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Sample records for expansion properties explained

  1. The ecology of population dispersal: Modeling alternative basin-plateau foraging strategies to explain the Numic expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magargal, Kate E; Parker, Ashley K; Vernon, Kenneth Blake; Rath, Will; Codding, Brian F

    2017-07-08

    The expansion of Numic speaking populations into the Great Basin required individuals to adapt to a relatively unproductive landscape. Researchers have proposed numerous social and subsistence strategies to explain how and why these settlers were able to replace any established populations, including private property and intensive plant processing. Here we evaluate these hypotheses and propose a new strategy involving the use of landscape fire to increase resource encounter rates. Implementing a novel, spatially explicit, multi-scalar prey choice model, we examine how individual decisions approximating each alternative strategy (private property, anthropogenic fire, and intensive plant processing) would aggregate at the patch and band level to confer an overall benefit to this colonizing population. Analysis relies on experimental data reporting resource profitability and abundance, ecological data on the historic distribution of vegetation patches, and ethnohistoric data on the distribution of Numic bands. Model results show that while resource privatization and landscape fires produce a substantial advantage, intensified plant processing garners the greatest benefit. The relative benefits of alternative strategies vary significantly across ecological patches resulting in variation across ethnographic band ranges. Combined, a Numic strategy including all three alternatives would substantially increase subsistence yields. The application of a strategy set that includes landscape fire, privatization and intensified processing of seeds and nuts, explains why the Numa were able to outcompete local populations. This approach provides a framework to help explain how individual decisions can result in such population replacement events throughout human history. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Maxwell stress to explain the mechanism for the anisotropic expansion in lithiated silicon nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald C. Boone

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This computational research study attempts to explain the process that leads to volume expansion during insertion of lithium ions into a silicon nanowire. During lithiation, electrons flow through the nanowire in the opposing direction of lithium ions insertion. This causes an applied electromagnetic field which is described as being a quantum mechanical version of photon density wave theory. A series of events are calculated as the individual electrons and photons travels through the lithiated silicon nanowire. The hypothesis that will be presented employs the Maxwell stress tensor to calculate the refractive indices in three orthogonal directions during lithiation. The quantum harmonic oscillator and the electromagnetic intensity will be utilized in this presentation to calculate the energy of electrons and optical amplification of the electromagnetic field respectively. The main focus of this research study will use electron scattering theory, spontaneous and stimulated emission theory to model the breaking of cohesion bonds between silicon atoms that ultimately leads to excessive volume expansion that is witnessed during the lithiation process in Si nanowires.

  3. Learning to Apply Models of Materials While Explaining Their Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpin, Tiia; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Applying structural models is important to chemistry education at the upper secondary level, but it is considered one of the most difficult topics to learn. Purpose: This study analyses to what extent in designed lessons students learned to apply structural models in explaining the properties and behaviours of various materials.…

  4. Spatial assortment of mixed propagules explains the acceleration of range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanantoanina, Andriamihaja; Ouhinou, Aziz; Hui, Cang

    2014-01-01

    Range expansion of spreading organisms has been found to follow three types: (i) linear expansion with a constant rate of spread; (ii) bi-phase expansion with a faster linear expansion following a slower linear expansion; and (iii) accelerating expansion with a continuously increasing rate of spread. To date, no overarching formula exists that can be applied to all three types of range expansion. We investigated how propagule pressure, i.e., the initial number of individuals and their composition in terms of dispersal ability, affects the spread of a population. A system of integrodifference equations was then used to model the spatiotemporal dynamics of the population. We studied the dynamics of dispersal ability as well as the instantaneous and asymptotic rate of spread. We found that individuals with different dispersal abilities were spatially sorted with the stronger dispersers situated at the expanding range front, causing the velocity of expansion to accelerate. The instantaneous rate of spread was found to be fully determined by the growth and dispersal abilities of the population at the advancing edge of the invasion. We derived a formula for the asymptotic rate of spread under different scenarios of propagule pressure. The results suggest that data collected from the core of the invasion may underestimate the spreading rate of the population. Aside from better managing of invasive species, the derived formula could conceivably also be applied to conservation management of relocated, endangered or extra-limital species.

  5. Learning to apply models of materials while explaining their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpin, Tiia; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2014-09-01

    Background:Applying structural models is important to chemistry education at the upper secondary level, but it is considered one of the most difficult topics to learn. Purpose:This study analyses to what extent in designed lessons students learned to apply structural models in explaining the properties and behaviours of various materials. Sample:An experimental group is 27 Finnish upper secondary school students and control group included 18 students from the same school. Design and methods:In quasi-experimental setting, students were guided through predict, observe, explain activities in four practical work situations. It was intended that the structural models would encourage students to learn how to identify and apply appropriate models when predicting and explaining situations. The lessons, organised over a one-week period, began with a teacher's demonstration and continued with student experiments in which they described the properties and behaviours of six household products representing three different materials. Results:Most students in the experimental group learned to apply the models correctly, as demonstrated by post-test scores that were significantly higher than pre-test scores. The control group showed no significant difference between pre- and post-test scores. Conclusions:The findings indicate that the intervention where students engage in predict, observe, explain activities while several materials and models are confronted at the same time, had a positive effect on learning outcomes.

  6. Explaining the Expansion of Feminist Ideas: Cultural Diffusion or Political Struggle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromquist, Nelly P.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the expansion of feminist ideas as both a conceptual and a political issue. It focuses on two major theories of social change, world culture theory (WCT) and world system analysis (WSA), comparing and contrasting how they frame gender as a factor shaping society, how they account for the diffusion of feminist ideas and how…

  7. A physical model of sill expansion to explain the dynamics of unrest at calderas with application to Campi Flegrei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; Martini, Marcello

    2017-07-01

    Many calderas show remarkable unrests, which often do not culminate in eruptions (non-eruptive unrest). In this context the interpretation of the geophysical data collected by the monitoring networks is difficult. When the unrest is eruptive, a vent opening process occurs, which leads to an eruption. In volcanic calderas, vent locations typically are scattered over a large area and monogenic cones form. The resulting pattern is characterized by a wide dispersion of eruptive vents, therefore, the location of the future vent in calderas is not easily predictable. We propose an interpretation of the deformation associated to unrest and vent pattern commonly observed at volcanic calderas, based on a physical model that simulates the intrusion and the expansion of a sill. The model can explain both the uplift and the subsequent subsidence, through a single geological process. In particular, we simulate the vertical displacement that occurred at the central area of Campi Flegrei caldera during the last decades, and we obtain good agreement with the data of a leveling benchmark near the center of the caldera. Considering that the stress mainly controls the vent opening process, we try to gain insight on the vent opening in calderas through the study of the stress field produced by the intrusion of an expanding sill. We find that the tensile stress in the rock above the sill is concentrated in a ring-shaped area with radius depending on the physical properties of magma and rock, the feeding rate and the magma cooling rate. This stress field is consistent with widely dispersed eruptive vents and monogenic cone formation, which are often observed in the calderas. However, considering the mechanical properties of the elastic plate and the rheology of magma, we show that remarkable deformations may be associated with low values of stress in the rock at the top of the intrusion, thereby resulting in non-eruptive unrests. Moreover, we have found that, under the assumption of

  8. Expansions and Extensions : Ergodic, combinatorial and geometric properties of β-expansions with arbitrary digits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalle, C.C.C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Let beta be a real number bigger than 1 and A a finite set of arbitrary real numbers. A beta-expansion with digits in A of a real number x is an expression for x by an infinite sum of fractions with powers of beta in the denominators and elements from A in the numerators. Such expansions can be

  9. Effective Thermal Expansion Property of Consolidated Granular Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçük, Gülşad; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2017-11-09

    Thermally-assisted compaction of granular materials is of keen interest in many engineering applications. A proper estimation of the material behavior of compacted granular materials is contingent upon the knowledge of microstructure formation, which is highly dependent on the bulk material properties and processing conditions, during the deformation stage. Originating from the pair interactions between particles, the macroscopic properties are obtained using various homogenization techniques and postulating continuum constitutive laws. While pioneers in this field have laid fundamental groundwork regarding effective medium descriptions, there exists a discrepancy between discrete and continuum level solutions. In our previous work, we elaborated a Particle Mechanics Approach (PMA) that integrates thermal contact and Hertzian deformation models to understand the thermo-mechanically-coupled consolidation problem. We also considered the analogous problem from the perspective of the conventional Continuum Mechanics Approach (CMA). In this study, following the multi-scale modeling framework, we propose an effective thermal expansion coefficient for the thermally-assisted compaction of granular materials.

  10. Chelyabinsk meteorite explains unusual spectral properties of Baptistina Asteroid Family

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Bottke, William; Cloutis, Ed; Izawa, Matt; O'Brien, Dave; Mann, Paul; Cuddy, Matt; Corre, Lucille Le; Gaffey, Michael; Fujihara, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the spectral and compositional properties of Chelyabinsk meteorite to identify its possible parent body in the main asteroid belt. Our analysis shows that the meteorite contains two spectrally distinct but compositionally indistinguishable components of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material. Our X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the two lithologies of the Chelyabinsk meteorite are extremely similar in modal mineralogy. The meteorite is compositionally similar to LL chondrite and its most probable parent asteroid in the main belt is a member of the Flora family. Intimate mixture of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material from Chelyabinsk provides a spectral match with (8) Flora, the largest asteroid in the Flora family. The Baptistina family and Flora family overlap each other in dynamical space. Mineralogical analysis of (298) Baptistina and 9 small family members shows that their surface compositions are similar to LL chondrites, although their absorptio...

  11. Some properties of Riesz means and spectral expansions

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    S. A. Fulling

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that short-time expansions of heat kernels correlate to formal high-frequency expansions of spectral densities. It is also well known that the latter expansions are generally not literally true beyond the first term. However, the terms in the heat-kernel expansion correspond rigorously to quantities called Riesz means of the spectral expansion, which damp out oscillations in the spectral density at high frequencies by dint of performing an average over the density at all lower frequencies. In general, a change of variables leads to new Riesz means that contain different information from the old ones. In particular, for the standard second-order elliptic operators, Riesz means with respect to the square root of the spectral parameter correspond to terms in the asymptotics of elliptic and hyperbolic Green functions associated with the operator, and these quantities contain ``nonlocal'' information not contained in the usual Riesz means and their correlates in the heat kernel. Here the relationship between these two sets of Riesz means is worked out in detail; this involves just classical one-dimensional analysis and calculation, with no substantive input from spectral theory or quantum field theory. This work provides a general framework for calculations that are often carried out piecemeal (and without precise understanding of their rigorous meaning in the physics literature.

  12. High-temperature expansion and knock-out properties of moulding sands with water glass

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    Major-Gabryś K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the topic of improving the knock-out properties of moulding sand with water glass and ester hardener. It is settled that the cause of worse knock-out properties of moulding sand can be brought by their thermal expansion in increased temperatures. There is a presentation of the influence of different additives, containing Al2O3, on moulding sands’ expansion in increased temperatures. Within the frames of research, there was an elaboration of the influence of authors own additive- Glassex, on the expansion phenomenon of moulding sands with water glass and ester hardener. It is concluded, that the new additive stops the expansion of moulding sands and as well it improves their knock-out properties.

  13. [Determination of major expansion properties of refractory die material compatible with slip casting core of sintered titanium powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Y; Kuang, X; Liao, Y; Wang, H

    1999-02-01

    To determinate major expansion properties of refractory die material. The setting expansion ratio of refractory die material for slip casting core of sintered titanium powder at room temperature was performed, as well as thermal expansion ratio from room temperature to 800 degrees C. The maximum setting expansion ratio in 2 hours reached 0.3407%; The final setting expansion ratio in 24 hours was 0.3117%; The mean thermal expansion coefficient was mainly in range of 8 x 10(-6)-11 x 10(-6)/degree C; The expansion property seemed very stable after sintering repeatedly and the small shrinkage after sintering could be compensated with the die spacer and setting expansion. The expansion properties of the refractory die material that we synthesized can fulfil the application requirements of slip casting core of sintered titanium powder.

  14. Effect of Twice Hole Expansion on Fatigue Property of Ti1023 Alloy

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    YANG Guangyong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The property of the surface layer of twice hole expansion Ti1023 alloy was analyzed by TEM, X-ray and roughness tester, and the strengthen mechanism of the bushing hole expansion was discussed. The results indicate that the roughness(Ra1.722→0.349 μm, hardness(Hv32→38 and residual stress distribution of the hole are improved by twice hole expansion techniques,and the fretting wear fatigue(fatigue limits 385→619MPa of Ti1023 alloy is improved.

  15. Identification and properties of the fundamental expansion functions for neutron transport in an infinite homogeneous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, Michael S. [P.O. Box 1484, Deep River, Ont., K0J 1P0 (Canada)]. E-mail: mike@geometrics-unlimited.com

    2005-07-15

    Starting from the basic expression for the neutron flux due to a point source in an infinite homogeneous scattering and absorbing medium, the first few fundamental expansion functions corresponding to successive collisions are identified, and their analytic properties are presented, in spherical and plane geometry. Various representations of the functions are obtained in the form of power series, an expansion in a series of exponential integrals, and other integrals. The adequacy of traditional asymptotic forms is considered.

  16. Spatial variability of expansive soil properties at different scales ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper applies statistical and geostatistical procedures to analyse the spatial distribution of several soil properties and use the contribution of ge ostatistics to plan optimal soil sampling and management schemes in. Kibaha, Tanzania. Particle-size distribution, Atterberg limits and potential swell were analysed.

  17. Isentropic expansion and related thermodynamic properties of non-ionic amphiphile-water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, João Carlos R; Douhéret, Gérard; Davis, Michael I; Fjellanger, Inger Johanne; Høiland, Harald

    2008-01-28

    A concise thermodynamic formalism is developed for the molar isentropic thermal expansion, ES,m = ( partial differential Vm/ partial differential T)(Sm,x), and the ideal and excess quantities for the molar, apparent molar and partial molar isentropic expansions of binary liquid mixtures. Ultrasound speeds were determined by means of the pulse-echo-overlap method in aqueous mixtures of 2-methylpropan-2-ol at 298.15 K over the entire composition range. These data complement selected extensive literature data on density, isobaric heat capacity and ultrasound speed for 9 amphiphile (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, 2-methylpropan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol, 2-methoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol or 2-butoxyethanol)-water binary systems, which form the basis of tables listing molar and excess molar isobaric expansions and heat capacities, and molar and excess molar isentropic compressions and expansions at 298.15 K and at 65 fixed mole fractions spanning the entire composition range and fine-grained in the water-rich region. The dependence on composition of these 9 systems is graphically depicted for the excess molar isobaric and isentropic expansions and for the excess partial molar isobaric and isentropic expansions of the amphiphile. The analysis shows that isentropic thermal expansion properties give a much stronger response to amphiphile-water molecular interactions than do their isobaric counterparts. Depending on the pair property-system, the maximum excess molar isentropic value is generally twenty- to a hundred-fold greater than the corresponding maximum isobaric value, and occurs at a lower mole fraction of the amphiphile. Values at infinite dilution of the 9 amphiphiles in water are given for the excess partial molar isobaric heat capacity, isentropic compression, isobaric expansion and isentropic expansion. These values are interpreted in terms of the changes occurring when amphiphile molecules cluster into an oligomeric form. Present results are discussed

  18. High tolerance to salinity and herbivory stresses may explain the expansion of Ipomoea cairica to salt marshes.

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    Gang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Invasive plants are often confronted with heterogeneous environments and various stress factors during their secondary phase of invasion into more stressful habitats. A high tolerance to stress factors may allow exotics to successfully invade stressful environments. Ipomoea cairica, a vigorous invader in South China, has recently been expanding into salt marshes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine why this liana species is able to invade a stressful saline environment, we utilized I. cairica and 3 non-invasive species for a greenhouse experiment. The plants were subjected to three levels of salinity (i.e., watered with 0, 4 and 8 g L(-1 NaCl solutions and simulated herbivory (0, 25 and 50% of the leaf area excised treatments. The relative growth rate (RGR of I. cairica was significantly higher than the RGR of non-invasive species under both stress treatments. The growth performance of I. cairica was not significantly affected by either stress factor, while that of the non-invasive species was significantly inhibited. The leaf condensed tannin content was generally lower in I. cairica than in the non-invasive I. triloba and Paederia foetida. Ipomoea cairica exhibited a relatively low resistance to herbivory, however, its tolerance to stress factors was significantly higher than either of the non-invasive species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study examining the expansion of I. cairica to salt marshes in its introduced range. Our results suggest that the high tolerance of I. cairica to key stress factors (e.g., salinity and herbivory contributes to its invasion into salt marshes. For I. cairica, a trade-off in resource reallocation may allow increased resources to be allocated to tolerance and growth. This may contribute to a secondary invasion into stressful habitats. Finally, we suggest that I. cairica could spread further and successfully occupy salt marshes, and countermeasures based on herbivory could be

  19. On the properties of circular beams: normalization, Laguerre-Gauss expansion, and free-space divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Giuseppe

    2015-04-15

    Circular beams were introduced as a very general solution to the paraxial wave equation carrying orbital angular momentum. Here, we study their properties by looking at their normalization and their expansion in terms of Laguerre-Gauss modes. We also study their far-field divergence and, for particular cases of the beam parameters, their possible experimental generation.

  20. Stepping-stone expansion and habitat loss explain a peculiar genetic structure and distribution of a forest insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel-Lundhagen, Anna; Ronnås, Cecilia; Battisti, Andrea; Wallén, Johan; Larsson, Stig

    2013-06-01

    It is challenging to unravel the history of organisms with highly scattered populations. Such species may have fragmented distributions because extant populations are remnants of a previously more continuous range, or because the species has narrow habitat requirements in combination with good dispersal capacity (naturally or vector borne). The northern pine processionary moth Thaumetopoea pinivora has a scattered distribution with fragmented populations in two separate regions, northern and south-western Europe. The aims of this study were to explore the glacial and postglacial history of T. pinivora, and add to the understanding of its current distribution and level of contemporary gene flow. We surveyed published records of its occurrence and analysed individuals from a representative subset of populations across the range. A 633 bp long fragment of the mtDNA COI gene was sequenced and nine polymorphic microsatellite loci were genotyped. Only nine nucleotide sites were polymorphic in the COI gene and 90% of the individuals from across its whole range shared the same haplotype. The microsatellite diversity gradually declined towards the north, and unique alleles were found in only three of the northern and three of southern sites. Genetic structuring did not indicate complete isolation among regions, but an increase of genetic isolation by geographic distance. Approximate Bayesian model choice suggested recent divergence during the postglacial period, but glacial refugia remain unidentified. The progressive reduction of suitable habitats is suggested to explain the genetic structure of the populations and we suggest that T. pinivora is a cold-tolerant relict species, with situation-dependent dispersal. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Investigation of char strength and expansion properties of an intumescent coating exposed to rapid heating rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kristian Petersen; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Català, Pere

    2013-01-01

    , char properties, measured at room temperature, were dependent on the preceding storage conditions (in air or in a desiccator). The char was found to have the highest mechanical strength against compression in the outer crust facing the heat source. For thin (147μm) free coating films, a tendency...... with respect to the mechanical resistance against compression, degree of expansion, and residual mass fraction. Experimental results show that when using this type of shock heating, the mechanical resistance of the char against compression cannot meaningfully be correlated to the expansion factor. In addition...

  2. Explaining the texture properties of whey protein isolate/starch co-gels from fracture structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Nakamura, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    The effects of tapioca starch (TS) and potato starch (PS) on texture properties of whey protein isolate (WPI)/starch co-gels were investigated for fracture structures. We focused on two types of WPI network structures. In a fine-stranded structure at pH 6.8, the WPI/TS co-gel fractured similarly to the WPI single gel. The WPI/PS co-gel was broken at a lower strain and lower stress. In a random aggregation at pH 5.8, the WPI/TS co-gel reached a yielding point at a lower strain, whereas the WPI/PS co-gel fractured at a higher strain and higher stress. In the fracture structures, it was revealed that breaks occurred in different places in these cases, which could explain the different texture properties of samples. This study tries to explain the texture properties of WPI/starch co-gels from fracture structures and provides a reference to predict texture properties of the WPI/starch food system.

  3. XRD- and infrared-probed anisotropic thermal expansion properties of an organic semiconducting single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, J; Capria, E; Benevoli, L; Perucchi, A; Demitri, N; Fraleoni-Morgera, A

    2018-01-17

    The anisotropic thermal expansion properties of an organic semiconducting single crystal constituted by 4-hydroxycyanobenzene (4HCB) have been probed by XRD in the range 120-300 K. The anisotropic thermal expansion coefficients for the three crystallographic axes and for the crystal volume have been determined. A careful analysis of the crystal structure revealed that the two different H-bonds stemming from the two independent, differently oriented 4HCB molecules composing the unit cell have different rearrangement patterns upon temperature variations, in terms of both bond length and bond angle. Linearly Polarized Mid InfraRed (LP-MIR) measurements carried out in the same temperature range, focused on the O-H bond spectral region, confirm this finding. The same LP-MIR measurements, on the basis of a semi-empirical relation and of geometrical considerations and assumptions, allowed calculation of the -CNH-O- hydrogen bond length along the a and b axes of the crystal. In turn, the so-calculated -CNH-O- bond lengths were used to derive the thermal expansion coefficients along the corresponding crystal axes, as well as the volumetric one, using just the LP-MIR data. Reasonable to good agreement with the same values obtained from XRD measurements was obtained. This proof-of-principle opens interesting perspectives about the possible development of a rapid, low cost and industry-friendly assessment of the thermal expansion properties of organic semiconducting single crystals (OSSCs) involving hydrogen bonds.

  4. Uniaxial Negative Thermal Expansion and Mechanical Properties of a Zinc-Formate Framework

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    Hongqiang Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermal expansion behavior of a metal-formate framework, Zn(HCOO2·2(H2O (1, has been systematically studied via variable temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Our results demonstrate that this formate exhibits significant negative thermal expansion (NTE, −26(2 MK−1 along its c-axis. Detailed structural analyses reveal that the large NTE response is attributed to the ‘hinge-strut’ like framework motion. In addition, the fundamental mechanical properties of framework 1 have been explored via nanoindentation experiments. The measured elastic modulus and hardness properties on the (00-2/(100/(110 facets are 35.5/35.0/27.1 and 2.04/1.83/0.47 GPa, respectively. The stiffness and hardness anisotropy can be correlated well with the underlying framework structure, like its thermoelastic behavior.

  5. Negative thermal expansion properties in tetragonal NbPO5 from the first principles studies

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    Tao Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available By using the first-principles calculations based on density functional theory combined with quasi-harmonic approximation, we have studied the geometric structural, thermal properties, and the negative thermal expansion (NTE properties of tetrahedral NbPO5. The variations of cell parameter and cell volume of tetrahedral NbPO5 with temperature show that it displays NTE behavior in the range of 473-800 K along a-axis and the corresponding average coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE is approximately -0.766 ×10−6 K−1, while the c cell parameter and the cell volume display positive thermal expansion behaviors. These results are in consistent well with the experiment observations. Further vibrational modes analysis, together with Grüneisen parameters calculations, revealed that the transverse vibration of O corner atoms accompanying the rocking motions of corner-shared NbO6 octahedron and PO4 tetrahedron dominate the negative thermal properties of tetrahedral NbPO5. Our findings will provide an understanding for the underlying mechanisms of the NTE in oxides materials.

  6. Are the High Hip Fracture Rates Among Norwegian Women Explained by Impaired Bone Material Properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Vilaplana, Laila; Güerri, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Wang-Fagerland, Morten; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; F Eriksen, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture rates in Norway rank among the highest in the world, more than double that of Spanish women. Previous studies were unable to demonstrate significant differences between the two populations with respect to bone mass or calcium metabolism. In order to test whether the difference in fracture propensity between both populations could be explained by differences in bone material quality we assessed bone material strength using microindentation in 42 Norwegian and 46 Spanish women with normal BMD values, without clinical or morphometric vertebral fractures, no clinical or laboratory signs of secondary osteoporosis, and without use of drugs with known influence on bone metabolism. Bone material properties were assessed by microindentation of the thick cortex of the mid tibia following local anesthesia of the area using the Osteoprobe device (Active Life Scientific, Santa Barbara, CA, USA). Indentation distance was standardized against a calibration phantom of methylmethacrylate and results, as percentage of this reference value, expressed as bone material strength index units (BMSi). We found that the bone material properties reflected in the BMSi value of Norwegian women was significantly inferior when compared to Spanish women (77 ± 7.1 versus 80.7 ± 7.8, p hip BMD was significantly higher in Norwegian women (1.218 g/cm(2) versus 0.938 g/cm(2) , p fracture after such falls. These ethnic differences in bone material properties may partly explain the higher propensity for fracture in Norwegian women. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  7. Removal properties of low-thermal-expansion materials with rotating-sphere elastic emission machining

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    Masahiko Kanaoka et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical mirrors used in extreme ultraviolet lithography systems require a figure accuracy and a roughness of about 0.1 nm rms. In addition, mirror substrates must be low-thermal-expansion materials. Thus, in this study, we processed two low-thermal-expansion materials, ULE [K. Hrdina, B. Hanson, P. Fenn, R. Sabia, Proc. SPIE 4688 (2002 454.] (Corning Inc. and Zerodur [I. Mitra, M.J. Davis, J. Alkemper, Rolf Müller, H. Kohlmann, L. Aschke, E. Mörsen, S. Ritter, H. Hack, W. Pannhorst, Proc. SPIE 4688 (2002 462.] (SCHOTT AG, with elastic emission machining (EEM in order to evaluate the removal properties. Consequently, we successfully calculated the respective removal rates, because removal volumes were found to be proportional to process times in EEM. Moreover, we demonstrated that the surface roughness of Zerodur is reduced to 0.1 nm rms in the spatial wavelength range from 100 μm to 1 mm.

  8. Development of Cone Wedge Ring Expansion Test to Evaluate Mechanical Properties of Clad Tubing Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    To determine the hoop tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding in a hot cell, a cone wedge ring expansion test method was developed. A four-piece wedge insert was designed with tapered angles matched to the cone shape of a loading piston. The ring specimen was expanded in the radial direction by the lateral expansion of the wedges under the downward movement of the piston. The advantages of the proposed method are that implementation of the test setup in a hot cell is simple and easy, and that it enables a direct strain measurement of the test specimen from the piston’s vertical displacement soon after the wedge-clad contact resistance is initiated.

  9. Soil food web properties explain ecosystem services across European land use systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Franciska T; Thébault, Elisa; Liiri, Mira; Birkhofer, Klaus; Tsiafouli, Maria A; Bjørnlund, Lisa; Bracht Jørgensen, Helene; Brady, Mark Vincent; Christensen, Søren; de Ruiter, Peter C; d'Hertefeldt, Tina; Frouz, Jan; Hedlund, Katarina; Hemerik, Lia; Hol, W H Gera; Hotes, Stefan; Mortimer, Simon R; Setälä, Heikki; Sgardelis, Stefanos P; Uteseny, Karoline; van der Putten, Wim H; Wolters, Volkmar; Bardgett, Richard D

    2013-08-27

    Intensive land use reduces the diversity and abundance of many soil biota, with consequences for the processes that they govern and the ecosystem services that these processes underpin. Relationships between soil biota and ecosystem processes have mostly been found in laboratory experiments and rarely are found in the field. Here, we quantified, across four countries of contrasting climatic and soil conditions in Europe, how differences in soil food web composition resulting from land use systems (intensive wheat rotation, extensive rotation, and permanent grassland) influence the functioning of soils and the ecosystem services that they deliver. Intensive wheat rotation consistently reduced the biomass of all components of the soil food web across all countries. Soil food web properties strongly and consistently predicted processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations, and they were a better predictor of these processes than land use. Processes of carbon loss increased with soil food web properties that correlated with soil C content, such as earthworm biomass and fungal/bacterial energy channel ratio, and were greatest in permanent grassland. In contrast, processes of N cycling were explained by soil food web properties independent of land use, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and bacterial channel biomass. Our quantification of the contribution of soil organisms to processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations shows that soil biota need to be included in C and N cycling models and highlights the need to map and conserve soil biodiversity across the world.

  10. The rights of a Florida wife: slavery, U.S. expansion, and married women's property law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Laurel A

    2010-01-01

    Civil law rules were adopted in Florida that granted married women property rights long before legal reforms occurred in northern states. This article analyzes white wives' property and law in Florida between 1820 and 1860. Initially, married women's property rights were inadvertently protected by treaty law and limited to women who married before 1818. Wives' right to own separate property in Florida was subsequently reconfirmed in statute and extended to include later marriages. In contrast, nonwhites generally lost the rights and property they had enjoyed under Spain's civil law in the same period. This contrast reveals that in Florida (and other southern borderlands) it was not concern for women, or simply legal precedent, but the desire to incorporate new territory and expand slavery that influenced the development of marital property law. This challenges previous histories, which have excluded the earlier acts in the Southern borderlands and emphasized those passed in the Northeast beginning in the late 1840s. While those later acts were influenced by the early woman's rights movement and by concern for families reduced to poverty during the rise of market capitalism, this case study indicates that expansion of United States territory and slavery were responsible for the earlier married women's property rights in southern borderland territories such as Florida.

  11. Parallel calculations of vibrational properties in complex materials: negative thermal expansion and elastic inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    Effects of thermal vibrations are essential to obtain a more complete understanding of the properties of complex materials. For example, they are important in the analysis and simulation of x-ray absorption spectra (XAS). In previous work we introduced an ab initio approach for a variety of vibrational effects, such as crystallographic and XAS Debye-Waller factors, Debye and Einstein temperatures, and thermal expansion coefficients. This approach uses theoretical dynamical matrices from which the locally-projected vibrational densities of states are obtained using a Lanczos recursion algorithm. In this talk I present recent improvements to our implementation, which permit simulations of more complex materials with up to two orders of magnitude larger simulation cells. The method takes advantage of parallelization in calculations of the dynamical matrix with VASP. To illustrate these capabilities we discuss two problems of considerable interest: negative thermal expansion in ZrW2O8; and local inhomogeneities in the elastic properties of supported metal nanoparticles. Both cases highlight the importance of a local treatment of vibrational properties. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER15476, with computer support from DOE-NERSC.

  12. Properties of glass, oil's formation...how to explain it? The secret is to amaze!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, Silvia; Evangelista, Rosaria; Bianucci, Marco; Mantovani, Carlo; Gambarelli, Licia

    2013-04-01

    The design and testing of numerous routes for teaching and dissemination of topics in physics, biology, geology and energy is born from a collaboration between teachers and researchers that lasted for many years in Parma, Italy. These projects are implemented by the association "Parma Casa della Scienza", which promotes the dissemination of scientific culture in schools and among the public. The main purpose of the association is to create a science center in Parma, offering also training opportunities on techniques for teaching science. The funds for the projects come from European competitions and Cariparma Foundation. Currently the association is proposing laboratory activities, with the widespread diffusion of 20 educational programs, included in school curricula. The approach is informal and aims at the stimulation of curiosity and surprise. Students who participate arise so spontaneously in an attitude of research - action, working directly on the phenomena under study. This avoids the clichés of standard passive listening. Our work is a constant search for ideas, ways and means to demonstrate, for the purposes of school education, how useful is the game and the interaction with the phenomena, many of which are usually only seen in books and not lived with awareness. Two in particular are the educational proposals that we would like to present , relating to content of great importance that are rarely addressed in the context of schooling completed First Path: explains the physico-chemical properties and structural properties of glassy materials; enters the details of the molecular structure of "amorphous solid" contrasting it with that of crystalline solid; llustrates the process of formation; gives reason for its peculiar properties from which derive extreme flexibility of working and the many optical properties. This is achieved through the actual processing of a fluid "pseudo glassy" realized at low temperatures, which simulates the processes described

  13. The Development of Expansion Plug Wedge Test for Clad Tubing Structure Mechanical Property Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL

    2016-01-12

    To determine the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding in a hot cell, a simple test was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is described fully in US Patent Application 20060070455, “Expanded plug method for developing circumferential mechanical properties of tubular materials.” This method is designed for testing fuel rod cladding ductility in a hot cell using an expandable plug to stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The specimen strain is determined using the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. This method removes many complexities associated with specimen preparation and testing. The advantages are the simplicity of measuring the test component assembly in the hot cell and the direct measurement of the specimen’s strain. It was also found that cladding strength could be determined from the test results.

  14. Properties of Expansive Porous Materials Based on Aluminate Cement for Underground Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Wojciech

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory tests of expansive mineral binding materials based on calcium aluminate with mineral additive and carbonate expander. The expansion size can be controlled by the amount of expander as well as by water-binder ratio. The study describes the method of measuring the expansion size and selected technical parameters of obtained expansive binders together with the proposed scope of their use in underground construction.

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of the Effects of 3-Chloride Compounds on the Geotechnical Properties of an Expansive Subgrade Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Anjan Kumar, M.; Raju, G. V. R. Prasada

    2017-12-01

    Expansive soils are known to be problematic due to their nature and behavior. These soils show volume changes due to changes in moisture content, which cause distortions to structures constructed on them. Relentless efforts are being made all over the world to find solution to the problems of expansive soils. In the case of flexible pavements, unless the subgrade is appropriately treated during the construction stage, the maintenance cost will increase substantially due to deterioration. There are many methods of stabilising expansive subgrade soils. Chemical stabilisation is one such technique employed in improving the engineering properties of the expansive soil. Investigations on chemical stabilization of expansive soils revealed that conventionally used lime could be replaced by the chloride compound chemicals because of their ready dissolvability in water, ease of mixing with soil and supply of sufficient cations for ready cation exchange. The main objective of this work is to study the effectiveness of three chloride compound chemicals, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), magnesium chloride (MgCl2) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on the geotechnical properties of an expansive soil. The chemicals content up to 2% were added to the soil and its effect on the index limits, swell pressure, compaction characteristics as well as California bearing ratio are studied. It was observed that aluminum chloride chemical content has a significantly higher influence than the other two chemicals and it could be recognized as an effective chemical stabilizer.

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of the Effects of 3-Chloride Compounds on the Geotechnical Properties of an Expansive Subgrade Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Anjan Kumar, M.; Raju, G. V. R. Prasada

    2017-10-01

    Expansive soils are known to be problematic due to their nature and behavior. These soils show volume changes due to changes in moisture content, which cause distortions to structures constructed on them. Relentless efforts are being made all over the world to find solution to the problems of expansive soils. In the case of flexible pavements, unless the subgrade is appropriately treated during the construction stage, the maintenance cost will increase substantially due to deterioration. There are many methods of stabilising expansive subgrade soils. Chemical stabilisation is one such technique employed in improving the engineering properties of the expansive soil. Investigations on chemical stabilization of expansive soils revealed that conventionally used lime could be replaced by the chloride compound chemicals because of their ready dissolvability in water, ease of mixing with soil and supply of sufficient cations for ready cation exchange. The main objective of this work is to study the effectiveness of three chloride compound chemicals, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), magnesium chloride (MgCl2) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on the geotechnical properties of an expansive soil. The chemicals content up to 2% were added to the soil and its effect on the index limits, swell pressure, compaction characteristics as well as California bearing ratio are studied. It was observed that aluminum chloride chemical content has a significantly higher influence than the other two chemicals and it could be recognized as an effective chemical stabilizer.

  17. Improving the geotechnical properties of expansive soils by mixture with olive mill wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña, C.; Azañón, J. M.; Corpas, F.; Nieto, F.; León-Buendía, C.

    2012-04-01

    In Southern Spain, Olive grove is an artificial forest which has a surface of 18.000 km2, representing more than 25% of olive oil world production. During the manufacturing process of this oil, different types of residues are generated. The most important is a biomass called olive mill wastewater. It is a dark colored liquid which can not be directly poured onto natural watercourses. On the one hand, part of this biomass is burnt to produce electrical energy or treated to make a bio-diesel. On the other hand, we propose the use of olive mill wastewater as a stabilization agent for expansive clayey soils. Using raw biomass as a stabilization agent two objectives are achieved: adding value to biomass and reducing the problems of expansive soils. Moreover, an important reduction of economic costs can take place. A pure bentonite clay was chosen as a sample of original expansive soil. It is abundant in Southern Spain and its main component is Na-Montmorillonite. Bentonite is very susceptible to changes in the environmental available moisture and very unsuitable for its use in civil engineering due to its low bearing capacity, high plasticity and volume changes. Several dosages (5%, 10%, 15%) of olive mill wastewater were added to the original sample of bentonite. To study eventual improvements in the mechanical properties of soil, Proctor, Atterberg Limits, California Bearing Ratio, Swelling Pressure and X-Ray Diffraction tests were carried out, following Spanish standards UNE by AENOR. Both geotechnical and mineralogical characterizations were developed at two different curing times: 15 and 30 days. The Plasticity Index (PI) of the original bentonite soil was 251 (High Plasticity). The addition of 15% of olive mill wastewater yielded reductions of PI similar to those produced by the addition of 5% of Portland cement. The California Bearing Ratio (CBR) values increased slightly after the treatment with biomass leading to very similar values to those obtained after the

  18. Effect of Aggregate Mineralogy and Concrete Microstructure on Thermal Expansion and Strength Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwoo An

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate type and mineralogy are critical factors that influence the engineering properties of concrete. Temperature variations result in internal volume changes could potentially cause a network of micro-cracks leading to a reduction in the concrete’s compressive strength. The study specifically studied the effect of the type and mineralogy of fine and coarse aggregates in the normal strength concrete properties. As performance measures, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and compressive strength were tested with concrete specimens containing different types of fine aggregates (manufactured and natural sands and coarse aggregates (dolomite and granite. Petrographic examinations were then performed to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the aggregate and to examine the aggregate and concrete microstructure. The test results indicate the concrete CTE increases with the silicon (Si volume content in the aggregate. For the concrete specimens with higher CTE, the micro-crack density in the interfacial transition zone (ITZ tended to be higher. The width of ITZ in one of the concrete specimens with a high CTE displayed the widest core ITZ (approx. 11 µm while the concrete specimens with a low CTE showed the narrowest core ITZ (approx. 3.5 µm. This was attributed to early-age thermal cracking. Specimens with higher CTE are more susceptible to thermal stress.

  19. Effect of culture media on expansion properties of human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehinejad, Parvin; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Nematollahi-Mahani, Seyed Noureddin; Ali, Abdul Manaf; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Janzamin, Ehsan; Hajghani, Masoomeh

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been isolated from a number of different tissues, including umbilical cord. Because of the lack of a uniform approach to human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal (hUCM) cell expansion, we attempted to identify the optimum conditions for the production of a high quantity of hUCM cells by comparing two media. We compared the ability of Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/F12 (DMEM/F12) and Alpha Minimum Essential Medium (α-MEM) with Glutamax (GL) (α-MEM/GL) to expand hUCM cells. For this purpose, hUCM cells were cultured in plates containing different culture media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Culture dishes were left undisturbed for 10-14 days to allow propagation of the newly formed hUCM cells. The expansion properties, CD marker expression, differentiation potential, population doubling time (PDT) and cell activity were compared between the two groups. The hUCM cells harvested from each group were positive for MSC markers, including CD44, CD90 and CD105, while they were negative for the hematopoietic cell surface marker CD34. Differentiation into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages was confirmed for both treatments. Cell activity was higher in the α-MEM/GL group than the DMEM/F12 group. PDT was calculated to be 60 h for the DMEM/F12 group, while for the α-MEM/GL group it was 47 h. Our data reveal that α-MEM/GL with 10% FBS supports hUCM cell growth more strongly than DMEM/F12 with 10% FBS.

  20. Experimental high temperature coefficients of compressibility and expansivity of liquid sodium and other related properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das Gupta, S.

    1977-01-01

    The subcooled compressibility of liquid sodium was directly measured up to 200 atm between 900 K and 1867 K, utilizing a new multi-property apparatus which was previously tested with water. The experimental data were correlated by a 6-term equation with a standard deviation of 9.2 percent. The equation can be used to estimate the subcooled compressibilities and densities of liquid sodium up to 2300 K and 500 ata. The thermal expansion of liquid sodium was also measured along the isobars 1 ata, 28.9 ata and 69 ata. Densities within 1 percent of those obtained from the compressibilities were obtained. The above compressibility data were used to calculate the thermal pressure coefficient of saturated liquid sodium. Also, Bhise and Bonilla's correlations for the vapor pressure and the saturated liquid density of sodium were improved by including more data in the analysis. The critical temperature and density were thus reestimated as 2508.7 K and 0.2141 g/cc. Furthermore, a new correlation was developed to determine the heat of vaporization of sodium up to the critical point, which was then used to estimate the internal energy and the entropy of vaporization and the saturated vapor density of sodium up to the critical point.

  1. Effects of cation substitution on thermal expansion and electrical properties of lanthanum chromites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Xifeng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Liu Yingjia [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Gao Ling [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China); Guo Lucun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210009 (China)]. E-mail: lc-guo@163.com

    2006-11-30

    The effects of cation substitution on the sintering characteristics, thermal expansion and electrical conductivity properties of La(AE)Cr(M)O{sub 3} (AE=Mg, Ca, Sr, M=Ni, Cu, Co) were investigated. The sinterability of alkaline metal earth (AE)-doped LaCrO{sub 3} increased with AE contents in a sequence of Ca > Sr > Mg. Sr-doped LaCrO{sub 3} sample had a TEC compatible with that of 8YSZ electrolyte. The transition metals of Ni, Co and Cu substituted in Cr-site further optimized the sinterability of La{sub 0.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CrO{sub 3} in air. Ni and Co could effectively enhance the electrical conductivity from room temperature to 1123 K though the concomitant increase in TEC was distinctively large with Co doping. The TEC was controlled by co-doping Ni and Co in Cr-site, and La{sub 0.85}Sr{sub 0.15}Cr{sub 0.95}Ni{sub 0.02}Co{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} exhibited a TEC of 10.9 x 10{sup -6}/K, which was matched with that of 8YSZ, indicating that it could be suitable to be used as an SOFC interconnect material.

  2. The Thermal Expansion and Tensile Properties of Nanofiber-ZrW2O8 Reinforced Epoxy Resin Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xinran; Huang, Chuanjun; Yang, Huihui; Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Jingwen; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    Zirconium tungstate/epoxy (ZrW2O8/EP) nanocomposites were prepared and their thermal expansion properties were investigated within the temperature range of 4-300 K. Compared to unmodified epoxy resin, zirconium tungstate/epoxy composites lowers the thermal expansion coefficient (CTEs). The tensile strength was investigated at room temperature (300 K) and liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the tensile strength and elongation at break increases with the increasing ZrW2O8 content.

  3. Expansion parallaxes and intrinsic stellar properties for 15 simple planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberner, Detlef; Jacob, Ralf; Balick, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    We determined individual distances to a small number of rather round, quite regularly shaped planetary nebulae by combining their angular expansion in the plane of the sky with a spectroscopically measured expansion along the line of sight. For this goal, we combined up to three epochs of Hubble Space Telescope imaging data and determined the respective proper motions of rim and shell edges, and of other features as well. Ground-based radial velocities are assigned separately to the nebular rims and shells and used to determine individual distances, thereby assuming that the expansions in the line-of-sight and in the plane of sky are equal. We employed 1D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of planetary nebulae evolution to correct for the difference between the spectroscopically measured expansion velocities of rim and shell and the expansion speeds of their respective shock fronts.

  4. Matrix-filler interfaces and physical properties of metal matrix composites with negative thermal expansion manganese nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Koshi; Kuzuoka, Kota; Sugimoto, Norihiro

    2015-08-01

    Copper matrix composites containing antiperovskite manganese nitrides with negative thermal expansion (NTE) were formed using pulsed electric current sintering. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the chemically reacted region extends over 10 μm around the matrix-filler interfaces. The small-size filler was chemically deteriorated during formation of composites and it lost the NTE property. Therefore, we produced the composites using only the nitride particles having diameter larger than 50 μm. The large-size filler effectively suppressed the thermal expansion of copper and improved the conductivity of the composites to the level of pure aluminum. The present composites, having high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, are suitable for practical applications such as a heat radiation substrate for semiconductor devices.

  5. Matrix-filler interfaces and physical properties of metal matrix composites with negative thermal expansion manganese nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Koshi, E-mail: takenaka@nuap.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kuzuoka, Kota [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Sugimoto, Norihiro [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-08-28

    Copper matrix composites containing antiperovskite manganese nitrides with negative thermal expansion (NTE) were formed using pulsed electric current sintering. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the chemically reacted region extends over 10 μm around the matrix–filler interfaces. The small-size filler was chemically deteriorated during formation of composites and it lost the NTE property. Therefore, we produced the composites using only the nitride particles having diameter larger than 50 μm. The large-size filler effectively suppressed the thermal expansion of copper and improved the conductivity of the composites to the level of pure aluminum. The present composites, having high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, are suitable for practical applications such as a heat radiation substrate for semiconductor devices.

  6. a Strained Space-Time to Explain the Large Scale Properties of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2011-06-01

    Space-time can be treated as a four-dimensional material continuum. The corresponding generally curved manifold can be thought of as having been obtained, by continuous deformation, from a flat four-dimensional Euclidean manifold. In a three-dimensional ordinary situation such a deformation process would lead to strain in the manifold. Strain in turn may be read as half the difference between the actual metric tensor and the Euclidean metric tensor of the initial unstrained manifold. On the other side we know that an ordinary material would react to the attempt to introduce strain giving rise to internal stresses and one would have correspondingly a deformation energy term. Assuming the conditions of linear elasticity hold, the deformation energy is easily written in terms of the strain tensor. The Einstein-Hilbert action is generalized to include the new deformation energy term. The new action for space-time has been applied to a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe filled with dust and radiation. The accelerated expansion is recovered, then the theory has been put through four cosmological tests: primordial isotopic abundances from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis; Acoustic Scale of the CMB; Large Scale Structure formation; luminosity/redshift relation for type Ia supernovae. The result is satisfying and has allowed to evaluate the parameters of the theory.

  7. Hydration properties of vegetable foods explained by Flory-Rehner theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Paudel, E.; Voda, A.; Khalloufi, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have analyzed the hydration properties of vegetable materials, namely carrots and mushrooms, by means of the Flory-Rehner theory. This is done to circumvent problems with the ill-defined concept of water holding capacity. Via this thermodynamic theory one can predict the hydration

  8. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Yan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou (China); Li, Yuan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou (China); Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Kaufmann, Andreas M. [Clinic for Gynecology CCM/CBF, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Albers, Andreas E., E-mail: andreas.albers@charite.de [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  9. Investigation of the relationship between negative thermal expansion and other thermal properties of framework oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catherine Anne

    2005-07-01

    Several framework solids exhibit negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide temperature range, e.g. ZrW2O 8 exhibits NTE from 0.3 to 1050 K. Although NTE is observed in other materials, it occurs over much smaller temperature ranges. NTE in ZrW 2O8 is associated with the low-energy modes corresponding to the correlated vibrations of the [WO4]2- tetrahedra and their three nearest [ZrO6]8- octahedra. This involves translation as well as libration, and low-energy optic modes play a central role. Thermal expansion and resistance to heat flow both originate in the anharmonic terms of the lattice dynamics. The influence of NTE in these framework materials on thermal conductivity was investigated by measuring thermal properties (thermal conductivity, kappa, from ca. 2 to 390 K and heat capacity, CP, from ca. 0.4 to 300 K) of ZrW2O8 and HfMo2O8. Literature values of the CP of ZrW2 O8 showed more disagreement than one might expect. In this research, it was found that the discrepancy could be due to low thermal conductivity of ZrW2O8. The CP of HfMo 2O8 is reported here for the first time. Analysis of CP reveals low-frequency modes that are not present in the binary oxides. A calculation of CP of HfMo 2O8 from HfMo2O8, ZrW2O 8, and ZrMo2O8 fits experimental C P of HfMo2O8 better since each AB 2O8 compound exhibits NTE and therefore has the low-frequency modes attributed to NTE. The thermodynamic calculations of the production of ZrW2O8 and HfMo2O8 from the appropriate oxides confirm that both are thermodynamically unstable with respect to the oxides. The kappa values of both ZrW2O8 and HfMo 2O8 are exceptionally low: kappadense(ZrW 2O8) is 0.91 W m-1 K-1 and kappadense(HfMo2O8) is 0.64 W m-1 K-1 at T = 300 K. Temperature-dependent kappa values of ZrW2O8 and HfMo2O8 are glass-like, despite polycrystalline morphology. Through consideration of the CP, phonon mean free path, and Gruneisen parameter, the kappa behavior is attributed to the low-frequency modes which are also

  10. GABAergic synapse properties may explain genetic variation in hippocampal network oscillations in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim S Heistek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive ability and the properties of brain oscillation are highly heritable in humans. Genetic variation underlying oscillatory activity might give rise to differences in cognition and behavior. How genetic diversity translates into altered properties of oscillations and synchronization of neuronal activity is unknown. To address this issue, we investigated cellular and synaptic mechanisms of hippocampal fast network oscillations in eight genetically distinct inbred mouse strains. The frequency of carbachol-induced oscillations differed substantially between mouse strains. Since GABAergic inhibition sets oscillation frequency, we studied the properties of inhibitory synaptic inputs (IPSCs received by CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells of three mouse strains that showed the highest, lowest and intermediate frequencies of oscillations. In CA3 pyramidal cells, the frequency of rhythmic IPSC input showed the same strain differences as the frequency of field oscillations. Furthermore, IPSC decay times in both CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells were faster in mouse strains with higher oscillation frequencies than in mouse strains with lower oscillation frequency, suggesting that differences in GABAA-receptor subunit composition exist between these strains. Indeed, gene expression of GABAA-receptor β2 (Gabrb2 and β3 (Gabrb2 subunits was higher in mouse strains with faster decay kinetics compared with mouse strains with slower decay kinetics. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons in mouse strains with higher oscillation frequencies and faster decay kinetics fired action potential at higher frequencies. These data indicate that differences in genetic background may result in different GABAA-receptor subunit expression, which affects the rhythm of pyramidal neuron firing and fast network activity through GABA synapse kinetics.

  11. Influence of Heartwood on Wood Density and Pulp Properties Explained by Machine Learning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Iglesias

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a tool to predict some pulp properties e.g., pulp yield, Kappa number, ISO brightness (ISO 2470:2008, fiber length and fiber width, using the sapwood and heartwood proportion in the raw-material. For this purpose, Acacia melanoxylon trees were collected from four sites in Portugal. Percentage of sapwood and heartwood, area and the stem eccentricity (in N-S and E-W directions were measured on transversal stem sections of A. melanoxylon R. Br. The relative position of the samples with respect to the total tree height was also considered as an input variable. Different configurations were tested until the maximum correlation coefficient was achieved. A classical mathematical technique (multiple linear regression and machine learning methods (classification and regression trees, multi-layer perceptron and support vector machines were tested. Classification and regression trees (CART was the most accurate model for the prediction of pulp ISO brightness (R = 0.85. The other parameters could be predicted with fair results (R = 0.64–0.75 by CART. Hence, the proportion of heartwood and sapwood is a relevant parameter for pulping and pulp properties, and should be taken as a quality trait when assessing a pulpwood resource.

  12. Anisotropic properties of high-temperature polyimide thin films: Dielectric and thermal-expansion behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, M.; Chen, K.-J.; Kirby, D. P.; Katzenellenbogen, N.; Grischkowsky, D.

    1992-09-01

    Multilayer poly(p-phenylene biphenyltetracarboximide) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide films of 172 μm total thickness (11.4 μm per layer) were prepared from the poly(amic acid) precursor solution through repetition of a spin-coat/softbake/cure process. Wide-angle x-ray diffraction results indicate that the polyimide molecules in the multilayer films are highly ordered along the chain axes as well as in the lateral direction and furthermore are highly oriented in the film plane as observed in a single-layer film of 11.4 μm thickness. The multilayer films showed the same dynamic mechanical properties and glass transition behavior (Tg = 330 °C) as a single-layer film. For the multilayer films both the in-plane dielectric constant (ɛ'XY) and out-of-plane thermal-expansion coefficient (αZ) were measured using time-domain spectroscopy and conventional thermal mechanical analysis, respectively. The ɛ'XY at room temperature was 3.69 (±0.08) over a frequency range of 0.35-2.50 THz. A similar ɛ'XY is predicted at frequencies of ≤0.35 THz. In contrast to the ɛ'XY, a relatively lower out-of-plane dielectric constant (ɛ'Z) was observed: ɛ'Z = 2.96-3.03 (±0.02) at 1 MHz, depending on moisture content in the film. The dielectric loss ɛ`Z at 1 MHz was 0.011-0.014 (±0.001), depending on moisture content. The measured αZ was 74 ppm/°C over the temperature range of 25-150 °C, which was much higher than αXY = 2.6-5 ppm/°C. Consequently, large anisotropic ɛ' and α have been observed in the in plane and out of plane of the thermally imidized BPDA-PDA films. The anisotropic ɛ' and α were caused by high in-plane orientation of the polyimide molecules highly ordered along the chain axes in the films.

  13. Thermophysical Properties of Matter - the TPRC Data Series. Volume 13. Thermal Expansion - Nonmetallic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    to a high enough the near-zero expansivity of vitreous silica that makes temperature it will crystallize in the cristobalite it so useful. Methods for...John Wiley, 1961. 33. Matthias, B.T., Geballe, T.H., Corenzwit, E., Andres, K., and Hall, G.W., "Superconductivity of Beta -Uranium," Science, 151, 985...Thermal Expansion Coefficients of Beta -MnOt,ŕ J. Electro- chem. Soc., 109(7), 651, 1962. 125 52255 Mistler, R. E., Ploetz, G. L., and Smith, J. A

  14. Investigation of Thermal Expansion Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Raman Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimir, Daniel

    The mechanical properties of nano-sized materials seem to differ significantly from the predicted behavior of their bulk macroscopic counterparts (Smart, 2014, 16). The former tend to be stronger, more malleable and exhibit greater flexibility. The thermal properties of materials have also been shown to be altered significantly after having been shrunken to nanometer dimensions. The nano material that exhibits this peculiar behavior that is studied in this dissertation are single walled carbon nanotubes. Single walled carbon nanotubes are hollow cylindrical tubes that are one atomic layer in thickness and made up of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms. The majority of samples have diameters on the order 1 nm, with lengths ranging from 1 micron to sometimes a centimeter (Tomanek, 2008, v). The thermo-mechanical quantity that I specifically examine in this research is the linear and volume thermal expansion coefficients of SWCNTs. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficient is the ratio of the change in unit length in response to a 1 degree Celsius rise in temperature. The "true" value of this quantity is obtained in the theoretical limit of a vanishing temperature range DeltaT in the ratio stated above. However, this simply stated thermo-mechanical quantity for Carbon Nanotubes still remains a controversial topic, with widespread discrepancies among results of certain magnitudes - such as the temperature at the occurrence of maximum contraction, and at the transition from contraction to expansion. In conclusion, there is much incentive in examining the somewhat controversial variation in the behavior and quoted values of the thermal expansion of these quasi one-dimensional objects. In this study, I examine this important property of single walled carbon nanotubes using Resonant Raman Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation based on the Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order potential. The latter is a well established potential that is well-suited to

  15. Silent Polymorphisms: Can the tRNA Population Explain Changes in Protein Properties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Fernández-Calero

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silent mutations are being intensively studied. We previously showed that the estrogen receptor alpha Ala87’s synonymous polymorphism affects its functional properties. Whereas a link has been clearly established between the effect of silent mutations, tRNA abundance and protein folding in prokaryotes, this connection remains controversial in eukaryotic systems. Although a synonymous polymorphism can affect mRNA structure or the interaction with specific ligands, it seems that the relative frequencies of isoacceptor tRNAs could play a key role in the protein-folding process, possibly through modulation of translation kinetics. Conformational changes could be subtle but enough to cause alterations in solubility, proteolysis profiles, functional parameters or intracellular targeting. Interestingly, recent advances describe dramatic changes in the tRNA population associated with proliferation, differentiation or response to chemical, physical or biological stress. In addition, several reports reveal changes in tRNAs’ posttranscriptional modifications in different physiological or pathological conditions. In consequence, since changes in the cell state imply quantitative and/or qualitative changes in the tRNA pool, they could increase the likelihood of protein conformational variants, related to a particular codon usage during translation, with consequences of diverse significance. These observations emphasize the importance of genetic code flexibility in the co-translational protein-folding process.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet optical properties of two SiO2 based low-expansion materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife, J.; Osantowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectances of two low-expansion materials, a recrystallized glass ceramic and a high silica glass, have been measured at five angles of incidence from 15 to 85 deg in the wavelength region from 80 to 310 A and in some cases up to 1050 A. Optical constants are derived and silicon core-level transitions analyzed.

  17. Exploring geometric properties of gold nanoparticles using TEM images to explain their chaperone like activity for citrate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Vikas; Lahiri, Tapobrata; Singha, Shantiswaroop; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Kumar, Upendra; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Study on geometric properties of nanoparticles and their relation with biomolecular activities, especially protein is quite a new field to explore. This work was carried out towards this direction where images of gold nanoparticles obtained from transmission electron microscopy were processed to extract their size and area profile at different experimental conditions including and excluding a protein, citrate synthase. Since the images were ill-posed, texture of a context-window for each pixel was used as input to a back-propagation network architecture to obtain decision on its membership as nanoparticle. The segmented images were further analysed by k-means clustering to derive geometric properties of individual nanoparticles even from their assembled form. The extracted geometric information was found to be crucial to give a model featuring porous cage like configuration of nanoparticle assembly using which the chaperone like activity of gold nanoparticles can be explained.

  18. Large variation in glyphosate mineralization in 21 different agricultural soils explained by soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nghia Khoi; Dörfler, Ulrike; Welzl, Gerhard; Munch, Jean Charles; Schroll, Reiner; Suhadolc, Marjetka

    2018-01-30

    Glyphosate and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) have frequently been detected in surface water and groundwaters. Since adequate glyphosate mineralization in soil may reduce its losses to environment, improved understanding of site specific factors underlying pesticide mineralization in soils is needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between soil properties and glyphosate mineralization. To establish a sound basis for resilient correlations, the study was conducted with a large number of 21 agricultural soils, differing in a variety of soil parameters, such as soil texture, soil organic matter content, pH, exchangeable ions etc. The mineralization experiments were carried out with 14 C labelled glyphosate at a soil water tension of -15 kPa and at a soil density of 1.3 g cm -3 at 20 ± 1 °C for an incubation period of 32 days. The results showed that the mineralization of glyphosate in different agricultural soils varied to a great extent, from 7 to 70% of the amount initially applied. Glyphosate mineralization started immediately after application, the highest mineralization rates were observed within the first 4 days in most of the 21 soils. Multiple regression analysis revealed exchangeable acidity (H + and Al 3+ ), exchangeable Ca 2+ ions and ammonium lactate extractable K to be the key soil parameters governing glyphosate mineralization in the examined soils. A highly significant negative correlation between mineralized glyphosate and NaOH-extractable residues (NaOH-ER) in soils strongly suggests that NaOH-ER could be used as a simple and reliable parameter for evaluating the glyphosate mineralization capacity. The NaOH-ER were composed of glyphosate, unknown 14 C-residues, and AMPA (12%-65%, 3%-34%, 0%-11% of applied 14 C, respectively). Our results highlighted the influential role of soil exchangeable acidity, which should therefore be considered in pesticide risk assessments and management to

  19. The fabrication and thermal expansion properties of 4H-Ag nanowire arrays in porous anodic alumina templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Fei, Guang Tao; Cui, Ping; Wu, Bing; Wang, Biao; Zhang, Li De

    2008-07-16

    Hexagonal silver nanowire (4H-Ag NW) arrays with preferred orientation are fabricated into the holes of porous anodic alumina membranes (AAMs) by direct current electrodeposition. The addition of tartaric acid and low deposition temperature are crucial conditions for the growth of 4H-Ag NWs. The thermal expansion properties of the as-prepared and annealed 4H-Ag NWs are studied by in situ x-ray diffraction in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 °C. The axial thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of the as-prepared sample decreases initially and increases subsequently, while that of the annealed sample consistently increases during the whole measuring process.

  20. The fabrication and thermal expansion properties of 4H-Ag nanowire arrays in porous anodic alumina templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Ye; Fei Guangtao; Cui Ping; Wu Bing; Wang Biao; Zhang Lide [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics and Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanostructures, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1129, Hefei, 230031 (China)], E-mail: gtfei@issp.ac.cn

    2008-07-16

    Hexagonal silver nanowire (4H-Ag NW) arrays with preferred orientation are fabricated into the holes of porous anodic alumina membranes (AAMs) by direct current electrodeposition. The addition of tartaric acid and low deposition temperature are crucial conditions for the growth of 4H-Ag NWs. The thermal expansion properties of the as-prepared and annealed 4H-Ag NWs are studied by in situ x-ray diffraction in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 deg. C. The axial thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of the as-prepared sample decreases initially and increases subsequently, while that of the annealed sample consistently increases during the whole measuring process.

  1. Heterogeneity and nearest-neighbor coupling can explain small-worldness and wave properties in pancreatic islets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappon, Giacomo; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-05-01

    Many multicellular systems consist of coupled cells that work as a syncytium. The pancreatic islet of Langerhans is a well-studied example of such a microorgan. The islets are responsible for secretion of glucose-regulating hormones, mainly glucagon and insulin, which are released in distinct pulses. In order to observe pulsatile insulin secretion from the β-cells within the islets, the cellular responses must be synchronized. It is now well established that gap junctions provide the electrical nearest-neighbor coupling that allows excitation waves to spread across islets to synchronize the β-cell population. Surprisingly, functional coupling analysis of calcium responses in β-cells shows small-world properties, i.e., a high degree of local coupling with a few long-range "short-cut" connections that reduce the average path-length greatly. Here, we investigate how such long-range functional coupling can appear as a result of heterogeneity, nearest-neighbor coupling, and wave propagation. Heterogeneity is also able to explain a set of experimentally observed synchronization and wave properties without introducing all-or-none cell coupling and percolation theory. Our theoretical results highlight how local biological coupling can give rise to functional small-world properties via heterogeneity and wave propagation.

  2. A mixture of sparse coding models explaining properties of face neurons related to holistic and parts-based processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Haruo; Hyvärinen, Aapo

    2017-07-01

    Experimental studies have revealed evidence of both parts-based and holistic representations of objects and faces in the primate visual system. However, it is still a mystery how such seemingly contradictory types of processing can coexist within a single system. Here, we propose a novel theory called mixture of sparse coding models, inspired by the formation of category-specific subregions in the inferotemporal (IT) cortex. We developed a hierarchical network that constructed a mixture of two sparse coding submodels on top of a simple Gabor analysis. The submodels were each trained with face or non-face object images, which resulted in separate representations of facial parts and object parts. Importantly, evoked neural activities were modeled by Bayesian inference, which had a top-down explaining-away effect that enabled recognition of an individual part to depend strongly on the category of the whole input. We show that this explaining-away effect was indeed crucial for the units in the face submodel to exhibit significant selectivity to face images over object images in a similar way to actual face-selective neurons in the macaque IT cortex. Furthermore, the model explained, qualitatively and quantitatively, several tuning properties to facial features found in the middle patch of face processing in IT as documented by Freiwald, Tsao, and Livingstone (2009). These included, in particular, tuning to only a small number of facial features that were often related to geometrically large parts like face outline and hair, preference and anti-preference of extreme facial features (e.g., very large/small inter-eye distance), and reduction of the gain of feature tuning for partial face stimuli compared to whole face stimuli. Thus, we hypothesize that the coding principle of facial features in the middle patch of face processing in the macaque IT cortex may be closely related to mixture of sparse coding models.

  3. A mixture of sparse coding models explaining properties of face neurons related to holistic and parts-based processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Hosoya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies have revealed evidence of both parts-based and holistic representations of objects and faces in the primate visual system. However, it is still a mystery how such seemingly contradictory types of processing can coexist within a single system. Here, we propose a novel theory called mixture of sparse coding models, inspired by the formation of category-specific subregions in the inferotemporal (IT cortex. We developed a hierarchical network that constructed a mixture of two sparse coding submodels on top of a simple Gabor analysis. The submodels were each trained with face or non-face object images, which resulted in separate representations of facial parts and object parts. Importantly, evoked neural activities were modeled by Bayesian inference, which had a top-down explaining-away effect that enabled recognition of an individual part to depend strongly on the category of the whole input. We show that this explaining-away effect was indeed crucial for the units in the face submodel to exhibit significant selectivity to face images over object images in a similar way to actual face-selective neurons in the macaque IT cortex. Furthermore, the model explained, qualitatively and quantitatively, several tuning properties to facial features found in the middle patch of face processing in IT as documented by Freiwald, Tsao, and Livingstone (2009. These included, in particular, tuning to only a small number of facial features that were often related to geometrically large parts like face outline and hair, preference and anti-preference of extreme facial features (e.g., very large/small inter-eye distance, and reduction of the gain of feature tuning for partial face stimuli compared to whole face stimuli. Thus, we hypothesize that the coding principle of facial features in the middle patch of face processing in the macaque IT cortex may be closely related to mixture of sparse coding models.

  4. Development of Low Carbon Niobium Bearing High Strength F-B Dual Phase Steel with High Hole Expansion Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Xia, Ming-sheng; Xiong, Zi-liu; Du, Yan-bing; Qiao, Zhi-ming; Zhang, Hong-bo

    In the study a low carbon niobium bearing high strength F-B dual phase automobile steel with high hole expansion property has been investigated. Steels of different chemical composition have been investigated by simulation experiments of controlled rolling and cooling process to study the influences of chemical elements, especially for C,Nb and Ti, and cooling pattern on the mechanical properties, flangeability and microstructure of strips. So-called 3-stages cooling pattern was adopted in simulation experiments, combining ultra fast cooling in first stage, air cooling in middle stage and fast cooling in the last stage, and at the end of run-out table the temperature of rolled pieces drop to below Bs point. Optical microstructure and SEM morphology have been observed. Results indicate that it is possible to obtain dual phase microstructure of polygonal ferrite plus bainite in adopting 3-stages cooling pattern. The low temperature coiling method using 3-step controlled cooling pattern after hot rolling is effective to produce low carbon Nb bearing steel with high balance of strength-ductility-flangeability, in addition, higher carbon content of steel tend to be detrimental to flangeability of steel, due to much carbide precipitation at ferrite boundary. Based on the results of simulation experiments mill trial has been carried out and hot rolled high strength steel with tensile strength higher as 600Mpa and hole expansion ratio higher as 100% has been developed successfully.

  5. Can Suspended Iron-Alloy Droplets Explain the Origin, Composition and Properties of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Dorfman, S. M.; Labidi, J.; Zhang, S.; Manga, M.; Stixrude, L. P.; McDonough, W. F.; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The enigmatic large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) identified by seismic tomography at the base of the Earth's mantle have been proposed to be reservoirs of primordial mantle composition tapped by hot spot volcanism. The LLSVPs are characterized by anomalously low shear wave speed, VS, slightly elevated bulk sound speed, VB, and high density, ρ, in piles as thick as 1000 km above the core-mantle boundary. This combination of properties could be explained by a few percent dense melt, but the solidus of the lower mantle silicate and oxide assemblage may be too high to produce melt over the large extent of these regions. Iron-rich sulfur-bearing alloy may be molten at the conditions of the LLSVPs and ~1-2% of this component could satisfy both constraints on VS and ρ. An Fe alloy phase in the LLSVPs also has the potential to explain geochemical anomalies associated with hot spot volcanism, and its existence can be constrained by geochemical mass balance. Primordial noble gases such as 3He would be preferentially dissolved in Fe-rich melt rather than crystalline silicates. The reconstructed abundances of the moderately siderophile/chalcophile elements S, Cu and Pb in iron-alloy-bearing LLSVPs do not exceed predicted losses from volatilization, though this depends on the S-content of the alloy. The alloy phase would also be expected to incorporate W, and W isotope anomalies associated with hot spots are thus expected to have important implications for the timing of LLSVP formation. We have developed a model, via CIDER-2014, for the origin and properties of LLSVPs incorporating geochemistry, mineral physics, and fluid dynamic constraints on the generation, capture, and thermoelastic properties of Fe-rich melt droplets. The solidification of a basal magma ocean would produce both solid silicates and metallic melt. The bulk of the alloy generated by this process would sink to merge with the core. However, once the density of the remnant liquid exceeds that of the

  6. Does Cosmological Scale Expansion Explain the Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masreliez, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The idea of the creation of the world has been central in Western civilization since the earliest recorded history some 6000 years ago and it still prevails, supported by religious dogma. If the creation idea is wrong and the universe is eternal we might wonder why science has not yet revealed this fundamental truth. To understand why, we have to review how the Big Bang theory came to be the dominant cosmological paradigm in spite of many clear indications that the theory might be fundamentally flawed.

  7. Maxillary Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Anirudh; Mathur, Rinku

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maxillary transverse discrepancy usually requires expansion of the palate by a combination of orthopedic and orthodontic tooth movements. Three expansion treatment modalities are used today: rapid maxillary expansion, slow maxillary expansion and surgically assisted maxillary expansion.This article aims to review the maxillary expansion by all the three modalities and a brief on commonly used appliances.

  8. Preparation and properties of negative thermal expansion zirconium tungstate thin films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong-Fei; Cheng, Xiao-Nong; Zhang, Zhi-Ping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2008-11-15

    Zirconium tungstate (ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering followed by annealing at various temperatures. The effects of post-deposition annealing temperature on the phase, morphology and negative thermal expansion properties of the ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} thin films were investigated. X-ray diffraction data confirmed that the as-deposited ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} films were amorphous, and crystalline ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} films could be obtained at high annealing temperature. Trigonal ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} films could be prepared at 740 C and cubic ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} films could be prepared at 1200 C. The surface morphologies of the ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} thin films were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that amorphous ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} films were uniform and dense, and the grain size of the crystalline ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} films became larger with increasing annealing temperature. The resulting cubic ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} films showed negative thermal expansion, the average value of thermal expansion coefficient being -8.18 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} in the temperature range 15-700 C. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Thermal expansion and magnetic properties of benzoquinone-bridged dinuclear rare-earth complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Jani O; Mansikkamäki, Akseli; Lahtinen, Manu; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Kalenius, Elina; Layfield, Richard A; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2017-10-10

    The synthesis and structural characterization of two benzoquinone-bridged dinuclear rare-earth complexes [BQ(MCl2·THF3)2] (BQ = 2,5-bisoxide-1,4-benzoquinone; M = Y (1), Dy (2)) are described. Of these reported metal complexes, the dysprosium analogue 2 is the first discrete bridged dinuclear lanthanide complex in which both metal centres reside in pentagonal bipyramidal environments. Interestingly, both complexes undergo significant thermal expansion upon heating from 120 K to 293 K as illustrated by single-crystal X-ray and powder diffraction experiments. AC magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that 2 does not show the slow relation of magnetization in zero dc field. The absent of single-molecule behaviour in 2 arises from the rotation of the principal magnetic axis as compared to the pseudo-C5 axis of the pentagonal bipyramidal environment as suggested by ab initio calculations. The cyclic voltammetry and chemical reduction experiments demonstrated that complexes 1 and 2 can be reduced to radical species containing [BQ(3)˙(-)]. This study establishes efficient synthetic strategy to make bridged redox-active multinuclear lanthanide complexes with a pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment that are potential precursors for single-molecule magnets.

  10. Effect of Expansive Admixtures on the Shrinkage and Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites (HPFRCCs are characterized by strain-hardening and multiple cracking during the inelastic deformation process, but they also develop high shrinkage strain. This study investigates the effects of replacing Portland cement with calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive admixtures (CSA EXAs to compensate for the shrinkage and associated mechanical behavior of HPFRCCs. Two types of CSA EXA (CSA-K and CSA-J, each with a different chemical composition, are used in this study. Various replacement ratios (0%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 14% by weight of cement of CSA EXA are considered for the design of HPFRCC mixtures reinforced with 1.5% polyethylene (PE fibers by volume. Mechanical properties, such as shrinkage compensation, compressive strength, flexural strength, and direct tensile strength, of the HPFRCC mixtures are examined. Also, crack width and development are investigated to determine the effects of the EXAs on the performance of the HPFRCC mixtures, and a performance index is used to quantify the performance of mixture. The results indicate that replacements of 10% CSA-K (Type 1 and 8% CSA-J (Type 2 considerably enhance the mechanical properties and reduce shrinkage of HPFRCCs.

  11. Giant negative thermal expansion in magnetic nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X. G.; Kubozono, H.; Yamada, H.; Kato, K.; Ishiwata, Y.; Xu, C. N.

    2008-12-01

    Most solids expand when they are heated, but a property known as negative thermal expansion has been observed in a number of materials, including the oxide ZrW2O8 (ref. 1) and the framework material ZnxCd1-x(CN)2 (refs 2,3). This unusual behaviour can be understood in terms of low-energy phonons, while the colossal values of both positive and negative thermal expansion recently observed in another framework material, Ag3[Co(CN)6], have been explained in terms of the geometric flexibility of its metal-cyanide-metal linkages. Thermal expansion can also be stopped in some magnetic transition metal alloys below their magnetic ordering temperature, a phenomenon known as the Invar effect, and the possibility of exploiting materials with tuneable positive or negative thermal expansion in industrial applications has led to intense interest in both the Invar effect and negative thermal expansion. Here we report the results of thermal expansion experiments on three magnetic nanocrystals-CuO, MnF2 and NiO-and find evidence for negative thermal expansion in both CuO and MnF2 below their magnetic ordering temperatures, but not in NiO. Larger particles of CuO and MnF2 also show prominent magnetostriction (that is, they change shape in response to an applied magnetic field), which results in significantly reduced thermal expansion below their magnetic ordering temperatures; this behaviour is not observed in NiO. We propose that the negative thermal expansion effect in CuO (which is four times larger than that observed in ZrW2O8) and MnF2 is a general property of nanoparticles in which there is strong coupling between magnetism and the crystal lattice.

  12. Importance of considering the coupling between transfer properties, alkali leaching and expansion in the modelling of concrete beams affected by internal swelling reactions

    OpenAIRE

    MARTIN, Renaud Pierre; OMIKRINE METALSSI, Othman; TOUTLEMONDE, François

    2013-01-01

    Alkali aggregat reaction (AAR) and delayed ettringite formation (DEF) cause expansion of the affected concrete that generally leads to cracking and decrease of its mechanical properties. Consequently, these pathologies raise severe problems regarding serviceability, sustainable operation and structural integrity. Thus it is necessary to provide predictive models able to re-assess the mechanical state of the affected structures. Since cracking may alter diffusion properties of concrete, and si...

  13. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  14. X-ray CT-Derived Soil Characteristics Explain Varying Air, Water, and Solute Transport Properties across a Loamy Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of soil pore space geometry is important for explaining fluxes of air, water, and solutes through soil and understanding soil hydrogeochemical functions. X-ray computed tomography (CT) can be applied for this characterization, and in this study CT-derived parameters were used...... to explain water, air, and solute transport through soil. Forty-five soil columns (20 by 20 cm) were collected from an agricultural field in Estrup, Denmark, and subsequently scanned using a medical CT scanner. Nonreactive tracer leaching experiments were performed in the laboratory along with measurements...... of air permeability (Ka) and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat). The CT number of the matrix (CTmatrix), which represents the moist bulk density of the soil matrix, was obtained from the CT scans as the average CT number of the voxels in the grayscale image excluding macropores and stones...

  15. Burst firing in a motion-sensitive neural pathway correlates with expansion properties of looming objects that evoke avoidance behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Allan McMillan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The locust visual system contains a well-defined motion-sensitive pathway that transfers visual input to motor centers involved in predator evasion and collision avoidance. One interneuron in this pathway, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD, is typically described as using rate coding; edge expansion of approaching objects causes an increased rate of neuronal firing that peaks after a certain retinal threshold angle is exceeded. However, evidence of intrinsic DCMD bursting properties combined with observable oscillations in mean firing rates and tight clustering of spikes in raw traces, suggest that bursting may be important for motion detection. Sensory neuron bursting provides important timing information about dynamic stimuli in many model systems, yet no studies have rigorously investigated if bursting occurs in the locust DCMD during object approach. We presented repetitions of 30 looming stimuli known to generate behavioural responses to each of 20 locusts in order to identify and quantify putative bursting activity in the DCMD. Overall, we found a bimodal distribution of inter-spike intervals (ISI with peaks of more frequent and shorter ISIs occurring from 1-8 ms and longer less frequent ISIs occurring from 40-50 ms. Subsequent analysis identified bursts and isolated single spikes from the responses. Bursting frequency increased in the latter phase of an approach and peaked at the time of collision, while isolated spiking was predominant during the beginning of stimulus approach. We also found that the majority of inter-burst intervals occurred at 40-50 ms (or 20-25 bursts/s. Bursting also occurred across varied stimulus parameters and suggests that burst timing may be a key component of looming detection. Our findings suggest that the DCMD uses two modes of coding to transmit information about looming stimuli and that these modes change dynamically with a changing stimulus at a behaviourally-relevant time.

  16. Burst Firing in a Motion-Sensitive Neural Pathway Correlates with Expansion Properties of Looming Objects that Evoke Avoidance Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Glyn A; Gray, John R

    2015-01-01

    The locust visual system contains a well-defined motion-sensitive pathway that transfers visual input to motor centers involved in predator evasion and collision avoidance. One interneuron in this pathway, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), is typically described as using rate coding; edge expansion of approaching objects causes an increased rate of neuronal firing that peaks after a certain retinal threshold angle is exceeded. However, evidence of intrinsic DCMD bursting properties combined with observable oscillations in mean firing rates and tight clustering of spikes in raw traces, suggest that bursting may be important for motion detection. Sensory neuron bursting provides important timing information about dynamic stimuli in many model systems, yet no studies have rigorously investigated if bursting occurs in the locust DCMD during object approach. We presented repetitions of 30 looming stimuli known to generate behavioral responses to each of 20 locusts in order to identify and quantify putative bursting activity in the DCMD. Overall, we found a bimodal distribution of inter-spike intervals (ISI) with peaks of more frequent and shorter ISIs occurring from 1-8 ms and longer less frequent ISIs occurring from 40-50 ms. Subsequent analysis identified bursts and isolated single spikes from the responses. Bursting frequency increased in the latter phase of an approach and peaked at the time of collision, while isolated spiking was predominant during the beginning of stimulus approach. We also found that the majority of inter-burst intervals (IBIs) occurred at 40-50 ms (or 20-25 bursts/s). Bursting also occurred across varied stimulus parameters and suggests that burst timing may be a key component of looming detection. Our findings suggest that the DCMD uses two modes of coding to transmit information about looming stimuli and that these modes change dynamically with a changing stimulus at a behaviorally-relevant time.

  17. Impact of Sequential Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) Pretreatment and Pelletization on the Moisture Sorption Properties of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, Ian J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, David N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Teymouri, Farzaneh [Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States); Campbell, Timothy [Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States); Bals, Bryan [Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States); Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Combining ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™) pretreatment with a depot processing facility is a promising option for delivering high-value densified biomass to the emerging bioenergy industry. However, because the pretreatment process results in a high moisture material unsuitable for pelleting or storage (40% wet basis), the biomass must be immediately dried. If AFEX pretreatment results in a material that is difficult to dry, the economics of this already costly operation would be at risk. This work tests the nature of moisture sorption isotherms and thin-layer drying behavior of corn (Zea mays L.) stover at 20°C to 60°C before and after sequential AFEX pretreatment and pelletization to determine whether any negative impacts to material drying or storage may result from the AFEX process. The equilibrium moisture content to equilibrium relative humidity relationship for each of the materials was determined using dynamic vapor sorption isotherms and modeled with modified Chung-Pfost, modified Halsey, and modified Henderson temperature-dependent models as well as the Double Log Polynomial (DLP), Peleg, and Guggenheim Anderson de Boer (GAB) temperature-independent models. Drying kinetics were quantified under thin-layer laboratory testing and modeled using the Modified Page's equation. Water activity isotherms for non-pelleted biomass were best modeled with the Peleg temperature-independent equation while isotherms for the pelleted biomass were best modeled with the Double Log Polynomial equation. Thin-layer drying results were accurately modeled with the Modified Page's equation. The results of this work indicate that AFEX pretreatment results in drying properties more favorable than or equal to that of raw corn stover, and pellets of superior physical stability in storage.

  18. Effect of space exposure of some epoxy matrix composites on their thermal expansion and mechanical properties (A0138-8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabs, Heinrich

    1992-01-01

    Assessments of the behavior of the carbon/epoxy composites in space conditions are described. After an exposure of five years, the mechanical characteristics and the coefficient of thermal expansion are measured and compared to reference values.

  19. Development of Ab-initio Multibody Energy Expansions for the Design of Metallic Materials with Extremal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-31

    multiscale deformation processes", Computational Materias Science, Vol. 48, Issue 2, pp. 213--227, 2010 Zheng Li, Bin Wen and N. Zabaras, "Computing...expansions: An ab initio based transferable potential for computational thermodynamics", presented at the `Computational thermodynamics and kinetics...DD882) Inventions (DD882) Scientific Progress Technology Transfer 1 Development of ab-initio multibody energy expansions for the design of

  20. Nonlinear thermo-optical properties of two-layered spherical system of gold nanoparticle core and water vapor shell during initial stage of shell expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astafyeva Liudmila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nonlinear thermo-optical properties of two-layered spherical system of gold nanoparticle core and water vapor shell, created under laser heating of nanoparticle in water, were theoretically investigated. Vapor shell expansion leads to decreasing up to one to two orders of magnitude in comparison with initial values of scattering and extinction of the radiation with wavelengths 532 and 633 nm by system while shell radius is increased up to value of about two radii of nanoparticle. Subsequent increasing of shell radius more than two radii of nanoparticle leads to rise of scattering and extinction properties of system over initial values. The significant decrease of radiation scattering and extinction by system of nanoparticle-vapor shell can be used for experimental detection of the energy threshold of vapor shell formation and investigation of the first stages of its expansion. PACS: 42.62.BE. 78.67. BF

  1. The energy components of stacked chromatin layers explain the morphology, dimensions and mechanical properties of metaphase chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the dimensions of metaphase chromosomes in different animal and plant karyotypes prepared in different laboratories indicates that chromatids have a great variety of sizes which are dependent on the amount of DNA that they contain. However, all chromatids are elongated cylinders that have relatively similar shape proportions (length to diameter ratio approx. 13). To explain this geometry, it is considered that chromosomes are self-organizing structures formed by stacked layers of planar chromatin and that the energy of nucleosome–nucleosome interactions between chromatin layers inside the chromatid is approximately 3.6 × 10−20 J per nucleosome, which is the value reported by other authors for internucleosome interactions in chromatin fibres. Nucleosomes in the periphery of the chromatid are in contact with the medium; they cannot fully interact with bulk chromatin within layers and this generates a surface potential that destabilizes the structure. Chromatids are smooth cylinders because this morphology has a lower surface energy than structures having irregular surfaces. The elongated shape of chromatids can be explained if the destabilizing surface potential is higher in the telomeres (approx. 0.16 mJ m−2) than in the lateral surface (approx. 0.012 mJ m−2). The results obtained by other authors in experimental studies of chromosome mechanics have been used to test the proposed supramolecular structure. It is demonstrated quantitatively that internucleosome interactions between chromatin layers can justify the work required for elastic chromosome stretching (approx. 0.1 pJ for large chromosomes). The high amount of work (up to approx. 10 pJ) required for large chromosome extensions is probably absorbed by chromatin layers through a mechanism involving nucleosome unwrapping. PMID:24402918

  2. Structural and controllable thermal expansion properties of Sc{sub 2−x}Al{sub x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meimei, E-mail: mmwu@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Peng, Jie [Experimental Physics Center, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Cheng, Yingzhi [College of Chemical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Xiao, Xiaoling [College of Materials and Photoelectric Technology, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Dongfeng, E-mail: dongfeng@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Hu, Zhongbo [College of Materials and Photoelectric Technology, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Monophasic solid solutions Sc{sub 2−x}Al{sub x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} have been prepared in the whole composition range. •The cell parameters decrease with increasing Al content. •Fe substitution induces the thermal expansion property of Sc{sub 2−x}Al{sub x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} controllable. •Sc{sub 1.7}Al{sub 0.3}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} exhibits zero thermal expansion in 600–800 °C temperature range. -- Abstract: The crystal structure and thermal expansion properties of solid solutions Sc{sub 2−x}Al{sub x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} (x = 0.0–2.0) are systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction. Rietveld refinement results indicate that samples with x ⩽ 1.3 crystallize in a Sc{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12}-type orthorhombic (Pnca) structure, whereas others have an Al{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12}-type monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/a) structure. Substitution of 15% Al{sup 3+} for Sc{sup 3+} leads to a rapid change in linear thermal expansion coefficient from −2.334 × 10{sup −6} °C{sup −1} to −0.732 × 10{sup −6} °C{sup −1}. The thermal expansion coefficients of Sc{sub 2−x}Al{sub x}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} monotonously increase with increased Al{sup 3+} content.

  3. SPSS explained

    CERN Document Server

    Hinton, Perry R; Brownlow, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    SPSS Explained provides the student with all that they need to undertake statistical analysis using SPSS. It combines a step-by-step approach to each procedure with easy to follow screenshots at each stage of the process. A number of other helpful features are provided: regular advice boxes with tips specific to each test explanations divided into 'essential' and 'advanced' sections to suit readers at different levels frequently asked questions at the end of each chapter. The first edition of this popular book has been fully updated for IBM SPSS version 21 and also includes: chapters that expl

  4. Preparation, quality criteria, and properties of human blood platelet lysate supplements for ex vivo stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi; Burnouf, Thierry

    2015-01-25

    Most clinical applications of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for cell therapy, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and treatment of immune and inflammatory diseases require a phase of isolation and ex vivo expansion allowing a clinically meaningful cell number to be reached. Conditions used for cell isolation and expansion should meet strict quality and safety requirements. This is particularly true for the growth medium used for MSC isolation and expansion. Basal growth media used for MSC expansion are supplemented with multiple nutrients and growth factors. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) has long been the gold standard medium supplement for laboratory-scale MSC culture. However, FBS has a poorly characterized composition and poses risk factors, as it may be a source of xenogenic antigens and zoonotic infections. FBS has therefore become undesirable as a growth medium supplement for isolating and expanding MSCs for human therapy protocols. In recent years, human blood materials, and most particularly lysates and releasates of platelet concentrates have emerged as efficient medium supplements for isolating and expanding MSCs from various origins. This review analyzes the advantages and limits of using human platelet materials as medium supplements for MSC isolation and expansion. We present the modes of production of allogeneic and autologous platelet concentrates, measures taken to ensure optimal pathogen safety profiles, and methods of preparing PLs for MSC expansion. We also discuss the supply of such blood preparations. Produced under optimal conditions of standardization and safety, human platelet materials can become the future 'gold standard' supplement for ex vivo production of MSCs for translational medicine and cell therapy applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The structure, thermal expansion and phase transition properties of Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3−x}W{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0, 1.0, 2.0) solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.Z.; Hao, L.J.; Wu, M.M.; Ma, X.B.; Chen, D.F.; Liu, Y.T., E-mail: ytliu@ciae.ac.cn

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: A polymorph with Gd{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12}-type structure (space group: Pba2) for negative thermal expansion material Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} is observed above 700 °C, this polymorphism could be effectively supressed by W-substiution for Mo, the give the temperature dependence of Pba2 phase contents for Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3−x}W{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0.0, 1.0, 2.0). - Highlights: • The solid solution Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3−x}W{sub x}O{sub 12} was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction. • It is found that the substitution slightly influence thermal expansion property. • A polymorph of Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} with Pba2 space group was observed above 700 °C. • The W-substitution for Mo effectively suppresses this transformation. - Abstract: Three solid solutions of Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3−x}W{sub x}O{sub 12}(x = 0, 1.0, 2.0) were prepared by solid state reaction method, the temperature dependent in-situ X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis were performed to investigate their structure and thermal expansion. All samples have orthorhombic structure(space group Pbcn# 60) with negative thermal expansion at the room temperature. the substitution of W for Mo enlarges the lattice constant and slightly influences the negative thermal expansion. An irreversible phase transformation to the Pba2 phase(Tb{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} structure) was observed at high temperature for Mo-rich samples. This ploymorphism could be effectively suppressed by the W-substitution for Mo, this phenomenon could be explained by the lower electronegativity of W{sup 6+} than Mo{sup 6+}.

  6. Technique for reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils due to thermal expansion properties of various FRP bobbins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, N.; Tada, S.; Higuchi, T.; Furumura, Y.; Takao, T.; Yamanaka, A.

    2005-10-01

    We reported about reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils. The method is the use of FRP bobbins fabricated with special fibers. Since their FRPs have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, the FRP bobbins expand to the circumferential direction during cooling down. In case of the superconducting coils with such FRP bobbins, the winding tensions do not decrease during cooling down. Therefore, the mechanical losses are reduced by the suppression of wire's vibration. Their special FRPs are a Dyneema® fiber reinforced plastic (DFRP), a Dyneema and glass fiber reinforced plastic (DGFRP), and a Zylon® fiber reinforced plastic (ZFRP). These materials have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, however, the amplitudes of thermal expansion are various by the quantity or quality of the fiber. In this paper, the values of thermal expansion were actually measured, and it was discussed about the influence on the mechanical losses. At the experimental results, the mechanical loss was small, so that the thermal strain to the circumferential direction on the coil was large. Moreover, in case of the coils with sufficiently strong winding tensions at coil-operating temperature, the mechanical losses vanished.

  7. Technique for reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils due to thermal expansion properties of various FRP bobbins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, N. [Tsukamoto Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: n-sekine@tsukalab.dnj.ynu.ac.jp; Tada, S. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Higuchi, T. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Furumura, Y. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Takao, T. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Yamanaka, A. [Research Center, Toyobo, Co., Ltd, 2-1-1, Katata, Otsu, Shiga 520-0292 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    We reported about reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils. The method is the use of FRP bobbins fabricated with special fibers. Since their FRPs have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, the FRP bobbins expand to the circumferential direction during cooling down. In case of the superconducting coils with such FRP bobbins, the winding tensions do not decrease during cooling down. Therefore, the mechanical losses are reduced by the suppression of wire's vibration. Their special FRPs are a Dyneema[reg] fiber reinforced plastic (DFRP), a Dyneema and glass fiber reinforced plastic (DGFRP), and a Zylon[reg] fiber reinforced plastic (ZFRP). These materials have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, however, the amplitudes of thermal expansion are various by the quantity or quality of the fiber. In this paper, the values of thermal expansion were actually measured, and it was discussed about the influence on the mechanical losses. At the experimental results, the mechanical loss was small, so that the thermal strain to the circumferential direction on the coil was large. Moreover, in case of the coils with sufficiently strong winding tensions at coil-operating temperature, the mechanical losses vanished.

  8. Spatial heterogeneity of physicochemical properties explains differences in microbial composition in arid soils from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Escalante, Ana E; Noguez, Ana M; García-Oliva, Felipe; Martínez-Piedragil, Celeste; Cram, Silke S; Eguiarte, Luis Enrique; Souza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Arid ecosystems are characterized by high spatial heterogeneity, and the variation among vegetation patches is a clear example. Soil biotic and abiotic factors associated with these patches have also been well documented as highly heterogeneous in space. Given the low vegetation cover and little precipitation in arid ecosystems, soil microorganisms are the main drivers of nutrient cycling. Nonetheless, little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms and the relationship that their diversity holds with nutrients and other physicochemical gradients in arid soils. In this study, we evaluated the spatial variability of soil microbial diversity and chemical parameters (nutrients and ion content) at local scale (meters) occurring in a gypsum-based desert soil, to gain knowledge on what soil abiotic factors control the distribution of microbes in arid ecosystems. We analyzed 32 soil samples within a 64 m(2) plot and: (a) characterized microbial diversity using T-RFLPs of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (b) determined soil chemical parameters, and (c) identified relationships between microbial diversity and chemical properties. Overall, we found a strong correlation between microbial composition heterogeneity and spatial variation of cations (Ca(2), K(+)) and anions (HCO[Formula: see text], Cl(-), SO[Formula: see text]) content in this small plot. Our results could be attributable to spatial differences of soil saline content, favoring the patchy emergence of salt and soil microbial communities.

  9. Spatial heterogeneity of physicochemical properties explains differences in microbial composition in arid soils from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pajares

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Arid ecosystems are characterized by high spatial heterogeneity, and the variation among vegetation patches is a clear example. Soil biotic and abiotic factors associated with these patches have also been well documented as highly heterogeneous in space. Given the low vegetation cover and little precipitation in arid ecosystems, soil microorganisms are the main drivers of nutrient cycling. Nonetheless, little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms and the relationship that their diversity holds with nutrients and other physicochemical gradients in arid soils. In this study, we evaluated the spatial variability of soil microbial diversity and chemical parameters (nutrients and ion content at local scale (meters occurring in a gypsum-based desert soil, to gain knowledge on what soil abiotic factors control the distribution of microbes in arid ecosystems. We analyzed 32 soil samples within a 64 m2 plot and: (a characterized microbial diversity using T-RFLPs of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (b determined soil chemical parameters, and (c identified relationships between microbial diversity and chemical properties. Overall, we found a strong correlation between microbial composition heterogeneity and spatial variation of cations (Ca2, K+ and anions (HCO ${}_{3}^{-}$ 3 − , Cl−, SO ${}_{4}^{2-}$ 4 2 − content in this small plot. Our results could be attributable to spatial differences of soil saline content, favoring the patchy emergence of salt and soil microbial communities.

  10. The biological properties of different Epstein-Barr virus strains explain their association with various types of cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Han; Lin, Xiaochen; Shumilov, Anatoliy; Bernhardt, Katharina; Feederle, Regina; Poirey, Remy; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Pereira, Bruno; Almeida, Raquel; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2017-02-07

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically associated with the development of multiple types of tumors, but it is unclear whether this diversity is due to infection with different EBV strains. We report a comparative characterization of SNU719, GP202, and YCCEL1, three EBV strains that were isolated from gastric carcinomas, M81, a virus isolated in a nasopharyngeal carcinoma and several well-characterized laboratory type A strains. We found that B95-8, Akata and GP202 induced cell growth more efficiently than YCCEL1, SNU719 and M81 and this correlated positively with the expression levels of the viral BHRF1 miRNAs. In infected B cells, all strains except Akata and B95-8 induced lytic replication, a risk factor for carcinoma development, although less efficiently than M81. The panel of viruses induced tumors in immunocompromised mice with variable speed and efficacy that did not strictly mirror their in vitro characteristics, suggesting that additional parameters play an important role. We found that YCCEL1 and M81 infected primary epithelial cells, gastric carcinoma cells and gastric spheroids more efficiently than Akata or B95-8. Reciprocally, Akata and B95-8 had a stronger tropism for B cells than YCCEL1 or M81. These data suggest that different EBV strains will induce the development of lymphoid tumors with variable efficacy in immunocompromised patients and that there is a parallel between the cell tropism of the viral strains and the lineage of the tumors they induce. Thus, EBV strains can be endowed with properties that will influence their transforming abilities and the type of tumor they induce.

  11. The crystallization behavior and thermal expansion properties of {beta}-eucryptite prepared by sol-gel route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Long [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, 2 Wenhua West Road, Weihai 264209 (China); Wen Guangwu, E-mail: wgw@hitwh.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, 2 Wenhua West Road, Weihai 264209 (China); Song Liang; Wang Xinyu [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, 2 Wenhua West Road, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2010-02-15

    Lithium-aluminosilicate glass-ceramics in the form of eucryptite were synthesized through sol-gel technique by mixing boehmite sol, silica sol and lithium salt and sintering at different temperatures for further analysis. Thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR analysis and dilatometry were done to study sintering characteristics, phase transformation and thermal expansion behavior on the sintered specimens. XRD and FTIR results confirmed that crystallization of {beta}-eucryptite took place at about 600 deg. C, substantial increase of {beta}-eucryptite was observed in the specimens sintered at temperatures from 800 to 1300 deg. C. Trace amount of cristobalite also emerged at 600 deg. C and disappeared at 1300 deg. C. The thermal expansion behavior characteristics were found to be strongly influenced by crystalline phases in the specimens which depended on the sintering temperatures.

  12. TiO2 films annealing temperature-dependent properties in terms of the Amlouk-Boubaker opto-thermal expansivity ψAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlouk, A.; Boubaker, K.; El Mir, L.; Amlouk, M.

    2011-02-01

    In this study, TiO2 films were grown at room temperature by sol-gel process using titanium (IV)-isopropylat as precursor. XRD, EDS and MEB analyses proved that an eventual annealing treatment caused the TiO2 amorphous phase to shift to a crystalline anatase phase. Optical measurements were carried out via absorbance spectra in 500-2500 nm wavelength domain. From these optical measurements, the temperature-dependent conjoint optical and thermal properties were deduced using the Amlouk-Boubaker opto-thermal expansivity ψAB.

  13. Modelling of concrete structures affected by internal swelling reactions : couplings between transfer properties, alkali leachning and expansion

    OpenAIRE

    MARTIN, Renaud Pierre; OMIKRINE METALSSI, Othman; TOUTLEMONDE, François

    2012-01-01

    La Réaction Alcali Granulat (RAG) et la Réaction Sulfatique Interne (RSI) sont deux pathologies du béton induisant son expansion. Elles engendrent généralement sa fissuration et une dégradation des performances mécaniques. Ainsi, ces réactions posent la question de l’aptitude au service et de la stabilité structurelle des structures atteintes. Pour les gérer, il est nécessaire de mettre au point des outils de re-calcul capable de quantifier leur état mécanique. Dans cet article, le modè...

  14. The evolution of magnetic transitions, negative thermal expansion and unusual electronic transport properties in Mn3AgxMnyN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sihao; Sun, Ying; Yan, Jun; Shi, Zaixing; Shi, Kewen; Wang, Lei; Hu, Pengwei; Malik, Muhammad Imran; Wang, Cong

    2015-11-01

    The antiperovskite compounds Mn3AgxMnyN with Ag vacancies and Mn doping at Ag site were synthesized and investigated. The introduction of Ag vacancies has a very small influence on magnetic transitions. However, the magnetic transitions at TN (Néel temperature) and Tt (transition at lower temperature) gradually overlap with Mn doping accompanied by broadening of negative thermal expansion behavior. We also observed the nearly zero temperature coefficient of resistivity (NZ-TCR) behavior above magnetic order-disorder transition. The tunable TCR values from positive to negative could be achieved in Mn3AgxMnyN by reducing the contribution of (electron-phonon) e-p scattering in resistivity. Our results reveal the significance of e-p scattering for the evolution of TCR values, which could enrich the understanding of NZ-TCR behavior in antiperovskite manganese nitrides.

  15. expansion method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we shall apply the (G /G)-expansion method to obtain the exact travelling wave solution of the two-dimensional ... In §3, we apply our method to the mentioned equations. In §4, some conclusions are ..... The exact solution obtained by this method can be used to check computer codes or as initial condition for ...

  16. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  17. Expansion of Kolarik model for tensile strength of polymer particulate nanocomposites as a function of matrix, nanoparticles and interphase properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Yasser; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2017-11-15

    Kolarik proposed a model for tensile strength of polymer particulate composites based on the cubic orthogonal skeleton or three perpendicular plates (3PP) system. In this paper, Kolarik model is expanded for tensile strength of polymer nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles assuming the interphase properties. This model expresses the strength as a function of interphase properties. This development is performed using some models such as Pukanszky and Nicolais-Narkis. The expanded model is applied to calculate the thickness and strength of interphase by the experimental results. Furthermore, the strength of polymer nanocomposites is evaluated at different levels of material and interphase properties. The experimental data show good agreement with the predictions of the developed model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Observing properties of an interacting homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate: Heisenberg-limited momentum spread, interaction energy, and free-expansion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlibovych, Igor; Schmidutz, Tobias F.; Gaunt, Alexander L.; Navon, Nir; Smith, Robert P.; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2014-06-01

    We study the properties of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate produced in an optical-box potential, using high-resolution Bragg spectroscopy. For a range of box sizes, up to 70μm, we directly observe Heisenberg-limited momentum uncertainty of the condensed atoms. We measure the condensate interaction energy with a precision of kB×100 pK and study, both experimentally and numerically, the dynamics of its free expansion upon release from the box potential. All our measurements are in good agreement with theoretical expectations for a perfectly homogeneous condensate of spatial extent equal to the size of the box, which also establishes the uniformity of our optical-box system on a sub-nK energy scale.

  19. Resonant state expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P.

    1993-02-01

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound state, virtual states and resonances characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential is investigated. From a completeness relation in terms of these discrete states and complex scattering states one can derive several Resonant State Expansions (RSE). It is interesting to obtain purely discrete expansion which, if valid, would significantly simplify the treatment of the continuum. Such expansions can be derived using Mittag-Leffler (ML) theory for a cutoff potential and it would be nice to see if one can obtain the same expansions starting from an eigenfunction theory that is not restricted to a finite sphere. The RSE of Greens functions is especially important, e.g. in the continuum RPA (CRPA) method of treating giant resonances in nuclear physics. The convergence of RSE is studied in simple cases using square well wavefunctions in order to achieve high numerical accuracy. Several expansions can be derived from each other by using the theory of analytic functions and one can the see how to obtain a natural discretization of the continuum. Since the resonance wavefunctions are oscillating with an exponentially increasing amplitude, and therefore have to be interpreted through some regularization procedure, every statement made about quantities involving such states is checked by numerical calculations.Realistic nuclear wavefunctions, generated by a Wood-Saxon potential, are used to test also the usefulness of RSE in a realistic nuclear calculation. There are some fundamental differences between different symmetries of the integral contour that defines the continuum in RSE. One kind of symmetry is necessary to have an expansion of the unity operator that is idempotent. Another symmetry must be used if we want purely discrete expansions. These are found to be of the same form as given by ML. (29 refs.).

  20. A sequential vesicle pool model with a single release sensor and a ca(2+)-dependent priming catalyst effectively explains ca(2+)-dependent properties of neurosecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Alexander M; da Silva Pinheiro, Paulo César; Verhage, Matthijs

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release depends on the fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane and the release of their contents. The final fusion step displays higher-order Ca(2+) dependence, but also upstream steps depend on Ca(2+). After deletion of the Ca(2+) sensor for fast release - synaptot......Neurotransmitter release depends on the fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane and the release of their contents. The final fusion step displays higher-order Ca(2+) dependence, but also upstream steps depend on Ca(2+). After deletion of the Ca(2+) sensor for fast release...... identified. We here propose a Sequential Pool Model (SPM), assuming a novel Ca(2+)-dependent action: a Ca(2+)-dependent catalyst that accelerates both forward and reverse priming reactions. While both models account for fast fusion from the Readily-Releasable Pool (RRP) under control of synaptotagmin-1...... that the elusive 'alternative Ca(2+) sensor' for slow release might be the upstream priming catalyst, and that a sequential model effectively explains Ca(2+)-dependent properties of secretion without assuming parallel pools or sensors....

  1. A sequential vesicle pool model with a single release sensor and a Ca(2+-dependent priming catalyst effectively explains Ca(2+-dependent properties of neurosecretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Walter

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter release depends on the fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane and the release of their contents. The final fusion step displays higher-order Ca(2+ dependence, but also upstream steps depend on Ca(2+. After deletion of the Ca(2+ sensor for fast release - synaptotagmin-1 - slower Ca(2+-dependent release components persist. These findings have provoked working models involving parallel releasable vesicle pools (Parallel Pool Models, PPM driven by alternative Ca(2+ sensors for release, but no slow release sensor acting on a parallel vesicle pool has been identified. We here propose a Sequential Pool Model (SPM, assuming a novel Ca(2+-dependent action: a Ca(2+-dependent catalyst that accelerates both forward and reverse priming reactions. While both models account for fast fusion from the Readily-Releasable Pool (RRP under control of synaptotagmin-1, the origins of slow release differ. In the SPM the slow release component is attributed to the Ca(2+-dependent refilling of the RRP from a Non-Releasable upstream Pool (NRP, whereas the PPM attributes slow release to a separate slowly-releasable vesicle pool. Using numerical integration we compared model predictions to data from mouse chromaffin cells. Like the PPM, the SPM explains biphasic release, Ca(2+-dependence and pool sizes in mouse chromaffin cells. In addition, the SPM accounts for the rapid recovery of the fast component after strong stimulation, where the PPM fails. The SPM also predicts the simultaneous changes in release rate and amplitude seen when mutating the SNARE-complex. Finally, it can account for the loss of fast- and the persistence of slow release in the synaptotagmin-1 knockout by assuming that the RRP is depleted, leading to slow and Ca(2+-dependent fusion from the NRP. We conclude that the elusive 'alternative Ca(2+ sensor' for slow release might be the upstream priming catalyst, and that a sequential model effectively explains Ca(2+-dependent

  2. Range expansions transition from pulled to pushed waves with increasing cooperativity in an experimental microbial population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Saurabh; Yurtsev, Eugene; Korolev, Kirill; Gore, Jeff

    Range expansions are becoming more frequent due to environmental changes and rare long distance dispersal, often facilitated by anthropogenic activities. Simple models in theoretical ecology explain many emergent properties of range expansions, such as a constant expansion velocity, in terms of organism-level properties such as growth and dispersal rates. Testing these quantitative predictions in natural populations is difficult because of large environmental variability. Here, we used a controlled microbial model system to study range expansions of populations with and without intra-specific cooperativity. For non-cooperative growth, the expansion dynamics were dominated by population growth at the low-density front, which pulled the expansion forward. We found these expansions to be in close quantitative agreement with the classical theory of pulled waves by Fisher and Skellam, suitably adapted to our experimental system. However, as cooperativity increased, the expansions transitioned to being pushed, i.e. controlled by growth in the bulk as well as in the front. Although both pulled and pushed waves expand at a constant velocity and appear otherwise similar, their distinct dynamics leads to very different evolutionary consequences. Given the prevalence of cooperative growth in nature, understanding the effects of cooperativity is essential to managing invading species and understanding their evolution.

  3. Theory of low-temperature thermal expansion of glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Yu. M.; Gurevich, V. L.; Parshin, D. A.

    1985-11-01

    We have developed a theory of low-temperature thermal expansion of glasses explaining a number of existing experimental data. We assume that thermal expansion, like many other low-temperature properties of glasses, is determined by associated two-level systems (TLS's) this concept has been introduced to explain these properties by Anderson, Halperin, and Varma and by Phillips. Our theory is based on the Karpov-Klinger-Ignat'ev model of two-level systems in glasses. The deformation potential of the TLS's is calculated. We have shown that it consists of two parts: The larger part (of the order of 0.3 eV) is responsible for the observed transport properties of glasses; however, it does not contribute to the thermal expansion of glasses. The latter is caused by a relatively small second part of the deformation potential which is, within logarithmic accuracy, proportional to the TLS's interlevel spacing E. This is why at low temperatures the coefficient of thermal expansion of glasses is approximately a linear function of the temperature. Its sign is determined by a microscopic structure of the TLS. We have calculated the Grüneisen parameter Γ. It appears to be of the order of (scrEa/ħωD)2/3~=100, where scrEa is an energy of the order of 30 eV and ωD is the Debye frequency. Such large values of Γ are connected with the softness of local anharmonic potentials that produce the TLS's in glasses. Our principal result is the dependence of the coefficient of thermal expansion α on the time of experiment, τexpt. It is shown that if α<0, then after heating glass it is at first contracted and afterwards, after the time about 10-8 sec (at T=0.3 K), a slow expansion begins. At τexpt~=1 sec the parameter Γ can have the absolute value of about (1/3) of that at τexpt~=10-8 sec. Such behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient is due to the fact that the contribution of the TLS's with large relative tunnel splitting (Δ0/E~=1) is negative while that of the TLS's with

  4. Thermal Expansion, Elastic and Magnetic Properties of FeCoNiCu-Based High-Entropy Alloys Using First-Principle Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuo; Vida, Ádám; Heczel, Anita; Holmström, Erik; Vitos, Levente

    2017-11-01

    The effects of V, Cr, and Mn on the magnetic, elastic, and thermal properties of FeCoNiCu high-entropy alloy are studied by using the exact muffin-tin orbitals method in combination with the coherent potential approximation. The calculated lattice parameters and Curie temperatures in the face-centered-cubic structure are in line with the available experimental and theoretical data. A significant change in the magnetic behavior is revealed when adding equimolar V, Cr, and Mn to the host composition. The three independent single-crystal elastic constants are computed using a finite strain technique, and the polycrystalline elasticity parameters including shear modulus, Young's modulus, Pugh ratio, Poisson's ratio, and elastic anisotropy are derived and discussed. The effects of temperature on the structural parameters are determined by making use of the Debye-Grüneisen model. It is found that FeCoNiCuCr possesses a slightly larger thermal expansion coefficient than do the other alloys considered here.

  5. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  6. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  7. Influence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) on the morphology and negative thermal expansion property of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} powders synthesized by hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xiujuan; Yang Juan; Liu Qinqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Cheng Xiaonong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China)], E-mail: xncheng@ujs.edu.cn

    2009-07-29

    ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} powders were prepared by hydrothermal thermal method using sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as surfactant. The products were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra. Results indicate that the resulting powders are single cubic phase with high crystallinity. With increasing the amount of SDBS, morphology and particle size change from rod-like with an average dimension of 1.2 {mu}m x 1.2 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m to layered column with an average diameter of 0.4 {mu}m. ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} powders exhibit negative thermal expansion property. And the amount of SDBS is not influence on the average thermal expansion coefficients. The thermal expansion coefficients are about similar with an average value of -5.8 x 10{sup -6} deg. C{sup -1} from room temperature to 500 deg. C. However, the morphology has some effect on the thermal expansion coefficient of {alpha}-ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}.

  8. Fundamentals of Thermal Expansion and Thermal Contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zi-Kui; Shang, Shun-Li; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Thermal expansion is an important property of substances. Its theoretical prediction has been challenging, particularly in cases the volume decreases with temperature, i.e., thermal contraction or negative thermal expansion at high temperatures. In this paper, a new theory recently developed by the authors has been reviewed and further examined in the framework of fundamental thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Its applications to cerium with colossal thermal expansion and Fe3Pt with th...

  9. Isolation and prolonged expansion of oral mesenchymal stem cells under clinical-grade, GMP-compliant conditions differentially affects “stemness” properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Bakopoulou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of clinical-grade cell preparations is central to meeting the regulatory requirements for cellular therapies under good manufacturing practice-compliant (cGMP conditions. Since addition of animal serum in culture media may compromise safe and efficient expansion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for clinical use, this study aimed to investigate the potential of two serum/xeno-free, cGMP culture systems to maintain long-term “stemness” of oral MSCs (dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs and alveolar bone marrow MSCs (aBMMSCs, compared to conventional serum-based expansion. Methods DPSC and aBMMSC cultures (n = 6/cell type were established from pulp and alveolar osseous biopsies respectively. Three culture systems were used: StemPro_MSC/SFM_XenoFree (Life Technologies; StemMacs_MSC/XF (Miltenyi Biotek; and α-MEM (Life Technologies with 15% fetal bovine serum. Growth (population doublings (PDs, immunophenotypic (flow cytometric analysis of MSC markers and senescence (β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal activity; telomere length characteristics were determined during prolonged expansion. Gene expression patterns of osteogenic (ALP, BMP-2, adipogenic (LPL, PPAR-γ and chondrogenic (ACAN, SOX-9 markers and maintenance of multilineage differentiation potential were determined by real-time PCR. Results Similar isolation efficiency and stable growth dynamics up to passage 10 were observed for DPSCs under all expansion conditions. aBMMSCs showed lower cumulative PDs compared to DPSCs, and when StemMacs was used substantial delays in cell proliferation were noted after passages 6–7. Serum/xeno-free expansion produced cultures with homogeneous spindle-shaped phenotypes, while serum-based expansion preserved differential heterogeneous characteristics of each MSC population. Prolonged expansion of both MSC types but in particular the serum/xeno-free-expanded aBMMSCs was associated with downregulation of CD146, CD105, Stro-1, SSEA-1

  10. Triggering co-stimulation directly in melanoma tumor fragments drives CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte expansion with improved effector-memory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Jessica Ann; Sarnaik, Amod A; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2015-12-01

    TIL from solid tumors can express activation/co-stimulatory molecules like 4-1BB/CD137, a sign of recent antigenic stimulation in the tumor microenvironment (TME). This activated state can be exploited ex vivo to enhance the expansion of tumor-reactive CD8+ TIL for adoptive cell therapy through direct addition of immunomodulators to tumor fragments in culture.

  11. Low-temperature abnormal thermal expansion property of Mn doped cubic NaZn13-type La(Fe, Al)13 compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuqiang; Huang, Rongjin; Shan, Yi; Wang, Wei; Li, Jiangtao; Li, Laifeng

    2017-09-01

    Low-temperature abnormal thermal expansion (ATE) materials have been recently developed because of their significant applications for cryogenic engineering. However, the challenge still remains for the control of ATE effect at cryogenic temperature and adjustable ATE is of fundamental interest. In this paper, we report the isotropic ATE in La(Fe, Al)13 compounds over a wide adjusting temperature range by partially substituting Fe by Mn. It is found that all samples crystallize in the cubic NaZn13-type structure with the Fm\\bar{3}c space group. The introduction of nonmagnetic Mn atoms reduces the Fe-Fe exchange interaction, therefore, the itinerant electron system needs less energy to break the magnetic order in ferromagnetic (FM) state at low temperature. The negative thermal expansion (NTE) operation-temperature window moves towards lower temperatures accompanied with the decrease of Curie temperature (T C) by increasing Mn elements. Moreover, the composite combining Mn 0 and Mn 57 broadens the zero thermal expansion (ZTE) behavior occurring in the whole tested temperature range. The present studies could be useful to control the thermal expansion, and indicate the potential applications of ATE materials in cryogenic engineering.

  12. Near zero thermal expansion properties in antiperovskite Mn3Cu0.6Ge0.4N prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jie; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Wen; Huang, Chuangjun; Han, Yemao; Li, Laifeng

    2014-09-01

    Antiperovskite manganese nitride Mn3Cu0.6Ge0.4N was fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at different temperatures and its negative thermal expansion behavior was investigated. It is observed that the width of negative thermal expansion (NTE) operation-temperature window becomes broader when the sintering temperature decreases. Moreover, it is significantly larger than that of other Mn3CuN-based antiperovskite manganese nitrides prepared by solid-state reaction. More interestingly, the Mn3Cu0.6Ge0.4N sintered at 650 °C shows near zero thermal expansion (ZTE) behavior in the temperature range of 220-170 K. The average linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is estimated to be -0.9 × 10-6 K-1. Magnetic measurement shows that the process of the magnetic transition becomes slow when the sintering temperature decreases. This antiperovskite manganese nitride Mn3Cu0.6Ge0.4N with ZTE behavior is much useful for applications in the fields of cryogenics and applied superconductivity.

  13. Mechanical properties and coefficient of thermal expansion of β-eucryptite sintered by microwave technique; Propiedades mecanicas y coeficiente de dilatacion termica de la β-eucriptita sinterizada por la tecnica de microondas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavente, R.; Borrell, A.; Salvador, M. D.; Garcia-Moreno, O.; Penaranda-Foix, F. L.; Catala-Civera, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    Microwave non-conventional sintering technique allows obtaining fully dense glass-free β-eucryptite bulk material (∼99 %). A considerable difference in the densification, microstructure, coefficient of thermal expansion behaviour and mechanical properties, between conventional and non-conventional sintered specimens was observed. The hardness and Young's modulus values obtained by microwaves at 1200 degree centigrade-5min have been relatively high, 6.8 GPa and 101 GPa, respectively, compared to conventional sintering (3.9 GPa and 58 GPa, respectively). Very low thermal expansion materials have been obtained in a wide temperature range including cryogenic temperatures (from -150 degree centigrade to 150 degree centigrade). The high heating rate along with the lower energy consumption makes microwave technique a clear alternative to other types of sintering methods. (Author)

  14. Explaining key properties of lithiation in TiO2-anatase Li-ion battery electrodes using phase-field modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Klerk, Niek J. J.; Vasileiadis, Alexandros; Smith, Raymond B.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Wagemaker, Marnix

    2017-07-01

    The improvement of Li-ion battery performance requires development of models that capture the essential physics and chemistry in Li-ion battery electrode materials. Phase-field modeling has recently been shown to have this ability, providing new opportunities to gain understanding of these complex systems. In this paper, a novel electrochemical phase-field model is presented that captures the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of lithium insertion in Ti O2 -anatase, a well-known and intensively studied Li-ion battery electrode material. Using a linear combination of two regular solution models, the two phase transitions during lithiation are described as lithiation of two separate lattices with different physical properties. Previous elaborate experimental work on lithiated anatase Ti O2 provides all parameters necessary for the phase-field simulations, giving the opportunity to gain fundamental insight in the lithiation of anatase and validate this phase-field model. The phase-field model captures the essential experimentally observed phenomena, rationalizing the impact of C rate, particle size, surface area, and the memory effect on the performance of anatase as a Li-ion battery electrode. Thereby a comprehensive physical picture of the lithiation of anatase Ti O2 is provided. The results of the simulations demonstrate that the performance of anatase is limited by the formation of the poor Li-ion diffusion in the Li1TiO2 phase at the surface of the particles. Unlike other electrode materials, the kinetic limitations of individual anatase particles limit the performance of full electrodes. Hence, rather than improving the ionic and electronic network in electrodes, improving the performance of anatase Ti O2 electrodes requires preventing the formation of a blocking Li1TiO2 phase at the surface of particles. Additionally, the qualitative agreement of the phase-field model, containing only parameters from literature, with a broad spectrum of experiments

  15. Plagiarism explainer for students

    OpenAIRE

    Barba, Lorena A.

    2016-01-01

    A slide deck to serve as an explainer of plagiarism in academic settings, with a personal viewpoint. For my students.Also on SpeakerDeck:https://speakerdeck.com/labarba/plagiarism-explainer-for-students(The slide viewer on SpeakerDeck is much nicer.)

  16. Model-Assisted Analysis of Sugar Metabolism throughout Tomato Fruit Development Reveals Enzyme and Carrier Properties in Relation to Vacuole Expansion[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvoit, Bertrand P.; Colombié, Sophie; Monier, Antoine; Andrieu, Marie-Hélène; Biais, Benoit; Bénard, Camille; Chéniclet, Catherine; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Nazaret, Christine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Gibon, Yves

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic model combining enzyme activity measurements and subcellular compartmentation was parameterized to fit the sucrose, hexose, and glucose-6-P contents of pericarp throughout tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit development. The model was further validated using independent data obtained from domesticated and wild tomato species and on transgenic lines. A hierarchical clustering analysis of the calculated fluxes and enzyme capacities together revealed stage-dependent features. Cell division was characterized by a high sucrolytic activity of the vacuole, whereas sucrose cleavage during expansion was sustained by both sucrose synthase and neutral invertase, associated with minimal futile cycling. Most importantly, a tight correlation between flux rate and enzyme capacity was found for fructokinase and PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase during cell division and for sucrose synthase, UDP-glucopyrophosphorylase, and phosphoglucomutase during expansion, thus suggesting an adaptation of enzyme abundance to metabolic needs. In contrast, for most enzymes, flux rates varied irrespectively of enzyme capacities, and most enzymes functioned at <5% of their maximal catalytic capacity. One of the major findings with the model was the high accumulation of soluble sugars within the vacuole together with organic acids, thus enabling the osmotic-driven vacuole expansion that was found during cell division. PMID:25139005

  17. Some Improved Nonperturbative Bounds for Fermionic Expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Martin, E-mail: marlohmann@gmail.com [Universita di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We reconsider the Gram-Hadamard bound as it is used in constructive quantum field theory and many body physics to prove convergence of Fermionic perturbative expansions. Our approach uses a recursion for the amplitudes of the expansion, discovered in a model problem by Djokic (2013). It explains the standard way to bound the expansion from a new point of view, and for some of the amplitudes provides new bounds, which avoid the use of Fourier transform, and are therefore superior to the standard bounds for models like the cold interacting Fermi gas.

  18. Bridges Expansion Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-01-01

    The survey is concerned with the expansion joints, used in bridge constructions to compensate medium and significant operational linear and spatial displacements between adjacent spans or between bridge span and pier. The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting the modern demands imposed to expansion joints.

  19. The structures of CyMe4-BTBP complexes of americium(iii) and europium(iii) in solvents used in solvent extraction, explaining their separation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Christian; Löfström-Engdahl, Elin; Aneheim, Emma; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Geist, Andreas; Lundberg, Daniel; Denecke, Melissa; Persson, Ingmar

    2015-11-14

    Separation of trivalent actinoid (An(iii)) and lanthanoid (Ln(iii)) ions is extremely challenging due to their similar ionic radii and chemical properties. Poly-aromatic nitrogen compounds acting as tetradentate chelating ligands to the metal ions in the extraction, have the ability to sufficiently separate An(iii) from Ln(iii). One of these compounds, 6,6'-bis(5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-benzol[1,2,4]triazin-3-yl)[2,2]bipyridine, CyMe4-BTBP, has proven to be resistant towards acidic environments and strong radiation from radioactive decomposition. EXAFS studies of the dicomplexes of CyMe4-BTBP with americium(iii) and europium(iii) in nitrobenzene, cyclohexanone, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol and malonamide (DMDOHEMA) in 1-octanol have been carried out to get a deeper understanding of the parameters responsible for the separation. The predominating complexes independent of solvent used are [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) and [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+), respectively, which are present as outer-sphere ion-pairs with nitrate ions in the studied solvents with low relative permittivity. The presence of a nitrate ion in the first coordination sphere of the americium(iii) complex compensates the charge density of the complex considerably in comparison when only outer-sphere ion-pairs are formed as for the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex. The stability and solubility of a complex in a solvent with low relative permittivity increase with decreasing charge density. The [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) complex will therefore be increasingly soluble and stabilized over the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex in solvents with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent. The separation of americium(iii) from europium(iii) with CyMe4-BTBP as extraction agent will increase with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent, and thereby also with decreasing solubility of CyMe4-BTBP. The choice of solvent is therefore a balance of a high separation factor and sufficient solubility of the CyMe4-BTBP

  20. Reporting explained variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ron; Fletcher, Harold J.

    The importance of reporting explained variance (sometimes referred to as magnitude of effects) in ANOVA designs is discussed in this paper. Explained variance is an estimate of the strength of the relationship between treatment (or other factors such as sex, grade level, etc.) and dependent variables of interest to the researcher(s). Three methods that can be used to obtain estimates of explained variance in ANOVA designs are described and applied to 16 studies that were reported in recent volumes of this journal. The results show that, while in most studies the treatment accounts for a relatively small proportion of the variance in dependent variable scores., in., some studies the magnitude of the treatment effect is respectable. The authors recommend that researchers in science education report explained variance in addition to the commonly reported tests of significance, since the latter are inadequate as the sole basis for making decisions about the practical importance of factors of interest to science education researchers.

  1. Crystalline electric field and lattice contributions to thermodynamic properties of PrGaO{sub 3}: specific heat and thermal expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senyshyn, A [Materialwissenschaft, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Schnelle, W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Vasylechko, L [Semiconductor Electronics Department, Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera St, 79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Ehrenberg, H [Materialwissenschaft, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Berkowski, M [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-04-16

    The low-temperature heat capacity of perovskite-type PrGaO{sub 3} has been measured in the temperature range from 2 to 320 K. Thermodynamic standard values at 298.15 K are reported. An initial Debye temperature {theta}{sub D}(0) (480 {+-} 10) K was determined by fitting the calculated lattice heat capacity. The entropy of the derived Debye temperature functions agrees well with values calculated from thermal displacement parameters and from atomistic simulations. The thermal expansion and the Grueneisen parameter, arising from a coupling of crystal field states of Pr{sup 3+} ion and phonon modes at low temperature, were analysed.

  2. On skin expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Djenane C; Velloso, Raquel Q; Radwanski, Henrique N

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses skin expansion without considering cellular growth of the skin. An in vivo analysis was carried out that involved expansion at three different sites on one patient, allowing for the observation of the relaxation process. Those measurements were used to characterize the human skin of the thorax during the surgical process of skin expansion. A comparison between the in vivo results and the numerical finite elements model of the expansion was used to identify the material elastic parameters of the skin of the thorax of that patient. Delfino's constitutive equation was chosen to model the in vivo results. The skin is considered to be an isotropic, homogeneous, hyperelastic, and incompressible membrane. When the skin is extended, such as with expanders, the collagen fibers are also extended and cause stiffening in the skin, which results in increasing resistance to expansion or further stretching. We observed this phenomenon as an increase in the parameters as subsequent expansions continued. The number and shape of the skin expanders used in expansions were also studied, both mathematically and experimentally. The choice of the site where the expansion should be performed is discussed to enlighten problems that can lead to frustrated skin expansions. These results are very encouraging and provide insight into our understanding of the behavior of stretched skin by expansion. To our knowledge, this study has provided results that considerably improve our understanding of the behavior of human skin under expansion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 36 CFR 72.42 - Expansion and new development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expansion and new development... INTERIOR URBAN PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Grants for Recovery Action Program Development, Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.42 Expansion and new development. (a) Expansion. Because the UPARR Program is...

  4. Computer jargon explained

    CERN Document Server

    Enticknap, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Computer Jargon Explained is a feature in Computer Weekly publications that discusses 68 of the most commonly used technical computing terms. The book explains what the terms mean and why the terms are important to computer professionals. The text also discusses how the terms relate to the trends and developments that are driving the information technology industry. Computer jargon irritates non-computer people and in turn causes problems for computer people. The technology and the industry are changing so rapidly; it is very hard even for professionals to keep updated. Computer people do not

  5. Multipole expansion for transient electric and magnetic fields in an internally excited spherical cavity containing dampers of finite thickness with distributed electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, B. P.

    1981-10-01

    The multipole expansion coefficients needed to calculate transient electromagnetic fields and cavity frequency response in an internally excited, damped cavity are derived for an arbitrary but centralized distribution of source currents and an arbitrary number of dampers which have finite width. A block matrix procedure is devised to solve the N damper boundary value problems, but specific solutions are presented for the cases of zero, one, and two dampers. Also, the TM wave multipole coefficients for an uncapped biconical antenna used as excitation source are obtained in closed form, with use of Schelkunoff's mode solution for the antenna currents. Finally, coupled integrodifferential equations for the current distribution in the end caps and the conical sections of a capped bicone source are presented. This entire theory will be encoded to permit analysis of AEDC experiments.

  6. Defect structure, electronic conductivity and expansion of properties of (La1−xSrx)sCo1−yNiyO3−δ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalmarsson, Per; Søgaard, Martin; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on oxygen nonstoichiometry, electronic conductivity and lattice expansion of three compositions as function of T and PO2 in the (La1−xSrx)sCo1−yNiyO3−δ (x=0.1, y=0.4; x=0.1, y=0.3; x=0.2, y=0.2) materials system. The nonstoichiometry data were successfully fitted using the itin......This study reports on oxygen nonstoichiometry, electronic conductivity and lattice expansion of three compositions as function of T and PO2 in the (La1−xSrx)sCo1−yNiyO3−δ (x=0.1, y=0.4; x=0.1, y=0.3; x=0.2, y=0.2) materials system. The nonstoichiometry data were successfully fitted using...... the itinerant electron model which indicates the existence of delocalized electronic states. This was also reflected in the high electronic conductivities, above 1000 S cm−1, measured for all three compositions. The electronic conductivity was shown to decrease linearly with the oxygen nonstoichiometry...... parameter, δ, supporting that the conductivity is dependent on p-type charge carriers. Comparing calculated p-type mobilities with data reported in literature on La1−xSrxCoO3 indicated that Ni-substitution into (La1−xSrx)sCoO3−δ increases the p-type mobility. The electronic conductivity was also found...

  7. Bridges Expansion Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The survey is concerned with the expansion joints, used in bridge constructions to compensate medium and significant operational linear and spatial displacements between adjacent spans or between bridge span and pier. The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting the modern demands imposed to expansion joints.

  8. Explaining the Oxbridge Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Bronwyn; Harre, Rom

    1989-01-01

    Rejects sociobiological theories on female academic achievement and bases findings on social structure to explain why undergraduate women at Oxford University (England) achieve fewer first places and more second places in class honors. Bases theory on bipolarity of gender as an organizing principle of society. Claims that the double bind of social…

  9. The wireless internet explained

    CERN Document Server

    Rhoton, John

    2001-01-01

    The Wireless Internet Explained covers the full spectrum of wireless technologies from a wide range of vendors, including initiatives by Microsoft and Compaq. The Wireless Internet Explained takes a practical look at wireless technology. Rhoton explains the concepts behind the physics, and provides an overview that clarifies the convoluted set of standards heaped together under the umbrella of wireless. It then expands on these technical foundations to give a panorama of the increasingly crowded landscape of wireless product offerings. When it comes to actual implementation the book gives abundant down-to-earth advice on topics ranging from the selection and deployment of mobile devices to the extremely sensitive subject of security.Written by an expert on Internet messaging, the author of Digital Press''s successful Programmer''s Guide to Internet Mail and X.400 and SMTP: Battle of the E-mail Protocols, The Wireless Internet Explained describes and evaluates the current state of the fast-growing and crucial...

  10. Bridges Expansion Joints

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergey W. Kozlachkow

    2012-01-01

    .... The analysis of design features of these types of expansion joints, their advantages and disadvantages, based on operational experience justified the necessity to design constructions, meeting...

  11. Raman spectra and anomalies of dielectric properties and thermal expansion of lead-free (1-x)Na.sub.0.5./sub.Bi.sub.0.5./sub.TiO.sub.3./sub.-xSrTiO.sub.3./sub.(x=0,0.08 and 0.1) ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dutkiewicz, E.M.; Suchanicz, J.; Bovtun, Viktor; Konieczny, K.; Czaja, P.; Kluczewska, K.; Handke, B.; Antonova, M.; Sternberg, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 89, 7-8 (2016), s. 823-828 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-08389S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thermal expansion * dielectric properties * structural properties * relaxor behaviour Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.060, year: 2016

  12. Expansion Coefficient on Oxides and Oxide Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    Classification) EXPANSION COEFFICIENTS ON OXIDES AND OXIDE CERAMICS 12 PFRSONAL AUTHOR(S) Josephine Covino 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT...drastically alter expansion properties of oxides. It has been found that fine-grained (᝺ tm) anisotropic ceramic materials, such as hafnium oxide, hafnium ...Gokhale. "Thermal Expansion of Zircon ," Jap. J. AppZ. Phys., 7 (1968), p. 1126. 34 -- ’-a.’! nw-W’W L. .WW U. .PV _ 77 NWC TP 6663 81. J. L. Amoros, M

  13. Tissue expansion: Concepts, techniques and unfavourable results

    OpenAIRE

    Milind S Wagh; Varun Dixit

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of tissue expansion is observed in nature all the time. The same properties of the human skin to stretch and expand and yield extra skin if placed under continuous stress over a prolonged period of time has been utilised for reconstructive purposes with the help of a silicon balloon inserted under the skin and progressively filled with saline. The technique of tissue expansion is now more than three decades old and has been a value addition to our armamentarium in reconstructiv...

  14. QUANTUM SPACE AND THE EXPANSION OF THE UNIVERSE

    OpenAIRE

    CARLOS A. MELENDRES

    2017-01-01

    A new quantum model of space  and the evolution of the universe is presented. They provide a a mechanism to explain the accelerated expansion of the universe, dark energy,  and the nature of dark matter.

  15. Properties of chicken manure pyrolysis bio-oil blended with diesel and its combustion characteristics in RCEM, Rapid Compression and Expansion Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunbong Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bio-oil (bio-oil was produced from chicken manure in a pilot-scale pyrolysis facility. The raw bio-oil had a very high viscosity and sediments which made direct application to diesel engines difficult. The bio-oil was blended with diesel fuel with 25% and 75% volumetric ratio at the normal temperature, named as blend 25. A rapid compression and expansion machine was used for a combustion test under the experimental condition corresponding to the medium operation point of a light duty diesel engine using diesel fuel, and blend 25 for comparison. The injection related pressure signal and cylinder pressure signal were instantaneously picked up to analyze the combustion characteristics in addition to the measurement of NOx and smoke emissions. Blend 25 resulted in reduction of the smoke emission by 80% and improvements of the apparent combustion efficiency while the NOx emission increased by 40%. A discussion was done based on the analysis results of combustion.

  16. Effect of Keratin Structures from Chicken Feathers on Expansive Soil Remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elda Montes-Zarazúa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken feathers are composed mainly of avian keratin, a fibrillar protein with a complex structure, and important properties such as durability, hydrophobicity, being chemically unreactive, and depending on the specific function can change its morphological and inner structure. This study takes advantage of these features and for the first time the use of keratin from chicken feathers to modify characteristics on expansive soils is reported. Swelling characteristics of remolded expansive soil specimens were studied through varying the percentage of keratin fiber content using 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 and 3.00 wt%. One-dimensional swell-consolidation tests were conducted on oedometric specimens, specific surface area was determined using methylene blue, and degree of saturation was also analyzed. Finally random distribution and interaction between keratin structures and soil were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that randomly distributed fibers are useful in restraining the swelling tendency of expansive soils. The maximum reduction of pressure (43.99% due to swelling is achieved by reducing the void ratio, which can be reached with the addition of chicken feather keratin structures to the expansive soil. Finally, the mechanism by which discrete and randomly distributed fibers reduce swelling pressure of expansive soil is explained.

  17. Neuroblastoma killing properties of Vδ2 and Vδ2-negative γδT cells following expansion by artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jonathan P H; Yan, Mengyong; Heuijerjans, Jennifer; Carter, Lisa; Abolhassani, Ayda; Frosch, Jennifer; Wallace, Rebecca; Flutter, Barry; Capsomidis, Anna; Hubank, Mike; Klein, Nigel; Callard, Robin; Gustafsson, Kenth; Anderson, John

    2014-11-15

    The majority of circulating human γδT lymphocytes are of the Vγ9Vδ2 lineage, and have T-cell receptor (TCR) specificity for nonpeptide phosphoantigens. Previous attempts to stimulate and expand these cells have therefore focused on stimulation using ligands of the Vγ9Vδ2 receptor, whereas relatively little is known about variant blood γδT subsets and their potential role in cancer immunotherapy. To expand the full repertoire of γδT without bias toward specific TCRs, we made use of artificial antigen-presenting cells loaded with an anti γδTCR antibody that promoted unbiased expansion of the γδT repertoire. Expanded cells from adult blood donors were sorted into 3 populations expressing respectively Vδ2 TCR chains (Vδ2(+)), Vδ1 chains (Vδ1(+)), and TCR of other δ chain subtypes (Vδ1(neg)Vδ2(neg)). Both freshly isolated and expanded cells showed heterogeneity of differentiation markers, with a less differentiated phenotype in the Vδ1 and Vδ1(neg)Vδ2(neg) populations. Expanded cells were largely of an effector memory phenotype, although there were higher numbers of less differentiated cells in the Vδ1(+) and Vδ1(neg)Vδ2(neg) populations. Using neuroblastoma tumor cells and the anti-GD2 therapeutic mAb ch14.18 as a model system, all three populations showed clinically relevant cytotoxicity. Although killing by expanded Vδ2 cells was predominantly antibody dependent and proportionate to upregulated CD16, Vδ1 cells killed by antibody-independent mechanisms. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that polyclonal-expanded populations of γδT cells are capable of both antibody-dependent and -independent effector functions in neuroblastoma. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Linear Algebra Thoroughly Explained

    CERN Document Server

    Vujičić, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Linear Algebra Thoroughly Explained provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject suitable for adoption as a self-contained text for courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The clear and comprehensive presentation of the basic theory is illustrated throughout with an abundance of worked examples. The book is written for teachers and students of linear algebra at all levels and across mathematics and the applied sciences, particularly physics and engineering. It will also be an invaluable addition to research libraries as a comprehensive resource book for the subject.

  19. Quality evaluation of spaceborne SiC mirrors (I): analytical examination of the effects on mirror accuracy by variation in the thermal expansion property of the mirror surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Masaki; Imai, Tadashi; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Yui, Yukari; Tange, Yoshio; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakagawa, Takao; Enya, Keigo

    2013-07-10

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency has studied a large-scale lightweight mirror constructed of reaction-bonded silicon carbide-based material as a key technology in future astronomical and earth observation missions. The authors selected silicon carbide as the promising candidate due to excellent characteristics of specific stiffness and thermal stability. One of the most important technical issues for large-scale ceramic components is the uniformity of the material's property, depending on part and processing. It might influence mirror accuracy due to uneven thermal deformation. The authors conducted systematic case studies for the conditions of CTE by finite element analysis to know the typical influence of material property nonuniformity on mirror accuracy and consequently derived a comprehensive empirical equation for the series of CTE's main factors. In addition, the authors computationally reproduced the mirror accuracy profile of a small prototype mirror shown in cryogenic testing and hereby verified wide-range practical computational evaluation technology of mirror accuracy.

  20. Explaining embodied cognition results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, George

    2012-10-01

    From the late 1950s until 1975, cognition was understood mainly as disembodied symbol manipulation in cognitive psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and the nascent field of Cognitive Science. The idea of embodied cognition entered the field of Cognitive Linguistics at its beginning in 1975. Since then, cognitive linguists, working with neuroscientists, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists, have been developing a neural theory of thought and language (NTTL). Central to NTTL are the following ideas: (a) we think with our brains, that is, thought is physical and is carried out by functional neural circuitry; (b) what makes thought meaningful are the ways those neural circuits are connected to the body and characterize embodied experience; (c) so-called abstract ideas are embodied in this way as well, as is language. Experimental results in embodied cognition are seen not only as confirming NTTL but also explained via NTTL, mostly via the neural theory of conceptual metaphor. Left behind more than three decades ago is the old idea that cognition uses the abstract manipulation of disembodied symbols that are meaningless in themselves but that somehow constitute internal "representations of external reality" without serious mediation by the body and brain. This article uniquely explains the connections between embodied cognition results since that time and results from cognitive linguistics, experimental psychology, computational modeling, and neuroscience. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, S J; Grunberg, G; Rathsman, J; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Gardi, Einan; Grunberg, Georges; Rathsman, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The coefficients in perturbative expansions in gauge theories are factoriallyincreasing, predominantly due to renormalons. This type of factorial increaseis not expected in conformal theories. In QCD conformal relations betweenobservables can be defined in the presence of a perturbative infraredfixed-point. Using the Banks-Zaks expansion we study the effect of thelarge-order behavior of the perturbative series on the conformal coefficients.We find that in general these coefficients become factorially increasing.However, when the factorial behavior genuinely originates in a renormalonintegral, as implied by a postulated skeleton expansion, it does not affect theconformal coefficients. As a consequence, the conformal coefficients willindeed be free of renormalon divergence, in accordance with previousobservations concerning the smallness of these coefficients for specificobservables. We further show that the correspondence of the BLM method with theskeleton expansion implies a unique scale-setting procedure. Th...

  2. Matlab for engineers explained

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    2003-01-01

    This book is written for students at bachelor and master programs and has four different purposes, which split the book into four parts: 1. To teach first or early year undergraduate engineering students basic knowledge in technical computations and programming using MATLAB. The first part starts from first principles and is therefore well suited both for readers with prior exposure to MATLAB but lacking a solid foundational knowledge of the capabilities of the system and readers not having any previous experience with MATLAB. The foundational knowledge gained from these interactive guided tours of the system will hopefully be sufficient for an effective utilization of MATLAB in the engineering profession, in education and in research. 2. To explain the foundations of more advanced use of MATLAB using the facilities added the last couple of years, such as extended data structures, object orientation and advanced graphics. 3. To give an introduction to the use of MATLAB in typical undergraduate courses in elec...

  3. Explaining wartime rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Jonathan

    2004-05-01

    In the years since the first reports of mass rapes in the Yugoslavian wars of secession and the genocidal massacres in Rwanda, feminist activists and scholars, human rights organizations, journalists, and social scientists have dedicated unprecedented efforts to document, explain, and seek solutions for the phenomenon of wartime rape. While contributors to this literature agree on much, there is no consensus on causal factors. This paper provides a brief overview of the literature on wartime rape in historical and ethnographical societies and a critical analysis of the four leading explanations for its root causes: the feminist theory, the cultural pathology theory, the strategic rape theory, and the biosocial theory. The paper concludes that the biosocial theory is the only one capable of bringing all the phenomena associated with wartime rape into a single explanatory context.

  4. Does Viewing Explain Doing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Gert Martin; Kuyper, Lisette; Adam, Philippe C G

    2013-01-01

    that, when controlling for important other factors, SEM consumption influences sexual behaviors. The small to moderate associations that emerged between SEM consumption and sexual behavior after controlling for other variables suggest that SEM is just one factor among many that may influence youth...... hierarchical multiple regression analyses to control for other factors, the association between SEM consumption and a variety of sexual behaviors was found to be significant, accounting for between 0.3% and 4% of the total explained variance in investigated sexual behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests......INTRODUCTION: Concerns have been voiced that the use of sexually explicit materials (SEMs) may adversely affect sexual behaviors, particularly in young people. Previous studies have generally found significant associations between SEM consumption and the sexual behaviors investigated. However, most...

  5. Explaining climate danger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreskes, N.

    2016-12-01

    The idea of `managing planet Earth' is traceable back at least to the 1970s. Recently, it has been reformulated in the idea of a "good Anthropocene": the idea that humans should and can try to manage our planet now that we have become a planetary force. Yet available evidence and experience suggests that our prior attempts to do so have been plagued by under-estimation of the scale of the problems and over-estimation of our capacities to address them. In any case, Earth is not at risk—our planet will survive despite what we do or fail to do. Global climate change, for example, is not a problem for the planet, it is a problem for us. As the UNFCCC articulated in the 1990s, climate change matters because it is dangerous. Yet many Americans still do not understand why this is the case. I suggest that scientists can profitably focus attention on explaining this danger—why climate represents a threat to our health, well-being, and lives—and on what kinds of steps can be taken to reduce the danger.

  6. Virial Expansion Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  7. Negative thermal expansion in framework compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron microscopy, EXAFS and differential scanning calorimetry have been used to study structural properties as a function of temperature for these compounds. In this paper we report the results obtained from our study [14–20] of negative thermal expansion (NTE) compounds with chemical compositions of NX2O8 and.

  8. Wake Expansion Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Different models of wake expansion are presented in this chapter: the 1D momentum theory model, the cylinder analog model and Theodorsen’s model. Far wake models such as the ones from Frandsen or Rathmann or only briefly mentioned. The different models are compared to each other. Results from thi...... this chapter are used in Chap. 16 to link near-wake and far-wake parameters and in Chap. 20 to study the influence of expansion on tip-losses....

  9. Nuclear expansion with excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, J.N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Samaddar, S.K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Vinas, X. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centelles, M. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: mario@ecm.ub.es

    2006-07-06

    The expansion of an isolated hot spherical nucleus with excitation energy and its caloric curve are studied in a thermodynamic model with the SkM{sup *} force as the nuclear effective two-body interaction. The calted results are shown to compare well with the recent experimental data from energetic nuclear collisions. The fluctuations in temperature and density are also studied. They are seen to build up very rapidly beyond an excitation energy of {approx}9 MeV/u. Volume-conserving quadrupole deformation in addition to expansion indicates, however, nuclear disassembly above an excitation energy of {approx}4 MeV/u.

  10. Uniform gradient expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giovannini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  11. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-xiao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil.

  12. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  13. Rethinking expansive learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    discussion forum on Google groups, they created new ways of reflecting and learning. We used netnography to select qualitative postings from the online community and expansive learning concepts for data analysis. The findings show how students changed practices of organisational learning...

  14. Explaining time's arrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Craig Adam

    This thesis is an attempt to accurately formulate and solve one of the problems associated with the direction of time. Processes in nature appear to be 'irreversible', for instance, heat flows from hot to cold but never from cold to hot. The problem of the direction of time, roughly put, is the difficulty of squaring this irreversible behavior with the apparent fact that the fundamental laws of physics are completely reversible. In the first three chapters I critically review the foundations of statistical mechanics. After arguing that entropy is an objective property of the thermodynamic world, I contrast the 'Boltzmannian' single-system approach to statistical mechanics with the 'Gibbsian' many-system approach. Based in part on its ability to handle irreversibility, I judge the Boltzmann approach to be superior from a philosophical perspective. I argue, however, that the statistical mechanical probabilities cannot be interpreted in such a way as to allow the theory to give the sort of explanation originally desired. The next four chapters are devoted to the direction of time. Chapters four and five attempt to provide the problem with the philosophically mature geography that has so far eluded it. Chapter six discusses the problem in the context of quantum mechanics, and chapter seven criticizes the problem's standard formulation. I show that the problem is really a much more general one than has previously been appreciated; indeed, I try to show that it is a problem (if it is one) afflicting all the special sciences. Finally, the remaining three chapters investigate three separate issues. Chapter eight discusses the tensed theory of time. I claim the best argument for the tensed theory relies on various temporal asymmetries, e.g., the asymmetry of causation. I provide reasons for not being persuaded by this argument. The tensed theory, I conclude, is not incoherent, as many have claimed, instead it is simply an implausible explanation of our experience. Chapter

  15. Thermal expansion of vitrified blood vessels permeated with DP6 and synthetic ice modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David P; Taylor, Michael J; Jimenez-Rios, Jorge L; Rabin, Yoed

    2014-06-01

    This study provides thermal expansion data for blood vessels permeated with the cryoprotective cocktail DP6, when combined with selected synthetic ice modulators (SIMs): 12% polyethylene glycol 400, 6% 1,3-cyclohexanediol, and 6% 2,3-butanediol. The general classification of SIMs includes molecules that modulate ice nucleation and growth, or possess properties of stabilizing the amorphous state, by virtue of their chemical structure and at concentrations that are not explained on a purely colligative basis. The current study is part of an ongoing effort to characterize thermo-mechanical effects on structural integrity of cryopreserved materials, where thermal expansion is the driving mechanism to thermo-mechanical stress. This study focuses on the lower part of the cryogenic temperature range, where the cryoprotective agent (CPA) behaves as a solid for all practical applications. By combining results obtained in the current study with literature data on the thermal expansion in the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range, unified thermal expansion curves are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanosensitive Adhesion Explains Stepping Motility in Amoeboid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copos, Calina A; Walcott, Sam; Del Álamo, Juan C; Bastounis, Effie; Mogilner, Alex; Guy, Robert D

    2017-06-20

    Cells employing amoeboid motility exhibit repetitive cycles of rapid expansion and contraction and apply coordinated traction forces to their environment. Although aspects of this process are well studied, it is unclear how the cell controls the coordination of cell length changes with adhesion to the surface. Here, we develop a simple model to mechanistically explain the emergence of periodic changes in length and spatiotemporal dynamics of traction forces measured in chemotaxing unicellular amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum. In contrast to the biochemical mechanisms that have been implicated in the coordination of some cellular processes, we show that many features of amoeboid locomotion emerge from a simple mechanochemical model. The mechanism for interaction with the environment in Dictyostelium is unknown and thus, we explore different cell-environment interaction models to reveal that mechanosensitive adhesions are necessary to reproduce the spatiotemporal adhesion patterns. In this modeling framework, we find that the other motility modes, such as smooth gliding, arise naturally with variations in the physical properties of the surface. Thus, our work highlights the prominent role of biomechanics in determining the emergent features of amoeboid locomotion. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. How Can We Explain the Eastern Enlargement Process of the EU?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Enes Aşcı

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the Treaty of Rome, the expansion phenomenon of European Union is the most importalt political tool of the union. The Eastern Enlargement of the EU, the number of countries that are both included besides old and new members in terms of political, social, and economic differences have been the most compelling expansion. This study tries to explain the contributions of East expansion to the integration of Europe in the context of three theories.

  18. IKEA's International Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Harapiak, Clayton

    2013-01-01

    This case concerns a global retailing firm that is dealing with strategic management and marketing issues. Applying a scenario of international expansion, this case provides a thorough analysis of the current business environment for IKEA. Utilizing a variety of methods (e.g. SWOT, PESTLE, McKinsey Matrix) the overall objective is to provide students with the opportunity to apply their research skills and knowledge regarding a highly competitive industry to develop strategic marketing strateg...

  19. Explaining NDVI trends in northern Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kjeld; Fensholt, Rasmus; Fog, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    by a distinct spatial pattern and strongly dominated by negative trends in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The aim of the paper is to explain this distinct pattern. When studied over the period 2000–2012, using NDVI data from the MODIS sensor the spatial pattern of NDVI trends indicates that non......-climatic factors are involved. By relating NDVI trends to landscape elements and land use change we demonstrate that NDVI trends in the north-western parts of the study area are mostly related to landscape elements, while this is not the case in the south-eastern parts, where rapidly changing land use, including....... expansion of irrigation, plays a major role. It is inferred that a process of increased redistribution of fine soil material, water and vegetation from plateaus and slopes to valleys, possibly related to higher grazing pressure, may provide an explanation of the observed pattern of NDVI trends. Further work...

  20. Character expansion of matrix integrals

    OpenAIRE

    van de Leur, J. W.; Orlov, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    We consider character expansion of tau functions and multiple integrals in characters of orhtogonal and symplectic groups. In particular we consider character expansions of integrals over orthogonal and over symplectic matrices.

  1. Experimental Analysis on Flow Expansion Over Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittoni, L.; Paola, C.

    2005-12-01

    We present experimental evidence on the occurrence of large angles of flow expansion with no flow separation over depositional fans. The evolution of a number of self-formed experimental fans was analyzed using overhead images and detailed topographic surveys. Angles of flow expansion up to 45 degrees were found in association with a characteristic bed curvature. Although precise measurements indicate that transverse curvature appeared to slightly decrease downstream over the fans, an approximately constant value of curvature of about 0.1 (r/W = 0.1, where r is the dimensional curvature and W is the maximum width of the fan) fits well all fan sections analyzed. In addition, we found that bed curvature shows a weak proportional dependence with fan expansion angles (alpha around 20 degrees, where alpha is the local plan angle). The curvature appears sufficient to explain the common occurrence of unchannelized, simple fans with opening angles, and hence rates of bedload divergence, much larger than would be predicted from jet theory. We have also analyzed fan development. In our experiments, an instability phenomenon causes a sudden increase in channel width, in association with the formation of a scour. A common development pattern was observed: the upstream-migrating scour initiates flow expansion, inducing in turn the formation of a transient concave heart-shaped fan shape that then slowly develops into a final, steady cone-shaped deposit. Most of the deposition appears to occur during the initial expansion phase. During final steady conditions, fans were also observed to reach values of L/0.5W (L is the final fan length and W is the fan width) approximately constant and in the range 2-4.

  2. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hi, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! ... colonography or, as it is more commonly known, virtual colonoscopy. Virtual colonoscopy is a diagnostic imaging test ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript ... by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’ ...

  9. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

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    Full Text Available ... Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual ... to allow for inflation with air while CT images are being taken. If you’re scheduled for ...

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript ... by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’ ...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

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    Full Text Available ... Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) ... asked to wear a gown. After the CT scan you can return to your normal diet and ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  13. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, E; Gardi, Einan; Grunberg, Georges

    2001-01-01

    The large-order behaviour of QCD is dominated by renormalons. On the other hand renormalons do not occur in conformal theories, such as the one describing the infrared fixed-point of QCD at small beta_0 (the Banks--Zaks limit). Since the fixed-point has a perturbative realization, all-order perturbative relations exist between the conformal coefficients, which are renormalon-free, and the standard perturbative coefficients, which contain renormalons. Therefore, an explicit cancellation of renormalons should occur in these relations. The absence of renormalons in the conformal limit can thus be seen as a constraint on the structure of the QCD perturbative expansion. We show that the conformal constraint is non-trivial: a generic model for the large-order behaviour violates it. We also analyse a specific example, based on a renormalon-type integral over the two-loop running-coupling, where the required cancellation does occur.

  14. Resonant state expansion of the resolvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, T.; Lind, P. (Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden))

    1993-02-01

    An analytic method of generating resonant state expansions from the standard completeness relation of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is described and shown to reproduce the generalized completeness relations, earlier derived, involving resonant states. The method is then applied to the expansion of the resolvent (the complete Green's function), the symmetry properties of which [ital seem] to be destroyed if a conventional application of the completeness relations is made. These forms of expansions have a continuum term which contains symmetry-restoring contributions and can therefore never vanish identically, nor can it be neglected. The symmetry-conserving form of the expansion has a set of discrete terms which are identical in form to those of the Mittag-Leffler series for the resolvent. In addition, it contains a continuum contribution which in some cases vanishes identically, but in general does not. We illustrate these findings with numerical applictions in which the potential (a square well) is chosen so as to permit analytic evaluation of practically all functions and quantities involved.

  15. Permissible limit for mandibular expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shirai, Sawa; Yano, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kotoe; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2005-04-01

    In recent years, mandibular expansion has been increasingly performed in conjunction with orthodontic treatment. Lateral tipping of the molars associated with mandibular expansion should, however, be considered, because excessive expansion may result in excessive buccal tooth inclination, which may disturb the occlusal relationship. This study was conducted to quantitatively clarify molar movement during mandibular expansion using the Schwarz appliance to determine the permissible limit of mandibular expansion as a clinical index for inclination movement. Inclinations in the masticatory surface of the first molar and intermolar width were measured before expansion (T1), after expansion (T2), and before edgewise treatment (T3). Lower plaster models from 29 subjects treated with expansion plates were used and compared with models from 11 control subjects with normal occlusion. The average treatment change (T1-T2) in intermolar width was 5.42 mm (standard deviation 1.98), and the average angle of buccal tooth inclination was 10.16 degrees (standard deviation 3.83). No significant correlation was found between age prior to treatment and the treatment period when they were compared with the intermolar width increments and inclination angles. There was a significant positive correlation between retention duration and the amount of expansion. The regression coefficient of the angle of buccal tooth inclination during expansion to the increment of the intermolar width was approximately 0.2. This means that 1 mm of expansion is accompanied by 5 degrees of molar lateral tipping. This coefficient is clinically useful for estimating the permissible limit for mandibular expansion.

  16. Task-Based Language Teaching and Expansive Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT) has become increasingly recognized as an effective pedagogy, but its location in generalized sociocultural theories of learning has led to misunderstandings and criticism. The purpose of this article is to explain the congruence between TBLT and Expansive Learning Theory and the benefits of doing so. The merit…

  17. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  18. Small dead-time expansion in counting distributions and moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, J.; Hogreve, H.

    2010-03-01

    Considering type I counters affected by a dead-time τ, we study the τ expansion of the probabilities and moments of the underlying stochastic renewal process. For the counting distributions and probabilities we extend results from the literature and analyse their approximation properties. Our results show, in particular, that for increasing counting numbers ever larger orders of the τ expansion are required for accurate approximations. Furthermore, the τ expansion for the first and second moments are obtained; their series is proved to coincide with the respective long time asymptotics. This asymptotics is demonstrated to converge exponentially fast to the exact quantities for growing time.

  19. 6th International Symposium on Thermal Expansion

    CERN Document Server

    1978-01-01

    This 6th International Symposium on Thermal Expansion, the first outside the USA, was held on August 29-31, 1977 at the Gull Harbour Resort on Hecla Island, Manitoba, Canada. Symposium Chairman was Ian D. Peggs, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and our continuing sponsor was CINDAS/Purdue University. We made considerable efforts to broaden the base this year to include more users of expansion data but with little success. We were successful, however, in establishing a session on liquids, an area which is receiving more attention as a logical extension to the high-speed thermophysical property measurements on materials at temperatures close to their melting points. The Symposium had good international representation but the overall attendance was, disappointingly, relatively low. Neverthe­ less, this enhanced the informal atmosphere throughout the meeting with a resultant frank exchange of information and ideas which all attendees appreciated. A totally new item this year was the presentation of a bursary to ...

  20. Convergence of generalized eigenfunction expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Sakata

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a simplified theory of generalized eigenfunction expansions for a commuting family of bounded operators and with finitely many unbounded operators. We also study the convergence of these expansions, giving an abstract type of uniform convergence result, and illustrate the theory by giving two examples: The Fourier transform on Hecke operators, and the Laplacian operators in hyperbolic spaces.

  1. Explaining Errors in Children's Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Caroline F.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to explain the occurrence of errors in children's speech is an essential component of successful theories of language acquisition. The present study tested some generativist and constructivist predictions about error on the questions produced by ten English-learning children between 2 and 5 years of age. The analyses demonstrated that,…

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions ... Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji Rajendran, ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

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    Full Text Available ... of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual ... to allow for inflation with air while CT images are being taken. If you’re scheduled for ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

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  6. On the Bantu expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowold, Daine J; Perez-Benedico, David; Stojkovic, Oliver; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph; Herrera, Rene J

    2016-11-15

    Here we report the results of fine resolution Y chromosomal analyses (Y-SNP and Y-STR) of 267 Bantu-speaking males from three populations located in the southeast region of Africa. In an effort to determine the relative Y chromosomal affinities of these three genotyped populations, the findings are interpreted in the context of 74 geographically and ethnically targeted African reference populations representing four major ethno-linguistic groups (Afro-Asiatic, Niger Kordofanin, Khoisan and Pygmoid). In this investigation, we detected a general similarity in the Y chromosome lineages among the geographically dispersed Bantu-speaking populations suggesting a shared heritage and the shallow time depth of the Bantu Expansion. Also, micro-variations in the Bantu Y chromosomal composition across the continent highlight location-specific gene flow patterns with non-Bantu-speaking populations (Khoisan, Pygmy, Afro-Asiatic). Our Y chromosomal results also indicate that the three Bantu-speaking Southeast populations genotyped exhibit unique gene flow patterns involving Eurasian populations but fail to reveal a prevailing genetic affinity to East or Central African Bantu-speaking groups. In addition, the Y-SNP data underscores a longitudinal partitioning in sub-Sahara Africa of two R1b1 subgroups, R1b1-P25* (west) and R1b1a2-M269 (east). No evidence was observed linking the B2a haplogroup detected in the genotyped Southeast African Bantu-speaking populations to gene flow from contemporary Khoisan groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Climate suitability and human influences combined explain the range expansion of an invasive horticultural plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn M. Beans; Francis F. Kilkenny; Laura F. Galloway

    2012-01-01

    Ecological niche models are commonly used to identify regions at risk of species invasions. Relying on climate alone may limit a model's success when additional variables contribute to invasion. While a climate-based model may predict the future spread of an invasive plant, we hypothesized that a model that combined climate with human influences would most...

  8. Explaining mirror-touch synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jamie; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mirror-touch synesthesia (MTS) is the conscious experience of tactile sensations induced by seeing someone else touched. This paper considers two different, although not mutually exclusive, theoretical explanations and, in the final section, considers the relation between MTS and other forms of synesthesia and also other kinds of vicarious perception (e.g., contagious yawning). The Threshold Theory explains MTS in terms of hyper-activity within a mirror system for touch and/or pain. This offers a good account for some of the evidence (e.g., from fMRI) but fails to explain the whole pattern (e.g., structural brain differences outside of this system; performance on some tests of social cognition). The Self-Other Theory explains MTS in terms of disturbances in the ability to distinguish the self from others. This can be construed in terms of over-extension of the bodily self in to others, or as difficulties in the control of body-based self-other representations. In this account, MTS is a symptom of a broader cognitive profile. We suggest this meets the criteria for synesthesia, despite the proximal causal mechanisms remaining largely unknown, and that the tendency to localize vicarious sensory experiences distinguishes it from other kinds of seemingly related phenomena (e.g., non-localized affective responses to observing pain).

  9. Explaining the gender wealth gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, Erin; Hauser, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    To assess and explain the United States' gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family's best financial reporters. We find large gender wealth gaps between currently married men and women, and between never-married men and women. The never-married accumulate less wealth than the currently married, and there is a marital disruption cost to wealth accumulation. The status-attainment model shows the most power in explaining gender wealth gaps between these groups explaining about one-third to one-half of the gap, followed by the human-capital explanation. In other words, a lifetime of lower earnings for women translates into greatly reduced wealth accumulation. After controlling for the full model, we find that a gender wealth gap remains between married men and women that we speculate may be related to gender differences in investment strategies and selection effects.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Negative thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, G. D.; Bruno, J. A. O.; Barron, T. H. K.; Allan, N. L.

    2005-02-01

    There has been substantial renewed interest in negative thermal expansion following the discovery that cubic ZrW2O8 contracts over a temperature range in excess of 1000 K. Substances of many different kinds show negative thermal expansion, especially at low temperatures. In this article we review the underlying thermodynamics, emphasizing the roles of thermal stress and elasticity. We also discuss vibrational and non-vibrational mechanisms operating on the atomic scale that are responsible for negative expansion, both isotropic and anisotropic, in a wide range of materials.

  11. Strong anisotropic thermal expansion in cristobalite-type BPO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2004-11-01

    In this communication, the thermal expansion behavior of cristobalite-type BPO 4, determined from high-temperature X-ray diffraction studies, is being reported. BPO 4 crystallizes in tetragonal lattice, with space group I-4 (No. 82) at room temperature, with unit cell parameters: a=4.3447(2), c=6.6415(5) Å and V=125.37(1) Å 3. The tetragonal unit cell parameters at 900 °C are: a=4.3939(2), c=6.6539(6) Å and V=128.46(1) Å 3. The results show a very strong anisotropic expansion in the lattice, with the typical thermal expansion coefficients along a- and c-axis 12.9×10 -6 and 2.1×10 -6/°C, respectively. The volume thermal expansion coefficient of the lattice is 28.2×10 -6/°C in the temperature range of 25-900 °C. The variation of the crystal structure with temperature and the thermal expansion behavior are explained in this manuscript. The role of inter-polyhedral angle on the thermal expansion behavior has also been established.

  12. Tissue expansion: Concepts, techniques and unfavourable results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind S Wagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of tissue expansion is observed in nature all the time. The same properties of the human skin to stretch and expand and yield extra skin if placed under continuous stress over a prolonged period of time has been utilised for reconstructive purposes with the help of a silicon balloon inserted under the skin and progressively filled with saline. The technique of tissue expansion is now more than three decades old and has been a value addition to our armamentarium in reconstructive surgery in all parts of the body. However, it still requires careful patient selection, meticulous planning and faultless execution to successfully carry out the process, which usually lasts for more than 8-12 weeks and involves two sittings of surgery. Any compromise in this process can lead to unfavourable results and complications, some minor, which allow continuance of the process to attain the expected goal and others major, which force abandonment of the process without reaching the expected goal. This article seeks to highlight the intricacies of the concept of tissue expansion, the technique related to flawless execution of the process and likely complications with emphasis on their management. We also present our results from a personal series of 138 patients operated over a period of 18 years between 1994 and 2012.

  13. The [epsilon] expansion and the electroweak phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, P.; Yaffe, L.G. (Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1994-03-15

    Standard perturbative (or mean field theory) techniques are not adequate for studying the finite-temperature electroweak phase transition in some cases of interest to scenarios for electroweak baryogenesis. We instead study the properties of this transition using the renormalization group and the [epsilon] expansion. This expansion, based on dimensional continuation from 3 to 4--[epsilon] spatial dimensions, provides a systematic approximation for computing the effects of (near-)critical fluctuations. The [epsilon] expansion is known to predict a first-order transition in Higgs theories, even for heavy Higgs boson masses. The validity of this conclusion in the standard model is examined in detail. A variety of physical quantities are computed at leading and next-to-leading order in [epsilon]. For moderately light Higgs boson masses (below 100 GeV), the [epsilon] expansion suggests that the transition is more strongly first order than is predicted by the conventional analysis based on the one-loop (ring-improved) effective potential. Nevertheless, the rate of baryon nonconservation after the transition is found to be [ital larger] than that given by the one-loop effective potential calculation. Detailed next-to-leading order calculations of some sample quantities suggests that the [epsilon] expansion is reasonably well behaved for Higgs boson masses below 100--200 GeV. We also compare the [epsilon] expansion with large-[ital N] results (where [ital N] is the number of scalar fields) and find that the [epsilon] expansion is less well behaved in this limit.

  14. Strategic Complexity and Global Expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oladottir, Asta Dis; Hobdari, Bersant; Papanastassiou, Marina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the determinants of global expansion strategies of newcomer Multinational Corporations (MNCs) by focusing on Iceland, Israel and Ireland. We argue that newcomer MNCs from small open economies pursue complex global expansion strategies (CGES). We distinguish....... The empirical evidence suggests that newcomer MNCs move away from simplistic dualities in the formulation of their strategic choices towards more complex options as a means of maintaining and enhancing their global competitiveness....

  15. Estimates of expansion time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. M.

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expansion of a spacefaring civilization show that descendants of that civilization should be found near virtually every useful star in the Galaxy in a time much less than the current age of the Galaxy. Only extreme assumptions about local population growth rates, emigration rates, or ship ranges can slow or halt an expansion. The apparent absence of extraterrestrials from the solar system suggests that no such civilization has arisen in the Galaxy.

  16. Explaining the Evolution of Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Jones, Edward Samuel

    2012-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive approach for analyzing the evolution of poverty using Mozambique as a case study. Bringing together data from disparate sources, we develop a novel “back-casting” framework that links a dynamic computable general equilibrium model to a micro-simulation poverty module....... This framework provides a new approach to explaining and decomposing the evolution of poverty, as well as to examining rigorously the coherence between poverty, economic growth, and inequality outcomes. Finally, various simple but useful and rarely-applied approaches to considering regional changes in poverty...

  17. Explaining (Missing) Regulator Paradigm Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    of competition regulation is heaving into sight. It sets out to explain this from the vantage point of a critical political economy perspective, which identifies the circumstances under which a crisis can result in a regulatory paradigm shift. Contrasting the current situation with the shift in EC/EU competition...... capitalism; the social power configuration underpinning the neoliberal order remains unaltered; no clear counter-project has surfaced; the European Commission has been (and remains) in a position to oppose radical changes; and finally, there are no signs of a wider paradigm shift in the EU's regulatory...

  18. Explaining the Gender Wealth Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Ruel, Erin; Hauser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    To assess and explain the United States’ gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family’s best financial reporters. We find large gender wealth gaps between currently married men and women, and never-married men and women. The never-married accumulate less wealth than the currently married, and there is a marital disruption cost to wealth...

  19. Soil Organic Carbon Responses to Forest Expansion on Mountain Grasslands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidi, Claudia

    Grassland abandonment followed by progressive forest expansion is the dominant land-use change in the European Alps. Contrasting trends in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks have been reported for mountainous regions following forest expansion on grasslands. Moreover, its effects on SOC properties....... Changes in labile soil C were assessed by carbohydrate and thermal analyses of soil samples and fractions. Forest expansion on mountain grasslands caused a decrease in SOC stocks within the mineral soil. The SOC accumulation within the organic layers following forest establishment could not fully...... involved into long-term stability are largely unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to explore changes in: (i) SOC stocks; (ii) physical SOC fractions; and (iii) labile soil carbon components following forest expansion on mountain grasslands. A land-use gradient located in the Southern Alps (Italy...

  20. Differential cosmic expansion and the Hubble flow anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Nazer, M. Ahsan; Wiltshire, David L.

    2016-06-01

    The Universe on scales 01-100 h-1Mpc is dominated by a cosmic web of voids, filaments, sheets and knots of galaxy clusters. These structures participate differently in the global expansion of the Universe: from non-expanding clusters to the above average expansion rate of voids. In this paper we characterize Hubble expansion anisotropies in the COMPOSITE sample of 4534 galaxies and clusters. We concentrate on the dipole and quadrupole in the rest frame of the Local Group. These both have statistically significant amplitudes. These anisotropies, and their redshift dependence, cannot be explained solely by a boost of the Local Group in the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model which expands isotropically in the rest frame of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. We simulate the local expansion of the Universe with inhomogeneous Szekeres solutions, which match the standard FLRW model on gtrsim 100 h-1Mpc scales but exhibit nonkinematic relativistic differential expansion on small scales. We restrict models to be consistent with observed CMB temperature anisotropies, while simultaneously fitting the redshift variation of the Hubble expansion dipole. We include features to account for both the Local Void and the "Great Attractor". While this naturally accounts for the Hubble expansion and CMB dipoles, the simulated quadrupoles are smaller than observed. Further refinement to incorporate additional structures may improve this. This would enable a test of the hypothesis that some large angle CMB anomalies result from failing to treat the relativistic differential expansion of the background geometry; a natural feature of solutions to Einstein's equations not included in the current standard model of cosmology.

  1. Thermal expansion in the orthorhombic γ phase of ZrW2O8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. S. O.; Jorgensen, J. D.; Short, S.; David, W. I. F.; Ibberson, R. M.; Sleight, A. W.

    1999-12-01

    The thermal expansion of the orthorhombic γ phase of ZrW2O8 has been measured using neutron powder diffraction from 4.6 to 410 K, where it transforms to the cubic α phase. At low temperature, γ-ZrW2O8 has a negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion becomes less negative with increasing temperature and is slightly positive at room temperature. This behavior can be explained in terms of the contributing phonon modes: At low temperature, the vibrational modes lead to a negative thermal expansion, but additional modes that become active upon increasing temperature add positive contributions. Above room temperature, the a and b axes increase more sharply while the c axis reverses its behavior and decreases with increasing temperature. This unusual behavior can be explained in terms of a thermally activated process, presumed to result from oxygen-atom migration, that makes an additional contribution to the thermal expansion.

  2. Is thermodynamic irreversibility a consequence of the expansion of the Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osváth, Szabolcs

    2018-02-01

    This paper explains thermodynamic irreversibility by applying the expansion of the Universe to thermodynamic systems. The effect of metric expansion is immeasurably small on shorter scales than intergalactic distances. Multi-particle systems, however, are chaotic, and amplify any small disturbance exponentially. Metric expansion gives rise to time-asymmetric behaviour in thermodynamic systems in a short time (few nanoseconds in air, few ten picoseconds in water). In contrast to existing publications, this paper explains without any additional assumptions the rise of thermodynamic irreversibility from the underlying reversible mechanics of particles. Calculations for the special case which assumes FLRW metric, slow motions (v ≪ c) and approximates space locally by Euclidean space show that metric expansion causes entropy increase in isolated systems. The rise of time-asymmetry, however, is not affected by these assumptions. Any influence of the expansion of the Universe on the local metric causes a coupling between local mechanics and evolution of the Universe.

  3. Multiple pathways of commodity crop expansion in tropical forest landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyfroidt, Patrick; Carlson, Kimberly M.; Fagan, Matthew E.; Gutiérrez-Vélez, Victor H.; Macedo, Marcia N.; Curran, Lisa M.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Dyer, George A.; Gibbs, Holly K.; Lambin, Eric F.; Morton, Douglas C.; Robiglio, Valentina

    2014-07-01

    Commodity crop expansion, for both global and domestic urban markets, follows multiple land change pathways entailing direct and indirect deforestation, and results in various social and environmental impacts. Here we compare six published case studies of rapid commodity crop expansion within forested tropical regions. Across cases, between 1.7% and 89.5% of new commodity cropland was sourced from forestlands. Four main factors controlled pathways of commodity crop expansion: (i) the availability of suitable forestland, which is determined by forest area, agroecological or accessibility constraints, and land use policies, (ii) economic and technical characteristics of agricultural systems, (iii) differences in constraints and strategies between small-scale and large-scale actors, and (iv) variable costs and benefits of forest clearing. When remaining forests were unsuitable for agriculture and/or policies restricted forest encroachment, a larger share of commodity crop expansion occurred by conversion of existing agricultural lands, and land use displacement was smaller. Expansion strategies of large-scale actors emerge from context-specific balances between the search for suitable lands; transaction costs or conflicts associated with expanding into forests or other state-owned lands versus smallholder lands; net benefits of forest clearing; and greater access to infrastructure in already-cleared lands. We propose five hypotheses to be tested in further studies: (i) land availability mediates expansion pathways and the likelihood that land use is displaced to distant, rather than to local places; (ii) use of already-cleared lands is favored when commodity crops require access to infrastructure; (iii) in proportion to total agricultural expansion, large-scale actors generate more clearing of mature forests than smallholders; (iv) property rights and land tenure security influence the actors participating in commodity crop expansion, the form of land use displacement

  4. Explaining Counterfeit Alcohol Purchases in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Zoya

    2017-04-01

    Alcohol is a common target of counterfeiting in Russia. Counterfeit alcohol is defined here as the manufacture, distribution, unauthorized placement (forgery) of protected commodity trademarks, and infringement of the exclusive rights of the registered trademark holders of alcoholic beverages. It is often argued that the expansion of the counterfeit product market is due to the steady demand of economically disadvantaged people for low-priced goods. The situation becomes more complicated once deceptive and nondeceptive forms of counterfeiting are taken into account. This study aimed to identify markers of risky behavior associated with the purchase of counterfeit alcohol in Russia. The analysis relied on consumer self-reports of alcohol use and purchase collected nationwide by the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS-HSE) in 2012 to 2014. I used a generalized linear mixed-model logistic regression to identify predictors of risky behavior by consumers who purchased counterfeit alcohol, either knowingly or unknowingly, during the 30 days preceding the survey. Purchases of counterfeit alcohol declined slightly from 2012 to 2014, mainly due to a decrease in consumers mistakenly purchasing counterfeit products. Predictors of counterfeit alcohol purchases differed between consumers who knowingly and unknowingly purchased counterfeit products. Nondeceptive purchase of counterfeit alcohol was related primarily to an indifference to alcohol brands. Consumers with social networks that include drinkers of nonbeverage alcohol and producers of homemade alcohol were highly likely to consume counterfeit alcohol deliberately. Problem drinking was significantly associated with a higher risk of both deceptive and nondeceptive purchases of counterfeit alcohol. Poverty largely contributed to nondeceptive counterfeiting. The literature has overestimated the impact of low prices on counterfeit alcohol consumption. Problem drinking and membership in social networks of consumers

  5. What explains consciousness? Or…What consciousness explains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulany, Donelson E

    2014-01-01

    In this invited commentary I focus on the topic addressed in three papers: De Sousa's (2013[1617]) Toward an Integrative Theory of Consciousness, a monograph with Parts 1 & 2, as well as commentaries by Pereira (2013a[59]) and Hirstein (2013[42]). All three are impressively scholarly and can stand-and shout-on their own. But theory of consciousness? My aim is to slice that topic into the two fundamentally different kinds of theories of consciousness, say what appears to be an ideology, out of behaviourism into cognitivism, now also influencing the quest for an "explanation of consciousness" in cognitive neuroscience. I will then say what can be expected given what we know of the complexity of brain structure, the richness of a conscious "vocabulary", and current technological limits of brain imaging. This will then turn to the strategy for examining "what consciousness explains"-metatheory, theories, mappings, and a methodology of competitive support, a methodology especially important where there are competing commitments. There are also increasingly common identifications of methodological bias in, along with failures to replicate, studies reporting unconscious controls in decision, social priming-as there have been in perception, learning, problem solving, etc. The literature critique has provided evidence taken as reducing, and in some cases eliminating, a role for conscious controls-a position consistent with that ideology out of behaviourism into cognitivism. It is an ideological position that fails to recognize the fundamental distinction between theoretical and metaphysical assertions.

  6. Hybrid Composites from Wheat Straw, Inorganic Filler, and Recycled Polypropylene: Morphology and Mechanical and Thermal Expansion Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Min; Huang, Runzhou; He, Chunxia; Wu, Qinglin; Zhao, Xueni

    2016-01-01

    .... The effects of individual filler (WS) and combined fillers (WS and inorganic filler) on morphological, mechanical, and thermal expansion and water absorption properties of hybrid composites were investigated...

  7. Dissipative dark matter explains rotation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, R.

    2015-06-01

    Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particles interact with a massless (or very light) boson, is studied. Such dark matter can arise in simple hidden sector gauge models, including those featuring an unbroken U (1 )' gauge symmetry, leading to a dark photon. Previous work has shown that such models can not only explain the large scale structure and cosmic microwave background, but potentially also dark matter phenomena on small scales, such as the inferred cored structure of dark matter halos. In this picture, dark matter halos of disk galaxies not only cool via dissipative interactions but are also heated via ordinary supernovae (facilitated by an assumed photon-dark photon kinetic mixing interaction). This interaction between the dark matter halo and ordinary baryons, a very special feature of these types of models, plays a critical role in governing the physical properties of the dark matter halo. Here, we further study the implications of this type of dissipative dark matter for disk galaxies. Building on earlier work, we develop a simple formalism which aims to describe the effects of dissipative dark matter in a fairly model independent way. This formalism is then applied to generic disk galaxies. We also consider specific examples, including NGC 1560 and a sample of dwarf galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS survey. We find that dissipative dark matter, as developed here, does a fairly good job accounting for the rotation curves of the galaxies considered. Not only does dissipative dark matter explain the linear rise of the rotational velocity of dwarf galaxies at small radii, but it can also explain the observed wiggles in rotation curves which are known to be correlated with corresponding features in the disk gas distribution.

  8. Reed's Conjecture on hole expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Fouquet, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    In 1998, Reed conjectured that for any graph $G$, $\\chi(G) \\leq \\lceil \\frac{\\omega(G) + \\Delta(G)+1}{2}\\rceil$, where $\\chi(G)$, $\\omega(G)$, and $\\Delta(G)$ respectively denote the chromatic number, the clique number and the maximum degree of $G$. In this paper, we study this conjecture for some {\\em expansions} of graphs, that is graphs obtained with the well known operation {\\em composition} of graphs. We prove that Reed's Conjecture holds for expansions of bipartite graphs, for expansions of odd holes where the minimum chromatic number of the components is even, when some component of the expansion has chromatic number 1 or when a component induces a bipartite graph. Moreover, Reed's Conjecture holds if all components have the same chromatic number, if the components have chromatic number at most 4 and when the odd hole has length 5. Finally, when $G$ is an odd hole expansion, we prove $\\chi(G)\\leq\\lceil\\frac{\\omega(G)+\\Delta(G)+1}{2}\\rceil+1$.

  9. Prediction of the initial normal stress in piles and anchors constructed using expansive cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfield, C. M.

    2000-03-01

    Uses for expansive cements and additives have extended well beyond off-setting the shrinkage characteristics of grout and concrete to include enhancement of rock anchor and pile performance, providing an alternative form of connection for tubular members in off-shore structures and as an excavation tool in open-pit mines. In each case, the design rules governing the quantity of expansive additive to be used are based on guesswork or empiricism. This paper presents analytical solutions for estimating the degree of expansion and the level of normal stress developed for a range of different boundary conditions and expansive additive contents. The expansion process is modelled as a thermal expansion and is governed by one parameter that depends on the type of expansive additive and its dosage. Simple laboratory procedures for determining this property are outlined. Predictions from the analytical solutions are compared with laboratory experiments.

  10. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  11. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  12. Repeated expansion in burn sequela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitanguy, Ivo; Gontijo de Amorim, Natale Ferreira; Radwanski, Henrique N; Lintz, José Eduardo

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents a retrospective study of the use of 346 expanders in 132 patients operated at the Ivo Pitanguy Clinic, between the period of 1985 and 2000. The expanders were used in the treatment of burn sequela. In the majority of cases, more than one expander was used at the same time. In 42 patients, repeated tissue expansion was done. The re-expanded flaps demonstrated good distension and viability. With the increase in area at each new expansion, larger volume expanders were employed, achieving an adequate advancement of the flaps to remove the injured tissue. The great advantage of using tissue re-expansion in the burned patient is the reconstruction of extensive areas with the same color and texture of neighboring tissues, without the addition of new scars.

  13. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incremental expansions... incremental facilities to be rolled-in to the pipeline's rates. For every expansion that has an at-risk...

  14. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high.

  15. Prony's method and the connected-moments expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Francisco M.

    2013-02-01

    We show that Prony's method provides the full solution to the nonlinear equations of the connected-moments expansion (CMX). Knowledge of all the parameters in the CMX ansatz is useful for the analysis of the convergence properties of the approach. Prony's method may also be suitable for the calculation of the correlation function for simple quantum-mechanical models.

  16. Effectively control negative thermal expansion of single-phase ferroelectrics of PbTiO3-(Bi,La)FeO3 over a giant range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qingzhen; Hu, Lei; Song, Xiping; Deng, Jinxia; Yu, Ranbo; Xing, Xianran

    2013-01-01

    Control of negative thermal expansion is a fundamentally interesting topic in the negative thermal expansion materials in order for the future applications. However, it is a challenge to control the negative thermal expansion in individual pure materials over a large scale. Here, we report an effective way to control the coefficient of thermal expansion from a giant negative to a near zero thermal expansion by means of adjusting the spontaneous volume ferroelectrostriction (SVFS) in the system of PbTiO3-(Bi,La)FeO3 ferroelectrics. The adjustable range of thermal expansion contains most negative thermal expansion materials. The abnormal property of negative or zero thermal expansion previously observed in ferroelectrics is well understood according to the present new concept of spontaneous volume ferroelectrostriction. The present studies could be useful to control of thermal expansion of ferroelectrics, and could be extended to multiferroic materials whose properties of both ferroelectricity and magnetism are coupled with thermal expansion.

  17. Bond thermal expansion and effective pair potential in crystals: the case of cadmium selenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, Andrea

    2011-08-10

    The local dynamics of cadmium selenide (CdSe) with wurtzite structure has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations, using a many-body Tersoff potential. The radial distribution functions (i.e., the effective pair potentials) of the first seven coordination shells have been determined as a function of temperature, as well as their parallel and perpendicular mean-square relative atomic displacements. The bond thermal expansion of the first coordination shell is mainly due to the asymmetry of the effective pair potential. In contrast, the bond thermal expansion of the outer shells is mostly due to a rigid shift of the effective pair potential. This behavior, recently observed also in simple cubic monoatomic crystals, can be generalized and related to the correlation of atomic motion. Finally, a shift toward lower values of the first Se-Cd effective pair potential has been observed when increasing the temperature, confirming previous findings by extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements. Differently from superionic conductors like AgI and CuBr, in which this anomalous negative shift was tentatively explained by cluster distortion and cation diffusion, the negative shift of CdSe is related to the peculiar properties of the crystalline potential.

  18. Bond thermal expansion and effective pair potential in crystals: the case of cadmium selenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.sanson@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2011-08-10

    The local dynamics of cadmium selenide (CdSe) with wurtzite structure has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations, using a many-body Tersoff potential. The radial distribution functions (i.e., the effective pair potentials) of the first seven coordination shells have been determined as a function of temperature, as well as their parallel and perpendicular mean-square relative atomic displacements. The bond thermal expansion of the first coordination shell is mainly due to the asymmetry of the effective pair potential. In contrast, the bond thermal expansion of the outer shells is mostly due to a rigid shift of the effective pair potential. This behavior, recently observed also in simple cubic monoatomic crystals, can be generalized and related to the correlation of atomic motion. Finally, a shift toward lower values of the first Se-Cd effective pair potential has been observed when increasing the temperature, confirming previous findings by extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements. Differently from superionic conductors like AgI and CuBr, in which this anomalous negative shift was tentatively explained by cluster distortion and cation diffusion, the negative shift of CdSe is related to the peculiar properties of the crystalline potential.

  19. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  20. Expansive Openness in Teacher Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmons, Royce

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: Previous work on the use of open educational resources in K-12 classrooms has generally focused on issues related to cost. The current study takes a more expansive view of openness that also accounts for adaptation and sharing in authentic classroom contexts. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study The study seeks to…

  1. On Fourier re-expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Liflyand, E.

    2012-01-01

    We study an extension to Fourier transforms of the old problem on absolute convergence of the re-expansion in the sine (cosine) Fourier series of an absolutely convergent cosine (sine) Fourier series. The results are obtained by revealing certain relations between the Fourier transforms and their Hilbert transforms.

  2. On persistently positively expansive maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Arbieto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we prove that any C¹-persistently positively expansive map is expanding. This improves a result due to Sakai (Sakai 2004.Neste artigo, mostramos que todo mapa C¹-persistentemente positivamente expansivo e expansor. Isto melhora um resultado devido a Sakai (Sakai 2004.

  3. The bootstrap and edgeworth expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This monograph addresses two quite different topics, in the belief that each can shed light on the other. Firstly, it lays the foundation for a particular view of the bootstrap. Secondly, it gives an account of Edgeworth expansion. Chapter 1 is about the bootstrap, witih almost no mention of Edgeworth expansion; Chapter 2 is about Edgeworth expansion, with scarcely a word about the bootstrap; and Chapters 3 and 4 bring these two themes together, using Edgeworth expansion to explore and develop the properites of the bootstrap. The book is aimed a a graduate level audience who has some exposure to the methods of theoretical statistics. However, technical details are delayed until the last chapter (entitled "Details of Mathematical Rogour"), and so a mathematically able reader without knowledge of the rigorous theory of probability will have no trouble understanding the first four-fifths of the book. The book simultaneously fills two gaps in the literature; it provides a very readable graduate level account of t...

  4. Multiscale expansions in discrete world

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... multiscale expansions discretely. The power of this manageable method is confirmed by applying it to two selected nonlinear Schrödinger evolution equations. This approach can also be applied to other nonlinear discrete evolution equations. All the computations have been made with Maple computer packet program.

  5. Large N Expansion. Vector Models

    OpenAIRE

    Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary version of a contribution to the "Quantum Field Theory. Non-Perturbative QFT" topical area of "Modern Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics" (SELECTA), eds. Aref'eva I, and Sternheimer D, Springer (2007). Consists of two parts - "main article" (Large N Expansion. Vector Models) and a "brief article" (BPHZL Renormalization).

  6. Effective Expansion: Balance between Shrinkage and Hygroscopic Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, E A; Watson, L E; Tantbirojn, D; Lou, J S B; Versluis, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hygroscopic expansion and polymerization shrinkage for compensation of polymerization shrinkage stresses in a restored tooth. One resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), 2 compomers (Dyract, Dentsply; Compoglass, Ivoclar), and a universal resin-based composite (Esthet•X HD, Dentsply) were tested. Volumetric change after polymerization ("total shrinkage") and during 4 wk of water storage at 37°C was measured using an optical method (n= 10). Post-gel shrinkage was measured during polymerization using a strain gauge method (n= 10). Extracted human molars with large mesio-occluso-distal slot preparations were restored with the tested restorative materials. Tooth surfaces at baseline (preparation), after restoration, and during 4 wk of 37°C water storage were scanned with an optical scanner to determine cuspal flexure (n= 8). Occlusal interface integrity was measured using dye penetration. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc tests (significance level 0.05). All tested materials shrunk after polymerization. RMGI had the highest total shrinkage (4.65%) but lowest post-gel shrinkage (0.35%). Shrinkage values dropped significantly during storage in water but had not completely compensated polymerization shrinkage after 4 wk. All restored teeth initially exhibited inward (negative) cuspal flexure due to polymerization shrinkage. Cuspal flexure with the RMGI restoration was significantly less (-6.4 µm) than with the other materials (-12.1 to -14.1 µm). After 1 d, cuspal flexure reversed to +5.0 µm cuspal expansion with the RMGI and increased to +9.3 µm at 4 wk. After 4 wk, hygroscopic expansion compensated cuspal flexure in a compomer (Compoglass) and reduced flexure with Dyract and resin-based composite. Marginal integrity (93.7% intact restoration wall) was best for the Compoglass restorations and lowest (73.1%) for the RMGI restorations. Hygroscopic

  7. Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion analysis of nodal expansion method for steady convection diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiafeng, E-mail: zhou-xf11@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Guo, Jiong, E-mail: guojiong12@tsinghua.edu.cn; Li, Fu, E-mail: lifu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • NEMs are innovatively applied to solve convection diffusion equation. • Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion for NEM are analyzed for the first time. • Stability and numerical diffusion depend on the NEM expansion order and its parity. • NEMs have higher accuracy than both second order upwind and QUICK scheme. • NEMs with different expansion orders are integrated into a unified discrete form. - Abstract: The traditional finite difference method or finite volume method (FDM or FVM) is used for HTGR thermal-hydraulic calculation at present. However, both FDM and FVM require the fine mesh sizes to achieve the desired precision and thus result in a limited efficiency. Therefore, a more efficient and accurate numerical method needs to be developed. Nodal expansion method (NEM) can achieve high accuracy even on the coarse meshes in the reactor physics analysis so that the number of spatial meshes and computational cost can be largely decreased. Because of higher efficiency and accuracy, NEM can be innovatively applied to thermal-hydraulic calculation. In the paper, NEMs with different orders of basis functions are successfully developed and applied to multi-dimensional steady convection diffusion equation. Numerical results show that NEMs with three or higher order basis functions can track the reference solutions very well and are superior to second order upwind scheme and QUICK scheme. However, the false diffusion and unphysical oscillation behavior are discovered for NEMs. To explain the reasons for the above-mentioned behaviors, the stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion properties of NEM are analyzed by the Fourier analysis, and by comparing with exact solutions of difference and differential equation. The theoretical analysis results show that the accuracy of NEM increases with the expansion order. However, the stability and numerical diffusion properties depend not only on the order of basis functions but also on the parity of

  8. Behavior and characteristics of compacted expansive unsaturated bentonite-sand mixture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed Y. Fattaha Aysar H.S. Al-Lami

    2016-01-01

    .... In this study, expansive (bentonite–sand (B–S) mixture) and non-expansive (kaolin) soils were tested in different water contents and dry unit weights chosen from the compaction curve to examine the effect of water content change on soil properties...

  9. States of Change: Explaining Dynamics by Anticipatory State Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treur, J.

    2005-01-01

    In cognitive science, the dynamical systems theory (DST) has recently been advocated as an approach to cognitive modeling that is better suited to the dynamics of cognitive processes than the symbolic/computational approaches are. Often, the differences between DST and the symbolic/computational

  10. States of change: Explaining dynamics by anticipatory state properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treur, J.

    2004-01-01

    In Cognitive Science, recently Dynamical Systems Theory (DST) has been advocated as an approach to cognitive modelling that is better suited to the dynamics of cognitive processes than the symbolic/computational approaches are. Often the differences between DST and the symbolic/computational

  11. Symmetry Switching of Negative Thermal Expansion by Chemical Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Mark S; Murray, Claire A; Luo, Xuan; Wang, Lihai; Huang, Fei-Ting; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Bombardi, Alessandro; Ablitt, Chris; Mostofi, Arash A; Bristowe, Nicholas C

    2016-05-04

    The layered perovskite Ca3-xSrxMn2O7 is shown to exhibit a switching from a material exhibiting uniaxial negative to positive thermal expansion as a function of x. The switching is shown to be related to two closely competing phases with different symmetries. The negative thermal expansion (NTE) effect is maximized when the solid solution is tuned closest to this region of phase space but is switched off suddenly on passing though the transition. Our results show for the first time that, by understanding the symmetry of the competing phases alone, one may achieve unprecedented chemical control of this unusual property.

  12. Are we explaining consciousness yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, D

    2001-04-01

    Theorists are converging from quite different quarters on a version of the global neuronal workspace model of consciousness, but there are residual confusions to be dissolved. In particular, theorists must resist the temptation to see global accessibility as the cause of consciousness (as if consciousness were some other, further condition); rather, it is consciousness. A useful metaphor for keeping this elusive idea in focus is that consciousness is rather like fame in the brain. It is not a privileged medium of representation, or an added property some states have; it is the very mutual accessibility that gives some informational states the powers that come with a subject's consciousness of that information. Like fame, consciousness is not a momentary condition, or a purely dispositional state, but rather a matter of actual influence over time. Theorists who take on the task of accounting for the aftermath that is critical for consciousness often appear to be leaving out the Subject of consciousness, when in fact they are providing an analysis of the Subject, a necessary component in any serious theory of consciousness.

  13. Completeness relations and resonant state expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P. (Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden))

    1993-05-01

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound states, virtual states, and resonant states characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential are investigated. We do not limit ourselves to the restricted form of completeness that can be obtained from Mittag-Leffler theory in this case. Instead we will make use of the information contained in the asymptotic behavior of the discrete states to get a new approach to the question of eventual overcompleteness. Using the theory of analytic functions we derive a number of completeness relations in terms of discrete states and complex continuum states and give some criteria for how to use them to form resonant state expansions of functions, matrix elements, and Green's functions. In cases where the integral contribution vanishes, the discrete part of the expansions is of the same form as that given by Mittag-Leffler theory but with regularized inner products. We also consider the possibility of using the discrete states as basis in a matrix representation.

  14. Thin metastructures with engineered thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdoutos, Eleftherios E.

    The geometry and constituent materials of metastructures can be used to engineer the thermal expansion coefficient. In this thesis, we design, fabricate, and test thin thermally stable metastructures consisting of bi-metallic unit cells and show how the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of these metastructures can be finely and coarsely tuned by varying the CTE of the constituent materials and the unit cell geometry. Planar and three-dimensional finite element method modeling is used to drive the design and inform experiments, and predict the response of these metastructures. We demonstrate computationally the significance of out-of-plane effects in the metastructure response. We develop an experimental setup using digital image correlation and an infrared camera to experimentally measure full displacement and temperature fields during testing and accurately measure the metastructures' CTE. We experimentally demonstrate high aspect ratio metastructures of Ti/Al and Kovar/Al which exhibit near-zero and negative CTE, respectively. We demonstrate robust fabrication procedures for thermally stable samples with high aspect ratios in thin foil and thin film scales. We investigate the lattice structure and mechanical properties of thin films comprising a near-zero CTE metastructure. The mechanics developed in this work can be used to engineer metastructures of arbitrary CTE and can be extended to three dimensions.

  15. Spontaneous thermal expansion of nematic elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, A. R.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2001-10-01

    We study the monodomain (single-crystal) nematic elastomer materials, all side-chain siloxane polymers with the same mesogenic groups and crosslinking density, but differing in the type of crosslinking. Increasing the proportion of long di-functional segments of main-chain nematic polymer, acting as network crosslinking, results in dramatic changes in the uniaxial equilibrium thermal expansion on cooling from the isotropic phase. At higher concentration of main chains their behaviour dominates the elastomer properties. At low concentration of main-chain material, we detect two distinct transitions at different temperatures, one attributed to the main-chain, the other to the side-chain component. The effective uniaxial anisotropy of nematic rubber, r(T)=ell_{allel}/ell_{bot} proportional to the effective nematic order parameter Q(T), is given by an average of the two components and thus reflects the two-transition nature of thermal expansion. The experimental data is compared with the theoretical model of ideal nematic elastomers; applications in high-amplitude thermal actuators are discussed in the end.

  16. Expansion of the Universe and a Hierarchical Structure of the Universe as Solutions of the Dark Night Sky Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gron, O.

    1978-01-01

    Shows that the expansion of the universe and its hierarchical structure may solve the dark night sky paradox. Points out that Harrison's solution, and the expansion of the universe, are equally important in explaining the reduction of radiation density to the level we observe by night. (Author/GA)

  17. Implementation of the forest expansion policy in the Netherlands in the period 1986-2007: Decline in success?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gossum, Van P.; Arts, B.J.M.; Laar, van J.N.; Verheyen, K.

    2010-01-01

    The current study explains why Dutch forest expansion policy is at risk of failure. To study the forest expansion implementation process we have chosen to further operationalize Matland's policy type implementation model to an extended and comprehensive typology of relevant implementation

  18. High flux expansion divertor studies in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Maqueda, R; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L

    2009-06-29

    Projections for high-performance H-mode scenarios in spherical torus (ST)-based devices assume low electron collisionality for increased efficiency of the neutral beam current drive. At lower collisionality (lower density), the mitigation techniques based on induced divertor volumetric power and momentum losses may not be capable of reducing heat and material erosion to acceptable levels in a compact ST divertor. Divertor geometry can also be used to reduce high peak heat and particle fluxes by flaring a scrape-off layer (SOL) flux tube at the divertor plate, and by optimizing the angle at which the flux tube intersects the divertor plate, or reduce heat flow to the divertor by increasing the length of the flux tube. The recently proposed advanced divertor concepts [1, 2] take advantage of these geometry effects. In a high triangularity ST plasma configuration, the magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point (SP) is inherently high, leading to a reduction of heat and particle fluxes and a facilitated access to the outer SP detachment, as has been demonstrated recently in NSTX [3]. The natural synergy of the highly-shaped high-performance ST plasmas with beneficial divertor properties motivated a further systematic study of the high flux expansion divertor. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a mid-sized device with the aspect ratio A = 1.3-1.5 [4]. In NSTX, the graphite tile divertor has an open horizontal plate geometry. The divertor magnetic configuration geometry was systematically changed in an experiment by either (1) changing the distance between the lower divertor X-point and the divertor plate (X-point height h{sub X}), or by (2) keeping the X-point height constant and increasing the outer SP radius. An initial analysis of the former experiment is presented below. Since in the divertor the poloidal field B{sub {theta}} strength is proportional to h{sub X}, the X-point height variation changed the divertor plasma wetted area due to

  19. Shrub expansion in SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus Halfdan

    , and has a range of ecosystem effects where it occurs. Shrub expansion has to a large extend been attributed to increasing temperatures over the past century, while grazing and human disturbance have received less attention. Alnus viridis ssp. crispa is a common arctic species that contributes...... including only undisturbed sites. Shrub cover increased most on E and SE facing slopes, in sites with stable substrate, in areas characterised by human disturbance and in areas without muskoxen grazing. Aspect and human disturbances had the strongest effect on shrub expansion, followed by muskoxen...... locations. A. viridis represents an interesting case to study these effects. SW Greenland is a subarctic to low-arctic region with only limited increases in temperatures during the past decades, and observed climate trends being largely dependent on the observation period. In this region there is limited...

  20. Shrub expansion in SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus Halfdan

    of firewood collection. A delayed reaction to the ending of the little ice age cannot be excluded, but seems rather unlikely considering other studies from Greenland. Effects of global warming in SW Greenland must be studied over even longer time periods than the 120 years of the current study. To answer......, and has a range of ecosystem effects where it occurs. Shrub expansion has to a large extend been attributed to increasing temperatures over the past century, while grazing and human disturbance have received less attention. Alnus viridis ssp. crispa is a common arctic species that contributes...... by factors like grazing and human disturbance; II. which climatic factors control shrub growth in SW Greenland and whether these have improved sufficiently over the past century to allow shrub expansion; III. whether growth of A. viridis is promoted by experimental warming; IV. and whether plant genotypes...

  1. RELIABILITY OF LENTICULAR EXPANSION COMPENSATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel BURLACU,

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Axial lenticular compensators are made to take over the longitudinal heat expansion, shock , vibration and noise, made elastic connections for piping systems. In order to have a long life for installations it is necessary that all elements, including lenticular compensators, have a good reliability. This desire can be did by technology of manufactoring and assembly of compensators, the material for lenses and by maintenance.of compensator

  2. Effect of Microstructure Scale on Negative Thermal Expansion of Antiperovskite Manganese Nitride

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhonghua Sun Xiaoyan Song

    The negative thermal expansion (NTE) properties of the antiperovskite manganese nitrides with micron-scale, submicron-scale and nanometer-scale microstructures, respectively, were investigated using...

  3. Determination of coefficient of thermal expansion effects on Louisiana's PCC pavement design : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    PROBLEM: The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is a fundamental property of construction : materials such as steel and concrete. Although the CTE of steel is a well-defined : constant, the CTE of concrete varies substantially with aggregate type...

  4. Cures for the Expansion Shock and the Shock Instability of the Roe Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xue-song; Gu, Chun-wei

    2016-01-01

    A common defect of the Roe scheme is the production of non-physical expansion shock and shock instability. An improved method with several advantages was presented to suppress the shock instability. However, this method cannot prevent expansion shock and is incompatible with the traditional curing method for expansion shock. Therefore, the traditional curing mechanism is analyzed. The discussion explains the effectiveness of the traditional curing method and identifies several defects, one of which leads to incompatibility between curing the shock instability and expansion shock. Consequently, a new improved Roe scheme is proposed in this study. This scheme is concise, easy to implement, low computational cost, and robust. More importantly, the scheme can simultaneously cure the shock instability and expansion shock without additional costs.

  5. ACRES - Brownfields Properties

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Brownfields are real property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance,...

  6. Simplifying Bridge Expansion Joint Design and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    This report presents a study focused on identifying the most durable expansion joints for the South : Carolina Department of Transportation. This is performed by proposing a degradation model for the : expansion joints and updating it based on bridge...

  7. 48 CFR 570.403 - Expansion requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expansion requests. 570.403 Section 570.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL... Continued Space Requirements 570.403 Expansion requests. (a) If the expansion space is in the general scope...

  8. Microeconomic principles explain an optimal genome size in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranea, Juan A G; Grant, Alastair; Thornton, Janet M; Orengo, Christine A

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria can clearly enhance their survival by expanding their genetic repertoire. However, the tight packing of the bacterial genome and the fact that the most evolved species do not necessarily have the biggest genomes suggest there are other evolutionary factors limiting their genome expansion. To clarify these restrictions on size, we studied those protein families contributing most significantly to bacterial-genome complexity. We found that all bacteria apply the same basic and ancestral 'molecular technology' to optimize their reproductive efficiency. The same microeconomics principles that define the optimum size in a factory can also explain the existence of a statistical optimum in bacterial genome size. This optimum is reached when the bacterial genome obtains the maximum metabolic complexity (revenue) for minimal regulatory genes (logistic cost).

  9. Medicaid Expansion: A Tale of Two Governors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagg, Robin

    2016-10-01

    This is a study of why two seemingly similar governors made divergent decisions on expanding Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Performing a case study of Governors John Kasich (OH) and Scott Walker (WI), I explore the roles played by electoral pressures, political party, governor's ideology, the state's policy heritage, stakeholder advocacy, and the economy in each governor's decision about whether to expand Medicaid. Electoral pressure was the most significant factor for both governors. I demonstrate that even Walker succumbed to state electoral pressures and expanded Medicaid, albeit in a manner unique to Wisconsin. He did this despite his emphatic national rhetoric rejecting Obamacare and expansion. Additionally, existing state political institutions drove each governor to decide in a manner unique to his state: previous Medicaid decisions in Wisconsin and direct democracy in Ohio provided additional pressures and divergent starting points. The remaining factors served less as a driving force behind the decision and more as a frame to justify the decision ex post facto. Case studies allow for a more complex view of how political pressures fit together; differences can be explained and expanded, and an enhanced understanding of political processes can be gleaned. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  10. Contribution of thermal expansion and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I.Pursky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model is developed to describe the experimental results obtained for the isobaric thermal conductivity of rare gas solids (RGS. The isobaric thermal conductivity of RGS has been analysed within Debye approximation with regard to the effect of thermal expansion. The suggested model takes into consideration the fact that thermal conductivity is determined by U-processes while above the phonon mobility edge it is determined by "diffusive" modes migrating randomly from site to site. The mobility edge ω0 is determined from the condition that the phonon mean-free path restricted by the U-processes cannot be smaller than half of the phonon wavelength.

  11. Gravitational entropy of cosmic expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Sussman, Roberto A

    2014-01-01

    We apply a recent proposal to define "gravitational entropy" to the expansion of cosmic voids within the framework of non-perturbative General Relativity. By considering CDM void configurations compatible with basic observational constraints, we show that this entropy grows from post-inflationary conditions towards a final asymptotic value in a late time fully non-linear regime described by the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models. A qualitatively analogous behavior occurs if we assume a positive cosmological constant consistent with a $\\Lambda$-CDM background model. However, the $\\Lambda$ term introduces a significant suppression of entropy growth with the terminal equilibrium value reached at a much faster rate.

  12. Cerrejon expansion in a tight market?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretelt, A. [Carbocol SA, Bogota (Colombia)

    1995-12-31

    Examines plans to expand Carbocol`s Cerrejon North Zone coal mine (Colombia). Covers: background; current status of the project; main features of the expansion (i.e. coal reserves, infrastructure, operating costs, expansion schedule and market factors); advantages of expansion; and Carbocol`s vision of the market. A positive decision to expand will depend on the results of a feasibility class III study which will define in exact terms the technical and economic aspects of the expansion and the best way to execute it. The study will be completed next year. The expansion programme should improve the profitability of the project. 10 figs.

  13. Correlations between Socioeconomic Drivers and Indicators of Urban Expansion: Evidence from the Heavily Urbanised Shanghai Metropolitan Area, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urban expansion resulting in increased impervious surfaces causes a series of urban environmental problems, e.g., the urban heat island and urban forest fragmentation. Urban expansion is a serious threat to human quality of life and living environments. It has been studied from a variety of aspects, but its driving factors and time series expansion characteristics (i.e., expansion intensity, pattern and direction need to be better explained in order to devise more effective management strategies. This study examined how social and economic factors are linked in driving urban expansion. Based on multi-temporal aerial images, a rapid urban expansion period, 2000–2010, in Shanghai was analysed. The urban area expanded from 1770.36 to 2855.44 km2 in the period, with a mean annual expansion rate of 108.51 km2. Urban expansion in 2000–2005 (40.42% was much faster than in 2005–2010 (14.86%, and its direction was southeast, southwest and south. The main pattern was edge expansion in both sub-periods. Social factors, especially population density, significantly affected urban expansion. These findings can help understand the urban expansion process and its driving factors, which has important implications for urban planning and management in Shanghai and similar cities.

  14. Precise Modulation of the Breathing Behavior and Pore Surface in Zr-MOFs by Reversible Post-Synthetic Variable-Spacer Installation to Fine-Tune the Expansion Magnitude and Sorption Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Xia; Wei, Zhangwen; Jiang, Ji-Jun; Fan, Yan-Zhong; Zheng, Shao-Ping; Cao, Chen-Chen; Li, Yu-Hao; Fenske, Dieter; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2016-08-16

    To combine flexibility and modifiability towards a more controllable complexity of MOFs, a post-synthetic variable-spacer installation (PVSI) strategy is used to implement kinetic installation/ uninstallation of secondary ligands into/from a robust yet flexible proto-Zr-MOF. This PVSI process features precise positioning of spacers with different length, size, number, and functionality, enabling accurate fixation of successive breathing stages and fine-tuning of pore surface. It shows unprecedented synthetic tailorability to create complicated MOFs in a predictable way for property modification, for example, CO2 and R22 adsorption/separation, thermal/chemical stability, and extended breathing behavior. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  16. Imagination as expansion of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittoun, Tania; Cerchia, Frédéric

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a developmental view on imagination: from this perspective, imagination can be seen as triggered by some disrupting event, which generates a disjunction from the person's unfolding experience of the "real" world, and as unfolding as a loop, which eventually comes back to the actual experience. Examining recent and classical theorization of imagination in psychology, the paper opposes a deficitary view of imagination to an expansive notion of imagination. The paper explores Piaget, Vygotsky, Harris and Pelaprat & Cole consider: 1) What does provoke a "rupture" or disjunction? 2) What are the psychological processes involved in the imaginary loop? 3) What nourishes such processes? 4) What are the consequences of such imaginary loop, or what does it enable doing? The paper proposes to adopt an expansive view of imagination, as Vygotsky proposed-a perspective that has been under-explored empirically since his seminal work. To stimulate such sociocultural psychology of imagination, two empirical examples are provided, one showing how children make sense of metaphor in an experimental setting, the other showing a young person using a novel met at school as symbolic resource.

  17. The analytic structure of non-global logarithms: convergence of the dressed gluon expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew J. [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Physics Department, Reed College, Portland, OR 97202 (United States); Moult, Ian [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Neill, Duff [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Theoretical Division, MS B283, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Non-global logarithms (NGLs) are the leading manifestation of correlations between distinct phase space regions in QCD and gauge theories and have proven a challenge to understand using traditional resummation techniques. Recently, the dressed gluon expansion was introduced that enables an expansion of the NGL series in terms of a “dressed gluon' building block, defined by an all-orders factorization theorem. Here, we clarify the nature of the dressed gluon expansion, and prove that it has an infinite radius of convergence as a solution to the leading logarithmic and large-N{sub c} master equation for NGLs, the Banfi-Marchesini-Smye (BMS) equation. The dressed gluon expansion therefore provides an expansion of the NGL series that can be truncated at any order, with reliable uncertainty estimates. In contrast, manifest in the results of the fixed-order expansion of the BMS equation up to 12-loops is a breakdown of convergence at a finite value of α{sub s}log. We explain this finite radius of convergence using the dressed gluon expansion, showing how the dynamics of the buffer region, a region of phase space near the boundary of the jet that was identified in early studies of NGLs, leads to large contributions to the fixed order expansion. We also use the dressed gluon expansion to discuss the convergence of the next-to-leading NGL series, and the role of collinear logarithms that appear at this order. Finally, we show how an understanding of the analytic behavior obtained from the dressed gluon expansion allows us to improve the fixed order NGL series using conformal transformations to extend the domain of analyticity. This allows us to calculate the NGL distribution for all values of α{sub s}log from the coefficients of the fixed order expansion.

  18. General Relativity eliminates Dark Energy, Dark Matter and Universal Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Bartlett, Rodney

    2018-01-01

    This letter was rejected by International Knowledge Press because "we are unable to conclude that these findings would warrant publication in this journal." The letter is suggesting that dark energy, dark matter and universal expansion are intimately related. However, they aren't viewed as revolutions in cosmology which are essential to a complete understanding of the modern universe. They are instead viewed as properties which need to be added to the cosmos when Einstein...

  19. A phenomenological model of starch expansion by extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The expansion phenomenon is a key-point of the development of extruded starch based composites. During extrusion, the molten material is forced through a die so that the sudden pressure drop causes part of the water to vaporize, giving an expanded cellular structure. The knowledge of the cellular structure is important because it impacts the mechanical properties of the foams, its texture, etc1. The moisture is lost due to evaporation and heat transfer, as the material cools down. Thus, the m...

  20. Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-01-01

    The dissipation of energy from local velocity perturbations in the cosmological fluid affects the time evolution of spatially averaged fluid dynamic fields and the cosmological solution of Einstein's field equations. We show how this backreaction effect depends on shear and bulk viscosity and other material properties of the dark sector, as well as the spectrum of perturbations. If sufficiently large, this effect could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion.

  1. Fast algorithms for Quadrature by Expansion I: Globally valid expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachh, Manas; Klöckner, Andreas; O'Neil, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The use of integral equation methods for the efficient numerical solution of PDE boundary value problems requires two main tools: quadrature rules for the evaluation of layer potential integral operators with singular kernels, and fast algorithms for solving the resulting dense linear systems. Classically, these tools were developed separately. In this work, we present a unified numerical scheme based on coupling Quadrature by Expansion, a recent quadrature method, to a customized Fast Multipole Method (FMM) for the Helmholtz equation in two dimensions. The method allows the evaluation of layer potentials in linear-time complexity, anywhere in space, with a uniform, user-chosen level of accuracy as a black-box computational method. Providing this capability requires geometric and algorithmic considerations beyond the needs of standard FMMs as well as careful consideration of the accuracy of multipole translations. We illustrate the speed and accuracy of our method with various numerical examples.

  2. Light-induced reversible expansion of individual gold nanoplates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsheng Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Light-induced mechanical response of materials has been extensively investigated and widely utilized to convert light energy into mechanical energy directly. The metallic nanomaterials have excellent photothermal properties and show enormous potential in micromechanical actuators, etc. However, the photo-thermo-mechanical properties of individual metallic nanostructures have yet to be well investigated. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a way to realize light-induced reversible expansion of individual gold nanoplates on optical microfibers. The light-induced thermal expansion coefficient is obtained as 21.4 ± 4.6 ∼ 31.5 ± 4.2 μ·K-1 when the light-induced heating temperature of the gold nanoplates is 240 ∼ 490 °C. The photo-thermo-mechanical response time of the gold nanoplates is about 0.3 ± 0.1 s. This insight into the photo-thermo-mechanical properties of the gold nanoplates could deepen the understanding of the light-induced reversible expansion behavior in nanoscale and pave the way for applications based on this piezoelectric-like response, such as light-driven metallic micromotors.

  3. Tube Expansion Under Various Down-Hole End Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FJ Sanchez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fossil hydrocarbons are indispensables commodities that motorize the global economy, and oil and gas are two of those conventional fuels that have been extracted and processed for over a century. During last decade, operators face challenges discovering and developing reservoirs commonly found up to several kilometers underground, for which advanced technologies are developed through different research programs. In order to optimize the current processes to drill and construct oil/gas wells, a large number of mechanical technologies discovered centuries ago by diverse sectors are implemented by well engineers. In petroleum industry, the ancient tube forming manufacturing process founds an application once well engineers intend to produce from reservoirs that cannot be reached unless previous and shallower troublesome formations are isolated. Solid expandable tubular is, for instance, one of those technologies developed to mitigate drilling problems and optimize the well delivery process. It consists of in-situ expansion of a steel-based tube that is attained by pushing/pulling a solid mandrel, which permanently enlarge its diameters. This non-linear expansion process is strongly affected by the material properties of the tubular, its geometry, and the pipe/mandrel contact surface. The anticipated force required to deform long sections of the pipe in an uncontrollable expansion environment, might jeopardize mechanical properties of the pipe and the well structural integrity. Scientific-based solutions, that depend on sound theoretical formulation and are validated through experiments, will help to understand possible tubular failure mechanisms during its operational life. This work is aimed to study the effect of different loading/boundary conditions on mechanical/physical properties of the pipe after expansion. First, full-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the geometrical and behavioral changes. Second, simulation of deformation

  4. Explaining the Allocation of Regional Structural Funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charron, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    What regional factors can explain the heterogeneity in Structural Funds distribution to European Union regions? Past studies have shown that aside from the level of economic development and rates of unemployment, other political, and economic factors systematically explain why certain European...

  5. Explaining Biological Functionality: Is Control Theory Enough ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is generally agreed that organisms are Complex Adaptive Systems. Since the rise of Cybernetics in the middle of the last century ideas from information theory and control theory have been applied to the adaptations of biological organisms in order to explain how they work. This does not, however, explain functionality, ...

  6. Shrinkage Properties of Cement Stabilized Gravel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Cement stabilized gravel is an attractive material in road construction because its strength prop-erties are accommodating the increasingly higher requirements to the bearing capacity of a base course. However, reflection cracking of cement stabilized gravel is a major concern. In this pa......-per the shrinkage properties of cement stabilized gravel have been documented under various temperature and relative humidity conditions. Two cement contents corresponding to a 28-days compressive strength of 6.2 MPa and 12.3 MPa have been tested and compared. It is found that the coefficient of linear expansion...... for the two cement contents is 9.9 × 10-6 ⁰C-1 and 11.3 × 10-6 ⁰C-1, respectively. Furthermore, it is found that reflecting cracking can mainly be explained by temperature dependent shrinkage rather than moisture dependent shrinkage....

  7. On the equisummability of Hermite and Fourier expansions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove an equisummability result for the Fourier expansions and Hermite expansions as well as special Hermite expansions. We also prove the uniform boundedness of the Bochner-Riesz means associated to the Hermite expansions for polyradial functions.

  8. Evaluation on expansive performance of the expansive soil using electrical responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ya; Liu, Songyu; Bate, Bate; Xu, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Light structures, such as highways and railroads, built on expansive soils are prone to damages from the swelling of their underlain soil layers. Considerable amount of research has been conducted to characterize the swelling properties of expansive soils. Current swell characterization models, however, are limited by lack of standardized tests. Electrical methods are non-destructive, and are faster and less expensive than the traditional geotechnical methods. Therefore, geo-electrical methods are attractive for defining soil characteristics, including the swelling behavior. In this study, comprehensive laboratory experiments were undertaken to measure the free swelling and electrical resistivity of the mixtures of commercial kaolinite and bentonite. The electrical conductivity of kaolinite-bentonite mixtures was measured by a self-developed four-electrode soil resistivity box. Increasing the free swelling rate of the kaolinite-bentonite mixtures (0.72 to 1 of porosity of soils samples) led to a reduction in the electrical resistivity and an increase in conductivity. A unique relationship between free swelling rate and normalized surface conductivity was constructed for expensive soils by eliminating influences of porosity and m exponent. Therefore, electrical response measurement can be used to characterize the free swelling rate of expensive soils.

  9. Relationship Development in Greenfield Expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drogendijk, Rian; Andersson, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates conceptually how new Greenfield subsidiaries develop relationships over time. We focus our analysis on the earliest start-up stage of new Greenfield subsidiaries, and on the dynamics of relationships development with five different groups of actors within the MNC...... and the local environment of the new Greenfield. We argue that relationship strength, or the intensity of interaction and resource exchange, depends on the new Greenfield''s degree of dependence or interdependence within these relationships and develop propositions based on institutional theory, resource...... dependency theory and network approaches. In the concluding sections we suggest directions for future work to enhance understanding of the dynamics of relationship management in new Greenfield expansions....

  10. Expansion of Physician Assistant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James F; Jones, P. Eugene; Miller, Anthony A; Orcutt, Venetia L

    2016-12-01

    Physician assistant (PA) educational programs were created in the 1960s to prepare a new type of health care practitioner. Physician assistant programs began as experiments in medical education, and later, they proved to be highly successful in preparing capable, flexible, and productive clinicians. The growth of PA educational programs in US medical education-stimulated by grants, public policy, and anticipated shortages of providers-has gone through 3 distinct phases. At present, such programs are in the midst of the third growth spurt that is expected to continue beyond 2020, as a large number of colleges and universities seek to sponsor PA programs and attain accreditation status. Characteristics of these new programs are described, and the implications of the current expansion of PA education are examined.

  11. Serial Tissue Expansion at the Same Site in Pediatric Patients: Is the Subsequent Expansion Faster?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Ki Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Serial tissue expansion is performed to remove giant congenital melanocytic nevi. However, there have been no studies comparing the expansion rate between the subsequent and preceding expansions. In this study, we analyzed the rate of expansion in accordance with the number of surgeries, expander location, expander size, and sex. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in pediatric patients who underwent tissue expansion for giant congenital melanocytic nevi. We tested four factors that may influence the expansion rate: The number of surgeries, expander location, expander size, and sex. The rate of expansion was calculated by dividing the ‘inflation amount’ by the ‘expander size’. Results The expansion rate, compared with the first-time group, was 1.25 times higher in the second-or-more group (P=0.04 and 1.84 times higher in the third-or-more group (P<0.01. The expansion rate was higher at the trunk than at other sites (P<0.01. There was a tendency of lower expansion rate for larger expanders (P=0.03. Sex did not affect the expansion rate. Conclusions There was a positive correlation between the number of surgeries and the expansion rate, a positive correlation between the expander location and the expansion rate, and a negative correlation between the expander size and the expansion rate.

  12. Localized bedrock aquifer distribution explains discharge from a headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Katsura, Shin'ya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sando, Yoshiki; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    Understanding a discharge hydrograph is one of the leading interests in catchment hydrology. Recent research has provided credible information on the importance of bedrock groundwater on discharge hydrographs from headwater catchments. However, intensive monitoring of bedrock groundwater is rare in mountains with steep topography. Hence, how bedrock groundwater controls discharge from a steep headwater catchment is in dispute. In this study, we conducted long-term hydrological observations using densely located bedrock wells in a headwater catchment underlain by granitic bedrock. The catchment has steep topography affected by diastrophic activities. Results showed a fairly regionalized distribution of bedrock aquifers within a scale of tens of meters, consisting of upper, middle, and lower aquifers, instead of a gradual and continuous decline in water level from ridge to valley bottom. This was presumably attributable to the unique bedrock structure; fault lines developed in the watershed worked to form divides between the bedrock aquifers. Spatial expanse of each aquifer and the interaction among aquifers were key factors to explain gentle and considerable variations in the base flow discharge and triple-peak discharge responses of the observed hydrograph. A simple model was developed to simulate the discharge hydrograph, which computed each of the contributions from the soil mantle groundwater, from the lower aquifer, and from the middle aquifer to the discharge. The modeling results generally succeeded in reproducing the observed hydrograph. Thus, this study demonstrated that understanding regionalized bedrock aquifer distribution is pivotal for explaining discharge hydrograph from headwater catchments that have been affected by diastrophic activities.

  13. Pressurized electrolysis stack with thermal expansion capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Richard Scott

    2015-07-14

    The present techniques provide systems and methods for mounting an electrolyzer stack in an outer shell so as to allow for differential thermal expansion of the electrolyzer stack and shell. Generally, an electrolyzer stack may be formed from a material with a high coefficient of thermal expansion, while the shell may be formed from a material having a lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion may lead to damage to the electrolyzer stack as the shell may restrain the thermal expansion of the electrolyzer stack. To allow for the differences in thermal expansion, the electrolyzer stack may be mounted within the shell leaving a space between the electrolyzer stack and shell. The space between the electrolyzer stack and the shell may be filled with a non-conductive fluid to further equalize pressure inside and outside of the electrolyzer stack.

  14. Topo-climatic microrefugia explain the persistence of a rare endemic plant in the Alps during the last 21 millennia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsiou, Theofania S; Conti, Elena; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Theodoridis, Spyros; Randin, Christophe F

    2014-07-01

    Ongoing rapid climate change is predicted to cause local extinction of plant species in mountain regions. However, some plant species could have persisted during Quaternary climate oscillations without shifting their range, despite the limited evidence from fossils. Here, we tested two candidate mechanisms of persistence by comparing the macrorefugia and microrefugia (MR) hypotheses. We used the rare and endemic Saxifraga florulenta as a model taxon and combined ensembles of species distribution models (SDMs) with a high-resolution paleoclimatic and topographic dataset to reconstruct its potential current and past distribution since the last glacial maximum. To test the macrorefugia hypothesis, we verified whether the species could have persisted in or shifted to geographic areas defined by its realized niche. We then identified potential MR based on climatic and topographic properties of the landscape and applied refined scenarios of MR dynamics and functions over time. Last, we quantified the number of known occurrences that could be explained by either the macrorefugia or MR model. A consensus of two or three SDM techniques predicted absence between 14-10, 3-4 and 1 ka bp, which did not support the macrorefugia model. In contrast, we showed that S. florulenta could have contracted into MR during periods of absence predicted by the SDMs and later re-colonized suitable areas according to the macrorefugia model. Assuming a limited and realistic seed dispersal distance for our species, we explained a large number of the current occurrences (61-96%). Additionally, we showed that MR could have facilitated range expansions or shifts of S. florulenta. Finally, we found that the most recent and the most stable MR were the ones closest to current occurrences. Hence, we propose a novel paradigm to explain plant persistence by highlighting the importance of supporting functions of MR when forecasting the fate of plant species under climate change. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons

  15. A Simple Way of Modeling the Expansion of the Universe: What Does Light Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Gul Unal; Sengoren, Serap Kaya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to model the expansion of the universe by investigating the behavior of water waves. It is designed for students in the upper grades of physics and physical science who are learning about the wave nature of light and are ready to discover such important questions about science. The article explains first the Doppler…

  16. An in vitro model of intra-epithelial expansion of transformed urothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebel, J.M.J.; Boer, de W.I.; Thijssen, C.D.; Vermey, M.; Zwarthoff, E.C.; Kwast, van der T.H.

    1993-01-01

    Replacement of normal urothelium by pre-cancerous epithelium may explain the high recurrence rate of human bladder cancer. An in vitro model was designed in order to study the mechanisms of expansion of transformed urothelial cells at the expense of normal urothelium. For this purpose, mouse bladder

  17. Structure and thermal expansion of liquid bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudry S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental structural data for liquid Bi were used for estimation of the main structure parameters as well as the thermal expansion coefficient both in supercooled and superheated temperature ranges. It was shown that the equilibrium melt had a positive thermal expansion coefficient within a temperature range upon melting and a negative one at higher temperatures. The former was related to structure changes upon melting, whereas the latter with topologic disordering upon further heating. It was found that the superheated melt had a negative thermal expansion coefficient. The results obtained from structural data were compared with the thermal expansion coefficient calculated from the data of density for liquid Bi.

  18. Thermal expansion of L-ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaï, B.; Barrio, M.; Tamarit, J.-Ll.; Céolin, R.; Rietveld, I. B.

    2017-04-01

    The specific volume of vitamin C has been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction as a function of temperature from 110 K up to complete degradation around 440 K. Its thermal expansion is relatively small in comparison with other organic compounds with an expansivity α v of 1.2(3) × 10-4 K-1. The structure consists of strongly bound molecules in the ac plane through a dense network of hydrogen bonds. The thermal expansion is anisotropic. Along the b axis, the expansion has most leeway and is about 10 times larger than in the other directions.

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  2. Topology Explains Why Automobile Sunshades Fold Oddly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Curtis; Naimi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Automobile sunshades always fold into an "odd" number of loops. The explanation why involves elementary topology (braid theory and linking number, both explained in detail here with definitions and examples), and an elementary fact from algebra about symmetric group.

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  4. Explorers Presentation: Explaining the Tides to Children

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2015-01-01

    Explaining the tides to children Presentation includes information about: Orbits of the Earth, Moon and Sun; Moon phases and the lunar cycle; Gravity; Gravity and the tide; Types of tides; The tides and me!; Tide tables; Extra insight

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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  7. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  8. The influence of the relative thermal expansion and electric permittivity on phase transitions in the perovskite-type bidimensional layered NH3(CH2)3NH3CdBr4 compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staśkiewicz, Beata; Staśkiewicz, Anna

    2017-07-01

    Hydrothermal method has been used to synthesized the layered hybrid compound NH3(CH2)3NH3CdBr4 of perovskite architecture. Structural, dielectric and dilatometric properties of the compound have been analyzed. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) effect in the direction perpendicular to the perovskite plane as well as an unusual phase sequence have been reported based on X-ray diffraction analysis. Electric permittivity measurements evidenced the phase transitions at Tc1=326/328 K and Tc2=368/369 K. Relative linear expansion measurements almost confirmed these temperatures of phase transitions. Anomalies of electric permittivity and expansion behavior connected with the phase transitions are detected at practically the same temperatures as those observed earlier in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (IR), far infrared (FIR) and Raman spectroscopy studies. Mechanism of the phase transitions is explained. Relative linear expansion study was prototype to estimate critical exponent value β for continuous phase transition at Tc1. It has been inferred that there is a strong interplay between the distortion of the inorganic network, those hydrogen bonds and the intermolecular interactions of the organic component.

  9. MutSβ abundance and Msh3 ATP hydrolysis activity are important drivers of CTG•CAG repeat expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Norma; Chan, Kara Y; Li, Guo-Min; Lahue, Robert S

    2017-09-29

    CTG•CAG repeat expansions cause at least twelve inherited neurological diseases. Expansions require the presence, not the absence, of the mismatch repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3 heterodimer). To evaluate properties of MutSβ that drive expansions, previous studies have tested under-expression, ATPase function or polymorphic variants of Msh2 and Msh3, but in disparate experimental systems. Additionally, some variants destabilize MutSβ, potentially masking the effects of biochemical alterations of the variations. Here, human Msh3 was mutated to selectively inactivate MutSβ. Msh3-/- cells are severely defective for CTG•CAG repeat expansions but show full activity on contractions. Msh3-/- cells provide a single, isogenic system to add back Msh3 and test key biochemical features of MutSβ on expansions. Msh3 overexpression led to high expansion activity and elevated levels of MutSβ complex, indicating that MutSβ abundance drives expansions. An ATPase-defective Msh3 expressed at normal levels was as defective in expansions as Msh3-/- cells, indicating that Msh3 ATPase function is critical for expansions. Expression of two Msh3 polymorphic variants at normal levels showed no detectable change in expansions, suggesting these polymorphisms primarily affect Msh3 protein stability, not activity. In summary, CTG•CAG expansions are limited by the abundance of MutSβ and rely heavily on Msh3 ATPase function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the or...

  11. Local expansions and accretive mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Kirk

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available Let X and Y be complete metric spaces with Y metrically convex, let D⊂X be open, fix u0∈X, and let d(u=d(u0,u for all u∈D. Let f:X→2Y be a closed mapping which maps open subsets of D onto open sets in Y, and suppose f is locally expansive on D in the sense that there exists a continuous nonincreasing function c:R+→R+ with ∫+∞c(sds=+∞ such that each point x∈D has a neighborhood N for which dist(f(u,f(v≥c(max{d(u,d(v}d(u,v for all u,v∈N. Then, given y∈Y, it is shown that y∈f(D iff there exists x0∈D such that for x∈X\\D, dist(y,f(x0≤dist(u,f(x. This result is then applied to the study of existence of zeros of (set-valued locally strongly accretive and ϕ-accretive mappings in Banach spaces

  12. Global Monte Carlo Simulation with High Order Polynomial Expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Martin; James Paul Holloway; Kaushik Banerjee; Jesse Cheatham; Jeremy Conlin

    2007-12-13

    The functional expansion technique (FET) was recently developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The basic idea of the FET is to expand a Monte Carlo tally in terms of a high order expansion, the coefficients of which can be estimated via the usual random walk process in a conventional Monte Carlo code. If the expansion basis is chosen carefully, the lowest order coefficient is simply the conventional histogram tally, corresponding to a flat mode. This research project studied the applicability of using the FET to estimate the fission source, from which fission sites can be sampled for the next generation. The idea is that individual fission sites contribute to expansion modes that may span the geometry being considered, possibly increasing the communication across a loosely coupled system and thereby improving convergence over the conventional fission bank approach used in most production Monte Carlo codes. The project examined a number of basis functions, including global Legendre polynomials as well as “local” piecewise polynomials such as finite element hat functions and higher order versions. The global FET showed an improvement in convergence over the conventional fission bank approach. The local FET methods showed some advantages versus global polynomials in handling geometries with discontinuous material properties. The conventional finite element hat functions had the disadvantage that the expansion coefficients could not be estimated directly but had to be obtained by solving a linear system whose matrix elements were estimated. An alternative fission matrix-based response matrix algorithm was formulated. Studies were made of two alternative applications of the FET, one based on the kernel density estimator and one based on Arnoldi’s method of minimized iterations. Preliminary results for both methods indicate improvements in fission source convergence. These developments indicate that the FET has promise for speeding up Monte Carlo fission source

  13. Modelling the Spatial Expansion of Green Manure Considering Land Productivity and Implementing Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Liping Zhang; Meng Cao; An Xing; Zhongxiang Sun; Yuanfang Huang

    2018-01-01

    In modern sustainable agriculture, green manuring is increasingly emphasized for a reasonable land use management. However, the expansion of green manure is affected by a range of factors, such as soil geophysical properties and human intervention. This paper proposes an approach of spatial modelling to understand the mechanisms that influence green manure expansion and map the future distribution of green manure intercropped in the orchards in the Pinggu District, Beijing, China. We firstly ...

  14. Heat kernel expansion in the background field formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Barvinsky, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Heat kernel expansion and background field formalism represent the combination of two calculational methods within the functional approach to quantum field theory. This approach implies construction of generating functionals for matrix elements and expectation values of physical observables. These are functionals of arbitrary external sources or the mean field of a generic configuration -- the background field. Exact calculation of quantum effects on a generic background is impossible. However, a special integral (proper time) representation for the Green's function of the wave operator -- the propagator of the theory -- and its expansion in the ultraviolet and infrared limits of respectively short and late proper time parameter allow one to construct approximations which are valid on generic background fields. Current progress of quantum field theory, its renormalization properties, model building in unification of fundamental physical interactions and QFT applications in high energy physics, gravitation and...

  15. Earnings Returns to the British Education Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Paul J.; Fan, Wen

    2011-01-01

    We study the effects of the large expansion in British educational attainment that took place for cohorts born between 1970 and 1975. Using the Quarterly Labour Force Survey, we find that the expansion caused men to increase education by about a year on average and gain about 8% higher wages; women obtained a slightly greater increase in education…

  16. Series expansion of the modified Einstein Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema Chandrakant Shah-Fairbank

    2009-01-01

    This study examines calculating total sediment discharge based on the Modified Einstein Procedure (MEP). A new procedure based on the Series Expansion of the Modified Einstein Procedure (SEMEP) has been developed. This procedure contains four main modifications to MEP. First, SEMEP solves the Einstein integrals quickly and accurately based on a series expansion. Next,...

  17. Virial expansion coefficients in the harmonic approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Armstrong, J.; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; V. Fedorov, D.

    2012-01-01

    The virial expansion method is applied within a harmonic approximation to an interacting N-body system of identical fermions. We compute the canonical partition functions for two and three particles to get the two lowest orders in the expansion. The energy spectrum is carefully interpolated...

  18. Platform Expansion Design as Strategic Choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staykova, Kalina S.; Damsgaard, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address how the strategic choice of platform expansion design impacts the subse-quent platform strategy. We identify two distinct approaches to platform expansion – platform bun-dling and platform constellations, which currently co-exist. The purpose of this paper is to outline...

  19. The heavy quark expansion of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, A.F. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1997-06-01

    These lectures contain an elementary introduction to heavy quark symmetry and the heavy quark expansion. Applications such as the expansion of heavy meson decay constants and the treatment of inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays are included. Heavy hadron production via nonperturbative fragmentation processes is also discussed. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiron, Yohai [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Spurzem, Rainer, E-mail: ymeiron@pku.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ∼0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  1. The expansion of hazel (Corylus avellana L.) in the southern Alps: a key for understanding its early Holocene history in Europe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finsinger, W.; Tinner, W.; Knaap, W.O. van der; Ammann, B.

    2006-01-01

    In Northwestern and Central Europe the Holocene expansion of Corylus occurred before or at the same time as that of other thermophilous trees (e.g. Quercus). This sequence of expansion has been explained by migrational lag, competition, climatic changes, human assistance, or disturbance by fire. In

  2. Business information query expansion through semantic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiguo; Muyeba, Maybin; Guo, Jingzhi

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we propose a method for business information query expansions. In our approach, hypernym/hyponymy and synonym relations in WordNet are used as the basic expansion rules. Then we use WordNet Lexical Chains and WordNet semantic similarity to assign terms in the same query into different groups with respect to their semantic similarities. For each group, we expand the highest terms in the WordNet hierarchies with hypernym and synonym, the lowest terms with hyponym and synonym and all other terms with only synonym. In this way, the contradictory caused by full expansion can be well controlled. Furthermore, we use collection-related term semantic network to further improve the expansion performance. And our experiment reveals that our solution for query expansion can improve the query performance dramatically.

  3. Maxwell superalgebras and Abelian semigroup expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Concha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Abelian semigroup expansion is a powerful and simple method to derive new Lie algebras from a given one. Recently it was shown that the S-expansion of so(3,2 leads us to the Maxwell algebra M. In this paper we extend this result to superalgebras, by proving that different choices of abelian semigroups S lead to interesting D=4 Maxwell Superalgebras. In particular, the minimal Maxwell superalgebra sM and the N-extended Maxwell superalgebra sM(N recently found by the Maurer–Cartan expansion procedure, are derived alternatively as an S-expansion of osp(4|N. Moreover, we show that new minimal Maxwell superalgebras type sMm+2 and their N-extended generalization can be obtained using the S-expansion procedure.

  4. Microstructure and Thermal Expansion Properties of Ostrich Eggshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    A.Rodriguez-Hernindez, E. Villarreal4, A. Martinez, M.V. Garcia-GardufiolŖ, V.A. Basiuk 3ř, L. Bucio and E. Orozco Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apdo. Postal 20...Mexico D.F. MWxico 3instituto de Ciencias Nucleares UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. Mexico 5Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Japan. Hodogaya

  5. Explaining religiosity: towards a unified theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Jörg

    2009-06-01

    The article presents a unified theoretical model, explaining differences in Christian and 'alternative' religiosity at individual and collective levels. The model reconstructs and integrates the most important theories explaining religiosity (deprivation, regulation, socialization, cultural production, and ethnicity) as complementary causal mechanisms in a rational-action based framework. It is maintained that the mechanisms of the various theories are not exclusive, but complementary, and that integration into the general model is both theoretically and empirically beneficial. The model is tested on representative data from Switzerland. Substantively, I find for the Swiss case that Christian religiosity can be best explained by a religious socialization mechanism. The most important mechanisms accounting for alternative religiosity involve deprivation, gender, and age.

  6. On the equisummability of Hermite and Fourier expansions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove an equisummability result for the Fourier expansions and. Hermite expansions as well as special Hermite expansions. We also prove the uniform boundedness of the Bochner-Riesz means associated to the Hermite expansions for polyradial functions. Keywords. Hermite functions; special Hermite expansions; ...

  7. Explaining dysfunctional effects of lexicographical communication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Explaining Dysfunctional Effects of Lexicographical Communication. 61 part of the aim.El propositions relate directly to the observability and measur- ability of aim.El. They can be taken from education theory, for instance Bloom's revised taxonomy of educational objectives (cf. Anderson and Krathwohl. 2001).21. It is now ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

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  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ...

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is ...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is ...

  12. Explaining Violence in Sierra Leone's Civil War

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Explaining the violence of civil war is never a simple task for the scholar. In the case of the Sierra Leone, paradoxically, the task has in some ways been rendered more difficult by the sheer variety of compelling scholarship on the question. This paper seeks to identify the most useful of the explanations offered thus far, and ...

  13. Explaining the Sex Difference in Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Anne B.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Peterson, Robin L.; Willcutt, Erik G.; DeFries, John C.; Olson, Richard K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Males are diagnosed with dyslexia more frequently than females, even in epidemiological samples. This may be explained by greater variance in males' reading performance. Methods: We expand on previous research by rigorously testing the variance difference theory, and testing for mediation of the sex difference by cognitive correlates.…

  14. Explaining the VET Applied Research Developmental Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Linda; Beddie, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    This document explains the VET Applied Research Developmental Framework, created as part of a project that explored how the vocational education and training (VET) sector could broaden its engagement in Australia's research and development (R&D) and innovation systems. Achieving this engagement will rely significantly on building the…

  15. How Employees Remain Happy: Explaining a Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Dorothy M.; Atkinson, Barbara; Judd, Priya; Darling, Julie; Tran, Linh; Cummins, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper draws on subjective quality of life theory to explain findings from three studies of quality of work life. The studies were conducted with 346 regional process workers, metropolitan employment officers and nurses. The results support the adoption of the theory of homeostasis as an explanation for findings on subjective wellbeing at work…

  16. Explaining convergence of oecd welfare states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, C.; Starke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    of conditional convergence helps to both better describe and explain the phenomenon. By applying error correction models, we examine conditional convergence of various types of social expenditure in 21 OECD countries between 1980 and 2005. Our empirical findings go beyond the existing literature in two respects...

  17. Measuring and explaining house price developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study discusses ways of measuring and explaining the development of house prices. The goal of the research underpinning this dissertation was to develop a methodological framework for studying these developments. This framework relates, first, to correcting for changes in the composition of

  18. Explaining quality of life with crisis theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M.A.G.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.; de Haes, H.C.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the premises of crisis theory. we expected cancer patients in-crisis to report a poorer quality of life (QL) and cancer patients post-crisis to report a similar level of overall QL in comparison to healthy individuals. To explain these hypothesized findings, we expected the coping resources

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  20. Thermal expansion: Metallic elements and alloys. [Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Kirby, R. K.; Taylor, R. E.; Desai, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    The introductory sections of the work are devoted to the theory of thermal expansion of solids and to methods for the measurement of the linear thermal expansion of solids (X-ray methods, high speed methods, interferometry, push-rod dilatometry, etc.). The bulk of the work is devoted to numerical data on the thermal linear expansion of all the metallic elements, a large number of intermetallics, and a large number of binary alloy systems and multiple alloy systems. A comprehensive bibliography is provided along with an index to the materials examined.

  1. Thermal expansion of the cryoprotectant cocktail DP6 combined with synthetic ice modulators in presence and absence of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David P; Taylor, Michael J; Rabin, Yoed

    2012-10-01

    This study explores physical effects associated with the application of cryopreservation via vitrification using a class of compounds which are defined here as synthetic ice modulators (SIMs). The general classification of SIMs includes molecules that modulate ice nucleation and growth, or possess properties of stabilizing the amorphous state, by virtue of their chemical structure and at concentrations that are not explained on a purely colligative basis. A sub-category of SIMs, referred to in the literature as synthetic ice blockers (SIBs), are compounds that interact directly with ice nuclei or crystals to modify their structure and/or rate of growth. The current study is part of an ongoing effort to characterize thermo-mechanical effects during vitrification, with emphasis on measuring the physical property of thermal expansion-the driving mechanism to thermo-mechanical stress. Materials under investigation are the cryoprotective agent (CPA) cocktail DP6 in combination with one of the following SIMs: 12% polyethylene glycol 400, 6% 1,3 cyclohexanediol, and 6% 2,3 butanediol. Results are presented for the CPA-SIM cocktail in the absence and presence of bovine muscle and goat artery specimens. This study focuses on the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range, where the CPA behaves as a fluid for all practical applications. Results of this study indicate that the addition of SIMs to DP6 allows lower cooling rates to ensure vitrification and extends the range of measurements. It is demonstrated that the combination of SIM with DP6 increases the thermal expansion of the cocktail, with implications for the likelihood of fracture formation-the most dramatic outcome of thermo-mechanical stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Economic expansion and increase in labout market formality: a poaching approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique L. Corseuil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relationship between economic expansion and the degree of formalization for the Brazilian labour market in the recent period. We present a theoretical framework that attempts to explain this relationship through the dynamics of firms hiring strategies. The main predictions are: the share of formal employment rises as the unemployment rate falls, and that the formal-informal wage gap increases, at least at the beginning of the economic expansion. In the empirical part, we use longitudinal microdata from a Brazilian household survey to check whether these two predictions are confirmed. To a large extent our results corroborate both predictions.

  3. Effect of graphene nanoplatelets on coefficient of thermal expansion of polyetherimide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huang, E-mail: huang.wu.84@gmail.com [Composite Materials and Structures Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Drzal, Lawrence T. [Composite Materials and Structures Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Thermal expansion is one of the major concerns for polymer composites. In this research, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were added to polyetherimide (PEId) thermoplastic polymer in order to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the injection molded composite. First, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (LTE) was measured in three directions in the anisotropic coupon: 0°, 90° and the out of plane Z direction. It is found that the GNP particles are very effective in terms of reducing the LTE in 0° direction due to high degree of alignment. After annealing above glass transition temperature, significant increase of 0° LTE and decrease of Z° LTE were observed. The bulk CTE was calculated by adding up the LTEs in all three directions and is found to be independent of annealing. Second, several models were applied to predict both CTE and LTE. It is found that Schapery's lower limit model fits the experimental CTE very well. Chow's model was applied for LTEs in three directions. The behavior of GNP-5/PEId composites is explained by the combination of Chow's model and morphology obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). - Highlights: • Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of polymer composite is characterized. • Reduction of linear thermal expansion depends on filler orientation. • Filler orientation is characterized based on the location of the specimen. • Filler orientation is changed by annealing, causing subsequent change in CTE. • CTE and linear thermal expansion coefficient are modeled.

  4. Population dynamics of a meiotic/mitotic expansion model for the fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, A.E.; Sherman, S.L. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A model to explain the mutational process and population dynamics of the fragile X syndrome is presented. The mutational mechanism was assumed to be a multi-pathway, multistep process. Expansion of CGG repeats was based on an underlying biological process and was assumed to occur at two time points: meiosis and early embryonic development (mitosis). Meiotic expansion was assumed to occur equally in oogenesis and spermatogenesis, while mitotic expansion was restricted to somatic, or constitutional, alleles of maternal origin. Testable hypotheses were predicted by this meiotic/mitotic model. First, parental origin of mutation is predicted to be associated with the risk of a woman to have a full-mutation child. Second, {open_quotes}contractions{close_quotes} seen in premutation male transmissions are predicted not to be true contractions in repeat size, but a consequence of the lack of mitotic expansion in paternally derived alleles. Third, a portion of full-mutation males should have full-mutation alleles in their sperm, due to the lack of complete selection against the full-mutation female. Fourth, a specific premutation-allele frequency distribution is predicted and differs from that based on models assuming only meiotic expansion. Last, it is predicted that {approximately}65 generations are required to achieve equilibrium, but this depends greatly on the expansion probabilities. 42 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Ecological specialization in fossil mammals explains Cope's rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, P; Carotenuto, F; Passaro, F; Fulgione, D; Fortelius, M

    2012-03-01

    Cope's rule is the trend toward increasing body size in a lineage over geological time. The rule has been explained either as passive diffusion away from a small initial body size or as an active trend upheld by the ecological and evolutionary advantages that large body size confers. An explicit and phylogenetically informed analysis of body size evolution in Cenozoic mammals shows that body size increases significantly in most inclusive clades. This increase occurs through temporal substitution of incumbent species by larger-sized close relatives within the clades. These late-appearing species have smaller spatial and temporal ranges and are rarer than the incumbents they replace, traits that are typical of ecological specialists. Cope's rule, accordingly, appears to derive mainly from increasing ecological specialization and clade-level niche expansion rather than from active selection for larger size. However, overlain on a net trend toward average size increase, significant pulses in origination of large-sized species are concentrated in periods of global cooling. These pulses plausibly record direct selection for larger body size according to Bergmann's rule, which thus appears to be independent of but concomitant with Cope's.

  6. Exploring Bayesian model selection methods for effective field theory expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Taylor; Yamauchi, Yukari; Furnstahl, Richard

    2017-09-01

    A fundamental understanding of the microscopic properties and interactions of nuclei has long evaded physicists due to the complex nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). One approach to modeling nuclear interactions is known as chiral effective field theory (EFT). Today, the method's greatest limitation lies in the approximation of interaction potentials and their corresponding uncertainties. Computing EFT expansion coefficients, known as Low-Energy Constants (LECs), from experimental data reduces to a problem of statistics and fitting. In the conventional approach, the fitting is done using frequentist methods that fail to evaluate the quality of the model itself (e.g., how many orders to use) in addition to its fit to the data. By utilizing Bayesian statistical methods for model selection, the model's quality can be taken into account, providing a more controlled and robust EFT expansion. My research involves probing different Bayesian model checking techniques to determine the most effective means for use with estimating the values of LECs. In particular, we are using model problems to explore the Bayesian calculation of an EFT expansion's evidence and an approximation to this value known as the WAIC (Widely Applicable Information Criterion). This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1306250.

  7. Novel mutational mechanism in man: Expansion of trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilarioshkin, S.N.; Ivanova-Smolenskaya, I.A.; Markova, E.D. [Research Institute of Neurology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01

    An analysis of a novel, recently discovered class of mutations in man - an expansion, i.e., an increase of the copy number of intragenic unstable trinucleotide repeats - is presented. The expansion of trinucleotide X chromosome syndrome (two separate variants of the disease - FRAXA and FRAXE), myotonic dystrophy, spinal and bulbar Kennedy`s amyotrophy, Huntington`s chorea, type 1 spinocerebellar ataxia, and dentatorubral-pallidolyusian atrophy. The discovery of triplet expansion allows a satisfactory explanation on the molecular level of a series of unusual clinical genetic phenomena, such as anticipation, the {open_quotes}paternal transmission{close_quotes} effect, the {open_quotes}Sherman paradox,{close_quotes} and others. The common properties and the distinctions of unstable trinucleotide mutations in the nosologic forms mentioned above are analyzed comprehensively. These features include the mechanism by which these mutations cause disease, the time of their appearance in ontogenesis, and various clinical genetic correlations. The evolutionary origin of this class of mutations and, in particular, the role of alleles with an {open_quotes}intermediate{close_quotes} triplet number, which are the persistent reservoir of mutations arising de novo in a population, are also discussed. The possible implication of unstable trinucleotide repeats for a series of other hereditary diseases, such as type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, essential tremor, schizophrenia, and others, is also suggested. 108 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Negative Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Graphene Measured by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Duhee; Son, Young-Woo; Cheong, Heonsik

    2011-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of single-layer graphene is estimated with temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy in the temperature range between 200 and 400 K. It is found to be strongly dependent on temperature but remains negative in the whole temperature range, with a room temperature value of -8.0x10^{-6} K^{-1}. The strain caused by the TEC mismatch between graphene and the substrate plays a crucial role in determining the physical properties of graphene, and hence its effect...

  9. Negative thermal expansion coefficient of graphene measured by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Duhee; Son, Young-Woo; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2011-08-10

    The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of single-layer graphene is estimated with temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy in the temperature range between 200 and 400 K. It is found to be strongly dependent on temperature but remains negative in the whole temperature range with a room temperature value of (-8.0 ± 0.7) × 10(-6) K(-1). The strain caused by the TEC mismatch between graphene and the substrate plays a crucial role in determining the physical properties of graphene, and hence its effect must be accounted for in the interpretation of experimental data taken at cryogenic or elevated temperatures.

  10. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance. PMID:27352101

  11. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-06-28

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance.

  12. Collisional and collisionless expansion of Yukawa balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Goree, John A

    2013-12-01

    The expansion of Yukawa balls is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations of collisionless and collisional situations. High computation speed was achieved by using the parallel computing power of graphics processing units. When the radius of the Yukawa ball is large compared to the shielding length, the expansion process starts with the blow-off of the outermost layer. A rarefactive wave subsequently propagates radially inward at the speed of longitudinal phonons. This mechanism is fundamentally different from Coulomb explosions, which employ a self-similar expansion of the entire system. In the collisionless limit, the outer layers carry away most of the available energy. The simulations are compared with analytical estimates. In the collisional case, the expansion process can be described by a nonlinear diffusion equation that is a special case of the porous medium equation.

  13. Thermal expansion of doped lanthanum gallates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermal expansion of several compositions of Sr and Mg-doped LaGaO3 including an -site deficient composition (La0.9Sr0.1)0.98(Ga0.8Mg0.2)O2.821 were measured in the temperature range from 298 to 1273 K. The effect of doping on thermal expansion was studied by varying the composition at one site of the ...

  14. Expansion and rupture of charged microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Sujit S.; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David A

    2014-01-01

    We study the deformations of pH-responsive spherical microcapsules -- micrometer-scale liquid drops surrounded by thin, solid shells -- under the influence of electrostatic forces. When exposed to a large concentration of NaOH, the microcapsules become highly charged, and expand isotropically. We find that the extent of this expansion can be understood by coupling electrostatics with shell theory; moreover, the expansion dynamics is well described by Darcy's law for fluid flow through the mic...

  15. Negative thermal expansion in framework compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... We have studied negative thermal expansion (NTE) compounds with chemi- cal compositions of NX2O8 and NX2O7 (N=Zr, Hf and X=W, Mo, V) and M2O (M=Cu, Ag) using the techniques of inelastic neutron scattering and lattice dynamics. There is a large variation in the negative thermal expansion ...

  16. Russia and the Future Expansion of NATO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    2001 that he did not intend to let enlargement undermine the potential for U.S.- Russia cooperation. Later in the summer, Putin took a further step...St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t RUSSIA AND THE FUTURE EXPANSION OF NATO BY COLONEL RADEK CERNY Czech Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...Strategy Research Project 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Russia and the Future Expansion of NATO 5a. CONTRACT

  17. The. delta. expansion and local gauge invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, C.M. (Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (US)); Cooper, F. (Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexic o 87545); Milton, K.A. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklaho ma 73019)

    1989-08-15

    A recently proposed approximation method, called the {delta} expansion, was introduced in the context of a self-interacting scalar field theory. This approximation method offers the hope of obtaining nonperturbative information about a quantum field theory using perturbative techniques. In this paper we extend formally the {delta}-expansion methods to field theories having local gauge symmetry. We then compute the anomaly in the Schwinger model.

  18. Stochastic quantization and 1/N expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunelli, J.C. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mendes, R.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1992-10-01

    We study the 1/N expansion of field theories in the stochastic quantization method of Parisi and Wu using the supersymmetric functional approach. This formulation provides a systematic procedure to implement the 1/N expansion which resembles the ones used in the equilibrium. The 1/N perturbation theory for the non linear sigma model in two dimensions is worked out as an example. (author). 19 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Fixed Point Theorems for Times Reasonable Expansive Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chunfang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on previous notions of expansive mapping, times reasonable expansive mapping is defined. The existence of fixed point for times reasonable expansive mapping is discussed and some new results are obtained.

  20. Children's Theories and the Drive to Explain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzgebel, Eric

    Debate has been growing in developmental psychology over how much the cognitive development of children is like theory change in science. Useful debate on this topic requires a clear understanding of what it would be for a child to have a theory. I argue that existing accounts of theories within philosophy of science and developmental psychology either are less precise than is ideal for the task or cannot capture everyday theorizing of the sort that children, if they theorize, must do. I then propose an account of theories that ties theories and explanation very closely together, treating theories primarily as products of a drive to explain. I clarify some of the positions people have taken regarding the theory theory of development, and I conclude by proposing that psychologists interested in the ''theory theory'' look for patterns of affect and arousal in development that would accompany the existence of a drive to explain.

  1. Explaining money creation by commercial banks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Educators and economists concerned with monetary reform face the extraordinary challenge of explaining to the public and its elected representatives not only what a reformed system would look like, but also how the current system works. Centrally, the point that in a modern economy money is largely...... created by commercial banks, as explained by the Bank of England recently (McLeay, Radia & Thomas, 2014b), is often met with incredulity: “What do you mean, created?” This paper introduces five easy-to-grasp analogies that educators and reformers may use to convey key money-creation concepts to a lay...... audience. The analogies offered include (1) money as patches in an expandable patchwork quilt that covers a nation’s real assets, (2) the money supply as water in a bathtub with a faucet and a drain, (3) money understood as debt in a model economy run by schoolchildren, (4) the misleading concept of a bank...

  2. Drug detoxification dynamics explain the postantibiotic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Jaydeep K; Huang, Shuqiang; Lopatkin, Allison J; You, Lingchong

    2017-10-23

    The postantibiotic effect (PAE) refers to the temporary suppression of bacterial growth following transient antibiotic treatment. This effect has been observed for decades for a wide variety of antibiotics and microbial species. However, despite empirical observations, a mechanistic understanding of this phenomenon is lacking. Using a combination of modeling and quantitative experiments, we show that the PAE can be explained by the temporal dynamics of drug detoxification in individual cells after an antibiotic is removed from the extracellular environment. These dynamics are dictated by both the export of the antibiotic and the intracellular titration of the antibiotic by its target. This mechanism is generally applicable for antibiotics with different modes of action. We further show that efflux inhibition is effective against certain antibiotic motifs, which may help explain mixed cotreatment success. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  3. John Watson's paradoxical struggle to explain Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, M

    2000-03-01

    John Watson was fascinated by the discoveries of psychoanalysis, but he rejected Freud's central concept of the unconscious as incompatible with behaviorism. After failing to explain psychoanalysis in terms of William James's concept of habit, Watson borrowed concepts from classical conditioning to explain Freud's discoveries. Watson's famous experiment with Little Albert is interpreted not only in the context of Pavlovian conditioning but also as a psychoanalytically inspired attempt to capture simplified analogues of adult phobic behavior, including the "transference" of emotion in an infant. Watson used his behavioristic concept of conditioned emotional responses to compete with Freud's concepts of displacement and the unconscious transference of emotion. Behind a mask of anti-Freudian bias, Watson surprisingly emerges as a psychologist who popularized Freud and pioneered the scientific appraisal of his ideas in the laboratory.

  4. Explaining Underrepresentation: A Theory of Precluded Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheryan, Sapna; Plaut, Victoria C

    2010-10-01

    What processes best explain women's underrepresentation in science, math, and engineering fields in the U.S.? Do they also explain men's underrepresentation in the humanities? Two survey studies across two U.S. West Coast universities (N = 62; N = 614) addressed these questions in the context of two fields: one male-dominated (computer science) and the other female-dominated (English). Among a set of social predictors-including perceived similarity to the people in the field, social identity threats, and expectations of success-the best mediator of women's lower interest in computer science and men's lower interest in English was perceived similarity. Thus, changing students' social perceptions of how they relate to those in the field may help to diversify academic fields.

  5. IEE wiring regulations explained and illustrated

    CERN Document Server

    Scaddan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The IEE Wiring Regulations Explained and Illustrated, Second Edition discusses the recommendations of the IEE Regulations for the Electrical Equipment of Buildings for the safe selection or erection of wiring installations. The book emphasizes earthing, bonding, protection, and circuit design of electrical wirings. The text reviews the fundamental requirements for safety, earthing systems, the earth fault loop impedance, and supplementary bonding. The book also describes the different types of protection, such as protection against mechanical damage, overcurrent, under voltage (which prevents

  6. Explaining the Slowdown in Global Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Jarkko Jaaskela; Thomas Mathews

    2015-01-01

    Following the global financial crisis, global trade contracted sharply and, after an initial recovery, grew at an unusually slow pace relative to global GDP. This article reviews cyclical and structural explanations for this phenomenon, and finds econometric evidence that cyclical factors – namely shifts in the composition of aggregate demand toward less import-intensive components and heightened economic uncertainty – can explain most of the slowdown in trade in a panel of advanced economies...

  7. "Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia"

    OpenAIRE

    Khitarishvili, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates gender wage differentials in Georgia between 2000 and 2004. Using ordinary least squares, we find that the gender wage gap in Georgia is substantially higher than in other transition countries. Correcting for sample selection bias using the Heckman approach further increases the gender wage gap. The Blinder Oaxaca decomposition results suggest that most of the wage gap remains unexplained. The explained portion of the gap is almost entirely attributed to industrial variab...

  8. Explaining the variety of human sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, W A

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, the author formulates a theory to explain why human sexual orientation seems to run amok. The 'psychic instrument', as he terms it, is the baby's dreaming mind which interprets or misinterprets input from its sociocultural sexual environment. The baby, already born an omnisexual being, then develops a fantasy life with socially sanctioned or unsanctioned fetishes which are likely to be expressed when certain triggering situations arise.

  9. The role of break-induced replication in large-scale expansions of (CAG)n/(CTG)nrepeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane C; Harris, Samantha T; Dinter, Teresa; Shah, Kartik A; Mirkin, Sergei M

    2017-01-01

    Expansions of (CAG) n /(CTG) n trinucleotide repeats are responsible for over a dozen neuromuscular and neurodegenerative disorders. Large-scale expansions are commonly observed in human pedigrees and may be explained by iterative small-scale events such as strand slippage during replication or repair DNA synthesis. Alternatively, a distinct mechanism may lead to a large-scale repeat expansion as a single step. To distinguish between these possibilities, we developed a novel experimental system specifically tuned to analyze large-scale expansions of (CAG) n /(CTG) n repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The median size of repeat expansions was ∼60 triplets, although we also observed additions of more than 150 triplets. Genetic analysis revealed that Rad51, Rad52, Mre11, Pol32, Pif1, and Mus81 and/or Yen1 proteins are required for large-scale expansions, whereas proteins previously implicated in small-scale expansions are not involved. From these results, we propose a new model for large-scale expansions, which is based on the recovery of replication forks broken at (CAG) n /(CTG) n repeats via break-induced replication.

  10. How brain and neuronal networks explain human reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Monserrat

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available How is human reality presented to us in phenomenological experience? It is the one we see daily in our personal and social life. We are made of matter, we are part of the evolutionary universe. In addition, a psychic life is formed in us: sensation, a system of perceptions, an integrated consciousness, a condition of psychological subject; We produce knowledge, emotions, motivations; But, above all, we have a mind that rationally moves and installs us into a world of human emotions; This emotional reason lies at the base of the search for the truth of the universe, the meaning of life and the moral responsibility, in personal and social life. Our human reality is, therefore, a personal reality. We are persons. Now, how does science, neurology, explain today the fact that our human reality possesses these properties that give us the personal condition? This should be able to be explained (this is the initial assumption from the physical-biological world. Now, in particular, how does science make it possible to explain that evolution has produced us in our condition of ratio-emotional persons? That is, what is the physical support that makes intelligible the psycho-bio-physical ontology that evolutionarily produces our personal phenomenological experience? This is, ultimately, still the fundamental question of human sciences. What science, namely neurology, must explain (that is, know the causes that have produced it is obvious: the fact of our sensibility-consciousness, our condition of psychic subjects, knowledge and emotional reason that have emerged in the universe; In such a way that, once the emotional reason emerges, it leads by itself to constitute the rational activity and the emotions of the human person aimed at building the meaning of his life. These are the issues we address in this article.

  11. Moralistic gods, supernatural punishment and the expansion of human sociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purzycki, Benjamin Grant; Apicella, Coren; Atkinson, Quentin D; Cohen, Emma; McNamara, Rita Anne; Willard, Aiyana K; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Norenzayan, Ara; Henrich, Joseph

    2016-02-18

    Since the origins of agriculture, the scale of human cooperation and societal complexity has dramatically expanded. This fact challenges standard evolutionary explanations of prosociality because well-studied mechanisms of cooperation based on genetic relatedness, reciprocity and partner choice falter as people increasingly engage in fleeting transactions with genetically unrelated strangers in large anonymous groups. To explain this rapid expansion of prosociality, researchers have proposed several mechanisms. Here we focus on one key hypothesis: cognitive representations of gods as increasingly knowledgeable and punitive, and who sanction violators of interpersonal social norms, foster and sustain the expansion of cooperation, trust and fairness towards co-religionist strangers. We tested this hypothesis using extensive ethnographic interviews and two behavioural games designed to measure impartial rule-following among people (n = 591, observations = 35,400) from eight diverse communities from around the world: (1) inland Tanna, Vanuatu; (2) coastal Tanna, Vanuatu; (3) Yasawa, Fiji; (4) Lovu, Fiji; (5) Pesqueiro, Brazil; (6) Pointe aux Piments, Mauritius; (7) the Tyva Republic (Siberia), Russia; and (8) Hadzaland, Tanzania. Participants reported adherence to a wide array of world religious traditions including Christianity, Hinduism and Buddhism, as well as notably diverse local traditions, including animism and ancestor worship. Holding a range of relevant variables constant, the higher participants rated their moralistic gods as punitive and knowledgeable about human thoughts and actions, the more coins they allocated to geographically distant co-religionist strangers relative to both themselves and local co-religionists. Our results support the hypothesis that beliefs in moralistic, punitive and knowing gods increase impartial behaviour towards distant co-religionists, and therefore can contribute to the expansion of prosociality.

  12. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Takenaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over −30 ppm K−1. Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining practical aspects, this review briefly summarizes materials and mechanisms of NTE as well as composites containing NTE materials, based mainly on activities of the last decade.

  13. Forest Clearing Dynamics and the Expansion of Landholdings in Apuí, a Deforestation Hotspot on Brazil's Transamazon Highway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel C. Carrero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a local-scale case study in the Rio Juma Settlement Project (RJSP in Apuí, a deforestation hotspot in the southern portion of Brazil's state of Amazonas. We analyze land accumulation and land use strategies of households with a view to elucidating how their strategies are shaping deforestation. More than 76% of the household sample was from southern Brazil, and around 72% of them migrated to older expansion frontiers before reaching Apuí. The percentage of properties with legal land titles was up to five times less while land accumulation was much greater than reported for other settlement projects in Brazil. Land use change followed different patterns depending on whether the lot had been obtained with 100% forest cover or with inherited land use. Regression-tree analysis showed that the size of the cattle herd and the total area of the property do not always explain the area deforested, nor is the size of the deforested area necessarily related to productive activities. Lack of income obtained from livestock indicated that at least 30% of the cases studied were related to the speculative nature of land acquisition and deforestation. Increasing consolidation of land in larger, more highly capitalized ranches indicates the potential for high rates of deforestation in the future, even when the profitability of livestock is questionable.

  14. Porous composite with negative thermal expansion obtained by photopolymer additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Akihiro; Kobashi, Makoto; Kitamura, Mitsuru

    2015-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) could be a novel method of fabricating composite and porous materials having various effective performances based on mechanisms of their internal geometries. Materials fabricated by AM could rapidly be used in industrial application since they could easily be embedded in the target part employing the same AM process used for the bulk material. Furthermore, multi-material AM has greater potential than usual single-material AM in producing materials with effective properties. Negative thermal expansion is a representative effective material property realized by designing a composite made of two materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion. In this study, we developed a porous composite having planar negative thermal expansion by employing multi-material photopolymer AM. After measurement of the physical properties of bulk photopolymers, the internal geometry was designed by topology optimization, which is the most effective structural optimization in terms of both minimizing thermal stress and maximizing stiffness. The designed structure was converted to a three-dimensional stereolithography (STL) model, which is a native digital format of AM, and assembled as a test piece. The thermal expansions of the specimens were measured using a laser scanning dilatometer. Negative thermal expansion corresponding to less than -1 × 10-4 K-1 was observed for each test piece of the N = 3 experiment.

  15. Porous composite with negative thermal expansion obtained by photopolymer additive manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Takezawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM could be a novel method of fabricating composite and porous materials having various effective performances based on mechanisms of their internal geometries. Materials fabricated by AM could rapidly be used in industrial application since they could easily be embedded in the target part employing the same AM process used for the bulk material. Furthermore, multi-material AM has greater potential than usual single-material AM in producing materials with effective properties. Negative thermal expansion is a representative effective material property realized by designing a composite made of two materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion. In this study, we developed a porous composite having planar negative thermal expansion by employing multi-material photopolymer AM. After measurement of the physical properties of bulk photopolymers, the internal geometry was designed by topology optimization, which is the most effective structural optimization in terms of both minimizing thermal stress and maximizing stiffness. The designed structure was converted to a three-dimensional stereolithography (STL model, which is a native digital format of AM, and assembled as a test piece. The thermal expansions of the specimens were measured using a laser scanning dilatometer. Negative thermal expansion corresponding to less than −1 × 10−4 K−1 was observed for each test piece of the N = 3 experiment.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF REACTIVE FORMATIONS: A VISION FOR THE CAPACITY EXPANSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielly Vieira de Lucena

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available All classes of clay minerals absorb water, but the smectite absorb much larger volumes than the other classes because of its expanded network. During the drilling of oil wells it is common for the detection of layers consisting of clay minerals high grade of hydration arranged in laminar packages. When in contact with water, the packets are separated clay as the water enters the basal spacing. This phenomenon is known as expansion or swelling. Given this, this paper aims to characterize shales in two regions of the country to explain the susceptibility of hydration of each of these formations. The characterization was done by making use of Exchange cation capacity (ECC, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, diferential thermal analysis (DTA, Thermogravimetry (TGA and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results obtained showed that among the shales studied, those with the greatest degree of clay fractions (smectite in its composition showed higher swelling index according to the methodology of Foster.

  17. Drosophila Females Undergo Genome Expansion after Interspecific Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Soriano, Valèria; Burlet, Nelly; Vela, Doris; Fontdevila, Antonio; Vieira, Cristina; García Guerreiro, María Pilar

    2016-02-12

    Genome size (or C-value) can present a wide range of values among eukaryotes. This variation has been attributed to differences in the amplification and deletion of different noncoding repetitive sequences, particularly transposable elements (TEs). TEs can be activated under different stress conditions such as interspecific hybridization events, as described for several species of animals and plants. These massive transposition episodes can lead to considerable genome expansions that could ultimately be involved in hybrid speciation processes. Here, we describe the effects of hybridization and introgression on genome size of Drosophila hybrids. We measured the genome size of two close Drosophila species, Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila koepferae, their F1 offspring and the offspring from three generations of backcrossed hybrids; where mobilization of up to 28 different TEs was previously detected. We show that hybrid females indeed present a genome expansion, especially in the first backcross, which could likely be explained by transposition events. Hybrid males, which exhibit more variable C-values among individuals of the same generation, do not present an increased genome size. Thus, we demonstrate that the impact of hybridization on genome size can be detected through flow cytometry and is sex-dependent. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. A direct consequence of the Expansion of Space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Michał J.

    2007-06-01

    Consider radar ranging of a distant galaxy in a Friedman-Lemaître cosmological model. In this model the comoving coordinate of the galaxy is constant; hence, the equations of null geodesics for photons travelling to the distant galaxy and back imply Here, τe, τr and τo are, respectively, the times of emission, reflection and observation of the reflected photons, and a(τ) is the scalefactor. Since the Universe is expanding, a(τ) is a monotonically increasing function, so the return traveltime, τo - τr, must be greater than the forward traveltime, τr - τe. Clearly, space expands, and on their way back, the photons must travel a longer distance! This paper explains why this argument for the Expansion of Space (EoS) is wrong. We argue that, unlike the expansion of the cosmic substratum, the EoS is unobservable. We therefore propose to apply to it - just like to the ether - Ockham's razor.

  19. Azimuthal expansion of high-latitude auroral arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Safargaleev

    Full Text Available We used the TV auroral observations in Barentsburg (78.05° N 14.12° E in Spitsbergen archipelago, together with the data of the CUTLASS HF radars and the POLAR satellite images to study azimuthal (in the east-west direction expansion of the high-latitude auroral arcs. It is shown that the east or west edge of the arc moved in the same direction as the convection flow, westward in the pre-midnight sector and eastward in the post-midnight sector. The velocity of arc expansion was of the order of 2.5 km/s, which is 2–3 times larger than the convection velocity measured in the arc vicinity and 2–3 times smaller than the velocity of the bright patches propagating along the arc. The arc expanded from the active auroras seen from the POLAR satellite around midnight as a region of enhanced luminosity, which might be the auroral bulge or WTS. The pole- or equatorward drift of the arcs occurred at the velocity of the order of 100 m/s that was close to the convection velocity in the same direction. These experimental results can be well explained in terms of the interchange (or flute instability.

    Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection – Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  20. Explaining British Political Stability After 1832

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donagh Davis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Though not its main focus, Goldstone's Revolution and Rebellion in the Early Modern World (1991 threw considerable new light on 19th century Europe's revolutions and near-revolutions. While Goldstone stresses the role of an expanding and industrializing economy in absorbing 19th century England's demographic shocks, we accept this analysis but argue alongside it for similar attention to the vector of emigration, settler-colonialism, and imperial state expansion into which at least some of the exhaust fumes of the population explosion were vented. Furthermore, it is important to note the crucial role of a highly interventionist state and 'big' government in the background to these dynamics—a far cry from the light-touch, laissez-faire qualities with which the 19th century British state is often associated. To make our case, this article takes advantage of secondary literature and raw data not available prior to the publication of Goldstone's book. Of crucial importance here is our unique dataset of fatality-inducing political violence events in Britain and Ireland from 1785 to 1900. This is the first research paper to utilise this dataset. We draw upon this in the following section, which seeks to establish what the real level of political instability was in 19th century Britain—thus cross-referencing Goldstone's account with more recent data—before moving on in the following section to a more detailed overview of the socio-economic conditions underlying events at the political level. This is followed by our account of the emigration-settler-colonialism-imperial state expansion vector and the interventionist state policy behind it, which we argue was crucial to making 19th century Britain relatively 'revolution-proof'—alongside the expanding economic opportunities rightly highlighted by Goldstone. Lastly come our brief concluding remarks, which lay out the implications, as we see them, of this article's findings for research on

  1. An assessment of the expansion strategy followed by Avianca Airlines: Period 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Emboaba Moreira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This article aims to apply to the case of Avianca Airlines the Analytical Model for the Assessment of Airline Expansion Strategies developed by Moreira (2014 in order to explain the rationale of the expansion strategy followed by this airline and indicate other possible expansion strategies.  Design/methodology/approach: This article is a case study in the sense that it aims to arrive to broad generalizations based on the collected evidences, focusing on one of the most traditional airlines in the world. This article is a positivist case study, based in the positivist understanding; because it is supported by objective facts of the situation which are informed by the researcher’s interpretive understanding according to it is recommended for this type of study. Findings: The application of the Analytical Model for the Assessment of Airline Expansion Strategies above referred was successful, considering that the model was able to explain a wide range of complex aspects of the Avianca’s development. Thus, being one of the oldest airlines in continued operation in the world, the expansion process of this airline is connected to many political, sociological and economic facets - ie., its general environment - of its mother country, Colombia. The analytical model offered the opportunity to explore these issues in a detailed manner, adding a broader comprehension of this airline that goes beyond its operating and economic analysis. Originality/value: They reside on the fact that this is the first time that this analytical model is applied to study extensively an actual situation. Besides, airlines in Latin America have not been widely covered by the academia and this is an opportunity to begin to fill this gap. Furthermore, the referred analytical model is applicable to organizations or firms that operate in other industries if the proper adjustments are made. Implications: The implications for the academic research are to understand that

  2. Negative Thermal Expansion and Ferroelectric Oxides in Electronic Device Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Joy Elizabeth

    Electronic devices increasingly pervade our daily lives, driving the need to develop components which have material properties that can be designed to target a specific need. The principle motive of this thesis is to investigate the effects of particle size and composition on three oxides which possess electronic and thermal properties essential to designing improved ceramic composites for more efficient, high energy storage devices. A metal matrix composite project used the negative thermal expansion oxide, ZrW2O 8, to offset the high thermal expansion of the metal matrix without sacrificing high thermal conductivity. Composite preparation employed a powder mixing technique to achieve easy composition control and homogenous phase distribution in order to build composites which target a specific coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). A tailorable CTE material is desirable for overcoming thermomechanical failure in heat sinks or device casings. This thesis also considers the particle size effect on dielectric properties in a common ferroelectric perovskite, Ba1-xSrxTiO 3. By varying the Ba:Sr ratio, the Curie temperature can be adjusted and by reducing the particle size, the dielectric constant can be increased and hysteresis decreased. These conditions could yield anonymously large dielectric constants near room temperature. However, the ferroelectric behavior has been observed to cease below a minimum size of a few tens of nanometers in bulk or thin film materials. Using a new particle slurry approach, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy allows dielectric properties to be determined for nanoparticles, as opposed to conventional methods which measure only bulk or thin film dielectric properties. In this manner, Ba1-xSrxTiO3 was investigated in a new size regime, extending the theory on the ferroelectric behavior to < 10 nm diameter. This knowledge will improve the potential to incorporate high dielectric constant, low loss ferroelectric nanoparticles in many

  3. Expansion in finite simple groups of Lie type

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Terence

    2015-01-01

    Expander graphs are an important tool in theoretical computer science, geometric group theory, probability, and number theory. Furthermore, the techniques used to rigorously establish the expansion property of a graph draw from such diverse areas of mathematics as representation theory, algebraic geometry, and arithmetic combinatorics. This text focuses on the latter topic in the important case of Cayley graphs on finite groups of Lie type, developing tools such as Kazhdan's property (T), quasirandomness, product estimates, escape from subvarieties, and the Balog-Szemerédi-Gowers lemma. Applications to the affine sieve of Bourgain, Gamburd, and Sarnak are also given. The material is largely self-contained, with additional sections on the general theory of expanders, spectral theory, Lie theory, and the Lang-Weil bound, as well as numerous exercises and other optional material.

  4. Quasinormal-Mode Expansion of the Scattering Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpeggiani, Filippo; Parappurath, Nikhil; Verhagen, Ewold; Kuipers, L.

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the quasinormal modes (or resonant states) of photonic structures can be associated with the poles of the scattering matrix of the system in the complex-frequency plane. In this work, the inverse problem, i.e., the reconstruction of the scattering matrix from the knowledge of the quasinormal modes, is addressed. We develop a general and scalable quasinormal-mode expansion of the scattering matrix, requiring only the complex eigenfrequencies and the far-field properties of the eigenmodes. The theory is validated by applying it to illustrative nanophotonic systems with multiple overlapping electromagnetic modes. The examples demonstrate that our theory provides an accurate first-principles prediction of the scattering properties, without the need for postulating ad hoc nonresonant channels.

  5. word2vec Parameter Learning Explained

    OpenAIRE

    Rong, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The word2vec model and application by Mikolov et al. have attracted a great amount of attention in recent two years. The vector representations of words learned by word2vec models have been shown to carry semantic meanings and are useful in various NLP tasks. As an increasing number of researchers would like to experiment with word2vec or similar techniques, I notice that there lacks a material that comprehensively explains the parameter learning process of word embedding models in details, t...

  6. Chromosome congression explained by nanoscale electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, L John; Shain, Daniel H

    2014-02-24

    Nanoscale electrostatic microtubule disassembly forces between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charges on plus ends of microtubules have been implicated in poleward chromosome motions and may also contribute to antipoleward chromosome movements. We propose that chromosome congression can be understood in terms of antipoleward nanoscale electrostatic microtubule assembly forces between negatively charged microtubule plus ends and like-charged chromosome arms, acting in conjunction with poleward microtubule disassembly forces. Several other aspects of post-attachment prometaphase chromosome motions, as well as metaphase oscillations, are consistently explained within this framework.

  7. Explaining perceptions of the unemployed in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Vlandas, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the determinants of the perceptions of the unemployed in 29 European countries along three dimensions: whether people see the unemployed as the ‘government’s responsibility’; whether they believe the unemployed do not ‘try hard to find a job’; and whether they think that the standard of living of the unemployed is ‘bad’. I derive a number of expectations from the political economy literature on policy preferences and test whether these expectations explain variation in t...

  8. SOME THEORETICAL MODELS EXPLAINING ADVERTISING EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilica Magdalena SOMEŞFĂLEAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Persuade clients is still the main focus of the companies, using a set of methods and techniques designed to influence their behavior, in order to obtain better results (profits over a longer period of time. Since the late nineteenth - early twentieth century, the american E.St.Elmo Lewis, considered a pioneer in advertising and sales, developed the first theory, AIDA model, later used by marketers and advertisers to develop a marketing communications strategy. Later studies have developed other models that are the main subject of this research, which explains how and why persuasive communication works, to understand why some approaches are effective and others are not.

  9. Mapping Brazilian Cropland Expansion, 2000-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalles, V.; Hansen, M.; Potapov, P.

    2016-12-01

    Brazil is one of the world's leading producers and exporters of agricultural goods. Despite undergoing significant increases in its cropland area in the last decades, it remains one of the countries with the most potential for further agricultural expansion. Most notably, the expansion in production areas of commodity crops such as soybean, corn, and sugarcane has become the leading cause of land cover conversion in Brazil. Natural land covers, such as the Amazon and Cerrado forests, have been negatively affected by this agricultural expansion, causing carbon emissions, biodiversity loss, altered water cycles, and many other disturbances to ecosystem services. Monitoring of change in cropland area extent can provide relevant information to decision makers seeking to understand and manage land cover change drivers and their impacts. In this study, the freely-available Landsat archive was leveraged to produce a large-scale, methodologically consistent map of cropland cover at 30 m. resolution for the entire Brazilian territory in the year 2000. Additionally, we mapped cropland expansion from 2000 to 2013, and used statistical sampling techniques to accurately estimate cropland area per Brazilian state. Using the Global Forest Change product produced by Hansen et al. (2013), we can disaggregate forest cover loss due to cropland expansion by year, revealing spatiotemporal trends that could advance our understanding of the drivers of forest loss.

  10. Supercritical flow characteristics at abrupt expansion structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jia Jun; Puay, How Tion; Zakaria, Nor Azazi

    2017-10-01

    When dealing with the design of a hydraulic structure, lateral expansion is often necessary for flow emerging at high velocity served as a cross-sectional transition. If the abrupt expansion structure is made to diverge rapidly, it will cause the major part of the flow fail to follow the boundaries. If the transition is too gradual, it will result in a waste of structural material. A preliminary study on the flow structure near the expansion and its relationship with flow parameter is carried out in this study. A two-dimensional depth-averaged model is developed to simulate the supercritical flow at the abrupt expansion structure. Constrained Interpolation Profile (CIP) scheme (which is of third order accuracy) is adopted in the numerical model. Results show that the flow structure and flow characteristics at the abrupt expansion can be reproduced numerically. The validation of numerical result is done against analytical studies. The result from numerical simulation showed good agreement with the analytical solution.

  11. Developmental systems theory: what does it explain, and how does it explain it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Paul E; Tabery, James

    2013-01-01

    We examine developmental systems theory (DST) with two questions in mind: What does DST explain? How does DST explain it? To answer these questions, we start by reviewing major contributions to the origins of DST: the introduction of the idea of a "developmental system", the idea of probabilistic epigenesis, the attention to the role of information in the developmental system, and finally the explicit identification of a DST. We then consider what DST is not, contrasting it with two approaches that have been foils for DST: behavioral genetics and nativist cognitive psychology. Third, we distill out two core concepts that have defined DSTthroughout its history: epigenesis and developmental dynamics. Finally, we turn to how DST explains, arguing that it explains by elucidating mechanisms.

  12. Comparison of High Temperature Crystal Lattice and Bulk Thermal Expansion Measurements of LGT Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaucage, Timothy R [University of Maine; Beenfeldt, Eric P [University of Maine; Speakman, Scott A [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Pereira da Cunha, Mauricio [University of Maine

    2006-01-01

    Among the langasite family of crystals (LGX), the three most popular materials are langasite (LGS, La3Ga5SiO14), langatate (LGT, La3Ga5.5Ta0.5O14) and langanite (LGN, La3Ga5.5Nb0.5O14). The LGX crystals have received significant attention for acoustic wave (AW) device applications due to several properties, which include: (1) piezoelectric constants about two and a half times those of quartz, thus allowing the design of larger bandwidth filters; (2) existence of temperature compensated orientations; (3) high density, with potential for reduced vibration and acceleration sensitivity; and (4) possibility of operation at high temperatures, since the LGX crystals do not present phase changes up to their melting point above 1400degC. The LGX crystals' capability to operate at elevated temperatures calls for an investigation on the growth quality and the consistency of these materials' properties at high temperature. One of the fundamental crystal properties is the thermal expansion coefficients in the entire temperature range where the material is operational. This work focuses on the measurement of the LGT thermal expansion coefficients from room temperature (25degC) to 1200degC. Two methods of extracting the thermal expansion coefficients have been used and compared: (a) dual push-rod dilatometry, which provides the bulk expansion; and (b) x-ray powder diffraction, which provides the lattice expansion. Both methods were performed over the entire temperature range and considered multiple samples taken from <001> Czochralski grown LGT material. The thermal coefficients of expansion were extracted by approximating each expansion data set to a third order polynomial fit over three temperature ranges reported in this work: 25degC to 400degC, 400degC to 900degC, 900degC to 1200degC. An accuracy of fit better than 35ppm for the bulk expansion and better than 10ppm for the lattice expansion have been obtained with the aforementioned polynomial fitting. The

  13. Boosted Regression Tree Models to Explain Watershed ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boosted regression tree (BRT) models were developed to quantify the nonlinear relationships between landscape variables and nutrient concentrations in a mesoscale mixed land cover watershed during base-flow conditions. Factors that affect instream biological components, based on the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI), were also analyzed. Seasonal BRT models at two spatial scales (watershed and riparian buffered area [RBA]) for nitrite-nitrate (NO2-NO3), total Kjeldahl nitrogen, and total phosphorus (TP) and annual models for the IBI score were developed. Two primary factors — location within the watershed (i.e., geographic position, stream order, and distance to a downstream confluence) and percentage of urban land cover (both scales) — emerged as important predictor variables. Latitude and longitude interacted with other factors to explain the variability in summer NO2-NO3 concentrations and IBI scores. BRT results also suggested that location might be associated with indicators of sources (e.g., land cover), runoff potential (e.g., soil and topographic factors), and processes not easily represented by spatial data indicators. Runoff indicators (e.g., Hydrological Soil Group D and Topographic Wetness Indices) explained a substantial portion of the variability in nutrient concentrations as did point sources for TP in the summer months. The results from our BRT approach can help prioritize areas for nutrient management in mixed-use and heavily impacted watershed

  14. EXPLAINING THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN INCARCERATION AND DIVORCE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siennick, Sonja E.; Stewart, Eric A.; Staff, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that incarceration dramatically increases the odds of divorce, but we know little about the mechanisms that explain the association. This study uses prospective longitudinal data from a subset of married young adults in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,919) to examine whether incarceration is associated with divorce indirectly via low marital love, economic strain, relationship violence, and extramarital sex. The findings confirmed that incarcerations occurring during, but not before, a marriage were associated with an increased hazard of divorce. Incarcerations occurring during marriage also were associated with less marital love, more relationship violence, more economic strain, and greater odds of extramarital sex. Above-average levels of economic strain were visible among respondents observed preincarceration, but only respondents observed postincarceration showed less marital love, more relationship violence, and higher odds of extramarital sex than did respondents who were not incarcerated during marriage. These relationship problems explained approximately 40 percent of the association between incarceration and marital dissolution. These findings are consistent with theoretical predictions that a spouse’s incarceration alters the rewards and costs of the marriage and the relative attractiveness of alternative partners. PMID:25598544

  15. Ultra-low thermal expansion realized in giant negative thermal expansion materials through self-compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fei-Ran; Kuang, Hao; Hu, Feng-Xia; Wu, Hui; Huang, Qing-Zhen; Liang, Fei-Xiang; Qiao, Kai-Ming; Li, Jia; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Lei; He, Min; Zhang, Ying; Zuo, Wen-Liang; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2017-10-01

    Materials with zero thermal expansion (ZTE) or precisely tailored thermal expansion are in urgent demand of modern industries. However, the overwhelming majority of materials show positive thermal expansion. To develop ZTE or negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials as compensators has become an important challenge. Here, we present the evidence for the realization of ultra-low thermal expansion in Mn-Co-Ge-In particles. The bulk with the Ni2In-type hexagonal structure undergoes giant NTE owing to a martensitic magnetostructural transition. The major finding is that the thermal expansion behavior can be totally controlled by modulating the crystallinity degree and phase transition from atomic scale. Self-compensation effect leads to ultra-low thermal expansion with a linear expansion coefficient as small as +0.68 × 10-6/K over a wide temperature range around room temperature. The present study opens an avenue to reach ZTE particularly from the large class of giant NTE materials based on phase transition.

  16. [Forum on tissue expansion. Expansion of the scalp. Surgical techniques and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyatier, J L; Delay, E; Comparin, J P; Latarjet, J; Masson, C L

    1993-02-01

    Repair of all forms of alopecia is one of the principal applications of scalp expansion. The authors have inserted 400 expansion prostheses, including 20 in the scalp. The surgical technique, choice of material and various types of flaps are described and illustrated by clinical cases of extensive alopecia.

  17. Influence of Orthodontic Rapid Maxillary Expansion on Nocturnal Enuresis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Hyla-Klekot; Marek Truszel; Andrzej Paradysz; Lidia Postek-Stefańska; Marcin Życzkowski

    2015-01-01

    Background. The etiology of nocturnal enuresis (NE) is multifactorial and has not been fully explained yet. New ways of treatment are constantly being investigated, including the rapid maxillary expansion (RME). Methods. A total of 41 patients diagnosed with NE were divided into two experimental groups: A and B. Group A included 16 children who have been treated with RME. Group B comprised 25 children who have not undertaken orthodontic treatment. Children from both groups have been monitored...

  18. 2009 recession and expansion from 2010 to 2012 in the states of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo Erquizio Espinal; Roberto Ramírez Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the recession and expansion phases for which transited Mexico in the past four years and in particular explains the causes of regional diversity of manifes­tations of the Great Recession of 2009. It uses regional–sectoral typology, formulated new indices based on Mitchell hypothesis about classic cycles and proposes a regional cycle equation inspired Frish metaphor about cyclical mechanism. This verifies that the sectoral profile of the states determines such differentiat...

  19. Anisotropic thermal expansion in flexible materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romao, Carl P.

    2017-10-01

    A definition of the Grüneisen parameters for anisotropic materials is derived based on the response of phonon frequencies to uniaxial stress perturbations. This Grüneisen model relates the thermal expansion in a given direction (αi i) to one element of the elastic compliance tensor, which corresponds to the Young's modulus in that direction (Yi i). The model is tested through ab initio prediction of thermal expansion in zinc, graphite, and calcite using density functional perturbation theory, indicating that it could lead to increased accuracy for structurally complex systems. The direct dependence of αi i on Yi i suggests that materials which are flexible along their principal axes but rigid in other directions will generally display both positive and negative thermal expansion.

  20. Extrudate Expansion Modelling through Dimensional Analysis Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A new model framework is proposed to correlate extrudate expansion and extrusion operation parameters for a food extrusion cooking process through dimensional analysis principle, i.e. Buckingham pi theorem. Three dimensionless groups, i.e. energy, water content and temperature, are suggested...... to describe the extrudates expansion. From the three dimensionless groups, an equation with three experimentally determined parameters is derived to express the extrudate expansion. The model is evaluated with whole wheat flour and aquatic feed extrusion experimental data. The average deviations...... of the correlation are respectively 5.9% and 9% for the whole wheat flour and the aquatic feed extrusion. An alternative 4-coefficient equation is also suggested from the 3 dimensionless groups. The average deviations of the alternative equation are respectively 5.8% and 2.5% in correlation with the same set...

  1. Rapid palatal expansion: the role of microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilello, G; Currò, G; Messina, P; Scardina, G

    2015-08-01

    Transverse palate modifications fall under expansive orthopedic therapy of the upper maxilla. The only practical approach to the problem on the transverse plane is that of performing the expansion of the maxillary arch through an opening of the median palatal suture. It is important to understand the changes of the vascular network in midpalatal suture following the starting of rapid maxillary expansion. It is critical to maintain the blood supply and circulation for the osteogenesis and bone remodeling after the expansion. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of rapid orthopedic expansion (REP) at the microcirculatory level through capillaroscopic examination. Fifteen patients in their developing years between 9 and 15 years of age (average age 12.16 years) were examined. The application of the REP was the first step in the planning of orthopedic-orthodontic treatment which foresaw further stages in the odonto-osseous movement. The method of Biomicroscopic Video-Imaging of the microcirculation of oral mucosa is performed through the technique of computerized capillaroscopy and the related software. From the results it is evident that immediately after achieving the expansion of the upper maxilla (t1), a slight decrease in the number of vessels per mm² can be observed. In addition, a slight ectasia can be observed in these vessels in comparison to t0. Comparing the videocapillaroscopic images of t1 and t2, an increase in the capillaries per mm² can be observed. Ectasia of the capillaries, though subject to strictly individual variables, can be considered perfectly normal and it is compatible with the normal biology and physiology of vessel microcirculation.

  2. Longitudinal expansion of field line dipolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, O.; Hayashi, K.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the substorm expansions that started at 1155 UT 10 August 1994 in the midnight sector focusing on the longitudinal (eastward) expansion of field line dipolarization in the auroral zone. Eastward expansion of the dipolarization region was observed in all of the H, D, and Z components. The dipolarization that started at 1155 UT (0027 MLT) from 260° of geomagnetic longitude (CMO) expanded to 351°(PBQ) in about 48 min. The expansion velocity was 0.03-0.04°/s, or 1.9 km/s at 62°N of geomagnetic latitude. The dipolarization region expanding to the east was accompanied by a bipolar event at the leading edge of the expansion in latitudes equatorward of the westward electrojet (WEJ). In the midnight sector at the onset meridian, the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer (MAP) on board geosynchronous satellite L9 measured electrons and ions between 10 eV and 40 keV. We conclude from the satellite observations that this dipolarization was characterized by the evolution of temperature anisotropies, an increase of the electron and ion temperatures, and a rapid change in the symmetry axis of the temperature tensor. The field line dipolarization and its longitudinal expansion were interpreted in terms of the slow MHD mode triggered by the current disruption. We propose a new magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling (MI-coupling) mechanism based on the scenario that transmitted westward electric fields from the magnetosphere in association with expanding dipolarization produced electrostatic potential (negative) in the ionosphere through differences in the mobility of collisional ions and collisionless electrons. The field-aligned currents that emerged from the negative potential region are arranged in a concentric pattern around the negative potential region, upward toward the center and downward on the peripheral.

  3. Parabolic cyclinder functions : examples of error bounds for asymptotic expansions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Vidunas; N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractSeveral asymptotic expansions of parabolic cylinder functions are discussedand error bounds for remainders in the expansions are presented. Inparticular Poincaré-type expansions for large values of the argument$z$ and uniform expansions for large values of the parameter areconsidered.

  4. Program computes turbine steam rates and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (US))

    1988-11-01

    BASIC computer program quickly evaluates steam properties and rates during expansion in a steam turbine. Engineers involved in cogeneration projects and power plant studies often need to calculate the steam properties during expansion in a steam turbine to evaluate the theoretical and actual steam rates and hence, the electrical power output. With the help of this program written in BASIC, one can quickly evaluate all the pertinent data. Correlations used for steam property evaluation are also presented.

  5. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Borrell, Olga García-Moreno, Ramón Torrecillas, Victoria García-Rocha and Adolfo Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (−150 to 450 °C. The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  6. Soft Manifold Dynamics behind Negative Thermal Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Z.; Rosen, J. A.; Hancock, J. N.; Ramirez, A. P.

    2008-07-01

    Minimal models are developed to examine the origin of large negative thermal expansion in underconstrained systems. The dynamics of these models reveals how underconstraint can organize a thermodynamically extensive manifold of low-energy modes which not only drives negative thermal expansion but extends across the Brillioun zone. Mixing of twist and translation in the eigenvectors of these modes, for which in ZrW2O8 there is evidence from infrared and neutron scattering measurements, emerges naturally in our model as a signature of the dynamics of underconstraint.

  7. Air expansion in the water rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Romanelli, Alejandro; Madina, Federico González

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of the water rocket in the thrust phase, taking into account the expansion of the air with water vapor, vapor condensation and the energy taken from the environment. We set up a simple experimental device with a stationary bottle and verified that the gas expansion in the bottle is well approximated by a polytropic process $PV^\\beta$= constant, where the parameter $\\beta$ depends on the initial conditions. We find an analytical expression for $\\beta $ that only depends on the thermodynamic initial conditions and is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. NATO Expansion and Alternative Future Security Alignments,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    International Security," a joint paper by the Institute for USA and Canada and the Center for Naval Analysis, June 1992. 11. Malcolm Mackintosh , "Reform in the...former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Fred C. Ikle, who opposes NATO expansion, has observed that "This remedy may seem all the more urgent as...opposition to NATO expansion include Fred C. Ikl6, former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Charles Kupchan, a former member of the U.S. National

  9. Large J expansion in ABJM theory revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, H; Mladenov, S; Rashkov, R C

    Recently there has been progress in the computation of the anomalous dimensions of gauge theory operators at strong coupling by making use of the AdS/CFT correspondence. On the string theory side they are given by dispersion relations in the semiclassical regime. We revisit the problem of a large-charge expansion of the dispersion relations for simple semiclassical strings in an [Formula: see text] background. We present the calculation of the corresponding anomalous dimensions of the gauge theory operators to an arbitrary order using three different methods. Although the results of the three methods look different, power series expansions show their consistency.

  10. The Monetary Policy – Restrictive or Expansive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szafarczyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The monetary policy plays an important role in macroeconomic policy of government. There is a question concerning type of this policy ñ expansive or restrictive (easy or tidy monetary policy. Unfortunately, we have a lot of criteria. Each of them gives us other answer. So due to equitation of Irving Fisher we have dominantly expansive monetary policy. This same situation exists when we use nominal value of rediscount interest rate of central bank. Opposite result appears when we use real value of this interest rate or level of obligatory reserve. Taking under consideration liquidity on money market we know, that level of interest rate is too high.  

  11. Scenarios of Expansion to Electric Generation Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Somoza-Cabrera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We show the building scenarios of expansion to electric generation capacity enough to supply the demand to 2050. We were using the LEAP facility (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System, to simulate dispatch of electricity at minimum cost. Finally, we show the cost-benefice analysis of the technologies availability, included externality and CO2 emission limited. However that we included the externals cost in this analysis, it results insufficient to closed gap between fossil and renewable technologies of electric generation. Nevertheless, in some opportunities the renewable options had very important participations in the minimal cost scenario of expansion.

  12. Expansion of the whole wheat flour extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Hongyuan; Friis, Alan

    2008-01-01

    A new model framework is proposed to describe the expansion of extrudates with extruder operating conditions based on dimensional analysis principle. The Buckingham pi dimensional analysis method is applied to form the basic structure of the model from extrusion process operational parameters. Us....... Using the Central Composite Design (CCD) method, whole wheat flour was processed in a twin-screw extruder with 16 trials. The proposed model can well correlate the expansion of the 16 trials using 3 regression parameters. The average deviation of the correlation is 5.9%....

  13. Explaining the imperfection of the molecular clock of hominid mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Liis Loogväli

    Full Text Available The molecular clock of mitochondrial DNA has been extensively used to date various genetic events. However, its substitution rate among humans appears to be higher than rates inferred from human-chimpanzee comparisons, limiting the potential of interspecies clock calibrations for intraspecific dating. It is not well understood how and why the substitution rate accelerates. We have analyzed a phylogenetic tree of 3057 publicly available human mitochondrial DNA coding region sequences for changes in the ratios of mutations belonging to different functional classes. The proportion of non-synonymous and RNA genes substitutions has reduced over hundreds of thousands of years. The highest mutation ratios corresponding to fast acceleration in the apparent substitution rate of the coding sequence have occurred after the end of the Last Ice Age. We recalibrate the molecular clock of human mtDNA as 7990 years per synonymous mutation over the mitochondrial genome. However, the distribution of substitutions at synonymous sites in human data significantly departs from a model assuming a single rate parameter and implies at least 3 different subclasses of sites. Neutral model with 3 synonymous substitution rates can explain most, if not all, of the apparent molecular clock difference between the intra- and interspecies levels. Our findings imply the sluggishness of purifying selection in removing the slightly deleterious mutations from the human as well as the Neandertal and chimpanzee populations. However, for humans, the weakness of purifying selection has been further exacerbated by the population expansions associated with the out-of Africa migration and the end of the Last Ice Age.

  14. Thermal expansion of PBX 9501 and PBX 9502 plastic-bonded explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Darla Graff [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Geoff W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giambra, Anna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandstrom, Mary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Two applications of thermal expansion measurements on plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) composites are described. In the first dilatometer application, thermal expansion properties of HMX-based PBX 9501 are measured over a broad thermal range that includes glass and domain-restructuring transitions in the polymeric binder. Results are consistent with other thermal measurements and analyses performed on the composite, as well as on the binder itself. The second application used the dilatometer to distinguish the reversible and irreversible components of thermal expansion in PBX 9502, a TATB-based explosive. Irreversible expansion of the composite is believed to derive from the highly-anisotropic coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values measured on single T A TB crystals, although the mechanism is not well understood. Effects of specimen density, thermal ramp rate, and thermal range variation (warm first or cold first) were explored, and the results are presented and discussed. Dilatometer measurements are ongoing towards gaining insight into the mechanism(s) responsible for PBX 9502 irreversible thermal expansion.

  15. The effect of microstructure on the sheared edge quality and hole expansion ratio of hot-rolled 700 MPa steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaijalainen, A.; Kesti, V.; Vierelä, R.; Ylitolva, M.; Porter, D.; Kömi, J.

    2017-09-01

    The effects of microstructure on the cutting and hole expansion properties of three thermomechanically rolled steels have been investigated. The yield strength of the studied 3 mm thick strip steels was approximately 700 MPa. Detailed microstructural studies using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LCSM), FESEM and FESEM-EBSD revealed that the three investigated materials consist of 1) single-phase polygonal ferrite, 2) polygonal ferrite with precipitates and 3) granular bainite. The quality of mechanically sheared edges were evaluated using visual inspection and LSCM, while hole expansion properties were characterised according to the methods described in ISO 16630. Roughness values (Ra and Rz) of the sheet edge with different cutting clearances varied between 12 µm to 21 µm and 133 µm to 225 µm, respectively. Mean hole expansion ratios varied from 28.4% to 40.5%. It was shown that granular bainite produced the finest cutting edge, but the hole expansion ratio remained at the same level as in the steel comprising single-phase ferrite. This indicates that a single-phase ferritic matrix enhances hole expansion properties even with low quality edges. A brief discussion of the microstructural features controlling the cutting quality and hole expansion properties is given.

  16. Alcohol and breast cancer: the mechanisms explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sader, Hassen; Abdul-Jabar, Hani; Allawi, Zahra; Haba, Yasser

    2009-08-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death amongst women, several studies have shown significant association between alcohol consumption and breast cancer. The aim of this overview is to highlight some of the mechanisms by which alcohol consumption could increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Using online Medline search engine, article containing details about mechanisms which explain the link between alcohol and breast cancer were examined. A number of mechanisms were found by which alcohol could increase the risk of breast cancer, alcohol's interaction and effect on oestrogen secretion; number of oestrogen receptors; the generation of acetaldehyde and hydroxyl free radicals; cells migration and metastasis; secretion of IGF1 and interaction with HRT and folate metabolism. In conclusion, it is essential for clinicians to understand these mechanisms and inform patients of the link between alcohol and breast cancer. Breast cancer; Alcohol; Mechanisms.

  17. Explaining CMS lepton excesses with supersymmetry

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Prof. Allanach, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    1) Kostas Theofilatos will give an introduction to CMS result 2) Ben Allanach: Several CMS analyses involving di-leptons have recently reported small 2.4-2.8 sigma local excesses: nothing to get too excited about, but worth keeping an eye on nonetheless. In particular, a search in the $lljj p_T$(miss) channel, a search for $W_R$ in the $lljj$ channel and a di-leptoquark search in the $lljj$ channel and $ljj p_T$(miss) channel have all yielded small excesses. We interpret the first excess in the MSSM, showing that the interpretation is viable in terms of other constraints, despite only having squark masses of around 1 TeV. We can explain the last three excesses with a single R-parity violating coupling that predicts a non-zero contribution to the neutrinoless double beta decay rate.

  18. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Results Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. Conclusion We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply.

  19. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, Daniel H; Gagliardi, L John

    2011-05-27

    Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply. © 2011 Shain and Gagliardi; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Explaining variation in Down's syndrome screening uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crombag, Neeltje M T H; Vellinga, Ynke E; Kluijfhout, Sandra A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The offer of prenatal Down's syndrome screening is part of routine antenatal care in most of Europe; however screening uptake varies significantly across countries. Although a decision to accept or reject screening is a personal choice, it is unlikely that the widely differing uptake...... rates across countries can be explained by variation in individual values alone.The aim of this study was to compare Down's syndrome screening policies and programmes in the Netherlands, where uptake is relatively low ( 90% respectively....... RESULTS: There were many similarities in the demographics, healthcare systems, government abortion legislation and Down's syndrome screening policy across the studied countries. However, the additional cost for Down's syndrome screening over and above standard antenatal care in the Netherlands...

  1. Training science centre Explainers. The Techniquest experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Johnson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Techniquest was established in 1986, and in 1995 moved to its current premises at Cardiff Bay, South Wales. This was the first purpose-built science centre in the UK. It receives around 200,000 visitors every year to its exhibition, and to its programmes for schools and public audiences in the theatre, laboratory, discovery room and planetarium. The author joined the Techniquest project in 1985, became a staff member in 1990 and was the Chief Executive from 1997 until his retirement in 2004. Techniquest has three “out-stations” in Wales, and is responsible for the supply and maintenance of exhibits to the Look Out Discovery Centre in Bracknell, England. There is a Techniquest gallery at the Lisbon Pavilhão do Conhecimento - Ciência Viva, and a traveling exhibition, SciQuest, in South Africa which was also supplied by Techniquest. All these centres rely on the effective intervention of “Explainers” (at Techniquest we call them “Helpers” to provide the best possible experience for visitors. At its most demanding, the tasks of an Explainer are varied and intensive, yet there may be times when the duties are mundane or even dull. When you rely on people to act as both hosts and housekeepers, to provide both support and stimulus, and to be both welcoming and watchful, you are asking a great deal. This article raises some of the issues concerned with the recruitment and retention of Explainers, their training and management, and the way in which their role is recognized and valued by the science centre as a whole.

  2. Explaining polarization reversals in STEREO wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, Breneman et al. (2011) reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only right-hand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by ±200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo (1984) whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by ˜200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al. (2008).

  3. Explaining Polarization Reversals in STEREO Wave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L, B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently Breneman et al. reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (Lwaves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only righthand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by +/-200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by 200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al.

  4. Transitioning from Idiopathic to Explainable Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Albert J

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis lacks an identifiable cause, and its diagnosis requires the exclusion of etiologically defined diseases that resemble it. Insights into its pathogenesis are moving autoimmune hepatitis from an idiopathic to explainable disease, and the goal of this review is to describe the insights that are hastening this transition. Two types of autoimmune hepatitis are justified by serological markers, but they also have distinctive genetic associations (DRB1 and DQB1 genes) and autoantigens. DRB1 alleles are the principal susceptibility factors in white adults, and a six amino acid sequence encoded in the antigen-binding groove of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex can influence the selection of autoantigens. Polymorphisms, including variants of SH2B3 and CARD10 genes, may affect immune reactivity and disease severity. The cytochrome mono-oxygenase, CYP2D6, is the autoantigen associated with type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, and it shares homologies with multiple viruses that might promote self-intolerance by molecular mimicry. Chemokines, especially CXCL9 and CXCL10, orchestrate the migration of effector cells to sites of injury and are associated with disease severity. Cells of the innate and adaptive immune responses promote tissue damage, and possible deficiencies in the number and function of regulatory T cells may facilitate the injurious process. Receptor-mediated apoptosis is the principal mechanism of hepatocyte loss, and cell-mediated and antibody-dependent mechanisms of cytotoxicity also contribute. Insights that explain autoimmune hepatitis will allow triggering exogenous antigens to be characterized, risk management to be improved, prognostic indices to be refined, and site-specific therapeutic interventions to emerge.

  5. Cluster expansions for the correlated basis functions theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardiola, R. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear)

    1982-08-16

    Four kinds of cluster expansions for the calculation of non-diagonal matrix elements of the hamiltonian between correlated states have been derived. The derivation is based on a linearization mechanism for the standard cluster expansions in a configuration mixed state. Particulary simple formulae result for the multiplicative Factor-Aviles-Hartog-Tolhoek expansion and for the exponential form of the Gaudin-Gillespie-Ripka cluster expansion. The resulting expansions are directly usable in finite nuclei.

  6. Blazar spectral variability as explained by a twisted inhomogeneous jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiteri, C M; Villata, M; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Agudo, I; Arkharov, A A; Bachev, R; Baida, G V; Benítez, E; Borman, G A; Boschin, W; Bozhilov, V; Butuzova, M S; Calcidese, P; Carnerero, M I; Carosati, D; Casadio, C; Castro-Segura, N; Chen, W-P; Damljanovic, G; D'Ammando, F; Di Paola, A; Echevarría, J; Efimova, N V; Ehgamberdiev, Sh A; Espinosa, C; Fuentes, A; Giunta, A; Gómez, J L; Grishina, T S; Gurwell, M A; Hiriart, D; Jermak, H; Jordan, B; Jorstad, S G; Joshi, M; Kopatskaya, E N; Kuratov, K; Kurtanidze, O M; Kurtanidze, S O; Lähteenmäki, A; Larionov, V M; Larionova, E G; Larionova, L V; Lázaro, C; Lin, C S; Malmrose, M P; Marscher, A P; Matsumoto, K; McBreen, B; Michel, R; Mihov, B; Minev, M; Mirzaqulov, D O; Mokrushina, A A; Molina, S N; Moody, J W; Morozova, D A; Nazarov, S V; Nikolashvili, M G; Ohlert, J M; Okhmat, D N; Ovcharov, E; Pinna, F; Polakis, T A; Protasio, C; Pursimo, T; Redondo-Lorenzo, F J; Rizzi, N; Rodriguez-Coira, G; Sadakane, K; Sadun, A C; Samal, M R; Savchenko, S S; Semkov, E; Skiff, B A; Slavcheva-Mihova, L; Smith, P S; Steele, I A; Strigachev, A; Tammi, J; Thum, C; Tornikoski, M; Troitskaya, Yu V; Troitsky, I S; Vasilyev, A A; Vince, O

    2017-12-21

    Blazars are active galactic nuclei, which are powerful sources of radiation whose central engine is located in the core of the host galaxy. Blazar emission is dominated by non-thermal radiation from a jet that moves relativistically towards us, and therefore undergoes Doppler beaming. This beaming causes flux enhancement and contraction of the variability timescales, so that most blazars appear as luminous sources characterized by noticeable and fast changes in brightness at all frequencies. The mechanism that produces this unpredictable variability is under debate, but proposed mechanisms include injection, acceleration and cooling of particles, with possible intervention of shock waves or turbulence. Changes in the viewing angle of the observed emitting knots or jet regions have also been suggested as an explanation of flaring events and can also explain specific properties of blazar emission, such as intra-day variability, quasi-periodicity and the delay of radio flux variations relative to optical changes. Such a geometric interpretation, however, is not universally accepted because alternative explanations based on changes in physical conditions-such as the size and speed of the emitting zone, the magnetic field, the number of emitting particles and their energy distribution-can explain snapshots of the spectral behaviour of blazars in many cases. Here we report the results of optical-to-radio-wavelength monitoring of the blazar CTA 102 and show that the observed long-term trends of the flux and spectral variability are best explained by an inhomogeneous, curved jet that undergoes changes in orientation over time. We propose that magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or rotation of the twisted jet cause different jet regions to change their orientation and hence their relative Doppler factors. In particular, the extreme optical outburst of 2016-2017 (brightness increase of six magnitudes) occurred when the corresponding emitting region had a small viewing angle

  7. Expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.; Fennell, P.A.H. [Serco Assurance, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    . Initially, three cells were set up: two contained alternate carbon steel and copper discs, and the third, a control cell, consisted of alternate stainless steel and copper discs. A slight contraction of the control cell was observed but no expansion was measured in the carbon steel-copper cells. Analytical measurements showed that the corrosion products were magnetite and hydrogen, indicating that anaerobic corrosion was occurring. In a second series of experiments, one experiment was carried out in which carbon steel was replaced with cast iron and in a further experiment air was allowed to enter the test chamber. No expansion was detected in either of these additional experiments. However, expansion was detected when a separate stack of copper and steel washers was corroded in ambient atmospheric conditions under very small compressive loads, and subjected to a wet-dry cycle, demonstrating that the experimental technique was capable of detecting corrosion-induced expansion if it were occurring. In parallel with the stress cell experiments, coupons of mild steel and cast iron were corroded in anoxic, artificial groundwater at 50 deg C and 80 deg C for several months. The coupons were examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the mechanical properties and the structure of the corrosion product films, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify the chemical composition of the film. The report presents Young's modulus, thickness and hardness data for the oxides, which were much more compliant than the magnetite films formed at high temperatures, probably because of their high water content. The report considers the application of the results to assessing the performance of the SKB canister in a repository situation.

  8. Thermal expansion and magnetostriction studies on iron pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liran

    2010-09-19

    }){sub 2}As{sub 2} is one of the first materials where single crystals are available. The thermal expansion results on the undoped compound with x = 0 show a large anomaly at the combined magnetic and structural transition which is far sharper than that for polycrystalline systems. Upon doping, both transitions are suppressed and their splitting is visible in the thermal expansion data. The high precision thermal expansion and magnetostriction results presented in this work are among the first data on the novel family of iron-based superconductors. A valuable insight in the respective ordering phenomena and the thermodynamic properties is provided.

  9. Copper-based conductive composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Tucker, Ryan; Star, Kurt; Lan, Esther H; Ju, Yongho Sungtaek; Dunn, Bruce

    2013-11-13

    We have devised a moderate temperature hot-pressing route for preparing metal-matrix composites which possess tunable thermal expansion coefficients in combination with high electrical and thermal conductivities. The composites are based on incorporating ZrW2O8, a material with a negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), within a continuous copper matrix. The ZrW2O8 enables us to tune the CTE in a predictable manner, while the copper phase is responsible for the electrical and thermal conductivity properties. An important consideration in the processing of these materials is to avoid the decomposition of the ZrW2O8 phase. This is accomplished by using relatively mild hot-pressing conditions of 500 °C for 1 h at 40 MPa. To ensure that these conditions enable sintering of the copper, we developed a synthesis route for the preparation of Cu nanoparticles (NPs) based on the reduction of a common copper salt in aqueous solution in the presence of a size control agent. Upon hot pressing these nanoparticles at 500 °C, we are able to achieve 92-93% of the theoretical density of copper. The resulting materials exhibit a CTE which can be tuned between the value of pure copper (16.5 ppm/°C) and less than 1 ppm/°C. Thus, by adjusting the relative amount of the two components, the properties of the composite can be designed so that a material with high electrical conductivity and a CTE that matches the relatively low CTE values of semiconductor or thermoelectric materials can be achieved. This unique combination of electrical and thermal properties enables these Cu-based metal-matrix composites to be used as electrical contacts to a variety of semiconductor and thermoelectric devices which offer stable operation under thermal cycling conditions.

  10. On Learning Ring-Sum-Expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Simon, H. -U.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of learning ring-sum-expansions from examples is studied. Ring-sum-expansions (RSE) are representations of Boolean functions over the base {#123;small infinum, (+), 1}#125;, which reflect arithmetic operations in GF(2). k-RSE is the class of ring-sum-expansions containing only monomials...... of length at most k:. term-RSE is the class of ring-sum-expansions having at most I: monomials. It is shown that k-RSE, k>or=1, is learnable while k-term-RSE, k>2, is not learnable if RPnot=NP. Without using a complexity-theoretical hypothesis, it is proven that k-RSE, k>or=1, and k-term-RSE, k>or=2 cannot...... be learned from positive (negative) examples alone. However, if the restriction that the hypothesis which is output by the learning algorithm is also a k-RSE is suspended, then k-RSE is learnable from positive (negative) examples only. Moreover, it is proved that 2-term-RSE is learnable by a conjunction...

  11. Polytope expansion of Lie characters and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, Mark A., E-mail: walton@uleth.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    The weight systems of finite-dimensional representations of complex, simple Lie algebras exhibit patterns beyond Weyl-group symmetry. These patterns occur because weight systems can be decomposed into lattice polytopes in a natural way. Since lattice polytopes are relatively simple, this decomposition is useful, in addition to being more economical than the decomposition into single weights. An expansion of characters into polytope sums follows from the polytope decomposition of weight systems. We study this polytope expansion here. A new, general formula is given for the polytope sums involved. The combinatorics of the polytope expansion are analyzed; we point out that they are reduced from those of the Weyl character formula (described by the Kostant partition function) in an optimal way. We also show that the weight multiplicities can be found easily from the polytope multiplicities, indicating explicitly the equivalence of the two descriptions. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the polytope expansion by showing how polytope multiplicities can be used in the calculation of tensor product decompositions, and subalgebra branching rules.

  12. Annual cropped area expansion and agricultural production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper assesses the relationship between annual cropped area expansion and crop output and discusses the implication of such a relationship for environmental management in Benue State, Nigeria. The study was carried out using agricultural production survey (APS) data of five selected crops, namely: rice, sorghum, ...

  13. Hole expansion test of third generation steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirre, Julen; Mendiguren, Joseba; Galdos, Lander; de Argandoña, Eneko Sáenz

    2017-10-01

    The trend towards the implementation of new materials in the chassis of the automobiles is considerably making more complex the manufacturing of the components that built it up. In this scenario materials with higher strengths and lower formabilities are daily faced by tool makers and component producers what reduces the process windows and makes the forming processes to be in the limits of the materials. One of the concerns that tool makers must face during the definition of the tools is the expansion ratios that the holes in the sheet may reach before producing a breakage due to the stretching of the material (also known as edge cracks). For the characterization of such limits, a standard test, the hole expansion test, can be applied so that the limits of the material are known. At the present study, hole expansion tests of a third generation steel, Fortiform1050 with a thickness of 1.2 millimeters have been carried out and compared them to a mild steel, DX54D with a thickness of 0.6 millimeters. A comparison for each material in terms of technology used to punch the hole, mechanical punching vs laser cutting has also been conducted. In addition, the measurement technique (online measurement vs offline measurement) followed in the Hole Expansion Ratio (HER) identification has also been analyzed. Finally, differences between both materials and techniques are presented.

  14. The Asymptotic Expansion Method via Symbolic Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Navarro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an algorithm for implementing a perturbation method based on an asymptotic expansion of the solution to a second-order differential equation. We also introduce a new symbolic computation system which works with the so-called modified quasipolynomials, as well as an implementation of the algorithm on it.

  15. Hydrodynamic Gradient Expansion in Gauge Theory Plasmas,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, M.P.; Janik, R.A.; Witaszczyk, P

    2013-01-01

    We utilize the fluid-gravity duality to investigate the large order behavior of hydrodynamic gradient expansion of the dynamics of a gauge theory plasma system. This corresponds to the inclusion of dissipative terms and transport coefficients of very high order. Using the dual gravity description,

  16. Expansion and contraction of finite states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Allard

    2004-01-01

    We present a theory that copes with the dynamics of inconsistent information. A method is set forth to represent possibly inconsistent information by a *finite state*. Next, finite operations for expansion and contraction of finite states are given. No extra-logical element -- a choice function or

  17. A Computational Approach to Competitive Range Expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Markus F.; Poxleitner, Gabriele; Hebisch, Elke; Frey, Erwin; Opitz, Madeleine

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial communities represent complex and dynamic ecological systems. Environmental conditions and microbial interactions determine whether a bacterial strain survives an expansion to new territory. In our work, we studied competitive range expansions in a model system of three Escherichia coli strains. In this system, a colicin producing strain competed with a colicin resistant, and with a colicin sensitive strain for new territory. Genetic engineering allowed us to tune the strains' growth rates and to study their expansion in distinct ecological scenarios (with either cyclic or hierarchical dominance). The control over growth rates also enabled us to construct and to validate a predictive computational model of the bacterial dynamics. The model rested on an agent-based, coarse-grained description of the expansion process and we conducted independent experiments on the growth of single-strain colonies for its parametrization. Furthermore, the model considered the long-range nature of the toxin interaction between strains. The integration of experimental analysis with computational modeling made it possible to quantify how the level of biodiversity depends on the interplay between bacterial growth rates, the initial composition of the inoculum, and the toxin range.

  18. Effects of forest expansion on mountain grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidi, Claudia; Magid, Jakob; Rodeghiero, Mirco

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Grassland abandonment followed by forest succession is the dominant land-use change in the European Alps. We studied the impact of current forest expansion on mountain grassland on changes in physical soil organic carbon (SOC) fractions along a land-use and management gradient...

  19. Stakeholder Support for School Food Policy Expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Simone; Pescud, Melanie; Donovan, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which parents and school-based stakeholders (principals, teachers, canteen managers and Parents & Citizen Committee presidents) are supportive of potential expansions to a new school food policy. Eight additional policy components elicited in preliminary focus groups with parents and 19 additional…

  20. Global Expansion and English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2016-01-01

    Demand for higher education is global. As institutions extend opportunities beyond their borders, English language proficiency must be considered. This chapter focuses on considerations related to global expansion, with an emphasis on the role of distance English language courses and the distinct considerations in their development.

  1. Taylor series expansions for stationary Markov chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidergott, B.F.; Hordijk, A.

    2003-01-01

    We study Taylor series expansions of stationary characteristics of general-state-space Markov chains. The elements of the Taylor series are explicitly calculated and a lower bound for the radius of convergence of the Taylor series is established. The analysis provided in this paper applies to the

  2. Term Dependence: Truncating the Bahadur Lazarsfeld Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losee, Robert M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Studies the performance of probabilistic information retrieval systems using differing statistical dependence assumptions when estimating the probabilities inherent in the retrieval model. Experimental results using the Bahadur Lazarsfeld expansion on the Cystic Fibrosis database are discussed that suggest that incorporating term dependence…

  3. Revisting expansive learning for knowledge production and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revisting expansive learning for knowledge production and capability development at postgraduate level in Higher Education Studies. R Niemann. Abstract. Higher education in South Africa is challenged by academic and social demands. Universities, therefore, have to produce graduates who will be able to function ...

  4. On the Convergence of the Virial Expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramawadh, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    The virial expansion appears in statistical mechanics, an area where physics and mathematics intersect. Throughout this thesis we will mostly ignore the physics and mainly focus on the mathematical aspects. This is a deliberate choice, made for two reasons. Firstly, there are several books that

  5. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannen, N.R.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2014-01-01

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the

  6. The replication of expansive production knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Yang, Cheng; Madsen, Erik Skov

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – With the aim to support offshore production line replication, this paper specifically aims to explore the use of templates and principles to transfer expansive productive knowledge embedded in a production line and understand the contingencies that influence the mix of these approaches....

  7. Effects of volumetric expansion in molecular crystals: A quantum mechanical investigation on aspirin and paracetamol most stable polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kapil; Flurchick, Kenneth M.; Valenzano, Loredana

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a study performed at hybrid semi-empirical density functional level (B3LYP-D2*) of the physico-chemical properties of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in their most stable crystalline forms. It is shown how effects arising from volumetric expansions influence the properties of the materials. Structural, energetic, and vibrational properties are in good agreement with experimental values reported at temperatures far from 0 K. Results show that the proposed approach is reliable enough to reproduce effects of volumetric expansion on lattice energies and other measurable physico-chemical observables related to inter-molecular forces.

  8. Expansion patterns and parallaxes for planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberner, D.; Balick, B.; Jacob, R.

    2018-02-01

    Aims: We aim to determine individual distances to a small number of rather round, quite regularly shaped planetary nebulae by combining their angular expansion in the plane of the sky with a spectroscopically measured expansion along the line of sight. Methods: We combined up to three epochs of Hubble Space Telescope imaging data and determined the angular proper motions of rim and shell edges and of other features. These results are combined with measured expansion speeds to determine individual distances by assuming that line of sight and sky-plane expansions are equal. We employed 1D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of nebular evolution to correct for the difference between the spectroscopically measured expansion velocities of rim and shell and of their respective shock fronts. Results: Rim and shell are two independently expanding entities, driven by different physical mechanisms, although their model-based expansion timescales are quite similar. We derive good individual distances for 15 objects, and the main results are as follows: (i) distances derived from rim and shell agree well; (ii) comparison with the statistical distances in the literature gives reasonable agreement; (iii) our distances disagree with those derived by spectroscopic methods; (iv) central-star "plateau" luminosities range from about 2000 L⊙ to well below 10 000 L⊙, with a mean value at about 5000 L⊙, in excellent agreement with other samples of known distance (Galactic bulge, Magellanic Clouds, and K648 in the globular cluster M 15); (v) the central-star mass range is rather restricted: from about 0.53 to about 0.56 M⊙, with a mean value of 0.55 M⊙. Conclusions: The expansion measurements of nebular rim and shell edges confirm the predictions of radiation-hydrodynamics simulations and offer a reliable method for the evaluation of distances to suited objects. Results of this paper are based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope in Cycle 16 (GO11122

  9. 216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

  10. With respect to coefficient of linear thermal expansion, bacterial vegetative cells and spores resemble plastics and metals, respectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background If a fixed stress is applied to the three-dimensional z-axis of a solid material, followed by heating, the amount of thermal expansion increases according to a fixed coefficient of thermal expansion. When expansion is plotted against temperature, the transition temperature at which the physical properties of the material change is at the apex of the curve. The composition of a microbial cell depends on the species and condition of the cell; consequently, the rate of thermal expansion and the transition temperature also depend on the species and condition of the cell. We have developed a method for measuring the coefficient of thermal expansion and the transition temperature of cells using a nano thermal analysis system in order to study the physical nature of the cells. Results The tendency was seen that among vegetative cells, the Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have higher coefficients of linear expansion and lower transition temperatures than the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. On the other hand, spores, which have low water content, overall showed lower coefficients of linear expansion and higher transition temperatures than vegetative cells. Comparing these trends to non-microbial materials, vegetative cells showed phenomenon similar to plastics and spores showed behaviour similar to metals with regards to the coefficient of liner thermal expansion. Conclusions We show that vegetative cells occur phenomenon of similar to plastics and spores to metals with regard to the coefficient of liner thermal expansion. Cells may be characterized by the coefficient of linear expansion as a physical index; the coefficient of linear expansion may also characterize cells structurally since it relates to volumetric changes, surface area changes, the degree of expansion of water contained within the cell, and the intensity of the internal stress on the cellular membrane. The coefficient of linear expansion holds

  11. Thermal expansion behavior of fluor-chlorapatite crystalline solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, G.; Harlov, D.; Gottschalk, M.; Hudacek, W.; Wildermuth, S.

    2009-04-01

    Apatite Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH,CO3) occurs widely as an accessory mineral in many igneous and metamorphic rocks and in nature displays a wide range of F-Cl-OH-CO3 mixtures (e.g., O'Reilly and Griffin, 2000) that have been used to interpret the role of fluids, e.g. Cl, F, and OH activities, during metamorphic and igneous processes (e.g., Harlov and Förster, 2002). It is important, therefore, to understand the thermodynamic behavior of these solid solutions, including their thermal expansion properties. Fluorapatite - chlorapatite samples were synthesized at the GFZ-Potsdam (Hovis, Harlov, Hahn and Steigert, 2007) using an adaptation of the molten flux method of Cherniak (2000). Dry CaF2 and CaCl2 (0.1 mole total) were mixed with Ca3(PO4)2 (0.03 moles), placed in a Pt crucible, equilibrated for 15 hours at 1375 °C, cooled to 1220 °C at 3 °C/hour, removed from the oven and cooled in air. Crystals were separated from the flux by boiling the quenched product in water. F:Cl fractions for each sample were determined via Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data. Chemical homogeneity was confirmed by Rietveld refinement and high-contrast back-scattered electron imaging. Room-temperature unit-cell volumes were determined at the GFZ-Potsdam through Rietveld analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data and also at Lafayette College by standard unit-cell refinement techniques (Holland and Redfern, 1997) using NBS/NIST 640a Si as an internal standard. High-temperature unit-cell dimensions were calculated from X-ray powder diffraction data collected at Cambridge University from room temperature to 1000 °C on a Bruker D8 X-ray diffractometer. NBS Si again was utilized as an internal standard; high-temperature Si peak positions were taken from Parrish (1953). Results indicate that despite the considerable size difference between fluorine and chlorine ions, reflected by substantially different unit-cell sizes at room temperature, the coefficient of thermal expansion across

  12. Measurements on thermal expansion with strain gauge 2; Yugami geji wo mochiita gokuteion netsu bochoritsu no keisoku 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, O.; Numazawa, T.; Sato, A. [National Research Inst. of Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Okuda, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-05-29

    As the part of very low temperature thermophysical property measurement technique standardization by the intelligent basis promotion system, it examined very low temperature coefficient of linear expansion measurement method using the strain gauge. It produced the clip, which constituted the bridge circuit using strain sensor of 4 used by fatigue test of very low temperature, and it tried the measurement of convenient and quick coefficient of linear expansion from low temperature over high temperature. (NEDO)

  13. Explaining opinion polarisation with opinion copulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askitas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    An empirically founded and widely established driving force in opinion dynamics is homophily i.e. the tendency of "birds of a feather" to "flock together". The closer our opinions are the more likely it is that we will interact and converge. Models using these assumptions are called bounded confidence models (BCM) as they assume a tolerance threshold after which interaction is unlikely. They are known to produce one or more clusters, depending on the size of the bound, with more than one cluster being possible only in the deterministic case. Introducing noise, as is likely to happen in a stochastic world, causes BCM to produce consensus which leaves us with the open problem of explaining the emergence and sustainance of opinion clusters and polarisation. We investigate the role of heterogeneous priors in opinion formation, introduce the concept of opinion copulas, argue that it is well supported by findings in Social Psychology and use it to show that the stochastic BCM does indeed produce opinion clustering without the need for extra assumptions.

  14. Proposed Pathophysiologic Framework to Explain Some ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper proposes a pathophysiologic framework to explain the well-established epidemiological association between exposure to ambient air particle pollution and premature cardiovascular mortality, and offers insights into public health solutions that extend beyond regularory environmental protections to actions that can be taken by individuals, public health officials, healthcare professionals, city and regional planners, local and state governmental officials and all those who possess the capacity to improve cardiovascular health within the popula­tion.The foundation of the framework rests on the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors acting alone and in concert with long-term exposures to air pollutants to create a conditional susceptibility for clinical vascular events, such as myocardial ischemia and infarction; stroke and lethal ventricular arrhythmias. The conceprual framework focuses on the fact that short-term exposures to ambient air particulate matter (PM) are associated with vascular thrombosis (acute coronary syndrome. stroke, deep venous thrombosis. and pulmonary embolism ) and electrical dysfunction (ventricular arrhythmia); and that individuals having prevalent heart disease are at greatest risk. Moreover, exposure is concomitant with changes in autonomic nervous system balance, systemic in­flammation, and prothrombotic/anti-thrombotic and profibrinolytic-antifibrinolytic balance.Thus, a comprehensive solution to the problem o

  15. Explaining Global Secularity: Existential Security or Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude M. J. Braun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available At the time of data analysis for this report there were 193 countries in the world. Various institutions – the United Nations, the World Health Organization, the CIA, the World Values Survey, Gallup, and many others – have performed sophisticated statistical analyses on cross-national data. The present investigation demonstrates that valid and reliable data concerning religiosity and secularity exist for most countries and that these data are comparable. Cross-national data relating to social, political, economic and cultural aspects of life were tested for correlation with religiosity/secularity. In contrast to the most widely accepted general account of secularity, the Existential Security Framework (ESF; Norris & Inglehart, 2004, secularity was not most highly related to material security, though these were highly related. Rather, secularity was most strongly related to the degree of formal education attained. Material security explained no significant variance beyond education. Thus, religion’s primary function in the world today is being replaced, not so much by the pseudo-materialistic supplication for better living conditions as posited by the ESF, but by contemporary education – extensive knowledge of contemporary cultures, philosophy, modes of thought or processes of reasoning.

  16. THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF 1-BUTYL-3-METHYLIMIDAZOLIUM BIS(TRIFLUOROMETHYLSULFONYL)IMIDE AT HIGH TEMPERATURES AND PRESSURES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamidova, R; Kul, I; Safarov, J; Shahverdiyev, A; Hassel, E

    2015-01-01

    .... This equation is used for the calculation of the thermophysical properties of the ionic liquid, such as isothermal compressibility, isobaric thermal expansibility, thermal pressure coefficient, internal pressure, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, speed of sound and isentropic expansibility.

  17. Efforts toward expansion of the genetic alphabet: structure and replication of unnatural base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shigeo; Fillo, Jeremiah D; Henry, Allison A; Rai, Priyamrada; Wilkens, Steven J; Dwyer, Tammy J; Geierstanger, Bernhard H; Wemmer, David E; Schultz, Peter G; Spraggon, Glen; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2007-08-29

    Expansion of the genetic alphabet has been a long-time goal of chemical biology. A third DNA base pair that is stable and replicable would have a great number of practical applications and would also lay the foundation for a semisynthetic organism. We have reported that DNA base pairs formed between deoxyribonucleotides with large aromatic, predominantly hydrophobic nucleobase analogues, such as propynylisocarbostyril (dPICS), are stable and efficiently synthesized by DNA polymerases. However, once incorporated into the primer, these analogues inhibit continued primer elongation. More recently, we have found that DNA base pairs formed between nucleobase analogues that have minimal aromatic surface area in addition to little or no hydrogen-bonding potential, such as 3-fluorobenzene (d3FB), are synthesized and extended by DNA polymerases with greatly increased efficiency. Here we show that the rate of synthesis and extension of the self-pair formed between two d3FB analogues is sufficient for in vitro DNA replication. To better understand the origins of efficient replication, we examined the structure of DNA duplexes containing either the d3FB or dPICS self-pairs. We find that the large aromatic rings of dPICS pair in an intercalative manner within duplex DNA, while the d3FB nucleobases interact in an edge-on manner, much closer in structure to natural base pairs. We also synthesized duplexes containing the 5-methyl-substituted derivatives of d3FB (d5Me3FB) paired opposite d3FB or the unsubstituted analogue (dBEN). In all, the data suggest that the structure, electrostatics, and dynamics can all contribute to the extension of unnatural primer termini. The results also help explain the replication properties of many previously examined unnatural base pairs and should help design unnatural base pairs that are better replicated.

  18. A Laguerre expansion method for the field particle portion in the linearized Coulomb collision operator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Shin, E-mail: nishimura.shin@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    The spherical coordinates expressions of the Rosenbluth potentials are applied to the field particle portion in the linearized Coulomb collision operator. The Sonine (generalized Laguerre) polynomial expansion formulas for this operator allowing general field particles' velocity distributions are derived. An important application area of these formulas is the study of flows of thermalized particles in NBI-heated or burning plasmas since the energy space structure of the fast ions' slowing down velocity distribution cannot be expressed by usual orthogonal polynomial expansions, and since the Galilean invariant property and the momentum conservation of the collision must be distinguished there.

  19. Measurements on thermal expansion with strain gauge; yugami geji wo mochiita gokuteion netsubochoritsu no keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, T.; Sato, A. [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Arai, O.; Okuda, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    As the part of very low temperature thermophysical property measurement technique standardization by the intelligent basis promotion system, very low temperature coefficient of thermal expansion measurement method using the strain gauge was examined. Here, DyVO4 that that it has the unique temperature dependency as a sample for the test at 20K or less was expected was taken up. The strain gauge, which constituted bridge circuit using strain sensor of 4 used by fatigue test of very low temperature, was produced, and the measurement of coefficient of thermal expansion was tried. (NEDO)

  20. The origin of uniaxial negative thermal expansion in layered perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablitt, Chris; Craddock, Sarah; Senn, Mark S.; Mostofi, Arash A.; Bristowe, Nicholas C.

    2017-10-01

    Why is it that ABO3 perovskites generally do not exhibit negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide temperature range, whereas layered perovskites of the same chemical family often do? It is generally accepted that there are two key ingredients that determine the extent of NTE: the presence of soft phonon modes that drive contraction (have negative Grüneisen parameters); and anisotropic elastic compliance that predisposes the material to the deformations required for NTE along a specific axis. This difference in thermal expansion properties is surprising since both ABO3 and layered perovskites often possess these ingredients in equal measure in their high-symmetry phases. Using first principles calculations and symmetry analysis, we show that in layered perovskites there is a significant enhancement of elastic anisotropy due to symmetry breaking that results from the combined effect of layering and condensed rotations of oxygen octahedra. This feature, unique to layered perovskites of certain symmetry, is what allows uniaxial NTE to persist over a large temperature range. This fundamental insight means that symmetry and the elastic tensor can be used as descriptors in high-throughput screening and to direct materials design.

  1. Properties of extrudates from sorghum varieties | Byaruhanga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical-chemical properties of the extrudates including, lateral expansion, bulk density, hardness, water absorption index, water solubility index, as well as proximate composition were determined. The extrudates exhibited 240-300% lateral expansion and 0.067-0.095 g cm-3 bulk density. The water absorption index was ...

  2. Swelling of coal measure rocks. Effect of watre on mechanical properties of coal measure rocks (4th Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichinose, Masatomo; Uchino, Ken' ichi (Kyushu Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Fukuoka, Japan)

    1989-06-12

    Magnitude of free expansion and expansion pressure of rocks were measured for studying the effect of water absorption on their mechanical properties. Measurement of free expansion was conducted in three directions. Measurement of expansion pressure was conducted under complete suppression of expansion and under various load for extrapolation to obtain the pressure of complete suppression of expansion both values of which were compared. Apparatuses for both measurings were shown by figures. As the result of experiment, those were obtained that most of the samples showed sharp initial expansion and became slower with time, that two ways of measurement of expansion pressure gave almost similar results, that rocks with the larger expansion gave the larger decrease of mono-axial compression strength, that some rocks showed appreciable anisotropy of expansion which ment necessity of at least two directional measurement, and that correlation between magnitude of expansion and expansion pressure was not clearily recognized. 15 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Medicaid Expansion and Infant Mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Chintan B; Beck-Sagué, Consuelo M

    2018-01-18

    To explore the effect of Medicaid expansion on US infant mortality rate. We examined data from 2010 to 2016 and 2014 to 2016 to compare infant mortality rates in states and Washington, DC, that accepted the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion (Medicaid expansion states) and states that did not (non-Medicaid expansion states), stratifying data by race/ethnicity. Mean infant mortality rate in non-Medicaid expansion states rose (6.4 to 6.5) from 2014 to 2016 but declined in Medicaid expansion states (5.9 to 5.6). Mean difference in infant mortality rate in Medicaid expansion versus non-Medicaid expansion states increased from 0.573 (P = .08) in 2014 to 0.838 in 2016 (P = .006) because of smaller declines in non-Medicaid expansion (11.0%) than in Medicaid expansion (15.2%) states. The 14.5% infant mortality rate decline from 11.7 to 10.0 in African American infants in Medicaid expansion states was more than twice that in non-Medicaid expansion states (6.6%: 12.2 to 11.4; P = .012). Infant mortality rate decline was greater in Medicaid expansion states, with greater declines among African American infants. Future research should explore what aspects of Medicaid expansion may improve infant survival. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print January 18, 2018: e1-e3. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304218).

  4. The effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of C/SiC composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chunghao; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Steinbeck, John

    2013-08-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation to 3.5 and 9.5 dpa at 730 °C on a 2D plain woven carbon fiber reinforced polymer derived SiC matrix composite are presented. For both fluences, the irradiation caused in-plane contraction and trans-plane expansion. Irradiation also caused substantial reduction in composite flexural strength (-54%) and increase in flexural tangent modulus (+85%). The extents of dimensional/mechanical property changes were greater for the higher fluence irradiated samples. Those changes suggest the instability of the polymer derived SiC matrix following irradiation. The nature of the mechanical property changes suggest increased clamping stress between the fiber and the matrix. The composite property changes are explained in terms of irradiation effects on composite constituents and are compared with carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite as a reference material.

  5. Expansion of World Drylands Under Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S.; Fu, Q.; Hu, Q. S.

    2012-12-01

    The world drylands including both semi-arid and arid regions comprise of one-third of the global land surfaces, which support 14% of the world's inhabitants and a significant share of the world agriculture. Because of meager annual precipitation and large potential evaporative water loss, the ecosystems over drylands are fragile and sensitive to the global change. By analyzing the observations during 1948-2008 and 20 fully coupled climate model simulations from CMIP5 for the period 1900-2100, this study evaluated the changes of the world drylands that are defined with a modified form of the Thornthwaite's moisture index. The results based on observational data showed that the world drylands are steadily expanding during the past 60 years. The areas occupied by drylands in 1994-2008 is about 2.0×10^6km^2 (or 4%) larger than the average during the 1950s. Such an expansion is also a robust feature in the simulations of the 20 global climate models, though the rate is much smaller in the models. A stronger expanding rate is projected during the first half of this century than the simulations in the last century, followed by accelerating expansion after 2050s under the high greenhouse gas emission scenario (RCP8.5). By the end of this century, the world drylands are projected to be over 58×10^6km^2 (or 11% increase compared to the 1961-1990 climatology). The projected expansion of drylands, however, is not homogeneous over the world drylands, with major expansion of arid regions over the southwest North America, the northern fringe of Africa, southern Africa and Australia. Major expansions of semi-arid regions are projected over the north side of the Mediterranean, southern Africa, North and South America. The global warming is the main factor causing the increase of potential evapotranspiration estimated by Penman-Monteith algorithm, which in turn dominants the expansion of drylands. The widening of Hadley cell, which has impact on both temperature and precipitation

  6. Explaining clinical behaviors using multiple theoretical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eccles Martin P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of implementation research, there is an increased interest in use of theory when designing implementation research studies involving behavior change. In 2003, we initiated a series of five studies to establish a scientific rationale for interventions to translate research findings into clinical practice by exploring the performance of a number of different, commonly used, overlapping behavioral theories and models. We reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of the methods, the performance of the theories, and consider where these methods sit alongside the range of methods for studying healthcare professional behavior change. Methods These were five studies of the theory-based cognitions and clinical behaviors (taking dental radiographs, performing dental restorations, placing fissure sealants, managing upper respiratory tract infections without prescribing antibiotics, managing low back pain without ordering lumbar spine x-rays of random samples of primary care dentists and physicians. Measures were derived for the explanatory theoretical constructs in the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB, Social Cognitive Theory (SCT, and Illness Representations specified by the Common Sense Self Regulation Model (CSSRM. We constructed self-report measures of two constructs from Learning Theory (LT, a measure of Implementation Intentions (II, and the Precaution Adoption Process. We collected data on theory-based cognitions (explanatory measures and two interim outcome measures (stated behavioral intention and simulated behavior by postal questionnaire survey during the 12-month period to which objective measures of behavior (collected from routine administrative sources were related. Planned analyses explored the predictive value of theories in explaining variance in intention, behavioral simulation and behavior. Results Response rates across the five surveys ranged from 21% to 48%; we achieved the target sample size for three of

  7. Defining chemical expansion: the choice of units for the stoichiometric expansion coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marrocchelli, Dario; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Bishop, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical expansion refers to the spatial dilation of a material that occurs upon changes in its composition. When this dilation is caused by a gradual, iso-structural increase in the lattice parameter with composition, it is related to the composition change by the stoichiometric expansion coeffi...... are provided for changes in oxygen content in fluorite, perovskite, and Ruddlesden-Popper (K2NiF4) phase materials used in solid oxide fuel cells....

  8. Explaining G20 and BRICS Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Larionova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the internal and external factors influencing the compliance performance of the Group of 20 (G20 and the BRICS. The authors start with an overview of the G20 and BRICS compliance patterns using comparative data onthe number of commitments made by the two institutions, the level of institutional compliance, and distribution of commitments and compliance across issue areas. G20 compliance is traced since the leaders’ first 2008 summit in Washington. The BRICS compliance performance record includes data since the third stand alone summit in Sanya in 2011.The study then takes stock of compliance catalysts embedded in the summits’ discourse: priority placements, numerical targets, timelines, self-accountability pledges and mandates to implement and/or monitor implementation. The authors review trends in the use of catalysts in different years and issue areas and identify commonalities and differences.The analysis then turns to external causes of compliance and focuses on demand for collective actions and members’ collective power to respond and deliver on their pledges. Here the study explores whether the self-accountability mechanisms created by the institutions in response to the demand for effectiveness and legitimacy facilitate compliance.The article concludes by highlighting catalysts, causes of compliance and their combinations with the greatest power to encourage implementation, explaining trends in G20 and BRICS compliance performance. The data sets on G20 and BRICS differ in terms of scale. The G20 data set contains 1,511 commitments of which 114 have been monitored, and the BRICS data set contains 231 commitments of which 23 have been monitored.

  9. Characteristics explaining performance in downhill mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidley, Joel B; MacGregor, Alexandra L; Martin, Caoimhe; Arthur, Calum A; Macdonald, Jamie H

    2015-03-01

    To identify physiological, psychological, and skill characteristics that explain performance in downhill (DH) mountain-bike racing. Four studies were used to (1) identify factors potentially contributing to DH performance (using an expert focus group), (2) develop and validate a measure of rider skill (using video analysis and expert judge evaluation), (3) evaluate whether physiological, psychological, and skill variables contribute to performance at a DH competition, and (4) test the specific contribution of aerobic capacity to DH performance. STUDY 1 identified aerobic capacity, handgrip endurance, anaerobic power, rider skill, and self-confidence as potentially important for DH. In study 2 the rider-skill measure displayed good interrater reliability. Study 3 found that rider skill and handgrip endurance were significantly related to DH ride time (β=-0.76 and -0.14, respectively; R2=.73), with exploratory analyses suggesting that DH ride time may also be influenced by self-confidence and aerobic capacity. Study 4 confirmed aerobic capacity as an important variable influencing DH performance (for a DH ride, mean oxygen uptake was 49±5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), and 90% of the ride was completed above the 1st ventilatory threshold). In order of importance, rider skill, handgrip endurance, self-confidence, and aerobic capacity were identified as variables influencing DH performance. Practically, this study provides a novel assessment of rider skill that could be used by coaches to monitor training and identify talent. Novel intervention targets to enhance DH performance were also identified, including self-confidence and aerobic capacity.

  10. Osmosis and thermodynamics explained by solute blocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter Hugo

    2017-01-01

    A solute-blocking model is presented that provides a kinetic explanation of osmosis and ideal solution thermodynamics. It validates a diffusive model of osmosis that is distinct from the traditional convective flow model of osmosis. Osmotic equilibrium occurs when the fraction of water molecules in solution matches the fraction of pure water molecules that have enough energy to overcome the pressure difference. Solute-blocking also provides a kinetic explanation for why Raoult's law and the other colligative properties depend on the mole fraction (but not the size) of the solute particles, resulting in a novel kinetic explanation for the entropy of mixing and chemical potential of ideal solutions. Some of its novel predictions have been confirmed; others can be tested experimentally or by simulation.

  11. Osmosis and thermodynamics explained by solute blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter Hugo

    2016-01-01

    A solute-blocking model is presented that provides a kinetic explanation of osmosis and ideal solution thermodynamics. It validates a diffusive model of osmosis that is distinct from the traditional convective flow model of osmosis. Osmotic equilibrium occurs when the fraction of water molecules in solution matches the fraction of pure water molecules that have enough energy to overcome the pressure difference. Solute-blocking also provides a kinetic explanation for why Raoult’s law and the other colligative properties depend on the mole fraction (but not the size) of the solute particles, resulting in a novel kinetic explanation for the entropy of mixing and chemical potential of ideal solutions. Some of its novel predictions have been confirmed, others can be tested experimentally or by simulation. PMID:27225298

  12. Genetic alphabet expansion biotechnology by creating unnatural base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Hyun; Hamashima, Kiyofumi; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2017-10-16

    Recent studies have made it possible to expand the genetic alphabet of DNA, which is originally composed of the four-letter alphabet with A-T and G-C pairs, by introducing an unnatural base pair (UBP). Several types of UBPs function as a third base pair in replication, transcription, and/or translation. Through the UBP formation, new components with different physicochemical properties from those of the natural ones can be introduced into nucleic acids and proteins site-specifically, providing their increased functionalities. Here, we describe the genetic alphabet expansion technology by focusing on three types of UBPs, which were recently applied to the creations of DNA aptamers that bind to proteins and cells and semi-synthetic organisms containing DNAs with a six-letter alphabet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Mohagheghian, Erfan; Rasouli, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Due to the growing applications of silicon in nano-scale systems, a molecular dynamics approach is employed to investigate thermal properties of silicon. Since simulation results rely upon interatomic potentials, thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) and lattice constant of bulk silicon have been obtained using different potentials (SW, Tersoff, MEAM, and EDIP) and results indicate that SW has a better agreement with the experimental observations. To investigate effect of size on TEC of silicon nanowires, further simulations are performed using SW potential. To this end, silicon nanowires of different sizes are examined and their TEC is calculated by averaging in different directions ([100], [110], [111], and [112]) and various temperatures. Results show that as the size increases, due to the decrease of the surface effects, TEC approaches its bulk value.

  14. REGENERATIVE GAS TURBINES WITH DIVIDED EXPANSION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, Brian; Qvale, Einar Bjørn

    2004-01-01

    their efficiency are always of interest. Recently, two independent studies have proposed recuperated gas turbines to be configured with the turbine expansion divided, in order to obtain higher efficiency. The idea is to operate the system with a gas generator and a power turbine, and use the gas from the gas......Recuperated gas turbines are currently drawing an increased attention due to the recent commercialization of micro gas turbines with recuperation. This system may reach a high efficiency even for the small units of less than 100 kW. In order to improve the economics of the plants, ways to improve...... divided expansion can be advantageous under certain circumstances. But, in order for todays micro gas turbines to be competitive, the thermodynamic efficiencies will have to be rather high. This requires that all component efficiencies including the recuperator effectiveness will have to be high...

  15. Off-diagonal expansion quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Wagenbreth, Gene; Hen, Itay

    2017-12-01

    We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm designed to simulate quantum as well as classical systems at equilibrium, bridging the algorithmic gap between quantum and classical thermal simulation algorithms. The method is based on a decomposition of the quantum partition function that can be viewed as a series expansion about its classical part. We argue that the algorithm not only provides a theoretical advancement in the field of quantum Monte Carlo simulations, but is optimally suited to tackle quantum many-body systems that exhibit a range of behaviors from "fully quantum" to "fully classical," in contrast to many existing methods. We demonstrate the advantages, sometimes by orders of magnitude, of the technique by comparing it against existing state-of-the-art schemes such as path integral quantum Monte Carlo and stochastic series expansion. We also illustrate how our method allows for the unification of quantum and classical thermal parallel tempering techniques into a single algorithm and discuss its practical significance.

  16. Locally-smeared operator product expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostantinos

    2014-12-01

    We propose a "locally-smeared Operator Product Expansion" (sOPE) to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of locally-smeared operators. The sOPE formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements of smeared degrees of freedom, determined numerically using the gradient flow, to non-local operators in the continuum. The nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale prevents a simple connection to the standard operator product expansion and therefore requires the construction of a two-scale formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using the example of real scalar field theory.

  17. Morse basis expansion applied to diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Emanuel F. de, E-mail: eflima@rc.unesp.br [Departamento de Estatística, Matemática Aplicada e Computação, Instituto de Geociências e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista – UNESP, Rio Claro, São Paulo 13506-900 (Brazil)

    2012-02-20

    This work explores the use of the eigenfunctions of the Morse potential with a infinite barrier at long range to solve the radial Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Analytical formulas are obtained for the kinetic energy operator matrix elements in the Morse basis. The Morse basis expansion is applied to find the vibrational–rotational levels of the sodium molecule in the electronic ground state. -- Highlights: ► The Morse potential basis is invoked to find the rovibrational levels of diatomic molecules. ► Analytical formulas for the kinetic energy operator in the Morse basis are obtained. ► The results of the Morse basis expansion show good agreement with the Fourier Grid technique.

  18. Off-diagonal expansion quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Wagenbreth, Gene; Hen, Itay

    2017-12-01

    We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm designed to simulate quantum as well as classical systems at equilibrium, bridging the algorithmic gap between quantum and classical thermal simulation algorithms. The method is based on a decomposition of the quantum partition function that can be viewed as a series expansion about its classical part. We argue that the algorithm not only provides a theoretical advancement in the field of quantum Monte Carlo simulations, but is optimally suited to tackle quantum many-body systems that exhibit a range of behaviors from "fully quantum" to "fully classical," in contrast to many existing methods. We demonstrate the advantages, sometimes by orders of magnitude, of the technique by comparing it against existing state-of-the-art schemes such as path integral quantum Monte Carlo and stochastic series expansion. We also illustrate how our method allows for the unification of quantum and classical thermal parallel tempering techniques into a single algorithm and discuss its practical significance.

  19. Asymptotic expansions for the Gaussian unitary ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Uffe; Thorbjørnsen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Let g : R ¿ C be a C8-function with all derivatives bounded and let trn denote the normalized trace on the n × n matrices. In Ref. 3 Ercolani and McLaughlin established asymptotic expansions of the mean value ¿{trn(g(Xn))} for a rather general class of random matrices Xn, including the Gaussian...... aj(g), j ¿ N, as distributions (in the sense of L. Schwarts). We derive a similar asymptotic expansion for the covariance Cov{Trn[f(Xn)], Trn[g(Xn)]}, where f is a function of the same kind as g, and Trn = n trn. Special focus is drawn to the case where and for ¿, µ in C\\R. In this case the mean...

  20. Frostless heat pump having thermal expansion valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang C [Knoxville, TN; Mei, Viung C [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-10-22

    A heat pump system having an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant and further having a compressor, an interior heat exchanger, an exterior heat exchanger, a heat pump reversing valve, an accumulator, a thermal expansion valve having a remote sensing bulb disposed in heat transferable contact with the refrigerant piping section between said accumulator and said reversing valve, an outdoor temperature sensor, and a first means for heating said remote sensing bulb in response to said outdoor temperature sensor thereby opening said thermal expansion valve to raise suction pressure in order to mitigate defrosting of said exterior heat exchanger wherein said heat pump continues to operate in a heating mode.

  1. Bond return predictability in expansions and recessions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Møller, Stig Vinther; Jensen, Magnus David Sander

    We document that over the period 1953-2011 US bond returns are predictable in expansionary periods but unpredictable during recessions. This result holds in both in-sample and out-of-sample analyses and using both univariate regressions and combination forecasting techniques. A simulation study...... but negative in recessions. The results are also consistent with tests showing that the expectations hypothesis of the term structure holds in recessions but not in expansions. However, the results for bonds are in sharp contrast to results for stocks showing that stock returns are predictable in recessions...... but not in expansions. Thus, our results indicate that there is not a common predictive pattern of stock and bond returns associated with the state of the economy....

  2. Two Decades of Negative Thermal Expansion Research: Where Do We Stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora Lind

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Negative thermal expansion (NTE materials have become a rapidly growing area of research over the past two decades. The initial discovery of materials displaying NTE over a large temperature range, combined with elucidation of the mechanism behind this unusual property, was followed by predictions that these materials will find use in various applications through controlled thermal expansion composites. While some patents have been filed and devices built, a number of obstacles have prevented the widespread implementation of NTE materials to date. This paper reviews NTE materials that contract due to transverse atomic vibrations, their potential for use in controlled thermal expansion composites, and known problems that could interfere with such applications.

  3. Fractional Edgeworth expansion: Corrections to the Gaussian-Lévy central-limit theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazut, Netanel; Medalion, Shlomi; Kessler, David A.; Barkai, Eli

    2015-05-01

    In this article we generalize the classical Edgeworth expansion for the probability density function (PDF) of sums of a finite number of symmetric independent identically distributed random variables with a finite variance to PDFs with a diverging variance, which converge to a Lévy α -stable density function. Our correction may be written by means of a series of fractional derivatives of the Lévy and the conjugate Lévy PDFs. This series expansion is general and applies also to the Gaussian regime. To describe the terms in the series expansion, we introduce a new family of special functions and briefly discuss their properties. We implement our generalization to the distribution of the momentum for atoms undergoing Sisyphus cooling, and show the improvement of our leading order approximation compared to previous approximations. In vicinity of the transition between Lévy and Gauss behaviors, convergence to asymptotic results slows down.

  4. Soft Expansion of Double-Real-Virtual Corrections to Higgs Production at N$^3$LO

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    We present methods to compute higher orders in the threshold expansion for the one-loop production of a Higgs boson in association with two partons at hadron colliders. This process contributes to the N$^3$LO Higgs production cross section beyond the soft-virtual approximation. We use reverse unitarity to expand the phase-space integrals in the small kinematic parameters and to reduce the coefficients of the expansion to a small set of master integrals. We describe two methods for the calculation of the master integrals. The first was introduced for the calculation of the soft triple-real radiation relevant to N$^3$LO Higgs production. The second uses a particular factorization of the three body phase-space measure and the knowledge of the scaling properties of the integral itself. Our result is presented as a Laurent expansion in the dimensional regulator, although some of the master integrals are computed to all orders in this parameter.

  5. Thermal Expansion of Fluorapatite-Chlorapatite Solid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Guy; Abraham, Tony; Hudacek, William; Wildermuth, Sarah; Scott, Brian; Altomare, Caitlin; Medford, Aaron; Conlon, Maricate; Morris, Matthew; Leaman, Amanda; Almer, Christine; Tomaino, Gary; Harlov, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments have been performed on fifteen fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solutions synthesized and chemically characterized at the GeoForschungsZentrum - Potsdam (Hovis and Harlov, 2010; Schettler, Gottschalk, and Harlov, 2011), as well as two natural near-end-member samples, from room temperature to ~900 °C at 50 to 75 °C intervals. NIST 640a Si was employed as an internal standard; data from Parrish (1953) were used to determine Si peak positions at elevated temperatures. Unit-cell parameters calculated using the software of Holland and Redfern (1997) result in volume-temperature (V-T) plots that are linear or slightly concave up (V plotted as the vertical axis) over the T range investigated. Relations for the "a" and "c" unit-cell dimensions with T for these hexagonal minerals are nearly linear, but as with V, commonly improved by quadratic fits to the data. Coefficients of thermal expansion for volume (αV ), calculated as (1/V0°C) x (ΔV/ΔT) based on linear V-T relationships, mostly fall within the range 42 ± 2 x 10-6 deg-1 and show no obvious dependence on composition. Thermal expansion coefficients for individual unit-cell axes, however, do show clear relationships to composition, αa increasing from ~9.5 to ~13.5 x 10-6 deg-1 and αc decreasing from ~19.5 to ~13 x 10-6 deg-1 from the Cl to the F end member. Clearly, a compensating structural relationship accounts for the observed relationships. Such compositional dependence was not seen in the thermal expansion data for F-OH apatite solid solutions (Hovis, Scott, Altomare, Leaman, Morris, and Tomaino, American Mineralogist, in press). This difference can be explained by the similar sizes of F- and (OH)- versus the much greater size contrast between F- and Cl-. Sincere thanks to the National Science Foundation for support of this work, which has provided numerous research experiences for Lafayette College undergraduates. Thanks also to the Earth Sciences Department, University

  6. Accelerated Urban Expansion in Lhasa City and the Implications for Sustainable Development in a Plateau City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization challenges regional sustainable development, but a slight expansion mechanism was revealed in a plateau city. We have integrated the urban expansion process and analyzed its determinants in Lhasa (Tibet, and we provide insightful suggestions for urban management and planning for Lhasa. The full continuum of the urban expansion process has been captured using time-series of high-resolution remote sensing data (1990–2015. Four categories of potential determinants involved in economic, demographic, social, and government policy factors were selected, and redundancy analysis was employed to define the contribution rates of these determinants. The results illustrate that considerable urban expansion occurred from 1990 to 2015 in Lhasa, with the area of construction land and transportation land increasing at rates of 117.2% and 564.7%, respectively. The urban expansion in the center of Lhasa can be characterized as temperate sprawl from 1990 through 2008, primarily explained by governmental policies and investment, economic development, tourist growth, and increased governmental investment resulting in faster urban expansion from 2008 to 2015, mainly occurring in the east, south, and west of Lhasa. In contrast with other cities of China, central government investment and “pairing-up support” projects have played an important role in infrastructure construction in Lhasa. The miraculous development of the tourism industry had prominent effects on this economic development and urbanization after 2006, due to the running of the Tibetan Railway. An integrative and proactive policy framework, the “Lhasa development model”, having important theoretical, methodological, and management implications for urban planning and development, has been proposed.

  7. Cellular Responses to Auxin: Division versus Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a major regulator of plant growth and development. Many aspects of these processes depend on the multiple controls exerted by auxin on cell division and cell expansion. The detailed mechanisms by which auxin controls these essential cellular responses are still poorly understood, despite recent progress in the identification of auxin receptors and components of auxin signaling pathways. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the present knowledge of ...

  8. Multipole expansion in the quantum hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, Andrea [INFN, Sezione di Firenze,Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Randellini, Enrico [INFN, Sezione di Firenze,Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenze,Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The effective action for low-energy excitations of Laughlin’s states is obtained by systematic expansion in inverse powers of the magnetic field. It is based on the W-infinity symmetry of quantum incompressible fluids and the associated higher-spin fields. Besides reproducing the Wen and Wen-Zee actions and the Hall viscosity, this approach further indicates that the low-energy excitations are extended objects with dipolar and multipolar moments.

  9. Modeling factors explaining physicians’ satisfaction with competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepnurm, Rein; Dobson, Roy Thomas; Peña-Sánchez, Juan-Nicolás; Nesdole, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Recognition explained 60.2% of the variation in Satisfaction with Competence, controlling for years in practice, self-reported health and duties of physicians. Conclusion: Satisfaction with Competence could be affected by excessive accumulation of duties, concerns about quality, efficiency, access, excessive distress, inadequate coping abilities, personal satisfaction with life as a physician, challenges in managing practices and persistent inequities among physicians. PMID:27092256

  10. Modeling factors explaining physicians' satisfaction with competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepnurm, Rein; Dobson, Roy Thomas; Peña-Sánchez, Juan-Nicolás; Nesdole, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Attention to physician wellness has increased as medical practice gains in complexity. Physician satisfaction with practice is critical for quality of care and practice growth. The purpose of this study was to model physicians' self-reported Satisfaction with Competence as a function of their perceptions of the Quality of Health Services, Distress, Coping, Practice Management, Personal Satisfaction and Professional Equity. Comprehensive questionnaires were sent to a stratified sample of 5300 physicians across Canada. This cross-sectional study focused on physicians who examined and treated individual patients for a final study population of 2639 physicians. Response bias was negligible. The questionnaires contained measures of Satisfaction with Competence, Quality of Health Services, Distress, Coping, Personal Satisfaction, Practice Management and Professional Equity. Exploring relationships was done using Pearson correlations and one-way analysis of variance. Modeling was by hierarchical regressions. The measures were reliable: Satisfaction with Competence (α = .86), Quality (α = .86), Access (α = .82), Distress (α = .82), Coping (α = .76), Personal Satisfaction (α = .78), Practice Management (α = .89) and the dimensions of Professional Equity (Fulfillment, α = .81; Financial, α = .93; and Recognition, α = .75) with comparative validity. Satisfaction with Competence was positively correlated with Quality (r = .32), Efficiency (r = .37) and Access (r = .32); negatively correlated with Distress (r = -.54); and positively correlated with Coping strategies (r = .43), Personal Satisfaction (r = .57), Practice Management (r = .17), Fulfillment (r = .53), Financial (r = .36) and Recognition (r = .54). Physicians' perceptions on Quality, Efficiency, Access, Distress, Coping, Personal Satisfaction, Practice Management, Fulfillment, Pay and Recognition explained 60.2% of the variation

  11. Spatial Linkage and Urban Expansion: AN Urban Agglomeration View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, L. M.; Tang, X.; Liu, X. P.

    2017-09-01

    Urban expansion displays different characteristics in each period. From the perspective of the urban agglomeration, studying the spatial and temporal characteristics of urban expansion plays an important role in understanding the complex relationship between urban expansion and network structure of urban agglomeration. We analyze urban expansion in the Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration (YRD) through accessibility to and spatial interaction intensity from core cities as well as accessibility of road network. Results show that: (1) Correlation between urban expansion intensity and spatial indicators such as location and space syntax variables is remarkable and positive, while it decreases after rapid expansion. (2) Urban expansion velocity displays a positive correlation with spatial indicators mentioned above in the first (1980-1990) and second (1990-2000) period. However, it exhibits a negative relationship in the third period (2000-2010), i.e., cities located in the periphery of urban agglomeration developing more quickly. Consequently, the hypothesis of convergence of urban expansion in rapid expansion stage is put forward. (3) Results of Zipf's law and Gibrat's law show urban expansion in YRD displays a convergent trend in rapid expansion stage, small and medium-sized cities growing faster. This study shows that spatial linkage plays an important but evolving role in urban expansion within the urban agglomeration. In addition, it serves as a reference to the planning of Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration and regulation of urban expansion of other urban agglomerations.

  12. SPATIAL LINKAGE AND URBAN EXPANSION: AN URBAN AGGLOMERATION VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Jiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban expansion displays different characteristics in each period. From the perspective of the urban agglomeration, studying the spatial and temporal characteristics of urban expansion plays an important role in understanding the complex relationship between urban expansion and network structure of urban agglomeration. We analyze urban expansion in the Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration (YRD through accessibility to and spatial interaction intensity from core cities as well as accessibility of road network. Results show that: (1 Correlation between urban expansion intensity and spatial indicators such as location and space syntax variables is remarkable and positive, while it decreases after rapid expansion. (2 Urban expansion velocity displays a positive correlation with spatial indicators mentioned above in the first (1980–1990 and second (1990–2000 period. However, it exhibits a negative relationship in the third period (2000–2010, i.e., cities located in the periphery of urban agglomeration developing more quickly. Consequently, the hypothesis of convergence of urban expansion in rapid expansion stage is put forward. (3 Results of Zipf’s law and Gibrat's law show urban expansion in YRD displays a convergent trend in rapid expansion stage, small and medium-sized cities growing faster. This study shows that spatial linkage plays an important but evolving role in urban expansion within the urban agglomeration. In addition, it serves as a reference to the planning of Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration and regulation of urban expansion of other urban agglomerations.

  13. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  14. Precision Quantum Chromodynamics From Heavy Quark Expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, D G

    2005-01-01

    The heavy quark expansion is applied to the semileptonic width of b → c and b → u transitions along with the moments of various decay distributions in the semileptonic b → c transitions. The resulting expressions can be used to improve the precision with which we can extract the values of the CKM matrix elements Vcb and Vub from the data. Heavy quark parameters like mb and m2p are also obtained with values that are completely consistent with theoretical expectations. The observed agreement between the theoretical predictions of the heavy quark expansion and the experimental data tightly constrain the theoretical uncertainty. The heavy quark expansion can also be applied to the photon energy moments in B → Xsγ. The first two of these moments are directly related to mb and m2p . The experimentally imposed cuts on the photon energy spectrum introduce biases into the extracted values of these parameters. Correcting for these biases generates a remarkable agreem...

  15. Effect of MgO Additive on Volumetric Expansion of Self-Degradable Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Warren, J.; Butcher, T.

    2011-09-30

    We identified hard-burned magnesium oxide (MgO) as a suitable expansive additive for improving the plugging performance of self-degradable, temporary sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash (SSASC) blend cement sealers into rock fractures in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGSs). MgO extended the volumetric expansion of sealers during their exposure to a hydrothermal environment at 200 C under pressures, ranging from 300 to 1500 psi. A great expansion ratc of 19.3% was observed by adding 3.0 wt% MgO under 300 psi pressure, thus promising to plug thoroughly inner fracture. When the pressure was increased from 300 psi to 1500 psi, the expansion rate of cement markedly reduced, corresponding to the formaLion of crack-free specimens and the improvement of compressive strength. However, with 3.0 wt% MgO, the specimens still engendered the generation of numerous visual cracks, although they were prepared under a high pressure of 1500 psi. The effective content of MgO in minimizing and eliminating the generation of cracks was 2.0 wt%, which provided a moderate expansion of {ge} 0.5%. The compressive strength of 2.0 wt% MgO specimens made under a pressure of 300 psi rose {approx} 1.7-fold to 4816 psi with an increasing pressure to 1500 psi. The in-situ growth of brucite crystal formed by the hydrothermal hydration of MgO was responsive for such an expansion of the SSASC cement; meanwhile. two crystalline hydrothermal reaction products, 1.1 nm tobermorite and calcium silicate hydrated, contributed to the development of the sealer's compressive strength. Thus, the increasing pressure seems to suppress and control a growth rate of brucite crystal in response to a lower extension of expansion. Furthermore, all MgO-conlaining SSASC sealers possessed the water-catalyzed self-degradable properties.

  16. Pressure-dependence of the phase transitions and thermal expansion in zirconium and hafnium pyrovanadate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallington, Leighanne C.; Hester, Brett R.; Kaplan, Benjamin S.; Wilkinson, Angus P. (GIT)

    2017-05-01

    Low or negative thermal expansion (NTE) has been previously observed in members of the ZrP2O7 family at temperatures higher than their order-disorder phase transitions. The thermoelastic properties and phase behavior of the low temperature superstructure and high temperature negative thermal expansion phases of ZrV2O7 and HfV2O7 were explored via in situ variable temperature/pressure powder x-ray diffraction measurements. The phase transition temperatures of ZrV2O7 and HfV2O7 exhibited a very strong dependence on pressure (~700 K GPa), with moderate compression suppressing the formation of their NTE phases below 513 K. Compression also reduced the magnitude of the coefficients of thermal expansion in both the positive and negative thermal expansion phases. Additionally, the high temperature NTE phase of ZrV2O7 was found to be twice as stiff as the low temperature positive thermal expansion superstructure (24 and 12 GPa respectively).

  17. Lessons from Early Medicaid Expansions Under Health Reform..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Lessons from Early Medicaid Expansions Under Health Reform, Interviews with Medicaid Officials In a new study entitled Lessons from Early Medicaid Expansions Under...

  18. NiTi Expansion in Operated Unilateral Cleft Palate Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Y Poornima

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : NiTi expansion in operated cleft patients, showed mainly orthodontic expansion. The significant change in the maxillary inter- molar region is due to the direct placement of NiTi palatal expander to 16, 26.

  19. A theory with consolidation: Linking everything to explain everything

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biraris, Gaurav Shantaram

    The paper reports a theory which gives explicit (ontic) understanding of the abstract (epistemic) mechanisms spanning many branches of physics. It results to most modern physics starting from Newtonian physics by abandoning progress in twentieth century. The theory assumes consolidation of points in 4-balls of specific radius in the universe. Thus the 4-balls are fundamental elements of the universe. Analogue of momentum defined as soul vector is assumed to be induced on the 4-balls at the beginning of the universe. Then with progression of local time, collisions happen leading to different rotations of CNs. For such rotations, the consolidation provides centripetal binding. By using general terminologies of force and work, the mass energy mechanism gets revealed. The theory provides explicit interpretation of intrinsic properties of mass, electric charge, color charge, weak charge, spin etc. It also provides explicit understanding of the wave-particle duality & quantum mechanics. Epistemic study of the universe with the consolidation results to conventional quantum theories. Elementary mechanism of the field interactions is evident due to conservation of the soul vectors, and its epistemic expectation results to the gauge theories. The theory predicts that four types of interaction would exist in the universe along with the acceptable relative strengths; it provides fundamental interpretation of the physical forces. Further, it explains the basic mechanisms which can be identified with dark energy & dark matter. It also results to (or explains) entanglement, chirality, excess of matter, 4-component spinor, real-abstract (ontic-epistemic) correspondence etc. The theory is beyond standard model and results to the standard model, relativity, dark energy & dark matter, starting by simple assumptions.

  20. A theory with consolidation: Linking everything to explain everything

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Shantaram Biraris

    Full Text Available The paper reports a theory which gives explicit (ontic understanding of the abstract (epistemic mechanisms spanning many branches of physics. It results to most modern physics starting from Newtonian physics by abandoning progress in twentieth century. The theory assumes consolidation of points in 4-balls of specific radius in the universe. Thus the 4-balls are fundamental elements of the universe. Analogue of momentum defined as soul vector is assumed to be induced on the 4-balls at the beginning of the universe. Then with progression of local time, collisions happen leading to different rotations of CNs. For such rotations, the consolidation provides centripetal binding. By using general terminologies of force and work, the mass energy mechanism gets revealed. The theory provides explicit interpretation of intrinsic properties of mass, electric charge, color charge, weak charge, spin etc. It also provides explicit understanding of the wave-particle duality & quantum mechanics. Epistemic study of the universe with the consolidation results to conventional quantum theories. Elementary mechanism of the field interactions is evident due to conservation of the soul vectors, and its epistemic expectation results to the gauge theories. The theory predicts that four types of interaction would exist in the universe along with the acceptable relative strengths; it provides fundamental interpretation of the physical forces. Further, it explains the basic mechanisms which can be identified with dark energy & dark matter. It also results to (or explains entanglement, chirality, excess of matter, 4-component spinor, real-abstract (ontic-epistemic correspondence etc. The theory is beyond standard model and results to the standard model, relativity, dark energy & dark matter, starting by simple assumptions. Keywords: Beyond standard model, Phenomenology, Relativity, Dark matter, Realist theory

  1. Following Surgically Assisted Rapid Palatal Expansion, Do Tooth-Borne or Bone-Borne Appliances Provide More Skeletal Expansion and Dental Expansion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi-Sangsari, Adrien; Chinipardaz, Zahra; Carrasco, Lee

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare outcome measurements of skeletal and dental expansion with bone-borne (BB) versus tooth-borne (TB) appliances after surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion (SARPE). This study was performed to provide quantitative measurements that will help the oral surgeon and orthodontist in selecting the appliance with, on average, the greatest amount of skeletal expansion and the least amount of dental expansion. A computerized database search was performed using PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar on publications in reputable oral surgery and orthodontic journals. A systematic review and meta-analysis was completed with the predictor variable of expansion appliance (TB vs BB) and outcome measurement of expansion (in millimeters). Of 487 articles retrieved from the 6 databases, 5 articles were included, 4 with cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) data and 1 with non-CBCT 3-dimensional cast data. There was a significant difference in skeletal expansion (standardized mean difference [SMD], 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.30; P < .001) in favor of BB rather than TB appliances. However, there was no significant difference in dental expansion (SMD, 0.05; 95% CI, -0.24 to 0.34; P = .03). According to the literature, to achieve more effective skeletal expansion and minimize dental expansion after SARPE, a BB appliance should be favored. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection automatique de bulles HI en expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Anik

    Plusieurs cavités en expansion observées dans le gaz d'hydrogène neutre galactique ont été associées à la présence d'étoiles massives présentant d'intenses vents stellaires ou à des explosions de supernovae. Ces bulles, qui sont remplies de gaz très chaud ( T = 10 5 -10 7 K), tracent donc à la fois les étoiles massives et la phase chaude et ionisée du gaz interstellaire. La morphologie de ces bulles est instable et généralement perturbée par la multitude de structures et de phénomènes existant dans le milieu interstellaire. Leur détection par inspection visuelle est donc difficile et subjective. L'objet de cette thèse est le développement d'une technique de détection automatique et objective de bulles en expansion dans le gaz d'hydrogène neutre de la Voie lactée. Les bulles à progéniteurs stellaires présentent toutes des vitesses d'expansion comprises entre 6 et 19 km s -1 . Une telle caractéristique peut généralement être reconnue dans les spectres en vitesse des cubes de données à 21 cm de l'hydrogène neutre. Notre technique de détection a donc été fondée sur la reconnaissance automatique de la signature d'une expansion à [6, 19] km s -1 dans les spectres en vitesse. La caractérisation et la généralisation de la signature dynamique propre à une bulle en expansion a été confiée à des réseaux de neurones artificiels. Des validations subséquentes, dont certaines liées à la morphologie, ont ensuite été appliquées. La technique a été testée sur onze bulles connues, dont dix ont pu être détectées. La technique a aussi été employée pour la réalisation d'un relevé dans la région du bras de Persée. La distribution spatiale des objets détectés s'est révélée suivre la distribution des étoiles du disque de la Voie lactée. De plus, la distribution selon le rayon et selon la vitesse d'expansion des bulles détectées de rayons plus petits que 10 pc correspondent aux distributions dérivées du mod

  3. Polyclonal Expansion of NKG2C+ NK Cells in TAP-Deficient Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béziat, Vivien; Sleiman, Marwan; Goodridge, Jodie P.; Kaarbø, Mari; Liu, Lisa L.; Rollag, Halvor; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Zimmer, Jacques; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive natural killer (NK) cell responses to human cytomegalovirus infection are characterized by the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Here, we set out to study the HLA class I dependency of such NKG2C+ NK cell expansions. We demonstrate the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells in patients with transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) deficiency, who express less than 10% of normal HLA class I levels. In contrast to normal individuals, expanded NKG2C+ NK cell populations in TAP-deficient patients display a polyclonal KIR profile and remain hyporesponsive to HLA class I-negative target cells. Nonetheless, agonistic stimulation of NKG2C on NK cells from TAP-deficient patients yielded significant responses in terms of degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, while interactions with self-HLA class I molecules likely shape the KIR repertoire of expanding NKG2C+ NK cells during adaptive NK cell responses in normal individuals, they are not a prerequisite for NKG2C+ NK cell expansions to occur. The emergence of NKG2C-responsive adaptive NK cells in TAP-deficient patients may contribute to antiviral immunity and potentially explain these patients’ low incidence of severe viral infections. PMID:26500647

  4. Polyclonal Expansion of NKG2C+ NK Cells in TAP-deficient Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vivien eBeziat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive natural killer (NK cell responses to human cytomegalovirus (CMV infection are characterized by the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs. Here, we set out to study the HLA class I-dependency of such NKG2C+ NK cell expansions. We demonstrate expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells in patients with transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP-deficiency, whom express less than 10% of normal HLA class I levels. In contrast to normal individuals, expanded NKG2C+ NK cell populations in TAP-deficient patients display a polyclonal KIR-profile and remain hyporesponsive to HLA class I-negative target cells. Nonetheless, agonistic stimulation of NKG2C on NK cells from TAP-deficient patients yielded significant responses in terms of degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, while interactions with self-HLA class I molecules likely shape the KIR-repertoire of expanding NKG2C+ NK cells during adaptive NK cell responses in normal individuals, they are not a prerequisite for NKG2C+ NK cell expansions to occur. Thus, the emergence of NKG2C-responsive adaptive NK cells in TAP-deficient patients may contribute to anti-viral immunity and potentially explain these patients’ low incidence of severe viral infections.

  5. Business Associations, Conservative Networks, and the Ongoing Republican War over Medicaid Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel-Fernandez, Alexander; Skocpol, Theda; Lynch, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A major component of the Affordable Care Act involves the expansion of state Medicaid programs to cover the uninsured poor. In the wake of the 2012 Supreme Court decision upholding and modifying reform legislation, states can decide whether to expand Medicaid-and twenty states are still not proceeding as of August 2015. What explains state choices about participation in expansion, including governors' decisions to endorse expansion or not as well as final state decisions? We tackle this puzzle, focusing closely on outcomes and battles in predominantly Republican-led states. Like earlier scholars, we find that partisan differences between Democrats and Republicans are central, but we go beyond earlier analyses to measure added effects from two dueling factions within the Republican coalition: statewide business associations and cross-state networks of ideologically conservative organizations. Using both statistical modeling and case studies, we show that GOP-leaning or GOP-dominated states have been most likely to embrace the expansion when organized business support outweighs pressures from conservative networks. Our findings help make sense of ongoing state-level debates over a core part of health reform and shed new light on mounting policy tensions within the Republican Party. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  6. Range expansion of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in Kenya: evidence of genetic admixture and human-mediated dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aaron W; Liebl, Andrea L; Richards, Christina L; Martin, Lynn B

    2014-01-01

    Introduced species offer an opportunity to study the ecological process of range expansions. Recently, 3 mechanisms have been identified that may resolve the genetic paradox (the seemingly unlikely success of introduced species given the expected reduction in genetic diversity through bottlenecks or founder effects): multiple introductions, high propagule pressure, and epigenetics. These mechanisms are probably also important in range expansions (either natural or anthropogenic), yet this possibility remains untested in vertebrates. We used microsatellite variation (7 loci) in house sparrows (Passer domesticus), an introduced species that has been spreading across Kenya for ~60 years, to determine if patterns of variation could explain how this human commensal overcame the genetic paradox and expresses such considerable phenotypic differentiation across this new range. We note that in some cases, polygenic traits and epistasis among genes, for example, may not have negative effects on populations. House sparrows arrived in Kenya by a single introduction event (to Mombasa, ~1950) and have lower genetic diversity than native European and introduced North American populations. We used Bayesian clustering of individuals (n = 233) to detect that at least 2 types of range expansion occurred in Kenya: one with genetic admixture and one with little to no admixture. We also found that genetic diversity increased toward a range edge, and the range expansion was consistent with long-distance dispersal. Based on these data, we expect that the Kenyan range expansion was anthropogenically influenced, as the expansions of other introduced human commensals may also be.

  7. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  8. Rapid replacement of bridge deck expansion joints study - phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Bridge deck expansion joints are used to allow for movement of the bridge deck due to thermal expansion, dynamics loading, and : other factors. More recently, expansion joints have also been utilized to prevent the passage of winter de-icing chemical...

  9. 46 CFR 61.15-12 - Nonmetallic expansion joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nonmetallic expansion joints. 61.15-12 Section 61.15-12... INSPECTIONS Periodic Tests of Piping Systems § 61.15-12 Nonmetallic expansion joints. (a) Nonmetallic expansion joints must be examined externally at each inspection for certification and periodic inspection...

  10. 14 CFR 23.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank expansion space. 23.969 Section 23.969 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT....969 Fuel tank expansion space. Each fuel tank must have an expansion space of not less than two...

  11. A Low-Complexity KL Expansion-Based Channel Estimator for OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenol Habib

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper first proposes a computationally efficient, pilot-aided linear minimum mean square error (MMSE batch channel estimation algorithm for OFDM systems in unknown wireless fading channels. The proposed approach employs a convenient representation of the discrete multipath fading channel based on the Karhunen-Loeve (KL orthogonal expansion and finds MMSE estimates of the uncorrelated KL series expansion coefficients. Based on such an expansion, no matrix inversion is required in the proposed MMSE estimator. Moreover, optimal rank reduction is achieved by exploiting the optimal truncation property of the KL expansion resulting in a smaller computational load on the estimation algorithm. The performance of the proposed approach is studied through analytical and experimental results. We then consider the stochastic Cramér-Rao bound and derive the closed-form expression for the random KL coefficients and consequently exploit the performance of the MMSE channel estimator based on the evaluation of minimum Bayesian MSE. We also analyze the effect of a modelling mismatch on the estimator performance. To further reduce the complexity, we extend the batch linear MMSE to the sequential linear MMSE estimator. With the fast convergence property and the simple structure, the sequential linear MMSE estimator provides an attractive alternative to the implementation of channel estimator.

  12. Surveillance for microbes and range expansion in house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lynn B; Coon, Courtney A C; Liebl, Andrea L; Schrey, Aaron W

    2014-01-07

    Interactions between hosts and parasites influence the success of host introductions and range expansions post-introduction. However, the physiological mechanisms mediating these outcomes are little known. In some vertebrates, variation in the regulation of inflammation has been implicated, perhaps because inflammation imparts excessive costs, including high resource demands and collateral damage upon encounter with novel parasites. Here, we tested the hypothesis that variation in the regulation of inflammation contributed to the spread of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) across Kenya, one of the world's most recent invasions of this species. Specifically, we asked whether inflammatory gene expression declines with population age (i.e. distance from Mombasa (dfM), the site of introduction around 1950). We compared expression of two microbe surveillance molecules (Toll-like receptors, TLRs-2 and 4) and a proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-6, IL-6) before and after an injection of an immunogenic component of Gram-negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) among six sparrow populations. We then used a best-subset model selection approach to determine whether population age (dfM) or other factors (e.g. malaria or coccidian infection, sparrow density or genetic group membership) best-explained gene expression. For baseline expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4, population age tended to be the best predictor with expression decreasing with population age, although other factors were also important. Induced expression of TLRs was affected by LPS treatment alone. For induced IL-6, only LPS treatment reliably predicted expression; baseline expression was not explained by any factor. These data suggest that changes in microbe surveillance, more so than downstream control of inflammation via cytokines, might have been important to the house sparrow invasion of Kenya.

  13. Surveillance for microbes and range expansion in house sparrows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lynn B.; Coon, Courtney A. C.; Liebl, Andrea L.; Schrey, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between hosts and parasites influence the success of host introductions and range expansions post-introduction. However, the physiological mechanisms mediating these outcomes are little known. In some vertebrates, variation in the regulation of inflammation has been implicated, perhaps because inflammation imparts excessive costs, including high resource demands and collateral damage upon encounter with novel parasites. Here, we tested the hypothesis that variation in the regulation of inflammation contributed to the spread of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) across Kenya, one of the world's most recent invasions of this species. Specifically, we asked whether inflammatory gene expression declines with population age (i.e. distance from Mombasa (dfM), the site of introduction around 1950). We compared expression of two microbe surveillance molecules (Toll-like receptors, TLRs-2 and 4) and a proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-6, IL-6) before and after an injection of an immunogenic component of Gram-negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) among six sparrow populations. We then used a best-subset model selection approach to determine whether population age (dfM) or other factors (e.g. malaria or coccidian infection, sparrow density or genetic group membership) best-explained gene expression. For baseline expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4, population age tended to be the best predictor with expression decreasing with population age, although other factors were also important. Induced expression of TLRs was affected by LPS treatment alone. For induced IL-6, only LPS treatment reliably predicted expression; baseline expression was not explained by any factor. These data suggest that changes in microbe surveillance, more so than downstream control of inflammation via cytokines, might have been important to the house sparrow invasion of Kenya. PMID:24258722

  14. Zirconium titanate: stability and thermal expansion; Titanato de circonio: estabilidad termodinamica y expansion termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Lopez, E.; Moreno, R.; Baudin, C.

    2011-07-01

    Zirconium titanate is a well known compound in the field of electro ceramics, although it has also been used in catalyst and sensors applications. The crystallographic thermal expansion anisotropy of this compound makes it a potential candidate as constituent of structural components. In general, to assure the structural integrity and microstructural homogeneity of a ceramic piece, relatively low cooling rates from the fabrication temperature are required. This requirement is essential for zirconium titanate because thermal expansion as well as phase distribution is affected by small variations in the composition and cooling rate. This work reviews the available data on the phase equilibrium relationships in the systems ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The main discrepancies as well as the possible origins of them are discussed. Additionally, the crystallographic thermal expansion data in the current literature are reviewed. (Author) 56 refs.

  15. Capricious Cables: Understanding the Key Concepts in Transmission Expansion Planning and Its Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohoo, P.; Milligan, M.

    2014-06-01

    The extra-high-voltage transmission network is the bulk transport network of the electric power system. To understand how the future power system may react to planning decisions today, wide-area transmission models are increasingly used to aid decision makers and stakeholders. The goal of this work is to illuminate these models for a broader audience that may include policy makers or relative newcomers to the field of transmission planning. This paper explains the basic transmission expansion planning model formulation. It highlights six of the major simplifications made in transmission expansion planning models and the resulting need to contextualize model results using knowledge from other models and knowledge not captured in the modeling process.

  16. Local Effect of Space-Time Expansion ---- How Galaxies Form and Evolve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian Liang; Hua, He Yu

    2016-09-01

    generalize gravitational theory of central field to the expanding space-time, and realize the unification of structure of big scope space-time and physical phenomena of small scope, and reasonably and systematically explain gravitational anomalies of solar system such as extra receding rate of lunar orbit, the increase of astronomical unit, the secular change of day length, the earth's expansion as well as the extra acceleration of artificial aerocrafts and so on, which cannot be treated by current knowledge. Besides, it is disclosed that galaxies form from continued growth but not the assemblage of existent matter after big bang, new matter continuously creates in the interior of celestial bodies, celestial bodies, galaxies and space simultaneously enlarge at the same proportion, and it is the local effect of space-time expansion that determines formation and evolution of galaxies.

  17. The dynamics of innovation through the expansion in the adjacent possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tria, F.

    2016-03-01

    The experience of something new is part of our daily life. At different scales, innovation is also a crucial feature of many biological, technological and social systems. Recently, large databases witnessing human activities allowed the observation that novelties -such as the individual process of listening a song for the first time- and innovation processes -such as the fixation of new genes in a population of bacteria- share striking statistical regularities. We here indicate the expansion into the adjacent possible as a very general and powerful mechanism able to explain such regularities. Further, we will identify statistical signatures of the presence of the expansion into the adjacent possible in the analyzed datasets, and we will show that our modeling scheme is able to predict remarkably well these observations.

  18. Rainfall reductions over Southern Hemisphere semi-arid regions: the role of subtropical dry zone expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenju; Cowan, Tim; Thatcher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Since the late 1970s, Southern Hemisphere semi-arid regions such as southern-coastal Chile, southern Africa, and southeastern Australia have experienced a drying trend in austral autumn, predominantly during April and May. The rainfall reduction coincides with a poleward expansion of the tropical belt and subtropical dry zone by around 2°-3° in the same season. This has raised questions as to whether the regional rainfall reductions are attributable to this poleward expansion. Here we show that the impact of the poleward subtropical dry-zone shift is not longitudinally uniform: a clear shift occurs south of Africa and across southern Australia, but there is no evidence of a poleward shift in the southern Chilean sector. As such, a poleward shift of climatological April-May rainfall can explain most of the southeastern Australia rainfall decline, a small portion of the southern Africa rainfall trend, but not the autumn drying over southern Chile.

  19. Detonative propagation and accelerative expansion of the Crab Nebula shock front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K

    2011-10-21

    The accelerative expansion of the Crab Nebula's outer envelope is a mystery in dynamics, as a conventional expanding blast wave decelerates when bumping into the surrounding interstellar medium. Here we show that the strong relativistic pulsar wind bumping into its surrounding nebula induces energy-generating processes and initiates a detonation wave that propagates outward to form the current outer edge, namely, the shock front, of the nebula. The resulting detonation wave, with a reactive downstream, then provides the needed power to maintain propagation of the shock front. Furthermore, relaxation of the curvature-induced reduction of the propagation velocity from the initial state of formation to the asymptotic, planar state of Chapman-Jouguet propagation explains the observed accelerative expansion. Potential richness in incorporating reactive fronts in the description of various astronomical phenomena is expected. © 2011 American Physical Society

  20. Phonemic diversity supports a serial founder effect model of language expansion from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Quentin D

    2011-04-15

    Human genetic and phenotypic diversity declines with distance from Africa, as predicted by a serial founder effect in which successive population bottlenecks during range expansion progressively reduce diversity, underpinning support for an African origin of modern humans. Recent work suggests that a similar founder effect may operate on human culture and language. Here I show that the number of phonemes used in a global sample of 504 languages is also clinal and fits a serial founder-effect model of expansion from an inferred origin in Africa. This result, which is not explained by more recent demographic history, local language diversity, or statistical non-independence within language families, points to parallel mechanisms shaping genetic and linguistic diversity and supports an African origin of modern human languages.