascular endothelial cells. Shark CP expresses both PTHrP and its receptor. Could

  20. Studies on the characterization and regulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors and [3H]WB4101 binding sites in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of these studies has been to resolve the anomalous binding characteristics of two alpha adrenergic receptor ligands, [ 3 H]WB4101 and [ 3 H]prazosin and to study the regulation of the receptors labeled by these compounds after surgical denervation and chronic drug treatments. Preliminary studies indicated that [ 3 H]WB4101 binding sites, which were believed to represent alpha-1 adrenergic receptors, were increased in number following removal of the fimbrial afferents to the hippocampus. This increase was not due to removal of the adrenergic input into this structure since destruction of the locus coeruleus or the dorsal noradrenergic bundle did not produce the up-regulation. Characterization of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors using [ 3 H]prazosin and [ 3 H]WB4101 revealed evidence for subtypes of alpha-1 receptors designated alpha-1A and alpha-1B. The nanomolar affinity component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding is not adrenergic but serotonergic. The serotonergic agonists, serotonin and 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetraline have affinities of 1.5 and 3.0 nM for this site, when studied in the presence of a 30 nM prazosin mask of the alpha-1 component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding. Fimbria transection or 5,7 dihydroxytryptamine injections produced increases in the Bmax of the nanomolar affinity component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding in the presence of a prazosin mask. The up-regulated site showed identical serotonergic pharmacology compared to control tissue. Thus, the author concluded that serotonergic denervation of the hippocampus produces the increase in serotonergic binding sites labeled by [ 3 H]WB4101

  1. Establishment and maintenance of regulating ecosystem services in a dryland area of central Asia, illustrated using the Kökyar Protection Forest, Aksu, NW China, as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missall, S.; Welp, M.; Thevs, N.; Abliz, A.; Halik, Ü.

    2015-06-01

    The city of Aksu, situated at the northern fringe of the Taklimakan Desert in northwest China, is exposed to severe periodic dust and sand storms. In 1986, local authorities decided to establish a peri-urban shelterbelt plantation, the so-called Kökyar Protection Forest, with the aim of reducing dust and sand storm impacts on Aksu City by the regulating ecosystem services provided by the plantation. It was realised as a patchwork of poplar shelterbelts and orchards. The total area of the plantation reached 3800 ha in 2005. The Kökyar Protection Forest is used as a case study to answer the following question: under which institutional frameworks and to which financial conditions can peri-urban shelterbelts be established and maintained? The endeavour of planting the shelterbelt was made possible by the annual mass mobilisation of Aksu citizens, based on the Chinese regulation of the "National Compulsory Afforestation Campaigns". Establishment costs amounted to ca. CNY 60 000 ha-1 (ca. USD 10 000 ha-1). Permanent maintenance of the plantation is facilitated by leasing orchard plots to private fruit farmers. From the perspective of the local economy, annual farming net benefits generated by Kökyar fruit farmers more than compensate for annual government grants for maintenance, resulting in an average overall monetary net benefit of at least CNY 10 500 ha-1 (ca. USD 1600 ha-1) in the long term. For a more complete understanding of Kökyar Protection Forest, future research should be directed towards quantifying the effect of its regulating ecosystem services and on investigating the negative downstream consequences of its water consumption.

  2. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  3. Regulation of the market for listed securities - An introduction to the Danish experience related to insider dealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Nis Jul

    Gennem en klarlæggelse af de hensyn, som ligger bag EU's børsdirektiver og specielt insiderdirektivet, påvises det, at den danske børslovgivning nu udgør et selvstændigt retsområde - børsret - som adskiller sig fra den traditionelle selskabsretlige regulering....

  4. The Sociology of Regulation: The Case of Psychotherapy and Counselling and the Experience of the Arts Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Diane; Guthrie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on insights from the sociology of professions to explore the regulatory debate in the psychotherapy and counselling field contrasted with the regulation of arts therapists (art, drama and music therapists). A partial explanation is offered, illustrating the applicability of theory to these groups, but with adaptations to reflect…

  5. Implementation of training programs in self-regulated learning strategies in Moodle format: results of a experience in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José Carlos; Cerezo, Rebeca; Bernardo, Ana; Rosário, Pedro; Valle, Antonio; Fernández, Estrella; Suárez, Natalia

    2011-04-01

    This paper tests the efficacy of an intervention program in virtual format intended to train studying and self-regulation strategies in university students. The aim of this intervention is to promote a series of strategies which allow students to manage their learning processes in a more proficient and autonomous way. The program has been developed in Moodle format and hosted by the Virtual Campus of the University of Oviedo. The present study had a semi-experimental design, included an experimental group (n=167) and a control one (n=206), and used pretest and posttest measures (self-regulated learning strategies' declarative knowledge, self-regulated learning macro-strategy planning-execution-assessment, self-regulated learning strategies on text, surface and deep learning approaches, and academic achievement). Data suggest that the students enrolled in the training program, comparing with students in the control group, showed a significant improvement in their declarative knowledge, general and on text use of learning strategies, increased their deep approach to learning, decreased their use of a surface approach and, in what concerns to academic achievement, statistically significant differences have been found in favour of the experimental group.

  6. Calibration of the VIRGO experiment: from the testing of the detector to the search of coalescing binaries with the central interferometer; Calibration de l'experience VIRGO: de l'etalonnage du detecteur a la recherche de signaux de coalescences binaires avec l'interferometre central

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veziant, O

    2003-05-01

    The aim of the VIRGO experiment is the detection of gravitational waves. The detector is based on a Michelson interferometer with three-kilometer long arms. Before the availability of the complete detector, most of the technical choices have been tested on a small scale interferometer (central interferometer or CITF). This allowed to record the first technical data of the experiment. The calibration of the CITF data has been studied in this thesis. This work involved some local operations such as the calibration of the electronics of the detection system, and also some more global operation such as the characterisation of the detector response function. The latter is used to unfold the data from experimental effects and to estimate the detector sensitivity. A monitoring procedure of this response function has been applied to produce a time series of reconstructed data, i.e. data free from experimental distortions. The implementation of VIRGO will make use of an optical calibrator using the radiation pressure of a laser beam to act on the interferometer mirrors and characterize its response. The optical calibrator has been designed and assembled in laboratory and its performances have been measured. The physics analysis following the calibration step was tackled through a coalescing binary search algorithm. The latter was applied both on simulated data and on CITF data in order to estimate the detector noise level and to check the effects of the reconstruction procedure. (author)

  7. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M.

    1992-01-01

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  8. Central nervous system neuropeptide Y regulates mediators of hepatic phospholipid remodeling and very low-density lipoprotein triglyceride secretion via sympathetic innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jennifer M.; Bruinstroop, Eveline; Printz, Richard L.; Alijagic-Boers, Aldijana; Foppen, Ewout; Turney, Maxine K.; George, Leena; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Niswender, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride (TG) secretion from the liver contributes to an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is associated with obesity, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Numerous models of obesity and diabetes are characterized by increased central nervous system (CNS) neuropeptide Y (NPY); in fact, a single intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of NPY in lean fasted rats elevates hepatic VLDL-TG secretion and does so, in large part, via signaling through the CNS NPY Y1 receptor. Thus, our overarching hypothesis is that elevated CNS NPY action contributes to dyslipidemia by activating central circuits that modulate liver lipid metabolism. Methods Chow-fed Zucker fatty (ZF) rats were pair-fed by matching their caloric intake to that of lean controls and effects on body weight, plasma TG, and liver content of TG and phospholipid (PL) were compared to ad-libitum (ad-lib) fed ZF rats. Additionally, lean 4-h fasted rats with intact or disrupted hepatic sympathetic innervation were treated with icv NPY or NPY Y1 receptor agonist to identify novel hepatic mechanisms by which NPY promotes VLDL particle maturation and secretion. Results Manipulation of plasma TG levels in obese ZF rats, through pair-feeding had no effect on liver TG content; however, hepatic PL content was substantially reduced and was tightly correlated with plasma TG levels. Treatment with icv NPY or a selective NPY Y1 receptor agonist in lean fasted rats robustly activated key hepatic regulatory proteins, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), ADP-ribosylation factor-1 (ARF-1), and lipin-1, known to be involved in remodeling liver PL into TG for VLDL maturation and secretion. Lastly, we show that the effects of CNS NPY on key liporegulatory proteins are attenuated by hepatic sympathetic denervation. Conclusions These data support a model in which CNS NPY modulates mediators of hepatic PL remodeling and VLDL maturation to stimulate VLDL-TG secretion that is

  9. The RabGAP TBC1D1 plays a central role in exercise-regulated glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöckli, Jacqueline; Meoli, Christopher C; Hoffman, Nolan J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin and exercise stimulate glucose uptake into skeletal muscle via different pathways. Both stimuli converge on the translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from intracellular vesicles to the cell surface. Two Rab guanosine triphosphatases-activating proteins (GAPs) have been implicated...... weight, insulin action, and exercise. TBC1D1(-/-) mice showed normal glucose and insulin tolerance, with no difference in body weight compared with wild-type littermates. GLUT4 protein levels were reduced by ∼40% in white TBC1D1(-/-) muscle, and TBC1D1(-/-) mice showed impaired exercise endurance...... together with impaired exercise-mediated 2-deoxyglucose uptake into white but not red muscles. These findings indicate that the RabGAP TBC1D1 plays a key role in regulating GLUT4 protein levels and in exercise-mediated glucose uptake in nonoxidative muscle fibers....

  10. The underlying physiological basis of the desert rodent Meriones shawi's survival to prolonged water deprivation: Central vasopressin regulation on peripheral kidney water channels AQPs-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgot, A; El Hiba, O; Belkouch, M; Gamrani, H

    2018-02-01

    Meriones shawi (M. shawi) is a particular semi-desert rodent known by its resistance to long periods of thirst. The aim of the present investigation is to clarify the underlying mechanisms allowing M. shawi to resist to hard conditions of dehydration. For this reason we used two different approaches: i) a morphometric study, which consists in measuring the effect of dehydration on body and kidneys weights as well as the report kidney weight/body weight, ii) By immunohistochemistry, we proceed to study the effect of dehydration on the immunoreactivity of central vasopressin (AVP) and the kidney aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) which is a channel protein that allows water to permeate across cell membranes. Our results showed both a body mass decrease accompanied by a remarkable kidneys hypertrophy. The immunohistochemical study showed a significant increase of AQP-2 immunoreactivity in the medullar part of Meriones kidneys allowing probably to Meriones a great ability to water retention. Consistently, we demonstrate that the increased AQP-2 expression occurred together with an increase in vasopressin (AVP) expression in both hypothalamic supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN), which are a major hub in the osmotic control circuitry. These various changes seen either in body weight and kidneys or at the cellular level might be the basis of peripheral control of body water homeostasis, providing to M. shawia strong resistance against chronic dehydration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Central leptin gene therapy ameliorates diabetes type 1 and 2 through two independent hypothalamic relays; a benefit beyond weight and appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Satya P

    2009-10-01

    Although its role in energy homeostasis is firmly established, the evidence accumulated over a decade linking the adipocyte leptin-hypothalamus axis in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus has received little attention in the contemporary thinking. In this context various lines of evidence are collated here to show that (1) under the direction of leptin two independent relays emanating from the hypothalamus restrain insulin secretion from the pancreas and mobilize peripheral organs--liver, skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue--to upregulate glucose disposal, and (2), leptin insufficiency in the hypothalamus produced by either leptinopenia or restriction of leptin transport across the blood brain barrier due to hyperleptinemia of obesity and aging, initiate antecedent pathophysiological sequalae of diabetes type 1 and 2. Further, we document here the efficacy of leptin replenishment in vivo, especially by supplying it to the hypothalamus with the aid of gene therapy, in preventing the antecedent pathophysiological sequalae--hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia--in various animal models and clinical paradigms of diabetes type 1 and 2 with or without attendant obesity. Overall, the new insights on the long-lasting antidiabetic potential of two independent hypothalamic relays engendered by central leptin gene therapy and the preclinical safety indicators in rodents warrant further validation in subhuman primates and humans.

  12. Central Diffraction in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Schicker, R

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of a central barrel, a muon spectrometer and of additional detectors for trigger and event classification purposes. The low transverse momentum threshold of the central barrel gives ALICE a unique opportunity to study the low mass sector of central production at the LHC. I will report on first analysis results of meson production in double gap events in minimum-bias proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV, and will describe a dedicated double gap trigger for future data taking.

  13. Transports of radioactive materials. Legal regulations, safety and security concepts, experience; Befoerderung radioaktiver Stoffe. Rechtsvorschriften, Sicherheits- und Sicherungskonzept, Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Guenther

    2012-07-15

    In Germany, approximately 650,000 to 750,000 units containing radioactive materials for scientific, medical and technical applications are shipped annually by surface, air and water transports. Legally speaking, radioactive materials are dangerous goods which can cause hazards to life, health, property and the environment as a result of faulty handling or accidents in transit. For protection against these hazards, their shipment therefore is regulated in extensive national and international rules of protection and safety. The article contains a topical review of the international and national transport regulations and codes pertaining to shipments of radioactive materials, and of the protection concepts underlying these codes so as to ensure an adequate standard of safety and security in shipping radioactive materials in national and international goods traffic. (orig.)

  14. Acceptability of a very‐low‐energy diet in Type 2 diabetes: patient experiences and behaviour regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Rehackova, L.; Araújo‐Soares, V.; Adamson, A. J.; Steven, S.; Taylor, R.; Sniehotta, F. F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims To evaluate the acceptability of an 8‐week very‐low‐energy diet for remission of Type 2 diabetes, and to identify barriers and facilitators of adherence and behaviour‐regulation strategies used by participants in the Counterbalance study. Methods Eighteen of 30 participants in the Counterbalance study (ISRCTN88634530) took part in semi‐structured interviews. Of these, 15 participants were interviewed before and after the 8‐week very‐low‐energy diet intervention. Thematic analysi...

  15. Basic substances under EC 1107/2009 phytochemical regulation: experience with non-biocide and food products as biorationals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchand Patrice A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Basic Substances are a newly effective category of Plant Protection Product under EC Regulation No 1107/2009. The first approved application of Equisetum arvense L. opened Part C of Implementing Regulation (EU No 540/2011, which lists the basic substance approved. Although E. arvense was described as a fungicide extract, subsequent applications like chitosan were related to non-biocide molecules. Consequently, plant protection product data were collected from research on alternative or traditional crop protection methods. They are notably issued or derived from foodstuffs (plants, plant by-products, plant derived products, substances and derived substances from animal origin. Applications are currently submitted by our Institute, under evaluation at different stages of the approval process or already approved. Remarkably, this Basic Substance category under pesticide EU Regulation was surprisingly designed for these non-biocidal plant protection products. In fact, components described as the “active substance” of most of the actual applications are food products like sugars and lecithin. Basic Substance applications for these foodstuffs are therefore a straightforward way of easily gaining approval for them. Here we describe the approval context and detail the agricultural uses of theses food products as Biological Control Agents (BCAs or biorationals for crop protection. From all deposited or approved Basic Substance Application (BSA, a proof has been provided that non-biocide and food products via physical barrier or lure effects may be effective plant protection products with an acceptable low profile of concern for public and agricultural safety.

  16. Experience of regulatory body functioning in energy industry of Ukraine: Prospects for future development of state regulation of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oruskaya, M.

    2002-01-01

    Materials collected (presented) in the paper introduce to (familiarise) the audience with the main forms, methods and phases of the state regulation of energy industry in Ukraine in the period of transition to market economy. Special attention was paid to the following aspects: 1. Necessity and history of establishment of special regulatory body in Ukraine - The National Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC); 2. The main tasks and authorities of NERC according to the Ukraine Law on Energy Sector; 3. Regulation mechanisms of the main processes in the energy industry used by the Commission on the current level of energy sector development and economic results of its introduction; 4. Problems with functioning of the wholesale energy market specifically as the main component of the Ukraine energy industry and trends of future development (improvement of energy industry's financial situation, intensification of competition between energy producers and suppliers, improvement of tariff and investment policies, etc.); 5. Necessity and ways of future improvement of the standards and legal basis for regulation in Ukraine. (author)

  17. The Surface faulting produced by the 30 October 2016 Mw 6.5 Central Italy earthquake: the Open EMERGEO Working Group experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantosti, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    The October 30, 2016 (06:40 UTC) Mw 6.5 earthquake occurred about 28 km NW of Amatrice village as the result of upper crust normal faulting on a nearly 30 km-long, NW-SE oriented, SW dipping fault system in the Central Apennines. This earthquake is the strongest Italian seismic event since the 1980 Mw 6.9 Irpinia earthquake. The Mw 6.5 event was the largest shock of a seismic sequence, which began on August 24 with a Mw 6.0 earthquake and also included a Mw 5.9 earthquake on October 26, about 9 and 35 km NW of Amatrice village, respectively. Field surveys of coseismic geological effects at the surface started within hours of the mainshock and were carried out by several national and international teams of earth scientists (about 120 people) from different research institutions and universities coordinated by the EMERGEO Working Group of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. This collaborative effort was focused on the detailed recognition and mapping of: 1) the total extent of the October 30 coseismic surface ruptures, 2) their geometric and kinematic characteristics, 3) the coseismic displacement distribution along the activated fault system, including subsidiary and antithetic ruptures. The huge amount of collected data (more than 8000 observation points of several types of coseismic effects at the surface) were stored, managed and shared using a specifically designed spreadsheet to populate a georeferenced database. More comprehensive mapping of the details and extent of surface rupture was facilitated by Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry surveys by means of several helicopter flights. An almost continuous alignment of ruptures about 30 km long, N150/160 striking, mainly SW side down was observed along the already known active Mt. Vettore - Mt. Bove fault system. The mapped ruptures occasionally overlapped those of the August 24 Mw 6.0 and October 26 Mw 5.9 shocks. The coincidence between the observed surface ruptures and the trace of active

  18. Functional microRNA high throughput screening reveals miR-9 as a central regulator of liver oncogenesis by affecting the PPARA-CDH1 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drakaki, Alexandra; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Polytarchou, Christos; Vorvis, Christina; Poultsides, George A.; Souglakos, John; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, reflecting the aggressiveness of this type of cancer and the absence of effective therapeutic regimens. MicroRNAs have been involved in the pathogenesis of different types of cancers, including liver cancer. Our aim was to identify microRNAs that have both functional and clinical relevance in HCC and examine their downstream signaling effectors. MicroRNA and gene expression levels were measured by quantitative real-time PCR in HCC tumors and controls. A TargetScan algorithm was used to identify miR-9 downstream direct targets. A high-throughput screen of the human microRNAome revealed 28 microRNAs as regulators of liver cancer cell invasiveness. MiR-9, miR-21 and miR-224 were the top inducers of HCC invasiveness and also their expression was increased in HCC relative to control liver tissues. Integration of the microRNA screen and expression data revealed miR-9 as the top microRNA, having both functional and clinical significance. MiR-9 levels correlated with HCC tumor stage and miR-9 overexpression induced SNU-449 and HepG2 cell growth, invasiveness and their ability to form colonies in soft agar. Bioinformatics and 3′UTR luciferase analyses identified E-cadherin (CDH1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA) as direct downstream effectors of miR-9 activity. Inhibition of PPARA suppressed CDH1 mRNA levels, suggesting that miR-9 regulates CDH1 expression directly through binding in its 3′UTR and indirectly through PPARA. On the other hand, miR-9 inhibition of overexpression suppressed HCC tumorigenicity and invasiveness. PPARA and CDH1 mRNA levels were decreased in HCC relative to controls and were inversely correlated with miR-9 levels. Taken together, this study revealed the involvement of the miR-9/PPARA/CDH1 signaling pathway in HCC oncogenesis. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1562-9) contains supplementary material, which is

  19. [Psychological Characteristics of Patients With Stress-induced Arterial Hypertension: a Violation of the Regulation of Emotions as a Central Link of Pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumova, O D; Pervichko, E I; Zinchenko, Y P

    2016-09-01

    The study of emotional and personality characteristics of patients with hypertension in the workplace (HW) and comparative assessment of the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in these patients. The study included 170 patients c hypertensive disease stage II, 1-2-th degree, aged 32-52 years, including 85 patients with and 85 patients without WAH, and 82 healthy subjects matched for age and sex. To carry out simulation of the situation of emotional intensity (level of claims assessment process - UE) and a modified version of the test Rosenzweig. Patients with WAH were randomized into 2 groups: patients of group 1 received bisoprolol, 2nd group -eprosartan. If target blood pressure (BP) in 2 weeks, all patients were added indapamide retard. At baseline and after 16 weeks of treatment was carried out daily monitoring of blood pressure and the working day. When modeling a situation of emotional intensity in patients with WAP become, compared with patients without a healthy and WAH, revealed (1) marked increase in systolic blood pressure - 16.1, 4.1 and 3.0 mmHg, respectively (p motivation "avoid failure" (UP underestimated in 34.1% of cases, unformed UP - in 21.2% of cases, healthy - 14.6% and 3.7% of cases, cootvetstvenno, pemotionally meaningful situations (9.7 and 7.8, respectively) and emotional descriptors (11 and 7, respectively). Patients with WAH differ significantly (pemotion regulation in an emotionally meaningful situations: the suppression of the expression of emotions (38.3 and 20.3%, respectively), rumination and disasterization (19 and 11.8%, respectively) and more rare - high performance: sequential actualization of new meanings (25.7 and 31.7%, respectively) and the strategy of interactive subject-subject transformations (12.6 and 25.2%, respectively). After 16 weeks of treatment showed a significant (pemotionally meaningful situations frequently resorted to repression of emotions, choose the inefficient strategies of emotion regulation, they

  20. Implementing a multifaceted intervention to decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections in SEHA (Abu Dhabi Health Services Company) intensive care units: the Abu Dhabi experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Asad; Kelly, Bernadette; Edrees, Hanan; Kent, Paula S; Weaver, Sallie J; Jovanovic, Branislava; Attallah, Hadeel; de Grouchy, Kristin K; Al-Obaidli, Ali; Goeschel, Christine A; Berenholtz, Sean M

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether implementation of a multifaceted intervention would significantly reduce the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections. DESIGN Prospective cohort collaborative. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Intensive care units of the Abu Dhabi Health Services Company hospitals in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. INTERVENTIONS A bundled intervention consisting of 3 components was implemented as part of the program. It consisted of a multifaceted approach that targeted clinician use of evidence-based infection prevention recommendations, tools that supported the identification of local barriers to these practices, and implementation ideas to help ensure patients received the practices. Comprehensive unit-based safety teams were created to improve safety culture and teamwork. Finally, the measurement and feedback of monthly infection rate data to safety teams, senior leaders, and staff in participating intensive care units was encouraged. The main outcome measure was the quarterly rate of central line-associated bloodstream infections. RESULTS Eighteen intensive care units from 7 hospitals in Abu Dhabi implemented the program and achieved an overall 38% reduction in their central line-associated bloodstream infection rate, adjusted at the hospital and unit level. The number of units with a quarterly central line-associated bloodstream infection rate of less than 1 infection per 1,000 catheter-days increased by almost 40% between the baseline and postintervention periods. CONCLUSION A significant reduction in the global morbidity and mortality associated with central line-associated bloodstream infections is possible across intensive care units in disparate settings using a multifaceted intervention.

  1. What Can We Learn About the Processes of Regulation of Tuberculosis Medicines From the Experiences of Health Policy and System Actors in India, Tanzania, and Zambia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Sheikh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The unregulated availability and irrational use of tuberculosis (TB medicines is a major issue of public health concern globally. Governments of many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs have committed to regulating the quality and availability of TB medicines, but with variable success. Regulation of TB medicines remains an intractable challenge in many settings, but the reasons for this are poorly understood. The objective of this paper is to elaborate processes of regulation of quality and availability of TB medicines in three LMICs – India, Tanzania, and Zambia – and to understand the factors that constrain and enable these processes. Methods: We adopted the action-centred approach of policy implementation analysis that draws on the experiences of relevant policy and health system actors in order to understand regulatory processes. We drew on data from three case studies commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO, on the regulation of TB medicines in India, Tanzania, and Zambia. Qualitative research methods were used, including in-depth interviews with 89 policy and health system actors and document review. Data were organized thematically into accounts of regulators’ authority and capacity; extent of policy implementation; and efficiency, transparency, and accountability. Results: In India, findings included the absence of a comprehensive policy framework for regulation of TB medicines, constraints of authority and capacity of regulators, and poor implementation of prescribing and dispensing norms in the majority private sector. Tanzania had a policy that restricted import, prescribing and dispensing of TB medicines to government operators. Zambia procured and dispensed TB medicines mainly through government services, albeit in the absence of a single policy for restriction of medicines. Three cross-cutting factors emerged as crucially influencing regulatory processes - political and stakeholder support for

  2. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for molecules associated with metabolism, signaling and regulation in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studzinski Diane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines secreted by immune cells and activated glia play central roles in both the pathogenesis of and protection from damage to the central nervous system (CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods We have used gene array analysis to identify the initial direct effects of cytokines on CNS glia by comparing changes in early gene expression in CNS glial cultures treated for 6 hours with cytokines typical of those secreted by Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M. Results In two previous papers, we summarized effects of these cytokines on immune-related molecules, and on neural and glial related proteins, including neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins. In this paper, we present the effects of the cytokines on molecules involved in metabolism, signaling and regulatory mechanisms in CNS glia. Many of the changes in gene expression were similar to those seen in ischemic preconditioning and in early inflammatory lesions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, related to ion homeostasis, mitochondrial function, neurotransmission, vitamin D metabolism and a variety of transcription factors and signaling pathways. Among the most prominent changes, all three cytokine mixtures markedly downregulated the dopamine D3 receptor, while Th1 and Th2 cytokines downregulated neuropeptide Y receptor 5. An unexpected finding was the large number of changes related to lipid metabolism, including several suggesting a switch from diacylglycerol to phosphatidyl inositol mediated signaling pathways. Using QRT-PCR we validated the results for regulation of genes for iNOS, arginase and P glycoprotein/multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 seen at 6 hours with microarray. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures differentially regulated gene expression related to metabolism and signaling that may play roles in the pathogenesis of MS, most notably with regard to mitochondrial function and neurotransmitter

  3. MtNF-YA1, a central transcriptional regulator of symbiotic nodule development, is also a determinant of Medicago truncatula susceptibility towards a root pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant NF-Y transcription factors control a wide array of biological functions enabling appropriate reproductive and developmental processes as well as adaptation to various abiotic and biotic environments. In Medicago truncatula, MtNF-YA1 was previously identified as a key determinant for nodule development and establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. Here we highlight a new role for this protein in compatibility to Aphanomyces euteiches, a root pathogenic oomycete. The Mtnf-ya1-1 mutant plants showed better survival rate, reduced symptoms, and increased development of their root apparatus as compared to their wild type background A17. MtNF-YA-1 was specifically up-regulated by A. euteiches in F83005.5, a highly susceptible natural accession of M. truncatula while transcript level remained stable in A17, which is partially resistant. The role of MtNF-YA1 in F83005.5 susceptibility was further documented by reducing MtNF-YA1 expression either by overexpression of the miR169q, a microRNA targeting MtNF-YA1, or by RNAi approaches leading to a strong enhancement in the resistance of this susceptible line. Comparative analysis of the transcriptome of wild type and Mtnf-ya1-1 led to the identification of 1509 differentially expressed genes. Among those, almost 36 defence-related genes were constitutively expressed in Mtnf-ya1-1, while 20 genes linked to hormonal pathways were repressed. In summary, we revealed an unexpected dual role for this symbiotic transcription factor as a key player in the compatibility mechanisms to a pathogen.

  4. Depletion of norepinephrine of the central nervous system Down-regulates the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Lee, Jae-Ryeong; Sharma, Naveen; Suh, Hong-Won

    2016-05-04

    DSP-4[N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride] is a neurotoxin that depletes norepinephrine. The catecholaminergic system has been implicated in the regulation of blood glucose level. In the present study, the effect of DSP-4 administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) on blood glucose level was examined in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress mice models. Mice were pretreated once i.c.v. or i.t. with DSP-4 (10-40μg) for 3days, and d-glucose (2g/kg) was fed orally. Blood glucose level was measured 0 (prior to glucose feeding or restraint stress), 30, 60, and 120min after d-glucose feeding or restraint stress. The i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 attenuated blood glucose level in the d-glucose-fed model. Plasma corticosterone level was downregulated in the d-glucose-fed model, whereas plasma insulin level increased in the d-glucose-fed group. The i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 reversed the downregulation of plasma corticosterone induced by feeding d-glucose. In addition, the d-glucose-induced increase in plasma insulin was attenuated by the DSP-4 pretreatment. Furthermore, i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 reduced restraint stress-induced increases in blood glucose levels. Restraint stress increased plasma corticosterone and insulin levels. The i.c.v. pretreatment with DSP-4 attenuated restraint stress-induced plasma corticosterone and insulin levels. Our results suggest that depleting norepinephrine at the supraspinal and spinal levels appears to be responsible for downregulating blood glucose levels in both d-glucose-fed and restraint stress models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee-Cheng Khor

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS, a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR, including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA's (snoRNA. Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health

  6. Is Self-Regulation "All in the Family"? Testing Environmental Effects Using Within-Family Quasi-Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2016-01-01

    Most of the individual difference variance in the population is found "within" families, yet studying the processes causing this variation is difficult due to confounds between genetic and nongenetic influences. Quasi-experiments can be used to test hypotheses regarding environment exposure (e.g., timing, duration) while controlling for…

  7. Regulation of solid waste management at Brazilian ports: Analysis and proposals for Brazil in light of the European experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaccoud, Cristiane; Magrini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of the regulatory framework relating to solid waste management in Brazilian ports. • Comparison between European best practices and Brazilian structure. • Initiatives are suggested in order to improve Brazilian ports solid waste management regulation. - Abstract: With a coastline of 8500 km, Brazil has 34 public ports and various private terminals, which together in 2012 handled 809 million tonnes of goods. The solid wastes produced (from port activities, ships and cargoes) pose a highly relevant problem, both due to the quantity and diversity, requiring a complex and integrated set of practices resulting from legal requirements and proactive initiatives. The main Brazilian law on solid waste management is recent (Law 12,305/2010) and the specific rules on solid waste in ports are badly in need of revision to meet the challenges caused by expansion of the sector and to harmonize them with the best global practices. This paper analyzes the current legal/regulatory framework for solid waste management at Brazilian ports and compares this structure with the practice in Europe. At the end, we suggest initiatives to improve the regulation of solid wastes at Brazilian ports

  8. Suppression of the Escherichia coli dnaA46 mutation by changes in the activities of the pyruvate-acetate node links DNA replication regulation to central carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymecka-Mulik, Joanna; Boss, Lidia; Maciąg-Dorszyńska, Monika; Matias Rodrigues, João F; Gaffke, Lidia; Wosinski, Anna; Cech, Grzegorz M; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Glinkowska, Monika

    2017-01-01

    To ensure faithful transmission of genetic material to progeny cells, DNA replication is tightly regulated, mainly at the initiation step. Escherichia coli cells regulate the frequency of initiation according to growth conditions. Results of the classical, as well as the latest studies, suggest that the DNA replication in E. coli starts at a predefined, constant cell volume per chromosome but the mechanisms coordinating DNA replication with cell growth are still not fully understood. Results of recent investigations have revealed a role of metabolic pathway proteins in the control of cell division and a direct link between metabolism and DNA replication has also been suggested both in Bacillus subtilis and E. coli cells. In this work we show that defects in the acetate overflow pathway suppress the temperature-sensitivity of a defective replication initiator-DnaA under acetogenic growth conditions. Transcriptomic and metabolic analyses imply that this suppression is correlated with pyruvate accumulation, resulting from alterations in the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Consequently, deletion of genes encoding the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunits likewise resulted in suppression of the thermal-sensitive growth of the dnaA46 strain. We propose that the suppressor effect may be directly related to the PDH complex activity, providing a link between an enzyme of the central carbon metabolism and DNA replication.

  9. Cenozoic Evolution of the Central Part of the Mexican Subduction Zone From Geologic and Geophysical Data - In the Eve of the Result From the "Mase" Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, L.

    2006-12-01

    The Meso America Subduction Experiments (MASE), carried out jointly by Caltech, UCLA and UNAM (Institute of Geophysics and Center for Geoscience) is about to provide a detailed image of the crust and upper mantle in the central part of the Mexican subduction zone (Acapulco, Gro. Huejutla, Hgo.). Preliminary results show that the Cocos plate between the coast and the volcanic front is horizontal and placed just beneath the upper plate Moho. Further north, beneath the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), seismicity is scarce or absent and the geometry of the subducted plate is poorly defined. This part of the TMVB also displays a large geochemical variability, including lavas with scarce to none evidence of fluids from the subducting plate (OIB in Sierra Chichinautzin) and lavas with slab melting signature (adakites of Nevado de Toluca and Apan area) that coexist with the more abundant products showing clear evidence of fluids from the subduting plate. These peculiarities led several workers to formulate models that depart from a classic subduction scenario for the genesis of the TMVB. These include the presence of a rootless mantle plume, the development of a continental rift, a more or less abrupt increase of the subduction angle and a detached slab. While waiting from the final results of the MASE project the data available from potential methods, thermal modeling and the geologic record of the TMVB provide some constraints to evaluate these models. Gravimetric and magnetotelluric data consistently indicate that beneath the TMVB the upper mantle has a relatively low density and high temperatures/conductivity. Thermal modeling also indicates a low viscosity and high temperature mantle beneath the arc. All the above seems to indicate that the slab must increase rapidly its dip beneath the volcanic front leaving space for a hot asthenospheric mantle. The fate of the slab further to the north is unclear from geophysical data alone. Global and regional tomographic

  10. That’s not funny! – But it should be: effects of humorous emotion regulation on emotional experience and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Kugler, Lisa; Kuhbandner, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that humorous reappraisal can reduce elicited negative emotions, suggesting that humor may be a functional strategy to cope with emotionally negative situations. However, the effect of humorous reappraisal on later memory about the emotion-eliciting situation is currently unknown, although this is crucial for more adaptive responding in future situations. To address this issue, we examined the effects of humorous reappraisal on both emotional experience and memory,...

  11. Regulation of solid waste management at Brazilian ports: analysis and proposals for Brazil in light of the European experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccoud, Cristiane; Magrini, Alessandra

    2014-02-15

    With a coastline of 8500 km, Brazil has 34 public ports and various private terminals, which together in 2012 handled 809 million tonnes of goods. The solid wastes produced (from port activities, ships and cargoes) pose a highly relevant problem, both due to the quantity and diversity, requiring a complex and integrated set of practices resulting from legal requirements and proactive initiatives. The main Brazilian law on solid waste management is recent (Law 12,305/2010) and the specific rules on solid waste in ports are badly in need of revision to meet the challenges caused by expansion of the sector and to harmonize them with the best global practices. This paper analyzes the current legal/regulatory framework for solid waste management at Brazilian ports and compares this structure with the practice in Europe. At the end, we suggest initiatives to improve the regulation of solid wastes at Brazilian ports. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How to develop students’ approaches to learning: Experiences from a programme based on co-regulated learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stančić Milan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the insight that during their education students do not manage to learn how to learn, we created the programme called Blooming with the intention of enabling the students to reconsider their own approaches to learning by developing collaborative activities and relations in the classroom. The programme was realised in a secondary school class, and research goals were to explore the contribution of the programme to the change in students’ approach to learning - regarding the learning motivation and strategies - and to obtain an insight into students’ perspective of the benefits of the programme. The changes in learning strategies and students’ motivation were investigated using the MSLQ before and after programme attendance. The data on the programme benefits were obtained via focus groups with students and analysed by the thematic content analysis. It has been established that the students achieved a significant improvement when it comes to the mastering of the learning strategies that refer to self-regulation, critical thinking, peer learning and help seeking. In addition, the students pointed out as benefits a different method of work and pleasant atmosphere, the feeling of autonomy in classes, as well as the development of a different understanding of the nature of knowledge, the learning process and instruction. The results indicate that the use of Bloom’s taxonomy as the tool for co-regulated learning and self-evaluation of students can contribute to the change in students’ learning approaches. This finding is relevant for further considering of the possibility for this method to grow from a special programme into everyday teaching practice.

  13. Involvement of activated leukocytes in the regulation of plasma levels of acute phase proteins in microgravity simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna; Turin-Kuzmin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Earth-based studies of microgravity effects showed the induction of the mechanisms of acute phase reaction (APR). APR comprises the transition of stress-sensitive protein kinases of macrophages and other responsive cells into the active state and the phosphorylation of transcription factors which in turn stimulate the production of acute-phase reaction cytokines. Leukocyte activation is accompanied by the acceleration of the formation of oxygen radicals which can serve a functional indice of leukocyte cell state. The series of events at acute phase response result in selective changes in the synthesis of a number of secretory blood proteins (acute phase proteins, APPs) in liver cells thus contributing the recovery of homeostasis state in the organism. Earlier experiment with head-down tilt showed the increase in plasma concentrations of two cytokine mediators of acute phase response, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) being the outcome of the activation of producer cells, foremost, leukocytes. In experiment with 4-day dry immersion chemiluminescent (ChL) reply of the whole blood samples to a test stimulus were studied along with the measurements of plasma levels of APPs, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), alpha1-acid glycoprotein (alpha1-AGP), alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M), ceruloplasmin (Cer), haptoglobin (Hp), C3-complement component (C3), C-reactive protein (CRP). Eight individuals aged 21.2 ± 3.2 years were the test subjects in the investigation. Protein studies showed a noticeable increase in the mean plasma levels of all APPs measured in experiment thus producing the evidence of the activation of acute phase response mechanisms while individual patterns revealed variability during the immersion period. The overall trends were similar to these in the previous immersion series. The augment in the strength of signal in stimulated light emission tests was higher after 1- and 2-day of immersion exposure than before the

  14. Outsourcing central banking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoury, Sarkis Joseph; Wihlborg, Clas

    2005-01-01

    The literature on Currency Boards (CB) stops at the water edge in terms of dealing with the totality of the functions of a central bank. Monetary policy, and banking supervisioncan be "outsourced" in an open economy with substantial foreign direct investment (FDI)in the banking sector if political...... nationalism does not trump economic rationality. An orthodox CB renders the central banking function redundant in terms of interest rate and exchange rate determination. FDI in banking could perform the same role for the supervisory function of central banks. We use the case of Estonia to illustrate...... the feasibility of, and constraints on, outsourcing of central bank functions. A brief discussion of the Argentinian experience is used for contrast.Key words: Currency Board, Foreign Banks, Supervision, Regional Integration,outsourcing....

  15. The European Central Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Binder, Michael; Wieland, Volker

    2006-01-01

    The establishment of the ECB and with it the launch of the euro has arguably been a unique endeavor in economic history, representing an important experiment in central banking. This note aims to summarize some of the main lessons learned from this experiment and sketch some of the prospects for the ECB. It is written for "The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics", 2nd edition. JEL Classification: E52, E58

  16. Ashes in concrete related applications. Regulations, best practice and experiences; Energiaskor i betongrelaterade tillaempningar. Normer, praxis och erfarenheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordstroem, Erik; Thorsell, Per-Erik

    2003-10-01

    A compilation of regulations and best practice from different techniques to utilize ashes in concrete related applications is presented in this report. The term 'concrete related' applications also include geotechnical applications where cement is used as a binder. It can be seen that fully developed regulations is only available for concrete used as a structural building material. In other applications the formulations give an opportunity to use alternative materials as long as similar properties are achieved. In some applications not even this type of regulations are available but the alternatives are judged from case to case. The purpose with this work was to high-light acceptable variations for the parameters where limitations on constituent materials are formulated. During the work it has become clear that the task is not possible to solve since this kind of values seldom are available. A discussion about the economical potential for different applications is presented in the end of the report. In summary, the concrete applications do not allow the major part of the ashes to be utilized and the demands on the ashes are high. But it can also be stated that the high costs for cement give a big incitement for change of binder in concrete to e.g. flyash. In the geotechnical applications there is also a big potential both regarding technical and economical aspects, but the possible effects on soil and ground water will give rise to more rigorous considerations by the environmental authorities. Finally, the mining applications can give a large amount of ashes to be utilized in a limited region, and the transport cost can be problematic for the ash producers. The conclusions from the present work are that there exist several possible concrete applications also for other ashes than pure coal ashes. Type of ash, available amounts, storage facilities, local market, stability in fuel-mix, personal interests are important parameters influencing the possibilities

  17. Treatment of wastewater and restoration of aquatic systems through an eco-technology based constructed treatment wetlands - a successful experience in Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billore, S K; Sharma, J K; Singh, N; Ram, H

    2013-01-01

    In the last couple of decades constructed wetlands (CWs) have drawn considerable interest in Central India. CWs offer an effective means of integrating wastewater treatment and resource enhancement, often at competitive cost in comparison to conventional wastewater treatments, with additional benefits of Green Urban Landscaping and wildlife habitat. This paper describes treatment performances and the design of some Sub Surface Flow CWs (SSFCW) and Artificial Floating Islands (AFIs) in Central India. Central Indian CWs show significant pollution reduction load for total suspended solids (TSS) (62-82%), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (40-75%), NH(4)-N (67-78%) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (59-78%). Field scale SSFCWs installed so far in Central India are rectangular, earthen, single/multiple celled having similar depths of 0.60-0.90 m, hydraulic retention capacity 18-221 m(3) with effective size 41.8-1,050 m(2). The major components of CWs incorporate puddled bottom/side walls, sealed with impermeable low-density polyethylene, a bed of locally available river gravel planted with Phragmites karka, and an inlet distribution and outlet collection system. A new variant on CWs are AFIs working under hydroponics. The field scale experimental AFIs installed in-situ in a slowly flowing local river were composed of hollow bamboo, a bed of coconut coir, floating arrangements and Phragmites karka as nutrient stripping plant species. The AFIs polish the aquatic system by reducing 46.6% of TSS, 45-55% of NH(4)-N, 33-45% of NO(3)-N, 45-50% of TKN and 40-50% of BOD. The study established that there is a need for further research and sufficient data to assist the development of CWs by instilling confidence in policymakers, planners and in the public.

  18. Memória e patrimônio documental: a experiência no tratamento arquivístico do acervo da UFV sob guarda do Arquivo Central e Histórico da UFV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Maria de Aguiar da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem por objetivo relatar a experiência com o tratamento e organização do acervo documental sob posse do Arquivo Central e Histórico da UFV, que congrega uma vasta documentação relativa à trajetória da Universidade, desde sua fundação em 1926 até os dias atuais. A partir do trabalho de extensão, foram desenvolvidas atividades de conservação preventiva do acervo, além de possibilitar um espaço de interlocução entre teoria e prática histórica. Palavras chave: Arquivo Central e Histórico da UFV, conservação documental, memória institucional. Áreas temáticas: Comunicação, cultura e educação.

  19. Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The beginning of spring in central Chile looked like this to SeaWiFS. The snow-covered Andes mark the country's eastern border, and phytoplankton blooms and river sediment plumes fill the waters off its west coast. A large eddy due west of Concepcion is highlighted by the phytoplankton it contains.

  20. Afrique Centrale

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PR BOKO

    (Afrique Centrale) : peuplement de protozoaires ciliés et macro invertébrés ... Le lac d'Obili est un écosystème aquatique situé en plein cœur de Yaoundé en ...... électrique des eaux est assez stable, autour de 200 ; ce qui suppose que la ...

  1. “I want to have a path”: an exploratory study of parent experience of early autism diagnosis in Massachusetts and Central Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Glynne-Owen, Ruth Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Parents of children with autism have been identified across research as having unique experiences in comparison to parents of children with other disabilities. The focus to date has been on identifying factors impacting on parental well-being post-diagnosis, with some more recent studies looking more specifically at parent experience of the diagnostic process. However, there is less literature that explores the impact that this diagnosis may have on parental perspectives of, an...

  2. Involvement of N6 and N3 polyunsaturated faty acids on the lipidic profile in central nervous system of the animals of experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Iamandei1, Veronica Mocanu1, T. Oboroceanu2, Veronica Luca1

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: N-3 and N-6polyunsaturated fatty acids has manyinvolvements in activities within orentering in regulating various physiologicalprocesses and in certain pathologies.Among systemic physiological effects inwhich they are involved we mention thecentral nervous system development andrecall of the retina, regulating plasma lipidlevels, cardiovascular and immune systemfunctions, regulating the activity of insulin.Material and methods: The experimentthere were used 60 male Wistar rats , weight180 ± 20 grams, procured from the animalfarm of the Department ofPathophysiology, University of Medicineand Pharmacy “Gr.T. Popa”, Iaşi.Male Wistar rats were divided into twostudy groups: normal control animals (Mand test animals.Test group was further divided intothree groups - each group being composedof 15 animals.Administration of the substances wasmade for 36 weeks (nine months, afterwhich the animals were evaluated andsubsequently sacrificed.Results: Following statistical analysis, wedetermined the following:• Averages of AGP n3 were significantlyhigher in groups 2 (p <0.001 and 3 (p<0.001 compared with group 4• Averages ratio n6: n3 in nerve cellmembrane were significantly lower ingroups 2 (p <0.001 and 3 (p <0.001compared with group 4Discussions: Our experimentdemonstrates that increased amounts ofpolyunsaturated fatty acids in themembranes of nerve cells which can justifythe positive evolution of animals inassessing the performance of concomitantbehavioral tests.Conclusions: This study brings new lighton the importance of the existence of abalance between PUFA intake and dailydiet.

  3. Several Centuries of Centrality

    OpenAIRE

    Dana L. Roth

    2015-01-01

    As Carolyn Bertozzi mentioned in her inaugural editorial, the relationship of “Central Science” to “Chemistry” became popularized over 40 years ago with the publication of the first edition of Brown and LeMay’s Chemistry: The Central Science, now in its 13th edition. Yet as late as 2003, Prof. Sason Shaik at The Hebrew University claimed “popularization of chemistry remains scant.” He goes on to share [his] “own experience of popularizing chemistry by delivering the following universal messag...

  4. 76 FR 62630 - Information Security Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 32 CFR Part 1902 Information Security Regulations AGENCY: Central... information security regulations which have become outdated. The Executive Order upon which the regulations... CFR Part 1902 Information security regulations. PART 1902 [REMOVED AND RESERVED] Sec. 1902.13 [Removed...

  5. Experience with a mobile data storage device for transfer of studies from the critical care unit to a central nuclear medicine computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cradduck, T.D.; Driedger, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    The introduction of mobile scintillation cameras has enabled the more immediate provision of nuclear medicine services in areas remote from the central nuclear medicine laboratory. Since a large number of such studies involve the use of a computer for data analysis, the concurrent problem of how to transmit those data to the computer becomes critical. A device is described using hard magnetic discs as the recording media and which can be wheeled from the patient's bedside to the central computer for playback. Some initial design problems, primarily associated with the critical timing which is necessary for the collection of gated studies, were overcome and the unit has been in service for the past two years. The major limitations are the relatively small capacity of the discs and the fact that the data are recorded in list mode. These constraints result in studies having poor statistical validity. The slow turn-around time, which results from the necessity to transport the system to the department and replay the study into the computer before analysis can begin, is also of particular concern. The use of this unit has clearly demonstrated the very important role that nuclear medicine can play in the care of the critically ill patient. The introduction of a complete acquisition and analysis unit is planned so that prompt diagnostic decisions can be made available within the intensive care unit. (author)

  6. Temporal and spatial distribution of isotopes in river water in Central Europe: 50 years experience with the Austrian network of isotopes in rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Dieter; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Schott, Katharina; Weigand, Silvia; Oblin, Armin

    2018-05-01

    The Austrian network of isotopes in rivers comprises about 15 sampling locations and has been operated since 1976. The Danube isotope time series goes back to 1963. The isotopic composition of river water in Central Europe is mainly governed by the isotopic composition of precipitation in the catchment area; evaporation effects play only a minor role. Short-term and long-term isotope signals in precipitation are thus transmitted through the whole catchment. The influence of climatic changes has become observable in the long-term stable isotope time series of precipitation and surface waters. Environmental 3 H values were around 8 TU in 2015, short-term 3 H pulses up to about 80 TU in the rivers Danube and March were a consequence of releases from nuclear power plants. The complete isotope data series of this network will be included in the Global Network of Isotopes in Rivers database of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 2017. This article comprises a review of 50 years isotope monitoring on rivers and is also intended to provide base information on the (isotope-)hydrological conditions in Central Europe specifically for the end-users of these data, e.g. for modelling hydrological processes. Furthermore, this paper includes the 2006-2015 supplement adding to the Danube isotope set published earlier.

  7. Experience with the operation of a solar central heating system in Friedrichshafen/Wiggenhausen-Sued; Betriebserfahrungen mit der solaren Nahwaermeversorgung in Friedrichshafen/Wiggenhausen-Sued

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanzel, B.; Gawantka, F. [Technische Werke Friedrichshafen GmbH, Friedrichshafen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The ideas, concepts and pilot plants for solar central heating systems developed by the Institute for Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering of Stuttgart University were implemented by the Steinbeis-Transfer Centre for Energy, Building and Solar Engineering. In order to improve the economic efficiency of solar central heating with long-term storage a pilot plant with a heat storage tank of 12,000 cubic metres was built in Wiggenhausen-Sued. The `Technische Werke Friedrichshafen` (TWF) is in charge of the project `Solar City Wiggenhausen-Sued`. This company built the plant and also operates and maintains it. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Ideen, Konzepte und erste Pilotanlagen zur solaren Nahwaerme werden seit Mitte der achtziger Jahre vom Institut fuer Thermodynamik und Waermetechnik (ITW) der Universitaet Stuttgart entwickelt und vom Steinbeis-Transferzentrum Energie-, Gebaeude- und Solartechnik umgesetzt. Um die solare Nahwaermeversorgung mit Langzeit-Waermespeicher der Wirtschaftlichkeit etwas naeher zu bringen, wurde eine Pilotanlage mit einem 12.000 m{sup 3} grossen Waermespeicher in Wiggenhausen-Sued gebaut. Mit diesem Pilotprojekt soll neben der technischen Durchfuehrbarkeit die Kostendegression durch steigende Anlagengroesse nachgewiesen werden. Als Energiedienstleistungsunternehmen hat die Technische Werke Friedrichshafen GmbH (TWF) die technische und kaufmaennische Durchfuehrung des Projektes `Solarstadt Wiggenhausen-Sued` uebernommen. Sie errichtete, betreibt und wartet die Anlage. (orig.)

  8. Measurement and Regulation of Central Noradrenergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-30

    reduction in swimming ( Armario et al., 1991). Propranolol and betaxolol when given alone both produced a similar reduction in acitivity and when given with...19:74, 1993. Literature cited in report Armario , A., Gil, %., Marti, J., Pol, 0. and Balasch, J. Pharmacol.Biochem.Behav. 39:373-377, 1991. Blanchard

  9. Cytokinins are central regulators of cambial activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matsumoto-Kitano, M.; Kusumoto, T.; Tarkowski, Petr; Kinoshita-Tsujimura, K.; Václavíková, Kateřina; Miyawaki, K.; Kakimoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 50 (2008), s. 20027-20031 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cambium * isopentenyladenine * phytohormone * zeatin Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 9.380, year: 2008

  10. Safety Regulations in organizations and enterprises under supervision of Federal environmental, industrial and nuclear supervision service of Russia (Rostechnadzor), Central Region. Short overview of sites which potentially are dangerous for terrorist threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasselblat, A.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Federal environmental, industrial and nuclear supervision service of Russia carries out inspections over safety of atomic energy sites on the territory of Russian Federation, which are used for peaceful purposes. Currently under control of Supervision Service on the whole territory of Russia 2000 (2179) (1.) organizations (enterprises), business entities in the field of atomic energy use (industry, medicine, scientific research, agriculture, geological survey, education and etc.) using in their activity radionuclide sources. Approximately 6000 (5955) territorially separated or technologically independent radiation-dangerous sites are counted in their structure, which are dealing with radionuclides. The total number of sealed radionuclide sources is more than 1000 pieces. More than thousands radiation-dangerous entities are dealing with unsealed radionuclide sources and radioactive wastes. At such scales of activity, when evident dynamic of source movement is observed, it is very important for regulatory authority to update information on source location, condition, safe use and security, as well as physical protection and prevention of its use in terrorist purposes. In its structure industrial and nuclear supervision service of Russia has 7 big subdivisions (according to directions regulation in the field of atomic energy use) - inter regional territory administrations on control over nuclear and radiation safety, ensuring control over whole territory of Russian Federation, each in within its border of Federal region of Russian Federation. Central inter regional territory administration on control over nuclear and radiation safety is the biggest according to its personnel and number of controlled sites by territorial subdivision of Federal environmental, industrial and nuclear supervision service of Russia (in the field of atomic energy use, according to Federal Law dated 21.11.1995, №170-Federal Low On atomic energy use) and carries out its activity

  11. High burden of hepatocellular carcinoma and viral hepatitis in Southern and Central Vietnam: Experience of a large tertiary referral center, 2010 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Dinh, Song-Huy; Do, Albert; Pham, Trang Ngoc Doan; Dao, Doan Y; Nguy, Trinh Nhu; Chen, Moon S

    2018-01-27

    To examine the largest tertiary referral center in southern and central Vietnam from 2010 to 2016, evaluating epidemiological trends of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and viral hepatitis B-C in this resource-limited setting. We extracted data of patients receiving care from Cho Ray Hospital (Ho Chi Minh City), the largest oncology referral center in southern and central Vietnam, from 2010 to 2016. We collected information on patient age, gender, geographic distribution, and disease characteristics including disease stage, tumor biomarker levels [serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), AFP-L3 isoform percentage, and prothrombin induced by induced by vitamin K absence-II], and serological testing for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Data from 24091 HCC patients were extracted, with sample demographics comprising mostly male (81.8%) and older age (however with 8.5% younger than 40 years old). This patient sample included a geographic catchment population of 56 million people (60% of the country's total population of 92.7 million), derived from 38 provinces and municipalities in Vietnam. Chronic HBV infection was found in 62.3% of cases, and chronic HCV infection in 26.0%. HBV and HCV co-infection was seen in 2.7%. Cirrhosis was found in an estimated 30% to 40% of cases. Nine percent of patients were not found to have chronic viral hepatitis. Twenty three point two percent of the patients had a normal AFP level. A total of 2199 patients were tested with AFP-L3 and PIVKA II over two years, with 57.7% having elevated AFP-L3%, and 88.5% with elevated PIVKA II levels. Over this 7-year period, the incidence of HCC increased, with a large proportion of cases (overall 40.8%) presenting initially an advanced stage, not amendable to surgical or locoregional therapy. HCC contributes significant health care burden in southern and central Vietnam, with increasing case volume over this seven-year period. Viral hepatitis likely explains this high HCC prevalence.

  12. Europa central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel BARTOSEK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available La investigación francesa continúa interesándose por Europa Central. Desde luego, hay límites a este interés en el ambiente general de mi nueva patria: en la ignorancia, producto del largo desinterés de Francia por este espacio después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y en el comportamiento y la reflexión de la clase política y de los medios de comunicación (una anécdota para ilustrar este ambiente: durante la preparación de nuestro coloquio «Refugiados e inmigrantes de Europa Central en el movimiento antifascista y la Resistencia en Francia, 1933-1945», celebrado en París en octubre de 1986, el problema de la definición fue planteado concreta y «prácticamente». ¡Y hubo entonces un historiador eminente, para quién Alemania no formaría parte de Europa Central!.

  13. Energy integration experiences at the Europe, at the Nordic countries and at the Central America: considerations relevant to the South America integration process; Experiencias de integracao energetica na Europa, nos paises nordicos e na America Central: consideracoes relevantes ao processo de integracao Sul-Americana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Adriana Fiorotti; Andreza, Fernanda Marques Pereira; Soares, Jeferson Borghetti; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Bacile; Oliveira, Ricardo Gorini de [Empresa de Pesquisa Energetica (EPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], Emails: adriana.campos@epe.gov.br, fernanda.andreza@epe.gov.br; jeferson.soares@epe.gov.br, maria.pinheiro, ricardo.gorini@epe.gov.br

    2010-07-01

    In view of institutional/contractual regulatory problems at the South America, some experiences of energy integration at the electrical sectors and natural gas (Nordic countries. European Union and Central America), identifying related vantages and advantageous. Besides, there is an attempt of characterization of the process step of energy integration, and the fitting of regions in these steps, observing that the process of energy integration in the South America it is found in a initial step yet if it is considered the used methodology by the Colombian enterprise Interconexion Electrica S.A.E.S.P. - ISA (2007)

  14. Transverse momentum, rapidity, and centrality dependence of inclusive charged-particle production in sNN=5.02 TeV p+Pb collisions measured by the ATLAS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the per-event charged-particle yield as a function of the charged-particle transverse momentum and rapidity are performed using p+Pb collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of sNN=5.02TeV. Charged particles are reconstructed over pseudorapidity |η|<2.3 and transverse momentum between 0.1 GeV and 22 GeV in a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 μb−1. The results are presented in the form of charged-particle nuclear modification factors, where the p+Pb charged-particle multiplicities are compared between central and peripheral p+Pb collisions as well as to charged-particle cross sections measured in pp collisions. The p+Pb collision centrality is characterized by the total transverse energy measured in −4.9<η<−3.1, which is in the direction of the outgoing lead beam. Three different estimations of the number of nucleons participating in the p+Pb collision are carried out using the Glauber model and two Glauber–Gribov colour-fluctuation extensions to the Glauber model. The values of the nuclear modification factors are found to vary significantly as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum. A broad peak is observed for all centralities and rapidities in the nuclear modification factors for charged-particle transverse momentum values around 3 GeV. The magnitude of the peak increases for more central collisions as well as rapidity ranges closer to the direction of the outgoing lead nucleus.

  15. central t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Piña Monarrez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dado que la Regresión Ridge (RR, es una estimación sesgada que parte de la solución de la regresión de Mínimos Cuadrados (MC, es vital establecer las condiciones para las que la distribución central t de Student que se utiliza en la prueba de hipótesis en MC, sea también aplicable a la regresión RR. La prueba de este importante resultado se presenta en este artículo.

  16. Central sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - central; Obesity - central sleep apnea; Cheyne-Stokes - central sleep apnea; Heart failure - central sleep apnea ... Central sleep apnea results when the brain temporarily stops sending signals to the muscles that control breathing. The condition ...

  17. A conceptual framework for characterizing forest areas with high societal values: experiences from the Pacific Northwest of USA and Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simončič, Tina; Spies, Thomas A; Deal, Robert L; Bončina, Andrej

    2015-07-01

    In recent decades, much work has been invested to describe forest allocations with high societal values. Yet, few comparative analyses have been conducted on their importance and differences across the regions of the globe. This paper introduces a conceptual framework to characterize forest priority areas defined as areas with identified higher importance of societal values in the context of multi-objective forest management. The six dimensions of the framework (designation objective, prioritization of objectives, governance, permanency, spatial scale, and management regime) characterize the general approach (integrative vs. segregative) to multi-objective forest management and explain the form and role of priority areas for providing forest services. The framework was applied in two case study regions--Pacific Northwest of USA (PNW) and Central Europe (CE). Differences between the regions exist in all dimensions. Late-successional and riparian reserves are specific to the PNW, while protection against natural hazards is specific to CE. In PNW, priority areas are mainly focused on public lands whereas in CE they include public and private lands. Priority areas in PNW are designated in a much larger spatial context and have longer time commitments. In CE, integration of management objectives on priority areas prevails, whereas in PNW priority areas tend to be designated for single objectives. In CE, greater tolerance of timber management within priority areas compared to PNW is allowed. Convergent trends in application of priority areas between the regions indicate mixing of segregation and integration approaches to forest management.

  18. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after isolated central nervous system relapse: our experiences and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, T; Morimoto, A; Kuroda, H; Imamura, T; Ishida, H; Tsunamoto, K; Naya, M; Hibi, S; Todo, S; Imashuku, S

    2006-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and central nervous system (CNS) relapse has historically been very poor. Although chemo-radiotherapy has improved outcomes, some patients still have a poor prognosis after CNS relapse. Therefore, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has recently become an option for treatment of CNS leukemia; however, information, particularly on the long-term outcome of transplant recipients, is limited. We performed allo-SCT in eight pediatric patients with ALL (n=7) or T-cell type non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=1), who had isolated CNS relapse. All patients survived for a median of 70.5 (range, 13-153) months after SCT. Sequelae developed late in some patients: mental retardation (IQ=47) in one patient, severe alopecia in two patients, limited chronic graft-versus-host-disease in three patients, and amenorrhea and/or hypothyroidism in three patients. Except for a pre-school child with post transplant CNS relapse, six out of seven patients show normal school/social performance. Our results clearly indicate a high cure rate of isolated CNS relapse by allo-SCT in pediatric lymphoid malignancies; however, there needs to be further studies to determine which are the appropriate candidates for transplantation and what is the best transplant regimen to achieve high cure rate and maintain good quality of life.

  19. Surgical Excision with Forehead Flap as Single Modality Treatment for Basal Cell Cancer of Central Face: Single Institutional Experience of 50 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdeep Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common skin cancer worldwide. The WHO has defined it as “a locally invasive, slowly spreading tumor which rarely metastasizes, arising in the epidermis or hair follicles and in which the peripheral cells usually simulate the basal cells of the epidermis.” Here we discuss the management of BCCs of central face with surgical excision and reconstruction with forehead flap as single modality treatment. Material and Methods. This is a retrospective review of 50 patients who underwent surgical excision of BCC involving the facial region followed by primary reconstruction using forehead flaps at a single institution. There were 20 males and 30 females, mean age of 59 years. Results. No recurrence at primary site was observed during the follow-up of 1–4 yrs. There was no ectropion or exposure sequela. However, epiphora was evident. Size of lesions ranged from 2 to 6 cm. Keloid formation was seen in 2 (4% patients. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were satisfactory. Conclusion. For the face, the best reconstructive effort eventually fails in the face of tumor recurrence. The forehead flap represents one of the best methods for repair of extensive facial defects. Complete tumor extirpation, the primary event, is the key.

  20. The multistage nature of labour migration from Eastern and Central Europe (experience of Ukraine, Poland, United Kingdom and Germany during the 2002-2011 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khrystyna FOGEL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the consequences of the biggest round of EU Enlargement in 2004 on the labour migration flows from the new accession countries (A8 of the Eastern and Central Europe to Western Europe. The main focus of our research is the unique multistage nature of labour migration in the region. As a case study, we take labour migration from Poland to the United Kingdom and Germany and similar processes taking place in the labour migration from Ukraine to Poland. In particular, a new type of migration structure developed reflecting new features of integration stages of new EU Member States. This allows us to apprehend how this type of labour migration, within the multistage model, includes periods of time that take into account the inertia of labour movement. This article examines not only the character of A8 migration flows but also the potential drivers of this migration such as economic, institutional, etc. All processes are examined in the 2002 - 2011 time frame.

  1. Transvenous stimulation of the phrenic nerve for the treatment of central sleep apnoea: 12 months' experience with the remedē® System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, Dariusz; Ponikowski, Piotr; Augostini, Ralph; Kolodziej, Adam; Khayat, Rami; Abraham, William T

    2016-11-01

    Patients with central sleep apnoea (CSA) often have poor quality of life and are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This study sought to evaluate the 12-month clinical outcomes of patients with CSA treated with unilateral transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation in the prospective, multicentre, non-randomized remedē ® System pilot study. Forty-seven patients with CSA were treated with the remedē ® System (Respicardia Inc., Minnetonka, MN, USA) for a minimum of 3 months. Sleep-disordered breathing parameters were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up. Sleep symptoms and quality of life were also evaluated. Forty-one patients completed all follow-up PSGs and were included in the analysis. At 12 months, there was sustained improvement compared with baseline in the apnoea-hypopnoea index (49.9 ± 15.1 vs. 27.5 ± 18.3 events/h, P phrenic nerve stimulation is associated with sustained improvement in key sleep parameters, sleep symptoms, and quality of life over 12 months of follow-up. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  2. Petrophysical examination of CO₂-brine-rock interactions-results of the first stage of long-term experiments in the potential Zaosie Anticline reservoir (central Poland) for CO₂ storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Radosław; Wdowin, Magdalena; Manecki, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was determination of experiment-induced alterations and changes in the properties of reservoir rocks and sealing rocks sampled from potential reservoir for CO₂. In the experiment, rocks submerged in brine in specially constructed reactors were subjected to CO₂ pressure of 6 MPa for 20 months at room temperature. Samples of Lower Jurassic reservoir rocks and sealing rocks (sandstones, claystones, and mudstones) from the Zaosie Anticline (central Poland) were analysed for their petrophysical properties (specific surface area, porosity, pore size and distribution) before and after the experiment. Comparison of the ionic composition the brines before and after the experiment demonstrated an increase in total dissolved solids as well as the concentration of sulphates and calcium ions. This indicates partial dissolution of the rock matrix and the cements. As a result of the reaction, the properties of reservoir rocks did not changed significantly and should not affect the process of CO₂ storage. In the case of the sealing rocks, however, the porosity, the framework density, as well as the average capillary and threshold diameter increased. Also, the pore distribution in the pore space changed in favour of larger pores. The reasons for these changes could not be explained by petrographic characteristics and should be thoroughly investigated.

  3. Institutional capacity for health systems research in East and Central African schools of public health: experiences with a capacity assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessani, Nasreen; Lewy, Daniela; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Bennett, Sara

    2014-06-02

    Despite significant investments in health systems research (HSR) capacity development, there is a dearth of information regarding how to assess HSR capacity. An alliance of schools of public health (SPHs) in East and Central Africa developed a tool for the self-assessment of HSR capacity with the aim of producing institutional capacity development plans. Between June and November 2011, seven SPHs across the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda implemented this co-created tool. The objectives of the institutional assessments were to assess existing capacities for HSR and to develop capacity development plans to address prioritized gaps. A mixed-method approach was employed consisting of document analysis, self-assessment questionnaires, in-depth interviews, and institutional dialogues aimed at capturing individual perceptions of institutional leadership, collective HSR skills, knowledge translation, and faculty incentives to engage in HSR. Implementation strategies for the capacity assessment varied across the SPHs. This paper reports findings from semi-structured interviews with focal persons from each SPH, to reflect on the process used at each SPH to execute the institutional assessments as well as the perceived strengths and weaknesses of the assessment process. The assessment tool was robust enough to be utilized in its entirety across all seven SPHs resulting in a thorough HSR capacity assessment and a capacity development plan for each SPH. Successful implementation of the capacity assessment exercises depended on four factors: (i) support from senior leadership and collaborators, (ii) a common understanding of HSR, (iii) adequate human and financial resources for the exercise, and (iv) availability of data. Methods of extracting information from the results of the assessments, however, were tailored to the unique objectives of each SPH. This institutional HSR capacity assessment tool and the process for its utilization

  4. Lack of survival improvement with novel anti-myeloma agents for patients with multiple myeloma and central nervous system involvement: the Greek Myeloma Study Group experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katodritou, Eirini; Terpos, Evangelos; Kastritis, Efstathios; Delimpasis, Sossana; Symeonidis, Argiris S; Repousis, Panagiotis; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Vadikolia, Chrysa; Michalis, Eurydiki; Polychronidou, Genovefa; Michael, Michael; Papadaki, Sofia; Papathanasiou, Maria; Kokoviadou, Kyriaki; Kioumi, Anna; Vlachaki, Eythimia; Hadjiaggelidou, Christina; Kouraklis, Alexandra; Patsias, Ioannis; Gavriatopoulou, Maria; Kotsopoulou, Maria; Verrou, Evgenia; Gastari, Vasiliki; Christoulas, Dimitrios; Giannopoulou, Evlambia; Pouli, Anastasia; Konstantinidou, Pavlina; Anagnostopoulos, Achilles; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanasios

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare complication of multiple myeloma (MM). Herein, we have described the incidence, characteristics, prognostic factors for post CNS-MM survival, and outcome of CNS-MM and explored the efficacy of novel agents (NA) (thalidomide, bortezomib, lenalidomide) in this setting. Between 2000 and 2013, 31 (0.9 %) out of 3408 newly diagnosed symptomatic MM patients, consecutively diagnosed and treated during the same period in 12 Greek centers, developed CNS-MM (M/F 15/16, median age 59 years, range 20-96 years; newly diagnosed/relapsed-refractory 2/29; median time to CNS-MM diagnosis 29 months). Clinical and laboratory characteristics were retrospectively recorded. Twenty-six percent of patients had circulating plasma cells (PCs) or plasma cell leukemia (PCL) at CNS-MM and 39 % had skull-derived plasmacytomas, suggesting hematological and contiguous spread. Treatment for CNS-MM was offered in 29/31 patients and 11/29 responded (NA 18/29, additional radiotherapy 9/28, intrathecal chemotherapy 13/29). The median post CNS-MM survival was 3 months (95 % CI 1.9-4.1) and did not differ between patients treated with NA and/or radiotherapy vs. others. In the multivariate analysis, prior treatment of MM with NA, extramedullary disease (EMD) during MM course (i.e., plasmacytomas, circulating PCs, or documented PCL) and abnormally high LDH at MM diagnosis were independent prognostic factors, whereas treatment of CNS-MM with NA did not predict for post CNS-MM survival. Despite the relatively limited number of patients due to the rarity of CNS-MM, our results suggest that NA do not seem to improve post CNS-MM survival. Patients with EMD display shortened post CNS-MM survival and should be followed thoroughly.

  5. Central hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Central hypothyroidism is defined as hypothyroidism due to insufficient stimulation by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH of an otherwise normal thyroid gland. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 80,000 to 1 in 120,000. It can be secondary hypothyroidism (pituitary or tertiary hypothyroidism (hypothalamus in origin. In children, it is usually caused by craniopharyngiomas or previous cranial irradiation for brain tumors or hematological malignancies. In adults, it is usually due to pituitary macroadenomas, pituitary surgeries or post-irradiation. Fatigue and peripheral edema are the most specific clinical features. Diagnosis is established by the presence of normal to low-normal TSH on the background of low-normal thyroid hormones, confirmed by the thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test. Therapy includes use of levothyroxine titrated to improvement in symptomology and keeping free T4 in the upper limit of normal reference range.

  6. LHC-GCS Process Tuning selection and use of PID and Smith predictor for the regulations of the LHC experiments' gas systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cabaret, S; Rachid, A; Coppier, H

    2005-01-01

    The LHC experiment’s Gas Control System (LHC GCS) has to provide LHC experiments with homogeneous control systems (supervision and process control layers) for their 23 gas systems. The LHC GCS process control layer is based on Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), Field-Buses and on a library, UNICOS (UNified Industrial COntrol System). Its supervision layer is based on a commercial SCADA system and on the JCOP and UNICOS PVSS frameworks. A typical LHC experiment’s gas system is composed of up to ten modules, dedicated to specific functions (e.g. mixing, purification, circulation). Most of modules require control loops for the regulation of pressures, temperatures and flows or ratios of gases. The control loops of the 23 gas systems can be implemented using the same tools, but need specific tuning according to their respective size, volume, pipe lengths and required accuracy. Most of the control loops can be implemented by means a standard PID (Proportional, Integral and Derivative) controller. When this...

  7. 48 CFR 52.204-7 - Central Contractor Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Central Contractor....204-7 Central Contractor Registration. As prescribed in 4.1105, use the following clause: Central Contractor Registration (APR 2008) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause— Central Contractor Registration...

  8. Experiences of unemployment and well-being after job loss during economic recession: Results of a qualitative study in east central Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie; Marttila, Anneli; Mälstam, Emelie; Macassa, Gloria

    2017-12-13

    Introduction: Several studies have revealed an association between unemployment and ill health, and shown that unemployment can affect people differently. This study aimed to provide an understanding of the experiences of unemployment and perceptions of wellbeing among persons who involuntary lost their work during the recent economic recession in Gävle Municipality. Methods: Sixteen unemployed men and women aged 28-62 were interviewed face-to-face. A purposeful sampling strategy was used in order to suit the research question and to increase the variation among informants. The interview texts were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Six different themes emerged from the accounts: The respondents perceived work as the basis for belonging, and loss of work affected their social life and consumption patterns due to changes in their financial situation. They also expressed feelings of isolation, loss of self-esteem, and feelings of hopelessness, which affected their physical well-being. Longer duration of unemployment increased the respondents' negative emotions. The respondents reported activities, structure, and affiliation in other contexts as part of their coping strategy against poor mental health. Conclusions: After job loss, the respondents experienced feelings of loss of dignity and belonging as a human being. They also felt worry, insecurity, and stress due to their changed financial situation, which in turn led to isolation and loss of self-esteem. Social support and having other activities gave the respondents structure and meaning.

  9. Experiences of unemployment and well-being after job loss during economic recession: Results of a qualitative study in east central Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sofie Hiswåls

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several studies have revealed an association between unemployment and ill health, and shown that unemployment can affect people differently. This study aimed to provide an understanding of the experiences of unemployment and perceptions of wellbeing among persons who involuntary lost their work during the recent economic recession in Gävle Municipality. Methods: Sixteen unemployed men and women aged 28-62 were interviewed face-to-face. A purposeful sampling strategy was used in order to suit the research question and to increase the variation among informants. The interview texts were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Six different themes emerged from the accounts: The respondents perceived work as the basis for belonging, and loss of work affected their social life and consumption patterns due to changes in their financial situation. They also expressed feelings of isolation, loss of self-esteem, and feelings of hopelessness, which affected their physical well-being. Longer duration of unemployment increased the respondents’ negative emotions. The respondents reported activities, structure, and affiliation in other contexts as part of their coping strategy against poor mental health. Conclusions: After job loss, the respondents experienced feelings of loss of dignity and belonging as a human being. They also felt worry, insecurity, and stress due to their changed financial situation, which in turn led to isolation and loss of self-esteem. Social support and having other activities gave the respondents structure and meaning.

  10. Transverse momentum, rapidity, and centrality dependence of inclusive charged-particle production in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5.02$ TeV p+Pb collisions measured by the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabr