WorldWideScience

Sample records for expansive clays

  1. Stabilization of an expansive overconsolidated clay using hydraulic binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkrim Mahamedi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas of the wilaya of M’sila in Algeria nowadays experience a considerable development because of an unceasingly increasing demography, from where its extension toward virgin zones is often less favorable than those already urbanized. This wilaya is located in a zone classified as semi-arid, whose geology comprises clayey formations characterized by a high variation of volume when the conditions of their equilibrium are modified (natural climatic phenomena due to a prolonged dryness, human activity by modification of the ground water level because of excessive pumping, configuration of constructions in their environment. This paper presents and analyzes the results of a series of laboratory tests (identification, compaction, penetration and direct shear tests performed on an expansive overconsolidated clay obtained from an urban site situated in Sidi-Hadjrès city (wilaya of M’sila, Algeria, where significant damages frequently appear in the road infrastructures and in the light structures. Test results obtained show that the geotechnical parameteric values deduced from these tests are concordant and confirm the bearing capacity improvement of this natural clay treated with hydraulic binders (composed Portland cement and extinct lime and compacted under the optimum Proctor conditions, which is translated by a significant increase in soil strength and its durability.

  2. Behaviour of built light construction on expansible clays. Technical of design and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta, L.; Sánchez Naveda, F.

    2003-01-01

    The construction pathology of housing built on expansible clays is one of the most requested topics to be investigated in order to obtain solutions mainly in housing of social interest. A vision of the solution alternatives is presented that are being applying in Venezuela and specifically in the cities of Barquisimeto and Coro where the most harmful expansion characteristics are presented registered in the world literature. This population is located to the north of the country in front of t...

  3. A new isotropic cell for studying the thermo-mechanical behavior of unsaturated expansive clays

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Anh Minh; Cui, Yu-Jun; Barnel, Nathalie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a new suction-temperature controlled isotropic cell that can be used to study the thermo-mechanical behavior of unsaturated expansive clays. The vapor equilibrium technique is used to control the soil suction; the temperature of the cell is controlled using a thermostat bath. The isotropic pressure is applied using a volume/pressure controller that is also used to monitor the volume change of soil specimen. Preliminary experimental results showed go...

  4. Behaviour of built light construction on expansible clays. Technical of design and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrieta, L.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction pathology of housing built on expansible clays is one of the most requested topics to be investigated in order to obtain solutions mainly in housing of social interest. A vision of the solution alternatives is presented that are being applying in Venezuela and specifically in the cities of Barquisimeto and Coro where the most harmful expansion characteristics are presented registered in the world literature. This population is located to the north of the country in front of the Caribbean Sea with arid climate, deep phreatic level, appreciable loamy profile and water deficit. The investigation methodology and some proven procedures for the design of foundations in light housings and for the rehabilitation of damaged buildings are supported with the results of the researches on the part of the two authors and their research teams coming from two different Universities and with 20 years of experience in the practical field. 3 cases are illustrated, two of them with historical value in the design of housings of social interest and one of severely affected constructions and actually rehabilitated with success. Finally some practical recommendations are provided to be considered in the elaboration of projects related with the construction of light housings on expansible floors.

    La patología de construcción de viviendas construidas sobre arcillas expansivas constituye uno de los temas más investigados debido a la gran cantidad de casos identificados con fallos, sobre todo en viviendas de interés social. Se presenta una visión de las alternativas de solución que se vienen aplicando en Venezuela y, específicamente, en las ciudades de Barquisimeto y Coro donde se presentan las características de expansión más perjudiciales registradas en la literatura mundial. Esta población está ubicada al norte del país, frente al mar Caribe, con clima árido, nivel freático profundo, perfil arcilloso apreciable y régimen h

  5. Evaluation of swell behaviour of expansive clays from specific moisture capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pino Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current swell characterization techniques used to interpret the mechanical volume change occurring during the swelling process are not successful due to lack of inclusion of influential properties. Accurate prediction of swelling behaviour allows us to design more efficiently and with better reliability. This research aims at developing a more comprehensive framework to predict swell potential. Laboratory studies are conducted on five natural expansive soils with different degree of expansiveness. Initial studies include determination of basic soil characterization, swell strains and swell pressures at their compacted state along with their inherent mineralogy. Later, replicate samples were studied for soil water characteristic curves using standard pressure cell apparatus and filter paper techniques. The path traversed by the specimen during swelling process is representative of the soil water characteristic curve of the same specimen. Hence, studies are pursued to understand the relationship between degree of expansiveness and the specific moisture capacity relative to that particular range of suction head. Test results showed that the degree of expansion represented by swelling strain or swelling pressure is proportional to the specific moisture capacity determined during the swelling process.

  6. Feasibility of Using Unbound Mixed Recycled Aggregates from CDW over Expansive Clay Subgrade in Unpaved Rural Roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Del Rey

    2016-11-01

    demolition waste (CDW in the construction of an unpaved rural road with low traffic on an expansive clay subgrade.

  7. Feasibility of Using Unbound Mixed Recycled Aggregates from CDW over Expansive Clay Subgrade in Unpaved Rural Roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rey, Isaac; Ayuso, Jesús; Galvín, Adela P; Jiménez, José R; Barbudo, Auxi

    2016-11-17

    ) in the construction of an unpaved rural road with low traffic on an expansive clay subgrade.

  8. Effect of Water-Cement Ratio on Linear Shrinkage, Cohesion, Friction Angle and Compressive Strength of Expansive Black Clay of Gombe State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochepo, J.; Ogwola, O.; Masbeye, O.

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of water-cement ratio on linear shrinkage strain, cohesion, friction angle and unconfined compressive strength of expansive black clay of Gombe state in Nigeria. The soil was remolded with predetermined amount of water and then mixed with cement slurry which was design so as to obtain cement contents of 4, 8 and 12%. The remolding water content (w) and the water content of the cement slurry was design so as to obtain a clay-water-cement mixture with water content equal to the optimum mixing clay-water content. The specimen for linear shrinkage strain, cohesion, friction angle and unconfined compressive strength were then prepared and cured for 7, 14 and 28 days before the various tests were conducted. The results obtained show that LSS increased with W/C ratio and decreased with curing periods. Cohesion increased with W/C ratio and decreased with curing periods and cement content while the soil friction angle decreased with W/C ratio and increased with curing period and cement content. UCS decreased with increase in W/C ratio for all cement content and increased with curing period and cement contents. Statistical analysis using ANOVA was carried out to evaluate the relative effect of W/C ratio, cement content and curing period on LSS, C, θ, and UCS. The results shows that the effect of both W/C ratio, cement content and curing period are statistically significant at 5% level with values of F calculated all greater than F critical for all the properties investigated. However from the calculated F values, the effect of W/C ratio was found to be more statistically significant than the effect of curing periods and cement content while the effect of curing period was found to be more statistically significant than the effect of cement content on LSS, C, θ, and UCS respectively.

  9. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  10. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  11. Application of a Multi-Scale form of Terzaghi’s Effective Stress Principle for Unsaturated Expansive Clays to Simulate Hydro-Mechanical Behavior During Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainka Julia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed multi-scale form of Terzaghi’s effective stress principle for unsaturated swelling clays that was rigorously derived by periodic homogenization starting from micro- and nano-mechanical analyses is applied to numerically simulate one-dimensional swelling pressure tests of compacted bentonites during hydration. The total macroscopic stress captures the coupling between disjoining forces at the nanoscopic scale of clay platelets and capillary effects at the microscopic scale of clay aggregates over the entire water content range. The numerical results allow to draw conclusions on the water transfer mechanism between inter- and intra-aggregate pores during hydration and consequently on the evolution of the external swelling pressure resulting from the competition between capillary and disjoining forces. In addition, such application highlights the abilities and the limits of the electrical double-layer theory to compute the disjoining pressure in the nano-pores. For large platelet distances, in the range of osmotic swelling, the nature of the disjoining pressure is electro-chemical and can be computed from Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Conversely, at small distances, in the crystalline swelling, a solvation component has to be added to account for the molecular nature of the solvent. As a first improvement of the nano-scale description the solvent is treated as a hard sphere fluid using Density Functional Theory.

  12. Clay properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this report an overview will be given of the basic properties of (suspended) clay particles. In section 2 the structure of clay minerals will be described. The forces between suspended particles (section 3) and the possible consequences of them, flocculation or deflocculation (sections 4 and 5)

  13. clay nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    and X-ray diffraction and physico-mechanical properties. Due to polarity match, hydrophilic unmodified montmorillonite clay showed enhanced properties in resulting fluoroelastomer nanocomposites, while hydro- phobic organo-clay showed best results in SEBS nanocomposites. Keywords. Nanocomposites; nanoclays ...

  14. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...

  15. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  16. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  17. Maxillary Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Anirudh; Mathur, Rinku

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maxillary transverse discrepancy usually requires expansion of the palate by a combination of orthopedic and orthodontic tooth movements. Three expansion treatment modalities are used today: rapid maxillary expansion, slow maxillary expansion and surgically assisted maxillary expansion.This article aims to review the maxillary expansion by all the three modalities and a brief on commonly used appliances.

  18. Comportamento de expansão de argilas bentoníticas organofílicas do estado da Paraíba Expansion behavior of organophilic bentonite clays from the State of Paraíba

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    R. R. Menezes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Argilas organofílicas apresentam uma vasta gama de aplicações industriais, desde a indústria do petróleo à farmacêutica e de cosméticos, passando pela retenção de resíduos e produção de nanocompósitos argila-polímeros. Este trabalho tem por objetivo analisar a influência do teor de sais quaternários de amônio na organofilização de argilas bentoníticas. As argilas utilizadas foram caracterizadas através da determinação de sua composição química, distribuição do tamanho de partículas e capacidade de troca de cátions. As argilas organofílicas foram preparadas utilizando dois sais quaternários de amônio: cloreto de alquil benzil amônio (Dodigen e brometo de cetil trimetil amônio (Cetremide. As argilas organofilizadas foram caracterizadas por difração de raios X e espectroscopia de infravermelho. Os resultados mostraram que o espaçamento basal aumenta com o aumento na quantidade de sal utilizado para a organofilização e que o comportamento desse aumento depende do sal e da argila utilizados, sendo, linear quando da utilização do sal Dodigen e dependente do tipo da argila quando da utilização do sal Cetremide.Organoclays are used in a wide range of industrial applications, from the petroleum to the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry, reaching the waste adsorption applications and production of polymer-clay nanocomposites. This work has as aim study the influence of the amount of quaternary ammonium salts in the organophilization of bentonite clays. The used clays were characterized by chemical composition, particle size distribution and cation exchange capacity determination. The organoclays were prepared using two quaternary ammonium salts: alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (Dodigen and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (Cetremide. The organoclays were characterized by X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The results showed that the interlayer spacing increase with the rise in the amount of salt

  19. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  20. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Chan, Ying-Nan; Lan, Yi-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene)-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH) with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction) as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropylene)amine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT) clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness) in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  1. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Jen Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropyleneamine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE, enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  2. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  3. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  4. Finicky clay divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordry, Sean M.

    1998-02-01

    Clay spheres dropped into a dilute vinegar/baking-soda solution accumulate CO2 bubbles on their surfaces. Spheres below a certain size will then float, otherwise they remain sunken. Students must determine the maximum size that will float by considering the net density of the clay/bubble system.

  5. Modernity and putty-clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  6. Solid intercalation to produce polymer/clay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreyette, Shuaijin Chen

    A review of recent literature and current knowledge relating to the development in polymer/clay nanocomposites has been presented. A novel method, solid intercalation, to produce polymer/clay nanocomposites is described based on two polymers, polyethylene oxide and polystyrene with two clays, hydrophilic clay G105 and organoclay 1.28. The clays used in the solid intercalation are selected based on the nanostructure, microstructure and thermal stability results. The polymers are selected based on their potential applications. The structures of the resultant materials are analysed and the possible mechanisms of the solid intercalation in different polymer/clay systems are presented. The experiment results show that the organoclay is more promising in obtaining a good dispersion and expansion of the clay layers in polymer matrices, especially at high clay loading. Hydrophilic clay can be well dispersed and expanded in the polyethylene oxide/clay system for clay contents below 10 wt%. A comparison between solid intercalation and solution synthesis is made for the polyethylene oxide/clay system. The structure diagrams for the corresponding method are illustrated. The nanocomposites produced by solid intercalation are composed of isolated polymer and intercalated/exfoliated polymer/clay structures, while those produced by solution synthesis are mainly composed of intercalated structures. Studies of the processing conditions of solid intercalation of the PEO/G105 clay system were carried out. The results show that the moisture level is critical in producing the composites by solid intercalation. There are two possible mechanisms for producing the composites - the melt and flow of the polymer into the clay galleries or the formation of the polymer solution and flow into the clay galleries. The results also show that high pressure and temperature improve the melt and flow of the polymer in solid intercalation which encourages more intercalation to take place. The mechanical

  7. Mechanical properties of nylon 6/Brazilian clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiao Leite, Amanda Melissa, E-mail: amandamelissa.lins@yahoo.com.b [Department of Materials Engineering/Federal University of Campina Grande-UFCG, Av. Aprigio Veloso, 882, Campina Grande 58109-970, Pariba (Brazil); Fernandes Maia, Larissa, E-mail: larissa.ferma@gmail.co [Department of Materials Engineering/Federal University of Campina Grande-UFCG, Av. Aprigio Veloso, 882, Campina Grande 58109-970, Pariba (Brazil); Damiao Pereira, Osanildo, E-mail: osanildodpereira@hotmail.co [Department of Materials Engineering/Federal University of Campina Grande-UFCG, Av. Aprigio Veloso, 882, Campina Grande 58109-970, Pariba (Brazil); Araujo, Edcleide Maria, E-mail: edcleide@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Department of Materials Engineering/Federal University of Campina Grande-UFCG, Av. Aprigio Veloso, 882, Campina Grande 58109-970, Pariba (Brazil); Lira, Helio de Lucena, E-mail: helio@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Department of Materials Engineering/Federal University of Campina Grande-UFCG, Av. Aprigio Veloso, 882, Campina Grande 58109-970, Pariba (Brazil); Benicio de Castro, Walman, E-mail: walman@dem.ufcg.edu.b [Department of Materials Engineering/Federal University of Campina Grande-UFCG, Av. Aprigio Veloso, 882, Campina Grande 58109-970, Pariba (Brazil)

    2010-04-16

    In this work, nanocomposites of nylon 6 with montmorillonite clay, untreated and treated with two different quaternary ammonium salts (Dodigen and Genamin) were obtained. The originality of this work is that the study includes the Brazilian clay, different clay treatments and the comparison of the results from mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction of nanocomposites. The results indicated that the quaternary ammonium salts were intercalated between the layers of clay, causing an expansion of the interlayer spacing. The obtained nanocomposites showed better mechanical properties when compared to nylon 6. Apparently the treated and untreated clay were compatible with the polymer matrix and presented an exfoliated nanocomposite structure. So, the nanocomposites showed an increase in tensile modulus and yield strength and a decrease in elongation.

  8. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  9. Effect of clays on the fire-retardant properties of a polyethylenic copolymer containing intumescent formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone P S Ribeiro et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophilic clay particles were added to a standard intumescent formulation and, since the role of clay expansion or intercalation is still a matter of much controversy, several clays with varying degrees of interlayer distances were evaluated. The composites were obtained by blending the nanostructured clay and the intumescent system with a polyethylenic copolymer. The flame-retardant properties of the materials were evaluated by the limiting oxygen index (LOI, the UL-94 rating and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The results showed that the addition of highly expanded clays to the ammonium polyphosphate and pentaerythritol formulation does not significantly increase the flame retardancy of the mixture, when measured by the LOI and UL-94. However, when clays with smaller basal distances were added to the intumescent formulation, a synergistic effect was observed. In contrast, the simple addition of clays to the copolymer, without the intumescent formulation, did not increase the fire retardance of the materials.

  10. Effect of clays on the fire-retardant properties of a polyethylenic copolymer containing intumescent formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Simone P S; Estevão, Luciana R M; Nascimento, Regina S V

    2008-04-01

    Organophilic clay particles were added to a standard intumescent formulation and, since the role of clay expansion or intercalation is still a matter of much controversy, several clays with varying degrees of interlayer distances were evaluated. The composites were obtained by blending the nanostructured clay and the intumescent system with a polyethylenic copolymer. The flame-retardant properties of the materials were evaluated by the limiting oxygen index (LOI), the UL-94 rating and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the addition of highly expanded clays to the ammonium polyphosphate and pentaerythritol formulation does not significantly increase the flame retardancy of the mixture, when measured by the LOI and UL-94. However, when clays with smaller basal distances were added to the intumescent formulation, a synergistic effect was observed. In contrast, the simple addition of clays to the copolymer, without the intumescent formulation, did not increase the fire retardance of the materials.

  11. Effect of clays on the fire-retardant properties of a polyethylenic copolymer containing intumescent formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Simone P S; Nascimento, Regina S V [Instituto de Quimica-DQO, UFRJ, CT Bloco A, 60 andar, Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP: 21941-590 (Brazil); Estevao, Luciana R M [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e BiocombustIveis-ANP, SCM, Av. Rio Branco 65, 170 andar, Centro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP: 20090-004 (Brazil)], E-mail: rsandra@iq.ufrj.br

    2008-04-15

    Organophilic clay particles were added to a standard intumescent formulation and, since the role of clay expansion or intercalation is still a matter of much controversy, several clays with varying degrees of interlayer distances were evaluated. The composites were obtained by blending the nanostructured clay and the intumescent system with a polyethylenic copolymer. The flame-retardant properties of the materials were evaluated by the limiting oxygen index (LOI), the UL-94 rating and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the addition of highly expanded clays to the ammonium polyphosphate and pentaerythritol formulation does not significantly increase the flame retardancy of the mixture, when measured by the LOI and UL-94. However, when clays with smaller basal distances were added to the intumescent formulation, a synergistic effect was observed. In contrast, the simple addition of clays to the copolymer, without the intumescent formulation, did not increase the fire retardance of the materials.

  12. The Compressibility and Swell of Mixtures for Sand-Clay Liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muawia A. Dafalla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sand-clay liners utilize expansive clay to act as a filler to occupy the voids in the sand and thus reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the mixture. The hydraulic conductivity and transfer of water and other substances through sand-clay mixtures are of prime concern in the design of liners and hydraulic barriers. Many successful research studies have been undertaken to achieve appropriate mixtures that satisfy hydraulic conductivity requirements. This study investigates compressibility and swelling properties of mixtures to ensure that they were acceptable for light structures, roads, and slabs on grade. A range of sand-expansive clay mixtures were investigated for swell and compression properties. The swelling and compressibility indices were found to increase with increasing clay content. The use of highly expansive material can result in large volume changes due to swell and shrinkage. The inclusion of less expansive soil material as partial replacement of bentonite by one-third to two-thirds is found to reduce the compressibility by 60% to 70% for 10% and 15% clay content, respectively. The swelling pressure and swell percent were also found significantly reduced. Adding less expansive natural clay to bentonite can produce liners that are still sufficiently impervious and at the same time less problematic.

  13. Structure and mechanical properties of polyamide 6/Brazilian clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Melissa Damião Leite

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in polymer/organoclays nanocomposites systems is motivated by the possibility of achieving enhanced properties and added functionality at lower clay loading as compared to conventional micron size fillers. By adding montmorillonite clay to polyamide 6 increases the Young modulus, yield strength and also improves barrier properties. In this work, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 with montmorillonite clay were obtained. The clay was chemically modified with three different quaternary ammonium salts such as: Dodigen, Genamin and Cetremide. In this case, a dispersion of Na-MMT was stirred and a salt equivalent to 1:1 of cation exchange capacity (CEC of Na-MMT was added to the dispersion. The montmorillonite clay (untreated and treated by ammonium salts and nanocomposites were characterized by X ray diffractions. Also the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and mechanical properties. The results indicated that all the quaternary ammonium salts were intercalated between the layers of clay, leading to an expansion of the interlayer spacing. The obtained nanocomposites showed better mechanical properties when compared to polyamide 6. The clay acted as reinforcing filler, increasing the rigidity of nanocomposites and decreasing its ductility.

  14. The Clay that Cures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Hydrotalcite - The Clay that Cures. N Bejoy. General Article Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 57-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/02/0057-0061. Author Affiliations.

  15. Magnificent Clay Murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2007-01-01

    Each August, third grade artists at Apple Glen Elementary in Bentonville, Arkansas, start the school year planning, creating, and exhibiting a clay relief mural. These mural projects have helped students to acquire not only art knowledge and techniques, but an even more important kind of knowledge: what it means to plan and successfully complete a…

  16. Clay-fulleropyrrolidine nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gournis, D; Jankovic, L; Maccallini, E; Benne, D; Rudolf, P; Colomer, JF; Sooambar, C; Georgakilas, [No Value; Prato, M; Fanti, M; Zerbetto, F; Sarova, GH; Guldi, DM; Jankovič, Luboš; Colomer, Jean-François; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Sarova, Ginka H.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we describe the insertion of a water-soluble bisadduct fulleropyrrolidine derivative into the interlayer space of three layered smectite clays. The composites were characterized by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoemission and FTIR

  17. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brick is one of the most used and versatile building materials in use today. Bricks can be defined as modular units connected by mortar in the formation of a building system or product. Commonly the word brick is used to refer to clay bricks, which...

  18. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  19. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  20. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  1. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Girkontas; Tadas Tamošiūnas; Andrius Savickas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a) clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m); b) tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide); c) cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height). According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bear...

  2. Creep in buffer clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden); Adey, R. [Computational Mechanics BEASY, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    The study involved characterization of the microstructural arrangement and molecular forcefields in the buffer clay for getting a basis for selecting suitable creep models. It is concluded that the number of particles and wide range of the particle bond spectrum require that stochastical mechanics and thermodynamics will be considered and they are basic to the creep model proposed for predicting creep settlement of the canisters. The influence of the stress level on creep strain of MX-80 clay is not well known but for the buffer creep is approximately proportional to stress. Theoretical considerations suggest a moderate impact for temperatures up to 90 deg C and this is supported by model experiments. It is believed that the assumption of strain being proportional to temperature is conservative. The general performance of the stochastic model can be illustrated in principle by use of visco-elastic rheological models implying a time-related increase in viscosity. The shear-induced creep settlement under constant volume conditions calculated by using the proposed creep model is on the order of 1 mm in ten thousand years and up to a couple of millimeters in one million years. It is much smaller than the consolidation settlement, which is believed to be on the order of 10 mm. The general conclusion is that creep settlement of the canisters is very small and of no significance to the integrity of the buffer itself or of the canisters.

  3. expansion method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we shall apply the (G /G)-expansion method to obtain the exact travelling wave solution of the two-dimensional ... In §3, we apply our method to the mentioned equations. In §4, some conclusions are ..... The exact solution obtained by this method can be used to check computer codes or as initial condition for ...

  4. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 1. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts - Clays for 'Green Chemistry'. Gopalpur Nagendrappa. General Article Volume 7 Issue 1 January 2002 pp 64-77. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    His work includes organic synthesis and reaction mechanisms mainly in the area of organosilicon chemistry. Presently he is also working on organic synthesis under solvent- free conditions and using clay-catalyses. Keywords. Montmorillonite, ion-exchange, clay-nanomaterials, dehydration pyrolysis, rearrangement, steric.

  6. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    In the northern part of Vendsyssel, Denmark, the deposits made in the late glacial time are formed by the sea. The deposits are named after two mussels: Yoldia clay and Saxicava sand. However, in the southern part of Vendsyssel and in the area of Aalborg the clay and sand deposits from the late...... glacial time are characterised by the absence of this mussel. These deposits are named Aalborg Clay and Aalborg Sand. In the city of Aalborg, a fill layer superposes Aalborg Clay. This layer is at some places found to be 6m thick. This fill layer does not provide sufficient bearing capacity, which has...... resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...

  7. Chemo-Plasticity of Clays Subjected to Stress and Flow of a Single Contaminant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueckel, T.

    1997-01-01

    Isothermal chemo-elasto-plasticity of clays is discussed, to describe strains induced in clay by permeation of it with a low dielectric constant organic contaminant, in the presence of stress. The strain is crucial in controlling permeability changes in chemically affected clay barriers of landfills and impoundments. The theory encompasses chemical softening or yield surface reduction, coefficient of chemical reversible expansion or contraction due to mass concentration increase, as well as chemical sensitivity of bulk plastic modulus. The experiments on chemistry and stress dependent permeability of Sarnia clay performed by Fernandez and Quigley (1985, 1991) are interpreted using this model. The numerical representations of the chemo-plastic softening function and the chemo-elastic strain function, as well as plastic bulk modulus sensitivity to concentration are evaluated for dioxane and ethanol. Specific requirements for the tests for chemo-plastic behavior of clays are discussed.

  8. Influência da expansão por umidade no comportamento mecânico de argilas para uso em blocos de cerâmica vermelha - revisão Influence of moisture expansion on the mechanical behavior of structural clay materials for use in ceramic bricks - review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Andrade

    2011-09-01

    . In literature there is much emphasis on problems generated by the ME and the tensions resulting from this expansion, but until now there is a lack of data on mechanical behavior of ceramics after ME. Recent works in UFCG specifically deal with this problem in ceramic bricks. Initially it was found that in the case of ceramic bodies for use in red ceramic burned at different temperatures, ranging from 700 to 1100 ºC with ME induced by soaking, boiling and autoclaving, the ME correlated with the mechanical behavior of burned bodies, and a reduction in modulus of rupture with the rising of ME was observed. Researches undertaken with compositions developed using clay and calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate as adds for red ceramic, burned from 850 to 1000 °C, showed the beneficial effect of calcium carbonate in reducing moisture expansion and rise modulus of rupture. Correlations between ME and modulus of rupture, was observed when calcium carbonate was used as additive. However, this associations was noted when magnesium carbonate was used as additive. Works carried out using fine quartz as additive of red ceramic compositions and aiming glassy phases development not observed well defined correlations between ME and modulus of rupture. The addition of 10 and 20% of fine quartz improve the mechanical strength of ceramic bodies after autoclaving and that the addition of 30% of quartz decreases its mechanical strength.

  9. Clay and pillard clay membranes: Synthesis, characterization and transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, Sven

    In this work, the preparation and characterization of ceramic multilayer membranes with an Alsb2Osb3-pillared montmorillonite (Al-PILC) and a Laponite separating layer have been studied. Al-PILC is a pillared clay prepared by intercalation of polyoxo cations of aluminium between the montmorillonite clay sheets, followed by a thermal treatment (400sp°C) to obtain rigid oxide pillars. The free spacing between the clay plates is about 0.8 nm. Laponite is a synthetic clay with a pore structure formed by the stacking of very small clay plates. To deposit an Al-PILC top layer on a macro- or mesoporous aluminiumoxide support membrane, two preparation routes were considered. According to the standard preparation route of a pillared clay, the easiest way is to use a suspension of clay mixed with the pillaring solution in which the support membrane is dipped. However, it is not possible to deposit uniform and crack-free top layers in this way because of the formation of unstable suspensions. A second preparation route is based on an indirect pillaring procedure. By dipping a support membrane in a stable clay suspension, a thin clay film is deposited in a first step. Pillaring is achieved via immersion of the supported clay film in the pillaring solution in a second step. After a washing procedure, the membrane is dried and calcined at 400sp°C. Laponite membranes were simply prepared by dipping a support membrane in a suspension of this synthetic clay in water. Afterwards a drying at room temperature and a calcination at 400 ar 500sp°C is performed. Both membrane types were tested for gas separation and pervaporation purposes. Transport of permanent gases (He, N2) occurs by means of Knudsen diffusion. Diffusion is kinetically controlled and for a binary mixture, the maximum separation factor is determined by the difference in molecular weight of both components. From pervaporation experiments with water/alcohol mixtures it was found that Al-PILC membranes can be used for

  10. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine–grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  11. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  12. Clays in radioactive waste disposal

    OpenAIRE

    DELAGE, Pierre; CUI, Yu-Jun; TANG, Anh-Minh

    2010-01-01

    Clays and argillites are considered in some countries as possible host rocks for nuclear waste disposal at great depth. The use of compacted swelling clays as engineered barriers is also considered within the framework of the multi-barrier concept. In relation to these concepts, various research programs have been conducted to assess the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of radioactive waste disposal at great depth. After introducing the concepts of waste isolation developed in Belgium, Fran...

  13. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction...... is increased with increasing clay content, up to 30%, beyond which the mixture of silt and clay is not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction resistant under waves....

  14. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  15. Special clays: what they are, characterization and properties

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Antonio C. Vieira; Santos, Pérsio de Souza; Santos, Helena de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Special clays are a group of clays different from the large volume of clay mineral products named "Industrial Clays": kaolins, ball clays, refractory clays, bentonites, fuller's earths, common clays. Two groups of special clays exist: rare, as in the case of hectorite and sepiolite and restricted areas, as in the case of white bentonite, halloysite and palygorskite (attapulgite). A review is given of the most important producers of the special clays and their properties in the Western World, ...

  16. Clays, Nanoclays, and Montmorillonite Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Faheem

    2008-12-01

    The recent introduction of nanoclays as fillers or additives in polymers for various desired effects is a subject of an increased interest for research and development to establish various applications. An increased consumption is indicated by the wider applications of clay nanocomposites approaching to almost one-quarter (24 pct) in 2005 of the total nanocomposites used. However, an interesting concern, along with the studies addressing how nanoclays change the behavior of polymeric materials, is to discover what are clays, nanoclays and montmorillonite minerals. The various structures of montmorillonite available in nature and their modification for application are discussed. An attempt is made to review the origin of using clays when nanotechnology did not exist, coupled with the effects of montmorillonite-based nanoclays on commercially known polymers.

  17. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romas Girkontas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m; b tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide; c cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height. According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bearing capacity and failure mode were determined. For investigations Vilnius Gediminas Technical University Civil Engineering Scientific Research Center infrastructure was used.

  18. Processing, Characterization, and Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposite Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Choonghee; Naguib, Hani E.

    2007-04-01

    The effects of the material parameters and processing conditions on the foam morphologies, and mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposite foams were studied. Microcellular closed-cell nanocomposite foams were manufactured with poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and high density polyethylene (HDPE), where the nanoclay loadings of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt% were used. The effect of clay contents and foaming conditions on the volume expansion ratio, cell size, elastic modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at break were investigated and compared between amorphous and semicrystalline polymers. An elastic modulus model for tensile behavior of foams was proposed by using the micromechanics theory. The model was expressed in terms of microstructural properties of polymer and physical properties of the foams. The tensile experimental data of the foams were compared with those predicted by the theoretical model.

  19. Removal of cesium ions from clays by cationic surfactant intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach to remediate cesium-contaminated clays based on intercalation of the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) into clay interlayers. Intercalation of DTAB was found to occur very rapidly and involved exchanging interlayer cations. The reaction yielded efficient cesium desorption (∼97%), including of a large amount of otherwise non-desorbable cesium ions by cation exchange with ammonium ions. In addition, the intercalation of DTAB afforded an expansion of the interlayers, and an enhanced desorption of Cs by cation exchange with ammonium ions even at low concentrations of DTAB. Finally, the residual intercalated surfactants were easily removed by a decomposition reaction with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Cu 2+ /Fe 2+ catalysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF REACTIVE FORMATIONS: A VISION FOR THE CAPACITY EXPANSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielly Vieira de Lucena

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available All classes of clay minerals absorb water, but the smectite absorb much larger volumes than the other classes because of its expanded network. During the drilling of oil wells it is common for the detection of layers consisting of clay minerals high grade of hydration arranged in laminar packages. When in contact with water, the packets are separated clay as the water enters the basal spacing. This phenomenon is known as expansion or swelling. Given this, this paper aims to characterize shales in two regions of the country to explain the susceptibility of hydration of each of these formations. The characterization was done by making use of Exchange cation capacity (ECC, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, diferential thermal analysis (DTA, Thermogravimetry (TGA and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results obtained showed that among the shales studied, those with the greatest degree of clay fractions (smectite in its composition showed higher swelling index according to the methodology of Foster.

  1. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  2. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  3. Potential Of Fired Clay Bricks Produced From Aponmu Clay Deposits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of fired clay obtained from Aponmu river, Ondo State. Nigeria for brick production have been investigated. Properties of produced bricks investigated was compressive strength, density and water absorption. The results shows that the Compressive strength, density and water absorption values ranged from 2.48 ...

  4. Spectral characteristics of clay minerals in the 2.5 - 14 µm wavelength region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yitagesu, F.A.; Meer, F.D. van der; Werff, H.M.A. van der; Hecker, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Identification and quantification of clay minerals, particularly those that are responsible for susceptibility of soils to expansion and shrinkage, is a constant focus of research in geotechnical engineering. The visible, near infrared and short wave infrared wavelength regions are well explored.

  5. Stools - pale or clay-colored

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003129.htm Stools - pale or clay-colored To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stools that are pale, clay, or putty-colored may be due to problems ...

  6. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  7. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  8. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  9. 75 FR 81846 - Expansion of the Santa Maria Valley Viticultural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... well drained and fertile, and range in texture from sandy loam to clay loam. The prevailing, cooling... Torres Within the proposed 720-800 expansion. Le Bon Climate Within the proposed 600 expansion. Lucas... cooling wind and fog encounter little resistance in any direction until they meet the Sierra Madre...

  10. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain...

  11. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  12. Hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, G.; Visser, P.J.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay due to the turbulent flow, based on theoretical analysis and experimental results. The undisturbed clay has the unique and complicated characteristics of cohesive force among clay particles, which are highly different from

  13. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated or plastic clays (Tsang and Hudson, 2010). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. During the lifespan of a clay repository, the repository performance is affected by complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow, formation of damage zones, radionuclide transport, waste dissolution, and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) of the repository. These coupled processes may affect radionuclide transport by changing transport paths (e.g., formation and evolution of excavation damaged zone (EDZ)) and altering flow, mineral, and mechanical properties that are related to radionuclide transport. While radionuclide transport in clay formation has been studied using laboratory tests (e,g, Appelo et al. 2010, Garcia-Gutierrez et al., 2008, Maes et al., 2008), short-term field

  15. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413333450; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay

  16. [Species Determination and Spectral Characteristics of Swelling Clay Minerals in the Pliocene Sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-wen; Chen, Jiang-jun; Fang, Qian; Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-lie

    2015-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to deepen our research on specific species and spectral characteristics of swelling clay minerals in the Pliocene sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai province. XRD results show that swelling clay minerals are dominant clay minerals in the sandstones, which can be up to 97% in percentage. XRD patterns show 060 reflections of the samples occur both remarkably at 1.534 Å and 1.498 Å, indicating the samples contain physical mixtures of trioctahedral and dioctahedral swelling clay minerals, respectively. Further treatment of Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation shows the swelling clay minerals collapse to 9.3-9.9 Å with a partial expansion to -18 Å. This indicates the swelling clay minerals dominate montmorillonite and contain minor saponite. The montmorillonite shows no swelling after Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation because of Li+ inserting into the octahedral layers, which balances the layer charge caused by the substitution of Mg to Al. FTIR results show the samples are composed of a kind of phyllosilicate with absorbed and structural water, which is in agreement with the results of XRD. Absorbed peaks at 913, 842, 880 cm(-1), corresponding to OH associated with Al-Al, Al-Mg, and Al-Fe pairs, further indicates the minerals are dominant dioctahedron in structure. Meanwhile, absorbed peaks at 625 and 519 cm(-1), corresponding to coupled Si-O and Al-O-Si deformation, indicates parts of Si is replaced by Al in tetrahedron. The spectral characteristics of the samples are against the presence of beidellite and nontronite based on the results of XRD and FTIR, while demonstrating an,existence of montmorillonite. This study, to distinguish the specific species of swelling clay species in clay minerals, would be of great importance when using clay mineralogy to interpret provenance and climatic information.

  17. Clay-based Nanocomposites Possibilities and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, Dimitris

    2011-09-01

    In the last decades, clay mineral based nanocomposites and polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNC) have been proposed as very useful materials for many uses including photocatalysis, medicinal uses as tissue engineering or modified drug delivery systems. Clay minerals and especially montmorillonite, kaolinite, halloysite palygorskite and sepiolite are the most used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, colloidal dimensions of their particles and other properties. This lecture aims at reporting on very recent developments in the use of clay minerals and PCNC as materials with photocatalytic and medical interest.

  18. Tunable Exfoliation of Synthetic Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöter, Matthias; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Breu, Josef

    2015-07-01

    The large hydration enthalpy of inorganic interlayer cations sandwiched between moderately negatively charged silicate layers endows to smectites (e.g., hectorite) remarkably rich intracrystalline reactivity compared with most other layered materials. Moreover, they are transparent and inert in most potential suspension media. Upon suspension in water, smectites readily swell. For homogeneous, melt-synthesized smectites, the degree of swelling can be tuned by choice of interlayer cation and charge density of the layer. Because swelling renders the clay stacks more shear labile, the efficiency of exfoliation by applying shearing forces can in turn be adjusted. Certain smectites even spontaneously delaminate into clay platelets of uniform thickness of 1 nm by progressive osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling can also be applied to produce well-defined double stacks when one starts with ordered, interstratified heterostructures. Nanocomposites made with high-aspect-ratio fillers obtained this way show superior mechanical, flame retardancy, and permeability properties.

  19. Effect of clay distribution in synthetic sand-clay mixtures on hydraulic and geophysical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, G. K.; Keating, K.; Slater, L. D.; Sugand, M.; Binley, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of porous geological media is known to be controlled by clay content as well as the distribution of clay. Although numerous studies have explored the effect of clay content on geophysical measurements, most studies of synthetic sediment packs focus on a homogenous distribution of clay particles. In this laboratory experiment, we explore how both clay content and clay distribution impact hydraulic and geophysical parameters. Using two clays—kaolinite and montmorillonite—we prepared homogeneous and heterogeneous sand-clay mixtures containing 0 to 10% clay by mass. To create the heterogeneous mixtures, small (nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) mean-log T2 relaxation time, parameters known to be sensitive to changes in pore geometry. Our results show that for the homogenous clay samples, the hydraulic conductivity decreases with increasing clay content, as expected, and both SIP and NMR parameters correlate with the changing hydraulic conductivity. For the aggregated clay samples, there is no correlation between hydraulic conductivity and clay content; however, increasing clay content still impacts the geophysical data. The SIP data are less sensitive to increasing aggregated clay content than the NMR data, which display a similar degree of variability with clay content in mean-log T­2 relaxation time for both homogenous and aggregated clay samples. The results suggest that in heterogeneous clay-bearing sediments, NMR measured parameters are less sensitive to the specific pore geometries controlling fluid flow than the SIP parameters. This research represents a first step towards understanding how the distributions of clay in porous media impacts relationships between geophysical measurements and hydraulic conductivity.

  20. Intercalation of a nonionic surfactant (C10E3) bilayer into a Na-montmorillonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guégan, Régis

    2010-12-21

    A nonionic surfactant, triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether (C(10)E(3)), characterized by its lamellar phase state, was introduced in the interlayer of a Na-montmorillonite clay at several concentrations. The synthesized organoclays were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering in conjunction with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and adsorption isotherms. Experiments showed that a bilayer of C(10)E(3) was intercalated into the interlayer space of the naturally exchanged Na-montmorillonite, resulting in the aggregation of the lyotropic liquid crystal state in the lamellar phase. This behavior strongly differs from previous observations of confinement of nonionic surfactants in clays where the expansion of the interlayer space was limited to two monolayers parallel to the silicate surface and cationic surfactants in clays where the intercalation of organic compounds is introduced into the clay galleries through ion exchange. The confinement of a bilayer of C(10)E(3) nonionic surfactant in clays offers new perspectives for the realization of hybrid nanomaterials, since the synthesized organoclays preserve the electrostatic characteristics of the clays, thus allowing further ion exchange while presenting at the same time a hydrophobic surface and a maximum opening of the interlayer space for the adsorption of neutral organic molecules of important size with functional properties.

  1. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability - Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... friability for 1 yr of measurements could be ascribed to wet conditions for potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) harvest and tillage the preceding year. Literature data indicate soils’ content of clay and silt (Fines20) to be a better predictor of specific surface area than clay. We conclude that a clay/OC ratio...

  2. The Nature of Excess Intercalation of a Quaternary Ammonium Compound in Smectite Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafer, D. A.; Giese, R.

    2010-12-01

    Particular clay minerals, such as the French green clay used by Brunet de Courssou in the treatment of Mycobacterium ulcerans, have intrinsic antibacterial properties that surpass those of most conventional antibiotic treatments. The antimicrobial properties of the French green clay, comprised of 24% Fe-illite and 50% Fe-smectite, have been reproduced by a synthetically generated organically modified smectite (organoclay). The quaternary ammonium compound hexadecyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA) must undergo a cation exchange process in excess of the calculated cation exchange capacity (CEC) to render the clay antimicrobial. This work explores the position of the excess bonding within the clay lattice so as to challenge the hydrophobic bonding hypothesis proposed by Zhao et al (2003) concerning excess intercalation. After determining the CEC of BP smectite, organoclays were produced containing concentrations of one, two, and three times the CEC of HDTMA. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) on a scale of 2 to 20 degrees 2theta was conducted on each of the three organoclays to infer the loading capacity of the smectite by means of the clay’s d-spacing as a proxy for expansion. Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) quantitatively determined the surfactant retained on the clay by measuring the residual HDTMA in solution after extracting the organoclay. The d-spacing of the three organoclays implied that the first CEC of HDTMA entered the interlayer as an anion by means of a cation exchange process while the second and third CEC were incorporated into the clay lattice by means of a “hydrophobic bonding” mechanism in which the excess surfactants formed associations with the counterion Br+. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra will be collected to determine the specific attachment of the excess bonding within the clay structure.

  3. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  4. Physicochemical characterization of organophilic clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL Messabeb-Ouali, A.; Benna-Zayani, M.; Kbir-Ariguib, N.; Trabelsi-Ayadi, M.

    2009-11-01

    Organophilic smectite were obtained by intercalation of hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA) in the interlayer space of a purified Tunisian sodic-smectite. The HDTMA amounts were varied from 0.5 to 3 times the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the purified clay. Adsorption isotherm shows a total adsorption of HDTMA by purified smectite when the quantity of salt is less or equal to 2 CEC. Beyond this value, adsorption becomes limited and tends to saturation. All organoclays were characterized by X-ray diffraction which shows an increase of the basal distance. Infrared spectroscopy and differential thermic and thermogravimetric analysis results confirm the intercalation HDTMA.

  5. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  6. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  8. A steamy proposal for Martian clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Martian clays present a conundrum: the models proposed to explain their formation require conditions that are not predicted by computational climate simulations. Experiments now suggest an alternative scenario.

  9. Surface Geochemistry of the Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Garrison; Skipper, Neal T.; Sutton, Rebecca; Park, Sung-Ho; Soper, Alan K.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    1999-03-01

    Clay minerals are layer type aluminosilicates that figure in terrestrial biogeochemical cycles, in the buffering capacity of the oceans, and in the containment of toxic waste materials. They are also used as lubricants in petroleum extraction and as industrial catalysts for the synthesis of many organic compounds. These applications derive fundamentally from the colloidal size and permanent structural charge of clay mineral particles, which endow them with significant surface reactivity. Unraveling the surface geochemistry of hydrated clay minerals is an abiding, if difficult, topic in earth sciences research. Recent experimental and computational studies that take advantage of new methodologies and basic insights derived from the study of concentrated ionic solutions have begun to clarify the structure of electrical double layers formed on hydrated clay mineral surfaces, particularly those in the interlayer region of swelling 2:1 layer type clay minerals. One emerging trend is that the coordination of interlayer cations with water molecules and clay mineral surface oxygens is governed largely by cation size and charge, similarly to a concentrated ionic solution, but the location of structural charge within a clay layer and the existence of hydrophobic patches on its surface provide important modulations. The larger the interlayer cation, the greater the influence of clay mineral structure and hydrophobicity on the configurations of adsorbed water molecules. This picture extends readily to hydrophobic molecules adsorbed within an interlayer region, with important implications for clay-hydrocarbon interactions and the design of catalysts for organic synthesis.

  10. Bridges Expansion Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-01-01

    The survey is concerned with the expansion joints, used in bridge constructions to compensate medium and significant operational linear and spatial displacements between adjacent spans or between bridge span and pier. The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting the modern demands imposed to expansion joints.

  11. Catsius Clay Project. Calculation and Testing of Behaviour of Unsaturated Clay as Barrier in Radioactive Waste Repositories. Stage 2: Validation Exercises at Laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-07-01

    Stage 2 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at Laboratory Scale includes two Benchmarks, Benchmark 2.1: Oedometer Suction Controlled Tests on Samples of compacted Boom Clay and Benchmark 2.2: Small Scale Weltting-Heating Test on Compacted Bentonite. BM 2.1 had two parts: BM 2.1A (volumetric deformation upon wetting-drying cycles) and BM 2.1 B (swelling pressure test). In BM 2.1A, participants were asked to model the results of a series of five tests on samples of compacted Boom clay. In BM 2.1B, a swelling pressure test in which suction, vertical and horizontal stresses were monitored, was proposed as a blind exercise. Participants were asked to use, without further changes, the models calibrated in BM 2.1A. This exercise provides an evaluation of the capabilities of current mechanical constitutive models for unsaturated clay behaviour. It was found that, even if a calibration exercise on the basis of known experimental data is satisfactory, blind predictions of tests involving different paths may prove difficult. The test set up for BM 2.2 consisted of a stainless stell cell filled with highly expansive compacted bentonite (S2 clay from Almeria, Spain). The clay was subjected to a simultaneous central heating and a progressive water inflow through the botton plate. Temperature at various locations within the sample and the boundary radial stress were monitored throughout the test. Water content distribution was also measured at the end of the experiment. Predictions for this benchmark required the solution of field equations for flow, temperature distribution and mechanical analysis. Model parameters were derived from the extensive set of available experiments on this clay. Comparison between model predictions and measurements revealed the significance of water transport in vapour phase, the difficulties to predict boundary stresses and the general good agreement between measured and calculated temperatures. The report provides a detailed accojnt of the

  12. Freeze-agglomeration: An alternative mechanism for clay film formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriented clay coatings (argillans, clay cutans, clay films, lamellae) are often interpreted to be caused by illuviation (pervection, lessivage) of fine clay particles. In montane meadow soils (Typic Humaquepts) of the northern Sierra Nevada Range, prominent clay cutans occur on ped faces of a paleos...

  13. Intercalated layered clay composites and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phukan, Anjali

    Supported inorganic reagents are rapidly emerging as new and environmentally acceptable reagents and catalysts. The smectite group of layered clay minerals, such as, Montmorillonite, provides promising character for adsorption, catalytic activity, supports etc. for their large surface area, swelling behavior and ion exchange properties. Aromatic compounds intercalated in layered clays are useful in optical molecular devices. Clay is a unique material for adsorption of heavy metals and various toxic substances. Clay surfaces are known to be catalytically active due to their surface acidity. Acid activated clays possess much improved surface areas and acidities and have higher pore volumes so that can absorb large molecules in the pores. The exchangeable cations in clay minerals play a key role in controlling surface acidity and catalytic activity. Recently, optically active metal-complex-Montmorillonite composites are reported to be active in antiracemization purposes. In view of the above, a research work, relating to the preparation of different modified clay composites and their catalytic applications were carried out. The different aspects and results of the present work have been reported in four major chapters. Chapter I: This is an introductory chapter, which contains a review of the literature regarding clay-based materials. Clay minerals are phyllosilicates with layer structure. Montmorillonite, a member of smectite group of clay, is 2:1 phyllosilicate, where a layer is composed of an octahedral sheet sandwiched by two tetrahedral sheets. Such clay shows cation exchange capacity (CEC) and is expressed in milli-equivalents per 100 gm of dry clay. Clays can be modified by interaction with metal ion, metal complexes, metal cluster and organic cations for various applications. Clays are also modified by treating with acid followed by impregnation with metal salts or ions. Montmorillonite can intercalate suitable metal complexes in excess of CEC to form double

  14. On skin expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Djenane C; Velloso, Raquel Q; Radwanski, Henrique N

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses skin expansion without considering cellular growth of the skin. An in vivo analysis was carried out that involved expansion at three different sites on one patient, allowing for the observation of the relaxation process. Those measurements were used to characterize the human skin of the thorax during the surgical process of skin expansion. A comparison between the in vivo results and the numerical finite elements model of the expansion was used to identify the material elastic parameters of the skin of the thorax of that patient. Delfino's constitutive equation was chosen to model the in vivo results. The skin is considered to be an isotropic, homogeneous, hyperelastic, and incompressible membrane. When the skin is extended, such as with expanders, the collagen fibers are also extended and cause stiffening in the skin, which results in increasing resistance to expansion or further stretching. We observed this phenomenon as an increase in the parameters as subsequent expansions continued. The number and shape of the skin expanders used in expansions were also studied, both mathematically and experimentally. The choice of the site where the expansion should be performed is discussed to enlighten problems that can lead to frustrated skin expansions. These results are very encouraging and provide insight into our understanding of the behavior of stretched skin by expansion. To our knowledge, this study has provided results that considerably improve our understanding of the behavior of human skin under expansion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Nano-clay on Rheological and Extrusion Foaming Process of a Block-Copolymerized Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Mingyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nano-clay and the corresponding coupling agent maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (PP-g-MAH on thermal properties, rheological properties and extrusion foaming process of a block-copolymerized polypropylene (B-PP were studied. Supercritical CO2 (SC CO2 was used as the foaming agent with a concentration of 5wt%. Each step of foamed B-PP/ PP-g-MAH/ nano-clay composites processing is addressed, including mixing of the composites, manufacture of the composites, foaming process of the composites and characterization of the cell structure. The results showed that incorporation of nano-clay and PP-g-MAH caused reduced melt strength and complex viscosity of B-PP. However, the heterogeneous nucleation induced by nano-clay and PP-g-MAH improved the maximum foaming expansion ratio and cell-population density of B-PP foam.

  16. Geological explorations of clay deposit near Pragersko and clay quality tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duška Rokavec

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of illite clays located near Pragersko, at the southern boundary of the Maribor – Ptuj depression, was investigated. The results of mining geological investigations showed the extension and characteristics of clay occurrences in the area. Primary characteristics of single types of raw clay from the deposit (mineral composition, grain size distribution, plasticity, etc., and the quality of biscuit were determined with laboratory tests.In a 4-9 m thick bed of clay we identified four different types of clay, which are, as a mixture, suitable for use in brick industry.

  17. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  18. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange properties together with surface basicity making them materials of importance ...

  19. Geotechnical characteristics of some Southwestern Nigerian clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The geotechnical characteristics of some southwestern Nigeria clays were evaluated with a view to determining their suitability for use as barrier soils in waste disposal sites. Clay soils (consisting of twenty disturbed and twenty undisturbed samples) were subjected to grain size, consistency limits and permeability tests.

  20. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange ...

  1. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  2. Clay as Thermoluminescence Dosemeter in diagnostic Radiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the investigation of the basic thermoluminescence properties of clay at x-rays in the diagnostic radiology range, including dose monitoring in abdominal radiography. Clay sourced from Calabar, Nigeria, was tested for thermoluminescence response after irradiation at diagnostic radiology doses, including ...

  3. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  4. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaldoun, A.; Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Wegdam, G.; de Leeuw, B.; Méheust, Y.; Fossum, J.O.; Bonn, D.

    2009-01-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay

  5. 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues linked to Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete. The main subjects are geology of clays, hydration and performance of blended systems with calcined clays, alkali activated binders, economic and environmental impacts of the use of calcined clays in cement based materials. Topics addressed in this book include the influence of processing on reactivity of calcined clays, influence of clay mineralogy on reactivity, geology of clay deposits, Portland-calcined clay systems, hydration, durability, performance, Portland-calcined clay-limestone systems, hydration, durability, performance, calcined clay-alkali systems, life cycle analysis, economics and environmental impact of use of calcined clays in cement and concrete, and field applications. This book compiles the different contributions of the 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete, which took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, June, 23-25, 2015.The papers present the latest  res...

  6. Some Tests on Heather Field Moraine Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Jacobsen, Moust

    This report deals with oedometer tests on three samples of moraine clay from the Heather Field in the English part of the North Sea. The tests have been carried out in the very unelastic apparatus used in Denmark and with special test procedures differing from the ones used elsewhere. In Denmark...... Moraine Clay covers a large part of the surface, and it has therefore been investigated extensively in the field and in the laboratories during the last 25 years. It is to day - from a geotechnical point of view - the best known clay in Denmark. It could therefore be of some interest to compare...... the English North Sea moraine clays with the corresponding Danish Moraine Clays. The Danish test procedures are explained in details and some comments are given in the hope that they may not be banalities all of them....

  7. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  8. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundie, P. [Envirotech (Scotland) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)]|[Environmental Resource Industries Disposal Pty Ltd., Perth (Australia); McLeod, N. [Envirotreat Ltd., Kingswinford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  9. Bridges Expansion Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The survey is concerned with the expansion joints, used in bridge constructions to compensate medium and significant operational linear and spatial displacements between adjacent spans or between bridge span and pier. The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting the modern demands imposed to expansion joints.

  10. Bridges Expansion Joints

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-01-01

    .... The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting...

  11. Clays as mineral dust aerosol: An integrated approach to studying climate, atmospheric chemistry, and biogeochemical effects of atmospheric clay minerals in an undergraduate research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C. D.; Crane, C. C.; Harris, K. J.; Thompson, C. E.; Miles, M. K.; Weingold, R. M.; Bucuti, T.

    2011-12-01

    Entrained mineral dust aerosol accounts for 45% of the global annual atmospheric aerosol load and can have a significant influence on important environmental issues, including climate, atmospheric chemistry, cloud formation, biogeochemical processes, visibility, and human health. 70% of all mineral aerosol mass originating from Africa consists of layered aluminosilicates, including illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite clays. Clay minerals are a largely neglected component of mineral aerosol, yet they have unique physiochemical properties, including a high reactive surface area, large cation exchange capacities, small particle sizes, and a relatively large capacity to take up adsorbed water, resulting in expansion of clay layers (and a larger reactive surface area for heterogeneous interactions) in some cases. An integrated laboratory research approach has been implemented at Hendrix College, a Primarily Undergraduate Institution, in which undergraduate students are involved in independent and interdisciplinary research projects that relate the chemical aging processes (heterogeneous chemistry) of clay minerals as a major component of mineral aerosol to their effects on climate (water adsorption), atmospheric chemistry (trace gas uptake), and biogeochemistry (iron dissolution and phytoplankton biomarker studies). Preliminary results and future directions will be reported.

  12. Applications of clay as a building material. Der Baustoff Lehm und seine Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minke, G.

    1984-01-01

    This book is the first in a series on the subject of building with clay. The first part contains contributions from various authors who deal with the properties of clay. They also treat practical building with clay (light weight clay ceilings, clay stoves, clay domes, the thin clay-loaf method). The historical contributions present historical clay buildings in Schleswig Holstein. (BWI).

  13. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......, however, show high attenuation and velocity dispersion remaining at high confining stress. Such dispersion is proposed to be caused by pressure gradients induced by compliant porosity within clay inclusions. By modeling the response of two extreme systems we quantify the possible effects of such clay......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...

  14. Clay nanoparticles for regenerative medicine and biomaterial design: A review of clay bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Mohamed; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dawson, Jonathan I

    2018-03-01

    Clay nanoparticles, composites and hydrogels are emerging as a new class of biomaterial with exciting potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Clay particles have been extensively explored in polymeric nanocomposites for self-assembly and enhanced mechanical properties as well as for their potential as drug delivery modifiers. In recent years, a cluster of studies have explored cellular interactions with clay nanoparticles alone or in combination with polymeric matrices. These pioneering studies have suggested new and unforeseen utility for certain clays as bioactive additives able to enhance cellular functions including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, most notably for osteogenesis. This review examines the recent literature describing the potential effects of clay-based nanomaterials on cell function and examines the potential role of key clay physicochemical properties in influencing such interactions and their exciting possibilities for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determining Upper Bounds for the Clay-squirt Effect in Clay Bearing Sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    Sonic measurements of saturated bulk moduli of clay bearing sandstones show larger values than expected by Gassmann modelling from dry rock properties. This causes difficulties in extrapolation of laboratory data to different saturants or frequencies. Squirt flow from the clay phase of the rock...... have been proposed as the mechanism behind this stiffening. Low fluid mobility and low bulk modulus of the clay phase cause excess pore-pressures to be induced and retained in the phase leading to stiffening. A quantitative bound is formulated for this effect through the determination of the Hashin......-Shtrikman bounds for the case of a drained clay phase and an undrained clay phase. The bound is achieved by analyzing the influence of the relevant parameters with subsequent grouping using reasonable correlations. Through this approach only the saturated bulk modulus of the quartz phase and the clay fraction...

  16. Feasibility of Plasma Treated Clay in Clay/Polymer Nanocomposites Powders for use Laser Sintering (LS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansoori, Alaa; Seabright, Ryan; Majewski, C.; Rodenburg, C.

    2017-05-01

    The addition of small quantities of nano-clay to nylon is known to improve mechanical properties of the resulting nano-composite. However, achieving a uniform dispersion and distribution of the clay within the base polymer can prove difficult. A demonstration of the fabrication and characterization of plasma-treated organoclay/Nylon12 nanocomposite was carried out with the aim of achieving better dispersion of clay platelets on the Nylon12 particle surface. Air-plasma etching was used to enhance the compatibility between clays and polymers to ensure a uniform clay dispersion in composite powders. Downward heat sintering (DHS) in a hot press is used to process neat and composite powders into tensile and XRD specimens. Morphological studies using Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM) were undertaken to characterize the fracture surfaces and clay dispersion in powders and final composite specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) testing performed that the etched clay (EC) is more stable than the nonetched clay (NEC), even at higher temperatures. The influence of the clay ratio and the clay plasma treatment process on the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites was studied by tensile testing. The composite fabricated from (3% EC/N12) powder showed ~19 % improvement in elastic modulus while the composite made from (3% NEC/N12) powder was improved by only 14%). Most notably however is that the variation between tests is strongly reduced when etch clay is used in the composite. We attribute this to a more uniform distribution and better dispersion of the plasma treated clay within polymer powders and ultimately the composite.

  17. Biopolymer-clay nanocomposites: cassava starch and synthetic clay cast films

    OpenAIRE

    Perotti, Gustavo Frigi; TRONTO, JAIRO; Bizeto, Marcos Augusto [UNIFESP; Izumi, Celly Mieko Shinohara; Temperini, Marcia Laudelina Arruda; Lugão,Ademar Benévolo; Parra,Duclerc Fernandes; CONSTANTINO, Vera Regina Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCN) based on cassava starch, synthetic hectorite clay and inverted sugar cane syrup (plasticizer) were prepared by solvent-assisted (casting) process producing transparent and homogeneous films. Small amounts of clay (5-15 wt.%) resulted mainly in exfoliated nanocomposites while large amounts (30 wt.%) promote the intercalated nanocomposites formation. FT-Raman bands sensitive to hydrogen bonding in starch granules are progressively shifted to lower wavenumbers a...

  18. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Cox, Stephen J; Hu, Xiao L; Sorella, Sandro; Alfè, Dario; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields...

  19. Mullins' effect in polymer/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Klitkou, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Experimental data are reported on polypropylene/clay nanocomposites in uniaxial cyclic tensile tests at room temperature (oscillations between maximum strains and the zero minimum stress with maximum strains increasing monotonically with number of cycles). Observations reveal fading...

  20. Ordered assemblies of clay nano-platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Chen, Biqiong; Evans, Julian R G

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate five methods of arranging smectite clay tactoids into layered arrangements as a part of the quest for the biomimetic simulation of nacre. Provided the clay is not fully exfoliated, the tactoids retain sufficient rigidity for alignment and we present micrographs which demonstrate these ordered structures. This paves the way for exploration of the high mineral filler end of polymer-clay nanocomposites which can approach the high aragonite volume fraction of nacre. The clay was dispersed in water without additives by ultrasonic agitation, cleaned by partial sedimentation and the resulting suspension was subjected to controlled phase separation by sedimentation, centrifugation, controlled rate slip casting, filtration and electrophoresis. Well-aligned parallel layers of platelets were obtained from all the five methods, the best stacking being associated with slip cast layers. Polyethylene oxide was incorporated into these well-aligned tactoids.

  1. Utilization of Nkpuma-Akpatakpa clay in ceramics: characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Nkpuma – Akpatakpa clay was analysed for its ceramics suitability. Chemical, mechanical and spectral characterization of the clay was carried out to obtain more information from this clay found in commercial quantity at Ebonyi. State Nigeria. The XRD analysis showed that the principal minerals in the clay are ...

  2. Utilization of Nkpuma-Akpatakpa clay in ceramics: characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nkpuma – Akpatakpa clay was analysed for its ceramics suitability. Chemical, mechanical and spectral characterization of the clay was carried out to obtain more information from this clay found in commercial quantity at Ebonyi State Nigeria. The XRD analysis showed that the principal minerals in the clay are quartz, ...

  3. Pedological ~cterization, Clay Mine:at~ and .~cation of,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to classify them. Eight soil profiles were identified and form three major groups of soils ·namely, very deep, well drained, dark reddish brown to dark brown, sandy clay loams and sandy clays on the steep convex slopes; very deep, well drained, dark brown to dark red, sandy clay loams and; sandy clays on the linear slopes ...

  4. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. "Small" market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed.

  5. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  6. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of expansive soils using remote sensing and in-situ field measurements : phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Researchers at the University of Arkansas have conducted research on the suitability of using remote sensing techniques (radar and LIDAR) to monitor the shrink-swell behavior of an expansive clay material in a field test site as part of the Mack Blac...

  8. Strain development in smectite clays upon exposure to CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, S. M.; Spiers, C. J.; Busch, A.

    2012-04-01

    swelling (0.55 ± 0.46% at 10MPa CO2 pressure) is found for clay with an initial d001 spacing equivalent to 9.8Å. For an initial spacing of 9.8Å ≤ d001 ≤ 11Å, swelling decreases systematically with decreasing d-spacing at all pressures investigated. The strain effect is already observed at low CO2 pressure (1MPa) and expansion appears to be completed at PCO2 ~ 8MPa. Shale/claystone samples containing 53% smectite displays a volume increase of ~1.0%, at T = 45°C and PCO2 = 10MPa. No swelling effects were observed in identical experiments performed using Argon gas. Our results demonstrate that montmorillonite swells by up to a few percent due to uptake of CO2. Whether the CO2 actually penetrates the interlayer region or is adsorbed at clay crystallite surfaces remains unclear. No evidence is found for CO2 induced dehydration (shrinkage) of the crystal structure. For smectite-bearing caprocks above carbon sequestration reservoirs, our results suggest that a minor swelling can be expected if CO2 migrates into caprocks and faults, probably closing any open fractures or joints and thus reducing bulk permeability. Acknowledgement: this project is funded by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  9. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, S J; Grunberg, G; Rathsman, J; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Gardi, Einan; Grunberg, Georges; Rathsman, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The coefficients in perturbative expansions in gauge theories are factoriallyincreasing, predominantly due to renormalons. This type of factorial increaseis not expected in conformal theories. In QCD conformal relations betweenobservables can be defined in the presence of a perturbative infraredfixed-point. Using the Banks-Zaks expansion we study the effect of thelarge-order behavior of the perturbative series on the conformal coefficients.We find that in general these coefficients become factorially increasing.However, when the factorial behavior genuinely originates in a renormalonintegral, as implied by a postulated skeleton expansion, it does not affect theconformal coefficients. As a consequence, the conformal coefficients willindeed be free of renormalon divergence, in accordance with previousobservations concerning the smallness of these coefficients for specificobservables. We further show that the correspondence of the BLM method with theskeleton expansion implies a unique scale-setting procedure. Th...

  10. Semi-industrial production of organo clays to use in base oil drilling fluid; Producao em escala piloto de argilas organofilicas visando uso em fluidos de perfuracao base oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Heber S.; Martins, Alice B.; Costa, Danubia L. da; Ferreira, Heber C.; Neves, Gelmires de A.; Melo, Tomas J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Teixeira Neto, Erico [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The drilling fluids are essential to the operations of exploration of oil. The organoclays are widely used in the composition of the oil based drilling fluids and raw materials are of high value added. These clays can be obtained, traditionally, from bentonitic clay treated, in water, with ionic surfactants, however, non-ionic surfactants can be adsorbed on the surface of interlamelar bentonitic clay, naturally hydrophilic, making them organophilic. A pilot plant for production of organoclays was mounted in the Recycling Laboratory / UFCG. The bentonitic clay imported Cloisite Na{sup +R} was treated with a non-ionic surfactant in levels of 40, 50 and 60% in scale and bench-scale pilot. The commercial organoclay VG-69{sup R} was used as a standard for comparison of results. The clay obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and Foster's swelling. The oil based fluids were prepared in accordance with the standards of PETROBRAS (N-22581 1997 and N-2259, 1997). Tests show that the characterization of organoclays have obtained intercalation of non-ionic surfactant with great expansion of layers of clay, with interlayer distances more significant than the clay trade, both on clay obtained in the laboratory scale as in clays obtained by pilot scale, with results very similar for both methods. It appears that it is possible the pilot-scale production of organoclays with equivalent quality produced in the laboratory scale and quality compatible with the clay used commercially. (author)

  11. Clay mineralogy of weathering rinds and possible implications concerning the sources of clay minerals in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.

    1982-01-01

    Weathering rinds on volcanic clasts in Quaternary deposits in the western US contain only very fine-grained and poorly crystalline clay minerals. Rinds were sampled from soils containing well-developed argillic B horizons in deposits approx 105 yr old or more. The clay-size fraction of the rinds is dominated by allophane and iron hydroxy-oxides, whereas the B horizons contain abundant well-crystallized clay minerals. The contrast between the clay mineralogy of the weathering rinds, in which weathering is isolated from other soil processes, and that of the associated soil matrices suggests a need to reassess assumptions concerning the rates at which clay minerals form and the sources of clay minerals in argillic B horizons. It seems that crystalline clay minerals form more slowly in weathering rinds than is generally assumed for soil environments and that the weathering of primary minerals may not be the dominant source of crystalline clay minerals in Middle to Late Pleistocene soil.-A.P.

  12. Influence of Polymer-Clay Interfacial Interactions on the Ignition Time of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Indraneel S; Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2017-08-11

    Metal ions present on smectite clay (montmorillonite) platelets have preferential reactivity towards peroxy/alkoxy groups during polyamide 6 (PA6) thermal decomposition. This changes the decomposition pathway and negatively affects the ignition response of PA6. To restrict these interfacial interactions, high-temperature-resistant polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI) and polyimide (PI) were used to coat clay layers. PEI was deposited on clay by solution-precipitation, whereas PI was deposited through a solution-imidization-precipitation technique before melt blending with PA6. The absence of polymer-clay interfacial interactions has resulted in a similar time-to-ignition of PA6/PEI-clay (133 s) and PA6/PI-clay (139 s) composites as neat PA6 (140 s). On the contrary, PA6 with conventional ammonium-based surfactant modified clay has showed a huge drop in time-to-ignition (81 s), as expected. The experimental evidences provided herein reveal the role of the catalytic activity of clay during the early stages of polymer decomposition.

  13. Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporuscio, Florie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cheshire, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Dennis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCarney, Mary Kate [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-22

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

  14. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  15. Organoclay Networking in Polypropylene-Clay Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhauser, James; Treece, Mark

    2006-03-01

    We report on networking of organoclays and its influence on the rheology of polypropylene-clay nanocomposites. Samples are blended using either a twin screw extruder (TSE) or a single screw extruder with in situ addition of supercritical CO2 (SCCO2). Blends contain proportional amounts (3:1) of maleic anhydride functionalized PP and organically modified montmorillonite (Cloisite^ 15A, Southern Clay Products) at several clay loadings in a base PP resin (MFI 12 g/10 min at 230 C). Small-amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) and steady shear flow were utilized to probe clay morphology with varying annealing time. In SAOS experiments repeated over several hours, the terminal behavior of the TSE samples became increasingly solid-like; in steady shear, the magnitude of the viscosity overshoot increased with annealing time. The single-screw/SCCO2 materials at the same clay loadings differed little rheologically from the neat resin. Finally, network formation kinetics accelerated with increasing temperature, and sufficiently large deformations irreversibly weakened the network structure.

  16. IMPROVING MARINE CLAYS WITH ELECTROKINETICS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paravita Sri Wulandari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The high water content in marine clays could loosen the bond of soil particles, resulting in low bearing capacity and high compressibility of the soil. Excessive settlements could happened to the structures built on it. An electrokinetic process was attempted to reduce the high water content of the marine clay. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the effect of electrokinetic on marine clay improvement. This study focused on the use of electrokinetic to enhance the soil bearing capacity of marine clay by improving index properties of the marine clay. The result of this research was obtained by doing several analyses on water content, pH value, and soil particles of soil sample located between cathode and anode. Based on the results from laboratory testing, it can be concluded that electrokinetic process decreased the water content and pH value of soil surrounding the anode. Also, soil particles surrounding the anode became in close proximity. This indicated that as it became closer to the anode, soil became denser.

  17. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  18. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  19. Resonant state expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P.

    1993-02-01

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound state, virtual states and resonances characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential is investigated. From a completeness relation in terms of these discrete states and complex scattering states one can derive several Resonant State Expansions (RSE). It is interesting to obtain purely discrete expansion which, if valid, would significantly simplify the treatment of the continuum. Such expansions can be derived using Mittag-Leffler (ML) theory for a cutoff potential and it would be nice to see if one can obtain the same expansions starting from an eigenfunction theory that is not restricted to a finite sphere. The RSE of Greens functions is especially important, e.g. in the continuum RPA (CRPA) method of treating giant resonances in nuclear physics. The convergence of RSE is studied in simple cases using square well wavefunctions in order to achieve high numerical accuracy. Several expansions can be derived from each other by using the theory of analytic functions and one can the see how to obtain a natural discretization of the continuum. Since the resonance wavefunctions are oscillating with an exponentially increasing amplitude, and therefore have to be interpreted through some regularization procedure, every statement made about quantities involving such states is checked by numerical calculations.Realistic nuclear wavefunctions, generated by a Wood-Saxon potential, are used to test also the usefulness of RSE in a realistic nuclear calculation. There are some fundamental differences between different symmetries of the integral contour that defines the continuum in RSE. One kind of symmetry is necessary to have an expansion of the unity operator that is idempotent. Another symmetry must be used if we want purely discrete expansions. These are found to be of the same form as given by ML. (29 refs.).

  20. Solution of internal erosion equations by asymptotic expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubujet P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One dimensional coupled soil internal erosion and consolidation equations are considered in this work for the special case of well determined sand and clay mixtures with a small proportion of clay phase. An enhanced modelling of the effect of erosion on elastic soil behavior was introduced through damage mechanics concepts. A modified erosion law was proposed. The erosion phenomenon taking place inside the soil was shown to act like a perturbation affecting the classical soil consolidation equation. This interpretation has enabled considering an asymptotic expansion of the coupled erosion consolidation equations in terms of a perturbation parameter linked to the maximum expected internal erosion. A robust analytical solution was obtained via direct integration of equations at order zero and an adequate finite difference scheme that was applied at order one.

  1. Emulsions treatment of oil / water using clay vermiculite hydrofobized; Tratamento de emulsoes oleo/agua utilizando a argila vermiculita hidrofobizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, V.C.; Batista, T.S.; Ramos, I.B.M.; Alves, J.J.N.; Sousa, B.V., E-mail: valdetecampossilva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the oil removal capacity in synthetic emulsions using clay vermiculite expanded and hydrophobized. Removing and oil adsorption capacity were evaluated from the finite bath assays using the factorial design 2², and the model definition that describes the process by adsorption isotherm. The diffraction patterns confirm that the process of expansion and hydrophobic at 700 ° C increases the spacing between clay layers of vermiculite, as well as the infrared spectrum presents characteristic band of the hydrophobing process. From the isotherms it found that the correlation coefficients showed that the Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir sigmoidal Hill Sigmoidal well describe the adsorption behavior of vermiculite clay. However, the experimental data were best fitted to the Hill sigmoid model.(author)

  2. Clay Improvement with Burned Olive Waste Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkan Mutman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil is concentrated in the Mediterranean basin countries. Since the olive oil industries are incriminated for a high quantity of pollution, it has become imperative to solve this problem by developing optimized systems for the treatment of olive oil wastes. This study proposes a solution to the problem. Burned olive waste ash is evaluated for using it as clay stabilizer. In a laboratory, bentonite clay is used to improve olive waste ash. Before the laboratory, the olive waste is burned at 550°C in the high temperature oven. The burned olive waste ash was added to bentonite clay with increasing 1% by weight from 1% to 10%. The study consisted of the following tests on samples treated with burned olive waste ash: Atterberg Limits, Standard Proctor Density, and Unconfined Compressive Strength Tests. The test results show promise for this material to be used as stabilizer and to solve many of the problems associated with its accumulation.

  3. Virial Expansion Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  4. Cryosalt Formation in Delaminated Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2017-04-01

    -montmorillonite at hosting hydrohalite, the results of this study can be used to suggest that delaminated Na-montmorillonite sheets encapsulate the salt solutions and by preventing sublimation of water, promotes crystallization of hydrohalite. As delamination is not possible in Ca-montmorillonite, water more readily sublimated from the system, leaving behind a dry Ca-montmorillonite/NaCl assemblage. As such, this work identified processes through which clay minerals can affect the formation of cryosalts that are not only of importance to terrestrial environments of the cryosphere but also to atmospheric processes involving dust aerosols. [1] Yeşilbaş, M. and Boily, J.-F. (2016), Scientific Reports. 6, 32136. [2] Yeşilbaş, M. and Boily, J.-F. (2016), J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 7, 2849-2855. [3] Wagner, R., Möhler O., Schnaiter, M. (2012), 33, 8557-8571.

  5. Characterisation of some Clays Used for Whiteware Ceramics I. Mineralogical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Benea

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain a semiquantitative mineralogical composition of raw materials used for whiteware ceramics, four different clay types were analysed by X-ray diffraction. Studies were carried out by using a combination of analyses of the bulk sample, and of the fine fraction. Using a well-established pre-treatment methodology (use of chemicals, ultrasonic treatment, dispersion procedures, clay mineral concentration by centrifugation and sedimentation, oriented and random powder preparation, cation saturation, expansion/dehydration methods, 12 X-ray diffractometer traces were obtained from each sample. Based on these informations it was possible to establish the qualitative mineralogical composition, and also a semiquantitative one using peak intensities and peak area corrected by various factors. Scanning electron microscopy was also used in order to illustrate the identified mineral phases.

  6. Effects of Different Types of Clays and Maleic Anhydride Modified Polystyrene on Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehrabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer/clay nanocomposites are considered as a new subject of research in Iran and the world. Addition of a minimum amount of clay (2-5wt% can improve the mechanical properties, enhance barrier properties and reduce flammability dramatically. Polystyrene (PS exhibits high strength, high modulus and excellent dimensional stability, but it has poor ductility, elongation, and flexural modulus. By incorporating clay into polystyrene these properties can be improved. In this study preparation of polystyrene/clay nanocomposite, effects of different types of clays (Cloisite 10A andNanomer I.30TC and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene on mechanical properties of the prepared polystyrene/clay nanocomposites were evaluated. Samples were prepared by a twin screw extruder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were employed to evaluate the extent of intercalation and exfoliation of silicate layers in the nanocomposites. Mechanical tests show that by addition of clay and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene the flexural modulus (~30% and elongation-at-break (~40% of prepared nanocomposites have been improved. XRD and TEM results show that nanocomposite have an intercalated structure with ability to change to further exfoliation structure.

  7. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  8. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  9. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  10. Micro-fabric damages in Boom Clay inferred from cryo-BIB-SEM experiment: recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schmatz, Joyce; Klaver, Jop; Urai, Janos L.

    2017-04-01

    The Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock in Belgium for nuclear waste disposal in a deep geological formation. One of the keys to understand the long-term performance of such a host rock is the fundamental understanding of coupling between microstructural evolution, poromechanical behaviour and the state of hydration of the system. At in situ conditions, Boom Clay is a nearly water-saturated (>94%) clay-rich geomaterial. Subsequently, for measurement of mechanical and transport properties in laboratory, cores of Boom Clay are vacuum-packed in Al-coated-poly-ethylene barrier foil to be best preserved at original hydric state. Because clay microstructures are very sensitive to dehydration, the validity of investigations done on such preserved or/and dried samples is often questionable. Desbois et al. (2009, 2013, 2014) showed the possibility to image fluid-filled porosity in Boom Clay, by using the FIB-cryo-SEM (FIB: Focussed Ion Beam) and FIB-cryo-SEM (BIB: Broad Ion Beam) techniques. However, surprisingly in Desbois et al. (2014), BIB-cryo-SEM experiments on Boom Clay, shown that the majority of the pores were fluid-free, contrasting with result in Desbois et al. (2009). In Desbois et al. (2014), several reasons were discussed to explain such discrepancies. The likely ones are the sealing efficiency of the Al-barrier foil at long term and the volume expansion due to the release of in-situ stress after core extraction, contributing both to dehydration and microfabric damage. This contribution presents the newest results based on cryo-BIB-SEM. Small pieces (30 mm3) of Boom Clay were preserved in liquid nitrogen after the core extraction at the MOL/Dessel Underground Research Laboratory in Belgium. A maximum of ten minutes time span was achieved between opening the core, the sub-sample extraction and the quenching of sub-samples in liquid nitrogen. First results show that all pores visible at cryo-SEM resolution are water saturated. However, water

  11. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-size particles, 21% silt and 27% clay. Analysis of the clay-sized particles and the bulk materials shows: specific gravity of 2.07 and 2.66, liquid limit of 91.0% and 33.0%, plastic limit of 27.5% and 14.3%, plasticity index of 63.5% and 18.7% and a linear shrinkage of 7.9% and 5.4%, for both clay-sized particles and bulk clay respectively. The activity value of the clay material (0.64 suggests the presence of Kaolinite and Ilite; and these were confirmed with X-Ray diffraction on the bulk sample and clay-sized particles. X-Ray diffraction patterns shows distinctive peaks which highlight the dominance of Kaolinite (with 8 peaks in the pottery clay sample for both clay-sized particles and bulk material; while traces of other clay minerals like Illite and Halloysite and rock minerals like Mica, Feldspar and Chrysotile were also found. These results suggest that the clay possesses high viability in the manufacturing of ceramics, refractory bricks, paper, fertilizer and paint. The clay material can be used as a subgrade in road construction, since it possesses low swelling characteristics.

  12. Wake Expansion Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Different models of wake expansion are presented in this chapter: the 1D momentum theory model, the cylinder analog model and Theodorsen’s model. Far wake models such as the ones from Frandsen or Rathmann or only briefly mentioned. The different models are compared to each other. Results from thi...... this chapter are used in Chap. 16 to link near-wake and far-wake parameters and in Chap. 20 to study the influence of expansion on tip-losses....

  13. Nuclear expansion with excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, J.N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Samaddar, S.K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Vinas, X. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centelles, M. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: mario@ecm.ub.es

    2006-07-06

    The expansion of an isolated hot spherical nucleus with excitation energy and its caloric curve are studied in a thermodynamic model with the SkM{sup *} force as the nuclear effective two-body interaction. The calted results are shown to compare well with the recent experimental data from energetic nuclear collisions. The fluctuations in temperature and density are also studied. They are seen to build up very rapidly beyond an excitation energy of {approx}9 MeV/u. Volume-conserving quadrupole deformation in addition to expansion indicates, however, nuclear disassembly above an excitation energy of {approx}4 MeV/u.

  14. Uniform gradient expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giovannini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  15. Crystallite size distribution of clay minerals from selected Serbian clay deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The BWA (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique for the measurement of the mean crystallite thickness and thickness distributions of phyllosilicates was applied to a set of kaolin and bentonite minerals. Six samples of kaolinitic clays, one sample of halloysite, and five bentonite samples from selected Serbian deposits were analyzed. These clays are of sedimentary volcano-sedimentary (diagenetic, and hydrothermal origin. Two different types of shape of thickness distribution were found - lognormal, typical for bentonite and halloysite, and polymodal, typical for kaolinite. The mean crystallite thickness (T BWA seams to be influenced by the genetic type of the clay sample.

  16. Paleoceanography in Pelagic Clay of the South Pacific Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S.

    2014-12-01

    A spatially and temporally expansive record of early Cenozoic high-latitude ocean history resides in the pelagic clay of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). At the beginning of the Cenozoic, four sites drilled during IODP Expedition 329 were located between 40-62°S, which may have been the center of an ancient polar gyre. As the Pacific Plate migrated northward, these sites were subjected to major paleoceanographic changes including the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, Australian desertification, and Southern Hemisphere volcanism. The SPG sediment is homogenous brown, zeolitic, metalliferous pelagic clay. Such sediment can be challenging for paleooceanographic research due its ultrafine grain size, slow accumulation rate, post-depositional alteration, and lack of biogenic material. However, our geochemical techniques embrace the authigenic nature of SPG clay to develop a constant-Co age model and track variations in sediment origin and accumulation. By combining sedimentation patterns with backtracked site paths, we produce an unprecedented characterization of the Cenozoic paleoceanographic evolution of the SPG. We analyzed 47 major, trace, REE concentrations in 206 bulk sediment samples from 7 sites across the SPG, deposited as long ago as 100 Ma. For each sample, traditional geochemical partitioning techniques, Q-mode factor analyses, and multiple linear regressions allowed us to quantify contributions of six end-members: post-Archean average Australian shale (PAAS), Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, apatite, biogenic Si, and two distinct types of altered volcanic ash. Mass accumulation of the PAAS end-member increased 12-18% throughout the Cenozoic, with the most rapid increase occurring just after the mid-Miocene when Australia became more arid. The Paleogene/Neogene boundary also marks a change in sedimentation, likely caused by a change in eolian activity and/or a change in authigenic processes due to changing bottom water conditions. Contributions from one kind of

  17. HPLC Analysis of Colorants Migrated from Children's Modeling Clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Eri; Ozaki, Asako; Ooshima, Tomoko; Yamano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    A method using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) was developed for the identification of colorants migrated from colored modeling clays, which are popular toys for children. Twelve permitted dyes and 25 non-permitted dyes were analyzed in 20 clays (10 wheat clays, 2 rice clays, 2 corn clays, 3 paper clays and 3 resin clays). As a result, 13 products which were labeled for children's use (under 6 years old) met the specifications of the Japanese Food Sanitation Law, while non-permitted colorants were eluted from 2 products. In additon, unknown colorants were eluted from 3 products for people over 6 years old, although these are not covered by the Japanese regulation. It was suggested that some type of clays contained pigments, which are generally used in printing ink and plastics.

  18. Competitive adsorption of heavy metals on local landfill clay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2015-01-01

    ...) located in the northwest of Tunis (Tunisia, North Africa). The adsorption properties of natural clay and the Na-purified clay in a chromium and cadmium rich aqueous solution have been studied by batch technique...

  19. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  20. Rethinking expansive learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    discussion forum on Google groups, they created new ways of reflecting and learning. We used netnography to select qualitative postings from the online community and expansive learning concepts for data analysis. The findings show how students changed practices of organisational learning...

  1. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    3, (1 &. 2). pp. 10 -17. Gawu, S.K.Y. and Momade, F.W.Y. (1998). Progress Report on the Characterisation of the Awaso Lithomargic clay for the Ghana. Chamber of Mines, Report Two. 38p. Hlavăc, J. (1983). The Technology of Glass and. Ceramics. An Introduction. Elsevier Scien- tific Publishing Company, Amsterdam. pp.

  2. Calm, Cool, and Comfortable in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The author's fourth-grade students had just finished a drawing unit that focused on the human figure. Projects included charcoal gesture drawings and chalk manikin drawings in chiaroscuro. She wanted to integrate a new medium for students to continue their study of the human figure. Since students are always excited to work with clay, making clay…

  3. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  4. Mineralogical and Geochemical Characterization of Clay and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    ABSTRACT. The paper tries to characterize and evaluate clay, lacustrine and diatomaceous earth deposits of. Lake Ashenge basin, near Koram, northern Ethiopia and comment on its industrial implications. The country rocks are dominantly basalts and basaltic agglomerates overlain by minor amounts of rhyolite and ...

  5. Mineralogical and Geochemical Characterization of Clay and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper tries to characterize and evaluate clay, lacustrine and diatomaceous earth deposits of Lake Ashenge basin, near Koram, northern Ethiopia and comment on its industrial implications. The country rocks are dominantly basalts and basaltic agglomerates overlain by minor amounts of rhyolite and ignimbrite.

  6. Geotechnical studies of Jaitapur marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.

    characterisEd. by high water content and high Atterberg limits. Undrained shear strength varied from 1.8 to 6 KPa. These were moderately sensitive clays. Carbonate content which varied from 3 to 27%, was found to influence engineering properties of the soil...

  7. RHEOLOGY AND SCALING BEHAVIOR OF SWELLING CLAY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-31

    Dec 31, 2012 ... The scaling variable (ϕp/ϕpc-1), suggested in percolation theory to describe rheological behavior near percolation transition, acts to collapse G' data ... The purpose of rheology in oscillation mode is to better include/understand the evolution of clay dispersions with the bentonite concentration for different ...

  8. Radionuclide transport in clay during climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenborg, A.F.B.; Orlic, B.; Thimus, J.F.; Lange, G.de; Cock, S. de; Leeuw, C.S. de; Veling, E.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch national research programme into the feasibility of retrievable storage of radioactive waste (CORA Programme Phase I; CORA: Comité Opslag Radioactief Afval = Committee on Radioactive Waste Disposal) examined the suitability of Tertiary clay deposts for such storage. Long-term isolation -

  9. Radionuclide transport in clay during climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenborg, A.F.B.; Orlic, B.; Thimus, J.F.; De Lange, G.; De Cock, S.; De Leeuwe, C.S.; Veling, E.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch national research programme into the feasibility of retrievable storage of radioactive waste (CORA Programme Phase I; CORA: Comité Opslag Radioactief Afval = Committee on Radioactive Waste Disposal) examined the suitability of Tertiary clay deposits for such storage. Long-term isolation –

  10. Clay and clay-supported materials for clean energy storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available sources of cleaner energy. Among other challenges, the high cost of production together with limited reliable energy storage materials have contributed to the main obstacles for delayed the widespread switch toward cleaner energy sources. Clay materials...

  11. RESEARCH OF SWELLING OF SUZAKH CLAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubetskiy Valeriy Leonidovich

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the course of construction of Sangtudinsky hydropower plant-1 on the River Vakhsh, it was deemed necessary to identify clay swelling properties in the event of alterations of the humidity mode of fructured half-rock soils, or the Suzakh clay, that accommodated tunnel-shaped water outlets within a section that was 75 meters long. The depth of tunnels was about 100 m. Any interaction with swelling soils could lead to destruction of the tunnel lining. Suzakh clays demonstrated the following physical and mechanical properties: density of particles of soil ρ= 2,69 g/cm; soil density ρ = 2.40-2.47 g/cm; porosity of 8.2-10.8 %; ultimate resistance to uniaxial compression = 13.1-31.0 MPa. Water saturated clay samples disintegrated into cloddy fragments; the rate of a longitudinal ultrasonic wave in the area of unaltered soils was equal to = 2500 m/c; repulse coefficient k was equal to 15 MPa/m; solidity coefficient (according to Protodyakonov was equal to 1,5; modulus of deformation in the massif was equal to 0.23 х10 MPa. The author proposed a methodology and designed a pilot set of equipment units designated for the identification of the swelling properties of fractured half-rock soils. Results of the pilot unit operation are presented in the article. Swelling properties are based on the monolith testing results. The programme contemplated a set of experiments held in various limit states on the surface of monoliths. Dependence between the swelling pressure and the swelling deformation in the course of water saturation was identified. The experiment demonstrates that alterations of the humidity mode of free surface Suzakh clays cause the relative deformation of swelling up to 1.1 %, and if the lining is rigid, the swelling pressure can exceed 4 MPa.

  12. The Composition and Physical Properties of Some Clays of Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    manufacture of refractories, pottery/ceramic wares and structural units. They are also used as fillers or extenders in various products. The identification and quantification of the clay and non-clay minerals present in a clay material determines their uses and related industries. Each industrial process requires certain property ...

  13. Instrumental characterization of clay by XRF, XRD and FTIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Instrumental characterizations of the clay were performed by different techniques such as XRF, XRD and FTIR. XRF shows the chemical compositions of the clay where Al-oxide and silica oxide are present in major quantity whereas XRD confirms the presence of these minerals in clay. FTIR studies show the presence of ...

  14. Use of clay from kangerlussuaq in the Greenlandic construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Villumsen, Arne; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Clay material from Kangerlussuaq in West Greenland was characterised and its possible use for the production of bricks, expanded clay products and inert filler material was investigated. It was generally found that it was possible to use the clay in all of the above mentioned materials, although...

  15. Geological Investigations on Boulder-Clay of E. Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzel, van P.; Overweel, C.J.; Veenstra, H.J.

    1959-01-01

    In this article the results of a study on boulder-clay in the neighbourhood of Winschoten (N.E. Netherlands) are communicated (Chapter I). The underlying sediments of the boulder-clay in this area consist of fine preglacial sands and black clay. In the nuclei of the many drumlins a strongly

  16. 49 The Geology and Mineralogy of Clay Occurrences Around Kutigi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    Abstract. This paper reports the geology and mineralogy of the clay occurrences around Kutigi. The methodology of research includes detailed mapping of the area, collection of clay samples and laboratory analysis using X- ray diffraction. Field results show that clays in Kutigi are deposited as alluvial deposit from braided ...

  17. Ceramic properties of Pugu kaolin clays. Part I: Porosity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The utilisation of Pugu kaolin clay as a raw material in porcelain has been tested by laboratory scale experiments. Physical characteristics of the clay have shown it to be of satisfactory quality and comparable to commercial clays found elsewhere. The chemical analysis has indicated the presence of high levels of iron oxide ...

  18. Assessment of heavy metals leachability from traditional clay pots ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clay pots may transfer ones of their constituents into foodstuffs when they are coated with glazes which are said to contain heavy metals like Pb and Cd. This study was conducted to determine if traditional clay pots (unglazed) can also behave the same way. Leachate from the clay raw pulp material was initially ...

  19. Treatment of pulping effluents by using alum and clay - colour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of clay addition during alum coagulation, on the removal of colour from pulp-and-paper industry wastewaters, was investigated. Four types of clay, namely beige-and brown-sepiolites, calcium- and sodium-bentonites of different mesh sizes were used. Different quantities of alum and clay were applied, either singly ...

  20. Strength and Deformation Properties of Tertiary Clay at Moesgaard Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    The tertiary clay at Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus in the eastern part of Jutland in Denmark is a highly plastic, glacially disturbed nappe of Viborg Clay. The clay is characterised as a swelling soil, which could lead to damaging of the building due to additional heave of the soil. To take...

  1. evaluation and characterization of gakem and abouchiche clay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    The characterization of some clay as refractory materials for furnace lining has become relevant to find solutions to the cost involved in the purchase and importation of these refractory materials. This work investigated the refractory properties of clay samples for their suitability for use in the industries. Clay samples were ...

  2. Polymer-clay nanocomposites obtained by solution polymerization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Polymer-clay nanocomposites were synthesized by solution polymerization method using advanced functionalized clay and vinyl benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride as monomer. First stage con- sisted in the silylation of a commercial organo-modified clay-Cl 20A using alkoxysilanes with different chain lengths.

  3. Probabilistic Description of a Clay Site using CPTU tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sarah; Lauridsen, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2012-01-01

    A clay site at the harbour of Aarhus, where numerous cone penetration tests have been conducted, is assessed. The upper part of the soil deposit is disregarded, and only the clay sections are investigated. The thickness of the clay deposit varies from 5 to 6 meters, and is sliced into sections of 1...

  4. The Geology and Mineralogy of Clay Occurrences Around Kutigi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the geology and mineralogy of the clay occurrences around Kutigi. The methodology of research includes detailed mapping of the area, collection of clay samples and laboratory analysis using X- ray diffraction. Field results show that clays in Kutigi are deposited as alluvial deposit from braided and ...

  5. Assessment of heavy metals leachability from traditional clay pots ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The clay pots may transfer ones of their constituents into foodstuffs when they are coated with glazes which are said to contain heavy metals like Pb and Cd. This study was conducted to determine if traditional clay pots (unglazed) can also behave the same way. Leachate from the clay raw pulp material was initially ...

  6. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Determination of types and amounts for clay minerals in soil are important in environmental, agricultural, and geological investigations. Many reliable methods have been established to identify clay mineral types. However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study ...

  7. properties of fired bodies made from tanzanian talc- clay mixes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. Fired properties of talc-clay mixed bodies of different compositions were investigated for ceramic applications. Clays from Pugu and Malangali and talcs from two different sites in Kikombo deposits in Dodoma Region were used. Chemical analyses, X-ray analysis and Differential. Thermal analysis for clays and ...

  8. CERAMIC PROPERTIES OF PUGU KAOLIN CLAYS. PART I ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Porcelain is a vitrified product of mixtures of clay, quartz and feldspar. It is one of the most widely used and studied materials in the whole family of ceramics. A typical porcelain composition will consist of 50% clay, 25% quartz and 25% feldspar. China clay imparts rigidity to the ware and feldspar, as a flux provides a glassy ...

  9. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  10. Organically modified clays as binders of fumonisins in feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglieri, Andrea; Reyneri, Amedeo; Gennari, Mara; Nègre, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    This study reports an investigation on the ability of organically modified clays to bind mycotoxins, fumonisins B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2). Organically modified clays are commercia materials prepared from natural clays, generally montmorillonite, by exchanging the inorganic cation with an ammonium organic cation. A screening experiment conducted on 13 organically modified clays and 3 nonmodified clays, used as controls, has confirmed that the presence of an organic cation in the clay interlayer promoted the adsorption of both fumonisins. On the basis of the results of the screening test, four modified clays and a Na-montmorillonite were selected for the determination of the adsorption kinetics and isotherms. On all the tested materials adsorption took place within one hour of contact with fumonisins solutions. Adsorption isotherms have pointed out that the modified clays exhibited a higher adsorptive capacity than the unmodified clay. It was also demonstrated that, notwithstanding the reduced structural difference between FB1 and FB2, they were differently adsorbed on the modified clays. Addition of 2% modified clays to contaminated maize allowed a reduction of more than 70% and 60% of the amount of FB1and FB2 released in solution. Although in vivo experiments are required to confirm the effectiveness of the organically modified clays, these preliminary results suggest that these materials are promising as fumonisins binders.

  11. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trieves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  12. evaluation and characterization of gakem and abouchiche clay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EVALUATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GAKEM AND ABOUCHICHE CLAY SAMPLES IN BEKWARRA LGA OF CROSS RIVER STATE FOR USE AS REFRACTORY ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... This work investigated the refractory properties of clay samples for their suitability for use in the industries. Clay ...

  13. CONTRAST IN CLAY MINERALOGY AND THEIR EFFECT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    originating from percolation of mud-rich waters or illuviation of clay cutans, (ii) pedogenic mud aggregates ... pedogenic mud aggregates to authigenic clay, (iv) alteration of K-feldspar and ferromagnesian minerals to ..... mature source rocks and clay minerals transformation causing an activated acidic environment to leach ...

  14. Polymer-clay nanocomposites obtained by solution polymerization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Polymer-clay nanocomposites were synthesized by solution polymerization method using advanced functionalized clay and vinyl benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride as monomer. First stage consisted in the silylation of a commercial organo-modified clay-Cl 20A using alkoxysilanes with different chain lengths.

  15. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  16. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  17. Natural and controlled expansion of expanded clays for the production of lightweight aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann-Venevere, P.

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available Not availableLa modificación de una materia prima hace posible definir las propiedades del producto a manufacturar a partir de ella (fig. 1. La calidad de los áridos ligeros de diversos tipos, hechos con diferentes materias primas, puede juzgarse únicamente por su idoneidad como un constituyente del hormigón ligero. Por consiguiente, es esencial valorar la influencia del árido sobre ciertas características bien definidas del hormigón ligero.

  18. Evaluation of damage to a road and sports complex on expansive clays

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mgangira, Martin B

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available in the single sealed shoulders and in the outer portions of the asphalt carriageway was observed on a section of the road. Investigations were carried out and remedial measures were then suggested and implemented. However, a further section constructed..., pavement design reports, field and laboratory test and other as-built data necessary for evaluation of design compliance. Figure 1 shows an example of the longitudinal cracking in the shoulder. Figure 2 shows a typical longitudinal crack...

  19. IKEA's International Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Harapiak, Clayton

    2013-01-01

    This case concerns a global retailing firm that is dealing with strategic management and marketing issues. Applying a scenario of international expansion, this case provides a thorough analysis of the current business environment for IKEA. Utilizing a variety of methods (e.g. SWOT, PESTLE, McKinsey Matrix) the overall objective is to provide students with the opportunity to apply their research skills and knowledge regarding a highly competitive industry to develop strategic marketing strateg...

  20. Recovery of Porosity and Permeability for High Plasticity Clays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    Clays, which have been loaded to a high stress level, will under certain conditions keep low porosity and permeability due to the high degree of compression. In some situations it seems that porosity and permeability will recover to a very high extent when the clay is unloaded. This seems...... to be the case for high plasticity clays that are uncemented, and with a high content of clay minerals, especially smectite. Oedometer tests on samples from the Paleogene period show that 80% or more of the compaction will recover when unloaded, and if unloaded to a stress lower than in situ stress level...... the clay will expand to an even higher porosity....

  1. Compressed clay and its applications. Stampflehm und seine Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minke, G.

    1985-01-01

    This is the second book in a series books on the subject of building with clay. It contains contributions from various authors on research and practice of building with compressed clay. Building with compressed clay is a technique with a rich tradition, but which has sunk largely into oblivion in the 20th century. It was not until new machinery for working it that it again became economically interesting. Compressed clay is a useful material for walls, ceilings and floors. Stoves and furnances can also be built with it. The book also contains a list of historic clay buildings in Lower Saxony, Hamburg and Bremen. (BWI).

  2. Effect of swelling mineral on geotechnical characteristics of clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Cherif Mechri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The shrinking and swelling is a very common phenomenon in the world, mainly in arid and semiarid areas. The construction on these soils often requires a study of the risk of swelling, in advance. The emergence of this phenomenon in soils is caused primarily by the presence of swelling clays and water. The risk is most significant when the rate of the expansive minerals, such as bentonite, is important. Several researchers have studied the relationship between the percentages of swelling minerals and soil swelling potential. The researchers have shown the difficulty of characterization, because of the complexity of the phenomenon under natural conditions, where several other phenomena occur, and which are not considered in laboratory experimentation. This article addresses the characterization of several soils, with different swelling rates from the physical, chemical and mechanical tests. It shows the relationship between the quantity of swelling minerals and some site conditions, such as water content and consolidation stress, on the ability of soil to swell. This work aims to establish empirical relationships between the percentage of swelling minerals and soil swelling potential.

  3. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  4. Dioxins in primary kaolin and secondary kaolinitic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Martin; Scheeder, Georg; Bernau, Sarah; Dohrmann, Reiner; Germann, Klaus

    2011-01-15

    Since 1996 dioxins have been repeatedly detected worldwide in Tertiary ball clays used as anticaking agent in the production of animal feed and a variety of other applications. The dioxins of these natural clays are very unlikely of anthropogenic source, but no model of dioxin enrichment has been established. A hypothetical model is presented which explains the highly variable dioxin loadings of the Tertiary kaolinitic clays by natural addition during clay-sedimentation. To prove this hypothesis, Tertiary primary nonsedimentary kaolin and sedimentary kaolinitic clays were collected at three profiles in Europe and analyzed for mineralogy, chemistry, organic carbon, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/-furans (PCDD/F). Primary kaolin, kaolinitic, and lignitic clays contained almost no PCDFs. PCDD concentration differed markedly between primary kaolin (3-91 pg/g) and secondary kaolinitic clay (711-45935 pg/g), respectively, lignitic clays (13513-1191120 pg/g). The dioxin loading of secondary kaolinitic and lignitic clays is approximately 10 to a few thousand times higher than in the primary kaolin or recent environmental settings. The dioxin concentrations decrease from octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin to the tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxins and exhibit the "natural formation pattern". No correlation between PCDD/F concentration and bulk composition of clays was found. These findings support the hypothesis of the enrichment of dioxin in clays during sedimentation.

  5. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R.; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-01-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling. PMID:21845150

  6. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Moran

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  7. Character expansion of matrix integrals

    OpenAIRE

    van de Leur, J. W.; Orlov, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    We consider character expansion of tau functions and multiple integrals in characters of orhtogonal and symplectic groups. In particular we consider character expansions of integrals over orthogonal and over symplectic matrices.

  8. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. © 2013.

  9. Clay-based geothermal drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guven, N.; Carney, L.L.; Lee, L.J.; Bernhard, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The rheological properties of fluids based on fibrous clays such as sepiolite and attapulgite have been systematically examined under conditions similar to those of geothermal wells, i.e. at elevated temperatures and pressures in environments with concentrated brines. Attapulgite- and sepiolite-based fluids have been autoclaved at temperatures in the range from 70 to 800/sup 0/F with the addition of chlorides and hydroxides of Na, K, Ca, and Mg. The rheological properties (apparent and plastic viscosity, fluid loss, gel strength, yield point, and cake thickness) of the autoclaved fluids have been studied and correlated with the chemical and physical changes that occur in the clay minerals during the autoclaving process.

  10. Octyl Phenol Synthesis Using Natural Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casuscelli

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of clay minerals, HB, NB and Al-PILC have been studied in the alkylation reactions of 2-octanol with phenol at 180°C, under conditions of alcohol/phenol = 1 (mole ratio and W/FAo °= 64,27 ghmol-1. The selectivity of Al-PILC was 77,12% for octyl phenol and 16,5% for dioctyl phenol.

  11. Ensilin Tests on Selected Clays and Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    are one of the most difficult formations to drill effectively. Shales are sedimentary rocks deposited in a marine environment that contain silt and...minerals are exposed to water in drilling fluids, they swell, disperse and eventually cause wellbore instabilities. This leads to many problems in...of the numerous works on shale classification and shale control. 2.1 Clays In order to understand shale instability, one must first look at the

  12. The development and application of bi-functional clay inhibitor of CYY-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbin; Li, Fengqun; Yu, Jiliang; Han, Changsheng; Gong, Hui; Wang, Jing; Wu, Yingde; Wang, Rui

    2017-04-01

    with the constant discovery and gradual development of low-permeability and water-sensitivity formation, reservoir protection is especially important for improving water-injection development efficiency and enhancing working level of low-permeability reservoir, which will be a critical sector in enhancing development quality of low-permeability and water-sensitivity reservoir. Combined with the understanding of clay mineral expansion theory, starting from hydratability, polarity and oxidability of adopted materials, one type of bi-functional clay inhibitor, CYY-2, is developed which has the function of swelling prevention and swelling shrinkage, and property evaluation is carried out by adopting different methods and measures. Test results indicated that: by using this bi-functional clay inhibitor, the swelling prevention rate of magcogel and natural core powder could reach to 91.7% and 89.8%, swelling shrinkage of which could reach to 61.3% and 81.5%; in the natural flowing experiment, core damage ratio was declined from 86.3% to 12.8%, and the core permeability could be raised by 3 times averagely; in the field experiment of 5 wells, effective rate of 80%, the well effect, is reached. With the extension of injection time of injecting wells, injection pressure rose constantly, injection allocation request was not finished, which influenced the overall reservoir development effect. So reservoir protection is important to deal with the above problems.

  13. Effect of by-product steel slag on the engineering properties of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal I. Shalabi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay soils, mainly if they contain swelling minerals such as smectite or illite, may cause severe damage to structures, especially when these soils are subjected to wetting and drying conditions. High expansion and reduction in shear strength and foundation bearing capacity will take place due to the increase in water content of these soils. The engineering properties of these kinds of soils can be improved by using additives and chemical stabilizers. In this work, by-product steel slag was used to improve the engineering properties of clay soils. Lab and field experimental programs were developed to investigate the effect of adding different percentages of steel slag on plasticity, swelling, compressibility, shear strength, compaction, and California bearing ratio (CBR of the treated materials. The results of tests on the clay soil showed that as steel slag content increased, the soil dry density, plasticity, swelling potential, and cohesion intercept decreased and the angle of internal friction increased. For the CBR, the results of the tests showed an increase in the CBR value with the increase in slag content.

  14. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundl, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  16. Expansion reduction of clayey soils through Surcharge application and Lime Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. López-Lara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Expansive clayey soils produce heaving and cracking of floor slabs and walls. Expansive soils owe their characteristics to the presence of swelling clay minerals. This soil expands and contracts due to changes in the moisture content of the soil. In this study the surcharge required to counteract soil expansion was measured in natural expansive soils (untreated soils and lime treated soils starting at 19.61 kPa (2 Ton/m2 and continuing with increments of 19.61 kPa. Additionaly in lime treated soils the amount of lime was determined under different surcharges in order to reduce the expansion. The test results indicated that the surcharges applied to untreated soils were not proportional to the decrease of expansion which is probably due to the increase of soil density. In fact, only the initial surcharge of 19.61 kPa significantly decreased the expansion. According to the results, the soil expansion was considerably reduced (1.54% with the surcharge of 78.45 kPa, therefore this surcharge can be considered as the Swelling pressure. On the other hand the soil tested (high compressibility clay was stabilized with 6% of lime (without surcharges which was determined with the lowest value of liquid limit and plastic index as well as expansion test. After the application of surcharges and lime treatment to expansive soil, the surcharges of 39.22 kPa and 58.84 kPa decreased expansion and increased their resistance. This was concluded by similar low values of expansion (without settlements under both surcharges of each treated soil tested (2, 4 and 6% of lime. It can be concluded that the surcharge contributed to the decrease of soil expansion due to the decrease of the amount of lime required (6% without surcharge. So, 4% of lime was enough for the surcharge of 19.61 kPa and 2% of lime required the surcharge minimum of 39.22 kPa. This shows that the surcharge of a house on expansive soil reduces soil expansion and therefore reduces costs of any

  17. Influence of clay organic modifier on morphology and performance of poly(ε-caprolactone/clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Marija S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two series of poly(e-caprolactone nanocomposites with different organo-modified clays (1 to 8 wt% were prepared by the solution casting method. Organoclays with polar (Cloisite®C30B and nonpolar (Cloisite®C15A organic modifier and with different miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone matrix, were chosen. Exfoliated and/or intercalated nanocomposite’s structures were obtained by using high dilution and an ultrasonic treatment for the composite preparation. The effect of the surface modification and clay content on the morphology, mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites was studied. Scanning electron microscopy excluded the formation of microcomposite. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the tendency toward exfoliated structure is higher for the Cloisite®C30B, which had better miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone matrix. Differences in spherulites’ sizes and morphology between two series of the nanocomposites were observed by the optical microscopy performed on as-casted films. Enthalpies of fusion and degrees of crystallinity were higher for nanocomposites than for neat poly(e-caprolactone and increase with the clay loading in both series, as a consequence of the clay nucleating effect. Decreased thermal stability of nanocomposites was ascribed to thermal instability of organic modifiers of the clays. The Halpin-Tsai model was used to compare the theoretically predicted values of the Young’s modulus with experimentally obtained ones in tensile tests.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172062

  18. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besse-Hoggan, Pascale, E-mail: Pascale.Besse@univ-bpclermont.f [Laboratoire de Synthese et Etude de Systemes a Interet Biologique, UMR-CNRS 6504, Universite Blaise Pascal, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Alekseeva, Tatiana [Institute of Physical, Chemical and Biological Problems of Soil Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region 142290 (Russian Federation); Laboratoire des Materiaux Inorganiques, UMR-CNRS 6002, Universite Blaise Pascal, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie [Laboratoire de Synthese et Etude de Systemes a Interet Biologique, UMR-CNRS 6504, Universite Blaise Pascal, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Forano, Claude [Laboratoire des Materiaux Inorganiques, UMR-CNRS 6002, Universite Blaise Pascal, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2009-10-15

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. - The biodegradation rate of atrazine was greatly modulated by adsorption of the pesticide and also bacterial cells on clay particles.

  19. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A., E-mail: ferelenakq@gmail.co [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Inst. de Investigaciones para la Industria Quimica; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Profa. Eloisa Mano

    2009-07-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  20. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2017-05-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  1. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Clay-catalyzed reactions of coagulant polymers during water chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Lee, C.-K.; Chao, H.-P.; Peng, C.-L.; Chiou, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of suspended clay/solid particles on organic-coagulant reactions during water chlorination was investigated by analyses of total product formation potential (TPFP) and disinfection by-product (DBP) distribution as a function of exchanged clay cation, coagulant organic polymer, and reaction time. Montmorillonite clays appeared to act as a catalytic center where the reaction between adsorbed polymer and disinfectant (chlorine) was mediated closely by the exchanged clay cation. The transition-metal cations in clays catalyzed more effectively than other cations the reactions between a coagulant polymer and chlorine, forming a large number of volatile DBPs. The relative catalytic effects of clays/solids followed the order Ti-Mont > Fe-Mont > Cu-Mont > Mn-Mont > Ca-Mont > Na-Mont > quartz > talc. The effects of coagulant polymers on TPFP follow the order nonionic polymer > anionic polymer > cationic polymer. The catalytic role of the clay cation was further confirmed by the observed inhibition in DBP formation when strong chelating agents (o-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine) were added to the clay suspension. Moreover, in the presence of clays, total DBPs increased appreciably when either the reaction time or the amount of the added clay or coagulant polymer increased. For volatile DBPs, the formation of halogenated methanes was usually time-dependent, with chloroform and dichloromethane showing the greatest dependence. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A treatment of expansive soil using different additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestun J. Nareeman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors that govern the expansion behavior of soil. The primary factors are a change in water contentand the amount and type of clay size particles in the soil. Other important factors affecting the expansion behavior include the typeof soil (natural or fill, condition of the soil in terms of dry density and moisture content, magnitude of the surcharge pressure,and amount of no expansive material such as gravel or cobble size particles.In this paper, a swelling soil from the site Hamamuk earth dam, which is located in Koya town north of Iraq, is treated by fourtypes of additives; cement, steel fibers, gasoline fuel and injection by cement grout.The treatment of the expansive soil with 5 % of cement or steel fibers or the injection with cement grout revealed a betterimprovement while 4 % of gasoline oil is sufficient to reveal the optimum treatment by this material. The angle of internal friction is notaffected by the treatment while the cohesion between particles is slightly affected by these additives due to a change in the adhesionbetween the additive and soil particles.

  4. Influence of processing variables on the mechanical behavior of HDPE/clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Barbosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites were processed using the technique of melt intercalation, starting from a concentrated polar compatibilizer/organoclay (PE-g-MA/organoclay prepared in an internal mixer. The concentrate was incorporated into the matrix of HDPE by two methods: I counter-rotating twin-screw extruder and II co-rotating twin-screw extruder, using two screw profiles (ROS and 2KB90. After extrusion, the specimens of the extruded composites were injection molded. The X-ray diffraction (XRD technique was used to analyze the degree of expansion of the prepared clays. To analyze the degree of exfoliation of obtained nanocomposites, XRD and TEM (transmission electron microscopy were used. The influence of processing variables on mechanical properties was studied through the behavior of the modulus and tensile strength of nanocomposite systems. By XRD and TEM, it was seen that the clay was well dispersed in the matrix and the presence of intercalated and partially exfoliated hybrid structure for nanocomposites was observed when the systems were prepared in counter-rotating twin-screw extruder. A similar behavior was observed in the use of screws (2KB90 or ROS of the nanocomposites, with a reduction in modulus and tensile strength. Although the mixing process by extruding be the most common industrial practice, and also it is the preferred strategy for the preparation of polymer nanocomposites, much of the literature was directed to the study of chemical modification of clay, type and level of compatibilizer, in order to maximize the compatibility between clay and the polymeric matrix. On the other hand, studies about the role of the processing and configurations of screws are relatively scarce. The main motivation of this work was to expand and to contribute to spread a better understanding of the effects of processing to obtain polymer nanocomposites.

  5. Clay facial masks: physicochemical stability at different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zague, Vivian; de Almeida Silva, Diego; Baby, André Rolim; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles

    2007-01-01

    Clay facial masks--formulations that contain a high percentage of solids dispersed in a liquid vehicle--have become of special interest due to specific properties presented by clays, such as particle size, cooling index, high adsorption capacity, and plasticity. Although most of the physicochemical properties of clay dispersions have been studied, specific aspects concerning the physicochemical stability of clay mask products remain unclear. This work aimed at investigating the accelerated physicochemical stability of clay mask formulations stored at different temperatures. Formulations were subjected to centrifuge testing and to thermal treatment for 15 days, during which temperature was varied from -5.0 degrees to 45.0 degrees C. The apparent viscosity and visual aspect (homogeneity) of all formulations were affected by temperature variation, whereas color, odor, and pH value remained unaltered. These results, besides the estimation of physicochemical stability under aging, can be useful in determining the best storage conditions for clay-based formulations.

  6. Influence of clay content on wave-induced liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (CC) on liquefaction of seabed beneath progressive waves. Experiments were, for the most part, conducted with silt and silt-clay mixtures; in supplementary tests, sand-clay mixtures were used. Two types...... H 57:6218:3 cm, wave period T 51:6 s, and water depth h555 cm. The experiments showed that the influence ofCCon wave-induced liquefaction is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction was increased with increasing CC up to CC_30% (which is clay-specific), beyond which the mixture...... of silt and clay was not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction-resistant under waves. For instance, sand with d50 50:4 mmwas liquefied with CC510:8%, whereas sand with d50 50...

  7. Antimicrobial clay-based materials for wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Elsie E; Hamilton, Ashley R

    2014-04-01

    The historical use of clay minerals for the treatment of wounds and other skin ailments is well documented and continues within numerous human cultures the world over. However, a more scientific inquiry into the chemistry and properties of clay minerals emerged in the 19th century with work investigating their role within health gathering pace since the second half of the 20th century. This review gives an overview of clay minerals and how their properties can be manipulated to facilitate the treatment of infected wounds. Evidence of the antimicrobial and healing effects of some natural clay minerals is presented alongside a range of chemical modifications including metal-ion exchange, the formation of clay-drug composites and the development of various polymer-clay systems. While the evidence for applying these materials to infected wounds is limited, we contextualize and discuss the future of this research.

  8. Bentonite Clay as a Natural Remedy: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background: From old times, the human kind has used clays, externally or internally, for maintaining body health or treating some diseases. Meanwhile there are few scientific articles reviewing the beneficial effects of clays on body function. Bentonite clay is one of the available clays in nature, used as traditional habits, and remedies in many cultures. Methods: These articles explored among 2500 scientific articles published in PubMed to sort the scientific works have been done on the effects of this clay on body function (it was about 100 articles). Results: Bentonite has a broad range of action on different parts of body. Conclusion: As traditional remedies seem to have a deep root in maintaining body health, it merits doing more research works on bentonite clay and its impacts on body function. PMID:29026782

  9. Free volume sizes in intercalated polyamide 6/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, P.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Pedersen, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    mechanical analysis. At low concentrations of clay the fraction of PA6 crystals melting close to 212 degrees C was increased, while the fraction of the a-form PA6 crystals, melting close to 222 degrees C, was reduced. At higher concentrations of clay, a crystal phase with increased thermal stability emerged...... response of PA6/clay nanocomposites, as compared to unfilled PA6, pointed towards a changed mobility in the non-crystalline regions. At high concentrations of clay (> 19 wt%) an increase of the free volume cavity diameter was observed, indicating a lower chain packing efficiency in the PA6/clay....... Addition of more than 19 wt% clay caused a reduction of the heat of fusion of PA6. An unexpected reduction of the Delta C-p at the glass transition, contradicting the measured reduction of the heat of fusion, was detected, indicating an altered mobility in the non-crystalline regions. The viscoelastic...

  10. A quantification model for the structure of clay materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liansheng; Sang, Haitao; Chen, Haokun; Sun, Yinlei; Zhang, Longjian

    2016-07-04

    In this paper, the quantification for clay structure is explicitly explained, and the approach and goals of quantification are also discussed. The authors consider that the purpose of the quantification for clay structure is to determine some parameters that can be used to quantitatively characterize the impact of clay structure on the macro-mechanical behaviour. According to the system theory and the law of energy conservation, a quantification model for the structure characteristics of clay materials is established and three quantitative parameters (i.e., deformation structure potential, strength structure potential and comprehensive structure potential) are proposed. And the corresponding tests are conducted. The experimental results show that these quantitative parameters can accurately reflect the influence of clay structure on the deformation behaviour, strength behaviour and the relative magnitude of structural influence on the above two quantitative parameters, respectively. These quantitative parameters have explicit mechanical meanings, and can be used to characterize the structural influences of clay on its mechanical behaviour.

  11. Evaluation of elemental composition of clays from Campos Gerais (MG); Avaliacao da composicao elementar de argilas de Campos Gerais (MG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Joao P.M.; Maduar, Marcelo F.; Silva, Paulo S.C da, E-mail: jpmm0697@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    There are numerous applications given to clays including oil and water adsorbent, ceramic, whitening of beverages, porcelain, waste treatment, organic carrier molecules in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, support for catalysts. In the pharmaceutical industry, the clays are used as excipients, diluents, desiccants, emulsifiers, to mask undesirable flavors, isotonic agent such as charger and delivery of active substances. These characteristics have contributed to the expansion of the search for applications of clay minerals in the cosmetic industry. The aim of this study was to determine the elemental composition of clays from Campos Gerais, Minas Gerais, with a view to their applicability in the production of cosmetics. The elements As, Ba, Br, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th,U, Yb and Zn were determined by neutron activation analysis and radionuclide activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228} Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K were determined by gamma spectrometry. It was verified that the activity concentration of radionuclides was in the same concentration as the global average, indicating that these samples do not present a risk of increased radiation exposure. The concentration of most elements determined is less than or equal to the overall mean concentrations, indicated by the values of Continental Upper Crust. (author)

  12. Modeling of calcination of single kaolinitic clay particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    The present work aims at modeling of the calcination (dehydroxylation) process of clay particles, specifically kaolinite, and its thermal transformation. For such purpose, 1D single particle calcination model was developed based on the concept of shrinking core model to assess the dehydroxylation...... distribution within the clay particle and simultaneous density changes due to the reaction kinetics. Accordingly, a particular residence time was noticed as a point where kaolinitic clay particles attain optimum conversion to metakaolinite which is pozzolanic....

  13. Clay body wrap with microcurrent: effects in central adiposity

    OpenAIRE

    Noites, Andreia; Melo, A. S. C; Moreira, J S; Couto, Miriam F.; Argel Melo, C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increased fat mass is becoming more prevalent in women and its accumulation in the abdominal region can lead to numerous health risks such as diabetes mellitus. The clay body wrap using compounds such as green clay, green tea and magnesium sulfate, in addition to microcurrent, may reduce abdominal fat mass and minimize or prevent numerous health problems. Objective: This study aims at measuring the influence of the clay body wrap with microcurrent and aerobic exercise on abdom...

  14. Clays as dietary supplements for swine: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mohana Devi; Kim, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clays are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate molecules composed of alkali and alkaline earth cations along with small amounts of various other elements. The best-known are montmorillonite, smectite, illite, kaolinite, biotite and clinoptilolite. The molecules in these clays are arranged in three-dimensional structures creating internal voids and channels capable of trapping a wide variety of molecules. As a result of this structure, clay minerals are regarded as a simple and effective tool for the prevention of the negative effects of many toxic compounds. Dietary supplementation with clays has been shown to improve weight gain and feed conversion in pigs. Where improvements in performance have been noted, one of the most likely explanations for the improvement is the fact clays increase nutrient digestibility. Clays reduce the speed of passage of feed along the digestive tract which allows more time for digestion. Feeding clays also causes morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa such as an increase in villus height and an increase in the villus height to crypt depth ratio. These changes increase the surface area of the gastrointestinal tract thus increasing nutrient digestibility. Several studies have indicated that feeding clay reduces the incidence, severity and duration of diarrhea in pigs. The mechanism for the reduction in diarrhea is likely due to increases in the numbers of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus and decreases in Clostridia and E. coli in the small intestine of pigs fed clays. In addition, the numbers of pigs born alive and weaned, birth weight and weaning weight have been shown to be higher for sows fed clays. Several studies have indicated that clays can help mitigate the effects of mycotoxins. The aim of the present review is to focus on the various clays which have been given attention in recent research and to discuss their potential to improve pig performance.

  15. Clays as dietary supplements for swine: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Mohana Devi; Kim, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clays are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate molecules composed of alkali and alkaline earth cations along with small amounts of various other elements. The best-known are montmorillonite, smectite, illite, kaolinite, biotite and clinoptilolite. The molecules in these clays are arranged in three-dimensional structures creating internal voids and channels capable of trapping a wide variety of molecules. As a result of this structure, clay minerals are regarded as a simple and effective tool...

  16. Properties of Low Activity Clay Soils From South Kalimantan

    OpenAIRE

    PRASETYO, BAMBANG HENDRO; Suharta, Nata

    2004-01-01

    Soils with low activity clay is one of the problem soils in Indonesia. These soils consisted of Ultisols, Oxisols, Alfisols, and some Inceptisols, occupied about 34.5% of total Indonesian land, distributed in almost all Indonesian islands, and derived from various parent materials. To evaluate the properties of low activity clay soils, 6 pedons of Oxisols and Inceptisols, derived from clay stone, andesitic rock, ultra mafic rock and lime stone,from South Kalimantan were studied both in the fi...

  17. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, E; Gardi, Einan; Grunberg, Georges

    2001-01-01

    The large-order behaviour of QCD is dominated by renormalons. On the other hand renormalons do not occur in conformal theories, such as the one describing the infrared fixed-point of QCD at small beta_0 (the Banks--Zaks limit). Since the fixed-point has a perturbative realization, all-order perturbative relations exist between the conformal coefficients, which are renormalon-free, and the standard perturbative coefficients, which contain renormalons. Therefore, an explicit cancellation of renormalons should occur in these relations. The absence of renormalons in the conformal limit can thus be seen as a constraint on the structure of the QCD perturbative expansion. We show that the conformal constraint is non-trivial: a generic model for the large-order behaviour violates it. We also analyse a specific example, based on a renormalon-type integral over the two-loop running-coupling, where the required cancellation does occur.

  18. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Fachgebiet Theoretische Chemie

    2016-11-01

    This first systematic survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, is currently being extended to neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals, like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we examine if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally to support the interpretation of pertinent experiments. A further facet of these studies is to account also for the dynamic nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamic simulations.

  19. Henry Clay et la South American Question.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Henry

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In March 1818 the Speaker of the House of Representatives Henry Clay raised the question of recognition of the new Spanish‑American Republics in the House by presenting a resolution making an appropriation for a minister to Buenos Aires. This article argues that beyond the debate that took place in Congress about whether to recognize or not the new governments in Spanish America, what really divided the Representatives was opposing visions of future relations between North and South America in the post‑revolutionary period.

  20. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  1. Recent advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li Zhi; Zhou, Chun Hui; Wang, Jing; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua; Wang, Hao

    2015-12-28

    Clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels have been proven to have exceptional composition, properties, and applications, and consequently have attracted a significant amount of research effort over the past few years. The objective of this paper is to summarize and evaluate scientific advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels in terms of their specific preparation, formation mechanisms, properties, and applications, and to identify the prevailing challenges and future directions in the field. The state-of-the-art of existing technologies and insights into the exfoliation of layered clay minerals, in particular montmorillonite and LAPONITE®, are discussed first. The formation and structural characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogels made from in situ free radical polymerization, supramolecular assembly, and freezing-thawing cycles are then examined. Studies indicate that additional hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, coordination bonds, hydrophobic interaction, and even covalent bonds could occur between the clay mineral nanoplatelets and polymer chains, thereby leading to the formation of unique three-dimensional networks. Accordingly, the hydrogels exhibit exceptional optical and mechanical properties, swelling-deswelling behavior, and stimuli-responsiveness, reflecting the remarkable effects of clay minerals. With the pivotal roles of clay minerals in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels, the nanocomposite hydrogels possess great potential as superabsorbents, drug vehicles, tissue scaffolds, wound dressing, and biosensors. Future studies should lay emphasis on the formation mechanisms with in-depth insights into interfacial interactions, the tactical functionalization of clay minerals and polymers for desired properties, and expanding of their applications.

  2. Relationship between elastic moduli and pore radius in clay aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Available experimental data on elastic velocities of clay-air mixtures and clay-brine mixtures as a function of porosity are re-interpreted. Pore radius as calculated from porosity and specific surface measured by BET seems to be the factor controlling stiffness of these un-cemented sediments....... For each of the two pore fluids: air or brine smectitic clay and kaolinitic clay seem to have similar power law relationships between a given elastic modulus and pore radius. These results indicate that pore radius and thus permeability of shale in the depth interval of mechanical compaction may...

  3. Relationship between sediment clay minerals and total mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongchum, Manoch; Hudnall, Wayne H; DeLaune, R D

    2011-01-01

    A group of 262 sediment samples were collected from various lakes, rivers, reservoirs, and bayous of Louisiana. All samples were analyzed for total mercury. Twenty nine of the samples with total mercury content ranging from 11 to 401 ppb (μg/kg) were analyzed for clay minerals and other sediment physical and chemical properties. Clay content in sediments varied from 3 to 72%. Clay minerals were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Identification of clay minerals was determined by MacDiff software and quantification of clay minerals was obtained by Peak Height Percentage (PHP) calculation. The dominant clay mineral was Hydrated Interlayer Vermiculite (HIV), which represented 51-83% of the total clay mineral. Significant linear correlations were observed between Hg and total clay content (r=0.538**). However Smectite was the only individual clay type correlated (r=0.465**) with mercury in sediment. Cation exchange capacity (r=0.404*), organic matter (r=0.577**), and sulfur (r=0.676**) were also correlated significantly with mercury level in sediment.

  4. Microbiological characterisation of southern African medicinal and cosmetic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpuchane, Sisai F; Ekosse, Georges-Ivo E; Gashe, Berhanu A; Morobe, Isaac; Coetzee, Stephan H

    2010-02-01

    The effects of traditionally used medicinal and cosmetic clays in southern Africa on selected microorganisms were studied using microbiological media. The clay pH, microchemical composition, kind of associated microorganisms and antimicrobial activity of clays against test microorganisms were determined. The clays contained varying numbers of microorganisms which ranged from 0 up to 105 CFU/g. Clay pH ranged from 2.3-8.9. Neither Escherichia coli, nor other faecal coliforms were detected. Clays of pH value of Clays which were active against test microorganisms had Na(2)O, Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), SO(3), CuO or Cl(2)O as major components. Microbial activity of clays was attributed mainly to low pH but cations such as Cu, Al, S or Cl and various anions might have contributed to the microbicidal effects. No antimicrobial activity was established for many of the clays commonly used in the treatment of common ailments of microbial origin.

  5. Epoxy nanocomposites based on high temperature pyridinium-modified clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingxin; Naito, Kimiyoshi; Qi, Ben; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites are generally fabricated by thermal curing or melt compounding at elevated temperatures, however the thermal stability of common alkyl ammonium treated clays is poor and decomposition occurs inevitably during high temperature processing. In this study, we modified clays with an aromatic pyridinium salt. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the onset degradation temperature (Td(onset)) and maximum decomposition temperature (Td(max)) of the pyridinium treatment clays was up to 310 and 457 degrees C respectively implying high thermal stability. The thermal decomposition behaviour of the pyridinium modified clays was discussed. A series of epoxy/clay nanocomposites were synthesized using a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy and diethyltoluene diamine (DETDA). The morphology of epoxy/clay nanocomposites was characterized with wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), and intercalated structures were observed. The storage modulus of epoxy was increased but glass transition temperature was decreased with clay incorporation. The effects of clays on glass transition temperature (Tg) of epoxy were also discussed.

  6. Dioxin distribution in a tertiary sedimentary clay profile (Germany)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, M.; Bernau, S.; Germann, K. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer angewandte Geowissenschaften, Abt. Oekonomische Geologie; Pernak, P. [Dr. Fechter GmbH, Umweltlabor und Ingenieurbuero, Berlin (Germany); Rotard, W. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz, Abt. Klimachemie

    2004-09-15

    Since 1999 dioxin of possibly natural origin has repeatedly been found in kaolinitic clays of different countries. Until today it is not generally agreed how the dioxin was generated. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the dioxin content and the mineralogical composition of clays as well as the distribution of dioxin in different grain size fractions and its behaviour within a profile of Tertiary kaolinitic clays from Germany. The study may provide a hypothesis of dioxin formation, based on the genesis of the clays.

  7. Using Modeling Clay to Model the Rock Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    During this interactive exploration, students will be guided through the rock cycle using modeling clay as a medium. Each student will be given a ball of red clay and a ball of yellow clay. The instructor will introduce students to igneous rocks as they use their red clay to create a volcano. Students will then learn about weathering and erosion as they break their yellow ball of clay into smaller and smaller pieces that they will round into spheres. The "sand" created from the yellow clay gets accumulated and lithified (via gentle compression by the students) to form a sandstone. This sandstone then becomes covered by a lava flow, created by smashing the red clay volcanoes. The process of metamorphism is introduced as students gently cover their sandstone using the lava flow. This also serves a segue for a discussion about the various types of metamorphism beginning with contact metamorphism. Metamorphic grade is discussed as increased pressure further alters the sedimentary rock and lava flow. Ultimately a migmatite is formed by mixing the red and yellow clay together. Finally, they clays become so intermingled that a new larger orange ball is created, beginning the rock cycle anew with an igneous melt. This activity is engaging and effective with students of all ages. Intended as a fun, light-hearted approach to introducing rocks in an undergraduate earth science class, this can be effectively customized for use in an elementary, middle, or high school classroom.

  8. A study on the differential thermal analysis of clays and clay minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, P.L.

    1951-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) as a method of analysing properties of chemical compounds, more especially of clay minerals, developed rapidly, but lack of quantitative interpretations left many problems to be studied. A historical review was presented, showing the purpose of the study.

  9. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eLongo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS, have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals.

  10. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  11. Permissible limit for mandibular expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shirai, Sawa; Yano, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kotoe; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2005-04-01

    In recent years, mandibular expansion has been increasingly performed in conjunction with orthodontic treatment. Lateral tipping of the molars associated with mandibular expansion should, however, be considered, because excessive expansion may result in excessive buccal tooth inclination, which may disturb the occlusal relationship. This study was conducted to quantitatively clarify molar movement during mandibular expansion using the Schwarz appliance to determine the permissible limit of mandibular expansion as a clinical index for inclination movement. Inclinations in the masticatory surface of the first molar and intermolar width were measured before expansion (T1), after expansion (T2), and before edgewise treatment (T3). Lower plaster models from 29 subjects treated with expansion plates were used and compared with models from 11 control subjects with normal occlusion. The average treatment change (T1-T2) in intermolar width was 5.42 mm (standard deviation 1.98), and the average angle of buccal tooth inclination was 10.16 degrees (standard deviation 3.83). No significant correlation was found between age prior to treatment and the treatment period when they were compared with the intermolar width increments and inclination angles. There was a significant positive correlation between retention duration and the amount of expansion. The regression coefficient of the angle of buccal tooth inclination during expansion to the increment of the intermolar width was approximately 0.2. This means that 1 mm of expansion is accompanied by 5 degrees of molar lateral tipping. This coefficient is clinically useful for estimating the permissible limit for mandibular expansion.

  12. Prions, Radionuclides and Clays: Impact of clay interlayer "acidity" on toxic compound speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, L.; Hureau, C.; Sobolev, O.; Cuello, G.; Chapron, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The physical and chemical processes that are the basis of contaminant retardation in clay rich medium, such as soil or nuclear waste repository, have been studied at the molecular level by a combination of molecular dynamics (MD), electron paramagnetic spectroscopy (EPR) and neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS). The speciation of contaminants such as Sm, a radionuclide analogue, and Cu, bound to Prion protein (PrP), has been studied upon adsorption in clay interlayers. We used as molecular probe the P5-Cu(II) complex, where the P5 pentapeptide(92-96 PrP residues) represents one of the five Cu(II) binding site present in PrP, the key protein involved in diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In both cases, the pH of the interlayer has been inferred from the metal ion coordination, here used as a molecular reporter. In circum neutral pH waters, samarium is present as Sm(OH)3° species and should not be adsorbed in clay interlayer by "cation exchange" unless its hydrolysis is altered. Samarium NDIS results indicate that whether the number of oxygen nearest neighbours varies only from 8.5 to 7, as Sm penetrates the interlayer, the number of hydrogen nearest neighbours drops from 12 to 6. The high affinity of clay for Sm shows that a change in Sm hydrolysis occurs in the clay interlayer, but is directly followed by the formation of a surface complex with montmorillonite siloxane plane functional groups which prevents the determination of a "local pH". Conversely, has been found to be a much more sensitive interlayer water pH probe. and this peptide domain is involved in the misfolding of the protein,a transconformation which may lead to the pathogenic PrPSc form. We have therefore studied by EPR spectroscopy the adsorption of Cu(II)-P5 complexes on montmorillonite, and found the clay to have a large and selective adsorption capacity for the various [Cu(P5)H-n](2-n)+ complexes where n is the number of deprotonated amido function

  13. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  14. Thermal conductivity of unsaturated clay-rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jougnot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parameters used to describe the electrical conductivity of a porous material can be used to describe also its thermal conductivity. A new relationship is developed to connect the thermal conductivity of an unsaturated porous material to the thermal conductivity of the different phases of the composite, and two electrical parameters called the first and second Archie's exponents. A good agreement is obtained between the new model and thermal conductivity measurements performed using packs of glass beads and core samples of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rocks at different saturations of the water phase. We showed that the three model parameters optimised to fit the new model against experimental data (namely the thermal conductivity of the solid phase and the two Archie's exponents are consistent with independent estimates. We also observed that the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock was mainly due to the anisotropy of the thermal conductivity of the solid phase.

  15. Electrokinetic sedimentation and dewatering of clay slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamedelhassan, E. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Electrokinetics is the application of a low voltage direct current across soil mass or soil slurry. It involves electro-osmosis, electromigration, and electrophoresis. Electrokinetics improves the sedimentation and dewatering by increasing the sedimentation velocity of soil particles by electrophoresis and draining water from soil pores by electro-osmosis. This presentation discussed a study that involved the electrokinetic sedimentation and dewatering of clay slurries. The objectives of the study were to accelerate the sedimentation by electrophoresis and enhance the dewatering and consolidation by electro-osmosis for two clay slurries. The presentation discussed the experimental program and provided several illustrations and photographs of the sedimentation configuration and dewatering process. Last, results of the experiment were presented. It was concluded that the the volume of the kaolinite/bentonite slurry in the electrokinetic test decreased by 63.6 per cent compared to a decrease of only 2.9 per cent in the control group. Next steps were identified as conducting a sedimentation and dewatering study with a solar panel as the source for direct current. tabs., figs.

  16. Quantum-chemical modeling of smectite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, S.; Coyne, L.; Lawless, J.; Rishpon, J.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent charge extended Hueckel program is used in modeling isomorphic substitution of Al(3+) by Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Fe(3+) in the octahedral layer of a dioctahedral smectite clay, such as montmorillonite. Upon comparison of the energies involved in the isomorphic substitution, it is found that the order for successful substitution is as follows: Al(3+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Na(+), which is equivalent to Ca(2+), and then K(+). This ordering is found to be consistent with experimental observation. The calculations also make it possible to determine the possible penetration of metal ions into the clay's 2:1 crystalline layer. For the cases studied, this type of penetration can occur at elevated temperatures into regions where isomorphic substitution has occurred with metal ions that bear a formal charge of less than 3+. The computed behavior of the electronic structure in the presence of isomorphic substitution is found to be similar to behavior associated with semiconductors.

  17. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Koerner, R.M. [Geosynthetic Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bonaparte, R. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  18. Caffeine and performance in clay target shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, Bianca; Sanders, Nick; Kemp, Justin

    2009-04-01

    Controversy surrounds the influence that caffeine has on accuracy and cognitive performance in precision activities such as shooting and archery. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of two doses of caffeine on shooting performance, reaction time, and target tracking times in the sport of clay target shooting. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was undertaken by seven elite male shooters from the double-trap discipline. Three intervention trials (2 mg caffeine . kg(-1) body mass (BM); 4 mg caffeine . kg(-1) BM; placebo) were undertaken, in which shooters completed four rounds per trial of 50 targets per round. Performance accuracy (score) and digital video footage (for determination of reaction time and target tracking times) were gathered during competition. Data were analysed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. No differences in shooting accuracy, reaction time or target tracking times among the three intervention trials or across the four rounds within each intervention were observed (P > 0.05). The results indicate that ingestion of caffeine . kg(-1) BM does not provide performance benefits to elite performers of clay target shooting in the double-trap discipline.

  19. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaoui, A; Sekkal, W

    2015-03-06

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation.

  20. Interference of processing variables on the mechanical behavior of nano composites HDPE/clay; Interferencia das variaveis de processamento no comportamento mecanico de nanocompositos PEAD/argila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, R. [Universidade Federal do Piaui, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Souza, D.D.; Nobrega, K.C.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande - UAEMa Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Nano composites were processed using the technique of melt intercalation, starting from a concentrated polar compatibilizer / organo clay (PE-g-MA / organo clay) prepared in an internal mixer. The concentrate was incorporated into the matrix of PEAD by two methods: (I) twin screw contrarrotational extruder and (II) twin screw corrotational extruder, using two thread profiles (ROS and 2KB90), after extrusion, the specimens of the extruded composites were injection molded. The diffraction of X-ray was used to analyze the degree of expansion of the clays prepared, and the degree of exfoliation of nano composites developed. The interference of processing variables on mechanical properties was studied by the behavior of the modulus and tensile strength of nano composite systems. Observed similar behavior in the use of thread (or 2KB90 ROS) of the nano composites, with a reduction in modulus and tensile strength. (author)

  1. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  2. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  3. Effects of biochar on hydraulic conductivity of compacted kaolin clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Wong, Annie Yan Yan; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2018-03-01

    Compacted clay is widely used as capillary barriers in landfill final cover system. Recently, biochar amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as a sustainable alternative cover material. However, the effects of biochar on saturated hydraulic conductivity (k sat ) of clay with high degree of compaction is not yet understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of biochar on k sat of compacted kaolin clay. Soil specimens were prepared by amending kaolin clay with biochar derived from peanut-shell at 0, 5 and 20% (w/w). The k sat of soil specimens was measured using a flexible water permeameter. The effects of biochar on the microstructure of the compacted clay was also investigated using MIP. Adding 5% and 20% of biochar increased the k sat of compacted kaolin clay from 1.2 × 10 -9 to 2.1 × 10 -9 and 1.3 × 10 -8 ms -1 , respectively. The increase in k sat of clay was due to the shift in pore size distribution of compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC). MIP results revealed that adding 20% of biochar shifted the dominant pore diameter of clay from 0.01-0.1 μm (meso- and macropores) to 0.1-4 μm (macropores). Results reported in this communication revealed that biochar application increased the k sat of compacted clay, and the increment was positively correlated to the biochar percentage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact-Induced Clay Mineral Formation and Distribution on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Craig, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals have been identified in the central peaks and ejecta blankets of impact craters on Mars. Several studies have suggested these clay minerals formed as a result of impact induced hydrothermalism either during Mars' Noachian era or more recently by the melting of subsurface ice. Examples of post-impact clay formation is found in several locations on Earth such as the Mjolnir and Woodleigh Impact Structures. Additionally, a recent study has suggested the clay minerals observed on Ceres are the result of impact-induced hydrothermal processes. Such processes may have occurred on Mars, possibly during the Noachian. Distinguishing between clay minerals formed preor post-impact can be accomplished by studying their IR spectra. In fact, showed that the IR spectra of clay minerals is greatly affected at longer wavelengths (i.e. mid-IR, 5-25 micron) by impact-induced shock deformation while the near-IR spectra (1.0-2.5 micron) remains relatively unchanged. This explains the discrepancy between NIR and MIR observations of clay minerals in martian impact craters noted. Thus, it allows us to determine whether a clay mineral formed from impact-induced hydrothermalism or were pre-existing and were altered by the impact. Here we study the role of impacts on the formation and distribution of clay minerals on Mars via a fully 3-D Monte Carlo cratering model, including impact- melt production using results from modern hydrocode simulations. We identify regions that are conducive to clay formation and the location of clay minerals post-bombardment.

  5. [Mechanism of tritium persistence in porous media like clay minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Jie; Wang, Jin-Sheng; Teng, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Ni

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of tritium persistence in clay minerals, three types of clay soils (montmorillonite, kaolinite and illite) and tritiated water were used in this study to conduct the tritium sorption tests and the other related tests. Firstly, the ingredients, metal elements and heat properties of clay minerals were studied with some instrumental analysis methods, such as ICP and TG. Secondly, with a specially designed fractionation and condensation experiment, the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in the clay minerals separated from the tritium sorption tests were fractionated for investigating the tritium distributions in the different types of adsorptive waters. Thirdly, the location and configuration of tritium adsorbed into the structure of clay minerals were studied with infrared spectrometry (IR) tests. And finally, the forces and mechanisms for driving tritium into the clay minerals were analyzed on the basis of the isotope effect of tritium and the above tests. Following conclusions have been reached: (1) The main reason for tritium persistence in clay minerals is the entrance of tritium into the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in clay minerals. The percentage of tritium distributed in these three types of adsorptive water are in the range of 13.65% - 38.71%, 0.32% - 5.96%, 1.28% - 4.37% of the total tritium used in the corresponding test, respectively. The percentages are different for different types of clay minerals. (2) Tritium adsorbed onto clay minerals are existed in the forms of the tritiated hydroxyl radical (OT) and the tritiated water molecule (HTO). Tritium mainly exists in tritiated water molecule for adsorbed water and interlayer water, and in tritiated hydroxyl radical for structural water. (3) The forces and effects driving tritium into the clay minerals may include molecular dispersion, electric charge sorption, isotope exchange and tritium isotope effect.

  6. Convergence of generalized eigenfunction expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Sakata

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a simplified theory of generalized eigenfunction expansions for a commuting family of bounded operators and with finitely many unbounded operators. We also study the convergence of these expansions, giving an abstract type of uniform convergence result, and illustrate the theory by giving two examples: The Fourier transform on Hecke operators, and the Laplacian operators in hyperbolic spaces.

  7. Beneficiation of Nigerian Clay with Poly Anionic Cellulose-Regular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... concentrations and the effect of different concentration of Poly Anionic Cellulose-Regular (PAC-R) on the Emede clay was investigated. The experiment centred on the determination of its suitability for use in drilling mud formulation. Preliminary investigation suggests that Emede clay has a good potential for use in drilling ...

  8. Indigenous Knowledge Applied to the Use of Clays for Cosmetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Red, white, yellow and their related shades of clays, in combination with other natural substances such as plant and animal extracts have over time been used by different indigenous African communities to meet their cosmetic needs. The purposes advanced for the cosmetic usage of these clays include cleansing the skin, ...

  9. Role of clay as catalyst in Friedel–Craft alkylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solid acids have become increasingly important for many liquid-phase industrial reactions these days. Montmorillonite clays (2:1 clay mineral) have been used as efficient solid acid catalysts for a number of organic and liquid phase reactions and offer several advantages over classic acids. Tailor made catalysts can be ...

  10. ENHANCEMENT OF GAMBE CLAY USING UN-FERMENTABLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is availability and large deposits of bentonite (700 million tons in North Eastern part) in Nigeria but the clays had not been abundantly harnessed and enhanced with polymer for drilling fluid formulation because they are mostly composed of calcium montmorillonite. This work was aimed at enhancing Gambe clay ...

  11. organic template free synthesis of zsm11 from kaolinite clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    hydrocarbon, etc. Accordingly, this work present successful synthesis of zeolite ZSM11 from kaolinite clay, seeded with. NaY type zeolite and aged for 3-11 days, in an organic template free condition. The used kaolinite clays were sourced from two different mines in Nigeria, namely; Kankara and Onibode. They were both ...

  12. Preparation of polystyrene–clay nanocomposite by solution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Polymer–clay nanocomposites of commercial polystyrene (PS) and clay laponite were prepared via solu- tion intercalation technique. Laponite was modified suitably with the well known cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide by ion-exchange reaction to render laponite miscible with hydrophobic PS.

  13. Climatic control on clay mineral formation: Evidence from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type,climate,topography and exposure age affect weathering environments.In the present study,an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering pro ...

  14. Preparation of intercalated polyaniline/clay nanocomposite and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intercalated composite of polyaniline and clay has been reported. The composite was prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline within the layers of `illite' clay. The composite was characterized for its structural, spectral, and microscopic properties. At higher level of loading the layered structure of composite breaks ...

  15. Nanoclay Performance on Resistance of Clay under Freezing Cycles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aims to investigate effect of nanoclay on resistance of the exposed clay soils in freezing in vitro conditions. The clay sample was selected from the considered land. Then they were mixed on water in 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 6 percents as well as without nanoclay. There were prepared cylinders with 3.81 cm diameter and ...

  16. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples | Steiner-Asiedu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods: The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was ...

  17. Climatic control on clay mineral formation: Evidence from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type, climate, topography and exposure age affect weath- ering environments. In the present study, an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering ...

  18. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of PMMA/clay nanocomposites: Study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. PMMA/clay nanocomposites were synthesized by ultrasound assisted emulsifier-free emulsion polymeri- zation technique. Ultrasound waves of different power and frequencies were applied to enhance the dispersion of the clay layers with polymer matrix. The structural information of the synthesized materials was ...

  19. Preparation of polystyrene–clay nanocomposite by solution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymer–clay nanocomposites of commercial polystyrene (PS) and clay laponite were prepared via solution intercalation technique. Laponite was modified suitably with the well known cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide by ion-exchange reaction to render laponite miscible with hydrophobic PS.

  20. Palynology and clay mineralogy of the Deccan volcanic associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The clay mineral investigation of the Ninama sediments which are carbonate dominated shows dominance of low charge smectite (LCS) along with the presence of mica and vermiculite. Based on the clay mineral assemblage it is interpreted that arid climatic conditions prevailed during the sedimentation. The smectite ...

  1. Clay mineral distribution on the Kerala continental shelf and slope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of @iRV gaveshani@@ were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral cntent. The distribution of total clay (< 4~k fraction...

  2. Generalized Constitutive Model for Stabilized Quick Clay | Bujulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimentally-based two yield surface constitutive model for cemented quick clay has been developed at NTNU, Norway, to reproduce the mechanical behavior of the stabilized quick clay in the triaxial p'-q stress space. The model takes into account the actual mechanical properties of the stabilized material, such as ...

  3. Acoustic Velocity Data for Clay Bearing Carbonate Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida; Shogenova, Alla

    1998-01-01

    %, and it was attempted to find a "clay effect", by establishing linear trends between porosity and acoustic travel time for intervals defined on the basis of carbonate content, magnetic susceptibility, and (for the Caribbean samples) natural gamma radiation. A "clay effect", defined as a high acoustic traveltime...

  4. Learning of Cross-Sectional Anatomy Using Clay Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students…

  5. Comparative evaluation of clays from Abakaliki Formation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okeey Aghamelu

    The characteristics of clays from Abakaliki Formation, Southeastern Nigeria was evaluated to establish its suitability as drilling mud when compared with commercial bentonite such as Wyoming bentonite. The chemical, mineralogical and geotechnical properties were employed in assessing the suitability of. Abakaliki clay ...

  6. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kaolinite rich clay particles calcined under certain conditions can attain favorable pozzolanic properties and can be used to substitute part of the CO2 intensive clinker in cement production. To better guide calcination of a clay material, a transient one-dimensional single particle model...

  7. Geoelectrical mapping for improved performance of SUDS in clay tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockhorn, Britta; Møller, Ingelise; Klint, Knud Erik S.

    2015-01-01

    Many cities of the Northern Hemisphere are covered by low permeable clay tills, posing a challenge for stormwater infiltration practices. However, clay tills range amongst the most heterogeneous types of sediments and infiltration rates can vary by several orders of magnitude. This study evaluates...

  8. Application of solar treatment for the disinfection of geophagic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elvis Fosso-Kankeu

    amount of microorganisms in the clays. However, this process uses artificial sources of energy and is therefore costly. Furthermore, the extreme and uncontrolled heat may result in the degradation of some important nutrients or compounds present in the clay. Studies have demonstrated that solar radiation can inactivate a ...

  9. Geostatistical prediction of clay percentage based on soil survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TALKKARI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In precision farming fields may be divided into management zones according to the spatial variation in soil properties. Clay content is an important soil characteristic, because it is associated with other soil properties that are important in management. Soil survey data from 150 sampling sites taken from an area of 218 ha were used to predict the spatial variation of clay percentage geostatistically in an agricultural soil in Jokioinen, Finland. The exponential and spherical models with a nugget component were fitted to the experimental variogram. This indicated that the medium-range pattern could be modelled, but the short-range variation could not, due to sparsity of sample points at short distances. The effect of sampling density on the kriging error was evaluated using the random simulation method. Kriging with a spherical model produced a map with smooth variation in clay percentage. The standard error of kriging estimates decreased only slightly when the density of samples was increased. The predictions were divided into three classes based on the clay percentage. Areas with clay content below 30%, between 30% and 60% and over 60% belong to non-clay, clay and heavy clay zones, respectively. With additional information from the soil samples on the contents of nutrients and organic matter these areas can serve as agricultural management zones.;

  10. Nanoclay Performance on Resistance of Clay under Freezing Cycles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    msi

    ABSTRACT: This study aims to investigate effect of nanoclay on resistance of the exposed clay soils in freezing in vitro conditions. The clay sample was selected from the considered land. Then they were mixed on water in 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 6 percents as well as without nanoclay. There were prepared cylinders with 3.81 cm ...

  11. 49 The Geology and Mineralogy of Clay Occurrences Around Kutigi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    Dessauvagie (1972) identified clays in the. Middle Niger Basin or the Nupe sandstone now renamed the Nupe Group. They studied the Stratigraphic succession in the area and reported the direct overlying of the basement complex by a coarse conglomerate, clay- sandstone admixture, boulders etc of sedimentary origin.

  12. properties of fired bodies made from tanzanian talc- clay mixes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Pure talcs showed the lowest amount of shrinkage while body mixes having the highest percentage of clay showed the ... the eustatite phase and liquid is formed at a temperature of 1547 0C. Clays usually contain more than one ... replace that lost by evaporation. After sixteen hours heating the final volume was allowed to ...

  13. Elastic deformation behaviour of Palaeogene clay from Fehmarn Belt area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awadalkarim, Ahmed; Foged, Niels Nielsen; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Palaeogene clay samples were obtained by high quality boring and sampling techniques (Geobore S-system), during the extensive site investigations for building a bridge in the Fehmarn Belt area to link between Rødbyhavn in Denmark and Puttgarden in Germany. The Palaeogene clay is rich in smectite...

  14. enhancement of gambe clay using un-fermentable polymers for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    not been abundantly harnessed and enhanced with polymer for drilling fluid formulation because they are mostly composed of calcium montmorillonite. This work was aimed at enhancing Gambe clay using un-fermentable polymers. (three carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) with different average molecular weight). The clay ...

  15. Alteration of swelling clay minerals by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of six dioctahedral and two trioctahedral swellable clay minerals was leached in H2SO4 and HCl at concentrations of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 M at 80 °C for several hours. Alteration of the clay mineral structures was dependent on the individual character of each mineral (chemical

  16. Comparative evaluation of clays from Abakaliki Formation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The characteristics of clays from Abakaliki Formation, Southeastern Nigeria was evaluated to establish its suitability as drilling mud when compared with commercial bentonite such as Wyoming bentonite. The chemical, mineralogical and geotechnical properties were employed in assessing the suitability of Abakaliki clay as ...

  17. Identification of Clay Minerals of the Eastern Southern Region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of Clay Minerals of the Eastern Southern Region of Lake Victoria by Ethylene Glycol and Heat: Xray Diffraction and Infrared Spectroscopy ... Tanzania Journal of Science ... IR spectroscopy study was also carried out and the results were presented for comparison to clay minerals identified by XRD analysis.

  18. Geophagic clays: Their mineralogy, chemistry and possible human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geophagic clays: Their mineralogy, chemistry and possible human health effects. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... of the study were to qualitatively and quantitatively identify the mineral constituents and to determine selected elemental compositions in the clay samples in order to infer on possible human health effects.

  19. Vertisols in the Central Clay Plain of the Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokhuis, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Central Clay Plain is situated between latitudes 16° and 10° North and longitudes 32° and 37° East, in the Republic of the Sudan. The parent materials of the clay soils which cover almost this entire area belong to two broad groups: alluvial, deltaic and paludal sediments from rivers belonging

  20. The surface modification of clay particles by RF plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Keol

    In this study, the surface coatings of ball clay, organoclay and exfoliated clay prepared by sol-gel process were done by RF plasma polymerization to improve the surface activity of the clay filler. Characterization of the above plasma-treated clays has been carried out by various techniques. The effects of plasma-treated clays as substitute of carbon black in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) on the curing and mechanical properties were investigated. After plasma treatment, the tensile properties of organo and exfoliated clay were not unsatisfactory to that of carbon black filler system. Moreover, only 10 phr filler loading of plasma-treated organoclay in EPDM vulcanizates showed better results than 40 phr filler loading of carbon black in EPDM vulcanizates. The main objective of this study was to verify the applicability of the plasma technique for modifying clay surfaces for their use in the tire manufacturing industry. Another purpose was to reveal the advantage of the plasma technique used to obtain modified-clay and improved properties that those materials can display.

  1. Particle size distribution and physico-chemical composition of clay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP USER

    , A. Appl. Clay Sci., 10, (1996) 477. 5. Morton, M., ed., Rubber Technology, P. 59, Van Nostrand Reinhold Publishers. Inc., New York, 1997. 6. Murray, H. H., Appl. Clay Sci. 17, (2000). 207. 7. Bilimoria, B. M., Manasso, J.A. Willis, M. S. Methods ...

  2. Large Strain Analysis of Electro-Osmosis Consolidation for Clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Consolidation of soft clay creates a lot of problems in foundation engineering, because of the very low clay permeability and high compressibility. Primary consolidation takes a long time to complete if the material is left consolidating under atmospheric evaporation, and traditional dewatering

  3. Recyclable hydrotalcite clay catalysed Baylis–Hillman reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    process, the reactants enjoy ionic liquid/hydrotalcite clay catalytic system and gives corresponding Baylis–. Hillman reaction products in ... Baylis–Hillman reaction; hydrotalcite clay; ionic liquid; heterogeneous catalysis; lactone ceramide analogue. 1. ..... J M and Thomas W J 1996 Principles and practice of heterogeneous ...

  4. Dredging Processes I : The Cutting of Sand, Clay & Rock - Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    This book gives an overview of cutting theories. It starts with a generic model, which is valid for all types of soil (sand, clay and rock) after which the specifics of dry sand, water saturated sand, clay, rock and hyperbaric rock are covered. For each soil type small blade angles and large blade

  5. The Composition and Physical Properties of Some Clays of Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The firing colors ranged from whitish/pinkish to brownish and reddish depending on the amounts of iron and titanium oxides present. Compared to the dark carbonaceous shales of cretaceous origin in this area, these clays are relatively free from carbonaceous matter, which makes the clays potentially suitable for pottery, ...

  6. Application of solar treatment for the disinfection of geophagic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elvis Fosso-Kankeu

    harmful to geophagists; it is therefore important to develop a cheap and sustainable technique for the treatment of these clays prior to consumption. In this study, a solar treatment .... homogenized into fine powders using mortar and pestle. Genomic. DNA was extracted from ±250 mg of each of the six (6) clay samples using ...

  7. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Romero, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  8. Lime stabilization of expansive soil from Sergipe - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Rafaella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expansive soils are characterized by volumetric changes caused by variations in moisture. They can cause several damages to civil constructions, especially to lightweight structures, including cracks and fissures. Chemical stabilization through addition of lime is one of the most effective techniques used to treat this type of soil. Due to cationic exchanges, lime can significantly reduce swell potential. This research studied a disturbed sample of expansive soil collected in Nossa Senhora do Socorro – Sergipe, Brazil, through the following laboratory tests: sieve and hydrometer tests, Atterberg Limits, compaction, free swell and swell pressure. All direct and indirect methods mentioned in this paper indicated that the natural soil presented high to very high degree of expansion, which reached approximately 20% of free swell and nearly 200 kPa of swell pressure. In order to evaluate the effect of lime, the same tests were conducted in soil-lime mixtures, using lime contents of 3%, 6% and 9%. The results confirmed the efficiency of lime stabilization. It was noted that, as lime content increased, there was reduction of clay fraction and increment of silt fraction; plasticity index decreased to nearly its half; compaction curve was displaced; and free swell and swell pressure reduced significantly.

  9. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Andra organised an International Symposium on the use of Natural and Engineered Clay-based Barriers for the Containment of Radioactive Waste hold at the Congress Centre of Tours, France, in March 2005. The symposium provided an opportunity to take stock of the potential properties of the clay-based materials present in engineered or natural barriers in order to meet the containment specifications of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. It was intended for specialists working in the various disciplines involved with clays and clay based minerals, as well as scientists from agencies and organisations dealing with investigations on the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. The themes of the Symposium included geology, geochemistry, transfers of materials, alteration processes, geomechanics, as well as the recent developments regarding the characterisation of clays, as well as experiments in surface and underground laboratories. The symposium consisted of plenary sessions, parallel specialized sessions and poster sessions. (author)

  10. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-03-01

    Mud peeling is a common phenomenon whereby horizontal cracks propagate parallel to the surface of a drying clay. Differential stresses then cause the layer of clay above the crack to curl up to form a mud peel. By treating the clay as a poroelastic solid, we analyze the peeling phenomenon and show that it is caused by the gradient in tensile stress at the surface of the clay, analogously to the spalling of thermoelastic materials. For a constant water evaporation rate at the clay surface we derive equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement with the available experimental data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in clay till contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida

    in high permeability aquifers and has also been applied at a number of low permeability clay till sites. This thesis presents the results of an investigation of chlorinated ethenes (and ethanes) degradation in clay till with the objective of obtaining knowledge of degradation processes in clay till...... and to evaluate ERD as remediation technology. The development of degradation in clay till was investigated at two sites: one where natural attenuation processes (transport, sorption, diffusion and degradation) had been on-going for four decades (Vadsbyvej) and another which had been undergoing ERD for four years...... (direct push delivery, Gl. Kongevej). Degradation of chlorinated ethenes (and ethanes) in the clay till matrix and in embedded high permeability features was investigated by high resolution sampling of intact cores combined with groundwater sampling. An integrated approach using chemical analysis...

  12. Mapping and Quantifying Surface Charges on Clay Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Gaikwad, Ravi; Hande, Aharnish; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas

    2015-09-29

    Understanding the electrical properties of clay nanoparticles is very important since they play a crucial role in every aspect of oil sands processing, from bitumen extraction to sedimentation in mature fine tailings (MFT). Here, we report the direct mapping and quantification of surface charges on clay nanoparticles using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The morphology of clean kaolinite clay nanoparticles shows a layered structure, while the corresponding surface potential map shows a layer-dependent charge distribution. More importantly, a surface charge density of 25 nC/cm(2) was estimated for clean kaolinite layers by using EFM measurements. On the other hand, the EFM measurements show that the clay particles obtained from the tailings demonstrate a reduced surface charge density of 7 nC/cm(2), which may be possibly attributed to the presence of various bituminous compounds residing on the clay surfaces.

  13. On the Bantu expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowold, Daine J; Perez-Benedico, David; Stojkovic, Oliver; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph; Herrera, Rene J

    2016-11-15

    Here we report the results of fine resolution Y chromosomal analyses (Y-SNP and Y-STR) of 267 Bantu-speaking males from three populations located in the southeast region of Africa. In an effort to determine the relative Y chromosomal affinities of these three genotyped populations, the findings are interpreted in the context of 74 geographically and ethnically targeted African reference populations representing four major ethno-linguistic groups (Afro-Asiatic, Niger Kordofanin, Khoisan and Pygmoid). In this investigation, we detected a general similarity in the Y chromosome lineages among the geographically dispersed Bantu-speaking populations suggesting a shared heritage and the shallow time depth of the Bantu Expansion. Also, micro-variations in the Bantu Y chromosomal composition across the continent highlight location-specific gene flow patterns with non-Bantu-speaking populations (Khoisan, Pygmy, Afro-Asiatic). Our Y chromosomal results also indicate that the three Bantu-speaking Southeast populations genotyped exhibit unique gene flow patterns involving Eurasian populations but fail to reveal a prevailing genetic affinity to East or Central African Bantu-speaking groups. In addition, the Y-SNP data underscores a longitudinal partitioning in sub-Sahara Africa of two R1b1 subgroups, R1b1-P25* (west) and R1b1a2-M269 (east). No evidence was observed linking the B2a haplogroup detected in the genotyped Southeast African Bantu-speaking populations to gene flow from contemporary Khoisan groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. STABILISATION OF SILTY CLAY SOIL USING CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMADHER T. ABOOD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different chloride compounds including (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 on the engineering properties of silty clay soil. Various amounts of salts (2%, 4%, and 8% were added to the soil to study the effect of salts on the compaction characteristics, consistency limits and compressive strength. The main findings of this study were that the increase in the percentage of each of the chloride compounds increased the maximum dry density and decrease the optimum moisture content. The liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index decreased with the increase in salt content. The unconfinedcompressive strength increased as the salt content increased.

  15. Heteroaggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with natural clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labille, Jérôme; Harns, Carrie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Brant, Jonathan

    2015-06-02

    To better understand and predict the fate of engineered nanoparticles in the water column, we assessed the heteroaggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles with a smectite clay as analogues for natural colloids. Heteroaggregation was evaluated as a function of water salinity (10(-3) and 10(-1) M NaCl), pH (5 and 8), and selected nanoparticle concentration (0-4 mg/L). Time-resolved laser diffraction was used, coupled to an aggregation model, to identify the key mechanisms and variables that drive the heteroaggregation of the nanoparticles with colloids. Our data show that, at a relevant concentration, nanoparticle behavior is mainly driven by heteroaggregation with colloids, while homoaggregation remains negligible. The affinity of TiO2 nanoparticles for clay is driven by electrostatic interactions. Opposite surface charges and/or high ionic strength favored the formation of primary heteroaggregates via the attachment of nanoparticles to the clay. The initial shape and dispersion state of the clay as well as the nanoparticle/clay concentration ratio also affected the nature of the heteroaggregation mechanism. With dispersed clay platelets (10(-3) M NaCl), secondary heteroaggregation driven by bridging nanoparticles occurred at a nanoparticle/clay number ratio of greater than 0.5. In 10(-1) M NaCl, the clay was preaggregated into larger and more spherical units. This favored secondary heteroaggregation at lower nanoparticle concentration that correlated to the nanoparticle/clay surface area ratio. In this latter case, a nanoparticle to clay sticking efficiency could be determined.

  16. Antifungal activity of streptomycetes isolated bentonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Shirobokov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the biological activity of streptomycetes, isolated from Ukrainian bentonite clay. Methods. For identification of the investigated microorganisms there were used generally accepted methods for study of morpho-cultural and biochemical properties and sequencing of 16Ѕ rRNA producer. Antagonistic activity of the strain was determined by agar diffusion and agar block method using gram-positive, gram-negative microorganisms and fungi. Results. Research of autochthonous flora from bentonite clay of Ukrainian various deposits proved the existence of stable politaxonomic prokaryotic-eukaryotic consortia there. It was particularly interesting that the isolated microorganisms had demonstrated clearly expressed antagonistic properties against fungi. During bacteriological investigation this bacterial culture was identified like representative of the genus Streptomyces. Bentonite streptomycetes, named as Streptomyces SVP-71, inagar mediums (agar block method inhibited the growth of fungi (yeast and mold; zones of growth retardation constituted of 11-36 mm, and did not affect the growth of bacteria. There were investigated the inhibitory effects of supernatant culture fluid, ethanol and butanol extracts of biomass streptomycetes on museum and clinical strains of fungi that are pathogenic for humans (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. utilis, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. kefir, S. glabrata, C. lusitaniae, Aspergillus niger, Mucor pusillus, Fusarium sporotrichioides. It has been shown that research antifungal factor had 100% of inhibitory effect against all fungi used in experiments in vitro. In parallel, it was found that alcohol extracts hadn’t influence to the growth of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria absolutely. It was shown that the cultural fluid supernatant and alcoholic extracts of biomass had the same antagonistic effect, but with different manifestation. This evidenced about identity of antifungal substances

  17. Influence of clay organic modifier on morphology and performance of poly(ε-caprolactone)/clay nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Marija S.; Đorđević Nataša; Rogan Jelena; Đonlagić Jasna

    2015-01-01

    Two series of poly(e-caprolactone) nanocomposites with different organo-modified clays (1 to 8 wt%) were prepared by the solution casting method. Organoclays with polar (Cloisite®C30B) and nonpolar (Cloisite®C15A) organic modifier and with different miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone) matrix, were chosen. Exfoliated and/or intercalated nanocomposite’s structures were obtained by using high dilution and an ultrasonic treatment for the composite preparation...

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Negative thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, G. D.; Bruno, J. A. O.; Barron, T. H. K.; Allan, N. L.

    2005-02-01

    There has been substantial renewed interest in negative thermal expansion following the discovery that cubic ZrW2O8 contracts over a temperature range in excess of 1000 K. Substances of many different kinds show negative thermal expansion, especially at low temperatures. In this article we review the underlying thermodynamics, emphasizing the roles of thermal stress and elasticity. We also discuss vibrational and non-vibrational mechanisms operating on the atomic scale that are responsible for negative expansion, both isotropic and anisotropic, in a wide range of materials.

  19. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  20. Preparation and properties of biodegradable starch–clay nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Yi-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Well-dispersed starch-clay nanocomposites were prepared by adding a dilute clay dispersion to a solution of starch followed by coprecipitation in ethanol. The clay didn\\'t significantly influence the type of crystalline structure of starch molecules although the amount of crystallinity appears to be somewhat lower in the nanocomposites. The nanocomposites show improved modulus and strength without a decrease in elongation at break. The increase in modulus and strength is 65% and 30%, respectively for the nanocomposite containing 5 wt.% clay compared to the unfilled starch materials. Further increases in clay result in deterioration in properties most likely due to poorer clay dispersion and lower polymer crystallinity. As the amount of water increases, the modulus of both pure starch and starch nanocomposites decreases, although the change is less pronounced in the nanocomposites suggesting that the addition of clay to form nanocomposites can improve the stability of starch-based products during transportation and storage. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clay-Enriched Silk Biomaterials for Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Llamas, Jabier Gallego; Vaiana, Christopher A.; Kadakia, Madhavi P.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of silk protein/clay composite biomaterials for bone tissue formation is described. Silk fibroin serves as an organic scaffolding material offering mechanical stability suitable for bone specific uses. Clay montmorillonite (Cloisite ® Na+) and sodium silicate are sources of osteoinductive silica-rich inorganic species, analogous to bioactive bioglass-like bone repair biomaterial systems. Different clay particle-silk composite biomaterial films were compared to silk films doped with sodium silicate as controls for support of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic culture. The cells adhered and proliferated on the silk/clay composites over two weeks. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcript levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and collagen type 1 (Col I) osteogenic markers in the cells cultured on the silk/clay films in comparison to the controls. Early evidence for bone formation based on collagen deposition at the cell-biomaterial interface was also found, with more collagen observed for the silk films with higher contents of clay particles. The data suggest that the silk/clay composite systems may be useful for further study toward bone regenerative needs. PMID:21549864

  2. Catalyzed Synthesis of Zinc Clays by Prebiotic Central Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruixin; Basu, Kaustuv; Hartman, Hyman; Matocha, Christopher J; Sears, S Kelly; Vali, Hojatollah; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2017-04-03

    How primordial metabolic networks such as the reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and clay mineral catalysts coevolved remains a mystery in the puzzle to understand the origin of life. While prebiotic reactions from the rTCA cycle were accomplished via photochemistry on semiconductor minerals, the synthesis of clays was demonstrated at low temperature and ambient pressure catalyzed by oxalate. Herein, the crystallization of clay minerals is catalyzed by succinate, an example of a photoproduced intermediate from central metabolism. The experiments connect the synthesis of sauconite, a model for clay minerals, to prebiotic photochemistry. We report the temperature, pH, and concentration dependence on succinate for the synthesis of sauconite identifying new mechanisms of clay formation in surface environments of rocky planets. The work demonstrates that seeding induces nucleation at low temperatures accelerating the crystallization process. Cryogenic and conventional transmission electron microscopies, X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and measurements of total surface area are used to build a three-dimensional representation of the clay. These results suggest the coevolution of clay minerals and early metabolites in our planet could have been facilitated by sunlight photochemistry, which played a significant role in the complex interplay between rocks and life over geological time.

  3. Regeneration of Spent Lubricant Refining Clays by Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-zhen Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Step-by-step solvent extraction was used to regenerate spent clay by recovering the adsorbed oil in lubricating oil refining clay. Several polar and nonpolar solvents were tested, and petroleum ether (90–120°C and ethanol (95 v% were selected as the nonpolar and polar solvents, respectively. The spent clay was first extracted using petroleum ether (90–120°C to obtain ideal oil and then extracted with a mixed solvent of petroleum ether (90–120°C and ethanol (95 v% two or three times to obtain nonideal oil before being extracted with ethanol and water. Finally, the clay was dried at 130°C to obtain regenerated clay. The total oil recovery can be more than 99 wt% of the adsorbed oil. The recovered ideal oil can be used as lubricating base oil. Shorter storage times for spent clay produce better regeneration results. The regenerated clay can be reused to refine the lubricating base oils.

  4. Simple synthesis of clay-gold nanocomposites with tunable color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renyun; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2010-04-20

    Clay-based nanocomposites have been studied for several decades, mainly focusing on clay-polymer nanocomposites. Here, we report on a simple wet chemical method to synthesize clay-APTES-Au (CAAu) nanocomposites, where 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) acts as the linkage. The silane terminal of APTES formed bonds with the clay surface, while the other -NH(2) terminal bonds to gold nanoparticles. The color of clay changed when these CAAu nanocomposites were formed. By changing the size of the gold nanoparticles, the color of CAAu could be adjusted, simply by changing process parameters. TEM characterization of the synthesized nanocomposites showed an even distribution of gold nanoparticles on the clay surfaces. The nanocomposites were stable in strong acid and high concentration of salt conditions, while strong basic solution like NaOH could slightly influence the status of the gold nanoparticles due to the rupture of the Si-O-Si bonds between APTES and clay. To demonstrate the potential for label free sensing application of CAAu nanocomposites, we made hybrids of clay-APTES-Au-HD-Au (CAAuHAu), where hexamethylene diamine (HD) served as links between CAAu nanocomposites and the gold nanoparticles. The color of the composites changed from red to blue, when the hybrids were formed. Moreover, hemoglobin was loaded on the CAAu nanocomposites, which can potentially be used as a biosensor. These synthesized nanocomposites may combine the catalytic properties of clay and the well-known excellent properties of gold nanoparticles, such as the ability to anchor biological and chemical molecules. Furthermore, the color change of CAAu, when the CAAuHAu hybrids were observed, suggests the applications of these nanocomposites in biochemical and chemical sensing.

  5. Effects of lime treatment on the microstructure and hydraulic conductivity of Héricourt clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Danh Tran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at evidencing the effects of lime treatment on the microstructure and hydraulic conductivity of a compacted expansive clay, with emphasis put on the effect of lime hydration and modification. For this purpose, evolutions of hydraulic conductivity were investigated for both lime-treated and untreated soil specimens over 7 d after full saturation of the specimens and their microstructures were observed at the end. Note that for the treated specimen, dry clay powder was mixed with quicklime prior to compaction in order to study the effect of lime hydration. It is observed that lime hydration and modification did not affect the intra-aggregate pores but increased the inter-aggregates pores size. This increase gave rise to an increase of hydraulic conductivity. More precisely, the hydraulic conductivity of lime-treated specimen increased progressively during the first 3 d of modification phase and stabilised during the next 4 d which correspond to a short period prior to the stabilisation phase. The microstructure observation showed that stabilisation reactions took place after 7 d. Under the effect of stabilisation, a decreasing hydraulic conductivity can be expected in longer time due to the formation of cementitious compounds.

  6. Strategic Complexity and Global Expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oladottir, Asta Dis; Hobdari, Bersant; Papanastassiou, Marina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the determinants of global expansion strategies of newcomer Multinational Corporations (MNCs) by focusing on Iceland, Israel and Ireland. We argue that newcomer MNCs from small open economies pursue complex global expansion strategies (CGES). We distinguish....... The empirical evidence suggests that newcomer MNCs move away from simplistic dualities in the formulation of their strategic choices towards more complex options as a means of maintaining and enhancing their global competitiveness....

  7. Estimates of expansion time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. M.

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expansion of a spacefaring civilization show that descendants of that civilization should be found near virtually every useful star in the Galaxy in a time much less than the current age of the Galaxy. Only extreme assumptions about local population growth rates, emigration rates, or ship ranges can slow or halt an expansion. The apparent absence of extraterrestrials from the solar system suggests that no such civilization has arisen in the Galaxy.

  8. Desorption of toluene from modified clays using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro D. G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to study the regeneration capacity of modified clays using supercritical fluid. These modified clays are used as organic compound adsorvents. The experimental step was done using a packed column with the clay contaminated by toluene. The results obtained showed the influence of the density of the supercritical CO2 and of the organic modifier in the desorption process. These data were modeled with first- and second-order models. Better results were obtained using the second-order model. This study makes possible the scale-up of the desorption process for regeneration of solid matrices using supercritical fluids.

  9. Centrifuge modelling of rigid piles in soft clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, R.T.; Poder, M.; Truong, P.

    2016-01-01

    of this study is to employ centrifuge modelling in order to derive experimental p-y curves for rigid piles embedded in over-consolidated soft clay. A kaolin clay sample was prepared and pre-consolidated by applying a constant pressure at the soil surface, while different over-consolidation ratios were achieved...... within the clay sample by carrying out the experiments at different g fields. The findings suggest that the normalised shape of the p-y curves can be predicted within a sufficient accuracy using the current methodology but that the ultimate lat-eral resistance is underestimated at shallow depths...

  10. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF THE LAKE BLUE CLAY

    OpenAIRE

    Tretjakova, Rasma; Misiņa, Samanta Marija; Lukašenoks, Jevgenijs

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the chemical and biological properties of the lake blue clay are explored. A blue clay bed layer was found under the sapropel layer in the lake Plusons (area 4.8 km2, Ludza countries, Latvia). It has been determined that the lake Plusons blue clay has a colloid composition, which contains Na, Mg, K, Ca, Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Al, Ag, Ba. In samples Candida albicans, Pseudomona aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and a total number of aerobic mezofile bacterium have b...

  11. Fired products of Cr-smectite clays in nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Volzone, C.; Cesio, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The products of Cr-smectite clays heated to 1350 ° C in nitrogen were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. Cr-smectite clays were prepared at room temperature by contact between smectite clays and Cr species contained in OH-Cr solutions. The Cr species were prepared using chromium nitrate solution by addition of NaOH solution with OH/Cr = 2. Products of firing in nitrogen at the high temperature were different (magnesia chromite, donathite, iron chromium oxide and picrochromi...

  12. Fired products of Cr-smectite clays in nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Volzone

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The products of Cr-smectite clays heated to 1350 ° C in nitrogen were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. Cr-smectite clays were prepared at room temperature by contact between smectite clays and Cr species contained in OH-Cr solutions. The Cr species were prepared using chromium nitrate solution by addition of NaOH solution with OH/Cr = 2. Products of firing in nitrogen at the high temperature were different (magnesia chromite, donathite, iron chromium oxide and picrochromite depending on the type of isomorphous substitution of the smectite structure and the amount of retained chromium.

  13. Characterization of clay minerals; Caracterizacion de minerales arcillosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A. [Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF ELECTRICAL PORCELAIN INSULATORS FROM LOCAL CLAYS

    OpenAIRE

    Okolo Chidiebere Cajetan; Ezechukwu O.A.; Olisakwe C.O.; Ezendokwelu C.E.; Umunna Chike

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, the characterization of electrical porcelain insulators based on local clays has been investigated. Test samples were made by varying the quantities of feldspar and silica required to form a mouldable plastic body with each clay sample. The clay samples were bisque fired which is to 900°C and glazed before it was fired to 1250°C after air-drying. An electrical property such as dielectric strength (breakdown voltage) was determined for each test sample that survived the high te...

  15. Films, Buckypapers and Fibers from Clay, Chitosan and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc in het Panhuis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and electrical characteristics of films, buckypapers and fiber materials from combinations of clay, carbon nanotubes (CNTs and chitosan are described. The rheological time-dependent characteristics of clay are maintained in clay–carbon nanotube–chitosan composite dispersions. It is demonstrated that the addition of chitosan improves their mechanical characteristics, but decreases electrical conductivity by three-orders of magnitude compared to clay–CNT materials. We show that the electrical response upon exposure to humid atmosphere is influenced by clay-chitosan interactions, i.e., the resistance of clay–CNT materials decreases, whereas that of clay–CNT–chitosan increases.

  16. Crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal via clay-microbe-oil interactions: Effect of acid activated clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Fialips, Claire I

    2017-07-01

    Acid treatment of clay minerals is known to modify their properties such as increase their surface area and surface acidity, making them suitable as catalysts in many chemical processes. However, the role of these surface properties during biodegradation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is only known for mild acid (0.5 M Hydrochloric acid) treated clays. Four different clay minerals were used for this study: a montmorillonite, a saponite, a palygorskite and a kaolinite. They were treated with 3 M hydrochloric acid to produce acid activated clay minerals. The role of the acid activated montmorillonite, saponite, palygorskite and kaolinite in comparison with the unmodified clay minerals in the removal of PAHs during biodegradation was investigated in microcosm experiments. The microcosm experiments contained micro-organisms, oil, and clays in aqueous medium with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community predominantly composed of Alcanivorax spp. Obtained results indicated that acid activated clays and unmodified kaolinite did not enhance the biodegradation of the PAHs whereas unmodified montmorillonite, palygorskite and saponite enhanced their biodegradation. In addition, unmodified palygorskite adsorbed the PAHs significantly due to its unique channel structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of herbicide structure, clay acidity, and humic acid coating on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Gan, Jianying; Yates, Scott R

    2002-07-03

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption decreased in the order metolachlor > acetochlor > alachlor > propachlor on Ca(2+)- or Mg(2+)-saturated clays and in the order metolachlor > alachlor > acetachlor > propachlor on Al(3+)- or Fe(3+)-saturated clays. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in bonding. For the same herbicide, adsorption of alachlor, acetachlor, and metolachlor on clay followed the order Ca(2+) approximately Mg(2+) < Al(3+) < or = Fe(3+), which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Adsorption of propachlor, however, showed an opposite dependence, suggesting a different governing interaction. In clay and humic acid mixtures, herbicide adsorption was less than that expected from independent additive adsorption by the individual constituents, and the deviation was dependent on the clay-to-humic acid ratio, with the greatest deviation consistently occurring at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio.

  18. Mineralogy of subducted clay and clay restite in the lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, L.; Skora, S. E.; Walter, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic tomography indicates that subducting oceanic lithosphere often penetrates the transition zone and eventually the lower mantle [e.g. 1, 2]. While mineralogical changes in the mafic and ultramafic portions of slabs have been well documented experimentally, the phase relations of overlying sediments at pressures above 25 GPa remain poorly studied. This is in part because sediments are expected to partially melt at sub-arc depth (P~2.5-4.5 GPa), and contribute to the genesis of arc magmas. Sediment restites left behind after the extraction of low pressure melts undergo major chemical changes, according to the melting reaction: Coe+Phen+Cpx+H2O = Grt+Ky+Melt [3]. However, sediments may not always melt depending on the thermal regime and volatile availability and composition [3]. Hence, chemically unmodified sediments as well as restites may be entrained to greater depths and contribute to compositional heterogeneity in the deep mantle. Indeed, mineral inclusions with compositions indicative of subducted sedimentary protoliths (CAS-phase; K-hollandite; stishovite) have been reported in 'ultradeep' diamonds and suggest that deep subduction and survival of sediments occurs to at least transition zone depths [4]. With this in mind, we have performed laser heated diamond anvil cell experiments at pressures of 8-80 GPa on two anhydrous glass starting materials: a marine clay and the restite that is left after 50% melt extraction of this clay at 3 GPa and 800 °C [3]. We chose to work with an anhydrous version of the marine clay given that the investigated pressure range exceeds that of phengite stability [5], and phengite is the only hydrous phase in subducted sediments at UHP conditions. The clay was heated along a P-T path representative of a cold subduction geotherm, whereas the clay restite was heated along a hotter subduction geotherm consistent with low pressure melting. Phases were identified by synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction at beamline I15 of the Diamond

  19. GAS PERMEABILITY OF GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Vučenović

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geosynthetic clay liners (GCL are manufactured hydraulic barriers consisting of mineral and geosynthetic components. They belong to a group of geosynthetic products whose primary purpose is to seal and they have been used in many geotechnical and hydrotechnical applications, landfi lls and liquid waste lagoons for quite a while. They are used in landfill final cover systems to prevent the infi ltration of precipitation into the landfi ll body and the penetration of gases and liquids from the landfill into the atmosphere and environment. Laboratory and fi eld research and observations on regulated landfi lls have proven the eff ectiveness of GCL as a barrier for the infi ltration of precipitation into the landfi ll body as well as the drainage of fl uid beneath the landfill. Due to the presence of high concentrations of gases in the landfill body, there is a growing interest in determining the efficiency of GCL as a gas barrier. It was not until the last twenty years that the importance of this topic was recognized. In this article, current GCL gas permeability studies, the testing methods and test results of gas permeability in laboratory conditions are described.

  20. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  1. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the location and the obeying function, GCLs have to fulfill certain conditions. A legislated compatibility criterion has to be proven by various laboratory tests. In the paper are presented the results of direct shear and chemical compatibility tests of GCLs as well as the results of permeability measurement of kaolin clay (the paper is published in Croatian .

  2. Clay minerals in the sediments around the Andaman Islands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    Clay minerals in the eastern side of Andaman Islands consist of montmorillonite, kaolinite, illite and Fe-rich chlorites while on western side they consist of illite and Fe-poor chlorite with minor kaolinite and montmorillonite. These assemblages...

  3. Clay ground in paintings: from Northern to Southern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buti, David; Vila, Anna; Haack Christensen, Anne

    The use of clay grounds containing quartz was first observed in the Netherlands in artworks from Rembrandt’s workshop after 1640 [1, 2]. In addition, contemporary written sources outside the Netherlands mention this practice in Italy and Spain [2]. However, the reason for using clay...... as a constituent in paintings has still not been much investigated, neither with regard to the processing nor the trade of the material. Did it give a particular colour/structure in order to achieve a specific final effect of the painted surface? Was clay cheaper than chalk, calcium sulphate or earth pigments? Did...... it give more flexibility to the painting support? Was it connected to the tile industry? Was it a waste/reuse from the ceramic production? To better understand the role of clay ground as a material and its influence on painting techniques, a number of Danish and Italian 17th century paintings from...

  4. Unique morphology of dispersed clay particles in a polymer nanocomposite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malwela, T

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This communication reports a unique morphology of dispersed clay particles in a polymer nanocomposite. A nanocomposite of poly[butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PBSA) with 3 wt% of organically modified montmorillonite was prepared by melt...

  5. Clay squirt: Local flow dispersion in shale-bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Dispersion of elastic-wave velocity is common in sandstone and larger in shaly sandstone than in clean sandstone. Dispersion in fluid-saturated shaly sandstone often exceeds the level expected from the stress-dependent elastic moduli of dry sandstone. The large dispersion has been coined clay...... squirt and is proposed to originate from a pressure gradient between the clay microporosity and the effective porosity. We have formulated a simple model that quantifies the clay-squirt effect on bulk moduli of sandstone with homogeneously distributed shale laminae or dispersed shale. The model...... predictions were compared with the literature data. For sandstones with dispersed shale, agreement was found, whereas other sandstones have larger fluid-saturated bulk modulus, possibly due to partially load-bearing shales or heterogeneous shale distribution. The data that agree with the clay-squirt model...

  6. Performance of full scale enhanced reductive dechlorination in clay till

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2013-01-01

    At a low permeability clay till site contaminated with chlorinated ethenes (Gl. Kongevej, Denmark), enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) was applied by direct push injection of molasses and dechlorinating bacteria. The performance was investigated by long-term groundwater monitoring, and after 4...... years of remediation, the development of degradation in the clay till matrix was investigated by high-resolution subsampling of intact cores. The formation of degradation products, the presence of specific degraders Dehalococcoides spp. with the vinyl chloride (VC) reductase gene vcrA, and the isotope...... fractionation of trichloroethene, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and VC showed that degradation of chlorinated ethenes occurred in the clay till matrix as well as in sand lenses, sand stringers, and fractures. Bioactive sections of up to 1.8 m had developed in the clay till matrix, but sections, where...

  7. Strategic Shuffling of Clay Layers to Imbue Them with Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Raj Kumar; Raidongia, Kalyan

    2017-06-01

    Layers of naturally occurring clay minerals are rearranged to prepare highly sensitive multiresponsive clay-clay bilayer membrane (CCBM). The CCBM introduced here responds to the minuscule changes in the surrounding environments including temperature, humidity, and presence of solvent vapors by morphing in specific manners. Strips cut from CCBM exhibit up to 588 N kg -1 force output when exposed to temperature fluctuations. Inheriting the natural stability of clay minerals, CCBM demonstrates extreme robustness, heating up to 500 °C, cooling with liquid N 2 and exposure to corrosive chemical vapors did not deteriorate its bending performance. Mechanistic studies suggest that shape transformations of CCBM are driven by the unequal response of its components to external stimuli. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of polyethylene–clay ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MDPE) and MDPE–clay nanocomposites have been investigated by differential scanning calorimeter. The modified Avrami, Ozawa, Liu and Ziabicki equations have been applied to describe non-isothermal crystallization process. The results of ...

  9. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of PMMA/clay nanocomposites: Study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    free emulsion polymerization technique. Ultrasound waves of different power and frequencies were applied to enhance the dispersion of the clay layers with polymer matrix. The structural information of the synthesized materials was studied by ...

  10. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  11. Cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Hog Lejre, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Observations are reported in tensile relaxation tests under stretching and retraction on poly-propylene/clay nanocomposites with various contents of filler. A two-phase constitutive model is developed in cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of hybrid nanocomposites. Adjustable parameters...

  12. A Comprehensive Analysis of Organic Contaminant Adsorption by Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macroscopic studies of nonionic organic contaminant (NOC) sorption by clays have revealed many important clues regarding factors that influence sorption affinity, and enabled the development of structural hypotheses for operative adsorption mechanisms. Integrating this understanding with knowledge g...

  13. Industrial calcination of kaolinitic clays to make reactive pozzolans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Almenares

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an industrial trial for the production of calcined clay to be used as pozzolan in cement manufacture. For the trial, a wet-process clinker rotary kiln was modified to process on dry basis the low grade kaolinitic clay used as raw material. The kaolinitic clay deposit was chosen through a screening based on geologic, chemical and mineralogical criteria, and a confirmation of reactivity with an experimental protocol at lab scale. During the calcination trial technological parameters such as rotation speed, fuel pressure and outer temperature of calcined clay were measured and coupled with the reactivity of the samples tested, thus, preliminary estimations of operational parameters can be made. The trial proved that it is possible to produce a reactive pozzolan at industrial scale by implementing small conversions on existing equipment of a typical clinker plant.

  14. Characterization of low-purity clays for geopolymer binder formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Nasser Y.; Mohsen, Q.; El-maghraby, A.

    2014-06-01

    The production of geopolymer binders from low-purity clays was investigated. Three low-purity clays were calcined at 750°C for 4 h. The calcined clays were chemically activated by the alkaline solutions of NaOH and Na2SiO3. The compressive strength was measured as a function of curing time at room temperature and 85°C. The results were compared with those of a pure kaolin sample. An amorphous aluminosilicate polymer was formed in all binders at both processing temperatures. The results show that, the mechanical properties depend on the type and amount of active aluminum silicates in the starting clay material, the impurities, and the processing temperature.

  15. Utilization of crushed clay brick in cellular concrete production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Aliabdo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research program is to study the effect of using crushed clay brick as an alternative aggregate in aerated concrete. Two series of mixtures were designed to investigate the physico-mechanical properties and micro-structural analysis of autoclave aerated concrete and foamed concrete, respectively. In each series, natural sand was replaced with crushed clay brick aggregate. In both series results showed a significant reduction in unit weight, thermal conductivity and sound attenuation coefficient while porosity has increased. Improvement on compressive strength of autoclave aerated concrete was observed at a percentage of 25% and 50% replacement, while in foamed concrete compressive strength gradually decreased by increasing crushed clay brick aggregate content. A comparatively uniform distribution of pore in case of foamed concrete with natural sand was observed by scanning electron microscope, while the pores were connected mostly and irregularly for mixes containing a percentage higher than 25% clay brick aggregate.

  16. Control of clay minerals effect in flotation. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Hasan Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased exposure to low grade ores highlights the importance of understanding phyllosilicate gangue mineralogy which consists of common gangue minerals. To improve the flotation performance and ore quality the negative effect of the clay minerals on flotation should be identified. The presence of clay minerals leads to problems, such as changing the froth stability, which are related to swelling behaviour, increase in pulp viscosity, overconsumption of reagents, slime coating and mechanical entrainment. The clay content in the ore is changing from time to time and it is necessary to provide quick solutions to the issues caused by the new ore composition. The objective of this paper is to give an overview how to control the colloidal properties of clay minerals on flotation.

  17. Electrical resistivity tomography determines the spatial distribution of clay layer thickness and aquifer vulnerability, Kandal Province, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Sebastian; Kuras, Oliver; Richards, Laura A.; Naden, Emma; Polya, David A.

    2017-10-01

    Despite being rich in water resources, many areas of South East Asia face difficulties in securing clean water supply. This is particularly problematic in regions with a rapidly growing population. In this study, the spatial variability of the thickness of a clay layer, controlling surface - groundwater interactions that affect aquifer vulnerability, was investigated using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Data were acquired along two transects, showing significant differences in the imaged resistivities. Borehole samples were analyzed regarding particle density and composition, and linked to their resistivity. The obtained relationships were used to translate the field electrical resistivities into lithologies. Those revealed considerable variations in the thickness of the clay layer, ranging from 0 m up to 25 m. Geochemical data, highlighting zones of increased ingress of surface water into the groundwater, confirmed areas of discontinuities in the clay layer, which act as preferential flow paths. The results may guide urban planning of the Phnom Penh city expansion, in order to supply the growing population with safe water. The presented approach of using geophysics to estimate groundwater availability, accessibility, and vulnerability is not only applicable to Kandal Province, Cambodia, but also to many other areas of fast urbanization in South East Asia and beyond.

  18. Lead removal from aqueous solutions by a Tunisian smectitic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaari, Islem [Laboratoire de Georessources CERTE BP 95, 2050 Hamam-Lif (Tunisia)], E-mail: chaariislem@yahoo.fr; Fakhfakh, Emna; Chakroun, Salima [Laboratoire de Georessources CERTE BP 95, 2050 Hamam-Lif (Tunisia); Bouzid, Jalel; Boujelben, Nesrine [Laboratoire Eau Energie et Environnement, departement de genie geologique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Feki, Mongi [Unite de chimie industrielle I, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Rocha, Fernando [MIA, Universite d' Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810 Aveiro (Portugal)], E-mail: frocha@geo.ua.pt; Jamoussi, Fakher [Laboratoire de Georessources CERTE BP 95, 2050 Hamam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2008-08-15

    The adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} ions onto Tunisian smectite-rich clay in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system. Four samples of clay (AYD, AYDh, AYDs, AYDc) were used. The raw AYD clay was sampled in the Coniacian-Early Campanian of Jebel Aidoudi in El Hamma area (South of Tunisia). AYDh and AYDs corresponds to AYD activated by 2.5 mol/l hydrochloric acid and 2.5 mol/l sulphuric acid, respectively. AYDc corresponds to AYD calcined at different temperatures (100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 deg. C). The raw AYD clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy and coupled DTA-TGA. Specific surface area of all the clay samples was determined from nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Preliminary adsorption tests showed that sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid activation of raw AYD clay enhanced its adsorption capacity for Pb{sup 2+} ions. However, the uptake of Pb{sup 2+} by AYDs was very high compared to that by AYDh. This fact was attributed to the greater solubility of clay minerals in sulphuric acid compared to hydrochloric acid. Thermic activation of AYD clay reduced the Pb{sup 2+} uptake as soon as calcination temperature reaches 200 deg. C. All these preliminary results were well correlated to the variation of the specific surface area of the clay samples. The ability of AYDs sample to remove Pb{sup 2+} from aqueous solutions has been studied at different operating conditions: contact time, adsorbent amount, metal ion concentration and pH. Kinetic experiments showed that the sorption of lead ions on AYDs was very fast and the equilibrium was practically reached after only 20 min. The results revealed also that the adsorption of lead increases with an increase in the solution pH from 1 to 4.5 and then decreases, slightly between pH 4.5 and 6, and rapidly at pH 6.5 due to the precipitation of some Pb{sup 2+} ions. The equilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q{sub 0

  19. Lead removal from aqueous solutions by a Tunisian smectitic clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Islem; Fakhfakh, Emna; Chakroun, Salima; Bouzid, Jalel; Boujelben, Nesrine; Feki, Mongi; Rocha, Fernando; Jamoussi, Fakher

    2008-08-15

    The adsorption of Pb(2+) ions onto Tunisian smectite-rich clay in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system. Four samples of clay (AYD, AYDh, AYDs, AYDc) were used. The raw AYD clay was sampled in the Coniacian-Early Campanian of Jebel Aïdoudi in El Hamma area (South of Tunisia). AYDh and AYDs corresponds to AYD activated by 2.5 mol/l hydrochloric acid and 2.5 mol/l sulphuric acid, respectively. AYDc corresponds to AYD calcined at different temperatures (100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 degrees C). The raw AYD clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy and coupled DTA-TGA. Specific surface area of all the clay samples was determined from nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Preliminary adsorption tests showed that sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid activation of raw AYD clay enhanced its adsorption capacity for Pb(2+) ions. However, the uptake of Pb(2+) by AYDs was very high compared to that by AYDh. This fact was attributed to the greater solubility of clay minerals in sulphuric acid compared to hydrochloric acid. Thermic activation of AYD clay reduced the Pb(2+) uptake as soon as calcination temperature reaches 200 degrees C. All these preliminary results were well correlated to the variation of the specific surface area of the clay samples. The ability of AYDs sample to remove Pb(2+) from aqueous solutions has been studied at different operating conditions: contact time, adsorbent amount, metal ion concentration and pH. Kinetic experiments showed that the sorption of lead ions on AYDs was very fast and the equilibrium was practically reached after only 20 min. The results revealed also that the adsorption of lead increases with an increase in the solution pH from 1 to 4.5 and then decreases, slightly between pH 4.5 and 6, and rapidly at pH 6.5 due to the precipitation of some Pb(2+) ions. The equilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q(0)) increased from 25 to 25

  20. Solar conduction heat transfer in fired clay bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custodio-Garcia, E.; Andres Zarate, Esteban; Cordova, Quintiliano A. [Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, DACB, Cunduacan, Tabasco 86680 (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J.; Campos-Alvarez, J. [CIE-UNAM, 62580 Temixco, Mor 62580 (Mexico); Trevino-Palacios, Carlos G. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica. A.P. 51 Y 216. Puebla 72000 (Mexico); De la O-Leon, Hugo [Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, DAIS, Cunduacan Tab (Mexico)

    2005-07-15

    When somebody is interested in building a house in the year-round-hot and humid regions, faces with the decision of using modern construction block material or the traditional red fired clay brick material. We performed mechanical and thermal controlled measurements on walls made using both materials. We found that the ancient tradition of using fired clay bricks, for the weather conditions in central Tabasco, represents an excellent alternative in cost and energy savings for construction.

  1. Painting with Clay: A Study of the Masters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Plasticine clay is a bendable material that is easily manipulated by students of all ages. It is a great material to work with because it does not dry out from day to day, so high-school students can work on an extended project. They do not have to worry about the clay drying and cracking, and the entire work of art does not have to be completed…

  2. Study of desiccation cracking and fracture properties of clay soils

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Warnakulasuriya D. Susanga M.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the development of shrinkage cracking in clay soils upon drying and the determination of fracture properties of clay soils as applicable to analysis of desiccation cracking phenomenon. The results and conclusions were drawn from comprehensive experimental work analysed drawing from Classical Soil Mechanics, Fracture Mechanics, Unsaturated Soil Mechanics and Mechanics of Materials with the aid of powerful image analysis techniques. Attempts were made to fill the gaps in t...

  3. Role of Caustic Addition in Bitumen-Clay Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Tamiz Bakhtiari, M; Harbottle, D; Curran, M.; Ng, S.; Spence, J.; Siy, R; Liu, Q; Masliyah, J; Xu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Coating of bitumen by clays, known as slime coating, is detrimental to bitumen recovery from oil sands using the warm slurry extn. process. Sodium hydroxide (caustic) is added to the extn. process to balance many competing processing challenges, which include undesirable slime coating. The current research aims at understanding the role of caustic addn. in controlling interactions of bitumen with various types of model clays. The interaction potential was studied by quartz crystal microbalanc...

  4. Cu and Pb Adsorption on Some Bentonitic Clays

    OpenAIRE

    İNEL, Oğuz; ALBAYRAK, Fehmi; AŞKIN, Ayşegül

    1998-01-01

    Cu2+ and Pb2+ adsorption isotherms were measured on some clay samples obtained from various regions of Turkey. Also specific surface areas of clays were determined from adsorption data of ortho-phenanthroline(OP). The adsorptions of ions and OP were studied using the batch equilibration technique as a function of adsorbate concentration. The adsorption data, over the whole range of concentrations used, follow the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The retention capacities of the adsorbates and the...

  5. METHODICAL ASPECTS OF DETERMINATION OF THE BENTONITIC MOLDING CLAYS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Fedorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of different methods for determining the strength properties of bentonite molding clays are considered. It is shown that GOST 28177–89 not adequately characterizes the strength characteristics of bentonite important for its use in automatic molding lines. The expediency of mixing bentonite clays from different deposits, that allows to obtain a higher technological parameters of bentopowders in comparison with a variant of their manufacture from raw materials of one deposit is shown.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Confined Water and CO2 in Clays under Supercritical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezakou, V.; Lee, M.; Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; Davidson, C.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) driven enhanced gas recovery (EGR) from depleted fractured shale gas reservoirs has the potential for producing economic benefits and providing long term storage options for anthropogenic derived CO2 emissions. However key scientific processes related to CO2:CH4 exchange rates, mineral volume changes, organic mobility, and mineral stability in the presence of acid gas injections are not well understood. In this paper, we conduct atomistic simulations to examine interactions occurring between model clay minerals and supercritical CO2 equilibrated with water or brines to identify parameters controlling adsorption and desorption of gases. Integrated within these simulations are results derived from a set of newly developed experimental techniques designed to characterize physico-chemical reactions at reservoir conditions. In a series of cell optimizations under pressures relevant to sequestration scenarios, molecular simulations within the NVT and NPT ensembles with varying water/CO2 ratios showed a range of interlayer expansion for specific cation-saturated smectites. In conjunction with experimental in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD), semi-quantitative concentrations of interlayer H2O and CO2 were established. For example, Ca saturated smectites maintaining sub-single to single hydration states (waters during CO2 intercalation coincident with a decrease in the coordination population around the cations. Power spectra reveal rotationally constrained CO2 molecules over the silica layer of the Ca-smectite surface due to the formation of a two dimensional supercritical CO2 network at lower pressures, expanding to three-dimensions as the water content increases. Diffusion coefficients of the interlayer species determined from the molecular trajectories show dependence on the presence of CO2 and hydration state. In agreement with modeling studies, direct observations of volume changes were observed during in situ HXRD experiments when

  7. Reed's Conjecture on hole expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Fouquet, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    In 1998, Reed conjectured that for any graph $G$, $\\chi(G) \\leq \\lceil \\frac{\\omega(G) + \\Delta(G)+1}{2}\\rceil$, where $\\chi(G)$, $\\omega(G)$, and $\\Delta(G)$ respectively denote the chromatic number, the clique number and the maximum degree of $G$. In this paper, we study this conjecture for some {\\em expansions} of graphs, that is graphs obtained with the well known operation {\\em composition} of graphs. We prove that Reed's Conjecture holds for expansions of bipartite graphs, for expansions of odd holes where the minimum chromatic number of the components is even, when some component of the expansion has chromatic number 1 or when a component induces a bipartite graph. Moreover, Reed's Conjecture holds if all components have the same chromatic number, if the components have chromatic number at most 4 and when the odd hole has length 5. Finally, when $G$ is an odd hole expansion, we prove $\\chi(G)\\leq\\lceil\\frac{\\omega(G)+\\Delta(G)+1}{2}\\rceil+1$.

  8. Surfactant-modified bentonite clays: preparation, characterization, and atrazine removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Singh, Neera

    2015-03-01

    Bentonite clay was modified using quaternary ammonium cations, viz. phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), trioctylmethylammonium (TOMA) [100 % of cation exchange capacity of clay], and stearylkonium (SK) [100 % (SK-I) and 250 % (SK-II) of cation exchange capacity of clay]. The organoclays were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Atrazine adsorption on modified clays was studied using a batch method. Bentonite clay was a poor adsorbent of atrazine as 9.4 % adsorption was observed at 1 μg mL(-1) atrazine concentration. Modification of clay by PTMA cation did not improve atrazine adsorption capacity. However, atrazine adsorption in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-bentonites varied between 49 and 72.4 % and data fitted well to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm (R > 0.96). Adsorption of atrazine in organoclays was nonlinear and slope (1/n) values were organoclays showed hysteresis and TOMA- and SK-I-bentonites were the best organoclays to retain the adsorbed atrazine. Organoclays showed better atrazine removal from wastewater than an aqueous solution. The synthesized organoclays may find application in soil and water decontamination and as a carrier for atrazine-controlled released formulations.

  9. Controlling harmful algae blooms using aluminum-modified clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xihua; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Qiu, Lixia

    2016-02-15

    The performances of aluminum chloride modified clay (AC-MC), aluminum sulfate modified clay (AS-MC) and polyaluminum chloride modified clay (PAC-MC) in the removal of Aureococcus anophagefferens were compared, and the potential mechanisms were analyzed according to the dispersion medium, suspension pH and clay surface charges. The results showed that AC-MC and AS-MC had better efficiencies in removing A.anophagefferens than PAC-MC. The removal mechanisms of the three modified clays varied. At optimal coagulation conditions, the hydrolysates of AC and AS were mainly monomers, and they transformed into Al(OH)3(am) upon their addition to algae culture, with the primary mechanism being sweep flocculation. The PAC mainly hydrolyzed to the polyaluminum compounds, which remained stable when added to the algae culture, and the flocculation mainly occurred through polyaluminum compounds. The suspension pH significantly influenced the aluminum hydrolysate and affected the flocculation between the modified clay and algae cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interphase vs confinement in starch-clay bionanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coativy, Gildas; Chevigny, Chloé; Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Leroy, Eric; Lourdin, Denis

    2015-03-06

    Starch-clay bionanocomposites containing 1-10% of natural montmorillonite were elaborated by melt processing in the presence of water. A complex macromolecular dynamics behavior was observed: depending on the clay content, an increase of the glass transition temperature and/or the presence of two overlapped α relaxation peaks were detected. Thanks to a model allowing the prediction of the average interparticle distance, and its comparison with the average size of starch macromolecules, it was possible to associate these phenomena to different populations of macromolecules. In particular, it seems that for high clay content (10%), the slowdown of segmental relaxation due to confinement of the starch macromolecules between the clay tactoïds is the predominant phenomenon. While for lower clay contents (3-5%), a significant modification of chain relaxation seems to occur, due to the formation of an interphase by the starch macromolecules in the vicinity of clay nanoparticles coexisting with the bulk polymer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cyclic voltammetry of aquocobalamin on clay-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, V.; Morra, M.J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Soil Science Div.

    1998-07-15

    Halogenated synthetic compounds are widespread contaminants of the environment. Although corrinoids reductively dehalogenate synthetic contaminants in solution, the redox behavior of sorbed tetrapyrroles has received limited attention. Colloidal clay suspensions were prepared as Ca{sup 2+} forms of hectorite (SHCa-1), montmorillonite (SWy-1, Syn-1, and SAz-1), and vermiculite (VTx-1) and spin coated on platinum electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry was performed with the clay-modified electrodes immersed in buffered solutions containing 1.0 mM aquocobalamin. Aquocobalamin in the presence of vermiculite-coated electrodes displayed the same cathodic and anodic peak potentials as unmodified electrodes immersed in aquocobalamin solutions. All other clay-modified electrodes shifted cathodic peaks to more negative values, while anodic peak shifts varied with the clay. Hectorite caused the largest shift in formal redox potential as compared to aquocobalamin in solution. The redox behavior of aquocobalamin as modified by sorption to clay minerals potentially affects dehalogenation rates of synthetic organic compounds in the environment. Clays lowering the formal redox potential of the tetrapyrrole create a potentially more efficient catalyst for pollutant degradation. However, thermodynamic data as obtained using cyclic voltammetry cannot be used to make definitive predictions about the kinetics of contaminant dehalogenation. Reductive dehalogenation will be a function of altered electrochemical properties of the tetrapyrrole as well as rates of contaminant diffusion to the site of tetrapyrrole sorption.

  12. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  13. The composition and origin of Ghana medicine clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Bart E; Fraser, Sharon E; Insoll, Timothy

    2011-08-01

    The mineral, organic and elemental composition of medicine clays from three shrines in the Tong Hills in northern Ghana (Gbankil, Kusanaab, and Yaane) are assessed to ascertain what additives they might contain and the implications for their recognition, for example in archaeological contexts. These are clays that are widely used for healing purposes being perceived efficacious in curing multiple ailments and which are given a divine provenance, but their collection is ascribed human agency. The Yaane clay is also supplied as part of the process of obtaining the right to operate the shrine elsewhere making it widely dispersed. Organic geochemical analyses revealed a predominance of plant-derived material with a substantial contribution of microbial origin. Based on these (supported by elemental and mineral analyses), no unnatural organic material could be detected, making an exogenous contribution to these clays unlikely. The implications are that these are wholly natural medicinal substances with no anthropogenic input into their preparation, as the traditions suggest. The very similar mineralogy of all the clays, including a non-medicine clay sampled, suggests that, unless the geology radically differed, differentiating between them analytically in an archaeological contexts would be doubtful.

  14. Biodegradation of crude oil saturated fraction supported on clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Jones, Martin D; Head, Ian M; Manning, David A C; Fialips, Claire I

    2014-02-01

    The role of clay minerals in crude oil saturated hydrocarbon removal during biodegradation was investigated in aqueous clay/saturated hydrocarbon microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. The clay minerals used for this study were montmorillonite, palygorskite, saponite and kaolinite. The clay mineral samples were treated with hydrochloric acid and didecyldimethylammonium bromide to produce acid activated- and organoclays respectively which were used in this study. The production of organoclay was restricted to only montmorillonite and saponite because of their relative high CEC. The study indicated that acid activated clays, organoclays and unmodified kaolinite, were inhibitory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. Unmodified saponite was neutral to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturates. However, unmodified palygorskite and montmorillonite were stimulatory to biodegradation of the hydrocarbon saturated fraction and appears to do so as a result of the clays' ability to provide high surface area for the accumulation of microbes and nutrients such that the nutrients were within the 'vicinity' of the microbes. Adsorption of the saturated hydrocarbons was not significant during biodegradation.

  15. Fixation of Selenium by Clay Minerals and Iron Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdy, A. A.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1977-01-01

    In studying Se fixation, soil components capable of retaining Se were investigated. The importance of Fe hydrous oxides in the fixation of Se was established. The clay minerals common to soils, such as kaolinite, montmorillonite and vermiculite, all exhibited Se fixation, but greater fixation...... occurred with the 1:1 than the 2:1 clay type. Experiments with finely ground minerals showed that the pH of the systems greatly influenced the rate of fixation, reaching a maximum between pH 3 and 5 and decreasing rapidly as the pH increased. With the Fe2O3 system fixed Se was slightly reduced as the p......H was increased to over 8. The extractability of Se from the clay minerals indicated that 1:1 clay type minerals fix selenite more indissolubly than 2:1 clays and that selenite was adsorbed on the clays mainly by a surface exchange reaction. The major part of the selenite added to the Fe2O3 system was found...

  16. Adsorption of zinc and lead on clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Jablonovská

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Clays (especially bentonite, zeolite and quartz sand are widely used as landfill barriers to prevent contamination of subsoil and groundwater by leachates containing heavy metals. The sorption of zinc and lead on these clays was studied as a function of time and it was found that the initial 1 h our was sufficient to exchange most of the metal ions. The retention efficiency of clay samples of Zn2+ and Pb2+ follows the order of bentonite > zeolite> quartz sand. Whatever the clay sample, lead is retained more than zinc. The concentration of elements in the solution was followed by atomic adsorption spectrofotometry. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus, previously isolated from the kaoline deposit Horna Prievrana was added into the clay samples to comparise the accumulation of Zn2+ and Pb2+ from the model solution. The study of heavy metal adsorption capacity of bacteria- enriched clay adsorbent showed a high retention efficiency for lead ions as comparised with zinc ions. Biosorption is considered a potential instrument for the removal of metals from waste solutions and for the precious metals recovery as an alternative to the conventional processes.

  17. Laboratory evaluation of cement treated aggregate containing crushed clay brick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Hu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The waste clay bricks from debris of buildings were evaluated through lab tests as environmental friendly materials for pavement sub-base in the research. Five sets of coarse aggregates which contained 0, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% crushed bricks, respectively, were blended with sand and treated by 5% cement. The test results indicated that cement treated aggregate which contains crushed clay brick aggregate had a lower maximum dry density (MDD and a higher optimum moisture content (OMC. Moreover, the unconfined compressive strength (UCS, resilience modulus, splitting strength, and frost resistance performance of the specimens decreased with increase of the amount of crushed clay brick aggregate. On the other hand, it can be observed that the use of crushed clay brick in the mixture decreased the dry shrinkage strain of the specimens. Compared with the asphalt pavement design specifications of China, the results imply that the substitution rate of natural aggregate with crushed clay brick aggregate in the cement treated aggregate sub-base material should be less than 50% (5% cement content in the mixture. Furthermore, it needs to be noted that the cement treated aggregate which contains crushed clay bricks should be cautiously used in the cold region due to its insufficient frost resistance performance.

  18. SBR Brazilian organophilic/clay nanocomposites;Nanocompositos SBR/argila organofilica brasileira

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Thiago R.; Valenzuela-Diaz, Francisco R., E-mail: frrvdiaz@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EP/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. Eng. Metalurgica e de Materiais; Morales, Ana Rita; Paiva, Lucilene B. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is the obtaining of SBR composites using a Brazilian raw bentonite and the same bentonite treated with an organic salt. The clays were characterized by XRD. The clay addition in the composites was 10 pcr. The composites were characterized by XRD and had measured theirs tension strength (TS). The composite with Brazilian treated clay showed TS 233% higher than a composite with no clay, 133% higher than a composite with Cloisite 30B organophilic clay and 17% lower than a composite with Cloisite 20 A organophilic clay. XRD and TS data evidence that the composite with Brazilian treated clay is an intercalated nanocomposite. (author)

  19. Fundamental Studies of Clay and Clay-rich Mineral Reactions with H2O-CO2 Fluids: Application to Geological Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizmeshya, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Geological sequestration is currently being actively developed as a near-term, large-scale carbon sequestration technology in which supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is injected below-ground into saline aquifers, depleted and existing oil and gas reservoir. Implementation strongly depends on the specific geological profile of each candidate injection site. Caprock formations that contain swellable clay minerals are of particular concern, since interaction with injected CO2 may produce complex local structural effects related to shrinkage, desiccation, and plastic response leading to CO2 escape. The current knowledge-base on rock-brine-CO2 interactions often relies on semi-empirical geochemical modeling and autoclave experiments, which necessitate quenching (de-gassing) to ambient conditions for characterization. To avoid these effects we used a moissanite-based microreaction system (Diefenbacher, J et al Rev. Mod. Inst., 76 15103 (2005)) which enables in situ synchrotron characterization of interactions under constant CO2 activity. Synchrotron studies were performed at the GSECARS sector of the Argonne National Lab APS to systematically determine the response of representative Ca- and Na-montmorillonites (STx-1, SWy-1) clays to dry/wet scCO2 (H2O-rich) fluids at T and P encountered in typical aquifers. Our main findings for hydrated STx-1 are that desiccation occurs spontaneously on the scale of minutes-hours over a wide range of conditions in dry scCO2 via release of H2O with volume changes as large as 19% in relation to the initial volume. Desiccation was not observed in wet scCO2, or in corresponding saline solutions containing 1-3 M NaCl, but quenching to ambient conditions from low-pressures leads to re-hydration in STx-1 suggesting a pressure-dependent diffusion barrier for H2O from the clay into bulk scCO2. Similar desiccation transitions with smaller volume changes of 5-9% were also observed in SWy-1 at P 140 atm and T 40 C. At high pressures ( 200 atm

  20. Scour at Vertical Piles in Sand-Clay Mixtures under Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dey, Subhasish; Helkjær, Anders; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2011-01-01

    Marine sediments often contain sand-clay mixtures in widely varying proportions. This study presents the results of equilibrium scour and time variation of scour depths at circular piles embedded vertically in clay alone and sand-clay mixed beds under waves. Experiments were conducted in a wave...... flume with different proportions of sand-clay mixtures as bed sediments. Test results for the cases of steady current and sand alone under waves are used as references. The equilibrium scour depth reduces with an increase in clay proportion n (by weight) in a sand-clay mixture. Interestingly, the scour...... depth reductions for n=0.3 and 1 are almost equal, suggesting that when the clay proportion in a sand-clay mixture becomes 0.3, the sand-clay mixture behaves as if it were a clay-alone mixture, in relation to scour depths. The dependency of equilibrium scour depth on the Keulegan-Carpenter number...

  1. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  2. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  3. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  4. Repeated expansion in burn sequela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitanguy, Ivo; Gontijo de Amorim, Natale Ferreira; Radwanski, Henrique N; Lintz, José Eduardo

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents a retrospective study of the use of 346 expanders in 132 patients operated at the Ivo Pitanguy Clinic, between the period of 1985 and 2000. The expanders were used in the treatment of burn sequela. In the majority of cases, more than one expander was used at the same time. In 42 patients, repeated tissue expansion was done. The re-expanded flaps demonstrated good distension and viability. With the increase in area at each new expansion, larger volume expanders were employed, achieving an adequate advancement of the flaps to remove the injured tissue. The great advantage of using tissue re-expansion in the burned patient is the reconstruction of extensive areas with the same color and texture of neighboring tissues, without the addition of new scars.

  5. Thermo-mechanical constitutive modeling of unsaturated clays based on the critical state concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Tourchi; Amir Hamidi

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-mechanical constitutive model for unsaturated clays is constructed based on the existing model for saturated clays originally proposed by the authors. The saturated clays model was formulated in the framework of critical state soil mechanics and modified Cam-clay model. The existing model has been generalized to simulate the experimentally observed behavior of unsaturated clays by introducing Bishop's stress and suction as independent stress parameters and modifying the hardening rul...

  6. Properties of polymer/clay interphase in nanoparticles synthesized through in-situ polymerization processes

    OpenAIRE

    Faucheu, Jenny; Gauthier, Catherine; Chazeau, Laurent; Cavaille, Jean-Yves; Mellon, Veronique; Pardal, Francis; Lami, Elodie Bourgeat

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This article is devoted to the effects of the presence of modified clays during in-situ polymerization. Such synthesis routes require clay modifications in order to render the clay surface compatible with the monomer-polymer and/or reactive during polymerization. In addition, the use of nanometric clays (laponite) induces a large surface area which introduces the differentiation between the polymer located in the clay vicinity (interphase) and the bulk polymer. Composi...

  7. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incremental expansions... incremental facilities to be rolled-in to the pipeline's rates. For every expansion that has an at-risk...

  8. Recovery of valuable metals from electronic scraps by clays and organo-clays: Study on bi-ionic model solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannicelli-Zubiani, Elena Maria; Cristiani, Cinzia; Dotelli, Giovanni; Gallo Stampino, Paola

    2017-02-01

    The demand of valuable metals, as precious metals and rare earths, is constantly increasing in the global market, as many and different technological applications exploit these materials because of their unique properties. Since natural resources are located just in focused areas, an interesting possibility could be the recovery of metals from Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE). The aim of this work is to evaluate the recovery potentialities of clays and organo-clay based systems towards the metals contained in the solutions of electronic scraps dissolved in strong acid, by preliminary tests on bi-ionic model solutions. Lanthanum has been chosen as representative of the rare earths while copper has been considered since it is by far the most used metal in electric and electronic equipment. The considered sorbents are a montmorillonitic clay and two polyamine based organo-clays. Uptake and release processes have been carried out in order to assess the performances of these solids and to evaluate the uptake and release mechanisms. The results showed that the cationic exchange is the prevailing mechanism in the case of pristine clay, while both coordinating effect due to amino groups and cationic exchange occur in the case of modified clays, respectively accounting for copper and lanthanum uptake. Furthermore the pH was found having a great influence in both the adsorption and desorption phenomena. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stiff clay masses: big storages of fossil and renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilotro, Giuseppe; Fidelibus, Maria Dolores; Qeraxhiu, Lydra; Argentiero, Ilenia; Pellicani, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    The crystalline structure of the clay and its behaviour at the micro and macro scale have been and are still the object of studies in different fields of earth science: mineralogy, geotechnics, etc. It has been known for several decades that the volumetric equilibrium of a well-defined clay (mono mineralogical or mineralogical melange, with or without the mixing with other fines), depends on the salinity of the interstitial fluid (in terms of concentration of one or more kind of salts) under a stress field. The mechanism is very complex involving many chemical and physical topics, but may be easy to understand: the elementary structures of a two faced crystals are electrically negative charged with the interstitial fluid as the dielectric of a capacitor. Consequently, an electrical field is generated whose intensity depends on the electric charge and the properties of the dielectric. Such electric field can produce mechanical work, enlarging the faces of the capacitor, unless external forces prevent it. If external forces exceed the internal ones, the system behaves as a loaded spring, which stores energy of deformation to give back as soon as the external force weakens. The clay of marine sedimentation incorporates interstitial salt water of composition derived and similar to those of sea water. Such type of interstitial water chemically has high concentration of dissolved ions, mainly Na, which generates in the dielectric spaces a low electrical field, compared with that given in identical situation by low salt concentration in interstitial water. In nature, as well described in geoscience, the turning between the two interstitial water types is very common and driven by ion diffusion processes like, surface fresh water interacting with salt interstitial water of old marine clays. The latter, either by the overburden of younger sedimentary layers, but mainly by very strong capillary forces activated by surface drainage and EVT from sun and dry wind, undergo

  10. Tipping Point for Expansion of Layered Aluminosilicates in Weakly Polar Solvents: Supercritical CO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Herbert T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Loganathan, Narasimhan [College; Bowers, Geoffrey M. [Department; Kirkpatrick, R. James [College; Yazaydin, A. Ozgur [College; Department; Burton, Sarah D. [William; Hoyt, David W. [William; Thanthiriwatte, K. Sahan [Department; Dixon, David A. [Department; McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Ilton, Eugene S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States; Loring, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99356, United States

    2017-10-11

    Layered aluminosilicates play a dominant role in the mechanical and gas storage properties of the subsurface, are used in diverse industrial applications, and serve as model materials for understanding solvent-ion-support systems. Although expansion in the presence of H2O is well known to be systematically correlated with the hydration free energy of the interlayer cation, in environments dominated by non-polar solvents (i.e. CO2), uptake into the interlayer is not well-understood. Using novel high pressure capabilities, we investigated the interaction of super-critical CO2 with Na+-, NH4+-, and Cs+-saturated montmorillonite, comparing results with predictions from molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the known trend in H2O, and that cation solvation energies in CO2 suggest a stronger interaction with Na+, both the NH4+- and Cs+-clays readily absorbed CO2 and expanded while the Na+-clay did not. The apparent inertness of the Na+-clay was not due to kinetics, as experiments seeking a stable expanded state showed that none exists. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a large endothermicity to CO2 intercalation in the Na+-clay, but little or no energy barrier for the NH4+- and Cs+-clays. Consequently, we have shown for the first time that in the presence of a low dielectric constant gas swelling depends more on the strength of the interaction between interlayer cation and aluminosilicate sheets and less on that with solvent. The finding suggests a distinct regime in layered aluminosilicates swelling behavior triggered by low solvent polarizability, with important implications in geomechanics, storage and retention of volatile gases, and across industrial uses in gelling, decoloring, heterogeneous catalysis, and semi-permeable reactive barriers.

  11. The ternary system U(VI) / humic acid / Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Claudia

    2013-07-23

    The storage of nuclear waste in deep geological formations is discussed worldwide as the main strategy for nuclear waste management. To ensure the confinement of the nuclear waste, a multiple barrier system which consists of engineered, geo-engineered, and geological barriers will be applied. Thereby, in Germany the definition of the isolating rock zone represents an important safety function indicator. Clay rock is internationally investigated as potential host rock for a repository and represents a part of the geological barrier. In the present work, the natural clay rock Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri rock laboratory, Switzerland, was studied. In Germany, the direct disposal of the spent nuclear fuel without the reprocessing of the spent fuel is preferred. In case of water ingress, radionuclides can be released from the nuclear waste repository into its surroundings, namely the host rock of the repository. Humic acids, ubiquitous in nature, can be found associated with the inorganic components in natural clay rock (1.5 x 10{sup -3} wt.% in Opalinus Clay). They can be released under certain conditions. Due to their variety of functional groups, humic acids are very strong complexing agents for metal ions. They have inherent redox abilities and a colloidal conformation in solution. Because of these characteristics, humic acids can affect the mobility of metal ions such as actinides. Furthermore, in the near-field of a repository elevated temperatures have to be considered due to the heat production resulting from the radioactive decay of the various radionuclides in the nuclear waste. This work focuses on the interaction of uranium, as main component of spent nuclear fuel, with Opalinus Clay and studies the influence of humic acid and elevated temperature on this interaction. Thus, the collected sorption and diffusion data are not only relevant for safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories but also for any clay-containing system present in the environment

  12. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  13. Cysteine, thiourea and thiocyanate interactions with clays: FT-IR, Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana, Henrique; Paesano, Andrea; da Costa, Antonio C S; di Mauro, Eduardo; de Souza, Ivan G; Ivashita, Flávio F; de Souza, Cláudio M D; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2010-04-01

    The present study examined the adsorption of cysteine, thiourea and thiocyanate on bentonite and montmorillonite at two different pHs (3.00, 8.00). The conditions used here are closer to those of prebiotic earth. As shown by FT-IR, Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry, the most important finding of this work is that cysteine and thiourea penetrate into the interlayer of the clays and reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), and as consequence, cystine and c,c'-dithiodiformamidinium ion are formed. This mechanism resembles that which occurs with aconitase. This is a very important result for prebiotic chemistry; we should think about clays not just sink of molecules, but as primitive vessels of production of biomolecules. At pH 8.00, an increasing expansion was observed in the following order for both minerals: thiourea > thiocyanate > cysteine. At pH 3.00, the same order was not observed and thiourea had an opposite behavior, being the compound producing the lowest expansion. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that at pH 8.00, the proportion of Fe(2+) ions in bentonite increased, doubling for thiourea, or more than doubling for cysteine, in both clays. However, at pH 3.00, cysteine and thiourea did not change significantly the relative amount of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions, when compared to clays without adsorption. For thiocyanate, the amount of Fe(2+) produced was independent of the pH or clay used, probably because the interlayers of clays are very acidic and HSCN formed does not reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). For the interaction of thiocyanate with the clays, it was not possible to identify any potential compound formed. For the samples of bentonite and montmorillonite at pH 8.00 with cysteine, EPR spectroscopy showed that intensity of the lines due to Fe(3+) decreased because the reaction of Fe(3+)/cysteine. Intensity of EPR lines did not change when the samples of bentonite at pH 3.00 with and without cysteine were compared. These results are in accordance with those

  14. Light reflection visualization to determine solute diffusion into clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minjune; Annable, Michael D; Jawitz, James W

    2014-06-01

    Light reflection visualization (LRV) experiments were performed to investigate solute diffusion in low-permeability porous media using a well-controlled two-dimensional flow chamber with a domain composed of two layers (one sand and one clay). Two different dye tracers (Brilliant Blue FCF and Ponceau 4R) and clay domains (kaolinite and montmorillonite) were used. The images obtained through the LRV technique were processed to monitor two-dimensional concentration distributions in the low-permeability zone by applying calibration curves that related light intensity to equilibrium concentrations for each dye tracer in the clay. One dimensional experimentally-measured LRV concentration profiles in the clay were found to be in very good agreement with those predicted from a one-dimensional analytical solution, with coefficient of efficiency values that exceeded 0.97. The retardation factors (R) for both dyes were relatively large, leading to slow diffusive penetration into the clays. At a relative concentration C/C0=0.1, Brilliant Blue FCF in kaolinite (R=11) diffused approximately 10 mm after 21 days of source loading, and Ponceau 4R in montmorillonite (R=7) diffused approximately 12 mm after 23 days of source loading. The LRV experimentally-measured two-dimensional concentration profiles in the clay were also well described by a simple analytical solution. The results from this study demonstrate that the LRV approach is an attractive non-invasive tool to investigate the concentration distribution of dye tracers in clays in laboratory experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Expansive Openness in Teacher Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmons, Royce

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: Previous work on the use of open educational resources in K-12 classrooms has generally focused on issues related to cost. The current study takes a more expansive view of openness that also accounts for adaptation and sharing in authentic classroom contexts. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study The study seeks to…

  16. On Fourier re-expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Liflyand, E.

    2012-01-01

    We study an extension to Fourier transforms of the old problem on absolute convergence of the re-expansion in the sine (cosine) Fourier series of an absolutely convergent cosine (sine) Fourier series. The results are obtained by revealing certain relations between the Fourier transforms and their Hilbert transforms.

  17. On persistently positively expansive maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Arbieto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we prove that any C¹-persistently positively expansive map is expanding. This improves a result due to Sakai (Sakai 2004.Neste artigo, mostramos que todo mapa C¹-persistentemente positivamente expansivo e expansor. Isto melhora um resultado devido a Sakai (Sakai 2004.

  18. The bootstrap and edgeworth expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This monograph addresses two quite different topics, in the belief that each can shed light on the other. Firstly, it lays the foundation for a particular view of the bootstrap. Secondly, it gives an account of Edgeworth expansion. Chapter 1 is about the bootstrap, witih almost no mention of Edgeworth expansion; Chapter 2 is about Edgeworth expansion, with scarcely a word about the bootstrap; and Chapters 3 and 4 bring these two themes together, using Edgeworth expansion to explore and develop the properites of the bootstrap. The book is aimed a a graduate level audience who has some exposure to the methods of theoretical statistics. However, technical details are delayed until the last chapter (entitled "Details of Mathematical Rogour"), and so a mathematically able reader without knowledge of the rigorous theory of probability will have no trouble understanding the first four-fifths of the book. The book simultaneously fills two gaps in the literature; it provides a very readable graduate level account of t...

  19. Multiscale expansions in discrete world

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... multiscale expansions discretely. The power of this manageable method is confirmed by applying it to two selected nonlinear Schrödinger evolution equations. This approach can also be applied to other nonlinear discrete evolution equations. All the computations have been made with Maple computer packet program.

  20. Large N Expansion. Vector Models

    OpenAIRE

    Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary version of a contribution to the "Quantum Field Theory. Non-Perturbative QFT" topical area of "Modern Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics" (SELECTA), eds. Aref'eva I, and Sternheimer D, Springer (2007). Consists of two parts - "main article" (Large N Expansion. Vector Models) and a "brief article" (BPHZL Renormalization).

  1. Effective Expansion: Balance between Shrinkage and Hygroscopic Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, E A; Watson, L E; Tantbirojn, D; Lou, J S B; Versluis, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hygroscopic expansion and polymerization shrinkage for compensation of polymerization shrinkage stresses in a restored tooth. One resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), 2 compomers (Dyract, Dentsply; Compoglass, Ivoclar), and a universal resin-based composite (Esthet•X HD, Dentsply) were tested. Volumetric change after polymerization ("total shrinkage") and during 4 wk of water storage at 37°C was measured using an optical method (n= 10). Post-gel shrinkage was measured during polymerization using a strain gauge method (n= 10). Extracted human molars with large mesio-occluso-distal slot preparations were restored with the tested restorative materials. Tooth surfaces at baseline (preparation), after restoration, and during 4 wk of 37°C water storage were scanned with an optical scanner to determine cuspal flexure (n= 8). Occlusal interface integrity was measured using dye penetration. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc tests (significance level 0.05). All tested materials shrunk after polymerization. RMGI had the highest total shrinkage (4.65%) but lowest post-gel shrinkage (0.35%). Shrinkage values dropped significantly during storage in water but had not completely compensated polymerization shrinkage after 4 wk. All restored teeth initially exhibited inward (negative) cuspal flexure due to polymerization shrinkage. Cuspal flexure with the RMGI restoration was significantly less (-6.4 µm) than with the other materials (-12.1 to -14.1 µm). After 1 d, cuspal flexure reversed to +5.0 µm cuspal expansion with the RMGI and increased to +9.3 µm at 4 wk. After 4 wk, hygroscopic expansion compensated cuspal flexure in a compomer (Compoglass) and reduced flexure with Dyract and resin-based composite. Marginal integrity (93.7% intact restoration wall) was best for the Compoglass restorations and lowest (73.1%) for the RMGI restorations. Hygroscopic

  2. Seismic slip on clay nano-foliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretusini, Stefano; Plümper, Oliver; Spagnuolo, Elena; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Deformation processes active at seismic slip rates (ca. 1 m/s) on smectite-rich slipping zones are not well understood, although they likely control the mechanical behaviour of: i) subduction zone faults affected by tsunamigenic earthquakes and seismic surface rupturing, and ii) landslide decollements. Here we present a set of rotary experiments performed on water-dampened 2 mm thick clay-rich (70% wt. smectite and 30% wt. opal) gouge layers sheared at slip rates V ranging from 0.01 to 1.5 m/s, for 3 m of displacement under 5 MPa normal stress. Microstructural analyses were conducted on pre- and post-sheared gouges using focused ion beam scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. All sheared gouges were slip weakening in the first 0.1 m of displacement, with friction coefficient decreasing from 0.4-0.3 to 0.1-0.05. Then, with progressive slip, gouges evolved to slip-strengthening (final friction coefficient of 0.47-0.35) at V ≤0.1 m/s and slip-neutral (final friction of 0.05) at V=1.5 m/s. Despite the large difference in the imposed slip rate and frictional behaviour, the slipping zone always consisted of a nano-foliation defined by sub-micrometric smectite crystals wrapping opal grains. The microstructural differences were (1) the thickness of the slipping zone which decreased from 1.5 mm at V≤0.1 m/s to 0.15 mm at V=1.5 m/s, and (2) the structure of the foliated fabric, which was S/C'-type at V≤0.1 m/s and anastomosing-type at V=1.5 m/s. The presence of a similar nano-foliation in all the smectite-rich wet gouges suggests the activation of similar frictional processes, most likely grain boundary and interlayer frictional sliding aided by water films, operating from sub-seismic to seismic strain rates ( 10-10000 1/s). Water films on crystal boundaries and interlayers possibly control the micro- and nano-mechanics of smectite deformation, therefore influencing the bulk frictional behaviour during seismic slip.

  3. Kisameet Glacial Clay: an Unexpected Source of Bacterial Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Sarah L; Behroozian, Shekooh; Xu, Wanjing; Surette, Michael G; Li, Loretta; Davies, Julian

    2017-05-23

    Widespread antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is providing the impetus to explore novel sources of antimicrobial agents. Recently, the potent antibacterial activity of certain clay minerals has stimulated scientific interest in these materials. One such example is Kisameet glacial clay (KC), an antibacterial clay from a deposit on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. However, our understanding of the active principles of these complex natural substances is incomplete. Like soils, clays may possess complex mixtures of bacterial taxa, including the Actinobacteria , a clade known to be rich in antibiotic-producing organisms. Here, we present the first characterization of both the microbial and geochemical characteristics of a glacial clay deposit. KC harbors surprising bacterial species richness, with at least three distinct community types. We show that the deposit has clines of inorganic elements that can be leached by pH, which may be drivers of community structure. We also note the prevalence of Gallionellaceae in samples recovered near the surface, as well as taxa that include medically or economically important bacteria such as Actinomycetes and Paenibacillus These results provide insight into the microbial taxa that may be the source of KC antibacterial activity and suggest that natural clays may be rich sources of microbial and molecular diversity. IMPORTANCE Identifying and characterizing the resident microbial populations (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi) is key to understanding the ecology, chemistry, and homeostasis of virtually all sites on Earth. The Kisameet Bay deposit in British Columbia, Canada, holds a novel glacial clay with a history of medicinal use by local indigenous people. We previously showed that it has potent activity against a variety of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, suggesting it could complement our dwindling arsenal of antibiotics. Here, we have characterized the microbiome of this deposit to gain insight

  4. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weck, Philippe F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheshire, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaich, Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolery, Thomas J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, Terry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, William L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-04

    Deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in clay/shale/argillaceous rock formations has received much consideration given its desirable attributes such as isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, slow diffusion, sorbtive mineralogy, and geologically widespread (Jové Colón et al., 2014). There is a wealth of gained scientific expertise on the behavior of clay/shale/ argillaceous rock given its focus in international nuclear waste repository programs that includes underground research laboratories (URLs) in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. Jové Colón et al. (2014) have described some of these investigative efforts in clay rock ranging from site characterization to research on the engineered barrier system (EBS). Evaluations of disposal options that include nuclear waste disposition in clay/shale/argillaceous rock have determined that this host media can accommodate a wide range of waste types. R&D work within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) assessing thermal effects and fluid-mineral interactions for the disposition of heat-generating waste have so far demonstrated the feasibility for the EBS and clay host rock to withstand high thermal loads. This report represents the continuation of disposal R&D efforts on the advancement and refinement of coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), hydrothermal experiments on clay interactions, used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development. The development and implementation of a clay/shale/argillite reference case described in Jové Colón et al. (2014) for FY15 will be documented in another report (Mariner et al. 2015) – only a brief description will be given here. This clay reference case implementation is the result of integration efforts between the GDSA PA and disposal in argillite work packages. The assessment of sacrificial zones in the EBS is being addressed through experimental work along with 1D reactive

  5. Polyimide-Clay Composite Materials for Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwoll, Robert A.; Connell, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of nanometer-sized clay particles into a polyimide matrix has been shown to enhance the physical properties of specific polymer systems. The clay comprises large stacked platelets of the oxides of aluminum and silicon. These sheets have long dimensions on the order of tenths of a micrometer and thicknesses of several nanometers. Homogeneous dispersion of the clay platelets in the polymer matrix is necessary to achieve those enhancements in polymer properties. Natural montmorillonite with the empirical formula Na0.33Mg0.33Al1.67(OH)2(Si4O10) contains exchangeable inorganic cations. The clay lamellae stack together with the positive sodium ions situated between the surfaces of the individual sheets to balance negatively charged oxygen atoms that are on the surfaces of the sheets. These surface charges contribute to strong electrostatic forces which hold the sheets together tightly. Exfoliation can be accomplished only with unusual measures. In preparing clay nanocomposites, we have taken two steps to try to reduce these interlamellar forces in order to promote the separation (exfoliation) of the sheets and the dispersion of the individual clay particles throughout the organic polymer matrix. In the first step, some of the surface Na(+) ions are replaced with Li(+) ions. Unlike sodium cations, the lithium cations migrate into the interior of the lamellae when the system is heated. Their departure from the surface reduces the surface charge and therefore the attractive forces between the sheets. The loss of alkali metal cations from the surface can be measured as the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay. For example, we found that the CEC of montmorillonite clay was reduced by almost two thirds by treating it with lithium ions and heating to 250 C for 24 hr. Lesser heating has a smaller effect on the CEC. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the d-spacing decreased from ca. 1.34 to 0.97 nm, apparently a consequence of a collapse of the clay

  6. Influence of Alkali Resistant (Ar) Fibreglass in Porcelain Clay for Manufacturing Vitrified Clay Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhmal Hanapi, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sufizar; Taib, Hariati; Ismail, Al Emran; Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Salleh, Salihatun Md; Sadikin, Azmahani; Mahzan, Shahruddin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the characteristics of porcelain ceramic with influence of milled Alkali Resistant (AR) fiberglass for manufacturing vitrified clay pipes. In this study, raw materials consist of porcelain clay and AR fiberglass were refined into powders less than 90μm. Subsequently, these samples were compacted into cylindrical pellet for chemical analysis using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). The ceramic sample was produced by mixing different weight percentage of AR glass to porcelain ceramic with 3 wt%, 6 wt%, 9 wt% and 12 wt%. Subsequently, the sample was compacted with 3 ton of pressure load and sintered at 900 °C, 1000 °C, 1100 °C and 1200 °C. The phase identification by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and microstructural analysis were performed for the sintered sample. Chemical analysis revealed that the significant element for all raw material are SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O and K2O. Phase identification analysis shown that sample sintered at 1000 °C produces quartz (SiO2), berlinite (AlPO4), albite (NaAlSi3O8) and calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CaMgAlSiO). The formation of primary mullite was observed in sample sintered at 1100 °C. The image of microstructural morphology denoted that the formation of glassy phase with decreasing amount of void when sintering temperature and addition of AR glass were increased, which correspond well to phase identification analysis.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Acid and Alkaline Treated Kaolin Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaolin was refluxed with HNO3, HCl, H3PO4, CH3COOH, and NaOH of 3M concentration at 110 °C for 4 hours followed by calcination at 550 °C for 2 hours. The physico-chemical characteristics of resulted leached kaolinite clay were studied by XRF, XRD, FTIR, TGA, DTA, SEM and N2 adsorption techniques. XRF and FTIR study indicate that acid treatment under reflux conditions lead to the removal of the octahedral Al3+ cations along with other impurities. XRD of acid treated clay shows that, the peak intensity was found to decrease. Extent of leaching of Al3+ ions is different for different acid/base treatment. The acid treatment increased the Si/Al ratio, surface area and pore volume of the clay. Thus, the treated kaolin clay can be used as promising adsorbent and catalyst supports. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 1st March 2013; Revised: 9th April 2013; Accepted: 19th April 2013[How to Cite: Kumar, S., Panda, A. K., Singh, R.K. (2013. Preparation and Characterization of Acids and Alkali Treated Kaolin Clay. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 8 (1: 61-69. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4530.61-69][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4530.61-69] |View in  |

  8. Sensitive clay sands respond to chemical oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, G.E.; Bessenyei, Z.; Sloat, B.

    1975-11-01

    The Almy sands in the Green River Basin of northwest Wyoming contain water sensitive clays. To promote clay stabilization of the injection well bores, a long term potassium chloride soak of a week or more with a 5 percent solution and a follow-up treatment of phosphate and surfactant to coat clay surfaces was used. This stabilization treatment was followed by a slug of high molecular weight polyacrylamides, which gave a continued degree of clay stabilization by effectively insulating the clay surfaces from contact with the injection water. The nonionic polyacrylamides (10 percent anionic charge) were also used to improve volumetric sweep by permeability unification of the sand reservoirs. Following the permeability unification stage, a wettability adjustment was initiated to flood the tighter zones and promote inhibition. This flood of phosphates in the presence of very low concentrations of acrylamide was continued for the balance of flood life. The projected oil recovery efficiency of the above treatment was about 50 percent, while waterflood projects in the same area were only expected to reach 30 percent before water-oil ratios become uneconomic. A microemulsion flooding project is currently being planned for this area. It will include a brine preflush and micellar solution made up of petroleum sulfonate, phosphates, and polymer. The drive solution will be polyacrylamide.

  9. Nafion–clay hybrids with a network structure

    KAUST Repository

    Burgaz, Engin

    2009-05-01

    Nafion-clay hybrid membranes with a unique microstructure were synthesized using a fundamentally new approach. The new approach is based on depletion aggregation of suspended particles - a well-known phenomenon in colloids. For certain concentrations of clay and polymer, addition of Nafion solution to clay suspensions in water leads to a gel. Using Cryo-TEM we show that the clay particles in the hybrid gels form a network structure with an average cell size in the order of 500 nm. The hybrid gels are subsequently cast to produce hybrid Nafion-clay membranes. Compared to pure Nafion the swelling of the hybrid membranes in water and methanol is dramatically reduced while their selectivity (ratio of conductivity over permeability) increases. The small decrease of ionic conductivity for the hybrid membranes is more than compensated by the large decrease in methanol permeability. Lastly the hybrid membranes are much stiffer and can withstand higher temperatures compared to pure Nafion. Both of these characteristics are highly desirable for use in fuel cell applications, since a) they will allow the use of a thinner membrane circumventing problems associated with the membrane resistance and b) enable high temperature applications. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clay fraction mineralogy of a Cambisol in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastacio, A. S.; Fabris, J. D., E-mail: jdfabris@ufmg.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Stucki, J. W. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences (United States); Coelho, F. S.; Pinto, I. V. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Viana, J. H. M. [Embrapa Milho e Sorgo (Brazil)

    2005-11-15

    Clay minerals having a 2:1 (tetrahedral:octahedral sheet) structure may be found in strongly weathering soils only if the local pedo-climatic environment prevents them from further weathering to other minerals such as iron oxides. The clay minerals impart important chemical properties to soils, in part by virtue of changes in the redox state of iron in their crystal structures. Knowing the chemical nature of soil clays is a first step in evaluating their potential reactivity with other soil constituents and processes, such as the chemical decomposition of organic substrates to be potentially used in environmental remediation. The purpose of this work was to characterize the iron oxides and iron-bearing clay minerals from a B horizon of a Cambisol developed on tuffite in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. The iron oxides of this NaOH-treated clay-fraction were found to contain mainly maghemite ({gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and superparamagnetic goethite ({alpha}FeOOH). Kaolinite (Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}), smectite, and minor portions of anatase (TiO{sub 2}) were identified in the CBD-treated sample.

  11. Performance of macro clay on the porous asphalt mixture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurulain, C. M.; Ramadhansyah, P. J.; Haryati, Y.; Norhidayah, A. H.; Abdullah, M. E.; Ibrahim, M. H. Wan

    2017-11-01

    Porous asphalt pavement already well known as one type of pavement since many decades, however due to lack in strength it is not been widely used in road construction especially in high stresses areas. Many research had been conducted by researchers in order to improve the durability and increase the service life of the road. One of the methods that commonly used is through asphalt modification. Objectives of this study are to discuss influence of macro-clay in terms of physical and rheological properties and their effect on performance of porous asphalt mixture. Various percentage of macro-clay (starting from 2% to 8%) was blended in an asphalt binder and compacted using the Marshall compactor. The blended asphalt was characterized using penetration, softening point test and penetration index compared with unmodified binder. Performance tests of asphalt mixture were carried out such as Los Angeles Abrasion Value (LAAV) and Stability and Flow test in order to determine the strength and durability. The results show that the addition of macro-clay would increase in softening point but decrease in binder penetration. Based on the results, while macro-clay changes physical and rheological properties of bitumen and increase stiffness, it also improves strength and durability resistance, as well. Generally, the best improvements in the modified binders were obtained with 4% of macro-clay.

  12. Adsorption and Desorption of Nitrogen and Water Vapor by clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Deshan; Chen, Qiong; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and water vapor by clay has a significant impact on unsaturated soil physical and mechanical properties. In order to study the adsorption and desorption characteristics of nitrogen and water vapor by montmorillonite, kaolin and sliding zone soils, the Autosorb-iQ specific surface area and pore size analyzer instrument of United State was taken to carry out the analysis test. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen at 77K and water vapor at 293K on clay sample were conducted. The theories of BET, FHH and hydration energy were taken to calculate the specific surface, surface fractal dimension and adsorption energy. The results show that the calculated specific surface of water vapor by clay is bigger than nitrogen adsorption test because clay can adsorb more water vapor molecule than nitrogen. Smaller and polar water vapor molecule can access the micropore and then adsorb on the mineral surface and mineral intralayer, which make the mineral surface cations hydrate and the mineral surface smoother. Bigger and nonpolar nitrogen molecule can not enter into the micropore as water vapor molecule and has weak interaction with clay surface.

  13. Morphological Evaluation of Variously Intercalated Pre-baked Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah Hameed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of porous materials is enjoying tremendous popularity and attention of the advance scientific communities due to their excellent adsorptive and catalytic activities. Clays are one of the most important candidates in the porous community which shows the above mentioned activities after modifing with a different intercalating agent. The paper is focused on the infiuence of some inorganic intercalating agents (NaOH on the morphology of the variously intercalated clay samples. The alkali metal was used as the inorganic intercalating agent. The effect of intercalation temperature, intercalation agent concentration and intercalation time on the pre-baked clay morphology were also part of the study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM study was performed to evaluate the morphological changes of the resultant intercalates. Different morphological properties were improved significantly in the case of the inorganically modified clay samples. Thus, such intercalations are suggested to be effective if the clays under study are to be used for different industrial process at elevated conditions.

  14. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Water Absorbing Plantation Clay for Vertical Greenery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lih-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the arises of environmental conscious, the usage of vertical garden system has become more popular in urban cities. Citizens can enjoys the benefits of energy and cost saving besides ornamental effect. More investigations have been conducted on green facades led to the cities ecological enhancement.However, limited plants species can be planted for green facades systems as this system does not provide sufficient soil and nutrients for common plants. Alternative plantation methods such as planted box and felt system required additional maintenance attention. The idea of using clay composite which consists of nutritious soil, water absorbing polymer and flexible cement clay potentially become alternative vertical greenery systems that offers economic and sustainable plantation platform for more variety of plants.The fabricating of clay composite involved three processes, they are: mixing, moulding and drying. Physical properties characterisation (density, pH, compression test, aging test and water immersion test were tested on the dried fabricated clay composite to ensure their sustainability in tropical climate. The results showed that clay composite with 1.5 wt% of cement and 0.3 wt% superabsorbent polymer shows optimum water absorbing properties. This system are expected to enable more agriculture activities in urban living.

  16. Modification of clay-based waste containment materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K. [DuPont Central Research and Development, Newark, DE (United States); Whang, J.M. [DuPont Specialty Chemicals, Deepwater, NJ (United States); McDevitt, M.F. [DuPont Central Research and Development, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Bentonite clays are used extensively for waste containment barriers to help impede the flow of water in the subsurface because of their low permeability characteristics. However, they do little to prevent diffusion of contaminants, which is the major transport mechanism at low water flows. A more effective way of minimizing contaminant migration in the subsurface is to modify the bentonite clay with highly sorptive materials. Batch sorption studies were conducted to evaluate the sorptive capabilities of organo-clays and humic- and iron-based materials. These materials proved to be effective sorbents for the organic contaminants 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, nitrobenzene, and aniline in water, humic acid, and methanol solution media. The sorption capacities were several orders of magnitude greater than that of unmodified bentonite clay. Modeling results indicate that with small amounts of these materials used as additives in clay barriers, contaminant flux through walls could be kept very small for 100 years or more. The cost of such levels of additives can be small compared to overall construction costs.

  17. Geochemical Investigation of Clay Minerals in Marte, Borno State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Adams

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay deposit collected from various locations in Marte (Northern Borno, were studied to determine their physical and chemical characteristics in order to evaluate their suitability for industrial uses. Major and trace element analyses were carried out on clay samples using Inductively Couple Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES and X- Ray Fluorescence (XRF. The result of the chemical analysis of the ten (10 samples collected showed significant amounts of SiO2 and Al2O3. Silica content ranges from 51.48 to 62.44 % while alumina varies from 12.49 to 19.00 %. The calcium oxide ranges from 1.17 to 3.39 %, Na2O ranges from 1.1 to 8.61 %, K2O from 1.54 to 3.66 %, MgO varies from 0.04 to0.14 %, Fe2O3 varies from 0.3 to 2.7 % and MnO ranges from 0.01 to 1.03 %. The result showed that the clays are mainly smectite with quartz and felspar as the main non-clay minerals. Generally, the geochemical results of the samples do not meet the standard for industrial utilization when compared to the Industrial specifications. However, for industrial utilization, some of the clay samples may be used after necessary beneficiations.

  18. {alpha}-Pinene conversion by modified-kaolinitic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volzone, C. [CETMIC-Centro de Tecnologia de Recursos Minerales y Ceramica-(CONICET-CIC), C.C. 49, Cno. Centenario y 506 (1897) M.B. Gonnet, Prov., Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: volzcris@netverk.com.ar; Masini, O. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Comelli, N.A. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Grzona, L.M. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Ponzi, E.N. [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP) calle 47 No. 257 (1900) La Plata, Prov., Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, M.I. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina)

    2005-10-15

    The isomerization of {alpha}-pinene using natural kaolinitic clay before and after different treatments was studied in this work. The kaolinite is a clay material constituted by phyllosilicate 1:1 layer (one sheet of tetrahedral silicon and one sheet of octahedral alumina). The clay was treated at different times using 6.0 N solution of sulfuric acid previous heating to 500 or 700 K. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, by chemical analyses and acidity measurements. The catalytic reactions were carried out at 373 K in a reactor batch with condenser and stirrer. Samples were taken at regular intervals, and reactants and products were quantitatively analyzed with a gas chromatograph after separation of the individual compounds. Conversions of alpha pinene between 67 and 94%, and selectivities in camphene and in limonene of 65 and 23%, respectively, were obtained with the clay treated at different conditions. The structural and textural changes of the clay by the treatments influenced on catalytic reactions.

  19. Selective organic synthesis over metal cation-exchanged clay catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateiwa, J.; Uemura, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Results of recent studies conducted by the authors are reviewed on the use, as catalysts, of metal cation-exchanged montmorillonite (M{sup n+}-mont), a modified natural clay with a layer structure, and metal cation-exchanged fluor-tetrasilicic mica (M{sup n+}-TSM), a synthetic clay with a layer structure, for the following organic synthesis: (1) Friedel-Crafts alkylation of phenol with 4-hydroxybutan-2-one to produce 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butan-2-one (raspberry ketone), (2) rearrangement of alkyl phenyl ethers to corresponding alkylphenols, (3) aromatic alkylation of phenol with aldehydes and ketones to produce corresponding gem-bis(hydroxyphenyl)alkanes (bisphenols) and alkylphenols, respectively, (4) a facile and an almost quantitative substrate-selective acetalization, (5) alkane oxidation with aqueous tert-butyl hydroperoxide, (6) Prins reaction of styrenes with aldehydes using clay as a Bronsted acid, and (7) inter-and intra-molecular carbonyl-ene reaction using clay as a Lewis acid in condition similar to that of Prins reaction. In almost all cases, the clay catalysts could be regenerated and reused several times, after filtration, washing and drying. 42 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Chemical composition of the clays as indicator raw material sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khramchenkova Rezida Kh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of study on the chemical composition of unglazed pottery from the excavations of the Bulgar fortified settlement site and the clay, selected from the modern deposits of ceramic raw materials located near the medieval settlement sites. Significant differences in macro- and microelement composition of different groups of ceramics have been revealed. The difference in the macroelemental composition is largely determined by the ceramic fabric recipe. Thus, the high calcium content corresponds to the addition of river shells, the high content of silicon results from sand addition. A more interesting picture has been revealed in the course of studies of the so-called “trace elements” (microelements. Nine groups of ceramics with different elemental set have been distinguished. The first two groups consist of imported ceramics; other groups have demonstrated a rather pronounced elemental composition. The most notable variations are observed in chromium, vanadium and nickel content. Similar microelement composition variety has been observed in clays from deposits of different localization, while the concentration of the mentioned elements in a variety of clays also differs considerably. Therefore, marker elements typical of different clays have been identified. A comparative analysis of the data obtained for clay raw materials and ceramics has been conducted. The results demonstrate the potential of studying the elemental composition in order to determine the localization of the raw material sources for ceramic production.

  1. Adsorption of cobalt ions from waste water on activated Saudi clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jlil, Saad A.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to remove the Cobalt ions from wastewater by three types of Saudi clay. These were collected from Tabbuk city (Tabbuk clay), Khiber city (Khiber clay), and Bahhah city (Bahhah clay). The paper also examined the effect of different activators on the enhancement of adsorption capacity of clays for cobalt ions. The results showed minor enhancement in the adsorption capacities of cobalt ions on three types of clays activated by acid treatment. The adsorption capacity of clays improved particularly for Tabbuk clay when treated with hydrogen peroxide as an activator. The adsorption capacity increased from 3.94 to 12.9 mg/g for the untreated and treated Tabbuk clay, respectively. Also, the adsorption capacity of Bahhah clay increased by activating with sodium chloride from 3.44 to 12.55 mg/g for untreated and treated sample, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data were correlated using five equilibrium equations, namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, BET, and Toth isotherm equations. Langmuir isotherm agreed well with the experimental data of Khiber and Bahhah clay, while Freundlich model and Langmuir-Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk and Bahhah clay activated by NaCl. The results showed that Freundlich model fitted well with the experimental data of Tabbuk clay when activated by H2O2 and H2SO4. Finally, the BET model did not describe the experimental data well for the three types of clay after activation.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and properties of fluoroelastomer/clay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Sriram

    The aim of the thesis is to prepare fluoroelastomer/clay nanocomposites by melt-mixing and investigate the effect of nano-dispersion on composite properties. Using theological and morphological analyses, it was found that intercalated FKM nanocomposites can he obtained by using di(hydrogenated tallow-alkyl) dimethyl ammonium modified organoclays. However, the presence of excess amount of modifier did not improve the composite morphology but rather resulted in plasticization of the elastomer matrix. The vulcanization conditions were shown to be detrimental to the nanocomposite morphology resulting in considerable decrease of d-spacing. Still, the mechanical properties of organofilled composites were superior to that of the carbon black or unmodified clay filled counterparts. This was attributed to efficient energy release mechanism in the presence of intercalated clays. However, the addition of carbon black to the nanocomposites led to a decrease in mechanical properties. The Payne effect was clearly seen in the nanocomposites evidenced using dynamic mechanical analysis.

  3. The relation between composition and swelling in clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Margaret D.

    1955-01-01

    The phenomenon of swelling is associated with the hydration of clays; however, all clays do not swell when hydrated. those of the kaolin group, for example, exhibit little or no swelling on hydration. Sodiwm montmoillonite, on the other hand, characteristically swells in water to many times its dry volume. Calcium and magnesium montmorillonite and the hydrous micas, or so called illites, fall between these two extremes in swelling properties, but are, in general, much closer to kaolinite than to sodium montmorillonite in their increase in volume on hydration. These differences in the swelling characteristics of different clays may be related to their chemical composition, to the kind and degree of isomorphous replacements in their structure, and to the amount and nature of their associated exchangeable cations. 

  4. Nafion–clay nanocomposite membranes: Morphology and properties

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera Alonso, Rafael

    2009-05-01

    A series of Nafion-clay nanocomposite membranes were synthesized and characterized. To minimize any adverse effects on ionic conductivity the clay nanoparticles were H+ exchanged prior to mixing with Nafion. Well-dispersed, mechanically robust, free-standing nanocomposite membranes were prepared by casting from a water suspension at 180 °C under pressure. SAXS profiles reveal a preferential orientation of Nafion aggregates parallel to the membrane surface, or normal plane. This preferred orientation is induced by the platy nature of the clay nanoparticles, which tend to align parallel to the surface of the membrane. The nanocomposite membranes show dramatically reduced methanol permeability, while maintaining high levels of proton conductivity. The hybrid films are much stiffer and can withstand much higher temperatures compared to pure Nafion. The superior thermomechanical, electrochemical and barrier properties of the nanocomposite membranes are of significant interest for direct methanol fuel cell applications. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Compressive Strength of Compacted Clay-Sand Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faseel Suleman Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of sand to improve the strength of natural clays provides a viable alternative for civil infrastructure construction involving earthwork. The main objective of this note was to investigate the compressive strength of compacted clay-sand mixes. A natural clay of high plasticity was mixed with 20% and 40% sand (SP and their compaction and strength properties were determined. Results indicated that the investigated materials exhibited a brittle behaviour on the dry side of optimum and a ductile behaviour on the wet side of optimum. For each material, the compressive strength increased with an increase in density following a power law function. Conversely, the compressive strength increased with decreasing water content of the material following a similar function. Finally, the compressive strength decreased with an increase in sand content because of increased material heterogeneity and loss of sand grains from the sides during shearing.

  6. Effects of Fiber Reinforcement on Clay Aerogel Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Finlay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel, low density structures which combine biologically-based fibers with clay aerogels are produced in an environmentally benign manner using water as solvent, and no additional processing chemicals. Three different reinforcing fibers, silk, soy silk, and hemp, are evaluated in combination with poly(vinyl alcohol matrix polymer combined with montmorillonite clay. The mechanical properties of the aerogels are demonstrated to increase with reinforcing fiber length, in each case limited by a critical fiber length, beyond which mechanical properties decline due to maldistribution of filler, and disruption of the aerogel structure. Rather than the classical model for reinforced composite properties, the chemical compatibility of reinforcing fibers with the polymer/clay matrix dominated mechanical performance, along with the tendencies of the fibers to kink under compression.

  7. Influence of Two Compatibilizers on Clay/PP Nanocomposites Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela; Vuluga, Zina; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the influence on mechanical properties of using a two compatibilizer system. Cloisite- Na Clay (ClNa) was organically modified in different ways with a polyethermonoamine and maleated polypropylene (MA-g-PP) added as a second compatibilizer. A corotating twin-screw extru......This article investigates the influence on mechanical properties of using a two compatibilizer system. Cloisite- Na Clay (ClNa) was organically modified in different ways with a polyethermonoamine and maleated polypropylene (MA-g-PP) added as a second compatibilizer. A corotating twin......, and 20% in crystallinity were observed. Also an increase of 23% in creep properties was observed when using these two compatibilizer system and 1% clay. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 00:000–000, 2012. ª2012 Society of Plastics Engineers...

  8. Evaluation methods for ceramic suitability of raw clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajjaji M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic suitability of kaolinitic-illitic and chloritic-illitic raw clays was assessed by methods involving microstructure investigation and ceramic properties measurements, some reported diagrams and response surface methodology (RSM. Results of the former method showed that all clays are suitable for red stoneware tiles. The stoneware manufacturing is facilitated by the marked reduction of porosity due to the flow of melt, mainly originated from the breakdowns of illite. This result was partially supported by the use of a diagram involving the chemical composition of clays as well as by the RSM results. According to the later method, bricks may be manufactured under restricted firing conditions and stoneware tiles could be prepared at temperatures as low as 950°C.

  9. Effects of Fiber Reinforcement on Clay Aerogel Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Katherine A.; Gawryla, Matthew D.; Schiraldi, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel, low density structures which combine biologically-based fibers with clay aerogels are produced in an environmentally benign manner using water as solvent, and no additional processing chemicals. Three different reinforcing fibers, silk, soy silk, and hemp, are evaluated in combination with poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix polymer combined with montmorillonite clay. The mechanical properties of the aerogels are demonstrated to increase with reinforcing fiber length, in each case limited by a critical fiber length, beyond which mechanical properties decline due to maldistribution of filler, and disruption of the aerogel structure. Rather than the classical model for reinforced composite properties, the chemical compatibility of reinforcing fibers with the polymer/clay matrix dominated mechanical performance, along with the tendencies of the fibers to kink under compression. PMID:28793515

  10. Significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Aquiléia Helena; Roecker, Simone; Salvagioni, Denise Albieri Jodas; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin

    2014-01-01

    To understand the significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital. Qualitative, descriptive and exploratory research, undertaken with 16 patients in a day hospital in Londrina, in the state of Parana, Brazil, who participated in seven clay therapy sessions. Data collection took place from January to July 2012 through interviews guided by a semi structured questionnaire and the data were submitted to content analysis. Three themes emerged: Becoming familiar with clay art therapy; Feeling clay therapy; and Realizing the effect of clay therapy. The use of clay as a therapeutic method by psychiatric patients promoted creativity, self-consciousness, and benefited those who sought anxiety relief.

  11. Release of Escherichia coli under raindrop impact: The role of clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Parlange, J.-Y.; Schneider, R. L.; Rasmussen, E. W.; Wang, X.; Chen, M.; Dahlke, H. E.; Truhlar, A. M.; Walter, M. T.

    2018-01-01

    A recent paper by Wang et al. (2017) showed that the release of Escherichia coli (E. coli) from soil into overland flow under raindrop impact and the release of clay follow identical temporal patterns. This raised the question: what is the role of clay, if any, in E. coli transfer from soil to overland flow, e.g., does clay facilitate E. coli transfer? Using simulated rainfall experiments over soil columns with and without clay in the matrix, we found there was significantly more E. coli released from the non-clay soil because raindrops penetrated more deeply than into the soil with clay.

  12. Traditional manufacturing of clay brick used in the historical buildings of Diyarbakir (Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Dalkılıç

    2017-09-01

    The manufacturing phases of the clay bricks in Diyarbakır were examined for the first time based on in-situ observations, investigations, and interviews. The research indicated the general phases of clay brick manufacturing. Raw materials are first prepared, formed, and dried. The firing of clay bricks is then performed through hacking, heating, burning, cooling, and de-hacking. The clay bricks are finally packaged and dispatched. The traditional manufacturing of clay brick methods in Diyarbakır is similar in many regions of the world. The clay bricks are currently and extensively used in the restoration of historic structures. Therefore, their production must be continuous.

  13. PENGGUNAAN CLAY THERAPY DALAM PROGRAM BIMBINGAN UNTUK PESERTA DIDIK TINGKAT SEKOLAH DASAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniek Wirastania

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay therapy has a special role in the field of guidance and counseling. Clay Therapy has been widely use by counselor to overcome problems faced by children. Clay media adores children. Therefore, this media can assist counselor to overcome the problem of children who cannot express their problems. The guidance and counseling program conducted using the concept of clay therapy has a special counselee target. Clay therapy is aimed at children of 9-12 years of age. At these ages children are in the development process, so they need facilitation for their development, especially in the cognitive and affective aspects..Keywords: Clay Therapy, Guidance and Counseling Program.

  14. Shrub expansion in SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus Halfdan

    , and has a range of ecosystem effects where it occurs. Shrub expansion has to a large extend been attributed to increasing temperatures over the past century, while grazing and human disturbance have received less attention. Alnus viridis ssp. crispa is a common arctic species that contributes...... including only undisturbed sites. Shrub cover increased most on E and SE facing slopes, in sites with stable substrate, in areas characterised by human disturbance and in areas without muskoxen grazing. Aspect and human disturbances had the strongest effect on shrub expansion, followed by muskoxen...... locations. A. viridis represents an interesting case to study these effects. SW Greenland is a subarctic to low-arctic region with only limited increases in temperatures during the past decades, and observed climate trends being largely dependent on the observation period. In this region there is limited...

  15. Shrub expansion in SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus Halfdan

    of firewood collection. A delayed reaction to the ending of the little ice age cannot be excluded, but seems rather unlikely considering other studies from Greenland. Effects of global warming in SW Greenland must be studied over even longer time periods than the 120 years of the current study. To answer......, and has a range of ecosystem effects where it occurs. Shrub expansion has to a large extend been attributed to increasing temperatures over the past century, while grazing and human disturbance have received less attention. Alnus viridis ssp. crispa is a common arctic species that contributes...... by factors like grazing and human disturbance; II. which climatic factors control shrub growth in SW Greenland and whether these have improved sufficiently over the past century to allow shrub expansion; III. whether growth of A. viridis is promoted by experimental warming; IV. and whether plant genotypes...

  16. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  17. Case Report: Human Exposure to Dioxins from Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzblau, Alfred; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Chen, Qixuan; Lee, Shih-Yuan; Adriaens, Peter; Demond, Avery; Garabrant, David; Gillespie, Brenda; Hong, Biling; Jolliet, Olivier; Lepkowski, James; Luksemburg, William; Maier, Martha; Wenger, Yvan

    2008-01-01

    Context For the general population, the dominant source of exposure to dioxin-like compounds is food. As part of the University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study (UMDES), we measured selected polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in serum of 946 subjects who were a representative sample of the general population in five Michigan counties. Case presentation The total toxic equivalency (TEQ; based on 2005 World Health Organization toxic equivalency factors) of serum from the index case was 211 ppt on a lipid-adjusted basis, which was the highest value observed in the UMDES study population. This subject had no apparent opportunity for exposure to dioxins, except that she had lived on property with soil contaminated with dioxins for almost 30 years, and had been a ceramics hobbyist for > 30 years. Soil from her property and clay that she used for ceramics were both contaminated with dioxins, but the congener patterns differed. Discussion The congener patterns in this subject’s serum, soil, and ceramic clay suggest strongly that the dioxin contamination in clay and not soil was the dominant source of dioxin contamination in her serum. Relevance to public health practice: It appears that ceramic clay, in particular the process of firing clay with unvented kilns, can be a significant nonfood and nonindustrial source of human exposure to dioxins among ceramics hobbyists. The extent of human exposure from ceramic clay is unclear, but it may be widespread. Further work is needed to more precisely characterize the routes of exposure. PMID:18288324

  18. Origin of life and iron-rich clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    The premise that life began with self-replicating iron-rich clays is explored. In association with these clays and UV light, polar organic molecules, such as oxalic acid, were synthesized. The carbonaceous chondrites have both iron-rich clays and organic molecules. It is convenient to classify meteoritic organic matter into 3 categories: insoluble polymer, hydrocarbons and polar organics (soluble in water). Recent work on the delta D, delta N-15 and delta C-13 has made it clear that these three fractions have been made by three different mechanisms. A significant fraction of the insoluble polymer has a delta-D which suggests that it was made in an interstellar medium. The hydrocarbons seem to have been made on a parent body by a Fischer-Tropsch mechanism. The polar organics were probably synthesized in a mixture of carbonate (NH4)2CO3, Fe(++) ion and liquid water by radiolysis. In a set of experiments the radiolysis of (NH4)2CO3 in the presence and absence of Fe(++) ion has been examined. The synthesis of glycine in the presence of Fe(++) ion is 3-4 times that in the absence of ferrous ion. The effects of the addition of hydrocarbons to this mixture are explored. Iron-rich clays at low temperature and pressure are synthesized. So far the results are not sufficiently crystalline to look for replication. It should be noted that organic chelating agents such as oxalic acid do increase the crystallinity of the clays but not sufficiently. The hydrothermal synthesis of iron-rich clays is being examined.

  19. Complex resistivity signatures of ethanol in sand-clay mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personna, Yves Robert; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Werkema, Dale; Szabo, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    We performed complex resistivity (CR) measurements on laboratory columns to investigate changes in electrical properties as a result of varying ethanol (EtOH) concentration (0% to 30% v/v) in a sand–clay (bentonite) matrix. We applied Debye decomposition, a phenomenological model commonly used to fit CR data, to determine model parameters (time constant: τ, chargeability: m, and normalized chargeability: mn). The CR data showed a significant (P ≤ 0.001) time-dependent variation in the clay driven polarization response (~ 12 mrad) for 0% EtOH concentration. This temporal variation probably results from the clay–water reaction kinetics trending towards equilibrium in the sand–clay–water system. The clay polarization is significantly suppressed (P ≤ 0.001) for both measured phase (ϕ) and imaginary conductivity (σ″) with increasing EtOH concentration. Normalized chargeability consistently decreases (by up to a factor of ~ 2) as EtOH concentration increases from 0% to 10% and 10 to 20%, respectively. We propose that such suppression effects are associated with alterations in the electrical double layer (EDL) at the clay–fluid interface due to (a) strong EtOH adsorption on clay, and (b) complex intermolecular EtOH–water interactions and subsequent changes in ionic mobility on the surface in the EDL. Changes in the CR data following a change of the saturating fluid from EtOH 20% to plain water indicate strong hysteresis effects in the electrical response, which we attribute to persistent EtOH adsorption on clay. Our results demonstrate high sensitivity of CR measurements to clay–EtOH interactions in porous media, indicating the potential application of this technique for characterization and monitoring of ethanol contamination in sediments containing clays.

  20. RELIABILITY OF LENTICULAR EXPANSION COMPENSATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel BURLACU,

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Axial lenticular compensators are made to take over the longitudinal heat expansion, shock , vibration and noise, made elastic connections for piping systems. In order to have a long life for installations it is necessary that all elements, including lenticular compensators, have a good reliability. This desire can be did by technology of manufactoring and assembly of compensators, the material for lenses and by maintenance.of compensator

  1. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Lone; Hassenkam, Tue; Makovicky, Emil

    2012-01-01

    adsorption takes place, are largely unknown. In this study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that the grain surfaces in offshore and onshore chalk are more heterogeneous than previously assumed. The particles are not simply calcite surfaces but are partially covered by clay that is only 1...... that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs...

  2. Impact of tillage intensity on clay loam soil structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraghmeh, Omar; Petersen, Carsten; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    was to improve the knowledge of precision tillage practices through characterizing the effect of varied tillage intensities on structural properties of a clay loam soil. A field experiment was conducted using a randomized complete block design with two main factors, i.e. operational speed (OS, 2 levels...... with high RS (630 rpm) showed significantly higher air permeability than the other treatments. Log-transformed air permeability was 17% lower for the WT treatment than for the NWT treatments at T2. Treatments with the high OS (6.3 km/h) and thus lowest tillage intensity, generally showed lower clay and silt...

  3. Unfired clay bricks – retention curves and liquid diffusivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Kristensen, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents retention curves and liquid diffusivities of two different types of unfired clay bricks, both produced in Denmark on commercial basis. The retention curves are determined by use of pressure plate and pressure membrane apparatuses. The liquid diffusivity is calculated on the ba......This paper presents retention curves and liquid diffusivities of two different types of unfired clay bricks, both produced in Denmark on commercial basis. The retention curves are determined by use of pressure plate and pressure membrane apparatuses. The liquid diffusivity is calculated...

  4. Lithium Isotopic Fractionation in Subduction Zones: Clues From Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. B.; Hervig, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    Lithium isotope ratios show such large variations in nature (>30 per mil), that many areas of geosciences are exploring the usefulness of this system in explaining the evolution of particular rocks. Here we show how the lithium isotope ratios change during the transformation of smectite clay minerals to illite during burial metamorphism. Such a transition may be a common feature in the shallow regions of subduction zones and may ultimately affect the Li isotope compositions of fluids contributing to arc magmatism. Lithium is a ubiquitous trace element in natural formation waters that, like B, shows large isotopic fractionation especially during interactions with clay minerals. Lithium is adsorbed in the interlayer region of expandable clay minerals but is easily exchanged. Lithium is also incorporated into the octahedral sites. The substitutions of Li in two crystallographic sites of clay minerals may complicate interpretations of bulk Li-isotope ratios. We suggest that the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of Li between fluid and clay is different in the interlayer sites of clay minerals than in the octahedral sites of clay minerals. Examination of Li contents and isotope variations in experimental reactions of smectite to illite (300C, 100MPa) shows changes with structural re-arrangement of the clay layers. The Li-isotope trend declines (from ~+6 to -13 per mil, expressed as ratios of 7/6) throughout R1-ordering of the mixed-layered illite smectite (I/S). However, the equilibrium end products of the reaction have R3-ordering and show a heavier isotope ratio (~0 per mil). This observation is very similar to the trends we observed for B-isotopes, where the interlayer B initially overprinted the tetrahedral-layer B isotope composition, but as the interlayer sites were collapsed during illitization, the equilibrium isotope composition was approached. The significant Li and B isotopic changes that occur during ordering of I/S coincides with the temperatures

  5. Clays Can Decrease Gaseous Nutrient Losses from Soil-Applied Livestock Manures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Chris; Redding, Matthew; Hill, Jaye; Brown, Grant; Westermann, Maren

    2016-03-01

    Clays could underpin a viable agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement technology given their affinity for nitrogen and carbon compounds. We provide the first investigation into the efficacy of clays to decrease agricultural nitrogen GHG emissions (i.e., NO and NH). Via laboratory experiments using an automated closed-vessel analysis system, we tested the capacity of two clays (vermiculite and bentonite) to decrease NO and NH emissions and organic carbon losses from livestock manures (beef, pig, poultry, and egg layer) incorporated into an agricultural soil. Clay addition levels varied, with a maximum of 1:1 to manure (dry weight). Cumulative gas emissions were modeled using the biological logistic function, with 15 of 16 treatments successfully fitted ( clay addition level compared with no clay addition, but this difference was not significant ( = 0.17). Nitrous oxide emissions were significantly lower (×3; clay addition level compared with no clay addition. When assessing manures individually, we observed generally decreasing trends in NH and NO emissions with increasing clay addition, albeit with widely varying statistical significance between manure types. Most of the treatments also showed strong evidence of increased C retention with increasing clay additions, with up to 10 times more carbon retained in treatments containing clay compared with treatments containing no clay. This preliminary assessment of the efficacy of clays to mitigate agricultural GHG emissions indicates strong promise. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Simplifying Bridge Expansion Joint Design and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    This report presents a study focused on identifying the most durable expansion joints for the South : Carolina Department of Transportation. This is performed by proposing a degradation model for the : expansion joints and updating it based on bridge...

  7. Lack of cross-shelf transport of sediments on the western margin of India: Evidence from clay mineralogy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Nair, R.R.

    transported long distances along the shelf, cross-shelf transport appears to be minimal. Confirmatory evidence of qualitative differences in outer and inner shelf clays is provided by sediment trap clay mineralogy on the outer shelf. Clay bound pollutant...

  8. Clay mineral distribution in the shelf sediments off the northern part of the east coast of india

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, Ch.M.

    and kaolinite concentrations are higher in the clay fraction of the more sandy sediments and montmorillonite proportions are higher in the clays. The clay minerals present in the shelf sediments closely reflect their sources but their relative abundance depends...

  9. 48 CFR 570.403 - Expansion requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expansion requests. 570.403 Section 570.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL... Continued Space Requirements 570.403 Expansion requests. (a) If the expansion space is in the general scope...

  10. 75 FR 54216 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption―in Clay County, KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... (Sub-No. 704X)] CSX Transportation, Inc.--Abandonment Exemption[horbar]in Clay County, KY CSX... Manchester, Clay County, KY. The following stations are located on the line: (1) Claymont, milepost 0CF208...

  11. Synthesis of organic/inorganic hybrid gel with acid activated clay after γ-ray radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hoik; Sohn, Daewon

    2014-08-01

    A hybrid gel was prepared from acid activated clay (AA clay) and acrylic acid by gamma ray irradiation. Irradiated inorganic particles which have peroxide groups act as initiator because it generates oxide radicals by increasing temperature. Inorganic nanoparticles which are rigid part in hybrid gel also contribute to increase the mechanical property as a crosslinker. We prepared two hybrid gels to compare the effect of acid activated treatment of clay; one is synthesized with raw clay particles and another is synthesized with AA clay particles. The composition and structure of AA clay particles and raw clay particles were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence instrument and surface area analyzer. And chemical and physical property of hybrid gel with different ratios of acrylic acid and clay particle was tested by Raman spectroscope and universal testing machine (UTM). The synthesized hydrogel with 76% gel contents can elongated approximately 1000% of its original size.

  12. Major Clay Step features near Shorty's Island on the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The major clay step features are defined as having a vertical face that is greater than 1.5 meters. The clay step features were qualitately identified using an...

  13. Characterization of Clays from Poorly Processing Oil Sands using Synchrotron Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    OMOTOSO, OLADIPO; MIKULA, RANDY; URQUHART, STEPHEN; SULIMMA, HARDY; STEPHENS, PETER

    2006-01-01

    ... into reasons for poor processability. Often, however, a greater level of detail is required to quantify low levels of mixed layering in clay minerals and the multitude of non-clay minerals in the ores...

  14. Toxicity assessment of organomodified clays used in food contact materials on human target cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, J.; Maisanaba, S.; Puerto, M.; Gutierrez-Praena, D.; Jorda, M.; Aucejo, S.; Jos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the incorporation of organomodified clays based on montmorillonite into polymers intended for packaging industry is a reality. The final result is a polymer nanocomposite with enhanced barrier properties. Different organomodified clays are already commercially available and others new ones

  15. Major Clay Step features near Myrtle Bend on the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The major clay step features are defined as having a vertical face that is greater than 1.5 meters. The clay step features were qualitately identified using an...

  16. Harnessing Water and Resources from Clay Minerals on Mars and Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    Clay minerals provide a source of water, metals, and cations that can be harvested to provide resources for human exploration on Mars, asteroids, etc. Planning how to access these resources from clays could be a vital component of human exploration.

  17. Tailoring the mechanical properties of SU-8/clay nanocomposites: polymer microcantilever fabrication perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chen, H

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available SU-8/Clay nanocomposite is considered as a candidate material for microcantilever sensor fabrication. Organically modified montmorillonite clay nanoparticles are dispersed in the universally used negative photoresist polymer SU-8, for a low cost...

  18. Investigation of Cyclodextrin-Enhanced Electrokinetic Soil Remediation. Fate and Transport of Nitroaromatic Contaminants and Cyclodextrin Amendments in Expansive Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    montmorillonite, illite, pyrophyllite, talc, mica, vermiculite ) can have fixed basal spacing (e.g., 1 nm for illite via non-exchangeable K+) or can...accomplished by saturating the anode reservoir with NaOH . The dis- sociated Na+ ions would serve as the charge-carrying medium between reservoirs

  19. Polymer–clay nanocomposites via chemical grafting of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. The prepared nanocomposite materials and grafted nanoparticles were studied by XRD and TEM. Exfoliated nanocomposites were obtained for 0.5–7 wt% clay content. The nanocomposites were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMTA).

  20. Fluorescence and structure of methyl red-clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Kulhánková, Lenka; Malý, Petr; Capková, Pavla

    2008-04-01

    Two types of clay minerals-montmorillonite and vermiculite have been chosen as a host matrix for the intercalation of methyl red (MR) in order to investigate a possible fluorescence tuning via dye-clay interactions. The effect of silicate layer charge on the structure and fluorescence of dye-clay intercalated hybrid nanostructures was investigated using combination of molecular modeling with experiment. Structure of both intercalates MR-vermiculite (MR-VER) and MR-montmorillonite (MR-MMT) exhibits high degree of structural disorder resulting in broaden emission band. The fluorescence wavelength range of MR intercalated in clays is shifted to lower wavelengths compared with the pristine MR polycrystalline sample (800 nm). Results showed the strong dependence of fluorescence band maximum on the silicate layer charge, lambda(max) = 565 nm for MR-MMT, 645 nm for MR-VER and 800 nm for the methyl red fine crystalline powder, whereas the structural disorder in the arrangement of dye molecules affects the emission band broadening.

  1. The Delft Sand, Clay & Rock Cutting Model. Family Edition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    In dredging, trenching, (deep sea) mining, drilling, tunnel boring and many other applications, sand, clay or rock has to be excavated. The productions (and thus the dimensions) of the excavating equipment range from mm3/sec - cm3/sec to m3/sec. In oil drilling layers with a thickness of a magnitude

  2. The Delft Sand, Clay and Rock Cutting Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Sand, clay and rock have to be excavated for a variety of purposes, such as dredging, trenching, mining (including deep sea mining), drilling, tunnel boring and many other applications. Many excavations take place on dry land, but they are also frequently required in completely saturated conditions,

  3. Novel applications of locally sourced montmorillonite (MMT) clay as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work explores the application of a locally sourced raw material, montmorillonite (MMT) clay, as a disintegrant in the formulation of an analgesic pharmaceutical product - paracetamol. The raw MMT was refined and treated with 0.IM NaCl to yield sodium montmorillonite (NaMMT) and the powder properties established in ...

  4. Compaction Behaviour of Akure Sandy Clay Loamy Soils | Manuwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory investigations were conducted to study the behaviors of sandy clay loam soil under uni-axial compression loading. The effects of applied pressure and moisture content on bulk density of soils were observed and subjected to regression analysis. The effect of applied pressure on bulk density could be described ...

  5. Clay mineralogy of the mud banks of Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The mineralogy of the sediments constituting the mud banks formed off Cochin, Kerala, India was studied. The clay mineral composition was used as a means of understanding the nature and source of origin of the muds. Fine fraction of the mud samples...

  6. Structure–property relationship of specialty elastomer–clay ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work deals with the synthesis of specialty elastomer [fluoroelastomer and poly (styrene--ethylene-co-butylene--styrene (SEBS)]–clay nanocomposites and their structure–property relationship as elucidated from morphology studies by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray ...

  7. Fire Resistance of Concrete Constructions with Expanded Clay Aggregate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes briefly a series of full-scale tests made as documentation for extending the field of application of the reduced cross section method from the structural codes to constructions based on expanded clay aggregate. As a special result the tests verify that slabs with a short...

  8. Characterization of Ibere and Oboro clay deposits in Abia state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibere and Oboro clay deposits in Ikwuano, Abia State of Nigeria were characterized for refractory and other applications. The characteristics investigated were mineralogical composition, chemical composition, plasticity, linear shrinkage, apparent porosity, bulk density, cold crushing strength, thermal shock resistance, ...

  9. Conversion of South African clays into high quality zeolites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Clays obtained from South Africa were used as feedstock materials for the synthesis of zeolites. The conventional alkaline hydrothermal treatment of the starting material (90 °C for 8 h)was preceded by a fusion step (550 °C for 1.5 h) to improve...

  10. Role of clay as catalyst in Friedel–Craft alkylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solid catalysts in a test Friedel–Craft alkylation reaction of benzyl chloride with toluene using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) are reported. Product formation has been analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. The main objective of this work is to show how clay as a solid catalyst affects reaction rates and activation energies.

  11. New membranes made of sintered clay application to crossflow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The new mineral membranes made of sintered clay are performed and characterized in terms of porosity, hydraulic resistance, pore diameter and mechanical resistance. It is shown that these membranes can be used as microfiltration membrane. The variations of the filtrate flux as a function of time are measured during the ...

  12. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of polyethylene–clay ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of pure medium density polyethylene (MDPE) and MDPE– clay nanocomposites have been investigated by differential scanning calorimeter. The modified Avrami,. Ozawa, Liu and Ziabicki equations have been applied to describe non-isothermal crystallization process. The.

  13. Ceremonial Usage of Clays for Body Painting According to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultural practices are explored and expressed in daily living through the creative abilities of every person. This article presents an analytical critique of the uses of clays for body painting and its ceremonial and ritual significance. It reports on an ethnographic study conducted to distinguish between various functions and ...

  14. novel applications of locally sourced montmorillonite (mmt) clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. This work explores the application of a locally sourced raw material, montmorillonite (MMT) clay, as a disintegrant in the formulation of an analgesic pharmaceutical product - paracetamol. The raw. MMT was refined and treated with 0.IM NaCl to yield sodium montmorillonite (NaMMT) and the.

  15. Physico-chemical properties and industrial potential of some clay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clay samples collected from 10 locations in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria were evaluated to determine their suitability for industrial applications. The samples were pulverized, dried, sieved and quantitatively analyzed. Physical properties determined were viscosity (11-15 secs), density (1072-1769 kg m-3), plasticity ...

  16. physico-chemical properties and industrial potential of some clay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    Clay samples collected from 10 locations in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria were evaluated to determine their suitability for industrial applications. The samples were pulverized, dried, sieved and quantitatively analyzed. Physical properties determined were viscosity (11-15 secs), density (1072-1769 kg m-3), plasticity ...

  17. Modelling unfrozen water content in a silty clay permafrost deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Frederik Ancker; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of a calibration equation for determining the unfrozen water content of a Greenlandic silty clay permafrost deposit. Calibration experiments have been conducted for water contents in the interval 0 – 10 % at both 5 °C and 22 °C. Calibration equations are verified against permittivity data from a permafrost core...

  18. CERAMIC PROPERTIES OF PUGU KAOLIN CLAYS. PART 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    KEY WORDS: Ceremic properties, Kaolin clay, Flexural strength, Mullitisation, Bulk density,. Modulus of Rupture, Microstructure. INTRODUCTION. Porcelain is one of the most researched materials in the whole family of ceramics. Researchers working in this field have established factors controlling the various properties of ...

  19. Assessment of Time Functions for Piles Driven in Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustesen, Anders; Andersen, Lars; Sørensen, Carsten Steen

    The vertical bearing capacity of piles situated in clay is studied with regard to the long-term set-up. A statistical analysis is carried out on the basis of data from numerous static loading tests. The database covers a wide range of both soil and pile properties, which ensures a general...

  20. Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in clays

    KAUST Repository

    Loch, J. P. Gustav

    2010-02-13

    Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in bentonite clay are studied in the laboratory, where a 6 mm thick bentonite layer is subjected to direct current. Acidification and alkalization near anode and cathode are expected, possibly causing mineral deterioration, ion mobilization and precipitation of new solids. Afterwards the clay is analysed by XRF and anolyte and catholyte are analysed by ICP-MS. In addition, as a preliminary experiment treated bentonite is analysed by high resolution μ-XRF. Electro-osmotic flow is observed. Due to its carbonate content the bentonite is pH-buffering. Alkalization in the catholyte is substantial. Ca, Na and Sr are significantly removed from the clay and accumulate in the catholyte. Recovery in the catholyte accounts for a small fraction of the element-loss from the clay. The rest will have precipitated in undetected solid phases. μ-XRF indicates the loss of Ca-content throughout the bentonite layer. © The Author(s) 2010.

  1. Effects of Consolidation Stress State on Normally Consolidated Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lade, Poul V.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of consolidation stress state on the stress-strain and strength characteristics has been studied from experiments on undisturbed block samples of a natural, normally consolidated clay known as San Francisco Bay Mud. The results of experiments on K0-consolidated, hollow cylinder specimens...

  2. ADSORPTION OF ACID DYE ONTO ACTIVATED ALGERIAN CLAY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. In this work, activated clay from Algeria was used as adsorbent for the removal of methyl orange (MO) from aqueous solution, for this, the effects of several parameters such as contact time, adsorbent dose, pH value of aqueous solution and temperature on the adsorption of MO were also studied. The results.

  3. Birds of a Feather... and Clay, Wire, Tissue and Paint!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Lois

    2011-01-01

    What began as a review lesson in clay construction quickly became a fun learning experience filled with inspiring conversations and creatively painted birds. This lesson was successful from beginning to end, with a final reward when the artwork was displayed. The author describes the process of working on this project and shares how the students…

  4. Clay Caterpillars: A Tool for Ecology & Evolution Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    I present a framework for ecology and evolution laboratory exercises using artificial caterpillars made from modeling clay. Students generate and test hypotheses about predation rates on caterpillars that differ in appearance or "behavior" to understand how natural selection by predators shapes distribution and physical characteristics of…

  5. Placed on a Pedestal: Famous Faces in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkup, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Artists have created portraits of people for thousands of years. In sculpture, a portrait of a person's face often includes the neck and part of the shoulders and chest. These artworks are called portrait busts. In this article, the author describes how her fifth-grade students created clay portrait busts on pedestal columns. The objectives are…

  6. Palynology and clay mineralogy of the Deccan volcanic associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Palynology and clay mineralogy of the Deccan volcanic associated sediments of Saurashtra, Gujarat: Age and paleoenvironments. Bandana Samant. 1,∗. , D M Mohabey. 2. , P Srivastava. 3 and Deepali Thakre. 1. 1. Department of Geology, Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Nagpur 440 001, India. 2.

  7. Synthesis and properties of new polyimide/clay nanocomposite films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    789–798. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Synthesis and properties of new polyimide/clay nanocomposite films. YAGOUB MANSOORI. ∗. , SOMAYEH SHAH SANAEI, MOHAMMAD-REZA ZAMANLOO,. GHOLAMHASSAN IMANZADEH and SEYED VAHID ATGHIA. Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, ...

  8. Vitrification and neomineralisation of bentonitic and kaolinitic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These processes are found to be similar to those of transformation of sedimentary rocks into metamorphic and/or igneous rocks. Resultant fired mineral phases depicted mineral compositions of ceramic bodies, and the study suggested that these clays could be gainfully utilized in the making of ceramic wares, subject to ...

  9. Kinetics of plutonium and americium sorption to natural clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujanienė, Galina; Beneš, Petr; Štamberg, Karel; Ščiglo, Tomas

    2012-06-01

    Kinetics of Pu(IV) and Am(III) sorption from natural groundwater to three types of clays were studied at trace concentrations of the elements. Higher K(d) values were determined for sorption of Pu than of Am, and no clear dependence of the K(d) values and the kinetic coefficients on the composition of the clays can be deduced. Kinetic data evaluated by models for six different control processes indicated a sorption mechanism controlled by Pu or Am diffusion in the inert layer on the surface of the clays. Apart from the kinetics of the elements sorption, time-dependent changes in their bonding nature were also studied using a sequential extraction. It was found that Pu(IV) was predominantly associated with amorphous and crystalline Fe oxides as well as natural organic matter sites on the clays, whereas in the case of Am(III) the exchangeable and carbonate sites played the principal role. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adsorption of copper ions of natural montmorillonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimneva Ludmila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prospects of montmorillonite clay using for the extraction of copper ions from natural and waste waters were determined. Specified chemical and phase composition of natural forms of the montmorillonite clay are shown in the article. Quantitative characteristics of adsorption process of copper ions, the statistical exchange capacity is 1,21 (298 К, 1,25 (313 К, 1,43 (333 К. The authors have studied the balance of copper ions by the method of constructing the isotherms. The description of the adsorption process was carried out by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models. The calculations showed that the best data for the sorption described by Langmuir model. The nature of the interaction of copper ions with montmorillonite clay in natural form is presented. The calculated thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process, the obtained values of the Gibbs energy have a negative sign -11,5 (298 К, -15,6 (313 К, -16,2 (333 К кJ/mol, that corresponds to a sustainable consolidation of copper ions on the surface of the montmorillonite clay.

  11. Polypropylene–clay composite prepared from Indian bentonite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microstructural studies were carried out using scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope and the thermal properties were studied using differential scanning calorimeter. Mechanical properties of the prepared composites showed highest reinforcing and toughening effects of the clay filler at a ...

  12. Characterisation of selected South African clays for defluoridation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In large parts of South Africa groundwater contains excessive fluoride. In many such areas fluorosis is a serious problem among the local population. One way of solving the problem is to use simple house-based defluoridation systems using suitable clays, processed in various ways, as adsorbents. No information on the ...

  13. Adsorption of acid dye onto activated Algerian clay | Bendaho ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, activated clay from Algeria was used as adsorbent for the removal of methyl orange (MO) from aqueous solution, for this, the effects of several parameters such as contact time, adsorbent dose, pH value of aqueous solution and temperature on the adsorption of MO were also studied. The results showed that ...

  14. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Abdullahi and Audu. 35. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays. Obtained from Ashaka and Tango Deposits in Gombe State, Nigeria. Abdullahi S.L1 and Audu A.A2. 1Kano State Polytechnic, Kano - Nigeria. 2Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Bayero University Kano ...

  15. The radiolysis and radioracemization of amino acids on clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hall, H.; Chow, G.; Yi, L.; Lemmon, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of the surfaces of kaolinite and bentonite clays on the radiolysis and radioracemization of L-leucine and its hydrochloride salt have been investigated experimentally. L-leucine and its hydrochloride salt were deposited on the clays and the amino acid/clay preparations were irradiated by a Co-60 gamma-ray source which induced 2-89 percent radiolysis. The efficiency of radiolysis and radioracemization were measured using gas chromatography. Results were obtained for leucine in 0.1 M aqueous solution for comparison with the clay-deposted leucine and leucine hydrochloride. It is found that radiolysis and radioracemization in the samples occurred according to a pseudo-first-order rate law. Comparison of the specific rate constants showed that leucine and its hydrochloride salt were the most resistant to both radiolysis and radioracemization, followed by leucine and its hydrochloride salt on kaolin. Leucine and its HCl salt on bentonite, and leucine in aqueous solution were found to be the least resistant to radiolysis and radioracemization. The experimental results are intepreted with respect to the Vester-Ulbricht mechanism for the origin of optical activity.

  16. Improvement of Strength on Local Pottery Clays by Traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of ageing on various parameters such as particle size distribution, specific surface area, dry strength, shrinkage, fired strength, bulk density, and moisture content of clay was stud-ied. The results indicate that ageing introduces finer particle sizes due to a progressive increase in the proportion of the fine particles as ...

  17. Experiencing Clay: Inquiry-Based Learning and Assessment for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mui, Ma So

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an examination of the effects of using an inquiry-based learning pedagogy to teach ceramics to pre-service teachers (my students) at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. At the beginning of the study the students were asked to conduct experiments on the properties of clay. The results indicate that half of them were able to…

  18. Fluorescent clays-Similar transfer with sensitive detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gitis, V.; Dlugy, C.; Ziskind, G.; Sladkevich, S.; Lev, O.

    2011-01-01

    The significant probe dilution is one of the reasons to use soluble dyes and concentrated ion solutions for studies of colloid transport in subsoils and aquifers. We studied the clay transport in sand columns with Rhodamine 6G-intercalated montmorillonite (MMT). Our MMT-R exhibited transfer

  19. Burnt clay waste as a pozzolanic material in Kenya | Shihembetsa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is therefore, recommended that small scale production enterprises be set up in areas that produce burnt clay products in order to process the pozzolana from the wastes to produce alternative pozzolanic cement, hence reduce the cost of cement in construction. (Journal of Civil Engineering, JKUAT: 2002 7: 27-44) ...

  20. Vitrification and neomineralisation of bentonitic and kaolinitic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resultant fired mineral phases depicted mineral compositions of ceramic bodies, and the study suggested that these clays could be gainfully utilized in the making of ceramic wares, subject to selected beneficiation processes. Keywords: kaolin, bentonite, vitrification, neomineralization, ceramic, firing. Global Journal of ...