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Sample records for expanded polystyrene eps

  1. Designing strip footing foundations using expanded polystyrene (EPS) as fill material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psarropoulos, Prodromos; Zania, Varvara; Spyrakos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    One of the modern uses of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is in strip footings as fill material. The current study investigates the effect of the geofoam filling in the static and seismic design of the base slab founded on strip footings. For this purpose the finite element method is employed, and three......-dimensional as well as two-dimensional parametric analyses are conducted taking into account static and seismic loading conditions. The interaction of the soil–geofoam–foundation system is taken into consideration. The use of EPS as fill material in foundation systems is proven to be not only technically but also...

  2. Proportioning of Lightweight Concrete by the Inclusions of Expanded Polystyrene Beads (EPS and Foam Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eethar Thanon Dawood

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates the performance of lightweight concrete using various amounts of expanded polystyrene beads (EPS and different amounts of foam agent to produce lightweight concrete. The objective of this paper is to produce lightweight concrete with good workability and strength, by different mix proportion of foam agent (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1, 1.2 kg/m3 and varying water cement ratio (w/c depending on the flow. Besides, various proportions using different percentages of EPS in order of volume fractions are used. The flow range used in the study is 110-130%. Each mix proportion is tested for compressive strength, modulus of rupture, density and voids ratio. The results gives acceptable ranges of strength for lightweight concrete produced by the inclusions of EPS beads and foam concrete. Therefore, the lightweight concrete produced in this work can be used for structural applications like multistory building frames, floors, bridges and prestressed or precast elements. 

  3. Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) White-Painted Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) Radome Survivability Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylov, Rebecca; Kwack, Eug; Stegman, Matthew; Dawson, Douglas; Hoffman, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    NASA's SMAP Mission launched in January 2015 into a 685 km near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. The SMAP instrument architecture incorporates an L-band radar and radiometer which share a common feedhorn and mesh reflector. The instrument rotates about the nadir axis at approximately 15 rpm, thereby providing a conically scanning wide swath antenna beam that is capable of achieving global coverage within three days. The radiometer and its associated electronics have tight thermal stability requirements in order to meet the required surface emittance measurement precision from space. Maintaining the thermal stabilities is quite challenging because the radiometer is located on a spinning platform that can either be in full sunlight or eclipse, and thus exposed to a highly transient environment. Stability requirements were met by integrating a light-weight Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) radome into the design to prevent solar illumination of the feed horn interior. The radome was painted white since the thermo-optical properties of bare sunlit EPS degrade rapidly over the three-year mission. Milling of the EPS and solvent within the white paint created cavities on the EPS surface which may introduce localized hot spots possibly violating the EPS glass transition temperature of 96degC and leading to structural integrity concerns. A three-day thermal test was conducted in a vacuum chamber to verify survivability of the radome during a simulated non-spin fault condition at end of mission. A portable solar simulator illuminated the test article and the beam irradiance was kept nearly constant during the entire 50 hour test, except during the first hour which simulated the expected 79degC on-orbit surface temperature of the radome. The test article survived based on the established pass criteria for three separate metrics: dimensional, optical property, and color. If any hot spots exist locally, they did not cause any observable permanent deformation when compared to pre- and

  4. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF FRAME STRUCTURE ON SHALLOW FOUNDATION WITH EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Waluyohadi

    2015-08-01

    test results. A series of parametric study is conducted including the interface element and the variations of size of EPS. The use of EPS underneath shallow foundation do not show the correlation with the seismic response of structure if there is no interface element constructed. Variation of EPS size used were contributed to the acceleration and displacement of  structure with shallow foundation. As the larger size of EPS applied, the larger reduction of seismic responses will be obtained.

  5. BEHAVIOUR OF UNREINFORCED EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE (EPS-LWC WALL PANEL ENHANCED WITH STEEL FIBRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROHANA MAMAT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used steel fibre as reinforcement while enhancing the EPS-LWC strength. In line with architectural demand and ventilation requirement, opening within wall panel was also taken into account. Experimental tests were conducted for reinforced and unreinforced EPS-LWC wall panel. Two samples with size of 1500 mm (height x 1000 mm (length x 75 mm (thickness for each group of wall panel were prepared. Samples in each group had opening size of 600 mm (height x 400 mm (length located at 350 mm and 550 mm from upper end respectively. EPS-LWC wall panel had fcu of 20.87 N/mm2 and a density of 1900 kg/m3. The loading capacity, displacement profiles and crack pattern of each sample was analyzed and discussed. Unreinforced EPS-LWC enhanced with steel fibre resist almost similar loading as reinforced EPS-LWC wall panel. The presence of steel fibre as the only reinforcement creates higher lateral displacement. Wall panel experience shear failure at the side of opening. The number of micro cracks reduces significantly due to presence of steel fibre.

  6. EFFECT OF INCORPORATING EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... Incorporating expanded polystyrene granules in concrete matrix can produce lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete of ... structure. [1] reported that the standard workability tests are not suitable for the polystyrene aggregate concrete since they are sensitive to the unit weight of concrete. [2] made ...

  7. Technical Note: Effect of Incorporating Expanded Polystyrene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incorporating expanded polystyrene granules in concrete matrix can produce lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete of various densities. Workability which is an important property of concrete, aects the rate of placement and the degree of compaction of concrete. Inadequate compaction leads to reduction in both ...

  8. Manufacture of Strand Board Bonded with Disposal Expanded Polystyrene as Binder

    OpenAIRE

    Hermawan, Andi; Ohuchi, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Noboru; 大内, 毅; 藤本, 登留

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and mechanical properties of strand board bonded with disposal expanded polystyrene (EPS) as binder. The strand board was manufactured using strand made from Douglas-fir beams selected from construction scrap wood. The strands were oriented, and two types of three-layer (face-core-face) strand board were manufactured: one in which the board bounded with only disposal EPS (P board), and the other in which the board bonded with disposal...

  9. Leachate From Expanded Polystyrene Cups Is Toxic to Aquatic Invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Thaysen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Expanded polystyrene (EPS products and their associated chemicals (e.g., styrenes are widespread in the marine environment. As a consequence, bans on their use for single-use packaging materials are being proposed in several municipalities. To better understand how science can inform decision-making, we looked at the available scientific literature about contamination and effects and conducted experiments to measure chemical leachate from polystyrene products and toxicity from the leachate. We conducted leaching experiments with common food matrices (water, soup broth, gravy, black coffee and coffee with cream and sugar at relevant temperatures (70 and 95°C that are consumed in or with several polystyrene products (coffee cup lids, polystyrene stir sticks, polystyrene spoons, EPS cups, EPS bowls, and EPS takeout containers. We analyzed each sample for styrene, ethylbenzene, toluene, benzene, meta- and para- xylene, isopropylbenzene, and isopropyltoluene—chemicals associated with polystyrene products. To determine whether the leachates are toxic, we conducted chronic toxicity tests, measuring survival and reproductive output in Ceriodaphnia dubia. Toxicity tests included nine treatments: seven concentrations of ethylbenzene, EPS cup leachate and a negative control. Overall, we found that temperature has a significant effect on leaching. We only detected leachates in trials conducted at higher temperature −95°C. Ethylbenzene was the only target analyte with final concentrations above the method limit of detection, and was present in the greatest concentrations in EPS and with soup broth. Measurable concentrations of ethylbenzene in the leachate ranged from 1.3 to 3.4 μg/L. In toxicity tests, the calculated LC50 for ethylbenzene was 14 mg/L and the calculated LC20 was 210 μg/L. For the treatment exposed to the EPS cup leachate, mortality was 40%—four times greater than the negative control. Finally, there was no significant difference (p

  10. The investigation of expanded polystyrene creep behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained in long-term testing under constant compressive stress of the cut from the Slabs EPS 50/100 and EPS 150 with the density ranging from 15 to 24 kg/m3, which were manufactured by the same manufacturer by foaming EPS solid granules (beads in closed volume. The creep strain of the above described specimens was used as a criterion for estimating the deformability of the EPS slabs under long-term compressive stress. It was measured using special stands EN 1606, maintaining constant stress during the fixed time interval tn=122 days. Creep strains were determined by the methods described in EN 1606 for constant stress σc=0.35σ10% (compressive stress σ10% was determined in accordance with EN 826:2013. The long-term compressive stress measurement error did not exceed 1 %, while the creep strain measurement error was not larger than 0,005 mm. The tests were conducted at the ambient temperature of (23±2°С and relative humidity of (50±5 %.The long-term constant compressive load σc=0.35σ10%. The method of mathematical and statistical experimental design optimization models taking into account the thickness of specimens is proposed to determine the creep compliance Ic (tn the creep strain εc (tn and predictive point estimate of creep strain εc (T. Graphical interpretation of the abstained models is also presented. It should be noted that the abstained equations may be used in practice for estimating the creep strains at time tn=122 days and predictive estimates of εc (T for the load time of 10 years.

  11. Destruction behavior of hexabromocyclododecanes during incineration of solid waste containing expanded and extruded polystyrene insulation foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takigami, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Mafumi; Kajiwara, Natsuko

    2014-12-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) have been used for flame retardation mainly in expanded polystyrene (EPS) and extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation foams. Controlled incineration experiments with solid wastes containing each of EPS and XPS were conducted using a pilot-scale incinerator to investigate the destruction behavior of HBCDs and their influence on the formation of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/DFs). EPS and XPS materials were respectively blended with refuse derived fuel (RDF) as input wastes for incineration. Concentrations of HBCDs contained in the EPS- and XPS-added RDFs, were 140 and 1100 mg kg(-1), respectively. In which γ-HBCD was dominant (68% of the total HBCD content) in EPS-added RDF and α-HBCD accounted for 73% of the total HBCDs in XPS-added RDF. During the incineration experiments with EPS and XPS, primary and secondary combustion zones were maintained at temperatures of 840 °C and 900 °C. The residence times of waste in the primary combustion zone and flue gas in the secondary combustion zone was 30 min and three seconds, respectively. HBCDs were steadily degraded in the combustion chambers and α-, β-, and γ-HBCD behaved similarly. Concentration levels of the total HBCDs in the bag filter exit gas for the two experiments with EPS and XPS were 0.7 and 0.6ngmN(-3), respectively. HBCDs were also not detected (incineration process with destruction efficiencies of more than 99.9999 for both of EPS and XPS cases. For PBDD/DFs, the levels detected in the bottom and fly ash samples were very low (0.028 ng g(-1) at maximum). In the case of XPS-added experiment, 2,3,7,8-TeBDD and 2,3,7,8-TeBDF were determined in the flue gas at levels (0.05-0.07 ng mN(-3)) slightly over the detection limits in the environmental emission gas samples, suggesting HBCDs in XPS are possibly a precursor of detected PBDD/DFs. Operational care should be taken when the ratio of HBCD-containing polystyrene is increased in the input wastes just

  12. Utilization of waste expanded polystyrene: Blends with silica-filled natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekharan, Renju Vaikathusseril; Abraham, Beena Thattekatt; Thachil, Eby Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Tensile strength of the silica filled blend is comparable with silica filled NR. ► Modulus and compression set were the best for compatibilized NR/EPS blends. ► Tear strength has increased by 25% for compatibilized blends. ► A 5% waste EPS can be incorporated into NR compounds as a waste management measure. -- Abstract: Expanded polystyrene (EPS) constitutes a considerable part of thermoplastic waste in the environment in terms of volume. In this study, this waste material has been utilized for blending with silica-reinforced natural rubber (NR). The NR/EPS (35/5) blends were prepared by melt mixing in a Brabender Plasticorder. Since NR and EPS are incompatible and immiscible a method has been devised to improve compatibility. For this, EPS and NR were initially grafted with maleic anhydride (MA) using dicumyl peroxide (DCP) to give a graft copolymer. Grafting was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. This grafted blend was subsequently blended with more of NR during mill compounding. Morphological studies using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed better dispersion of EPS in the compatibilized blend compared to the noncompatibilized blend. By this technique, the tensile strength, elongation at break, modulus, tear strength, compression set and hardness of the blend were found to be either at par with or better than that of virgin silica filled NR compound. It is also noted that the thermal properties of the blends are equivalent with that of virgin NR. The study establishes the potential of this method for utilising waste EPS.

  13. Seismic Performance of Composite Shear Walls Constructed Using Recycled Aggregate Concrete and Different Expandable Polystyrene Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The seismic performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC composite shear walls with different expandable polystyrene (EPS configurations was investigated. Six concrete shear walls were designed and tested under cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of fine RAC in designing earthquake-resistant structures. Three of the six specimens were used to construct mid-rise walls with a shear-span ratio of 1.5, and the other three specimens were used to construct low-rise walls with a shear-span ratio of 0.8. The mid-rise and low-rise shear walls consisted of an ordinary recycled concrete shear wall, a composite wall with fine aggregate concrete (FAC protective layer (EPS modules as the external insulation layer, and a composite wall with sandwiched EPS modules as the insulation layer. Several parameters obtained from the experimental results were compared and analyzed, including the load-bearing capacity, stiffness, ductility, energy dissipation, and failure characteristics of the specimens. The calculation formula of load-bearing capacity was obtained by considering the effect of FAC on composite shear walls as the protective layer. The damage process of the specimen was simulated using the ABAQUS Software, and the results agreed quite well with those obtained from the experiments. The results show that the seismic resistance behavior of the EPS module composite for shear walls performed better than ordinary recycled concrete for shear walls. Shear walls with sandwiched EPS modules had a better seismic performance than those with EPS modules lying outside. Although the FAC protective layer slightly improved the seismic performance of the structure, it undoubtedly slowed down the speed of crack formation and the stiffness degradation of the walls.

  14. Radioinduced grafting of acrylic acid on expanded polystyrene matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, C.; Simion, Corina; Dragomir, A.; Ponta, C.; Chirvasoiu, G.; Postolache, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    The unfixed surface radioactive contamination for low energy β radionuclides ( 3 H and 14 C) is determined by wiping the checked surfaces with sponge of absorbent materials. The activity built up by this sponge is measured by a liquid scintillator spectrometer. In this work, a method of obtaining sponges of expanded polystyrene with hydrophobic surface by radioinduced grafting of the acrylic acid is presented. These sponges have diameters of 28 mm, thicknesses of 1.5 - 2 mm and density of 22 mg/cm 3 . The samples were immersed in a grafting solution with the following composition: acrylic acid 30%, Cu SO 4 1%; water 69% which were deeply impregnated in repeated operations under vacuum and pressure conditions, respectively. Finally, the samples were exposed to γ radiation emitted by a 60 Co source (IETI 10 000 - IFIN-HH). The dose rates were 0.3, 0.5 and 1 Mrad/h. The range of the absorbed doses was 1 - 25 Mrad. The yields of radiochemical grafting have been determined by gravimetric, spectrophotometric and radiometric methods. The grafting agent used was 3 H labelled acrylic acid. The solvation capacity and the quenching characteristics of the grafted sponges in liquid scintillators, as well as the sampling yields have been analyzed as function of irradiation procedure and the percentage of grafted acrylic fragments. The superficial grafting of the acrylic acid has been carried out by the mentioned technique, leading to the increase of the wiping efficiency of the unfixed surface contaminating activity, without changes of polymer solubility in liquid scintillators and without the perturbation of the radioactivity detection process. (authors)

  15. Widespread detection of a brominated flame retardant, hexabromocyclododecane, in expanded polystyrene marine debris and microplastics from South Korea and the Asia-Pacific coastal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Mi; Shim, Won Joon; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    The role of marine plastic debris and microplastics as a carrier of hazardous chemicals in the marine environment is an emerging issue. This study investigated expanded polystyrene (EPS, commonly known as styrofoam) debris, which is a common marine debris item worldwide, and its additive chemical, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). To obtain a better understanding of chemical dispersion via EPS pollution in the marine environment, intensive monitoring of HBCD levels in EPS debris and microplastics was conducted in South Korea, where EPS is the predominant marine debris originate mainly from fishing and aquaculture buoys. At the same time, EPS debris were collected from 12 other countries in the Asia-Pacific region, and HBCD concentrations were measured. HBCD was detected extensively in EPS buoy debris and EPS microplastics stranded along the Korean coasts, which might be related to the detection of a quantity of HBCD in non-flame-retardant EPS bead (raw material). The wide detection of the flame retardant in sea-floating buoys, and the recycling of high-HBCD-containing EPS waste inside large buoys highlight the need for proper guidelines for the production and use of EPS raw materials, and the recycling of EPS waste. HBCD was also abundantly detected in EPS debris collected from the Asia-Pacific coastal region, indicating that HBCD contamination via EPS debris is a common environmental issue worldwide. Suspected tsunami debris from Alaskan beaches indicated that EPS debris has the potential for long-range transport in the ocean, accompanying the movement of hazardous chemicals. The results of this study indicate that EPS debris can be a source of HBCD in marine environments and marine food web. - Highlights: • A brominated flame retardant, HBCD, was assessed in EPS debris and microplastics. • HBCD was widely detected in EPS debris from the Asia-Pacific coastal region. • Additive HBCD are dispersed via EPS pollution in marine environments. • EPS debris can be a

  16. An Experimental Investigation on Fire Behavior of Expanded Polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bakhtiary

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Fire behavior of different types of EPS was evaluated with the use of ISO 5660 cone calorimeter test method. Considering the complexity of behavior of EPS against high temperatures, several specimens were tested, so a betterjudgment on fire behavior of this material could be acquired. The effects of foam density, thickness of specimens and the level of heat flux on fire behavior of foam were examined. The relation between total heat release (THR and heat release rate (HRR with the density of the specimens were examined. The increase of thickness showed a two-fold influence on the fire behavior of the specimens. In one side, the mass of fuel increases with thickness, hence the THR and HRR needs to be increased. Contrary to that however, as EPS quickly melts and recedes away the heat source athigh temperatures, the incident heat flux on specimen conciderably reduces with increase of thickness and as a result the time to ignition will be lengthened with increase of thickness. These observations are discussed in the paper. On the basis of our results the comparison between the fire behavior of fire-retarded and standard types of foam is also discussed in the paper.

  17. DEMONSTRATION OF PACKAGING MATERIALS ALTERNATIVES TO EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report represents the second demonstration of cleaner technologies to support the goals of the 33/50 Program under the EPA Cooperative Agreement No. CR-821848. The report presents assessment results of alternative packaging materials which could potentially replace expanded...

  18. Field efficacy of expanded polystyrene and shredded waste polystyrene beads for mosquito control in artificial pools and field trials, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, A; Vatandoost, H; Jabbari, H; Mesdaghinia, A R; Mahvi, A H; Younesian, M; Hanafi-Bojd, A A; Bozorgzadeh, S

    2012-10-01

    Concerns about traditional chemical pesticides has led to increasing research into novel mosquito control methods. This study compared the effectiveness of 2 different types of polystyrene beads for control of mosquito larvae in south-east Islamic Republic of Iran. Simulated field trials were done in artificial pools and field trials were carried out in 2 villages in an indigenous malaria area using WHO-recommended methods. Application of expanded polystyrene beads or shredded, waste polystyrene chips to pool surfaces produced a significant difference between pre-treatment and post-treatment density of mosquitoes (86% and 78% reduction respectively 2 weeks after treatment). There was no significant difference between the efficacy of the 2 types of material. The use of polystyrene beads as a component of integrated vector management with other supportive measures could assist in the control of mosquito-borne diseases in the Islamic Republic of Iran and neighbouring countries.

  19. Investigation of E. coli bacteria inactivation by photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coated expanded polystyrene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnagiris, S.; Sakalauskaite, S.; Tuckute, S.; Lelis, M.; Daugelavicius, R.; Milcius, D.

    2017-03-01

    Photocatalytic properties of anatase and other TiO2 polymorphs are widely researched and applied in practical application. In current study TiO2 films on the plasma pre-treated expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam were deposited using magnetron sputtering technique. Main properties of the films were characterised using combination of XRD, XPS and SEM techniques. Photocatalytic properties of the observed crystalline anatase phase were tested by investigating bleaching of the methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution and by testing Escherichia coli (E. coli) viability after incubation under UV-B irradiation. E. coli viability experiments indicated that there are two mechanisms of E. coli bacteria inactivation. UV irradiation alone causes rapid damage to the outer membrane of E. coli bacteria. The second mechanism of E. coli inactivation is invoked only with synergistic combination of TiO2 and UV. Acting as photocatalyst TiO2 generates active radicals who initiate the chain peroxidation of organic molecules and within 45 min reduce E. coli bacteria viability by nearly 90%.

  20. The application of expandable polystyrene pellets as filter media to controlled filter in a uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Ruiguo; Liu Mingde; Li Chunhua

    1987-11-01

    Expandable polystyrene pellets as filter media are used for controlled filter of uranium ore processing. Results from bench scale tests, pilot plant tests and full scale tests are satisfactory. The filter used in the full scale tests is 4 m in diameter, and the capacity is from 75 to 100 m 3 per hour. The soild content in the pregnant solution which overflowing the first thichener contains about 250 ppm of suspended solid can be reduced to 5 ∼ 10 ppm. The filter bed is backflushed with the feed liquors and the backflush returns to the countercurrent decantation circuit. The entrainment loss of the organic phase in the raffinate from solvnet extraction can be decreased by about 60% with treating the filtrated solution

  1. Support vector machine-based exergetic modelling of a DI diesel engine running on biodiesel–diesel blends containing expanded polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Aghbashlo, Mortaza; Yee, Por Lip; Petković, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SVM-based thermodynamic modelling of a DI diesel engine working with diesel/biodiesel blends containing EPS. • Comparison of SVM-WT, SVM-FFA, SVM-RBF, SVM-QPSO, and ANN approaches for exergetic modelling of the engine. • Satisfactory performance of the SVM-WT for performance modelling of the engine over the other approaches. - Abstract: In the present study, four Support Vector Machine-based (SVM-based) approaches and the standard artificial neural network (ANN) model were designed and compared in modelling the exergetic parameters of a DI diesel engine running on diesel/biodiesel blends containing expanded polystyrene (EPS) wastes. For this aim, the SVM was coupled with discrete wavelet transform (SVM-WT), firefly algorithm (SVM-FFA), radial basis function (SVM-RBF) and quantum particle swarm optimization (SVM-QPSO). The exergetic data were computed using mass, energy, and exergy balance equations for the engine at different speeds and loads as well as various biodiesel and EPS wastes quantities. Three statistical indicators namely root means square error, coefficient of determination and Pearson coefficient were used to access the capability of the developed approaches for exergetic performance modelling of the DI diesel engine. The modelling results indicated that the SVM-WT approach was more efficient in exergetic modelling of the engine than the other three approaches. Moreover, the results obtained confirmed the effectiveness of the SVM-WT model in identifying the most exergy-efficient combustion conditions and the best fuel composition for achieving the most cost-effective and eco-friendly combustion process.

  2. Magnetization of large polystyrene peptide beads for capturing and expanding cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marik, Jan; Lau, D.H.; Song Aimin; Wang Xiaobing; Liu Ruiwu; Lam, K.S.

    2003-01-01

    A method is described for preparation of large magnetic polystyrene beads coupled with peptide ligands for surface receptors of lung cancer cells. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using these magnetic peptide beads for capturing and enriching lung cancer cells spiked into blood. These magnetic peptide beads potentially can be used to efficiently isolate cancer cells from body fluids

  3. Extruded expanded polystyrene sheets coated by TiO{sub 2} as new photocatalytic materials for foodstuffs packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loddo, V.; Marci, G. [Schiavello-Grillone Photocatalysis Group - Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e delle Telecomunicazioni, di tecnologie Chimiche, Automatica e modelli Matematici - Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze (Ed. 6) - 90128 Palermo (Italy); Palmisano, G., E-mail: giovanni_palmisano@yahoo.it [Schiavello-Grillone Photocatalysis Group - Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e delle Telecomunicazioni, di tecnologie Chimiche, Automatica e modelli Matematici - Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze (Ed. 6) - 90128 Palermo (Italy); Yurdakal, S. [Kimya Boeluemue, Fen-Edebiyat Fakueltesi, Afyon Kocatepe Ueniversitesi - Ahmet Necdet Sezer Kampuesue - 03200 Afyon (Turkey); Brazzoli, M.; Garavaglia, L. [Sirap-Gema S.p.A. - Via Industriale, 1/3 - 25028 Verolanuova (Brescia) (Italy); Palmisano, L., E-mail: leonardo.palmisano@unipa.it [Schiavello-Grillone Photocatalysis Group - Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e delle Telecomunicazioni, di tecnologie Chimiche, Automatica e modelli Matematici - Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze (Ed. 6) - 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An extruded polystyrene has been functionalised by TiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A photocatalytic polymer has been developed via a sol-gel method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoformed packagings for foodstuffs application have been prepared. - Abstract: Nanostructured, photoactive anatase TiO{sub 2} sol prepared under very mild conditions using titanium tetraisopropoxide as the precursor is used to functionalise extruded expanded polystyrene (XPS) sheets by spray-coating resulting in stable and active materials functionalised by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Photocatalytic tests of these sheets performed in a batch reactor in gas-solid system under UV irradiation show their successful activity in degrading probe molecules (2-propanol, trimethylamine and ethene). Raman spectra ensure the deposition of TiO{sub 2} as crystalline anatase phase on the polymer surface. The presence of TiO{sub 2} with respect to polymer surface can be observed in SEM images coupled to EDAX mapping allowing to monitor the surface morphology and the distribution of TiO{sub 2} particles. Finally thermoforming of these sheets in industrial standard equipment leads to useful containers for foodstuffs.

  4. Thermal decomposition of expanded polystyrene in a pebble bed reactor to get higher liquid fraction yield at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, R.S.; Gopinath, S.; Razdan, P.; Delattre, C.; Nirmala, G.S.; Natarajan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Expanded polystyrene is one of the polymers produced in large quantities due to its versatile application in different fields. This polymer is one of the most intractable components in municipal solid waste. Disposal of polymeric material by pyrolysis or catalytic cracking yields valuable hydrocarbon fuels or monomers. Literature reports different types of reactors and arrangements that have uniform temperatures during pyrolysis and catalytic cracking. The present study focuses on reducing the temperature to maximize the quantity of styrene monomer in the liquid product. A bench scale reactor has been developed to recover the styrene monomer and other valuable chemicals. Experiments were carried under partial oxidation and vacuum conditions in the temperature range of 300-500 deg. C. In the pyrolysis optimization studies, the best atmospheric condition was determined to be vacuum, the pyrolysis temperature should be 500 deg. C, yield of liquid product obtained was 91.7% and yield of styrene obtained was 85.5%. In the characterization studies, distillation and IR spectroscopy experiments were carried out. The remaining of the liquid product comprises of benzene, ethyl benzene, and styrene dimers and trimers

  5. Selected engineering properties and applications of EPS geofoam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elragi, Ahmed Fouad

    Expanded polystyrene (EPS) geofoam is a lightweight material that has been used in engineering applications since at least the 1950s. Its density is about a hundredth of that of soil. It has good thermal insulation properties with stiffness and compression strength comparable to medium clay. It is utilized in reducing settlement below embankments, sound and vibration damping, reducing lateral pressure on substructures, reducing stresses on rigid buried conduits and related applications. This study starts with an overview on EPS geofoam. EPS manufacturing processes are described followed by a review of engineering properties found in previous research work done so far. Standards and design manuals applicable to EPS are presented. Selected EPS geofoam-engineering applications are discussed with examples. State-of-the-art of experimental work is done on different sizes of EPS specimens under different loading rates for better understanding of the behavior of the material. The effects of creep, sample size, strain rate and cyclic loading on the stress strain response are studied. Equations for the initial modulus and the strength of the material under compression for different strain rates are presented. The initial modulus and Poisson's ratio are discussed in detail. Sample size effect on creep behavior is examined. Three EPS projects are shown in this study. The creep behavior of the largest EPS geofoam embankment fill is shown. Results from laboratory tests, mathematical modeling and field records are compared to each other. Field records of a geofoam-stabilized slope are compared to finite difference analysis results. Lateral stress reduction on an EPS backfill retaining structure is analyzed. The study ends with a discussion on two promising properties of EPS geofoam. These are the damping ability and the compressibility of this material. Finite element analysis, finite difference analysis and lab results are included in this discussion. The discussion with the

  6. Conversion of waste polystyrene through catalytic degradation into valuable products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Jasmin; Jan, Muhammad Rasul; Adnan [University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan)

    2014-08-15

    Waste expanded polystyrene (EPS) represents a source of valuable chemical products like styrene and other aromatics. The catalytic degradation was carried out in a batch reactor with a mixture of polystyrene (PS) and catalyst at 450 .deg. C for 30 min in case of Mg and at 400 .deg. C for 2 h both for MgO and MgCO{sub 3} catalysts. At optimum degradation conditions, EPS was degraded into 82.20±3.80 wt%, 91.60±0.20 wt% and 81.80±0.53 wt% liquid with Mg, MgO and MgCO{sub 3} catalysts, respectively. The liquid products obtained were separated into different fractions by fractional distillation. The liquid fractions obtained with three catalysts were compared, and characterized using GC-MS. Maximum conversion of EPS into styrene monomer (66.6 wt%) was achieved with Mg catalyst, and an increase in selectivity of compounds was also observed. The major fraction at 145 .deg. C showed the properties of styrene monomer. The results showed that among the catalysts used, Mg was found to be the most effective catalyst for selective conversion into styrene monomer as value added product.

  7. Expanded HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) implementation in communities in New South Wales, Australia (EPIC-NSW): design of an open label, single arm implementation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotska, Iryna B; Selvey, Christine; Guy, Rebecca; Price, Karen; Holden, Jo; Schmidt, Heather-Marie; McNulty, Anna; Smith, David; Jin, Fengyi; Amin, Janaki; Cooper, David A; Grulich, Andrew E

    2018-02-02

    The New South Wales (NSW) HIV Strategy 2016-2020 aims for the virtual elimination of HIV transmission in NSW, Australia, by 2020. Despite high and increasing levels of HIV testing and treatment since 2012, the annual number of HIV diagnoses in NSW has remained generally unchanged. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly effective in preventing HIV infection among gay and bisexual men (GBM) when taken appropriately. However, there have been no population-level studies that evaluate the impact of rapid PrEP scale-up in high-risk GBM. Expanded PrEP Implementation in Communities in NSW (EPIC-NSW) is a population-level evaluation of the rapid, targeted roll-out of PrEP to high-risk individuals. EPIC-NSW, is an open-label, single-arm, multi-centre prospective observational study of PrEP implementation and impact. Over 20 public and private clinics across urban and regional areas in NSW have participated in the rapid roll-out of PrEP, supported by strong community mobilization and PrEP promotion. The study began on 1 March 2016, aiming to enroll at least 3700 HIV negative people at high risk of HIV. This estimate took into consideration criteria for PrEP prescription in people at high risk for acquiring HIV as defined in the NSW PrEP guidelines. Study participants receive once daily co-formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) and are followed for up to 24 months. Follow-up includes: testing for HIV at 1 month, HIV and other sexually transmissible infections three-monthly, HCV annually and monitoring of renal function six-monthly. Optional online behavioural surveys are conducted quarterly. The co-primary endpoints are (i) HIV diagnoses and incidence in the cohort and (ii) HIV diagnoses in NSW. EPIC-NSW is a population-based PrEP implementation trial which targets the entire estimated population of GBM at high risk for HIV infection in NSW. It will provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the population impact of PrEP on a concentrated HIV

  8. Environmental impacts from the EPSPEX-system. Part 1. Life-cycle analysis of a District Heating System with PEX-pipes insulated by expanded polystyrene; Miljoebelastning fraan EPSPEX-systemet. Del 1: Livscykelanalys av Polystyrenisolerat Fjaerrvaermesytem med PEX-mediaroer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Kristin; Olsson, A. Maria; Froeling, Morgan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Environmental Science

    2005-07-15

    The EPSPEX system is a distribution system for district heat with media pipes of cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) insulated by blocks of expanded polystyrene (EPS). In this low-pressure distribution system two pipes are used for a space heating circuit, having layers of EVAL to hinder oxygen diffusion, whereas two pipes without diffusion barrier are used for delivery of hot tap water and warm water circulation. The four pipes are placed in the insulating blocks of EPS. Environmental impacts from production, laying and use of an EPSPEX district heat distribution system have been investigated using life cycle methodology. The distribution system is a secondary system developed specially for areas with low heat density. The case studied is the installation and use of an EPSPEX system in Vraaen, Vaernamo, Sweden. The environmental impacts are described in four categories: climate change, acidification, eutrophication and use of finite resources. Four weighting methods have also been used in the evaluation: EPS2000, Ecoscarcity, ExternE and EcoIndicator99. While carefully considering the precise circumstances of this study, the findings can be adapted for using the EPSPEX district heat distribution systems in other areas. During this study the question was raised of how this district heat delivery system compares with systems that use conventional district heating pipes. This has been further investigated and is reported in the second part of this report. In the second part the environmental impacts from the EPSPEX system have been compared with the impacts from conventional twin pipes (polyurethane insulated steel media pipes) used in a comparable setting. A discussion on the environmental choice between media pipes of PEX and steel can also be found in the second part. It should be noted that the two systems for district heat distribution are not fully comparable in function. The EPSPEX system has stricter limitations regarding pressure and temperature compared with

  9. Environmental impacts from the EPSPEX-system. Part 1. Life-cycle analysis of a District Heating System with PEX-pipes insulated by expanded polystyrene; Miljoebelastning fraan EPSPEX-systemet. Del 1: Livscykelanalys av Polystyrenisolerat Fjaerrvaermesytem med PEX-mediaroer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Kristin; Olsson, A Maria; Froeling, Morgan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Environmental Science

    2005-07-15

    The EPSPEX system is a distribution system for district heat with media pipes of cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) insulated by blocks of expanded polystyrene (EPS). In this low-pressure distribution system two pipes are used for a space heating circuit, having layers of EVAL to hinder oxygen diffusion, whereas two pipes without diffusion barrier are used for delivery of hot tap water and warm water circulation. The four pipes are placed in the insulating blocks of EPS. Environmental impacts from production, laying and use of an EPSPEX district heat distribution system have been investigated using life cycle methodology. The distribution system is a secondary system developed specially for areas with low heat density. The case studied is the installation and use of an EPSPEX system in Vraaen, Vaernamo, Sweden. The environmental impacts are described in four categories: climate change, acidification, eutrophication and use of finite resources. Four weighting methods have also been used in the evaluation: EPS2000, Ecoscarcity, ExternE and EcoIndicator99. While carefully considering the precise circumstances of this study, the findings can be adapted for using the EPSPEX district heat distribution systems in other areas. During this study the question was raised of how this district heat delivery system compares with systems that use conventional district heating pipes. This has been further investigated and is reported in the second part of this report. In the second part the environmental impacts from the EPSPEX system have been compared with the impacts from conventional twin pipes (polyurethane insulated steel media pipes) used in a comparable setting. A discussion on the environmental choice between media pipes of PEX and steel can also be found in the second part. It should be noted that the two systems for district heat distribution are not fully comparable in function. The EPSPEX system has stricter limitations regarding pressure and temperature compared with

  10. A thermo-electro-mechanical simulation model for hot wire cutting of EPS foam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, Kiril; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermo-electro-mechanical mathematical model describing the effects taking place within a Ni-Cr20% wire used in a hot-wire cutting process for free forming and rapid prototyping of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is investigated and simulated. The model implements and solves three semi...... cutting of EPS in contact with a cutting tool made of an electrically heated metal wire attached to a robot device. The finite difference method is used to solve the coupled equations in the two environments (domains) in which the hot-wire operates, namely air and EPS. The model is calibrated against...... experimentally obtained data. Novel findings are a transient temperature-dependent kerfwidth prediction and a relation between kerfwidth and the cutting angle as measured from the horizontal direction. These are important relations in the aim for higher geometrical accuracy of the hot-wire cutting process. (C...

  11. PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than 70%. Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower if you combine PrEP with condoms and other prevention methods. Download PrEP 101 Consumer Info Sheet Vital Signs Fact Sheet on Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV (PrEP) Expand All Collapse All Video Introductions to PrEP What is PrEP? A Brief ...

  12. HIV-1 Env DNA vaccine plus protein boost delivered by EP expands B- and T-cell responses and neutralizing phenotype in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar Muthumani

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will most likely require the induction of strong T-cell responses, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, and the elicitation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Previously, we demonstrated the induction of strong HIV/SIV cellular immune responses in macaques and humans using synthetic consensus DNA immunogens delivered via adaptive electroporation (EP. However, the ability of this improved DNA approach to prime for relevant antibody responses has not been previously studied. Here, we investigate the immunogenicity of consensus DNA constructs encoding gp140 sequences from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and D in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccine regimen. Mice and guinea pigs were primed with single- and multi-clade DNA via EP and boosted with recombinant gp120 protein. Sera were analyzed for gp120 binding and induction of neutralizing antibody activity. Immunization with recombinant Env protein alone induced low-titer binding antibodies with limited neutralization breath. In contrast, the synthetic DNA prime-protein boost protocol induced significantly higher antibody binding titers. Furthermore, sera from DNA prime-protein boost groups were able to neutralize a broader range of viruses in a panel of tier 1 clade B viruses as well as multiple tier 1 clade A and clade C viruses. Further investigation of synthetic DNA prime plus adaptive EP plus protein boost appears warranted.

  13. The effectiveness of the biodegradation of raw and processed polystyrene by mealworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leluk, Karol; Hanus-Lorenz, Beata; Rybak, Justyna; Bożek, Magdalena

    2017-11-01

    In our studies biodegradation of four variants of polystyrene was performed. We tested: raw material (PS), processed polystyrene (PSr), building insulation material (EPS) and food packaging boxes (PSp). Materials were characterized by means melt flow ratio (MFR), shore hardness and gloss. The biochemical assessment of macromolecules (proteins, lipids and sugars) in the mealworms organisms fed with tested forms of polystyrene allowed us to set how efficient and beneficial the biodegradation of types of polystyrene is. We also evaluated the variability of bacterial community in larval guts by the use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on the bacterial DNA of 16S rRNA genes amplified in polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results suggest that EPS and PSp polystyrene are the most digestible for T. molitor larvae. The metabolic degradation of polystyrene is probably strictly connected with the changes in biodiversity of gut bacteria.

  14. The effectiveness of the biodegradation of raw and processed polystyrene by mealworms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leluk Karol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In our studies biodegradation of four variants of polystyrene was performed. We tested: raw material (PS, processed polystyrene (PSr, building insulation material (EPS and food packaging boxes (PSp. Materials were characterized by means melt flow ratio (MFR, shore hardness and gloss. The biochemical assessment of macromolecules (proteins, lipids and sugars in the mealworms organisms fed with tested forms of polystyrene allowed us to set how efficient and beneficial the biodegradation of types of polystyrene is. We also evaluated the variability of bacterial community in larval guts by the use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE on the bacterial DNA of 16S rRNA genes amplified in polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The results suggest that EPS and PSp polystyrene are the most digestible for T. molitor larvae. The metabolic degradation of polystyrene is probably strictly connected with the changes in biodiversity of gut bacteria.

  15. Concreto leve com pérolas de EPS: estudo de dosagens e de características mecânicas

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Pereira Moreira Ozório

    2016-01-01

    Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar o comportamento do concreto leve com pérolas de poliestireno expandido (expanded polystyreneEPS), para posterior utilização em estruturas pré-moldadas constituídas, por exemplo, por painéis de paredes e lajes sujeitas a ações mecânicas. Também foram considerados parâmetros de durabilidade e mecanismos de redução da porosidade. Dentre um universo de solicitações a que as estruturas de concreto leve podem estar submetidas, analisaram-se, para d...

  16. Life cycle assessment of EPS and CPB inserts: design considerations and end of life scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Reginald B H; Khoo, Hsien H

    2005-02-01

    Expanded polystyrene (EPS) and corrugated paperboard (CPB) are used in many industrial applications, such as containers, shock absorbers or simply as inserts. Both materials pose two different types of environmental problems. The first is the pollution and resource consumption that occur during the production of these materials; the second is the growing landfills that arise out of the excessive disposal of these packaging materials. Life cycle assessment or LCA will be introduced in this paper as a useful tool to compare the environmental performance of both EPS and CPB throughout their life cycle stages. This paper is divided into two main parts. The first part investigates the environmental impacts of the production of EPS and CPB from 'cradle-to-gate', comparing two inserts--both the original and proposed new designs. In the second part, LCA is applied to investigate various end-of-life cases for the same materials. The study will evaluate the environmental impacts of the present waste management practices in Singapore. Several 'what-if' cases are also discussed, including various percentages of landfilling and incineration. The SimaPro LCA Version 5.0 software's Eco-indicator 99 method is used to investigate the following five environmental impact categories: climate change, acidification/eutrophication, ecotoxicity, fossil fuels and respiratory inorganics.

  17. Lipase polystyrene giant amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velonia, Kelly; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2002-04-24

    A new type of giant amphiphilic molecule has been synthesized by covalently connecting a lipase enzyme headgroup to a maleimide-functionalized polystyrene tail (40 repeat units). The resulting biohybrid forms catalytic micellar rods in water.

  18. Structural behavior of lightweight bamboo reinforced concrete slab with EPS infill panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Ari; Wijatmiko, Indradi; Nainggolan, Christin Remayanti

    2017-09-01

    Eco-friendly, green, and natural materials have become increasingly important issues in supporting sustainable development, for the substitution of nonrenewable materials such as steel. Bamboo has been considered in many studies to replace steel in reinforced concrete elements. Further investigation has been carried out to obtain lightweight and eco-friendly reinforced concrete slabs by using bamboo bars as reinforcement and recycled materials such as EPS (expanded polystyrene) as infill panel. The flexural loading test on full scale one-way slabs test has been conducted. The results showed that the flexural strength of specimens decreased marginally of about 6% but with the weight advantage of 27% less compared with those of steel rebar reinforced concrete slab with the same dimension. Two type shear-connectors comprising of concrete and bamboo studs were also investigated which showed that the bamboo stud provided better ductility compared to that of slab with concrete as shear connector. Overall, the reinforced concrete slab with bamboo reinforcement and EPS infill panel showed reasonably good performance compared to slabs with steel rebar.

  19. Home-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP services for gay and bisexual men: An opportunity to address barriers to PrEP uptake and persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A John

    Full Text Available Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. Despite the promise of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP in reducing HIV transmission risk, barriers for uptake and persistence exist. We sought to identify whether GBM in a nationwide cohort who have not yet initiated PrEP (n = 906 would prefer to get PrEP-related care from a primary care provider (PCP compared to a specialist clinic or provider. We then sought to identify their level of interest and factors associated with preference for using home-based PrEP services (i.e., HB-PrEP, defined to participants as conducting HIV/STI self-testing from home with PrEP prescription mailing after an initial in-person clinic visit. We examined the associations of demographics, sexual HIV transmission risk, concern about frequent medical checkups associated with PrEP, health care access, and PrEP intentions with preferences for healthcare provider type and HB-PrEP. Concern about frequent medical checkups were associated with preferring a PCP for PrEP-related care, but men who perceived a barrier to bringing up the topic of PrEP with a doctor preferred a specialist clinic or provider more than a PCP. HB-PrEP was more appealing for younger men and those engaged in sexual HIV transmission risk, suggesting HB-PrEP could help reach GBM most vulnerable to HIV and in need of PrEP. HB-PrEP expansion has potential to increase PrEP uptake and persistence among GBM, particularly for men with barriers to clinic-based care and higher intentions to initiate PrEP. Clinical guidelines regarding HB-PrEP are needed to expand its use.

  20. Seismic Performance of Precast Polystyrene RC Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibowo Ari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Precast concrete structure such as precast wall is a concept that is growing rapidly these days. However, the earthquake resistance is believed to be one of its drawbacks. Additionally, the large weight of solid elements also increase the building weight significantly which consequently increase the earthquake base shear force as well. Therefore, investigation on the seismic performance of precast concrete wall has been carried out. Three RC wall specimens using wire mesh reinforcement and EPS (Extended Polystyrene System panel have been tested. This wall was designed as a structural wall that was capable in sustaining lateral loads (in-plane yet were lightweight to reduce the total weight of the building. Parameter observed was the ratio of height to width (aspect ratio of wall of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 respectively with the aim to study the behaviour of brittle to ductile transition of the wall. Incremental static load tests were conducted until reaching peak load and then followed by displacement control until failure. Several data were measured at every stage of loading comprising lateral load-displacement behaviour, ultimate strength and collapse mechanism. The outcomes showed that precast concrete walls with a steel wire and EPS panel filler provided considerably good resistance against lateral load.

  1. Polystyrene cryostat facilitates testing tensile specimens under liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogan, R. P.; Skalka, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    Lightweight cryostat made of expanded polystyrene reduces eccentricity in a tensile system being tested under liquid nitrogen. The cryostat is attached directly to the tensile system by a special seal, reducing misalignment effects due to cryostat weight, and facilitates viewing and loading of the specimens.

  2. EP BICYCLE POOL - VIGNETTES 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    EP-SMI Help Desk

    2002-01-01

    The vignettes (insurance certificates) for 2002 become obligatory from 1 June. If you have a bicycle from the EP Pool, please bring it to the EP-SMI Help Desk (Building 124) on any working day up to 31 May between 8h.30 - 12h.00 or 13h.30 - 17h.30. EP-SMI Help Desk

  3. ep possibility for ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of adding an electron ring to ISABELLE is discussed in terms of cost, physics goals, count rate estimates, the detector requirements, and the possibility of producing intermediate bosons. The purpose of adding an electron ring to ISABELLE must be considered to be the study of e + p → e + x, e - p → νx, and e + p → anti νx. Other processes, such as W production, are less interesting for an ep ring than for a pp ring. However, there may be other new particles--such as leptonic quarks--that only turn up here. These processes are, however, exciting. In a 30 day run at L = 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 300 neutrino events are expected at q 2 > 5000 GeV 2 where the propagator is expected to be less than 1 / 4 . Thus the value of the mass in the propagator can be measured to 5%. The ep cross section would be measured over the momentum transfer range 1 2 2 ). This range is large enough that a logarithmic deviation from scaling can be distinguished easily from a power law approach to scaling

  4. Influência do substrato e do tamanho da célula de bandejas de poliestireno expandido no desenvolvimento de mudas e produção de calêndula (Calendula officinalis L. Influence of substrate and cell size of expanded polystyrene tray on the development and production of marigold (Calendula officinalis L. seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K.R Barbosa

    2010-03-01

    influence of two cell sizes of expanded polystyrene trays (40 cm³ and 12 cm³ and two substrates (soil + cattle manure and Plantmax® commercial substrate for vegetables on marigold production and seedling quality. Experimental design in both assays was in randomized blocks, in a 2x2 factorial arrangement (two substrates and two cell sizes, with six replicates. Treatments regarding cell sizes were trays presenting 128 cells (40 cm³ and trays containing 288 cells (12 cm³. The used substrates were cerrado soil + cattle manure (1:1 and Plantmax® commercial substrate for vegetables. Part of the seedlings was transplanted to evaluate capitulum production. There were significant differences among substrates for total, root and shoot dry matter. The use of substrate containing cerrado soil and cattle manure led to the best development of marigold seedlings. However, the different types of substrates and polystyrene trays did not significantly influence capitulum production in transplanted seedlings.

  5. Mezclas de residuos de poliestireno expandido (EPS conglomerados con yeso o escayola para su uso en la construcción

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Madariaga, Francisco Javier

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This research project looks for to innovate in the management of expanded plastic materials wastes and to propose techniques that take advantage of the properties that those plastics still have at the time they are discarded to the urban wastes flow, such is the case of the expanded polystyrene wastes (EPS which after being transformed in small particles and mixed with pastes made of standard gypsum and water in diverse proportions allows the production of different construction products. At the end of this paper two specific mixtures are described; the first useful for gypsum wallboard production, and the second one to manufacture a flat board for thermal isolation material. The EPS is a stiff cell plastic material produced from the molding of little spheres or pearls of expansible polystyrene that shows a closed structure made of this thermoplastic which contains trapped air in a 96-98% proportion of the volume of the pearls. Packaging is one of the main applications for this material hence EPS is a plenty waste in our society, it is also very popular in building construction where it is installed in air wall cameras and indoors covers; finally in a small proportion the plastic has other kind of applications like sport protections and commercial display.Se ha logrado ofrecer un grupo de 8 propuestas concretas para reciclaje de poliestireno expandido (EPS que consiste en mezclar yeso o escayola y agua para constituir pastas que contienen residuos de EPS que se moldean como placas y paneles para la construcción. Se ha ensayado con muestras de pastas que van desde aquellas que contienen proporciones extremas de residuos hasta otras donde la presencia de agua para la preparación de las mezclas es inusualmente rica, también se han ensayado mezclas compuestas por proporciones intermedias de sus ingredientes. De las pastas con los mejores comportamientos en ensayos previos se han aplicado sus fórmulas en la fabricación de muestras de placas y

  6. Comparaison performantielle à court et à long termes de mortiers légers à base de déchets de mousse de polyuréthane rigide et de billes de polystyrène expansé Comparison of short and long-term performances of lightweight aggregate mortars made with polyurethane foam waste and expanded polystyrene beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounanga P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cet article s’intègre dans une étude menée sur la valorisation de déchets de mousse de polyuréthane rigide (PUR pour l’élaboration de matériaux cimentaires légers. Dans ce but, des mortiers ont été fabriqués en remplaçant partiellement le sable par des particules fines de mousse PUR. Les taux de remplacement volumique considérés sont de 25 et 50%. Afin de comparer les bénéfices apportés par l’utilisation de mousse PUR par rapport à des granulats légers commerciaux, des mortiers légers à base de billes de polystyrène expansé (PSE de diamètre compris entre 1,5 et 2,5 mm, ont également été fabriqués. L’ouvrabilité, la cinétique d’hydratation au jeune âge et les propriétés mécaniques (résistance à la compression et module d’Young dynamique, thermiques (conductivité thermique et capacité calorifique, le retrait de séchage et la perméabilité au gaz ont été mesurés sur les différents mortiers mis en oeuvre. Une analyse comparative de ces propriétés est alors proposée. This article is part of a study on the valorization of rigid polyurethane foam (PUR waste for the development of lightweight cementitious materials. Mortars were made with volume replacement rates of sand with plastic lightweight aggregates equal to 25 and 50%. To compare the benefits of the use of PUR foam in comparison with commercial lightweight aggregates, two types of aggregates were considered: PUR foam particles and expanded polystyrene beads. The workability, early-age hydration rate, mechanical properties (compressive strength and dynamic Young’s modulus, thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat, drying shrinkage and gas permeability were measured on the different mortars investigated. A comparative analysis of these properties was then proposed, which showed that it was possible to produce lightweight aggregate mortars for structural use using PUR foam waste and that PUR foam particles had a

  7. Structural analysis of syndiotactic polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitani, Masahiro

    1988-09-01

    Since the stereostructure of a high-molecular compound includes three types of isotactic, atactic and sydiotactic structures, a high-molecular compound with excellent properties can be produced by controlling the stereogularity of the compound with the identical composition. The stereoregularity of a stereogular polystyrene, or syndiotactic polystyrene (SPS), which had been successfully synthesized recently was quantitatively determined and the open chain structure by polymerization was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Two SPSs were synthesized from cis-beta-d/sub/1-styrene and trans-beta-d/sub/1-styrene with alpha, beta, beta-d/sub/3-styrene. The results of spectral analysis of these two SPSs indicate that the former is of trans-conformation and the latter is of gauche conformation and that accordingly the open chain structure by polymerization of SPS is of cis-open chain and SPS has a planar zigzag structure even in the solution. (5 figs, 9 refs)

  8. The surface modification of polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremlett, C.

    2000-03-01

    Polymers have ideal bulk properties for many applications. However, adhesion to many polymers is poor without surface pretreatment. This can result, for example, in peeling paint and printing, adhesive joint failure and bio-incompatibility. In applications such as painting, printing, adhesive bonding and biocompatibility, various cleaning or surface chemical modifications may be employed. A commodity polymer where pretreatment is sometimes needed is polystyrene. This project investigated, in detail, the effects of a novel method of modification namely mediated electrochemical oxidation (MEO), as a mode of surface modification on polystyrene and a comparison was made with other polymers. The resulting modification was investigated using a range of surface analysis techniques to obtain complementary information. These included, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angles, static secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, chemical derivatization, scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and composite lap shear joint testing. It has been shown that MEO modifies the surface of polystyrene introduced oxygen mainly as hydroxyl groups, and a small number of carbonyl groups, that are positioned only on the backbone hydrocarbon chain. This modification improved adhesion, was stable and samples could be stored in aqueous media. The resulting hydroxylation was further derivatized using an amino acid to provide a specialised surface. This was very different from the multiple oxygen functionalities introduced in the comparison studies by UV/ozone and plasma treatments. (author)

  9. PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region: opportunities, implementation and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotska, Iryna; Grulich, Andrew E; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Anand, Tarandeep; Janyam, Surang; Poonkasetwattana, Midnight; Baggaley, Rachel; van Griensven, Frits; Lo, Ying-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV epidemics in the Asia-Pacific region are concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM) and other key populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention intervention and could be a potential game changer in the region. We discuss the progress towards PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region, including opportunities and barriers. Discussion Awareness about PrEP in the Asia-Pacific is still low and so are its levels of use. A high proportion of MSM who are aware of PrEP are willing to use it. Key PrEP implementation barriers include poor knowledge about PrEP, limited access to PrEP, weak or non-existent HIV prevention programmes for MSM and other key populations, high cost of PrEP, stigma and discrimination against key populations and restrictive laws in some countries. Only several clinical trials, demonstration projects and a few larger-scale implementation studies have been implemented so far in Thailand and Australia. However, novel approaches to PrEP implementation have emerged: researcher-, facility- and community-led models of care, with PrEP services for fee and for free. The WHO consolidated guidelines on HIV testing, treatment and prevention call for an expanded access to PrEP worldwide and have provided guidance on PrEP implementation in the region. Some countries like Australia have released national PrEP guidelines. There are growing community leadership and consultation processes to initiate PrEP implementation in Asia and the Pacific. Conclusions Countries of the Asia-Pacific region will benefit from adding PrEP to their HIV prevention packages, but for many this is a critical step that requires resourcing. Having an impact on the HIV epidemic requires investment. The next years should see the region transitioning from limited PrEP implementation projects to growing access to PrEP and expansion of HIV prevention programmes. PMID:27760688

  10. Low molecular weight block copolymers as plasticizers for polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Karsten; Nielsen, Charlotte Juel; Hvilsted, Søren

    2005-01-01

    /mol and minimum polystyrene content of 50 w/w%, which by us is predicted as the limits for solubility of polystyrene-b-alkyl in polystyrene. DSC showed polystyrene was plasticized, as seen by a reduction in glass transition temperature, by block copolymers consisting of a polystyrene block with molecular weight...... of approximately 1 kg/mol and an alkyl block with a molecular weight of approximately of 0.3 kg/mol. The efficiency of the block copolymers as plasticizers increases with decreasing molecular weight and polystyrene content. In addition, polystyrene-b-alkyl is found to be an efficient plasticizer also...... for polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-b-polystyrene (SIS) block copolymers. The end use properties of SIS plasticized with polystyrene-b-alkyl, measured as tensile strength, is higher than for SIS plasticized with dioctyl adipate. The polystyrene-b-polybutadiene-b-polystyrene and polystyrene-bpoly(propylene glycol...

  11. Copolymers of fluorinated polydienes and sulfonated polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jimmy W [Knoxville, TN; Gido, Samuel P [Hadley, MA; Huang, Tianzi [Knoxville, TN; Hong, Kunlun [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-17

    Copolymers of fluorinated polydienes and sulfonated polystyrene and their use in fuel cell membranes, batteries, breathable chemical-biological protective materials, and templates for sol-gel polymerization.

  12. Ep option at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1984-05-01

    The possibilities for colliding electrons with the 20 TeV proton beams of the SSC are considered. Kinematics of ep colliding beams is reviewed. Energies that may be possible and interesting are suggested, and detector problems associated with the highly imbalanced collisions are briefly considered

  13. PrEP in Europe - expectations, opportunities and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Sheena Mary; Noseda, Veronica; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the global trend showing a decline in new HIV infections, the number reported in the World Health Organization (WHO) region of Europe is increasing. Health systems are disparate, but even countries with free access to screening and treatment observe continuing high rates of new infections in key populations, notably men who have sex with men (MSM). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is only available in France. This commentary describes the European epidemics and healthcare settings where PrEP could be delivered, how need might be estimated for MSM and the residual barriers to access. Health systems and government commitment to HIV prevention and care, both financial and political, differ considerably between the countries that make up Europe. A common feature is that funds for prevention are a small fraction of funds for care. Although care is generally good, access is limited in the middle-income countries of Eastern Europe and central Asia, and only 19% of people living with HIV received antiretroviral therapy in 2014. It is challenging to motivate governments or civil society to implement PrEP in the context of this unmet treatment need, which is driven by limited national health budgets and diminishing assistance from foreign aid. The high-income countries of Western Europe have hesitated to embrace PrEP for different reasons, initially due to key gaps in the evidence. Now that PrEP has been shown to be highly effective in European MSM in two randomized controlled trials, it is clear that the major barrier is the cost of the drug which is still on patent, although inadequate health systems and diminishing investment in civil society are also key challenges to overcome. The momentum to implement PrEP in European countries is increasing and provides a welcome opportunity to expand and improve clinical services and civil society support focused on HIV and related infections including other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections.

  14. Polystyrene Based Silver Selective Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Agarwal

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Silver(I selective sensors have been fabricated from polystyrene matrix membranes containing macrocycle, Me6(14 diene.2HClO4 as ionophore. Best performance was exhibited by the membrane having a composition macrocycle : Polystyrene in the ratio 15:1. This membrane worked well over a wide concentration range 5.0×10-6–1.0×10-1M of Ag+ with a near-Nernstian slope of 53.0 ± 1.0 mV per decade of Ag+ activity. The response time of the sensor is <15 s and the membrane can be used over a period of four months with good reproducibility. The proposed electrode works well in a wide pH range 2.5-9.0 and demonstrates good discriminating power over a number of mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. The sensor has also been used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of silver(II ions against NaCl solution. The sensor can also be used in non-aqueous medium with no significant change in the value of slope or working concentration range for the estimation of Ag+ in solution having up to 25% (v/v nonaqueous fraction.

  15. Polystyrene calorimeter for electron beam dose measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    Calorimeters from polystrene have been constructed for dose measurement at 4-10 MeV electron accelerators. These calorimeters have been used successfully for a few years, and polystyrene calorimeters for use at energies down to 1 MeV and being tested. Advantage of polystyrene as the absorbing...

  16. EPS Young Physicist Prize - CORRECTION

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The original text for the article 'Prizes aplenty in Krakow' in Bulletin 30-31 assigned the award of the EPS HEPP Young Physicist Prize to Maurizio Pierini. In fact he shared the prize with Niki Saoulidou of Fermilab, who was rewarded for her contribution to neutrino physics, as the article now correctly indicates. We apologise for not having named Niki Saoulidou in the original article.

  17. EP1000 passive plant description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiu, G.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, a group of European Utilities, together with Westinghouse and its Industrial Partner GENESI (an Italian consortium including ANSALDO and FIAT), initiated a program designated EPP (European Passive Plant) to evaluate Westinghouse Passive Nuclear Plant Technology for application in Europe. In Phase I of the European Passive Plant Program which was completed in 1996, a 1000 MWe passive plant reference design (EP1000) was established which conforms to the European Utility Requirements (EUR) and is expected to meet the European Safety Authorities requirements. Phase 2 of the program was initiated in 1997 with the objective of developing the Nuclear Island design details and performing supporting analyses to start development of Safety Case Report (SCR) for submittal to European Licensing Authorities. The first part of Phase 2, 'Design Definition' phase (Phase 2A) will be completed at the end of 1998, the main efforts being design definition of key systems and structures, development of the Nuclear Island layout, and performing preliminary safety analyses to support design efforts. The second part, 'Phase 2B', includes both the analyses and evaluations required to demonstrate the adequacy of the design, and to support the preparation of Safety Case Report. The second part of Phase 2 of the program will start at the beginning of 1999 and will be completed in the 2001. Incorporation of the EUR has been a key design requirement for the EP1000 from the beginning of the program. Detailed design solutions to meet the EUR have been defined and the safety approach has also been developed based on the EUR guidelines. This paper integrates and updates the plant description reported in the IAEA TECDOC-968. The most significant developments of the EP1000 plant design during Phase 2A of the EPP program are described and reference is made to the key design requirements set by the EUR Rev. B document. (author)

  18. The future of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdener, Ayşe Elif; Park, Tae Eun; Kalabalik, Julie; Gupta, Rachna

    2017-05-01

    People at high risk for HIV acquisition should be offered pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC) is currently the only medication recommended for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in people at high risk for HIV acquisition. This article will review medications currently under investigation and the future landscape of PrEP therapy. Areas covered: This article will review clinical trials that have investigated nontraditional regimens of TDF/FTC, antiretroviral agents from different drug classes such as integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) as potential PrEP therapies. Expert commentary: Currently, there are several investigational drugs in the pipeline for PrEP against HIV infection. Increased utilization of PrEP therapy depends on provider identification of people at high risk for HIV transmission. Advances in PrEP development will expand options and access for people and reduce the risk of HIV acquisition.

  19. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool......-Saxon and continental traditions, this special issue provides examples of the use of researcher subjectivity, informed by psychoanalytic thinking, in expanding research understanding....

  20. Polystyrene/Hyperbranched Polyester Blends and Reactive Polystyrene/Hyperbranched Polyester Blends

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mulkern, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    .... In this work, the incorporation of HBPs in thermoplastic blends was investigated. Several volume fractions of hydroxyl functionalized hyperbranched polyesters were melt blended with nonreactive polystyrene (PS...

  1. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the

  2. Effect of Recycling in Post-Consumer Polystyrene Cups

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Mehnaz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to recycle post-consumer polystyrene cups and to analyze the changes in mechanical and rheological properties of the recycled polystyrene. The me-chanical properties were tensile strength, Young’s modulus and the rheological proper-ties was melt flow index. In order to analyze the changes in properties, material testing results of pristine polystyrene were compared with the recycled polystyrene. The same polystyrene material was recycled and tested twice in order to ...

  3. QCD studies in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F 2 , which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q 2 regimes are discussed. The low Q 2 transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure α s , and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs

  4. QCD studies in ep collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  5. Simple Coatings to Render Polystyrene Protein Resistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Hecker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific protein adsorption is detrimental to the performance of many biomedical devices. Polystyrene is a commonly used material in devices and thin films. Simple reliable surface modification of polystyrene to render it protein resistant is desired in particular for device fabrication and orthogonal functionalisation schemes. This report details modifications carried out on a polystyrene surface to prevent protein adsorption. The trialed surfaces included Pluronic F127 and PLL-g-PEG, adsorbed on polystyrene, using a polydopamine-assisted approach. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D results showed only short-term anti-fouling success of the polystyrene surface modified with F127, and the subsequent failure of the polydopamine intermediary layer in improving its stability. In stark contrast, QCM-D analysis proved the success of the polydopamine assisted PLL-g-PEG coating in preventing bovine serum albumin adsorption. This modified surface is equally as protein-rejecting after 24 h in buffer, and thus a promising simple coating for long term protein rejection of polystyrene.

  6. An e-p facility for Europe. Weak interactions in e-p physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlay, R.

    1979-01-01

    We first present the recent development on an e-p collider in Europe occuring in the last year. Then a review of physics motivations for an e-p ring is discussed and developed with the latest work presented at the meeting on 'Study for an e-p Facility for Europe' held at Hamburg on April 2-3, 1979

  7. Expandable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, J C; Carrasco, H

    1996-05-01

    Expandable metallic stents are effective in selected patients with malignant or benign airway stenoses. When used for malignant lesions, the primary purpose of the stent is to improve the quality of life; stents are usually chosen for palliation of symptoms in recognition of the low likelihood of success for other therapy. For patients with benign stenoses, the stents provide a permanent source of structural support to alleviate the narrowed segment. The advantages of the expandable metallic stents are as follows: (1) they can be inserted through an endotracheal tube or under local anesthesia with relative simplicity under fluoroscopic guidance; (2) they do not impair the drainage of sputum because ciliary movement is not interrupted; (3) over a period of a few weeks, the meshwork is gradually covered with mucosa as the stent becomes incorporated into the airway wall; (4) ventilation usually is not impaired if the metallic mesh stent covers another nonstenosed bronchus, because the interstices of the stent are nonobstructive; and (5) they are dynamic and continue to expand over time, particularly if concurrent treatment achieves an effect on the lesion that caused stenosis. Disadvantages of the expandable stent include (1) they often are only temporarily effective for tracheobronchial stenosis due to intraluminal tumor or granulation tissue, both of which can grow between the wires; (2) they are considered permanent stents because removal is difficult; and (3) they can be poorly positioned during placement or can become displaced by progressive migration after placement, and they cannot be repositioned. A relative contraindication to insertion is an inflammatory process or infection that can predispose to granulation formation, particularly at the points of maximal contact pressure of the stent to the airway mucosa. In the presence of inflammation, it may be better to use a silicone prosthesis until the inflammatory process subsides and fibrosis occurs. Granulation

  8. Preparation and microwave-absorbing property of EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Huixia, E-mail: fenghx@lut.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Bai, Dezhong [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Tan, Lin; Chen, Nali [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Wang, Yueyi [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China)

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we introduced expanded perlite (EP) into the system of ferrite composites for the first time. By sol-gel self-propagating combustion method, expanded perlite/barium ferrite (EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) was prepared, and then ternary composites of expanded perlite/barium ferrite/polyaniline (EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI) were obtained by in-situ oxidative polymerization of aniline on EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} mixture. Although, as is well known, the values of saturation magnetization (Ms), remnant magnetization (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) of composites are all lower than the pure BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} particles owing to the existence of the nonmagnetic EP and PANI, the EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI composites exhibit absorption characteristics at the range of 2–18 GHz, the effective absorption bandwidth (less than −4 dB) reached 12.12 GHz and the minimum reflection loss of −5.66 dB at 8.48 GHz with only 2 mm thickness of absorbing layer. So the composites could resist urban electromagnetic pollution, such as wireless network, communication and so on, effectively. - Highlights: • The expanded perlite (EP) was introduced into the system of ferrite composites at the first time. • Novel ternary nanocomposite of EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI is prepared by in-situ oxidative polymerization. • Composite absorber exhibit a minimum reflection loss of -5.66 dB at 8.48 GHz with a matching thickness of 2 mm. • Composite absorber possess the features like low-cost, lightweight and wide bandwidth absorption of civil EM radiation.

  9. The Study of the Microbes Degraded Polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Long Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the observation that Tenebrio molitor and Zophobas morio could eat polystyrene (PS, we setup the platform to screen the gut microbes of these two worms. To take advantage of that Tenebrio molitor and Zophobas morio can eat and digest polystyrene as its diet, we analyzed these special microbes with PS plate and PS turbidity system with time courses. There were two strains TM1 and ZM1 which isolated from Tenebrio molitor and Zophobas morio, and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The results showed that TM1 and ZM1 were cocci-like and short rod shape Gram-negative bacteria under microscope. The PS plate and turbidity assay showed that TM1 and ZM1 could utilize polystyrene as their carbon sources. The further study of PS degraded enzyme and cloning warrants our attention that this platform will be an excellent tools to explore and solve this problem.

  10. Evaluating the impact of prioritization of antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jason; Myers, Julie E.; Nucifora, Kimberly A.; Mensah, Nana; Toohey, Christopher; Khademi, Amin; Cutler, Blayne; Braithwaite, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the value and effectiveness of different prioritization strategies of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in New York City (NYC). Design Mathematical modeling utilized as clinical trial is not feasible. Methods Using a model accounting for both sexual and parenteral transmission of HIV we compare different prioritization strategies (PPS) for PrEP to two scenarios—no PrEP and PrEP for all susceptible at-risk individuals. The PPS included PrEP for all MSM, only high-risk MSM, high-risk heterosexuals, and injection drug users, and all combinations of these four strategies. Outcomes included HIV infections averted, and incremental cost effectiveness (per-infection averted) ratios. Initial assumptions regarding PrEP included a 44% reduction in HIV transmission, 50% uptake in the prioritized population and an annual cost per person of $9,762. Sensitivity analyses on key parameters were conducted. Results Prioritization to all MSM results in a 19% reduction in new HIV infections. Compared to PrEP for all persons at-risk this PPS retains 79% of the preventative effect at 15% of the total cost. PrEP prioritized to only high-risk MSM results in a reduction in new HIV infections of 15%. This PPS retains 60% of the preventative effect at 6% of the total cost. There are diminishing returns when PrEP utilization is expanded beyond this group. Conclusions PrEP implementation is relatively cost-inefficient under our initial assumptions. Our results suggest that PrEP should first be promoted among MSM who are at particularly high-risk of HIV acquisition. Further expansion beyond this group may be cost-effective, but is unlikely to be cost-saving. PMID:25493594

  11. Expander Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Expander Codes - The Sipser–Spielman Construction. Priti Shankar. General Article Volume 10 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  12. Comparative characteristics of polystyrene scintillation strips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gapienko, V.A.; Denisov, A.G.; Mel'nikov, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    Results are provided for a study of the main characteristics of polystyrene scintillation strips with a cross-section of 200 x 10 mm with two different scintillation-additive compositions: 1.5% p-terphenyl + 0.01% POPOP and 1.5% p-terphenyl + 0.01% DBP. The mean light-attenuation lengths are 180 cm and 260 cm, respectively, for strips with POPOP and DBP. The emittances of the polystyrene scintillators with DBP and POPOP additives have a ratio of 0.8:1.0 as recorded by an FEU-110 photomultiplier. 2 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  13. Fosforihapon epäpuhtauksien uuttaminen

    OpenAIRE

    Sengström, Heli

    2012-01-01

    Fosforihappoa tuotetaan yleisesti sekä märkäprosessilla että termisellä prosessilla. Märkäprosessilla tuotettuun fosforihappoon jää erilaisia epäpuhtauksia, joita ei happoa käytettäessä saisi olla. Yleisimmät epäpuhtaudet ovat erilaiset fluoridit, kloridit ja metallit. Tämän opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli selvittää, kuinka hyvin nämä epäpuhtaudet saadaan poistettua uuttamalla happoa liuottimella, jossa on 80 % tributyylifosfaattia (TBP) ja 20 % ExxsolTM D80 -laimenninta. Työn kokeellisessa ...

  14. Simulative calculation of bromo-polystyrene mechanical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Chao; Tang Yong Jian

    2002-01-01

    The non-crystal model of polystyrene and bromo-polystyrene was established with the help of simulative software in the computer. DREIDING was chosen as force field and its parameters is modified according to the published data. Based on the calculation results and other published data the mechanism properties of polystyrene and bromo-polystyrene, such as bulk module, Yong's module and Poisson's ratios, were discussed

  15. Activity of Antimicrobial Silver Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palomba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple technique based on doping polymers with in situ generated silver nanoparticles (Ag/PS films has been developed. In particular, an antiseptic material has been prepared by dissolving silver 1,5-cyclooctadiene-hexafluoroacetylacetonate in amorphous polystyrene, and the obtained solid solution has been heated for ca. 10 s at a convenient temperature (180°C. Under such conditions the metal precursor decomposes producing silver atoms that diffuse into the polymer and clusterize. The antimicrobial characteristics of the resulting polystyrene-based material have been accurately evaluated toward Escherichia coli (E. coli comparing the cytotoxicity effect of 10 wt.% and 30 wt.% (drastic and mild annealing silver-doped polystyrene to the corresponding pure micrometric silver powder. Two different bacterial viability assays were performed in order to demonstrate the cytotoxic effect of Ag/PS films on cultured E. coli: (1 turbidimetric determination of optical density; (2 BacLight fluorescence-based test. Both methods have shown that silver-doped polystyrene (30 wt.% provides higher antibacterial activity than pure Ag powder, under similar concentration and incubation conditions.

  16. Effects of Different Types of Clays and Maleic Anhydride Modified Polystyrene on Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehrabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer/clay nanocomposites are considered as a new subject of research in Iran and the world. Addition of a minimum amount of clay (2-5wt% can improve the mechanical properties, enhance barrier properties and reduce flammability dramatically. Polystyrene (PS exhibits high strength, high modulus and excellent dimensional stability, but it has poor ductility, elongation, and flexural modulus. By incorporating clay into polystyrene these properties can be improved. In this study preparation of polystyrene/clay nanocomposite, effects of different types of clays (Cloisite 10A andNanomer I.30TC and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene on mechanical properties of the prepared polystyrene/clay nanocomposites were evaluated. Samples were prepared by a twin screw extruder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were employed to evaluate the extent of intercalation and exfoliation of silicate layers in the nanocomposites. Mechanical tests show that by addition of clay and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene the flexural modulus (~30% and elongation-at-break (~40% of prepared nanocomposites have been improved. XRD and TEM results show that nanocomposite have an intercalated structure with ability to change to further exfoliation structure.

  17. Partition expanders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavinsky, Dmitry; Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2017), s. 378-395 ISSN 1432-4350 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : expanders * pseudorandomness * communication complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00224-016-9738-5

  18. Biosorption of Cadmium by Non-Toxic Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS Synthesized by Bacteria from Marine Intertidal Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Camacho-Chab

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a major heavy metal found in polluted aquatic environments, mainly derived from industrial production processes. We evaluated the biosorption of solubilized Cd2+ using the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by Bacillus sp. MC3B-22 and Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10 (Microbactan; these bacteria were originally isolated from intertidal biofilms off the coast of Campeche, Mexico. EPS were incubated with different concentrations of cadmium in ultrapure water. Residual Cd2+ concentrations were determined by Inductive Coupled Plasma-Optic Emission Spectrometry and the maximum sorption capacity (Qmax was calculated according to the Langmuir model. EPS were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS before and after sorption. The Qmax of Cd2+ was 97 mg g−1 for Microbactan and 141 mg g−1 for MC3B-22 EPS, these adsorption levels being significantly higher than previously reported for other microbial EPS. In addition, XPS analysis revealed changes in structure of EPS after biosorption and showed that amino functional groups contributed to the binding of Cd2+, unlike other studies that show the carbohydrate fraction is responsible for this activity. This work expands the current view of bacterial species capable of synthesizing EPS with biosorbent potential for cadmium and provides evidence that different chemical moieties, other than carbohydrates, participate in this process.

  19. Thermal compatibility of Sodium Nitrate/Expanded Perlite composite phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ruguang; Zhu, Jiaoqun; Zhou, Weibing; Cheng, Xiaomin; Li, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded Perlite/Sodium Nitrate composites hardly reported in thermal storage fields. • The thermal compatibility and adsorption of Expanded Perlite were investigated. • The thermo physic properties of composites were determined. • The thermal stability and long term enthalpy changes of composites were investigated. - Abstract: The present work focused on the preparation and characterization of a new thermal storage material applied in thermal energy management. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that Expanded Perlite (EP) has a good thermal stability varying from 300 °C to 900 °C. Morphology of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that sodium nitrate is uniformly encapsulated and embedded in the three-dimensional network structure of EP. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy indicated that the EP is physically combined with the nitrate salt. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) indicated that the composites have good thermal stability. The adsorption capacity of loose EP was 213.21%. When the EP mass fraction varying from 10% to 60%, thermal conductivity decreased with the content of EP increased, and the highest thermal conductivity is 1.14 W (m K)"−"1 at 300 °C. SEM revealed the network structure of EP provided thermal conduction paths which enhanced the thermal conductivity of the composites. All results indicated that EP could be a good adsorption material to be applied in the thermal storage fields.

  20. Characterization of SWNT based Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cynthia; Bahr, Jeffrey; Tour, James; Arepalli, Sivaram; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2003-03-01

    Polystyrene nanocomposites with functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), prepared by the in-situ generation and addition of organic diazonium compounds, were characterized using a range of structural and dynamic methods. These were contrasted to the properties of polystyrene composites prepared with unfunctionalized SWNTs at the same loadings. The functionalized nanocomposites demonstrated a percolated SWNT network structure at concentrations of 1 vol SWNT based composites at similar loadings of SWNT exhibited behavior comparable to that of the unfilled polymer. This formation of the SWNT network structure is because of the improved compatibility between the SWNTs and the polymer matrix due to the functionalization. Further structural evidence for the compatibility of the modified SWNTs and the polymer matrix will be discussed in the presentation.

  1. Highlights from e-EPS: EPS and EuChems are joining forces

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   On the occasion of the EPS Council 2013 in Strasbourg, a memorandum of understanding was signed between the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Societies (EuCheMS) and the European Physical Society (EPS) by presidents Ulrich Schubert and Luisa Cifarelli. EuCheMS and EPS share many objectives, such as community building, scientific excellence, communication and representation of their respective members to European policy makers. The two societies recognise that issues in many fields such as education, publication, support for basic sciences and frontier research are similar in their respective disciplines. They wish to combine efforts in developing and presenting common standpoints to their mutual benefit as European representatives in chemistry ...

  2. Boring crustaceans damage polystyrene floats under docks polluting marine waters with microplastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Boring isopods damage expanded polystyrene floats under docks and, in the process, expel copious numbers of microplastic particles. This paper describes the impacts of boring isopods in aquaculture facilities and docks, quantifies and discusses the implications of these microplastics, and tests if an alternate foam type prevents boring. Floats from aquaculture facilities and docks were heavily damaged by thousands of isopods and their burrows. Multiple sites in Asia, Australia, Panama, and the USA exhibited evidence of isopod damage. One isopod creates thousands of microplastic particles when excavating a burrow; colonies can expel millions of particles. Microplastics similar in size to these particles may facilitate the spread of non-native species or be ingested by organisms causing physical or toxicological harm. Extruded polystyrene inhibited boring, suggesting this foam may prevent damage in the field. These results reveal boring isopods cause widespread damage to docks and are a novel source of microplastic pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  4. Wettability control of polystyrene by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kusakabe, Masahiro; Iwaki, Masaya

    1994-01-01

    The permanent effects of ion implantation on the improvement of wettability of polystyrene is investigated in relation to ion species and fluences. The He + , Ne + , Na + , N 2 + , O 2 + , Ar + , K + and Kr + ion implantations were performed at energies of 50 and 150 keV at room temperature. The fluences ranged from 1x10 15 to 1x10 17 ions/cm 2 . The results showed that the contact angle of water for Na + and K + implanted polystyrene decreased from 87 to 0 , as the fluences increased to 1x10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 50 keV. The contact angle for Na + and K + implanted polystyrene did not change under ambient room conditions, even when time elapsed. However, the contact an gle for He + , C + , O + , Ne + , N 2 + , O 2 + , Ar + , and Kr + ion implanted specimens decreased slightly immediately after ion implantation. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the increase in the Na content in the surface of Na + implanted specimens were observed with increasing fluence. It is concluded that permanent improvement in wettability was caused by doping effects rather than by radiation effects from Na + and K + ion implantation. ((orig.))

  5. Clinical Applications for EPs in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Matthew A; Kaplan, Peter W

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients, evoked potential (EP) testing is an important tool for measuring neurologic function, signal transmission, and secondary processing of sensory information in real time. Evoked potential measures conduction along the peripheral and central sensory pathways with longer-latency potentials representing more complex thalamocortical and intracortical processing. In critically ill patients with limited neurologic exams, EP provides a window into brain function and the potential for recovery of consciousness. The most common EP modalities in clinical use in the intensive care unit include somatosensory evoked potentials, brainstem auditory EPs, and cortical event-related potentials. The primary indications for EP in critically ill patients are prognostication in anoxic-ischemic or traumatic coma, monitoring for neurologic improvement or decline, and confirmation of brain death. Somatosensory evoked potentials had become an important prognostic tool for coma recovery, especially in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. In this population, the bilateral absence of cortical somatosensory evoked potentials has nearly 100% specificity for death or persistent vegetative state. Historically, EP has been regarded as a negative prognostic test, that is, the absence of cortical potentials is associated with poor outcomes while the presence cortical potentials are prognostically indeterminate. In recent studies, the presence of middle-latency and long-latency potentials as well as the amplitude of cortical potentials is more specific for good outcomes. Event-related potentials, particularly mismatch negativity of complex auditory patterns, is emerging as an important positive prognostic test in patients under comatose. Multimodality predictive algorithms that combine somatosensory evoked potentials, event-related potentials, and clinical and radiographic factors are gaining favor for coma prognostication.

  6. Comparison of the cytotoxic effect of polystyrene latex nanoparticles on planktonic cells and bacterial biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Fujisawa, Eri; Itoh, Shikibu; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of positively charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles (PSL NPs) was compared between planktonic bacterial cells and bacterial biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and a colony counting method. Pseudomonas fluorescens, which is commonly used in biofilm studies, was employed as the model bacteria. We found that the negatively charged bacterial surface of the planktonic cells was almost completely covered with positively charged PSL NPs, leading to cell death, as indicated by the NP concentration being greater than that required to achieve single layer coverage. In addition, the relationship between surface coverage and cell viability of P. fluorescens cells correlated well with the findings in other bacterial cells (Escherichia coli and Lactococcuslactis). However, most of the bacterial cells that formed the biofilm were viable despite the positively charged PSL NPs being highly toxic to planktonic bacterial cells. This indicated that bacterial cells embedded in the biofilm were protected by self-produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that provide resistance to antibacterial agents. In conclusion, mature biofilms covered with EPS exhibit resistance to NP toxicity as well as antibacterial agents.

  7. Comparison of the cytotoxic effect of polystyrene latex nanoparticles on planktonic cells and bacterial biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Toshiyuki, E-mail: nomura@chemeng.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Fujisawa, Eri; Itoh, Shikibu; Konishi, Yasuhiro [Osaka Prefecture University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    The cytotoxic effect of positively charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles (PSL NPs) was compared between planktonic bacterial cells and bacterial biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and a colony counting method. Pseudomonas fluorescens, which is commonly used in biofilm studies, was employed as the model bacteria. We found that the negatively charged bacterial surface of the planktonic cells was almost completely covered with positively charged PSL NPs, leading to cell death, as indicated by the NP concentration being greater than that required to achieve single layer coverage. In addition, the relationship between surface coverage and cell viability of P. fluorescens cells correlated well with the findings in other bacterial cells (Escherichia coli and Lactococcuslactis). However, most of the bacterial cells that formed the biofilm were viable despite the positively charged PSL NPs being highly toxic to planktonic bacterial cells. This indicated that bacterial cells embedded in the biofilm were protected by self-produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that provide resistance to antibacterial agents. In conclusion, mature biofilms covered with EPS exhibit resistance to NP toxicity as well as antibacterial agents.

  8. Comparison of the cytotoxic effect of polystyrene latex nanoparticles on planktonic cells and bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Fujisawa, Eri; Itoh, Shikibu; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The cytotoxic effect of positively charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles (PSL NPs) was compared between planktonic bacterial cells and bacterial biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and a colony counting method. Pseudomonas fluorescens, which is commonly used in biofilm studies, was employed as the model bacteria. We found that the negatively charged bacterial surface of the planktonic cells was almost completely covered with positively charged PSL NPs, leading to cell death, as indicated by the NP concentration being greater than that required to achieve single layer coverage. In addition, the relationship between surface coverage and cell viability of P. fluorescens cells correlated well with the findings in other bacterial cells ( Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis). However, most of the bacterial cells that formed the biofilm were viable despite the positively charged PSL NPs being highly toxic to planktonic bacterial cells. This indicated that bacterial cells embedded in the biofilm were protected by self-produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that provide resistance to antibacterial agents. In conclusion, mature biofilms covered with EPS exhibit resistance to NP toxicity as well as antibacterial agents.

  9. Local Segmental Dynamics and Stresses in Polystyrene - C$_{60}$ Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Vogiatzis, Georgios G.; Theodorou, Doros N.

    2014-01-01

    The polymer dynamics of homogeneous C$_{60}$-polystyrene mixtures in the molten state are studied via molecular simulations using two interconnected levels of representation for polystyrene nanocomposites: (a) A coarse-grained representation, in which each polystyrene repeat unit is mapped into a single "superatom" and each fullerene is viewed as a spherical shell. Equilibration of coarse-grained polymer-nanoparticle systems at all length scales is achieved via connectivity-altering Monte Car...

  10. Mortar modified with sulfonated polystyrene produced from waste plastic cups

    OpenAIRE

    MOTTA,L. A. C.; VIEIRA,J. G.; OMENA,T. H.; FARIA,F. A. C.; RODRIGUES FILHO,G.; ASSUNÇÃO,R. M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this work, we studied the addition of sulfonated polystyrene produced from waste plastic cups as an admixture for mortars. Mortars were analyzed with polystyrene content of 0.0; 0.2; 0.6; 1.0 and 1.4% in relation to the cement mass. The influence of polystyrene on the mortars' properties was evaluated by the consistency index, water retention, water absorption, porosity, elasticity modulus, compressive strength, flexural strength, bond tensile strength and microscopy. The increase...

  11. Druhý Čep

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubíček, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 1 (2014), s. 35-45 ISSN 0009-0468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP406/11/1421 Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Czech literature * modern prose * Čep, Jan * narrative analysis Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  12. Fabrication of polystyrene porous films with gradient pore structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Hongwei; Zhang Lin; Li Bo; Yin Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Silica opals and multilayer heterostructures were fabricated by vertical deposition technique. Polystyrene inverse opals and gradient porous structures were obtained by colloidal templating, in order to control the pore microstructure of polymer porous materials. As shown in the scanning electron microscopy images, the polystyrene porous structures are precise replicas of inverse structures of the original templates. After being infiltrated with the polystyrene, the photonic stop-band position of the opal composite is redshifted compared with the original template, and it is blueshifted after the opal template being removed. The filling ratio of polystyrene was calculated according to the Bragg formula. (authors)

  13. PrEP adopted by the brazilian national health system: What is the size of the demand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Paula M; Benzaken, Adele; Alencar, Tatianna M de; Pimenta, Cristina; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2018-05-01

    Brazil's response to the HIV epidemic now includes free access to preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to populations at substantial risk for HIV infection including men who have sex with men (MSM). We used nationally representative demographic, epidemiologic, and surveillance data to offer estimates for the number of MSM at substantial risk for HIV infection who might be eligible and willing to use PrEP in Brazil. Starting from the age/sex-stratified population, we calculated the number of men aged 15 to 64 years, in 5-year age groups, and the proportion of those who report sex with other men during their lifetime. We focused on 11 cities (representing all regions) that are responsible for a significant fraction of the HIV burden of the country and used city-specific HIV prevalence estimates to infer the fraction of MSM who are HIV-negative. We then derived the proportion of HIV-negative MSM under substantial risk for HIV infection defined as having unprotected receptive anal intercourse in the 6 months before study participation. Finally, PrEP uptake among the eligible was inferred from the PrEP Brazil study. Our results show that PrEP demand in these 11 cities is of 66,120 men aged 15 to 64 years. When we consider the lower and upper bounds for the available parameters, we find that PrEP demand in these 11 cities might vary from 33,378 to 97,962 men. If PrEP is restricted to those aged 15 to 49 years, demand drops by 20%. PrEP demand varies considerably by city, mostly because of the differences in population size and city-specific HIV prevalence. We have shed light on the probable size of PrEP demand in Brazil certain that the incorporation of PrEP as part of Brazil's combination prevention for populations at substantial risk for HIV infection is a necessary challenge. PrEP will not only prevent HIV infections, it will also expand testing among the most vulnerable with the added benefit of offering combination prevention for the uninfected and immediate treatment for

  14. Towards a fair consideration of PrEP as part of combination HIV prevention in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasi, Giovanni; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Baruch, Ricardo; Guanira, Juan Vicente; Luque, Ricardo; Cáceres, Carlos F; Ghidinelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in scaling up antiretroviral treatment, HIV prevention strategies have not been successful in significantly curbing HIV incidence in Latin America. HIV prevention interventions need to be expanded to target the most affected key populations with a combination approach, including new high impact technologies. Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended as additional prevention choice for individuals at higher risk of infection and could become a cost-effective prevention tool. We discuss the barriers and solutions for a fair consideration of PrEP as part of combination HIV prevention strategies in Latin America. Although demonstration projects are ongoing or being planned in a number of countries, to date no Latin American country has implemented a public PrEP programme. The knowledge of policymakers about PrEP implementation needs to be strengthened, and programmatic guidance and cost estimate tools need to be developed to support adequate planning. Despite high levels of awareness among health providers, especially if engaged in HIV or key population care, willingness to prescribe PrEP is still low due to the lack of national policies and guidelines. Key populations, especially men who have sex with men, transgender women and sex workers, have been engaged in demonstration projects, and qualitative research shows high awareness and willingness to use PrEP, especially if accessible in the public sector for free or at affordable price. Concerns of safety, adherence, effectiveness and risk compensation need to be addressed through targeted social communication strategies to improve PrEP knowledge and stimulate demand. Alliance among policymakers, civil society and representatives from key populations, healthcare providers and researchers will be critical for the design and successful implementation of PrEP demonstration projects of locally adapted delivery models. The use of mechanisms of joint negotiation and procurement of antiretrovirals

  15. Circularly polarized luminescence of syndiotactic polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Guerra, Gaetano

    2017-11-01

    Syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS) films, when crystallized from the amorphous state by temporary sorption of non-racemic guest molecules (like carvone) not only exhibit unusually high optical activity, both in the UV-Visible and Infrared ranges, but also present circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) with high dissymmetry ratios (g = ΔI/I values in the range 0.02-0.03). Experimental evidences provide support, rather than to the usual molecular circular dichroism, to a supramolecular chiral optical response being extrinsic to the site of photon absorption and emission, possibly associated with a helical morphology of s-PS crystallites.

  16. Integrated lenses in polystyrene microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports a new method for integrating microlenses into microfluidic devices for improved observation. Two demonstration microfluidic devices were provided which were fabricated using this new technique. The integrated microlenses were fabricated using a free-surface thermo-compression molding method on a polystyrene (PS) sheet which was then bonded on top of microfluidic channels as a cover plate, with the convex microlenses providing a magnified image of the channel for the easier observation of the flow in the microchannels. This approach for fabricating the integrated microlens in microfluidic devices is rapid, low cost and without the requirement of cleanroom facilities. © 2013 IEEE.

  17. Provider perspectives on PrEP for adolescent girls and young women in Tanzania: The role of provider biases and quality of care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanlesta Pilgrim

    Full Text Available Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP has the potential to reduce HIV acquisition among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW in sub-Saharan Africa. However, health care providers' (HCPs perspectives and interactions with potential clients can substantially influence effective provision of quality health services. We examine if HCPs' knowledge, attitude, and skills, as well as their perceptions of facility readiness to provide PrEP are associated with their willingness to provide PrEP to AGYW at high risk of HIV in Tanzania.A self-administered questionnaire was given to 316 HCPs from 74 clinics in two districts and 24 HCPs participated in follow-up in-depth interviews (IDIs. We conducted bivariate and multivariable Poisson regression to assess factors associated with willingness to provide PrEP to AGYW. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the IDIs, which expanded upon the quantitative results.Few HCPs (3.5% had prior PrEP knowledge, but once informed, 61.1% were willing to prescribe PrEP to AGYW. Higher negative attitudes toward adolescent sexuality and greater concerns about behavioral disinhibition due to PrEP use were associated with lower willingness to prescribe PrEP. Qualitatively, HCPs acknowledged that biases, rooted in cultural norms, often result in stigmatizing and discriminatory care toward AGYW, a potential barrier for PrEP provision. However, better training to provide HIV services was associated with greater willingness to prescribe PrEP. Conversely, HCPs feared the potential negative impact of PrEP on the provision of existing HIV services (e.g., overburdened staff, and suggested the integration of PrEP into non-HIV services and the use of paramedical professionals to facilitate PrEP provision.Preparing for PrEP introduction requires more than solely training HCPs on the clinical aspects of providing PrEP. It requires a two-pronged strategy: addressing HCPs' biases regarding sexual health services to AGYW; and preparing

  18. PrEP as a feature in the optimal landscape of combination HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillen, Jessica B; Anderson, Sarah-Jane; Hallett, Timothy B

    2016-01-01

    The new WHO guidelines recommend offering pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to people who are at substantial risk of HIV infection. However, where PrEP should be prioritised, and for which population groups, remains an open question. The HIV landscape in sub-Saharan Africa features limited prevention resources, multiple options for achieving cost saving, and epidemic heterogeneity. This paper examines what role PrEP should play in optimal prevention in this complex and dynamic landscape. We use a model that was previously developed to capture subnational HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. With this model, we can consider how prevention funds could be distributed across and within countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa to enable optimal HIV prevention (that is, avert the greatest number of infections for the lowest cost). Here, we focus on PrEP to elucidate where, and to whom, it would optimally be offered in portfolios of interventions (alongside voluntary medical male circumcision, treatment as prevention, and behaviour change communication). Over a range of continental expenditure levels, we use our model to explore prevention patterns that incorporate PrEP, exclude PrEP, or implement PrEP according to a fixed incidence threshold. At low-to-moderate levels of total prevention expenditure, we find that the optimal intervention portfolios would include PrEP in only a few regions and primarily for female sex workers (FSW). Prioritisation of PrEP would expand with increasing total expenditure, such that the optimal prevention portfolios would offer PrEP in more subnational regions and increasingly for men who have sex with men (MSM) and the lower incidence general population. The marginal benefit of including PrEP among the available interventions increases with overall expenditure by up to 14% (relative to excluding PrEP). The minimum baseline incidence for the optimal offer of PrEP declines for all population groups as expenditure increases. We find that using

  19. The Role of Mucin in the Toxicological Impact of Polystyrene Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Inkielewicz-Stepniak

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel oral drug delivery systems is an expanding area of research and both new approaches for improving their efficacy and the investigation of their potential toxicological effect are crucial and should be performed in parallel. Polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs have been used for the production of diagnostic and therapeutic nanosystems, are widely used in food packaging, and have also served as models for investigating NPs interactions with biological systems. The mucous gel layer that covers the epithelium of the gastrointestinal system is a complex barrier-exchange system that it is mainly constituted by mucin and it constitutes the first physical barrier encountered after ingestion. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of polystyrene NPs on mucin and its potential role during NP–cell interactions. For this purpose, we evaluated the interaction of polystyrene NPs with mucin in dispersion by dynamic light scattering and with a deposited layer of mucin using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technology. Next, we measured cell viability and the apoptotic state of three enterocyte-like cell lines that differ in their ability to produce mucin, after their exposure to the NPs. Positive charged NPs showed the ability to strongly interact and aggregate mucin in our model. Positive NPs affected cell viability and induced apoptosis in all cell lines independently of their ability of produce mucin.

  20. Vacuolar Localization of Endoproteinases EP(1) and EP(2) in Barley Mesophyll Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, S S; Huffaker, R C

    1984-05-01

    The localization of two previously characterized endoproteinases (EP(1) and EP(2)) that comprise more than 95% of the protease activity in primary Hordeum vulgare L. var Numar leaves was determined. Intact vacuoles released from washed mesophyll protoplasts by gentle osmotic shock and increase in pH, were purified by flotation through a four-step Ficoll gradient. These vacuoles contained endoproteinases that rapidly degraded purified barley ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) substrate. Breakdown products and extent of digestion of RuBPCase were determined using 12% polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Coomassie brilliant blue- or silver-stained gels were scanned, and the peaks were integrated to provide quantitative information. The characteristics of the vacuolar endoproteinases (e.g. sensitivity to various inhibitors and activators, and the molecular weights of the breakdown products, i.e. peptide maps) closely resembled those of purified EP(1) and partially purified EP(2). It is therefore concluded that EP(1) and EP(2) are localized in the vacuoles of mesophyll cells.

  1. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.; Danly, C.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurlbut, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented.

  2. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R., E-mail: raspberry@lanl.gov; Danly, C.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hurlbut, C. [Eljen Technology, Sweetwater, Texas 79556 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented.

  3. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongational...

  4. RESEARCHES OF WORKING LIFE OF FOAM POLYSTYRENE OF BUILDING APPOINTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyumdzhjan Perch Pogosovich

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental researches of physicomechanical properties of foam polystyrene thermal insulation materials are presented in article. The operational resource was defined on materials subject to ageing, action of liquid excited environments and atmospheric impacts. The destructive processes leading to destruction of foam polystyrene are revealed.

  5. Influence of recycled polystyrene beads on cement paste properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaroufi Maroua

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to keep up with the requirements of sustainable development, there is a growing interest towards reducing the energy consumption in the construction and rehabilitation of buildings and the promotion of recycling waste in building materials. The use of recycled polystyrene beads in cement-based materials composition constitutes a solution to improve the insulation in buildings. This allows also limiting landfill by reusing the polystyrene waste. The aim of this study is to compare some properties and performances of a cement paste containing polystyrene beads to a reference paste designed with only the same cement. An experimental campaign was conducted and the obtained results showed that adding recycled polystyrene beads to a cement paste improves its hygro-thermal properties. Further studies are however necessary to better understand the real role of the polystyrene beads in the heat and mass transfers.

  6. Special 2005 EPS HEPP prize colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Wahl, Heinrich; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    First evidence and measurement of direct CP violation by the NA31 experiment This is a colloquium celebrating the awarding of the 2005 EPS High Energy Particle Physics prize to Heinrich Wahl and the NA31 collaboration which showed for the first time Direct CP Violation in the decay of neutral K mesons. There will be an introduction to direct CP violation, followed by a review of experimental results.

  7. e-EPS News: Light for Development

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles by the e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   A central goal of the EPS International Year of Light project will be to promote optical technologies and optics education to improve the quality of life in the developing world – under the theme of ‘Light for Development’. Light plays a central role in human activities in science, technology and culture. On a fundamental scientific level, light is necessary for the existence of life itself, whilst on a more technical level, light-based technologies will underpin the future development of human society. The systematic study of the physics of light and electromagnetic waves has been central to the evolution of modern science and – in the 20th century alone – there have been many fundamental ...

  8. Key developments of the EP1000 design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noviello, L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, a group of European utilities initiated, together with Westinghouse and its industrial partner GENESI (an Italian consortium including ANSALDO and FIAT), a program designated EPP (European Passive Plant) to evaluate Westinghouse passive nuclear plant technology for application in Europe. The Phase I of the European Passive Plant program involved the evaluation of the Westinghouse 600 MWe AP600 and 1000 MWe Simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR) designs against the European Utility Requirements (EUR), and when necessary, the investigation of possible modifications to achieve compliance with the EUR. In Phase 1 of the program, which has been completed in 1996, the following major tasks were accomplished: The impacts of the European Utility Requirements (EUR) on the Westinghouse nuclear island design were evaluated. A 1000 MWe passive plant reference design (EP1000) was developed which conforms to the EUR and is expected to be licensable in Europe. With respect to the NSSS and containment, the EP1000 reference design closely follows those of the Westinghouse SPWR design, while the AP600 design has been taken as the basis for the design of the auxiliary systems. Extensive design and testing efforts have been made for the AP600 and SPWR during the respective multi-year programs. While the results of these programs have been and will continue to be utilised, at the maximum extent, to minimise the work to be performed on the EP1000 design, the compliance with EUR is a key design requirement for the EP1000 The ultimate objective of Phase 2 of the program is to develop design details and perform supporting analyses to produce a Safety Case Report (SCR) for submittal to European Safety Authorities. The first part of Phase 2, hereafter referred as Phase 2A, started at the beginning of 1997 and will be completed at the end of 1998. Scope of this phase of the program is to develop the design modifications of important systems and structures so to comply with the

  9. Correlated dewetting patterns in thin polystyrene films

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, C; Seemann, R; Blossey, R; Becker, J; Grün, G

    2003-01-01

    We describe preliminary results of experiments and simulations concerned with the dewetting of thin polystyrene films (thickness < 7 nm) on top of silicon oxide wafers. In the experiments we scratched an initially flat film with an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip, producing dry channels in the film. Dewetting of the films was imaged in situ using AFM and a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') was observed along the rims bordering the channels. The development of this complex film rupture process was simulated and the results of experiments and simulations are in good agreement. On the basis of these results, we attempt to explain the appearance of satellite holes and their positions relative to pre-existing holes.

  10. Correlated dewetting patterns in thin polystyrene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, Chiara; Jacobs, Karin; Seemann, Ralf; Blossey, Ralf; Becker, Juergen; Gruen, Guenther

    2003-01-01

    We describe preliminary results of experiments and simulations concerned with the dewetting of thin polystyrene films (thickness < 7 nm) on top of silicon oxide wafers. In the experiments we scratched an initially flat film with an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip, producing dry channels in the film. Dewetting of the films was imaged in situ using AFM and a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') was observed along the rims bordering the channels. The development of this complex film rupture process was simulated and the results of experiments and simulations are in good agreement. On the basis of these results, we attempt to explain the appearance of satellite holes and their positions relative to pre-existing holes

  11. Adsorption of amphipathic dendrons on polystyrene nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, T; Florence, A T

    2003-03-18

    Adsorption of dendrons onto nanoparticles may provide new model structures which may be useful in drug and gene delivery. Tritiated amphipathic dendrons having three lipidic (C(14)) chains coupled to branched (dendritic) lysine head groups with 8, 16 or 32 free terminal amino groups have been synthesised by solid phase peptide techniques. The interaction between these tritiated dendrons and 200 nm polystyrene latex nanoparticles was investigated in phosphate buffered saline. The amount of dendron adsorbed increased with increasing concentration of dendrons and then decreased. Maximum adsorption of dendrons per gram of nanoparticles was found to be between 8.2 and 84 x 10(-6)M, the amounts adsorbed being inversely proportional to the number of amino groups present in the molecule. The number of dendron molecules adsorbed per nanoparticle was found to be between 430 and 4421. The degree of adsorption was found to be slightly altered by the temperature. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. ANALYSIS DEGRADATION OF POLYSTYRENE WITH MONTMORILLONITE NANOFILLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mihalikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the experimental investigation of the montmorillonite nanofillers effect on deformation properties of polystyrene KRASTEN 171. In some cases, combination of a low amount of clay with dispersed polymeric phase may cause synergistic effects leading to very fair balance of mechanical behaviour. This seems to be a consequence of complex influencing the multiphase system by clay such as modification of components (reinforcement and parameters of the interface accompanied by influencing the dynamic phase behaviour, i.e., the compactibilizing effect. The paper analyses the effect of nanocomposites and type of the material on the individual measured parameters, relations between them, strength and deformation behaviour. Deformation was evaluated by non-contact videoextensometry method

  13. Phase Segregation in Polystyrene?Polylactide Blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Bonnie; Hitchcock, Adam; Brash, John; Scholl, Andreas; Doran, Andrew

    2010-06-09

    Spun-cast films of polystyrene (PS) blended with polylactide (PLA) were visualized and characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotron-based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM). The composition of the two polymers in these systems was determined by quantitative chemical analysis of near-edge X-ray absorption signals recorded with X-PEEM. The surface morphology depends on the ratio of the two components, the total polymer concentration, and the temperature of vacuum annealing. For most of the blends examined, PS is the continuous phase with PLA existing in discrete domains or segregated to the air?polymer interface. Phase segregation was improved with further annealing. A phase inversion occurred when films of a 40:60 PS:PLA blend (0.7 wt percent loading) were annealed above the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PLA.

  14. Synthesis and properties of deuterated polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang; Jin Rong; Xu Yewei; Zhang Lin; Yan Hongwei; Du Kai; Wei Chengfu

    2012-01-01

    Deuterated poly(vinylcyclohexane) (D-PVCH, C 8 H 8 D 6 ) was successfully prepared via deuterated catalytic technology of polystyrene (PS). The structure of D-PVCH was characterized by FT-IR and 1 HNMR spectroscopy, and the results show good agreement with the proposed structure and the deuterated ratio is 41.5%. DSC and TG analyses of the D-PVCH show that D-PVCH possesses good thermal stability (glass transition temperature of 125 ℃, 5% weight loss temperature of 403 ℃). Additionally, D-PVCH dissolves in common solvents such as petroleum ether, cyclohexane and toluene at room temperature. Compared with PS, D-PVCH possesses better thermal stability and improved solubility. (authors)

  15. EP 1000 -The European Passive Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, Ed; Oyarzabal, Mariano; Saiu, Gianfranco

    1998-01-01

    A group of European utilities, along with Westinghouse and its industrial partner GENESI (an Italian consortium including ANSALDO and FIAT) initiated a program to evaluate Westinghouse passive nuclear plant technology for application in Europe. The European utility group consisted of: Agrupacion electrica para al Desarrollo Technologico Nuclear (DTN), Spain; Electricite de France; ENEL, SpA., Italy; IVO Power Engineering, Ltd., Finland; Scottish Nuclear Limited (acting for itself on behalf of Nuclear Electric plc, U.K.; Tractebel Energy Engineering, Belgium; UAK (represented by NOK-Beznau), Switzerland; and Vattenfall AB, Ringhals, Sweden. The European Passive Plant (EPP) program, which began in 1994, is an evaluation of the Westinghouse 600 MWe AP 600 and 1000 MWe Simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR) designs in meeting the European Utility Requirements (EUR), and where necessary, modifying the design to achieve compliance. Phase 1 or the EPP program was completed and included the two major tasks of evaluating the effect of the EUR on the Westinghouse nuclear island and developing the EP 1000, a 1000 MWe passive plant reference design that conforms to the EUR and would be licensable in Europe. The EP 1000 closely follows the Westinghouse SPWR design for safety systems and containment and the AP 600 design for auxiliary systems. It also includes features that where required to meet the EUR and key European licensing requirements. The primary circuit of the EP 1000 retains most of the general features of the current-day designs, but some evolutionary features to enhance reliability, simplicity of operation, ease of maintenance, and plant safety have been incorporated into the design. The core, reactor vessel, and reactor internals of the EP 1000 are similar to those of currently operating Westinghouse PWR plants, but several new features are included to enhance the performance characteristics. The basic EP 1000 safety philosophy is based on use of inherent

  16. Values and Preferences on the Use of Oral Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV Prevention Among Multiple Populations: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechlin, Florence M; Fonner, Virginia A; Dalglish, Sarah L; O'Reilly, Kevin R; Baggaley, Rachel; Grant, Robert M; Rodolph, Michelle; Hodges-Mameletzis, Ioannis; Kennedy, Caitlin E

    2017-05-01

    Daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is the use of antiretroviral drugs by HIV-negative people to prevent HIV infection. WHO released new guidelines in 2015 recommending PrEP for all populations at substantial risk of HIV infection. To prepare these guidelines, we conducted a systematic review of values and preferences among populations that might benefit from PrEP, women, heterosexual men, young women and adolescent girls, female sex workers, serodiscordant couples, transgender people and people who inject drugs, and among healthcare providers who may prescribe PrEP. A comprehensive search strategy reviewed three electronic databases of articles and HIV-related conference abstracts (January 1990-April 2015). Data abstraction used standardised forms to categorise by population groups and relevant themes. Of 3068 citations screened, 76 peer-reviewed articles and 28 conference abstracts were included. Geographic coverage was global. Most studies (N = 78) evaluated hypothetical use of PrEP, while 26 studies included individuals who actually took PrEP or placebo. Awareness of PrEP was low, but once participants were presented with information about PrEP, the majority said they would consider using it. Concerns about safety, side effects, cost and effectiveness were the most frequently cited barriers to use. There was little indication of risk compensation. Healthcare providers would consider prescribing PrEP, but need more information before doing so. Findings from a rapidly expanding evidence base suggest that the majority of populations most likely to benefit from PrEP feel positively towards it. These same populations would benefit from overcoming current implementation challenges with the shortest possible delay.

  17. Development of the nuclear weapons complex EP architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, C.; Halbleib, L.

    1996-07-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Guidance Team is an interagency committee led by Earl Whiteman, DOE that chartered the generation of EP40100, Concurrent Qualification and its successor EP401099, Concurrent Engineering and Qualification. As this new philosophy of concurrent operations has evolved and as implementation has been initiated, conflicts and insufficiencies in the remaining Engineering Procedures (EPs) have become more apparent. At the Guidance Team meeting in November 1995, this issue was explored and several approaches were considered. It was concluded at this meeting, that a smaller set of interagency EPs described in a hierarchical system could provide the necessary interagency direction to support complex-wide implementation. This set consolidates many existing EP processes where consistency and commonality are critical to success of the extended enterprise. The Guidance Team subsequently chartered an interagency team to initiate development activity associated with the envisioned new EP set. This team had participation from seven Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) sites as well as DOE/AL and DP-14 (team members are acknowledged later in this report). Per the Guidance Team, this team, referred to as the Architecture Subcommittee, was to map out and define an EP Architecture for the interagency EPs, make recommendations regarding a more agile process for EP approval and suggest an aggressive timeline to develop the combined EPs. The Architecture Subcommittee was asked to brief their output at the February Guidance Team meeting. This SAND report documents the results of the Architecture Subcommittee`s recommendations.

  18. Experimental research in the phase change materials based on paraffin and expanded perlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiesheng, Liu; Faping, Li; Xiaoqiang, Gong; Rongtang, Zhang

    2018-06-01

    In this study, paraffin (PA)/expanded perlite (EP) form-stable phase change material (PCM) was first fabricated using the direct impregnation method without vacuum treatment. Absorptive capacity results showed that the PA/EP composite can obtain good absorptive capacity with the temperature 80 °C and the time 2 h. Compared with the water absorption of EP, the decrease in the water absorption of PA/EP form-stable proved that the absorption of PA into porous EP has been carried out successfully. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) results show that paraffin can be well impregnated into EP pores and has good compatibility with it. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results reveal that paraffin/EP composite PCM has melting temperature and latent heat of 53.6 °C and 91.3 J/g, respectively. The durability cycles results suggest that form-stable PA/EP PCM shows good durability.

  19. Combined effect of gamma radiation and stress cracking in polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Fernando A.; Rabello, Marcelo S.; Silva, Leonardo G.A.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the combined effect of gamma radiation and stress cracking in polystyrene. Three different grades of polystyrene were analysed. The material was submitted to tensile tests and relaxation, analysis of molecular weight and determination of crosslinking. The results showed an increase in tensile strength in the specimens that had been exposed to radiation. The higher the molecular weight polystyrene showed better mechanical properties and after suffering the effects of gamma radiation there was an increase of 5.67% in the resistance to stress cracking effects. (author)

  20. Rooting gene trees without outgroups: EP rooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, Janet S; Little, Roderick J A; Lake, James A

    2012-01-01

    Gene sequences are routinely used to determine the topologies of unrooted phylogenetic trees, but many of the most important questions in evolution require knowing both the topologies and the roots of trees. However, general algorithms for calculating rooted trees from gene and genomic sequences in the absence of gene paralogs are few. Using the principles of evolutionary parsimony (EP) (Lake JA. 1987a. A rate-independent technique for analysis of nucleic acid sequences: evolutionary parsimony. Mol Biol Evol. 4:167-181) and its extensions (Cavender, J. 1989. Mechanized derivation of linear invariants. Mol Biol Evol. 6:301-316; Nguyen T, Speed TP. 1992. A derivation of all linear invariants for a nonbalanced transversion model. J Mol Evol. 35:60-76), we explicitly enumerate all linear invariants that solely contain rooting information and derive algorithms for rooting gene trees directly from gene and genomic sequences. These new EP linear rooting invariants allow one to determine rooted trees, even in the complete absence of outgroups and gene paralogs. EP rooting invariants are explicitly derived for three taxon trees, and rules for their extension to four or more taxa are provided. The method is demonstrated using 18S ribosomal DNA to illustrate how the new animal phylogeny (Aguinaldo AMA et al. 1997. Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods, and other moulting animals. Nature 387:489-493; Lake JA. 1990. Origin of the metazoa. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87:763-766) may be rooted directly from sequences, even when they are short and paralogs are unavailable. These results are consistent with the current root (Philippe H et al. 2011. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella. Nature 470:255-260).

  1. E.P.S. HUAYCO: DECLARACIONES

    OpenAIRE

    Falla, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    EL ARTISTA Y LA ÉPOCA: UN «HUAYCO» DE CREACIÓN COLECTIVA» RICARDO FALLA Hace aproximadamente 3 años [sic], apareció en Barranco el Taller de Arte «Huayco» EPS con el deliberado propósito de mostrar las esencias de nuestro ser nacional. Francisco Mariotti (36), María Luy (30), Charo Noriega (23), Mariela Zevallos (21), Herbert Rodríguez (21), Armando Williams (24) y juan Javier Salazar (25), integrantes de esta singular experiencia, decidieron apoyarse mutuamente para «crear una alternativa o ...

  2. Prospects of the future ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekhin, S.I.; Boos, Eh.Eh.; Borodulin, V.I.; Dzhikiya, G.V.; Slabospitskij, S.R.; Smirnov, A.Yu.; Sultanov, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities of ep colliders with √=1.1 and 2.4 TeV to investigate new physics at the l∼10 -17 cm have been considered. UNK with linear electron accelerator enables to investigate the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking in the standard model, interactions conditioned by new gauge bosons, the properties if excited leptons and quarks of the first family, the structure of contact interactions, predicted by preon models, the properties of SUSY-partners of electrons and light quarks

  3. Fibrous Concrete with Reduced Permeability to Protect the Home Against the Fumes of Expanded Polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fediuk, R. S.; Smoliakov, A. K.; Timokhin, R. A.; Stoyushko, N. Yu; Gladkova, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    Designed the composition of the fiber-reinforced concrete on composite binder with high gas-, water- and steam impermeability. With 1.6% of reinforcing steel anchoring a fiber can be obtained in terms of the maximum physical and mechanical properties (Rcompr = 100.9 MPa). It was found that the combined effect of mechanical and chemical activation (the presence of limestone particles) increases the pozzolanic activity of acidic environment. It has a catalytic effect on the reaction activity of the surface of ash and sand during machining in vario-planetary mill. Furthermore, the introduction of limestone increases the alkalinity of the concrete, which leads to the formation of greater hydration products of cement per unit of time. Theoretical and experimental results can be recommended for enhanced implementation of the construction in various regions of the World, taking into account the availability of raw materials.

  4. Synthesis of micro-sized polystyrene magnetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Juliete S.; Suarez, Paulo A.Z.; Umpierre, Alexandre P.; Machado, Fabricio; Souza Junior, Fernando G. de

    2011-01-01

    The present work illustrates the synthesis of spherical and micro-sized polystyrene magnetic particles by using a water-based suspension polymerization process to incorporate in situ surface modified superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. The crystallite size of Fe 3 O 4 was determined to be equal to 7.7 nm, based on Scherrer's equation and XRD measurement. According to EDX analyses, Fe 3 O 4 / polystyrene nanocomposites particles show strong characteristic peaks Kα and Kβ of iron at the interval from 6.38 KeV to 7.04 KeV with an amount of iron in the samples equal to 98 %, indicating that the inorganic material dispersed in the polystyrene matrix is essentially Fe in the form of iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ). The obtained polymeric materials presented good magnetic behavior, indicating that the modified Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were successfully dispersed in the polystyrene particles. (author)

  5. ESR studies of the radiation effects on polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, R.W.; O'Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the polystyrene system (both pure and commercial samples) to elucidate the type and percentage of each paramagnetic species upon exposure to various irradiation doses. The size of dose plays a vital role in the type of spectra obtained. Upon irradiation in vacuo, polystyrene displays ESR spectra which are basically triplet in character but the line spacing and intensities of components are observed to depend on the magnitude of the irradiation dose. G value for the total radicals present and for the individual species present as a function of dose have been obtained. The relative concentration of each paramagnetic species has been determined through computer simulation of the observed ESR spectra. The relative stability of the different species with respect to temperature is discussed. The results for deuterated polystyrene is used to support those obtained for the unsubstituted polystyrene system. (author)

  6. Mortar modified with sulfonated polystyrene produced from waste plastic cups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. C. MOTTA

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, we studied the addition of sulfonated polystyrene produced from waste plastic cups as an admixture for mortars. Mortars were analyzed with polystyrene content of 0.0; 0.2; 0.6; 1.0 and 1.4% in relation to the cement mass. The influence of polystyrene on the mortars' properties was evaluated by the consistency index, water retention, water absorption, porosity, elasticity modulus, compressive strength, flexural strength, bond tensile strength and microscopy. The increase in the sulfonated polystyrene content decreased the elasticity modulus of the mortar and, despite higher porosity, there was a reduction of water absorption by capillarity. In relation to mortar without admixture, the modified mortar showed an increase in water retention and consistency index, and a large increase in flexural strength and bond tensile strength. The significant increase of bond tensile strength (214% with admixture 1% highlights the potential of the produced material as an adhesive mortar.

  7. Constancy in composition of polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.J.; Nath, R.

    1979-01-01

    Variations in the atomic compostion, and mass and electron densities of polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate (PMM) plastics were assessed from experimentally determined mass attenuation coefficients for 125 I and 137 Cs gamma rays. The means and standard deviations in the mass densities of 16 samples of PMM and 10 samples of polystyrene were found to be 1.174 +- 1.4% and 1.042 +- 0.6% g/cm 3 , respectively. Based upon transmission measurements on various solutions of ethyl alcohol in water, the standard deviations in the effective atomic numbers of PMM and polystyrene were determined to be 0.77% and 1.3%, respectively. Based upon experimentally determined mass attenuation coefficients for 137 Cs, the standard deviations in electron density for PMM and polystyrene were 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Similar measurements on tap water and two grades of distilled water failed to detect any differences in atomic composition

  8. Behavior of positronium in polystyrene and its derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Y.; Watanabe, M.; Tashiro, M.; Terashima, Y.; Miyamoto, K.; Kimura, N.; Tagawa, S.

    2003-01-01

    The polystyrene, poly(4-bromostyrene) and poly(4-vinylphenol) are investigated using slow positron beam based on electron linac. There was a difference in the intensity of long-lived component of lifetime in o-Ps (τ 3 ). The S-parameter and the intensity of τ 3 were strongly influenced by the presence of the substituents of polystyrene. In thin films, irradiation effect caused by positron beam was observed

  9. On the Importance of Purification of Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Akhil K.; Roy, Sandip; Juvekar, Vinay A.

    2012-01-01

    Ion exchange is commonly employed for purification of sodium polystyrene sulfonate (NaPSS), a molecule widely used as a model polyelectrolyte. However, the present work demonstrates that the ion exchange process itself may introduce some extraneous species into NaPSS samples by two possible mechanisms: (i) chemical transformation of polystyrene sulfonic acid (HPSS), a relatively unstable intermediate formed during ion exchange and (ii) release of small amount of “condensed” acid from cationic...

  10. The polymerization of aniline in polystyrene latex particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blinova, Natalia V.; Reynaud, S.; Roby, F.; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 160, 15/16 (2010), s. 1598-1602 ISSN 0379-6779 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500905; GA ČR GA203/08/0686; GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyaniline * polystyrene latex * polyaniline-polystyrene composite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.871, year: 2010

  11. Formation of core (polystyrene)-shell (polybenzimidazole) nanoparticles using sulfonated polystyrene as template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Mousumi; Arunbabu, Dhamodaran; Jana, Tushar

    2010-11-15

    We report formation of core (polystyrene)-shell (polybenzimidazole) nanoparticles from a new blend system consisting of an amorphous polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) and an ionomer sodium salt of sulfonated polystyrene (SPS-Na). The ionomer used for the blending is spherical in shape with sulfonate groups on the surface of the particles. An in depth investigation of the blends at various sulfonation degrees and compositions using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy provides direct evidence of specific hydrogen bonding interactions between the N-H groups of PBI and the sulfonate groups of SPS-Na. The disruption of PBI chains self association owing to the interaction between the functional groups of these polymer pairs is the driving force for the blending. Thermodynamical studies carried out by using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) establish partially miscible phase separated blending of these polymers in a wider composition range. The two distinguishable glass transition temperatures (T(g)) which are different from the neat components and unaltered with the blends composition attribute that the domain size of heterogeneity (d(d)) of the blends is >20 nm since one of the blend component (SPS-Na particle) diameter is ∼70 nm. The diminish of PBI chains self association upon blending with SPS-Na particles and the presence of invariant T(g)'s of the blends suggest the wrapping of PBI chains over the SPS-Na spherical particle surface and hence resulting a core-shell morphology. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study provides direct evidence of core-shell nanoparticle formation; where core is the polystyrene and shell is the PBI. The sulfonation degree affects the blends phase separations. The higher degree of sulfonation favors the disruption of PBI self association and thus forms partially miscible two phases blends with core-shell morphology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ''Nonisolated-sensor'' solid polystyrene absorbed dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitz, L.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A ''nonisolated-sensor'' solid polystyrene calorimeter was constructed to test the role of thermal diffusion in limiting the length of irradiation time during which temperature measurements with nonisolated sensors could be made sufficiently free of drift for determining dose with radiation fields such as gamma rays, x rays, and high-energy electrons. From measured ratios of dose at 5.0 and 0.5 cm in polystyrene and comparisons to dose measurements with a polystyrene parallel-plate (pancake) ion chamber, it was shown that thermal diffusion is sufficiently small in polystyrene to permit accurate measurements for irradiation periods of less than 20 min. Comparison of the absorbed dose measurements and depth dose ratios with pancake ion chambers and calorimeter showed, that within the precision and accuracy of the two measuring systems, there is close agreement. The nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter has the interesting features of (i) simplicity of construction, (ii) simplicity of operation without vacuum or feedback for temperature control, (iii) capability of simultaneous measurements at several depths and off-axis positions, (iv) the very small thermal defect correction with polystyrene, and (v) operation with the calorimeter in any orientation

  13. Nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene absorbed dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitz, L.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter was constructed to test the role of thermal diffusion in limiting the length of irradiation time during which temperature measurements with nonisolated sensors could be made sufficiently free of drift for determining dose with radiation fields such as gamma rays, x rays, and high-energy electrons. From measured ratios of dose at 5.0 and 0.5 cm in polystyrene and comparisons to dose measurements with a polystyrene parallel-plate (pancake) ion chamber, it was shown that thermal diffusion is sufficiently small in polystyrene to permit accurate measurements for irradiation periods of less than 20 min. Comparison of the absorbed dose measurements and depth dose ratios with pancake ion chambers and calorimeter showed, that within the precision and accuracy of the two measuring systems, there is close agreement. The nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter has the interesting features of (i) simplicity of construction, (ii) simplicity of operation without vacuum or feedback for temperature control, (iii) capability of simultaneous measurements at several depths and off-axis positions, (iv) the very small thermal defect correction with polystyrene, and (v) operation with the calorimeter in any orientation

  14. Organic nanostructures on silicon, created with semitransparent polystyrene spheres and 248 nm laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, Erhard W; Manke, Charles W; Piparia, Reema; Baird, Ronald J

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of nanostructures are made starting with a template of close-packed, polystyrene spheres on a silicon surface. The spheres are either 1.091 or 2.99 μm in diameter (d) and are of polystyrene (PS). They are irradiated with a pulse of either 308 or 248 nm light to which they are transparent and semitransparent, respectively. A transparent sphere with d = 1.091 μm diameter concentrates incident light onto a small substrate area. As has been previously reported, that creates silicon nanobumps that rise from circular craters. At 248 nm and d = 2.99 μm, the light energy is mainly absorbed, destroys the sphere, and leaves a shrunken mass (typically about 500 nm wide and 100 nm high) of organic material that is probably polystyrene and its thermal degradation products. At 248 nm and d = 1.091 μm, the residual organic structures are on the order of 300 nm wide and 100 nm high. A distinctive feature is that these organic structures are connected by filaments that are on the order of 50 nm wide and 10 nm high. Filaments form because the close-packed PS spheres expand into each other during the early part of the laser pulse, and then, as the main structures shrink, their viscoelasticity leads to threads between them. Our results with 248 nm and d = 1.091 μm differ from those described by Huang et al with 248 nm and d = 1.0 μm. Future studies might include the further effect of wavelength and fluence upon the process as well the use of other materials and the replacement of nanospheres by other focusing shapes, such as ellipsoids or rods

  15. A novel anion exchange membrane from polystyrene (ethylene butylene) polystyrene: Synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinodh, Rajangam; Ilakkiya, Arjunan; Elamathi, Swaminathan; Sangeetha, Dharmalingam

    2010-01-01

    We look forward for an eco-friendly hydrocarbon polymer with higher molecular weight for the preparation of an anion exchange membrane. Polystyrene ethylene butylene polystyrene (PSEBS) was chosen as the polymer matrix. The anion exchange membrane was prepared from PSEBS tri-block co-polymer and then the properties were characterized for alkaline fuel cell application. The preparation of anion exchange polymer involved two steps namely chloromethylation and quaternization. The anion exchange membrane with high conductivity has been prepared by introducing quaternary ammonium groups in to the polymer. Finally, the membrane was prepared using solution casting method. The solution casting method yields highly hydrophilic membranes with uniform structure that were suitable for electrochemical applications. The efficiency of the entrapment was monitored by swelling ratio, chemical stability and ion exchange measurement. The characteristic structural properties of the membrane were investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy and 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the membrane was characterized by TGA, DSC and DMA (dynamic mechanical analysis). The prepared uniform electrolyte membrane in this study has high thermal and chemical stability. The surface morphology and elemental composition of the quaternized PSEBS was determined by SEM-EDXA techniques, respectively. The measured hydroxyl ion conductivity of the synthesized alkaline PSEBS polymer electrolyte membrane showed ionic conductivity in the range of 10 -3 S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. It was found that the substitution provided a flexible, chemically and thermally stable membrane. Hence, the membrane will have potential application in the alkaline fuel cell.

  16. A strange nucleon probe: the parity violation in ep{yields}ep; Une etrange sonde du nucleon: la violation de parite en diffusion ep{yields}ep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavata, Ch

    1998-10-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed the importance of strange quarks in the description of the spin structure of the proton. This unexpected fact has spurred an intense experimental activity to study the contribution of strange quarks to other aspects of the nucleon. In this framework experiments have been designed to weigh up this contribution to the charge distribution and the magnetization of the nucleon. The experimental way that leads to the measuring of the s-quark contribution is presented. The strange form factor can be deduced from the weak form factor of the proton combined with its electromagnetic form factors. The weak form factor can be measured by studying parity violation in ep elastic scattering. One of the chapters reviews the experimental equipment required to perform parity breaking measurements.The preliminary results of 2 experiments: SAMPLE and HAPPEX are given. (A.C.)

  17. EP1000 anticipated transient without scram analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiu, G.; Frogheri, M.; Schulz, T.L.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the main results of the Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) analysis activity, performed for the European Passive Plant Program (EPP). The behavior of the EP1000 plant following an ATWS has been analyzed by means of the RELAP5/Mod3.2 code. An ATWS is defined as an Anticipated Transient accompanied by a common mode failure in the reactor protection system, such that the control rods do not scram as required to mitigate the consequences of the transient. According to the experience gained in PWR design, the limiting ATWS events, in a PWR, have been found to be the heatup transients caused by a reduction of heat removal capability by the secondary side of the plant. For this reason, the Loss of Normal Feedwater initiating event, to which the failure of the reactor scram is associated, has been analyzed. The purpose of the study is to verify the performance requirements set for the core feedback characteristics (that is to evaluate the effect of the low boron core neutron kinetic parameters), the overpressure protection system, and boration systems to cope with the EUR Acceptance Criteria for ATWS. Another purpose of this analysis was to support development of revised PSA success criteria that would reduce the contribution of ATWS to the large release frequency (LRF). The low boron core improved the basic EP1000 response to an ATWS event. In particular, the peak pressure was significantly lower than that which would result from a standard core configuration. The improved ATWS analysis results also permitted improved ATWS PSA success criteria. For example, the reduced peak pressure allows the use of other plant features to mitigate the event, including manual initiation of feed-bleed cooling in the event of PRHR HX failure. As a result, the core melt frequency and especially the LRF are significantly reduced. (author)

  18. Modelling of Radiolytical Proceses in Polystyrenic Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, C.

    2006-01-01

    The behavior of polystyrene, poly α-methylstyrene and poly β-methylstyrene structures in ionizing fields was analyzed using computational methods. In this study, the primary radiolytic effect was evaluated using a free radical mechanism. Molecular structures were built and geometrical optimized using quantum-chemical methods. Binding energies for different quantum states and peripheral orbitals distribution were determined. Based on obtained results it was proposed an evaluation model of radiolytical processes in polymers in solid phase. Suggested model suppose to distinguish the dominant processes by binding energies values analysis and LUMO peripheral orbital distribution. Computed binding energies analysis of energetically optimized molecular structures in ionized state (charge +1, multiplicity 2) reveals a high similitude of obtained binding energies for ionized states. The same similitude was observed also in case of total binding energies for neutral state (charge 0, multiplicity 1). Analyzed molecular structures can be associated with ionized molecule state right after one electron capture. This fact suggests that the determined stage of radiolitical fragmentation act is intermediate state of ionized molecule. This molecule captured one electron but it had no necessary time for atoms rearrangement in the molecule for new quantum state. This supposition is in accordance with literature, the time period between excitation act and fragmentation act being lower than 10 - 15 seconds. Based on realized model could be explained the behavior differences of polymeric structures in ionizing radiation field. Preferential fracture of main chains in fragmentation poly α-methylstirene can be explained in accordance with proposed model by C-C from main C bonding energies decreasing in the neighboring of quaternary C

  19. Polystyrene nanoparticles affect Xenopus laevis development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tussellino, Margherita; Ronca, Raffaele [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Biology (Italy); Formiggini, Fabio [Italian Institute of Technology, Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Health Care IIT@CRIB (Italy); Marco, Nadia De [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Biology (Italy); Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo Antonio [Italian Institute of Technology, Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Health Care IIT@CRIB (Italy); Carotenuto, Rosa, E-mail: rosa.carotenuto@unina.it [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Biology (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    Exposing living organisms to nanoparticulates is potentially hazardous, in particular when it takes place during embryogenesis. In this investigation, we have studied the effects of 50-nm-uncoated polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) as a model to investigate the suitability of their possible future employments. We have used the standardized Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus test during the early stages of larval development of Xenopus laevis, and we have employed either contact exposure or microinjections. We found that the embryos mortality rate is dose dependent and that the survived embryos showed high percentage of malformations. They display disorders in pigmentation distribution, malformations of the head, gut and tail, edema in the anterior ventral region, and a shorter body length compared with sibling untreated embryos. Moreover, these embryos grow more slowly than the untreated embryos. Expressions of the mesoderm markers, bra (T-box Brachyury gene), myod1 (myogenic differentiation1), and of neural crest marker sox9 (sex SRY (determining region Y-box 9) transcription factor sox9), are modified. Confocal microscopy showed that the nanoparticles are localized in the cytoplasm, in the nucleus, and in the periphery of the digestive gut cells. Our data suggest that PSNPs are toxic and show a potential teratogenic effect for Xenopus larvae. We hypothesize that these effects may be due either to the amount of NPs that penetrate into the cells and/or to the “corona” effect caused by the interaction of PSNPs with cytoplasm components. The three endpoints of our study, i.e., mortality, malformations, and growth inhibition, suggest that the tests we used may be a powerful and flexible bioassay in evaluating pollutants in aquatic embryos.

  20. Polystyrene nanoparticles affect Xenopus laevis development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tussellino, Margherita; Ronca, Raffaele; Formiggini, Fabio; Marco, Nadia De; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Carotenuto, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Exposing living organisms to nanoparticulates is potentially hazardous, in particular when it takes place during embryogenesis. In this investigation, we have studied the effects of 50-nm-uncoated polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) as a model to investigate the suitability of their possible future employments. We have used the standardized Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus test during the early stages of larval development of Xenopus laevis, and we have employed either contact exposure or microinjections. We found that the embryos mortality rate is dose dependent and that the survived embryos showed high percentage of malformations. They display disorders in pigmentation distribution, malformations of the head, gut and tail, edema in the anterior ventral region, and a shorter body length compared with sibling untreated embryos. Moreover, these embryos grow more slowly than the untreated embryos. Expressions of the mesoderm markers, bra (T-box Brachyury gene), myod1 (myogenic differentiation1), and of neural crest marker sox9 (sex SRY (determining region Y-box 9) transcription factor sox9), are modified. Confocal microscopy showed that the nanoparticles are localized in the cytoplasm, in the nucleus, and in the periphery of the digestive gut cells. Our data suggest that PSNPs are toxic and show a potential teratogenic effect for Xenopus larvae. We hypothesize that these effects may be due either to the amount of NPs that penetrate into the cells and/or to the “corona” effect caused by the interaction of PSNPs with cytoplasm components. The three endpoints of our study, i.e., mortality, malformations, and growth inhibition, suggest that the tests we used may be a powerful and flexible bioassay in evaluating pollutants in aquatic embryos

  1. Selective inhibition of prostaglandin E2 receptors EP2 and EP4 induces apoptosis of human endometriotic cells through suppression of ERK1/2, AKT, NFkappaB, and beta-catenin pathways and activation of intrinsic apoptotic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Sakhila K; Lee, JeHoon; Speights, V O; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Arosh, Joe A

    2009-08-01

    Endometriosis is a benign chronic gynecological disease of reproductive-age women characterized by the presence of functional endometrial tissues outside the uterine cavity. It is an estrogen-dependent disease. Current treatment modalities to inhibit biosynthesis and actions of estrogen compromise menstruation, pregnancy, and the reproductive health of women and fail to prevent reoccurrence of disease. There is a critical need to identify new specific signaling modules for non-estrogen-targeted therapies for endometriosis. In our previous study, we reported that selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 prevented survival, migration, and invasion of human endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells, which was due to decreased prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production. In this study, we determined mechanisms through which PGE(2) promoted survival of human endometriotic cells. Results of the present study indicate that 1) PGE(2) promotes survival of human endometriotic cells through EP2 and EP4 receptors by activating ERK1/2, AKT, nuclear factor-kappaB, and beta-catenin signaling pathways; 2) selective inhibition of EP2 and EP4 suppresses these cell survival pathways and augments interactions between proapoptotic proteins (Bax and Bad) and antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2/Bcl-XL), facilitates the release of cytochrome c, and thus activates caspase-3/poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathways; and 3) these PGE(2) signaling components are more abundantly expressed in ectopic endometriosis tissues compared with eutopic endometrial tissues during the menstrual cycle in women. These novel findings may provide an important molecular framework for further evaluation of selective inhibition of EP2 and EP4 as potential therapy, including nonestrogen target, to expand the spectrum of currently available treatment options for endometriosis in women.

  2. Spacecraft Electrical Power System (EPS) generic analysis tools and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gladys M.; Sheppard, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is provided of the analysis tools and techiques used in modeling the Space Station Freedom electrical power system, as well as future space vehicle power systems. The analysis capabilities of the Electrical Power System (EPS) are described and the EPS analysis tools are surveyed.

  3. Highlights from e-EPS: the 2015 EPS High Energy Physics Prize winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas Lohse, e-EPS News

    2015-01-01

    The EPS High Energy Physics Division announces the winners of its 2015 prizes, which will be awarded at the Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP 2015), Vienna (Austria) 22−29 July. Many people from CERN were among the winners.   The 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to James D. Bjorken “for his prediction of scaling behaviour in the structure of the proton that led to a new understanding of the b interaction”, and to Guido Altarelli, Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Lev Lipatov, and Giorgio Parisi “for developing a probabilistic field theory framework for the dynamics of quarks and gluons, enabling a quantitative understanding of high-energy collisions involving hadrons”. The 2015 Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize, for an outstanding contribution to Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in the past 15 years, is awarded to Francis Halzen “for his visiona...

  4. Highlights from e-EPS: Hetland to receive EPS-PED Award for Secondary School Teaching

    CERN Multimedia

    Urbaan Titulaer

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The EPS Physics Education Division selected Karl Thorstein Hetland, West Telemark Secondary School, Norway, as this year’s recipient of its Secondary School Teaching Award. K.T. Hetland developed the Energy Network, which aims to make students energy conscious and focus on renewable energy. The Energy Network, created in 2005, consists of 15 local networks, each involving an upper secondary school and several lower secondary schools, 55 schools in all. Material from the Network is used in physics classes in a large number of schools at national level and plays a major role in recruiting university physics students. K.T. Hetland will receive his award at the International Physics Education Conference, held together with the European Physics Educati...

  5. Highlights from e-EPS: Jean-Michel Raimond wins EPS Edison-Volta Prize 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Martina Knoop, e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The European Physical Society has the pleasure to announce that the 2014 EPS Edison-Volta Prize is awarded to Jean-Michel Raimond for “seminal contribution to physics (that) have paved the way for novel explorations of quantum mechanics and have opened new routes in quantum information processing”. J.-M. Raimond’s PhD thesis was supervised by Serge Haroche at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, in the early 1980′s, and together S. Haroche, M. Brune and J.-M. Raimond have built an extremely successful research group since then. J.-M. Raimond has made seminal contributions to the development of cavity QED experiments, in particular involving circular Rydberg atoms interacting with very high-Q superc...

  6. Incorporation of Nanohybrid Films of Silica into Recycled Polystyrene Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genoveva Hernández-Padrón

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An alternative for the reutilization of polystyrene waste containers consisting in creating a hybrid material made of SiO2 nanoparticles embedded in a matrix of recycled polystyrene (PSR has been developed. Recycled polystyrene functionalized (PSRF was used to influence the morphological and antifog properties by the sol-gel synthesis of nanohybrid silica. To this end, silica nanoparticles were produced from alkoxide precursors in the presence of recycled polystyrene. The functionalization of this polymeric matrix was with the purpose of uniting in situ carboxyl and silanol groups during the sol-gel process. In this way, opaque or transparent solid substrates can be obtained, with each of these endowed with optical conditions that depend on the amount of reactants employed to prepare each nanohybrid specimen. The nanohybrids were labelled as SiO2/PSR (HPSR and SiO2/PSRF (HPSRF and their properties were then compared to those of commercial polystyrene (PS. All the prepared samples were used for coating glass substrates. The hydrophobicity of the resultant coatings was determined through contact angle measurement. The nanohybrid materials were characterized by FT-IR and 1H-NMR techniques. Additionally, TGA and SEM were employed to determine their thermal and textural properties.

  7. Human plasma fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion to polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, W B; Grunkemeier, J M; Horbett, T A

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to further investigate the role of fibrinogen adsorbed from plasma in mediating platelet adhesion to polymeric biomaterials. Polystyrene was used as a model hydrophobic polymer; i.e., we expected that the role of fibrinogen in platelet adhesion to polystyrene would be representative of other hydrophobic polymers. Platelet adhesion was compared to both the amount and conformation of adsorbed fibrinogen. The strategy was to compare platelet adhesion to surfaces preadsorbed with normal, afibrinogenemic, and fibrinogen-replenished afibrinogenemic plasmas. Platelet adhesion was determined by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) method, which was found to be closely correlated with adhesion of 111In-labeled platelets. Fibrinogen adsorption from afibrinogenemic plasma to polystyrene (Immulon I(R)) was low and polystyrene preadsorbed with fibrinogen-replenished afibrinogenemic plasma. Addition of even small, subnormal concentrations of fibrinogen to afibrinogenemic plasma greatly increased platelet adhesion. In addition, surface-bound fibrinogen's ability to mediate platelet adhesion was different, depending on the plasma concentration from which fibrinogen was adsorbed. These differences correlated with changes in the binding of a monoclonal antibody that binds to the Aalpha chain RGDS (572-575), suggesting alteration in the conformation or orientation of the adsorbed fibrinogen. Platelet adhesion to polystyrene preadsorbed with blood plasma thus appears to be a strongly bivariate function of adsorbed fibrinogen, responsive to both low amounts and altered states of the adsorbed molecule. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. PrEP Whores and HIV Prevention: The Queer Communication of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieldenner, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been introduced as another biomedical tool in HIV prevention. Whereas other such tools-including post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and interruption of perinatal transmission-have been embraced by those impacted by HIV, PrEP has been met with more conflict, especially within the gay community and HIV organizations. The "PrEP whore" has come to designate the social value and personal practices of those taking PrEP. This study examines the "PrEP whore" discourse by using queer theory and quare theory. Within these theoretical vantage points, the study explicates four discursive areas: slut shaming, dirty/clean binaries, mourning the loss of condoms, and reclaiming the inner whore. The study illuminates possible discursive strategies that lie outside of the domains of public health and within the individual and community.

  9. A novel anion exchange membrane from polystyrene (ethylene butylene) polystyrene: Synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinodh, Rajangam; Ilakkiya, Arjunan; Elamathi, Swaminathan [Department of Chemistry, Anna University Chennai, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Sangeetha, Dharmalingam, E-mail: sangeetha@annauniv.ed [Department of Chemistry, Anna University Chennai, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-02-25

    We look forward for an eco-friendly hydrocarbon polymer with higher molecular weight for the preparation of an anion exchange membrane. Polystyrene ethylene butylene polystyrene (PSEBS) was chosen as the polymer matrix. The anion exchange membrane was prepared from PSEBS tri-block co-polymer and then the properties were characterized for alkaline fuel cell application. The preparation of anion exchange polymer involved two steps namely chloromethylation and quaternization. The anion exchange membrane with high conductivity has been prepared by introducing quaternary ammonium groups in to the polymer. Finally, the membrane was prepared using solution casting method. The solution casting method yields highly hydrophilic membranes with uniform structure that were suitable for electrochemical applications. The efficiency of the entrapment was monitored by swelling ratio, chemical stability and ion exchange measurement. The characteristic structural properties of the membrane were investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the membrane was characterized by TGA, DSC and DMA (dynamic mechanical analysis). The prepared uniform electrolyte membrane in this study has high thermal and chemical stability. The surface morphology and elemental composition of the quaternized PSEBS was determined by SEM-EDXA techniques, respectively. The measured hydroxyl ion conductivity of the synthesized alkaline PSEBS polymer electrolyte membrane showed ionic conductivity in the range of 10{sup -3} S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. It was found that the substitution provided a flexible, chemically and thermally stable membrane. Hence, the membrane will have potential application in the alkaline fuel cell.

  10. Variable Lysozyme Transport Dynamics on Oxidatively Functionalized Polystyrene Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moringo, Nicholas A; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Wang, Wenxiao; Bishop, Logan D C; Landes, Christy F

    2017-10-17

    Tuning protein adsorption dynamics at polymeric interfaces is of great interest to many biomedical and material applications. Functionalization of polymer surfaces is a common method to introduce application-specific surface chemistries to a polymer interface. In this work, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is utilized to determine the adsorption dynamics of lysozyme, a well-studied antibacterial protein, at the interface of polystyrene oxidized via UV exposure and oxygen plasma and functionalized by ligand grafting to produce varying degrees of surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, and induced oxygen content. Single-molecule tracking indicates lysozyme loading capacities, and surface mobility at the polymer interface is hindered as a result of all functionalization techniques. Adsorption dynamics of lysozyme depend on the extent and the specificity of the oxygen functionalities introduced to the polystyrene surface. Hindered adsorption and mobility are dominated by hydrophobic effects attributed to water hydration layer formation at the functionalized polystyrene surfaces.

  11. Photooxidation of polystyrene: irradiation at 254 and 365 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otocka, E.P.; Curran, S.; Porter, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Studies have been made of the near surface photooxidation of atactic polystyrene films prepared in the absence of air. The samples were photooxidized on exposure to air at two frequencies, 254 and 365 nm, using a calibrated mercury irradiation source with filters. Most studies were made at 40 0 C and as a function of irradiation time with the reactions characterized by changes in molecular weight and composition. The former was evaluated by gel permeation chromatography and the latter by transmission Fourier transform infrared ir spectroscopy and by multiple-internal-reflectance ir spectra using different angles and different crystals to evaluate compositions as a function of film depth. Species identified in photooxidation include the generation of hydroperoxides and the appearance of carbonyl bands with the latter identified by the spectral shift associated with the exposure of the photooxidized polystyrene surface to ammonia. These results suggest that principal products of near-surface oxidation of polystyrene are carboxylic acids. 6 figures, 1 table

  12. Partially-Functionalized Isotactic Polystyrene with Blocky Comonomer Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Ariel; Powers, Wayne; Ryu, Chang Y.

    2012-02-01

    Isotactic polystyrenes (iPSs) have been functionalized in solution, while the accessibility of functionalizing agent is limited by the formation of crystalline domains at various temperatures. The chemical system used is the borylated isotactic polystyrene system, and we investigated the temperature effects on reaction kinetics to ultimately control the blockiness of borylated segments in the resulting copolymer. The chemical composition of partially borylated iPS reaches a steady state that is dependent on temperature. This synthesis has been performed at many different temperatures, with different steady states being reached at different temperatures. Further analysis by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has shown that the higher temperature reactions have greater effect on breaking down the crystal lattice structure of the isotactic polystyrene. As a result, the lower temperature reactions affect the crystalline structure less, and the resulting copolymer has more blockiness.

  13. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of PMN/CNFs/EP Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Minxian; Huang Zhixiong; Qin Yan

    2011-01-01

    In this research, piezoelectric ceramic PMN(lead magnesium niobate-lead zirconate-lead titanate)/carbon nano-fibers(CNFs)/epoxy resin(EP) ccomposites were prepared and the dynamic mechanical properties and damping mechanism of PMN/CNFs/EP composites were investigated. The addition of CNFs into PMN/EP composite results in decrease of volume resistivity of the composite. When the concentration of CNFs is 0.6% weight of epoxy resin the volume resistivity of PMN/CNFs/EP composite is about 10 8 Ω·m. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicates that the loss factor, loss area, and damping temperature range of PMN/CNFs/EP composites increase with the CNFs content increasing till to 0.6% of weight of epoxy resin. When the CNFs content is more than 0.6% the damping properties of composites decrease oppositely. In PMN/CNFs/EP composites, the CNFs content 0.6% and the volume resistivity of PMN/CNFs/EP composites about 10 8 Ω·m just satisfy the practicing condition of piezo-damping, so the composites show optimal damping property.

  14. Exopolysaccharide (EPS synthesis by Oenococcus oeni: from genes to phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimopoulou

    Full Text Available Oenococcus oeni is the bacterial species which drives malolactic fermentation in wine. The analysis of 50 genomic sequences of O. oeni (14 already available and 36 newly sequenced ones provided an inventory of the genes potentially involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS biosynthesis. The loci identified are: two gene clusters named eps1 and eps2, three isolated glycoside-hydrolase genes named dsrO, dsrV and levO, and three isolated glycosyltransferase genes named gtf, it3, it4. The isolated genes were present or absent depending on the strain and the eps gene clusters composition diverged from one strain to another. The soluble and capsular EPS production capacity of several strains was examined after growth in different culture media and the EPS structure was determined. Genotype to phenotype correlations showed that several EPS biosynthetic pathways were active and complementary in O. oeni. Can be distinguished: (i a Wzy-dependent synthetic pathway, allowing the production of heteropolysaccharides made of glucose, galactose and rhamnose, mainly in a capsular form, (ii a glucan synthase pathway (Gtf, involved in β-glucan synthesis in a free and a cell-associated form, giving a ropy phenotype to growth media and (iii homopolysaccharide synthesis from sucrose (α-glucan or β-fructan by glycoside-hydrolases of the GH70 and GH68 families. The eps gene distribution on the phylogenetic tree was examined. Fifty out of 50 studied genomes possessed several genes dedicated to EPS metabolism. This suggests that these polymers are important for the adaptation of O. oeni to its specific ecological niche, wine and possibly contribute to the technological performance of malolactic starters.

  15. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ A. DE FREITAS PACHECO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  16. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  17. Polystyrene nanoparticles activate ion transport in human airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available J McCarthy1, X Gong2, D Nahirney2, M Duszyk2, MW Radomski11School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Panoz Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Physiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaBackground: Over the last decade, nanotechnology has provided researchers with new nanometer materials, such as nanoparticles, which have the potential to provide new therapies for many lung diseases. In this study, we investigated the acute effects of polystyrene nanoparticles on epithelial ion channel function.Methods: Human submucosal Calu-3 cells that express cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and baby hamster kidney cells engineered to express the wild-type CFTR gene were used to investigate the actions of negatively charged 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles on short-circuit current in Calu-3 cells by Ussing chamber and single CFTR Cl- channels alone and in the presence of known CFTR channel activators by using baby hamster kidney cell patches.Results: Polystyrene nanoparticles caused sustained, repeatable, and concentration-dependent increases in short-circuit current. In turn, these short-circuit current responses were found to be biphasic in nature, ie, an initial peak followed by a plateau. EC50 values for peak and plateau short-circuit current responses were 1457 and 315.5 ng/mL, respectively. Short-circuit current was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a CFTR Cl- channel blocker. Polystyrene nanoparticles activated basolateral K+ channels and affected Cl- and HCO3- secretion. The mechanism of short-circuit current activation by polystyrene nanoparticles was found to be largely dependent on calcium-dependent and cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of CFTR Cl- channels. Recordings from isolated inside-out patches using baby hamster kidney cells confirmed the direct activation of CFTR Cl- channels by the nanoparticles.Conclusion: This is the first study to identify

  18. Radiation-induced chemical processes in polystyrene scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milinchuk, V.K.; Bolbit, N.M.; Klinshpont, E.R.; Tupikov, V.I.; Zhdanov, G.S.; Taraban, S.B.; Shelukhov, I.P.; Smoljanskii, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The regularities established for macroradical accumulation and intensity of radioluminescence under γ-irradiation of a polystyrene scintillator prove benzyl macroradicals to be efficient quenchers of the excited scintillator molecules. Dissolved oxygen was determined to have a constant of the quenching rate 100 times lower than that of macroradicals. Oxygen is an efficient antirad because of participating in oxidation reactions and subsequent recombination of macroradicals. The method was developed to obtain a polymeric scintillator with a polystyrene matrix containing a dispersed system of pores and channels. Radiation resistance of such a scintillator is 5-10 times higher than that of standard types

  19. Preparation of Track Etch Membrane Filters Using Polystyrene Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaewsaenee, Jerawut; Ratanatongchai, Wichian; Supaphol, Pitt; Visal-athaphand, Pinpan

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Polystyrene nuclear track etch membrane filters was prepared by exposed 13 .m thin film polystyrene with fission fragment. Nuclear latent track was enlarged to through hole on the film by etching with 80 o C 40% H 2 SO 4 with K 2 Cr 2 O 7 solution for 6-10 hour. The hole size was depend on concentration of etching solution and etching time with 1.3-3.4 .m hole diameter. The flow rate test of water was 0.79-1.56 mm cm-2 min-1 at 109.8-113.7 kPa pressure

  20. Optical Properies of Polystyrene Films Doped by Methyl Green Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrar A. Saeed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of methyl green (MG dye on the optical properties of polystyrene (PS have been studied. Pure polystyrene and MG doped PS films were prepared by using casting method. These films were characterized using UV/VIS spectrophotometer technique in order to estimate the type of electric transition which was found to be indirect transition. The value of the optical energy gap was decreased with increasing doping ratios of methyl green dye. Absorption coefficient, extinction coefficient, refractive index and energy gap have been also investigated; it was found that all the above parameters affects by doping dye.

  1. HYDRATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF BLENDED CEMENT WITH SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene foamed plastic wastes are a kind of environmental pollutant. It could be recycled in cement industry as a chemical agent. In this paper, the effects of sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS on the hydration and microstructure of blended cement were investigated by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP. SPS slightly delayed the hydration of alite and decreased its hydration degree. SPS did not change the phase compositions during hydration. SPS changed the morphology of ettringite (AFt and decreased the pore volumes and the sizes of pores.

  2. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis: Exploring the potential for expanding the role of pharmacists in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Olihe; Hillman, Lisa

    2018-05-19

    The study objectives were to a) assess knowledge and experience; b) describe perceptions and attitudes; and c) identify training needs of community-based pharmacists regarding HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). This was a cross-sectional survey study. The survey was administered online to pharmacists practicing in a community setting in the state of Minnesota. Measures included knowledge of and experience with HIV PrEP, perceptions and attitudes towards pharmacists' involvement, and HIV PrEP-specific training needs for pharmacists. With a survey response rate of approximately 13% (n = 347), most respondents (76.4%) agreed that HIV PrEP can be beneficial in high-risk populations. Forty-six percent of respondents were not aware of U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for PrEP. Most respondents (71.1%) were "not at all familiar" with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for PrEP. Twenty-one percent of respondents had sufficient knowledge to counsel patients on PrEP. Experience with counseling on PrEP (21.8%), having dispensed PrEP in the last 2 years (33.1%), fewer years in practice (≤10 years), location of practice site (urban or suburban), and having received HIV continuing education in the last 2 years (33.0%) were associated with more knowledge of HIV PrEP. Top concerns with counseling were knowledge about the medication and behavior modification. The most frequently indicated primary concerns with implementing PrEP initiatives were identifying appropriate candidates and patient adherence. As pharmacists' roles continue to expand, relevant content in pharmacy education and requisite training (including continuing education) are critical to addressing knowledge gaps and competencies that will enable pharmacists engage more effectively in public health efforts such as HIV prevention. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by Serratia sp.1 using wastewater sludge as raw material and flocculation activity of the EPS produced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezawada, J; Hoang, N V; More, T T; Yan, S; Tyagi, N; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2013-10-15

    Growth profile and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production of Serratia sp.1 was studied in shake flask fermentation for 72 h using wastewater sludge as raw material. Maximum cell concentration of 6.7 × 10(9) cfu/mL was obtained at 48 h fermentation time. EPS dry weight, flocculation activity and dewaterability of different EPS (tightly bound or TB-EPS, loosely bound or LB-EPS and broth-EPS or B-EPS) were also measured. The highest concentration of LB-EPS (2.45 g/L) and TB-EPS (0.99 g/L) were attained at 48 h of fermentation. Maximum flocculation activity and dewaterability (ΔCST) of TB-EPS (76.4%, 14.5s and 76.5%, 15.5s), LB-EPS (67.8%, 8.1s and 64.7%, 7.6s) and broth EPS (61%, 6.1s and 70.4%, 6.8s) were obtained at 36 and 48 h of growth. Higher flocculation activity and dewaterability were achieved with TB-EPS than with the two other EPS. Characterization of TB-EPS and LB-EPS was done in terms of their protein and carbohydrate content. Protein content was much higher in TB-EPS where as carbohydrate content was only slightly higher in TB-EPS than LB-EPS. Morphology of the Serratia strain after fermentation in sludge and TSB was observed under a scanning electron microscope and the cell size was found to be bigger in the sludge medium than the TSB medium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hot-blade cutting of EPS foam for double-curved surfaces—numerical simulation and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, Kiril P.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, experimental and numerical studies of a newly developed process of Hot-Blade Cutting used for free forming of double-curved surfaces and cost effective rapid prototyping of expanded polystyrene foam is carried out. The experimental part of the study falls in two parts...... during the cutting process. A novel measurement method for determination of kerfwidth (i.e., the gap space after material removal) applying a commercially available large-scale optical 3D scanning technique was developed and used. A one-dimensional thermo-electro-mechanical numerical model for Hot...

  5. Prefabricated EPS Elements used as Strip Foundation of a Single-family House with a Double Brick Wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2008-01-01

    A new prefabricated lightweight element was designed for a strip foundation that was demonstrated on site as the base of a single-family house with a double brick wall. The element was placed on a stable surface underneath the top soil layer, just 0.25 m underneath the finished ground surface....... The prefabricated element was designed to fulfil the requirements of low energy consumption required by the new Danish Building Regulations. The base of the house was cast in one working operation and completed within two working days. The element, made of expanded polystyrene, was designed to be handled on site...

  6. EpCAM nuclear localization identifies aggressive Thyroid Cancer and is a marker for poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Christina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain (EpEx of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM and nuclear signaling by its intracellular oncogenic domain Ep-ICD has recently been implicated in increased proliferation of cancer cells. The clinical significance of Ep-ICD in human tumors remains an enigma. Methods EpEx, Ep-ICD and β-catenin immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies was conducted on 58 archived thyroid cancer (TC tissue blocks from 34 patients and correlated with survival analysis of these patients for up to 17 years. Results The anaplastic (ATC and aggressive thyroid cancers showed loss of EpEx and increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD. In contrast, the low grade papillary thyroid cancers (PTC showed membranous EpEx and no detectable nuclear Ep-ICD. The ATC also showed concomitant nuclear expression of Ep-ICD and β-catenin. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis revealed reduced overall survival (OS for TC patients showing nuclear Ep-ICD expression or loss of membranous EpEx (p Conclusion We report reciprocal loss of membrane EpEx but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD in aggressive TC; nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor OS of TC patients. Thus nuclear Ep-ICD localization may serve as a useful biomarker for aggressive TC and may represent a novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic target for aggressive TC.

  7. EpsA is an essential gene in exopolysaccharide production in Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertli, Enes; Mayer, Melinda J; Colquhoun, Ian J; Narbad, Arjan

    2016-07-01

    Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 has an eps gene cluster which is required for the biosynthesis of homopolymeric exopolysaccharides (EPS)-1 and heteropolymeric EPS-2 as a capsular layer. The first gene of the cluster, epsA, is the putative transcriptional regulator. In this study we showed the crucial role of epsA in EPS biosynthesis by demonstrating that deletion of epsA resulted in complete loss of both EPS-1 and EPS-2 on the cell surface. Plasmid complementation of the epsA gene fully restored EPS production, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Furthermore, this complementation resulted in a twofold increase in the expression levels of this gene, which almost doubled amounts of EPS production in comparison with the wild-type strain. Analysis of EPS by NMR showed an increased ratio of the heteropolysaccharide to homopolysaccharide in the complemented strain and allowed identification of the acetylated residue in EPS-2 as the (1,4)-linked βGlcp unit, with the acetyl group located at O-6. These findings indicate that epsA is a positive regulator of EPS production and that EPS production can be manipulated by altering its expression. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Epidermal growth factor pathway substrate 15, Eps15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Chen, H; Iannolo, G

    1999-01-01

    Eps15 was originally identified as a substrate for the kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Eps15 has a tripartite structure comprising a NH2-terminal portion, which contains three EH domains, a central putative coiled-coil region, and a COOH-terminal domain containing...... multiple copies of the amino acid triplet Aspartate-Proline-Phenylalanine. A pool of Eps15 is localized at clathrin coated pits where it interacts with the clathrin assembly complex AP-2 and a novel AP-2 binding protein, Epsin. Perturbation of Eps15 and Epsin function inhibits receptor-mediated endocytosis...... of EGF and transferrin, demonstrating that both proteins are components of the endocytic machinery. Since the family of EH-containing proteins is implicated in various aspects of intracellular sorting, biomolecular strategies aimed at interfering with these processes can now be envisioned...

  9. PrEP implementation research in Africa: what is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Frances M; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Sanders, Eduard J; Mugo, Nelly R; Guedou, Fernand A; Alary, Michel; Behanzin, Luc; Mugurungi, Owen; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Of the two million new HIV infections in adults in 2014, 70% occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. Several African countries have already approved guidelines for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for individuals at substantial risk of HIV as part of combination HIV prevention but key questions remain about how to identify and deliver PrEP to those at greatest need. Throughout the continent, individuals in sero-discordant relationships, and members of key populations (sex workers, men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender women and injection drug users) are likely to benefit from the availability of PrEP. In addition, adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) are at substantial risk in some parts of the continent. It has been estimated that at least three million individuals in Africa are likely to be eligible for PrEP according to WHO's criteria. Tens of demonstration projects are planned or underway across the continent among a range of countries, populations and delivery settings. In each of the target populations, there are overarching issues related to (i) creating demand for PrEP, (ii) addressing supply-side issues and (iii) providing appropriate and tailored adherence support. Critical for creating demand for PrEP is the normalization of HIV prevention. Community-level interventions which engage opinion leaders as well as empowerment interventions for those at highest risk will be key. Critical to supply of PrEP is that services are accessible for all, including for stigmatized populations. Establishing accessible integrated services provides the opportunity to address other public health priorities including the unmet need for HIV testing, contraception and sexually transmitted infections treatment. National policies need to include minimum standards for training and quality assurance for PrEP implementation and to address supply chain issues. Adherence support needs to recognize that social and structural factors are likely to have an important influence

  10. Syntheses, magnetic and spectral studies on polystyrene supported ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    DMF results in the formation of polystyrene-anchored monobasic bidentate Schiff base, ... studied ligands in coordination chemistry. On ac- count of their pronounced coordinating properties, a ... Experimental ... temperature and then was suction-filtered, washed .... vent due to its high dielectric constant and its ability.

  11. Adsorption of lysozyme unto silica and polystyrene surfaces in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption capacity of lysozyme (chicken egg white) from aqueous solutions unto silica and polystyrene interfaces was studied at varying lysozyme concentrations and ionic strength. The studies revealed an increase in adsorption capacity with increase in concentration and with maximum adsorption densities of 1.34 ...

  12. Spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of polystyrene films under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of polystyrene films under air plasma and He-Ne laser treatment ... The parameters such as (1) surface area by contact angle measurements, (2) quality of material before and after treatment by SEM and FTIR spectra and (3) material characterization by UV-vis spectra were studied.

  13. Fabrication of Cationic Exchange Polystyrene Nanofibers for Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To prepare polystyrene nanofiber ion exchangers (PSNIE) with surface cation exchange functionality using a new method based on electrospinning and also to optimize crosslinking and sulfonation reactions to obtain PSNIE with maximum ion exchange capacity (IEC). Method: The nanofibers were prepared from ...

  14. Rheological Behavior of Entangled Polystyrene-Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) Copolymer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Jian; Mather, Patrick T; Haddad, Timothy S; Kim, Gyeong-Man

    2006-01-01

    ...: random copolymers of polystyrene (PS) and styryl-based polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS), R7(Si8O12)(C6H4CH=CH2), with R = isobutyl (iBu). A series of styrene-styryl POSS random copolymers with 0, 6, 15, 30, 50 wt...

  15. Melt dispersion of thermoplastic polystyrene in polymer polyols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    Polystyrene is dispersed into a polyol via a mechanical dispersion process. A stabilizer is present to stabilize the dispersed polymer particles. The stabilizer includes a copolymer of (1) from 10 to 70% by weight of a branched polyol which has a molecular weight of from 4000 to 20,000, from 0.2 to

  16. Fabrication of polystyrene/agave particle biocomposites using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polystyrene (PS) composites reinforced with ungrafted and acrylonitrile (AN) grafted agave particles (AgP) have been prepared with 10–30% particle content by weight using compression molding technique. The composite specimens thus prepared were subjected to the evaluation of mechanical, chemical, flammability and ...

  17. Preparation and thermal properties of polystyrene/silica nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bera, O.; Pilić, B.; Pavličević, J.; Jovičić, M.; Holló, B.; Meszaros Szecsenyi, K.; Špírková, Milena

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 515, č. 1/2 (2011), s. 1-5 ISSN 0040-6031 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX08240901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polystyrene * silica nanoparticles * nanocomposites Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 1.805, year: 2011

  18. Microporous polystyrene particles for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliva, Maria; Armatas, Gerasimos S; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2012-02-07

    This study presents the synthesis of microporous polystyrene particles and the potential use of these materials in CO(2) capture for biogas purification. Highly cross-linked polystyrene particles are synthesized by the emulsion copolymerization of styrene (St) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in water. The cross-link density of the polymer is varied by altering the St/DVB molar ratio. The size and the morphology of the particles are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Following supercritical point drying with carbon dioxide or lyophilization from benzene, the polystyrene nanoparticles exhibit a significant surface area and permanent microporosity. The dried particles comprising 35 mol % St and 65 mol % DVB possess the largest surface area, ∼205 m(2)/g measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and ∼185 m(2)/g measured by the Dubinin-Radushkevich method, and a total pore volume of 1.10 cm(3)/g. Low pressure measurements suggest that the microporous polystyrene particles exhibit a good separation performance of CO(2) over CH(4), with separation factors in the range of ∼7-13 (268 K, CO(2)/CH(4) = 5/95 gas mixture), which renders them attractive candidates for use in gas separation processes.

  19. Radiation damage studies on polystyrene-based scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvich, G.I.; Peresypkin, A.I.; Rykalin, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation resistance of polystyrene-based scintillators containing various scintillation dopes is reported. All samples were irradiated to 137 Cs gamma rays in air at room temperature. The examination of radiation resistance of about thirty fluorescence compounds has been made. The most radiation-hard fluores are X25, X31, 3HF and M3HF. 1 fig.; 6 tabs

  20. Nanocomposite of polystyrene foil grafted with metallaboranes for antimicrobial activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benkocká, M.; Kolářová, K.; Matoušek, J.; Semerádtová, A.; Šícha, Václav; Kolská, Z.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 441, MAY (2018), s. 120-129 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Antimicrobial activity * Chemical grafting * Metallaboranes * Piranha solution * Polystyrene * Surface properties Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  1. Steady shear rheology of dilute polystyrene particle gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkersma, R.; Diemen, van A.J.G.; Laven, J.; Stein, H.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on dispersions of monodisperse polystyrene (PS) spheres with a typical radius of 1 µm, dispersed in an electrolyte at high ionic strength, screening the electrostatic repulsion. These suspensions gelate at rest even at low volume fractions of PS particles.

  2. Structures and Logic of EP Implementation and Administration in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Grunow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes empirical observations gathered during a research project on the implementation of environmental protection (EP policies in China. The project focused on local EP in both urban and rural areas. Policy field analysis was used as a conceptual framework for structuring the observations. The paper develops in three main steps discussing the following topics: 1 Collective problems within the policy field of EP show that EP issues in general are unlike those of other policy fields. Official EP policies in China today resemble those of other countries – but they are separating issues and responsibilities, making local implementation very demanding. 2 China lags behind in its willingness and ability to implement these policies – leading to implementation gaps. To explore the causes and consequences, specific sites in China are described in an extended look at local implementation structures. It was found that although policies in China are basically the same everywhere, the structures for implementing them and the quality of their implementation vary widely with regard to resources, organization, coordination, staff qualifications, personnel placement, and other aspects. 3 Not all of the challenges hampering local implementation of environmental policies were China-specific; however, some of those which are can be described as the macro-context: an ineffective rule of law, insufficient involvement of civil society, and complicated macro-structures of public administration prevent a generally high level of successful EP implementation in China.

  3. Neuron cell positioning on polystyrene in culture by silver-negative ion implantation and region control of neural outgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroko; Baba, Takahiro; Ikemura, Shin'ichi; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2000-01-01

    A new method to control the position of neuron cell attachment and extension region of neural outgrowth has been developed by using a pattering ion implantation with silver-negative ions into polystyrene dishes. This technique offers a promising method to form an artificially designed neural network in cell culture in vitro. Silver-negative ions were implanted into non-treated polystyrene dishes (NTPS) at conditions of 20 keV and 3x10 15 ions/cm 2 through a pattering mask, which had as many as 67 slits of 60 μm in width and 4 mm in length with a spacing of 60 μm. For cell culture in vitro, nerve cells of PC-12h (rat adrenal phechromocytoma) were used because they respond to a nerve growth factor (NGF). In the first 2 days in culture without NGF, we observed a selective cell attachment only to the ion-implanted region in patterning Ag - implanted polystyrene sample (p-Ag/NTPS). In another 2 days in culture with NGF, the nerve cells expanded neurites only over the ion-implanted region. For collagen-coated p-Ag/NTPS sample of which collagen was coated after the ion implantation (Collagen/p-Ag/NTPS), most nerve cells were also attached on the ion-implanted region. However, neurites expanded in both ion-implanted and unimplanted regions. The contact angle of NTPS decreased after the ion implantation from 86 deg. to 74 deg. . The region selectivity of neuron attachment and neurite extension is considered to be due to contact angle lowering by the ion implantation as radiation effect on the surface

  4. Energy saving by the use of polystyrene in construction; Ahorro de energia por la utilizacion de poliestireno en la construccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel, Raul [Polioles S. A. de C. V., Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    In the past last years, the building industry has been faced with requirements in the rational energy use and environmental preservation. The polystyrene foam is a material that for more than forty years has demonstrated its attributes all over the world in its application in the construction industry as well as in the packing and crating industries, becoming a synonym of economic construction in regard to energy saving and a synonym also of a rational and safe packing. In this paper a short description is made of the manufacturing process of the expandable polystyrene foam, its properties and applications in the construction industry. [Espanol] En los ultimos anos, la industria de la construccion se ha enfrentado a exigencias en el uso racional de la energia y en la preservacion del medio ambiente. La espuma de poliestireno expansible es un material que por mas de cuarenta anos, ha demostrado sus cualidades a nivel mundial en su aplicacion tanto en la industria de la construccion como en la del empaque y embalaje, llegando a convertirse en sinonimo de una construccion economica en cuanto a ahorro de energia y sinonimo tambien de un embalaje racional y seguro. En este trabajo se hace una breve descripcion del proceso de fabricacion de la espuma de poliestireno expandible, sus propiedades y aplicaciones dentro de la industria de la construccion.

  5. Energy saving by the use of polystyrene in construction; Ahorro de energia por la utilizacion de poliestireno en la construccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel, Raul [Polioles S. A. de C. V., Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    In the past last years, the building industry has been faced with requirements in the rational energy use and environmental preservation. The polystyrene foam is a material that for more than forty years has demonstrated its attributes all over the world in its application in the construction industry as well as in the packing and crating industries, becoming a synonym of economic construction in regard to energy saving and a synonym also of a rational and safe packing. In this paper a short description is made of the manufacturing process of the expandable polystyrene foam, its properties and applications in the construction industry. [Espanol] En los ultimos anos, la industria de la construccion se ha enfrentado a exigencias en el uso racional de la energia y en la preservacion del medio ambiente. La espuma de poliestireno expansible es un material que por mas de cuarenta anos, ha demostrado sus cualidades a nivel mundial en su aplicacion tanto en la industria de la construccion como en la del empaque y embalaje, llegando a convertirse en sinonimo de una construccion economica en cuanto a ahorro de energia y sinonimo tambien de un embalaje racional y seguro. En este trabajo se hace una breve descripcion del proceso de fabricacion de la espuma de poliestireno expandible, sus propiedades y aplicaciones dentro de la industria de la construccion.

  6. Synthesis in pilot plant scale and physical properties of sulfonated polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Cristiane R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogenous sulfonation of polystyrene was developed in a pilot plant scale producing polymers with different sulfonation degrees (18 to 22 mole % of sulfonated styrene units. The reaction yield depends chiefly on the concentration ratio of acetyl sulfate and polystyrene. The morphological and thermal properties of the sulfonated polystyrene obtained by homogeneous sulfonation were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry. The glass transition temperature of sulfonated polystyrene increases in relation to pure polystyrene and DCp was evaluated in order to confirm the strong interactions among the ~SO3H groups.

  7. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  8. Sorption behaviour of polystyrene grafted sago starch in various solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janarthanan, P.; Yunus, W.M.Z.W.; Ahmed, M.B.; Rahman, M.Z.; Haron, M.J.; Silong, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes swelling properties of polystyrene grafted sago starch in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO); chloroform (CHCl/sub 3/), water, acetone carbon tetrachloride (CCl/sub 4/) cyclohexanone and toluene. The copolymer for this study was prepared by grafting styrene onto sago starch using ceric ammonium nitrate as a redox initiator. Solvent uptake of the copolymer with respect to time was obtained by soaking the samples in chosen solvents for various time intervals at 25+-1 degree centigrade. The results obtained from swelling of polystyrene grafted sago starch in polar and non polar solvents showed that the percentage of swelling at equilibrium and the swelling rate coefficient decreased in the following order: DMSO > water > acetone cyclohexanone approx. CHCl/sub 3/ > toluene approx. CCl/sub 4/. Dimethyl sulfoxide showed the highest percentage of swelling at equilibrium that is 765%. Diffusions of the solvents onto the polymers were found to be of a Fickian only for DMSO. (author)

  9. Renewable aromatics from the degradation of polystyrene under mild conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouf M. Aljabri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A bimetallic FeCu/alumina catalyst was prepared and characterized. It showed excellent catalytic activity to quantitatively convert polystyrene (PS into aromatics at low temperatures. A clear goldish yellow liquid was produced at 250 °C in a batch reactor without distillation. A liquid yield of 66% in an inert environment was achieved without the formation of coke and gas by-products. An exposure time of 90 min. and a catalyst loading of 200 mg were considered as an optimum conditions to minimize the styrene re-polymerization. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS analysis confirms that the primary products are styrene, ethylbenzene, cumene, toluene and α-methylstyrene. Keywords: Polystyrene, Bimetallic, Low-temperature, Catalytic degradation

  10. Hydrophilic nanoporous polystyrenes and 1,2-polybutadienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    2008-01-01

    Nanoporous polymers from ordered block copolymers having hydrophilic cavity surfaces were successfully prepared by two methodologies: ' 1. Nanoporous polystyrenes fromPtBA-b-PS diblock or PDMS-b-PtBA-b-PS triblock copolymer precursors by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), or combination...... of living anionic polymerization~ and ATRP r~spectively. The one, PtBA block, can be modified to the hydrophilic PAA, where the dther, polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) block, can be fully degraded. Deprotection of the tert-butyl groups in PtBA and the selective etching of PDMS· chains were accomplished...... by applying HF or TFA in one step. Thus both the di- and triblock copolymers after such a treatment resulted. in nanoporous polystyrenes with hexagonal cavities of different nanosizes (6-11 nm, Figure 1). 2. Nanoporous I,2-polybutadienes (I,2-PB) by grafting various acrylic monomers onto the pore. surfaces...

  11. Stress relaxation of bi-disperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengeller, Ludovica; Huang, Qian; Dorokhin, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    We present start-up of uniaxial extension followed by stress relaxation experiments of a bi-disperse 50 % by weight blend of 95k and 545k molecular weight polystyrene. We also show, for comparison, stress relaxation measurements of the polystyrene melts with molecular weight 95k and 545k, which...... are the components of the bi-disperse melt. The measurements show three separated relaxation regimes: a fast regime, a transition regime, and a slow regime. In the fast regime, the orientation of the long chains is frozen and the stress relaxation is due to stretch relaxation of the short chains primarily....... Conversely in the slow regime, the long chains have retracted and undergo relaxation of orientation in fully relaxed short chains....

  12. Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Siqi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

  13. EpCAM nuclear localization identifies aggressive Thyroid Cancer and is a marker for poor prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralhan, Ranju; Cao, Jun; Lim, Terence; MacMillan, Christina; Freeman, Jeremy L; Walfish, Paul G

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain (EpEx) of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nuclear signaling by its intracellular oncogenic domain Ep-ICD has recently been implicated in increased proliferation of cancer cells. The clinical significance of Ep-ICD in human tumors remains an enigma. EpEx, Ep-ICD and β-catenin immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies was conducted on 58 archived thyroid cancer (TC) tissue blocks from 34 patients and correlated with survival analysis of these patients for up to 17 years. The anaplastic (ATC) and aggressive thyroid cancers showed loss of EpEx and increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD. In contrast, the low grade papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) showed membranous EpEx and no detectable nuclear Ep-ICD. The ATC also showed concomitant nuclear expression of Ep-ICD and β-catenin. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis revealed reduced overall survival (OS) for TC patients showing nuclear Ep-ICD expression or loss of membranous EpEx (p < 0.0004), median OS = 5 months as compared to 198 months for patients who did not show nuclear Ep-ICD or demonstrated only membranous EpE. We report reciprocal loss of membrane EpEx but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD in aggressive TC; nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor OS of TC patients. Thus nuclear Ep-ICD localization may serve as a useful biomarker for aggressive TC and may represent a novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic target for aggressive TC

  14. Biodegradation of weathered polystyrene films in seawater microcosms

    OpenAIRE

    Syranidou, Evdokia; Karkanorachaki, Katerina; Amorotti, Filippo; Franchini, Martina; Repouskou, Eftychia; Kaliva, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria; Kolvenbach, Boris; Fava, Fabio; Corvini, Philippe F.-X.; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    A microcosm experiment was conducted at two phases in order to investigate the ability of indigenous consortia alone or bioaugmented to degrade weathered polystyrene (PS) films under simulated marine conditions. Viable populations were developed on PS surfaces in a time dependent way towards convergent biofilm communities, enriched with hydrocarbon and xenobiotics degradation genes. Members of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were highly enriched in the acclimated plastic associate...

  15. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly...

  16. Electrorheological Properties of Suspensions Prepared from Polystyrene- Block- Polyisoprene Copolymer

    OpenAIRE

    YAVUZ, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Considerable scientific and industrial interest is currently being focused on a class of materials known as electrorheological (ER) fluids, which display remarkable rheological behaviour, being able to convert rapidly and repeatedly from a liquid to solid when an electric field (E) is applied or removed. In this article, the synthesis, characterization, partial hydrolysis and ER properties of polystyrene- block}-polyisoprene copolymer (COP) were investigated. The block copolymer was ...

  17. Radiation effect on polystyrene deposited and grafted on silica gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Y.; Udagawa, A.; Takehisa, M.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of radiation on polystyrene was studied in the presence and absence of silica gel by molecular weight measurement with gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Polystyrene crosslinked under vacuum in the absence of silica gel, but it either crosslinked or degraded by radiation, depending on the molecular weight of the polymer in the presence of silica gel. part of the deposited polymer bonded to silica gel by radiation; the G value for graft-chain formation is in the range of 0.01 to 0.1. Irradiation of polystyrene grafted on silica gel resulted in degradation of the graft chain because of the transfer of energy from silica gel. The G value for main chain scission was about 2 when graft polymer was irradiated in the absence of homopolymer. The degradation of graft polymer was suppressed when the polymer was irradiated in the presence of homopolymer, and the amount of unextractable polymer from silica gel increased with increasing irradiation. This adds evidence to the estimation that an increase in grafting percent coupled with a slight decrease in molecular weight at a later stage of radiation-induced polymerization of styrene adsorbed on slica gel is due to a secondary effect of radiation on the polymer

  18. Physical and Chemical Changes of Polystyrene Nanospheres Irradiated with Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, Mohd Ubaidillah; Juremi, Nor Rashidah Md.; Mohamad, Farizan; Wibawa, Pratama Jujur; Agam, Mohd Arif; Ali, Ahmad Hadi

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that polymer resist such as PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate) which is a well known and commonly used polymer resist for fabrication of electronic devices can show zwitter characteristic due to over exposure to electron beam radiation. Overexposed PMMA tend to changes their molecular structure to either become negative or positive resist corresponded to electron beam irradiation doses. These characteristic was due to crosslinking and scissors of the PMMA molecular structures, but till now the understanding of crosslinking and scissors of the polymer resist molecular structure due to electron beam exposure were still unknown to researchers. Previously we have over exposed polystyrene nanospheres to various radiation sources, such as electron beam, solar radiation and laser, which is another compound that can act as polymer resist. We investigated the physical and chemical structures of the irradiated polystyrene nanospheres with FTIR analysis. It is found that the physical and chemical changes of the irradiated polystyrene were found to be corresponded with the radiation dosages. Later, combining Laser irradiation and Reactive Ion Etching manipulation, created a facile technique that we called as LARIEA NSL (Laser and Reactive Ion Etching Assisted Nanosphere Lithography) which can be a facile technique to fabricate controllable carbonaceous nanoparticles for applications such as lithographic mask, catalysts and heavy metal absorbers.

  19. Separation of transfer ribonucleic acids on polystyrene anion exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhal, R.P.; Griffin, G.D.; Novelli, G.D.

    1976-11-16

    The transfer RNA separation by chromatography on strong-base-polystyrene exchange materials is examined and compared with the widely used reversed-phase chromatography. Results indicate important differences in some transfer RNA (tRNA) elution patterns by the anion-exchange chromatography, as compared with the reversed-phase chromatography. Transfer RNAs containing hydrophobic groups are adsorbed more strongly. The anion exchanger has twice the number of theoretical plates. Single peaks of tRNA/sub 2//sup Glu/ and tRNA/sub 1//sup Phe/ obtained from the reversed-phase column give multiple peaks on polystyrene anion-exchange chromatography. All six leucine tRNAs (Escherichia coli) and differences in tRNA populations synthesized during early and late stages of the dividing lymphocytes from normal human blood can be characterized by the anion-exchange chromatography. Different separation profiles are obtained by two separation systems for tyrosine tRNAs from mouse liver and mouse-plasma-cell tumor. The results indicate that, in contrast to the reversed-phase chromatography, strong-base-polystyrene anion-exchange chromatography is capable of separating tRNAs with minor structural differences.

  20. CERN's LHC is awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS), the Centro di Cultura Scientifica “Alessandro Volta” and Edison S.p.A. have awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize for outstanding contributions to physics to three CERN physicists.   The award was given to: • Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, • Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Computing, • Stephen Myers, CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology, for having led - building on decades of dedicated work by their predecessors - the culminating efforts in the direction, research and operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in many significant advances in high energy particle physics, in particular, the first evidence of a Higgs-like boson in July 2012. To learn more, check out e-EPS News.

  1. Structural features of subtype-selective EP receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovič, Tijana; Jakopin, Žiga; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 is a potent endogenous molecule that binds to four different G-protein-coupled receptors: EP1-4. Each of these receptors is a valuable drug target, with distinct tissue localisation and signalling pathways. We review the structural features of EP modulators required for subtype-selective activity, as well as the structural requirements for improved pharmacokinetic parameters. Novel EP receptor subtype selective agonists and antagonists appear to be valuable drug candidates in the therapy of many pathophysiological states, including ulcerative colitis, glaucoma, bone healing, B cell lymphoma, neurological diseases, among others, which have been studied in vitro, in vivo and in early phase clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. OMEGA EP high-energy petawatt laser: progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maywar, D N; Kelly, J H; Waxer, L J; Morse, S F B; Begishev, I A; Bromage, J; Dorrer, C; Edwards, J L; Folnsbee, L; Guardalben, M J; Jacobs, S D; Jungquist, R; Kessler, T J; Kidder, R W; Kruschwitz, B E; Loucks, S J; Marciante, J R; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Okishev, A V

    2008-01-01

    OMEGA EP (extended performance) is a petawatt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. It will enable high-energy picosecond backlighting of high-energy-density experiments and inertial confinement fusion implosions, the investigation of advanced-ignition experiments such as fast ignition, and the exploration of high-energy-density phenomena. The OMEGA EP short-pulse beams have the flexibility to be directed to either the existing OMEGA target chamber, or the new, auxiliary OMEGA EP target chamber for independent experiments. This paper will detail progress made towards activation, which is on schedule for completion in April 2008

  3. High-Intensity Laser Diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.-W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Junquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP is a new high-energy petawatt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from <1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy petawatt laser at full energy

  4. High-intensity laser diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Jungquist, R.; Stoeckl, C. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a new high-energy peta-watt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from < 1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy peta-watt laser at full energy. (authors)

  5. High-intensity laser diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Jungquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a new high-energy peta-watt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from < 1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy peta-watt laser at full energy. (authors)

  6. Effect of planar extension on the structure and mechanical properties of polystyrene-poly(ethylene-¤co¤-butylene)-polystyrene triblock copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, C.; Hamley, I.W.; Mortensen, K.

    2000-01-01

    Two thermoplastic poly(styrene)-poly(ethylene-co-butylene) -poly(styrene) triblock copolymers containing either spherical or cylindrical poly(styrene) microdomains were pre-oriented through extensional flow. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements revealed that the pre-oriented triblock...

  7. Effect of molecular weight distribution on e-beam exposure properties of polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Ripon Kumar; Cui Bo

    2013-01-01

    Polystyrene is a negative electron beam resist whose exposure properties can be tuned simply by using different molecular weights (Mw). Most previous studies have used monodisperse polystyrene with a polydispersity index (PDI) of less than 1.1 in order to avoid any uncertainties. Here we show that despite the fact that polystyrene’s sensitivity is inversely proportional to its Mw, no noticeable effect of very broad molecular weight distribution on sensitivity, contrast and achievable resolution is observed. It is thus unnecessary to use the costly monodisperse polystyrene for electron beam lithography. Since the polydispersity is unknown for general purpose polystyrene, we simulated a high PDI polystyrene by mixing in a 1:1 weight ratio two polystyrene samples with Mw of 170 and 900 kg mol −1 for the high Mw range, and 2.5 and 13 kg mol −1 for the low Mw range. The exposure property of the mixture resembles that of a monodisperse polystyrene with similar number averaged molecular weight (Mn)-bar, which indicates that it is (Mn)-bar rather than (Mw)-bar (weight averaged molecular weight) that dominates the exposure properties of polystyrene resist. This also implies that polystyrene of a certain molecular weight can be simulated by a mixture of two polystyrenes having different molecular weights. (paper)

  8. The USC-OSA-EPS section activities in optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymerich, María.; Cambronero-López, Ferran; Aragón, Ángel L.; Delgado, Tamara; Blanco, Manuel; Gómez Varela, Ana I.; Gargallo, Ana; Williamson, Sandra; Amorín, Adán.; Sánchez-García, Ángel; Bao-Varela, Carmen; Flores-Arias, M. Teresa

    2017-08-01

    The USC-OSA Student Chapter and USC-EPS Young Minds Section is a group financed by The Optical Society (OSA) and the European Physical Society (EPS). It is formed by PhD and degree students from the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC) and one supervisor of the Faculty of Physics. Its main goal is to promote and diffuse Optics in the society. For this purpose, the group carries out several activities in the academic and non-academic community. The group is also committed to the professional development of our members and motivates the exposition of our work into the scientific community.

  9. Hombro doloroso en trabajadores afiliados a eps-privada

    OpenAIRE

    Blandón Rodríguez, Jairo Alcibíades

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: Describir los elementos diagnósticos de la patología de hombro doloroso, en trabajadores calificados en medicina laboral EPS-privada, Bogotá (Colombia), año 2012. Método: Estudio descriptivo de corte transversal sobre una muestra de trabajadores afiliados a EPS-privada año 2012 calificados por patología de hombro doloroso de origen profesional. La muestra estudiada fue de 343 registros de trabajadores, que representa el 2.3% del total de la enfermedades profesionales y acci...

  10. Living with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS): the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Helen; Summers, Angela; Beaver, Kinta; Caress, Ann-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Although relatively rare, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is nonetheless a major concern within the renal community. Risk of developing EPS is associated with long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). High mortality was previously reported, although surgery has since improved outcomes. Research into EPS focuses on imaging and early detection methods, genetics, biomarkers and preventive strategies. No previous studies have examined patients' experiences of EPS. The aim of the present study was to explore the experience of patients who have undergone surgery for EPS in one center in the North of England. A qualitative phenomenological approach, involving in-depth interviews, was adopted. Nine participants were recruited out of a total of 18 eligible. Most participants were interviewed twice over a 12-month period (October 2009 to October 2010). Interpretive data analysis was conducted, following the philosophical tradition of hermeneutics, to draw out themes from the data. Data collection and analysis took place concurrently and participants were sent a summary of their first interview to allow a period of reflection prior to the subsequent interview. EPS presented the most serious challenge participants had faced since developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Three major themes were identified, each with subcategories. The key issues for patients were related to identification of early symptoms and lack of understanding. The patients' sense of 'not being heard' by health care professionals led to a loss of trust and enhanced their feelings of uncertainty. The enormity of the surgery, the suffering, and what they had to endure had an enormous impact, but an overriding aspect of this experience was also the loss they felt for their independence and for the PD therapy over which they had control. The findings of this study highlight a number of important issues relevant to clinical practice, including lack of information and understanding of EPS, particularly its

  11. Polyadenylation site prediction using PolyA-iEP method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavakiotis, Ioannis; Tzanis, George; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents a method called PolyA-iEP that has been developed for the prediction of polyadenylation sites. More precisely, PolyA-iEP is a method that recognizes mRNA 3'ends which contain polyadenylation sites. It is a modular system which consists of two main components. The first exploits the advantages of emerging patterns and the second is a distance-based scoring method. The outputs of the two components are finally combined by a classifier. The final results reach very high scores of sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed

  13. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  14. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  15. Functional and bioinformatics analysis of an exopolysaccharide-related gene (epsN) from Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingrui; Tang, Wei; Zheng, Yongna; Xing, Zhuqing; Wang, Yanping

    2016-09-01

    A novel lactic acid bacteria strain Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3 exhibited the characteristics of high production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). The epsN gene, located in the eps gene cluster of this strain, is associated with EPS biosynthesis. Bioinformatics analysis of this gene was performed. The conserved domain analysis showed that the EpsN protein contained MATE-Wzx-like domains. Then the epsN gene was amplified to construct the recombinant expression vector pMG36e-epsN. The results showed that the EPS yields of the recombinants were significantly improved. By determining the yields of EPS and intracellular polysaccharide, it was considered that epsN gene could play its Wzx flippase role in the EPS biosynthesis. This is the first time to prove the effect of EpsN on L. kefiranofaciens EPS biosynthesis and further prove its functional property.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 Prevents Hyperosmolar-Induced Human Mast Cell Activation through Prostanoid Receptors EP2 and EP4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Atencio, Ivonne; Ainsua-Enrich, Erola; de Mora, Fernando; Picado, César; Martín, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Background Mast cells play a critical role in allergic and inflammatory diseases, including exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in asthma. The mechanism underlying EIB is probably related to increased airway fluid osmolarity that activates mast cells to the release inflammatory mediators. These mediators then act on bronchial smooth muscle to cause bronchoconstriction. In parallel, protective substances such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are probably also released and could explain the refractory period observed in patients with EIB. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of PGE2 on osmotically activated mast cells, as a model of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Methods We used LAD2, HMC-1, CD34-positive, and human lung mast cell lines. Cells underwent a mannitol challenge, and the effects of PGE2 and prostanoid receptor (EP) antagonists for EP1–4 were assayed on the activated mast cells. Beta-hexosaminidase release, protein phosphorylation, and calcium mobilization were assessed. Results Mannitol both induced mast cell degranulation and activated phosphatidyl inositide 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, thereby causing de novo eicosanoid and cytokine synthesis. The addition of PGE2 significantly reduced mannitol-induced degranulation through EP2 and EP4 receptors, as measured by beta-hexosaminidase release, and consequently calcium influx. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 phosphorylation were diminished when compared with mannitol activation alone. Conclusions Our data show a protective role for the PGE2 receptors EP2 and EP4 following osmotic changes, through the reduction of human mast cell activity caused by calcium influx impairment and MAP kinase inhibition. PMID:25329458

  17. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Molecular-Bridged Expanded Graphite/Polyethylene Glycol Composite Phase Change Materials for Building Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Chen, Meizhu; Liu, Quantao; Wan, Jiuming; Hu, Jinxuan

    2018-05-16

    Using phase change materials (PCMs) in building envelopes became a reliable method to improve indoor comfort and reduce buildings' energy consumption. This research developed molecular-bridged expanded graphite (EG)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) composite PCMs (m-EPs) to conserve energy in buildings. The m-EPs were prepared through a vacuum absorption technique, and a titanate coupling agent was used to build a molecular bridge between EG and PEG. SEM, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), the leakage test, microcalorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were conducted to characterize the morphology, pore structure, absorbability, and modifying effects of the m-EPs. The phase change temperature, latent heat, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity of the m-EPs were determined by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), TGA, and a thermal constants analyzer. Results showed that the maximum mass ratio of PEG to EG without leakage was 1:7, and a stable connection was established in the m-EPs after modification. Compared with the unmodified EPs, the supercooling degree of the m-EPs reduced by about 3 °C, but the latent heats and initial decomposition temperatures increased by approximately 10% and 20 °C, respectively, which indicated an improvement in the thermal energy storage efficiency. The thermal conductivities of the m-EPs were 10 times higher than those of the pristine PEGs, which ensured a rapid responding to building temperature fluctuations.

  18. Intensity modulation of cutaneous electrical stimulation: : EPs and subjective ratings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, E.M.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Marani, Enrico; Rutten, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Chronic pain research is increasingly focused on the neuroplastic mechanisms underlying subjective pain experience. The latter is often measured using reported pain intensity, e.g. using a numeric rating scale (NRS). Evoked Potentials (EPs) reflect the cortical representation of applied stimuli and

  19. The design of an ECRH system for JET-EP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoeven, A.G.A.; Bongers, W.A.; Elzendoorn, B.S.Q.

    2003-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system has been designed for JET in the framework of the JET enhanced performance project (JET-EP) under the European fusion development agreement. Due to financial constraints it has been decided not to implement this project. Nevertheless, the design...

  20. 48 CFR 504.570 - Procedures for using the EPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 504.570 Procedures for using the EPS. (a... [Identify address block in the solicitation]. (e) The Electronic Posting System Manual provides detailed... that electronic access to a solicitation will result in adequate competition, distribute the...

  1. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) as anti-corrosive additives for coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerder, J.; Breur, R.; Slaghek, T.; Holtman, W.; Vennik, M.; Ferrari, G.

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are a class of renewable polymers that show interesting anti-corrosive properties and could potentially be used as an alternative for zinc phosphates. When combined with a waterborne styrene-acrylic polymer dispersion (SA-1), exopolysaccharides were shown to give an

  2. The design of an ECRH system for JET-EP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Graswinckel, M.; Hellingman, P.; Kooijman, W.; Kruijt, O. G.; Maagdenberg, J.; Ronden, D.; Stakenborg, J.; Sterk, A. B.; Tichler, J.; Alberti, S.; Goodman, T.; Henderson, M.; Hoekzema, J. A.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Fernandez, A.; Likin, K.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Novaks, S.; Piosczyk, B.; Thumm, M.; Bindslev, H.; Kaye, A.; Fleming, C.; Zohm, H.

    2003-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system has been designed for JET in the framework of the JET enhanced performance project (JET-EP) under the European fusion development agreement. Due to financial constraints it has been decided not to implement this project. Nevertheless, the design

  3. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  4. Fabrication of polystyrene microfluidic devices using a pulsed CO2 laser system

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huawei

    2013-10-10

    In this article, we described a simple and rapid method for fabrication of droplet microfluidic devices on polystyrene substrate using a CO2 laser system. The effects of the laser power and the cutting speed on the depth, width and aspect ratio of the microchannels fabricated on polystyrene were investigated. The polystyrene microfluidic channels were encapsulated using a hot press bonding technique. The experimental results showed that both discrete droplets and laminar flows could be obtained in the device.

  5. Fabrication of polystyrene microfluidic devices using a pulsed CO2 laser system

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huawei; Fan, Yiqiang; Foulds, Ian G.; Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we described a simple and rapid method for fabrication of droplet microfluidic devices on polystyrene substrate using a CO2 laser system. The effects of the laser power and the cutting speed on the depth, width and aspect ratio of the microchannels fabricated on polystyrene were investigated. The polystyrene microfluidic channels were encapsulated using a hot press bonding technique. The experimental results showed that both discrete droplets and laminar flows could be obtained in the device.

  6. PVDF multifilament yarns grafted with polystyrene induced by γ-irradiation: Influence of the grafting parameters on the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmey, P.; Porte, M.C.; Baquey, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The development of alternative prosthetic materials for cardiovascular applications has found growing interest due to the failure to date to be able to implement functional patent small diameter vascular grafts (diameter <5 mm). For instance, the successful implantation of small diameter polyester (PET) and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFEe) vascular grafts has not been achieved in humans. Our strategy is to work with a new multifilament yarns biomaterial, produced from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), which shows suitable mechanical properties, such as a lower tensile modulus than PET and PTFEe. The required biological properties sought for (i.e. low thrombogenicity) could be achieved by 'heparin-like' surface modification treatments in order to modify the thrombogenicity levels of the polymeric materials [Ann. Biomed. Eng. 7 (1979) 429]. A four step method is necessary to achieve this 'heparin-like' surface transformation [J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 52 (2000) 119]. The first step consists in grafting polystyrene onto the PVDF surface by γ irradiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of grafting parameters on the mechanical properties: (i) γ-ray irradiation time and (ii) grafting time of styrene monomers, which polymerize and form polystyrene bound to the PVDF surface

  7. DAMPAK PENYAJIAN KEMBALI EPS DAN CFPS TERHADAP RETURN SAHAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imelda Sinaga

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem in this study is whether there is a positive influence of CFPS and EPS before and after restatement in giving positive impact on stock returns. The sample used in EPS before and after the restatement, while as many as 102 samples meanwhile CFPS before and after restatement using 82 sample companies listed on the Stock Exchange. Independent variables used in this study are the earnings per share and cash flow per share and the dependent variables used in this study is the stock return. Test equipment used in this study using multiple regression statistical model           The results of this study demonstrate that EPS before restatement did not impact significantly on the stock returns which indicates that investors have been aware that there is signal to improve the EPS before the restatement. EPS after restatement had no significant effect on return, this indicates that the new information is in accordance with the Market Efficiency hypothesis is that will make the market participants to react and take action to respond that new information. CFPS before and after restatement also had no significant effect on stock returns because investors do not use operating cash flow information as a basic for investment decisions. This can have implications on investors who use financial statements to make right decisions on the location of their assets in the companies that perform restatement as well for the company itself that financial report restatement can be made if it is seen as a form of commitment and sense of responsibility to the market to provide trustable information

  8. Modification of Jute Fibers with Polystyrene via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Jankova, Katja Atanassova; Egsgaard, Helge

    2005-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was investigated as a method of covalently bonding polystyrene to jute (Corchorus capsularis) and as a possible approach to fiber composites with enhanced properties. Jute fibers were modified with a brominated initiator and subsequently ATRP modified...... to attach polystyrene and then examined using SEM, DSC, TGA, FTIR, XPS, elemental analysis, and Py-GC-MS. These techniques confirmed that polystyrene had been covalently bound to the fibers and consequently ATRP-modified jute fiber mats were used to prepare hot-pressed polystyrene composites. Composite...

  9. Morphology and Viscoelastic Properties of Polystyrene Blended with Fully Condensed Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Namani, Madhu; Geng, Hai-Ping; Lee, Andre; Blanski, Rusty L

    2004-01-01

    .... Experiments were performed using a nearly-monodisperse molecular weight polystyrene (PS) blended with varying amounts of two fully condensed POSS molecules surrounded with phenethyl and styrenyl groups...

  10. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producing bacterial strains of municipal wastewater sludge: isolation, molecular identification, EPS characterization and performance for sludge settling and dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala Subramanian, S; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2010-04-01

    Wastewater treatment plants often face the problems of sludge settling mainly due to sludge bulking. Generally, synthetic organic polymer and/or inorganic coagulants (ferric chloride, alum and quick lime) are used for sludge settling. These chemicals are very expensive and further pollute the environment. Whereas, the bioflocculants are environment friendly and may be used to flocculate the sludge. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by sludge microorganisms play a definite role in sludge flocculation. In this study, 25 EPS producing strains were isolated from municipal wastewater treatment plant. Microorganisms were selected based on EPS production properties on solid agar medium. Three types of EPS (slime, capsular and bacterial broth mixture of both slime and capsular) were harvested and their characteristics were studied. EPS concentration (dry weight), viscosity and their charge (using a Zetaphoremeter) were also measured. Bioflocculability of obtained EPS was evaluated by measuring the kaolin clay flocculation activity. Six bacterial strains (BS2, BS8, BS9, BS11, BS15 and BS25) were selected based on the kaolin clay flocculation. The slime EPS was better for bioflocculation than capsular EPS and bacterial broth. Therefore, extracted slime EPS (partially purified) from six bacterial strains was studied in terms of sludge settling [sludge volume index (SVI)] and dewatering [capillary suction time (CST)]. Biopolymers produced by individual strains substantially improved dewaterability. The extracted slime EPS from six different strains were partially characterized. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PGE2 maintains the tone of the guinea pig trachea through a balance between activation of contractile EP1 receptors and relaxant EP2 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säfholm, J; Dahlén, S-E; Delin, I; Maxey, K; Stark, K; Cardell, L-O; Adner, M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The guinea pig trachea (GPT) is commonly used in airway pharmacology. The aim of this study was to define the expression and function of EP receptors for PGE2 in GPT as there has been ambiguity concerning their role. Experimental Approach Expression of mRNA for EP receptors and key enzymes in the PGE2 pathway were assessed by real-time PCR using species-specific primers. Functional studies of GPT were performed in tissue organ baths. Key Results Expression of mRNA for the four EP receptors was found in airway smooth muscle. PGE2 displayed a bell-shaped concentration–response curve, where the initial contraction was inhibited by the EP1 receptor antagonist ONO-8130 and the subsequent relaxation by the EP2 receptor antagonist PF-04418948. Neither EP3 (ONO-AE5-599) nor EP4 (ONO-AE3-208) selective receptor antagonists affected the response to PGE2. Expression of COX-2 was greater than COX-1 in GPT, and the spontaneous tone was most effectively abolished by selective COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, ONO-8130 and a specific PGE2 antibody eliminated the spontaneous tone, whereas the EP2 antagonist PF-04418948 increased it. Antagonists of other prostanoid receptors had no effect on basal tension. The relaxant EP2 response to PGE2 was maintained after long-term culture, whereas the contractile EP1 response showed homologous desensitization to PGE2, which was prevented by COX-inhibitors. Conclusions and Implications Endogenous PGE2, synthesized predominantly by COX-2, maintains the spontaneous tone of GPT by a balance between contractile EP1 receptors and relaxant EP2 receptors. The model may be used to study interactions between EP receptors. PMID:22934927

  12. Purification and properties of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) antigens produced by different mould species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notermans, S; Wieten, G; Engel, H W; Rombouts, F M; Hoogerhout, P; van Boom, J H

    1987-02-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) antigens produced by different mould species were purified and partially characterized. Purification included (NH4)2SO4 treatment, Sepharose CL-4B column chromatography and Con A-sepharose chromatography. The EPS of Penicillium digitatum, Mucor racemosus and Cladosporium cladosporioides showed high antigenic capacities. Immunologically the EPS were partially genus-specific, but cross-reactivity was observed. The EPS antigens produced by species of Penicillium, Aspergillus repens and Geotrichum candidum lost their immunological activity upon heating (100 degrees C) at pH 1.8, while the EPS antigen of M. racemosus, Rhizopus oligosporus and C. cladosporioides were stable under the same conditions. The dominant monosaccharides present in the EPS antigen were mannose, galactose and glucose. The EPS obtained from cultures of M. racemosus and R. oligosporus also contained rhamnose. In the EPS produced by Penicillium spp. and A. repens the galactose residues were determined to be immunodominant.

  13. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1EP8B-1FAAA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1EP8B-1FAAA 1EP8 1FAA B A -------------GGSVIVIDSKAAWDAQLAKGKEEHKP...IVVAFTATWCGPCKMIAPLFETLSNDYAGKVIFLKVDVD-AVAAVAEAAGITAMPTFHVYKDGVKADDLVGASQDKLKALVAKHAAA LELALGT.../pdbChain> 1FAAA KLDCNQENKTL EEE HHH 1 1FAA A 1FAAA

  14. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1EP7B-1FAAA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1EP7B-1FAAA 1EP7 1FAA B A -------------GGSVIVIDSKAAWDAQLAKGKEEHKP...IVVDFTATWCGPCKMIAPLFETLSNDYAGKVIFLKVD-VDAVAAVAEAAGITAMPTFHVYKDGVKADDLVGASQDKLKALVAKHAAA LELALGT...AA A 1FAAA FLKLDCNQENK A 1FAAA VTEVN-KDTFW

  15. Renewable Aromatics from the Degradation of Polystyrene under Mild Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Al Jabri, Nouf M.

    2017-08-01

    Polystyrene (PS) is one of the most important polymers in the plastic sector due to its inexpensive cost as well as many preferred properties. Its international market is expected to achieve $28.2 billion by 2019. Although PS has a high calorific value of 87 GJ tonne-1, there is no a practical method to manage its waste but landfill. As a result, the PS debris in the oceans has reached 70% of the total plastic debris. This issue is considered as the main economical and environmental drivers of converting polystyrene waste into renewable chemical feedstocks. The aim of this work is to develop a catalyst for converting PS into renewable chemicals under mild conditions. We introduce FeCu/Alumina with excellent catalytic activity to fully degrade polystyrene with 66% liquid yield at 250 °C. The GC/MS confirmed that the primary products are in the gasoline range. Next, we present the bimetallic FeCo/Alumina and successfully we have obtained 100% PS conversion and 90% liquid yield with maintaining the products selectivity. Later, the tri-metallic FeCuCo/Alumina was synthesized and showed 100% PS conversion and 91% liquid yield. Surprisingly, ethylbenzene was the major product in which 80 wt. % was achieved with excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, the real waste Styrofoam was thermally and catalytically degraded at 250 °C. Interestingly, a high styrene content of 78 wt. % was recovered after 30 minutes of the reaction under mild conditions. Keeping in mind that a good balance between acidity and basicity is required to convert PS into aromatic under mild reaction conditions catalytically. Finally, the performance of the catalysts was compared to literature reports and showed novel liquid yields. In conclusion, we have synthesized cheap, easy to scale up, and efficient catalysts to fully degrade PS into high liquid yields of aromatics with excellent selectivity.

  16. Proton conducting sulphonated fluorinated poly(styrene) crosslinked electrolyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, A.; Ameduri, B.; Boutevin, B.; David, G. [Institut Charles Gerhardt UMR CNRS 5253 Equipe, Ingenierie et Architectures Macromoleculaires,' ' Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Montpellier, 8 rue de l' Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier, Cedex 05 (France); Perrin, R. [CEA Le Ripault Departement des Materiaux, DMAT/SCMF/LSTP, BP16 - 37260 Monts (France); Gebel, G. [Structure et Proprietes des Architectures Moleculaires UMR 5819 (CEA-CNRS-UJF), INAC, SPrAM, CEA Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Potential membranes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell based on crosslinked sulphonated fluorinated polystyrenes (PS) were synthesised in two steps. First, azide-telechelic polystyrene was obtained by iodine transfer polymerisation of styrene in the presence of 1,6-diiodoperfluorohexane followed by azido chain-end functionalisation. Then azide-telechelic polystyrene was efficiently crosslinked with 1,10-diazido-1H,1H,2H,2H,9H,9H,10H,10H-perfluorodecane under UV irradiation. After 45 min only, almost completion of azide crosslinking could be achieved, resulting in crosslinked membranes with insoluble fractions higher than 95%. The sulphonation of the crosslinked membranes afforded ionic exchange capacities (IECs) ranging from 2.2 to 3.2 meq g{sup -1}. The hydration number was shown to be very high (from 30 to 75), depending on both the content of perfluorodecane and of sulphonic acid groups. The morphology of the membranes, assessed by small-angle X-ray scattering, was found to be a lamellar-type structure with two types of ionic domains. For the membrane that exhibited an IEC value of 2.2 meq.g{sup -1}, proton conductivity was in the same range as that of Nafion {sup registered} (120-135 mS.cm{sup -1}), whereas the membrane IEC value of 3.2 meq.g{sup -1} showed a proton conductivity higher than that of Nafion {sup registered} in liquid water from 25 to 80 C, though a high water uptake. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Diameter measurements of polystyrene particles with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnaes, J

    2011-01-01

    The size of (nano) particles is a key parameter used in controlling their function. The particle size is also important in order to understand their physical and chemical properties and regulate their number in health and safety issues. In this work, the geometric diameters of polystyrene spheres of nominal diameter 100 nm are measured using atomic force microscopy. The measurements are based on the apex height and on the average distance between neighbouring spheres when they form a close-packed monolayer on a flat mica substrate. The most important influence parameters for the determination of the geometric diameter are the lateral air gaps and deformation of the spheres. The lateral air gaps are caused by significant size variations of the individual spheres, and a correction is calculated based on the simulation of packing of spheres. The deformation of the spheres is caused mainly by capillary forces acting when they are in contact with each other or with the mica substrate. Based on calculated capillary forces and the literature values of the elastic properties of the polystyrene and mica, the deformation is estimated to be 2 nm with a standard uncertainty of 2 nm. The geometric diameter of the polystyrene spheres was measured with a combined standard uncertainty of ≈3 nm. The measured vertical diameter of 92.3 nm and the certified mobility equivalent diameter measured by differential mobility analysis (DMA) are marginally consistent at a confidence level of 95%. However, the measured lateral geometric diameter was 98.9 nm and is in good agreement with DMA

  18. Review of HIV Pre exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and example of HIV PrEP Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    at Initiation of Sexual Activity Correct & Consistent Condom Use Prevention of mother-to- child transmission July 16, 2012: FDA approves...Okulicz JF, Medicine 2016 PrEP Utilization in a Managed Care System (Kaiser Permanente) 1200 ~ 1045 1000 . 800 600 . 400 200 0 835 657 0

  19. Modelling of Convective Process of Water Desorption from Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stakic, M.; Nikolic, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a mathematical model developed to evaluate the influence of structural and operational factors on convective dehydration process (desorption of liquid phase from capillary-porous material), as well as the possibility to utilize this model for the case of water desorption from polystyrene cation resin CG-8. The model accounts for unsteady one-dimensional simultaneous heat and mass transfer between the gas (air) and the solid phase (resin). The identification of effective transport properties for the considered fixed bed of material (resin CG 8) is discussed. To this purpose available data from the literature are used. (author)

  20. Preparation of polystyrene microsphere with emulsion microencapsulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bo Zhang Lin; Zhang Zhganwen; You Dan; Wei Yun; Wang Chaoyang; Lin Bo; Shi Tao; Chu Qiaomei

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of hollow polystyrene microspheres that are used as inner shell of multi-shell plastic microspheres in the ICF experiments is focused on. The effects of surfactants, water-soluble polymer and electrolyte on the properties of resultant microspheres are studied. Based on these experiments, a fabricating procedure was established with which hollow microspheres were prepared with diameter about 150-3000 μm, wall thickness 0.8-15 μm and toughness Ra less than 4 nm. (authors)

  1. Simulation and fabrication of integrated polystyrene microlens in microfluidic system

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-05-17

    This paper presents a simple and quick method to integrate microlens with the microfluidics systems. The polystyrene (PS) based microlens is fabricated with the free surface thermal compression molding methods, a thin PS sheet with the microlens is bonded to a PMMA substrate which contains the laser ablated microchannels. The convex profiler of the microlens will give a magnified images of the microchannels for easier observation. Optical simulation software is being used for the design and simulation of the microlens to have optimal optical performance with the desired focal length. A microfluidic system with the integrated PS microlens is also fabricated for demonstration.

  2. Melt dispersion of thermoplastic polystyrene in polymer polyols

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Polystyrene is dispersed into a polyol via a mechanical dispersion process. A stabilizer is present to stabilize the dispersed polymer particles. The stabilizer includes a copolymer of (1) from 10 to 70% by weight of a branched polyol which has a molecular weight of from 4000 to 20,000, from 0.2 to about 1.2 polymerizable ethylenically unsaturated groups per molecule and from about 3 to about 8 hydroxyl groups per molecule with (2) from 30 to 90% by weight of styrene or a mixture of styrene a...

  3. The Surface Imprinted Polystyrene Beads Prepared via Emulsion Templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Xiang CHENG; Guang Ling PEI; Ling Gang ZENG; Li Yong ZHANG; Chao LIU

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the surface imprinted cross-linked polystyrene beads were prepared via suspension polymerization with styrene (St), divinylbezene (DVB), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA1788), the mixture of Span 85 and xylene or the mixture of Span 85 and paraffin as monomer, cross-linking agent, dispersion stabilizer and templates, respectively. The results indicate that there are dense cavities on the surface of beads, and the diameter and density of cavity are related with the composition and amount of emulsion template. The forming mechanism of cavity from thermodynamics and dynamics was proposed.

  4. Performance ratio hardness characteristics polystyrene-metal composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepikov, V.F.; Prokhorenko, E.M.; Lytvynenko, V.V.; Zakharchenko, A.A.; Hazhmuradov, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The methods of measuring the hardness of layered polystyrene-metallic composite materials. It is proposed to use powder-like tungsten and powder-like steel as radiation-protective layer. A measurement of the hardness of composites of different composition, and given its dependence on the particle size and their form. The possibility of increasing the hardness of the composites reinforced with metallic additives. Radiation-protective characteristics were calculated for the studied species of composite materials. Influence of the quantitative composition of the metal components is studied on the change of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation

  5. Processing and characterization of Polystyrene/cornstarch/organophilic clay hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carlos Ivan R. de; Amorim, Ywrrenan C.; Andrade, Cristina T. de

    2011-01-01

    Polystyrene/cornstarch composite blends with organophilic Cloisite 15A were prepared in an internal mixer in the presence of maleic anhydride (MA). The contents of clay were 1, 3 and 5%, based on the weight of the blend. The results obtained by X-ray diffraction revealed significant intercalation and exfoliation of clay particles within the polymeric moiety, which indicate increased interaction between the components of the nanocomposites. Thermogravimetric analysis results revealed the increase in thermal stability for the compatibilized blends in relation to the noncompatibilized PS/starch blends. The composites showed better thermal stability with increasing clay content. (author)

  6. Simulation and fabrication of integrated polystyrene microlens in microfluidic system

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang; Li, Huawei; Conchouso Gonzalez, David; Foulds, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a simple and quick method to integrate microlens with the microfluidics systems. The polystyrene (PS) based microlens is fabricated with the free surface thermal compression molding methods, a thin PS sheet with the microlens is bonded to a PMMA substrate which contains the laser ablated microchannels. The convex profiler of the microlens will give a magnified images of the microchannels for easier observation. Optical simulation software is being used for the design and simulation of the microlens to have optimal optical performance with the desired focal length. A microfluidic system with the integrated PS microlens is also fabricated for demonstration.

  7. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  8. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  9. 30 CFR 250.231 - After receiving the EP, what will MMS do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false After receiving the EP, what will MMS do? 250.231 Section 250.231 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE... Decision Process for the Ep § 250.231 After receiving the EP, what will MMS do? (a) Determine whether...

  10. Should Earnings per Share (EPS) Be Taught as a Means of Comparing Intercompany Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Charles E.; Clark, Stanley J.; Smith, W. Robert

    2007-01-01

    Accounting standards state that the purpose of presenting earnings per share (EPS) is to provide financial statement users with information on the performance of a single entity. Yet, several textbook authors go further to state that EPS can be used to make comparisons among firms. In this article, the authors show that although EPS comparisons…

  11. 76 FR 52952 - Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu; Transfer of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... will enable Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu to fulfill the obligations of the contract... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0038; FRL-8884-1] Student Services Contract EP-11... Business Information (CBI) by the submitter, will be transferred to Student Services Contract EP- 11-D...

  12. Spray Drying as a Processing Technique for Syndiotactic Polystyrene to Powder Form for Part Manufacturing Through Selective Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mys, N.; Verberckmoes, A.; Cardon, L.

    2017-03-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS) is a rapidly expanding field of the three-dimensional printing concept. One stumbling block in the evolution of the technique is the limited range of materials available for processing with SLS making the application window small. This article aims at identifying syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) as a promising material. sPS pellets were processed into powder form with a lab-scale spray dryer with vibrating nozzle. This technique is the focus of this scope as it almost eliminates the agglomeration phenomenon often encountered with the use of solution-based processing techniques. Microspheres obtained were characterized in shape and size by scanning electron microscopy and evaluation of the particle size distribution. The effect the processing technique imparts on the intrinsic properties of the material was examined by differential scanning calorimetry analysis.

  13. Micro-layers of polystyrene film preventing metal oxidation: implications in cultural heritage conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambi, Francesca; Carretti, Emiliano; Dei, Luigi; Baglioni, Piero

    2014-12-01

    Protection of surfaces directly exposed to the detrimental action of degradative agents (i.e. oxygen, air pollutants and bacteria) is one of the most important challenges in the field of conservation of works of art. Metallic objects are subjected to specific surface corrosion phenomena that, over the years, make mandatory the research of innovative materials that should avoid the direct contact between the metal surface and the weathering agents. In this paper, the set-up, characterisation and application of a new reversible material for preserving metal artefacts are reported. Micro-layers constituted of low-adhesive polystyrene (PS) films obtained from recycling waste packaging materials made of expanded PS were studied. The morphology and thickness of PS films were characterised by optical, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A further check on thickness was carried out by means of visible spectrophotometry doping the films with a hydrophobic dye. Thermal properties of the PS micro-layers were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry coupled with optical microscopy. Permeability of the PS films to water vapour was also determined. The potential of the low-adhesive PS films, that enabled an easy removal in case of film deterioration, for preventing metal oxidation was investigated on brass specimens by simulating standard artificial corrosion programmes. Morphological and chemical (coupling the energy-dispersive X-rays spectrometry to SEM measurements) analyses carried out on these metal samples showed promising results in terms of surface protection against corrosion.

  14. Heavy quark physics in ep collisions at LEP+LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Barreiro, F.; Troconiz, J.F. de; Schuler, G.A.; Bij, J.J. van der

    1990-12-01

    We study electroweak production of heavy quarks - charm, beauty, and top - in deep inelastic electron-proton collisions at the proposed LEP+LHC collider at CERN. The assumed energy for the collisions is E e =50 GeV, E p =8000 GeV, providing an ep center of mass energy, √s≅1.26 TeV. We invoke the boson-gluon fusion model to estimate theoretical cross sections and distributions for the heavy quarks. Higher order QCD corrections are only approximately taken into account, by assuming a (normalization) K-factor of 2 for the charm and beauty quark production rates and incorporating the parton shower cascades. With these assumptions and the parameterization of Eichten et al. for the structure functions (EHLQ, set 1), we find the following cross sections: σ(ep→c+X)≅O(3 μb), σ(ep→b+X)≅O(40 nb), and σ(ep→t+X)≅4 pb for m t =120 GeV, decreasing to 0.5 pb for m t =250 GeV. These cross sections would provide O(6x10 9 ) charmed hadrons, O(8x10 7 ) beauty hadrons, and O(10 3 ) top hadrons, for an integrated ep luminosity of 1000 pb -1 . The heavy quark rates in ep collisions are considerably smaller than the corresponding rates in pp collisions at LHC, with √s=16 TeV. This gives a clear advantage to pp collisions for top searches. However, for the charmed and beauty quarks only a tiny fraction of the cross sections in p+p→Q+X can be triggered in comparison to the corresponding cross sections in e+p→Q+X, resulting in comparable number of measured heavy quark events in the ep and pp mode. We sketch the energy-momentum profile of heavy quark events in ep collisions and illustrate the kind of analyses that experiments at the LEP+LHC collider would undertake to quantitatively study heavy quark physics. In particular, prospects of measuring the particle-antiparticle mixing parameter x s =ΔM/Γ for the B s 0 -anti B s 0 meson system are evaluated, and search strategies for the top quark in ep collisions are presented. (orig.)

  15. A maladaptive role for EP4 receptors in mouse mesangial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-xia Yang

    Full Text Available Roles of the prostaglandin E2 E-prostanoid 4 receptor (EP4 on extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation induced by TGF-β1 in mouse glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs remain unknown. Previously, we have identified that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of FN and Col I in mouse GMCs. Here we asked whether stimulation of EP4 receptors would exacerbate renal fibrosis associated with enhanced glomerular ECM accumulation. We generated EP4(Flox/Flox and EP4(+/- mice, cultured primary WT, EP4(Flox/Flox and EP4(+/- GMCs, AD-EP4 transfected WT GMCs (EP4 overexpression and AD-Cre transfected EP4(Flox/Flox GMCs (EP4 deleted. We found that TGF-β1-induced cAMP and PGE2 synthesis decreased in EP4 deleted GMCs and increased in EP4 overexpressed GMCs. Elevated EP4 expression in GMCs augmented the coupling of TGF-β1 to FN, Col I expression and COX2/PGE2 signaling, while TGF-β1 induced FN, Col I expression and COX2/PGE2 signaling were down-regulated in EP4 deficiency GMCs. 8 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx, WT and EP4(+/- mice exhibited markedly increased accumulation of ECM compared with sham-operated controls. Albuminuria, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (BUN and Cr concentrations were significantly increased in WT mice as compared to those of EP4(+/- mice. Urine osmotic pressure was dramatically decreased after 5/6 Nx surgery in WT mice as compared to EP4(+/- mice. The pathological changes in kidney of EP4(+/- mice was markedly alleviated compared with WT mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant reductions of Col I and FN in the kidney of EP4(+/- mice compared with WT mice. Collectively, this investigation established EP4 as a potent mediator of the pro-TGF-β1 activities elicited by COX2/PGE2 in mice GMCs. Our findings suggested that prostaglandin E2, acting via EP4 receptors contributed to accumulation of ECM in GMCs and promoted renal fibrosis.

  16. Accurately controlled sequential self-folding structures by polystyrene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongping; Yang, Yang; Chen, Yong; Lan, Xing; Tice, Jesse

    2017-08-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) printing overcomes the traditional fabrication limitations by designing heterogeneous materials to enable the printed structures evolve over time (the fourth dimension) under external stimuli. Here, we present a simple 4D printing of self-folding structures that can be sequentially and accurately folded. When heated above their glass transition temperature pre-strained polystyrene films shrink along the XY plane. In our process silver ink traces printed on the film are used to provide heat stimuli by conducting current to trigger the self-folding behavior. The parameters affecting the folding process are studied and discussed. Sequential folding and accurately controlled folding angles are achieved by using printed ink traces and angle lock design. Theoretical analyses are done to guide the design of the folding processes. Programmable structures such as a lock and a three-dimensional antenna are achieved to test the feasibility and potential applications of this method. These self-folding structures change their shapes after fabrication under controlled stimuli (electric current) and have potential applications in the fields of electronics, consumer devices, and robotics. Our design and fabrication method provides an easy way by using silver ink printed on polystyrene films to 4D print self-folding structures for electrically induced sequential folding with angular control.

  17. Mass Transport Through Carbon Nanotube-Polystyrene Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rongzhou; Tran, Tuan

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely used as test channels to study nanofluidic transport, which has been found to have distinctive properties compared to transport of fluids in macroscopic channels. A long-standing challenge in the study of mass transport through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is the determination of flow enhancement. Various experimental investigations have been conducted to measure the flow rate through CNTs, mainly based on either vertically aligned CNT membranes or individual CNTs. Here, we proposed an alternative approach that can be used to quantify the mass transport through CNTs. This is a simple method relying on the use of carbon nanotube-polystyrene bundles, which are made of CNTs pulled out from a vertically aligned CNT array and glued together by polystyrene. We experimentally showed by using fluorescent tagging that the composite bundles allowed measureable and selective mass transport through CNTs. This type of composite bundle may be useful in various CNT research areas as they are simple to fabricate, less likely to form macroscopic cracks, and offer a high density of CNT pores while maintaining the aligned morphology of CNTs.

  18. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole (PS52K) and 103 kg/mole (PS103K), and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The bidisperse melts consist of PS103K or PS52K and a monodisperse...... (closed loop proportional regulator) using the laser in such a way that the stretch rate at the neck is kept constant. The rheometer has been described in more detail in (A. Bach, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager, Journal of Rheology, 47 (2003) 429). PS390K show a decrease in the steady viscosity as a power......-law function of the elongational rate (A. Bach, K. Almdal, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager, Macromolecules 36 (2003) 5174). PS52K and PS103K show that the steady viscosity has a maximum that is respectively 100% and 50% above 3 times the zero-shear-rate viscosity. The bidisperse melts show a significant...

  19. Low cost plastic scintillator by using commercial polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oktar, O.; Ari, G.; Guenduez, O.; Demirel, H.; Demirbas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors have been used in nuclear and high energy physics for many decades. Among their benefits are fast response, ease of manufacture and versatility. Their main drawbacks are radiation resistance and cost. Plastic Scintillators can be described as solid materials which contain organic fluorescent compounds dissolved within a polymer matri10. Transparent plastics commonly used for light scintillation are Polystyrene (or PS, poly-vinyl-benzene) and polyvinyl-toluene (or PVT, poly-methyl-styron). In this activity, preliminary studies for low cost plastic scintillator production by using commercial polystyrene pellets and extrusion method were aimed. For this purpose, PS blocks consist of commercial fluorescent dopant were prepared by an extruder in SANAEM. Molds suitable for extruder were designed and manufactured and optimum production parameters such as extrusion temperature profile, extrusion rate and pressure were obtained. Plastic blocks prepared were optically and mechanically tested and its response against various radioactive sources was measured.This study has shown that plastic scintillators imported can be produced in SANAEM domestically and be used for detection of radioactive materials within the country or border gates.

  20. Gamma radiation effects on the structure and properties of polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Ivania Soares de

    1996-01-01

    Polystyrene is a linear thermoplastic with a molecular weight ranging from 130,000 to 300,000 g/mole. This polymer has wide industrial applications. In medicine it is used to manufacture medical supplies which can be sterilized by ionizing radiation. The sterilization of medical instruments by ionizing radiation was introduced in the 60's as an alternative method to the conventional treatment with ethylene oxide gas. Radiosterilization is now worldwide standard procedure, as it is cheaper and cleaner. Some polymers, however, may show some changes in their physical properties following irradiation. These changes are due to the prevailing crosslinking and main chain scission induced by the irradiation of the polymeric system. In the present work, Brazilian-made polystyrene Lustrex was irrigated with γ rays in the presence of air at room temperature. Under these conditions, the analysis of viscosimetric essays showed the prevalence of crosslinking effects at doses up to 25 kGy and of main scission effects at does from 25 to 200 kGy. Observed G values (number of events per 100 eV of absorbed energy) pointed to low degrees of both crosslinking (Gx ∼ 0.15) and main chain scission (Gs ∼ 0.09). Therefore, the minor changes in Lustrex's molecular structure induced by irradiation have not influenced significantly its mechanical, thermal, and optical properties. As a result, Lustrex can be used in applications involving radiation without the need to introduce radioprotective to the polymeric system. (author)

  1. Synthesis of well-defined polystyrene macrophotoinitiators by ATRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degirmenci, M.

    2004-01-01

    Macrophotointiators are polymers with a photoinitiator functionality at side chains or in the end or middle of the chain. these materials are of great scientific and technological interest because of their application in UV-curable coatings and as precursors for graft and block copolymers depending on the position of the photoinitiator moiety incorporated. Many macrophotoinitiators have been synthesized and their utilization in both applications have been studied. The major concern for their uses particulary in the latter application was related to the efficiency of functionalization, well-defined and predetermined structures, and low polydispersities. Obviously, if the all chains are not functionalized, upon irradiation non-funtionalized chains will not be activated and consequently remain as homopolymers in the system. In this study, new mono and bifunctional atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initionars were synthesized by the condensation of 2-bromopropanoyl bromide with 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-1-phenyl propan-1-one (HMPP) and 2-hydroxy-1-(4-(2-hydroxyethoxy) phenyl)-2-methyl propan-1-one (HE-HMPP), respectively and characterized. The ATRP of styrene (St) in bulk at 110 degrees by means of these initiators in conjunction with a cuprous complex Cu(I) Br/bipyridine yields polystyrenes with photoactive alkoxy phenylketone groups. GPC, spectroscopic and photodegradation studies revealed that the initiation efficiency was quantitative and low-polydispersity polystyrenes with photoinitiator functionality in the end or middle of chain were obtained

  2. Prostaglandin E2 EP2 and EP4 receptor activation mediates cAMP-dependent hyperpolarization and exocytosis of renin in juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla Glenert; Stubbe, Jane; Uhrenholt, Torben Rene

    2005-01-01

    /l), AE1-259-01 (1 nmol/l), EP4-selective agonist AE1-329 (1 nmol/l), and IP agonist iloprost (1 micromol/l) significantly increased C(m) mediated by PKA. The EP4 antagonist AE3-208 (10 nmol/l) blocked the effect of EP4 agonist but did not alter the response to PGE(2). Application of both EP4 antagonist....... The membrane potential hyperpolarized significantly after PGE(2), butaprost, AE1-329 and AE1-259 and outward current was augmented in a PKA-dependent fashion. PGE(2)-stimulated outward current, but not C(m) change, was abolished by the BK(Ca) channel inhibitor iberiotoxin (300 nmol/l). EP2 and EP4 m......RNA was detected in sampled JG cells, and the preglomerular and glomerular vasculature was immunopositive for EP4. Thus IP, EP2, and EP4 receptors are associated with JG cells, and their activation leads to rapid PKA-mediated exocytotic fusion and release of renin granules....

  3. Abnormal placental development and early embryonic lethality in EpCAM-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nagao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: EpCAM (CD326 is encoded by the tacstd1 gene and expressed by a variety of normal and malignant epithelial cells and some leukocytes. Results of previous in vitro experiments suggested that EpCAM is an intercellular adhesion molecule. EpCAM has been extensively studied as a potential tumor marker and immunotherapy target, and more recent studies suggest that EpCAM expression may be characteristic of cancer stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain insights into EpCAM function in vivo, we generated EpCAM -/- mice utilizing an embryonic stem cell line with a tacstd1 allele that had been disrupted. Gene trapping resulted in a protein comprised of the N-terminus of EpCAM encoded by 2 exons of the tacstd1 gene fused in frame to betageo. EpCAM +/- mice were viable and fertile and exhibited no obvious abnormalities. Examination of EpCAM +/- embryos revealed that betageo was expressed in several epithelial structures including developing ears (otocysts, eyes, branchial arches, gut, apical ectodermal ridges, lungs, pancreas, hair follicles and others. All EpCAM -/- mice died in utero by E12.5, and were small, developmentally delayed, and displayed prominent placental abnormalities. In developing placentas, EpCAM was expressed throughout the labyrinthine layer and by spongiotrophoblasts as well. Placentas of EpCAM -/- embryos were compact, with thin labyrinthine layers lacking prominent vascularity. Parietal trophoblast giant cells were also dramatically reduced in EpCAM -/- placentas. CONCLUSION: EpCAM was required for differentiation or survival of parietal trophoblast giant cells, normal development of the placental labyrinth and establishment of a competent maternal-fetal circulation. The findings in EpCAM-reporter mice suggest involvement of this molecule in development of vital organs including the gut, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, eyes, and limbs.

  4. Abnormal placental development and early embryonic lethality in EpCAM-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Zhu, Jianjian; Heneghan, Mallorie B; Hanson, Jeffrey C; Morasso, Maria I; Tessarollo, Lino; Mackem, Susan; Udey, Mark C

    2009-12-31

    EpCAM (CD326) is encoded by the tacstd1 gene and expressed by a variety of normal and malignant epithelial cells and some leukocytes. Results of previous in vitro experiments suggested that EpCAM is an intercellular adhesion molecule. EpCAM has been extensively studied as a potential tumor marker and immunotherapy target, and more recent studies suggest that EpCAM expression may be characteristic of cancer stem cells. To gain insights into EpCAM function in vivo, we generated EpCAM -/- mice utilizing an embryonic stem cell line with a tacstd1 allele that had been disrupted. Gene trapping resulted in a protein comprised of the N-terminus of EpCAM encoded by 2 exons of the tacstd1 gene fused in frame to betageo. EpCAM +/- mice were viable and fertile and exhibited no obvious abnormalities. Examination of EpCAM +/- embryos revealed that betageo was expressed in several epithelial structures including developing ears (otocysts), eyes, branchial arches, gut, apical ectodermal ridges, lungs, pancreas, hair follicles and others. All EpCAM -/- mice died in utero by E12.5, and were small, developmentally delayed, and displayed prominent placental abnormalities. In developing placentas, EpCAM was expressed throughout the labyrinthine layer and by spongiotrophoblasts as well. Placentas of EpCAM -/- embryos were compact, with thin labyrinthine layers lacking prominent vascularity. Parietal trophoblast giant cells were also dramatically reduced in EpCAM -/- placentas. EpCAM was required for differentiation or survival of parietal trophoblast giant cells, normal development of the placental labyrinth and establishment of a competent maternal-fetal circulation. The findings in EpCAM-reporter mice suggest involvement of this molecule in development of vital organs including the gut, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, eyes, and limbs.

  5. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   European Physical Society Physics Education Division Since 2000, the European Physical Society’s Physics Education Division has been contributing to awareness of the relevance of physics in everyday culture, to interaction amongst schools and universities and to a better quality of physics teaching at all levels. The Physics Education Division achieves this by addressing and promoting physics, the continued education of teachers, large scale educational changes – such as the Bologna process – and successful new teaching methods, taking into account differences and similarities in the European education systems. Since 2008, their More Understanding with Simple Experiments (MUSE) project has offered teachers and researchers a set of nine research-bas...

  6. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   DESY and INFN physicists win 2011 Enrico Fermi prize The 2011 Enrico Fermi prize of the Italian Physical Society (Società Italiana di Fisica, SIF) has been awarded, for work in the field of experimental particle physics, to Dieter Haidt of the DESY Laboratory at Hamburg and to Antonino Pullia of the University of Milano Bicocca and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, “for their fundamental contribution to the discovery of weak neutral currents with the Gargamelle bubble chamber at CERN”. The Enrico Fermi Prize is awarded yearly to members of the society who especially honour physics by their discoveries. For more information on the prize, please visit the Italian Physical Society website.   Consultation on the future of European Uni...

  7. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   Conseil de Physique Solvay centenary One hundred years ago the celebrated first Conseil de Physique Solvay took place in Brussels, with the participation of the leading physicists of the time. It marked a profound rupture between the old classical physics and the new quantum physics that described the strange behaviour of Nature at the microscopic level. The conference was one of the most important events in the advent of the quantum revolution; no such physics conference since has acquired the same legendary status. To celebrate the centenary of this unique conference, the International Solvay Institutes are organizing a series of exceptional events that will make Brussels the world capital of physics for ten days in October. For more information, please visit the S...

  8. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lais Pêgas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tufting enteropathy (TE, also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED, is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epithelial diseases, or to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. The authors report a case of a Brazilian child with TE associated with c.556-14A>G mutation in the EpCAM gene (NM_002354.2.

  9. Search for Leptoquark Bosons in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Leiner, B.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2005-01-01

    A search for scalar and vector leptoquarks coupling to first generation fermions is performed using the e^+p and e^-p scattering data collected by the H1 experiment between 1994 and 2000. The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 117 pb^{-1}. No evidence for the direct or indirect production of such particles is found in data samples with a large transverse momentum final state electron or with large missing transverse momentum. Constraints on leptoquark models are established. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength, leptoquarks with masses up to 275-325 GeV are ruled out. These limits improve and supercede earlier H1 limits based on subsamples of the data used here.

  10. Search for excited electrons in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2008-08-01

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb-1. The electroweak decays of excited electrons e→eγ, e→eZ and e→νW with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for excited electron production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on e production cross sections and on the ratio f/Λ of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited electron searches. The e production via contact interactions is also addressed for the first time in ep collisions.

  11. Search for leptoquark bosons in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kückens, J.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Leißner, B.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2005-11-01

    A search for scalar and vector leptoquarks coupling to first generation fermions is performed using the ep and ep scattering data collected by the H1 experiment between 1994 and 2000. The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 117 pb. No evidence for the direct or indirect production of such particles is found in data samples with a large transverse momentum final state electron or with large missing transverse momentum. Constraints on leptoquark models are established. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength, leptoquarks with masses up to 275 325 GeV are ruled out at 95% confidence level. These limits improve and supercede earlier H1 limits based on subsamples of the data used here.

  12. Heavy Quark Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, I.

    2006-01-01

    Collisions of electrons with protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV are being recorded by the two experiments H1 and ZEUS at the ep accelerator HERA at DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Measurements involving beauty and charm quarks, performed by these experiments, provide a good environment to test perturbative QCD predictions as the large quark mass supplies a hard scale. Recent measurements of beauty and charm production in ep collisions are presented here. QCD predictions at next-to-leading order are found to generally agree with the measurements. Beauty measurements however are sometimes slightly higher than the predicted cross sections. Beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure were also measured and are well described by QCD predictions

  13. The properties of the wood-polystyrene interphase determined by inverse gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Simonsen; Zhenqiu Hong; Timothy G. Rials

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the interphase in wood-polymer composites are important determinants of the properties of the final composite. This study used inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to measure interphasal properties of composites of polystyrene and two types of wood fiber fillers and an inoranic substrate (CW) with varying amounts of surface coverage of polystyrene. Glass...

  14. Fabrication of microlens and microlens array on polystyrene using CO 2 laser

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang; Li, Huawei; Foulds, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new process for fabricating microlens and microlens arrays directly on a surface of polystyrene using a CO2 laser. The working spot of the polystyrene is heated locally by a focused CO2 laser beam, which tends to have a

  15. Synthesis and characterization of polystyrene-poly(ethylene oxide)-heparin block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulić, I.; Okano, T.; Kim, S.W.; Feijen, Jan

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for the preparation of new block copolymers composed of a hydrophobic block of polystyrene, a hydrophilic spacer-block of poly(ethylene oxide) and a bioactive block of heparin was investigated. Polystyrene with one amino group per chain was synthesized by free radical oligomerization of

  16. Improved synthesis of polystyrene-poly(ethylene oxide)-heparin block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulic, I.; Loman, A.J.B.; Feijen, Jan; Okano, T.; Kim, S.W.

    1990-01-01

    A novel procedure for the synthesis of block copolymers composed of a hydrophobic block of polystyrene, a hydrophilic block of poly(ethylene oxide) and a bioactive block of nitrous acid-degraded heparin was developed. Amino-semitelechelic polystyrene was prepared by anionic polymerization of styrene

  17. Colonic necrosis due to calcium polystyrene sulfonate (Kalimate not suspended in sorbitol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Castillo-Cejas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cation-exchange resins are used in the management of hyperkalemia, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. These resins were associated with gastrointestinal tract lesions, especially sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate mixed with sorbitol. We present a case of colonic necrosis after the administration of calcium polystyrene sulfonate (Kalimate not suspended in sorbitol.

  18. Non-aqueous retention measurement: ultrafiltration behaviour of polystyrene solutions and colloidal silver particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerlage, M.A.M.; Beerlage, M.A.M.; Heijnen, M.L.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Smolders, C.A.; Smolders, C.A.; Strathmann, H.

    1996-01-01

    The retention behaviour of polyimide ultrafiltration membranes was investigated using dilute solutions of polystyrene in ethyl acetate as test solutions. It is shown that flow-induced deformation of the polystyrene chains highly affects the membrane retention. This coil-stretch transition is not

  19. Foam supported sulfonated polystyrene as a new acidic material for catalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordomskiy, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Schaaf, van der J.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    Polystyrene was grafted on carbon foam with a melted polypropylene film predeposited on the surface. Polystyrene was subsequently sulfonated by chlorosulfonic acid. The effect of the temperature, time of grafting and concentration of radical initiator was studied. The materials were characterized by

  20. Polystyrene Microbeads by Dispersion Polymerization: Effect of Solvent on Particle Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jinhua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene microspheres (PS were synthesized by dispersion polymerization in ethanol/2-Methoxyethanol (EtOH/EGME blend solvent using styrene (St as monomer, azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN as initiator, and PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30 as stabilizer. The typical recipe of dispersion polymerization is as follows: St/Solvent/AIBN/PVP = 10 g/88 g/0.1 g/2 g. The morphology of polystyrene microspheres was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the molecular weights of PS particles were measured by the Ubbelohde viscometer method. The effect of ethanol content in the blend solvent on the morphology and molecular weight of polystyrene was studied. We found that the size of polystyrene microspheres increased and the molecular weight of polystyrene microspheres decreased with the decreasing of the ethanol content in the blend solvent from 100 wt% to 0 wt%. What is more, the size monodispersity of polystyrene microspheres was quite good when the pure ethanol or pure 2-Methoxyethanol was used; however when the blend ethanol/2-Methoxyethanol solvent was used, the polystyrene microspheres became polydisperse. We further found that the monodispersity of polystyrene microspheres can be significantly improved by adding a small amount of water into the blend solvent; the particles became monodisperse when the content of water in the blend solvent was up to 2 wt%.

  1. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  2. Expanding Your Horizon 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaltenhauser, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Expanding your horizons is a bi-annual “Science Day” for girls aged 11 to 14, held at the University of Geneva on 14 November. The girls had the opportunity to take part in hands-on workshops held by local professional women in the field of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. For the fourth time, CERN was part of this event, offering three workshops as well as a booth at the Discovery Fair, including Higgnite, an interactive visualization of the Higgs Field.

  3. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pêgas,Karla Lais; Cambruzzi,Eduardo; Ferrelli,Regis Schander; Silva,Carolina Soares da; Guedes,Renata Rostirola; Adami,Marina; Dias,Eduardo Montagner; Melere,Melina Utz; Ceza,Marilia Rosso; Steinhaus,Cintia; Epifanio,Matias; Salomon,Julie; Ferreira,Cristina Targa

    2014-01-01

    Tufting enteropathy (TE), also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epith...

  4. Diffractive hard scattering at ep and p antip colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruni, P.; Ingelman, G.; Uppsala Univ.

    1993-12-01

    Models for diffractive scattering based on the exchange of a pomeron with a parton structure are analysed in terms of hard scattering processes and the resulting characteristics of the final state. Diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering is considered in connection with the recently observed rapidity gap events at HERA. Heavy flavour and W, Z production in p anti p interactions are interesting measures of the gluon and quark component, respectively, in the pomeron. (orig.)

  5. Separate individual control systems come together at EP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podmore, A.

    1991-01-01

    At BNFL's EP2 radioactive waste encapsulation plant in the UK, eight area supervisory control and data acquisition systems (SCADAs) and one central SCADA are being installed to provide computer-controlled processing of waste drums. The individual systems are all autonomous, minimizing the effect they have on other areas of the process. At the same time, they are part of an integrated system which provides effective communication between the various areas. (author)

  6. Aquaponics System - An EPS@ISEP 2014 Spring Project

    OpenAIRE

    Llauradó, Ana Mesas; Docherty, Arlene; Méry, Gwénaël; Sokolowska, Natalia; Keane, Sean; Duarte, Abel José; Malheiro, Benedita; Ribeiro, Maria Cristina; Ferreira, Fernando José; Silva, Manuel; Ferreira, Paulo; Guedes, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this project, one of the proposals of the EPS@ISEP 2014 Spring, was to develop an Aquaponics System. Over recent years Aquaponics systems have received increased attention due to its possibilities in helping reduce strain on resources within 1st and 3rd world countries. Aquaponics is the combination of Hydroponics and Aquaculture and mimics a natural environment in order to successfully apply and enhance the understanding of natural cycles within an indoor pro...

  7. Integration of polystyrene microlenses with both convex and concave profiles in a polymer-based microfluidic system

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang; Li, Huawei; Foulds, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a new technique of fabricating polystyrene microlenses with both convex and concave profiles that are integrated in polymer-based microfluidic system. The polystyrene microlenses, or microlens array, are fabricated using the free

  8. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene. A Bach, K. Almdal, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distributin polystyrene melts ......Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distributin polystyrene melts ...

  9. Environmental protection in actual circumstances of EPS recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilovic, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a brief summary of the state of environmental protection in the vicinity of Electric Power Industry of Serbia (EPS) power facilities, both when economy of FR Yugoslavia (FRY) was at an acceptable level and the current situation resulting from a drastic decline of economic power of country and EPS itself, from unfavourable political development from the past period, from the sanctions imposed by UN Security Council, from a prolonged isolation from modern courses worldwide as well as from bombing of facilities during NATO aggression against Yugoslavia. The paper is focused on the analysis of the possibilities of taking certain activities aimed at environmental protection under expected realistic circumstances of EPS recovery and its further development, in accordance with the overall economic recovery and development of the country, and to estimate the price of all environmental protection measures which, would otherwise have been realised in the course of the past period if sanctions of UN Security Council have not been imposed on FR Yugoslavia. (author)

  10. e-EPS News: Consultation on European Research, Innovation & Gender

    CERN Document Server

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing an article by the e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a new collaboration between the two publications.   EPS members have been invited to take part in a Public Consultation on the Future of Gender and Innovation in Europe. The consultation, which is intended to complement the EC Green Paper ‘From Challenges to Opportunities: Towards a Common Strategic Framework for EU Research and Innovation Funding’, will be published and discussed during the first European Gender Summit in Brussels on 8-9 November this year. It is hoped that the consultation – which is being coordinated by genSET and the organisers of the European Gender Summit – will create a better understanding of how Europe might benefit from a more effective mainstreaming of the gender dimension in research, innovation and scientific systems. Responses from the co...

  11. Implications of HIV PrEP Trials Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Peter; Fletcher, Courtney V.; DeGruttola, Victor; McGowan, Ian; Becker, Stephen; Zwerski, Sheryl; Burns, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Six randomized clinical trials have been implemented to examine the efficacy of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and/or TDF/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) as preexposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 infection (PrEP). Although largely complementary, the six trials have many similar features. As the earliest results become available, an urgent question may arise regarding whether changes should be made in the conduct of the other trials. To consider this in advance, a Consultation on the Implications of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Trials Results sponsored by the Division of AIDS (DAIDS) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) was held on January 29, 2010, at the Natcher Conference Center, NIH, Bethesda, MD. Participants included basic scientists, clinical researchers (including investigators performing the current PrEP trials), and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the agencies sponsoring the trials: the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the BMGF, and the U.S. NIH. We report here a summary of the presentations and highlights of salient discussion topics from this workshop. PMID:20969483

  12. Search for Lepton Flavour Violation in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep->mu X and ep -> tau X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb-1 for e^+ p collisions and 13.7 pb^-1 for e^- p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchm"uller-R"uckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of lambda=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively.

  13. Search for lepton flavour violation in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, A. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Alexa, C. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)]|[National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2007-02-15

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep{yields}{mu}X and ep{yields}{tau}X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb{sup -1} for e{sup +}p collisions and 13.7 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchmueller-Rueckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of {lambda}=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively. (orig.)

  14. INVESTIGATING THE Ep, i –Eiso CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Amati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the spectral peak photon energy, Ep, and the radiated energy or luminosity (i.e., the “Amati relation” and other correlations derived from it is one of the central and most debated topics in GRB astrophysics, with implications for physics and the geometry of prompt emission, the identification and understanding of various classes of GRBs (short/long, XRFs,sub-energetic, and GRB cosmology. Fermi is exceptionally suited to provide, also in conjunction with Swift observations, a significant step forward in this field of research. Indeed, one of the main goals of Fermi/GBM is to make accurate measurements of Ep, by exploiting its unprecedented broad energy band from ~8 keV to ~30MeV; in addition, for a small fraction of GRBs, the LAT can extend the spectral measurements up to the GeV energy range, thus allowing a reliable estimate of the bolometric radiated energy/luminosity. We provide a review, an update and a discussion of the impact of Fermi observations in the investigation, understanding and testing of the Ep,i –Eiso (“Amati” relation.

  15. Search for lepton flavour violation in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, A.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-12-01

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep→μX and ep→τX is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb-1 for e+p collisions and 13.7 pb-1 for e-p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchmüller Rückl Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of λ=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon quark pair or a tau quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively.

  16. Serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 strains using a monoclonal-based polystyrene agglutination test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubreuil, J.D.; Letellier, A.; Stenbæk, Eva

    1996-01-01

    A polystyrene agglutination test has been developed for serotyping Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5a and 5b strains. Protein A-coated polystyrene microparticles were sensitized with a murine monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope on serotype 5 LPS-O chain as shown by SDS-PAGE and We......A polystyrene agglutination test has been developed for serotyping Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5a and 5b strains. Protein A-coated polystyrene microparticles were sensitized with a murine monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope on serotype 5 LPS-O chain as shown by SDS...... suspension of bacterial cells grown for 18 h. All A, pleuropneumoniae strains had been previously serotyped using standard procedures, The polystyrene agglutination test was rapid (less than 3 min) and easy to perform. Overall a very good correlation (97.3%) with the standard techniques was found...

  17. Absence of molecular deuterium dissociation during room-temperature permeation into polystyrene ICF target shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, A.; Alexander, N.; Fan, Q.; Gram, R.; Kim, H.

    1991-01-01

    Polystyrene microshells filled with deuterium and tritium gas are important target shells for inertially confined fusion (ICF) and are particularly promising for target containing spin-polarized hydrogens fuels. A currently active approach to the latter uses polarized D in HD, in a method which requires preservation of the high purity of the initially prepared HD (very low specified H 2 and D 2 concentrations). This would not be possible if dissociation should occur during permeation into the target shells. We have thus tested polystyrene shells using a novel method which employs very pure polystyrene shells using a novel method which employs very pure ortho-D 2 as the test gas. An upper limit of 6 x 10 -4 was deduced for the dissociation of D 2 upon room temperature permeation through an approximately 8 um wall of polystyrene, clearing the way for use of polystyrene target shells for ICF fusion experiments with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels. 19 refs., 1 fig

  18. Enhanced sensitivity of a microfabricated resonator using a graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Eunho; Cho, Kilwon; Jeon, Sangmin, E-mail: jeons@postech.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-18

    A graphene layer was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition methods and a polystyrene solution was spin-cast onto the graphene film. The graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane was attached between the two tines of a microfabricated quartz tuning fork (QTF). The modulus of the graphene-polystyrene bilayer was measured to be twice that of a pristine polystyrene membrane. Exposure of the membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor decreased the resonance frequency of the microresonator. The bilayer membrane-coated QTF produced a frequency change that was three times the change obtained using a polystyrene membrane-coated QTF, with a lower degree of degradation in the Q factor. The limit of detection of the bilayer membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor was determined to be 20 ppm.

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 is required for ligand-regulated, but not constitutive, endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Confalonieri, S; Salcini, A E; Puri, C

    2000-01-01

    for endocytosis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the prototypical ligand-inducible receptor, but not of the transferrin receptor (TfR), the prototypical constitutively internalized receptor. Eps15, an endocytic protein that is tyrosine phosphorylated by EGFR, is a candidate for such a function....... Here, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 is necessary for internalization of the EGFR, but not of the TfR. We mapped Tyr 850 as the major in vivo tyrosine phosphorylation site of Eps15. A phosphorylation-negative mutant of Eps15 acted as a dominant negative on the internalization...... of the EGFR, but not of the TfR. A phosphopeptide, corresponding to the phosphorylated sequence of Eps15, inhibited EGFR endocytosis, suggesting that phosphotyrosine in Eps15 serves as a docking site for a phosphotyrosine binding protein. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 represents the first molecular...

  20. HIV-negative male couples' attitudes about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and using PrEP with a sexual agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W; Lee, Ji-Young; Woodyatt, Cory; Bauermeister, José; Sullivan, Patrick; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-08-01

    One efficacious strategy to help prevent HIV is oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a daily regimen of antiretroviral treatment taken by HIV-negative individuals. Two of the recommendations of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for PrEP pertain to being in a relationship (i.e., male couples). Despite the recognition of how primary partners in male couples' relationships shape HIV risk and CDC's PrEP guidelines, there is a paucity of data that examine HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use and using PrEP with a sexual agreement. A sexual agreement is an explicit agreement made between two individuals about what sex and other related behaviors may occur within and outside of their relationship. In this qualitative study, we examine HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use and whether they thought PrEP could be integrated into a sexual agreement. Data for this study are drawn from couple-level interviews conducted in 2014 with 29 HIV-negative male couples who had a sexual agreement and were from Atlanta or Detroit. Both passive (e.g., flyers) and active (e.g., targeted Facebook advertisements) recruitment methods were used; the sample was stratified by agreement type. Thematic analysis was applied to identify the following themes regarding HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use: (1) PrEP and condom use; (2) concerns about PrEP (e.g., effectiveness, side effects, and promoting sexually risky behavior); and (3) accessibility of PrEP. Some thought PrEP could be a part of couples' agreement because it could help reduce sexual anxiety and sexual risk, and would help keep the couple safe. Others described PrEP use with an agreement as something for "others". Some were also concerned that incorporating PrEP could usurp the need for a sexual agreement in a couples' relationship. These themes highlight the need to improve informational messaging and promotion efforts about PrEP among HIV-negative male couples

  1. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) project is a NASA-industry partnership with Bigelow Aerospace (BA) that has developing the first human-rated expandable...

  2. Tissue expander infections in children: look beyond the expander pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A C; Davison, S P; Manders, E K

    1999-11-01

    Infection of the expander pocket is the most common complication encountered with soft-tissue expansion. It is usually due to direct inoculation with skin flora either at the time of expander insertion or from extrusion of the device. The authors report two cases of infection of tissue expanders in which the children had concomitant infected sites distant from the prosthesis. Etiological bacteria of common pediatric infections like otitis media and pharyngitis were cultured from the infected expander pocket, raising suspicion that translocation of the organism to the expander had occurred. Aggressive antibiotic treatment, removal of the prosthesis, and flap advancement is advocated.

  3. The expanding EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zank, Wolfgang

    In this paper I try to explore whether the EU can go on expanding and thereby become culturally ever more diversified, and at the same retain its stability. The answer is, in principle, affirmative. Europe has always been much diversified, and therefore it is not possible to define a European...... identity in terms of particular cultural traditions. However, in spite of their diversity, the EU-member countries are united by their adherence to the principles of democracy, rule by law and human rights. Countries which do not share this basic consensus would not be accepted as members, nor is it likely...... that they would apply for it. An essential part is the willingness of member states to accept a reduction of national sovereignty on some important policy fields. The EU project is basically about lifting the principles of democracy and rule by law on the international level, most and foremost among the member...

  4. Expanding hollow metal rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Harold B [Evans, GA; Imrich, Kenneth J [Grovetown, GA

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  5. Polyvinyl alcohol coating of polystyrene inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annamalai, P.; Lee, M.C.; Crawley, R.L.; Downs, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target made of polystyrene is first levitated in an acoustic field. The surface of the target is then etched using an appropriate solution (e.g., cyclohexane) to enhance the wetting characteristics. A specially prepared polyvinyl alcohol solution is atomized using an acoustic atomizer and deposited on the surface of the target. The solution is air dried to form a thin coating (2 μm) on the target (outside diameter approx.350--850 μm). Thicker coatings are obtained by repeated applications of the coating solution. Preliminary results indicate that uniform coatings may be achievable on the targets with a background surface smoothness in the order of 1000 A

  6. Room temperature synthesis of water-repellent polystyrene nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yonggang; Jiang Dong; Zhang Xia; Zhang Zhijun; Wang Qihua

    2010-01-01

    A stable superhydrophobic polystyrene nanocomposite coating was fabricated by means of a very simple and easy method. The coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrum. The wettability of the products was also investigated. By adding the surface-modified SiO 2 nanoparticles, the wettability of the coating changed to water-repellent superhydrophobic, not only for pure water, but also for a wide pH range of corrosive liquids. The influence of the drying temperature and SiO 2 content on the wettability of the nanocomposite coating was also investigated. It was found that both factors had little or no significant effect on the wetting behavior of the coating surface.

  7. Renewable Aromatics from the Degradation of Polystyrene under Mild Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Jabri, Nouf M

    2017-05-25

    A bimetallic FeCu/alumina catalyst was prepared and characterized. It showed excellent catalytic activity to quantitatively convert polystyrene (PS) into aromatics at low temperatures. A clear goldish yellow liquid was produced at 250 °C in a batch reactor without distillation. A liquid yield of 66% in an inert environment was achieved without the formation of coke and gas by-products. An exposure time of 90 min. and a catalyst loading of 200 mg were considered as an optimum condition to minimize the styrene re-polymerization. The gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis confirms that the primary products are styrene, ethylbenzene, cumene, toluene and α-methylstyrene.

  8. Hydrodynamic chromatography of polystyrene microparticles in micropillar array columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op de Beeck, Jeff; De Malsche, Wim; Vangelooven, Joris; Gardeniers, Han; Desmet, Gert

    2010-09-24

    We report on the possibility to perform HDC in micropillar array columns and the potential advantages of such a system. The HDC performance of a pillar array column with pillar diameter = 5 microm and an interpillar distance of 2.5 microm has been characterized using both a low MW tracer (FITC) and differently sized polystyrene bead samples (100, 200 and 500 nm). The reduced plate height curves that were obtained for the different investigated markers all overlapped very well, and attained a minimum value of about h(min)=0.3 (reduction based on the pillar diameter), corresponding to 1.6 microm in absolute value and giving good prospects for high efficiency separations. The obtained reduced retention time values were in fair agreement with that predicted by the Di Marzio and Guttman model for a flow between flat plates, using the minimal interpillar distance as characteristic interplate distance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fabrication of oriented wrinkles on polydopamine/polystyrene bilayer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Long, Yuhua; Zhu, Tang; Guo, Jing; Cai, Chao; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2017-07-15

    Wrinkles exist widely in nature and our life. In this paper, wrinkles on polydopamine (PDA)/polystyrene (PS) bilayer films were formed by thermal annealing due to the different thermal coefficients of expansion of each layer. The factors that influenced the dimensions of wrinkles were studied. We found that oriented wrinkles could be formed if the bilayer films were patterned with micro-grooves, and the degree of the orientation depended on the thickness of the PDA and the dimensions of the grooves. Combined with the strong adhesion, biocompatibility and reactivity of PDA, the oriented wrinkles on PDA/PS patterned bilayers may find potential application in diffraction gratings, optical sensors and microfluidic devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation of Dithizone Functionalized Polystyrene for Detecting Heavy Metal Ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeon Ho; Kim, Younghun [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Colorimetric sensors were usually used to detect specific metal ions using selective color change of solutions. While almost organic dye in colorimetric sensors detected single molecule, dithizone (DTZ) solution could be separately detected above 5 kinds of heavy metal ions by the change of clear color. Namely, DTZ could be used as multicolorimetric sensors. However, DTZ was generally used as aqueous type and paper/pellet-type DTZ was not reported yet. Therefore, in this work, polystyrene (PS) was prepared to composite with DTZ and then DTZ/PS pellet was obtained, which was used to selectively detect 10 kinds of heavy metal ions. When 10 ppm of Hg and Co ions was exposed in DTZ/PS pellets, clear color change was revealed. It is noted that DTZ/PS pellet could be used in detecting of heavy metal ion as dry type.

  11. Adsorption of different amphiphilic molecules onto polystyrene latices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar-Reyes, A B; Ortega-Vinuesa, J L; Martín-Rodríguez, A

    2005-02-15

    In order to know the influence of the surface characteristics and the chain properties on the adsorption of amphiphilic molecules onto polystyrene latex, a set of experiments to study the adsorption of ionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants and an amphiphilic synthetic peptide on different latex dispersions was performed. The adsorbed amount versus the equilibrium surfactant concentration was determined. The main adsorption mechanism was the hydrophobic attraction between the nonpolar tail of the molecule and the hydrophobic regions of the latex surface. This attraction overcame the electrostatic repulsion between chains and latex surface with identical charge sign. However, the electrostatic interactions chain-surface and chain-chain also played a role. General patterns for the adsorption of ionic chains on charged latex surfaces could be established. Regarding the shape, the isotherms presented different plateaus corresponding to electrostatic effects and conformational changes. The surfactant size also affects the adsorption results: the higher the hydrophilic moiety in the surfactant molecule the lower the adsorbed amount.

  12. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles embedded in polystyrene microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hoang Hai; Nguyen Hoang Luong; Nguyen Chau; Ngo Quy Tai

    2009-01-01

    Superparamagnetic particles are widely used for biological applications such as cell separation. The size of the particles is normally in the range of 10 - 20 nm which is much smaller than the size of a cell. Therefore small particles create small force which is not strong enough to separate the cells from solution. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in Polystyrene microspheres (magnetic beads) are very useful for cell separation. Magnetic beads have been prepared by solvent evaporation of an emulsion. The beads with size of 0.2 μm - 1.0 μm have a saturation magnetization of 10 - 25 emu/g. The change of the amount of surfactants, volatile solvent, magnetic particles resulted to the change of size, magnetic properties of the magnetic beads.

  13. PMMA to Polystyrene bonding for polymer based microfluidic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-03-29

    A thermal bonding technique for Poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) to Polystyrene (PS) is presented in this paper. The PMMA to PS bonding was achieved using a thermocompression method, and the bonding strength was carefully characterized. The bonding temperature ranged from 110 to 125 C with a varying compression force, from 700 to 1,000 N (0.36-0.51 MPa). After the bonding process, two kinds of adhesion quantification methods were used to measure the bonding strength: the double cantilever beam method and the tensile stress method. The results show that the bonding strength increases with a rising bonding temperature and bonding force. The results also indicate that the bonding strength is independent of bonding time. A deep-UV surface treatment method was also provided in this paper to lower the bonding temperature and compression force. Finally, a PMMA to PS bonded microfluidic device was fabricated successfully. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  14. Biodegradation of weathered polystyrene films in seawater microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syranidou, Evdokia; Karkanorachaki, Katerina; Amorotti, Filippo; Franchini, Martina; Repouskou, Eftychia; Kaliva, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria; Kolvenbach, Boris; Fava, Fabio; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2017-12-21

    A microcosm experiment was conducted at two phases in order to investigate the ability of indigenous consortia alone or bioaugmented to degrade weathered polystyrene (PS) films under simulated marine conditions. Viable populations were developed on PS surfaces in a time dependent way towards convergent biofilm communities, enriched with hydrocarbon and xenobiotics degradation genes. Members of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were highly enriched in the acclimated plastic associated assemblages while the abundance of plastic associated genera was significantly increased in the acclimated indigenous communities. Both tailored consortia efficiently reduced the weight of PS films. Concerning the molecular weight distribution, a decrease in the number-average molecular weight of films subjected to microbial treatment was observed. Moreover, alteration in the intensity of functional groups was noticed with Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) along with signs of bio-erosion on the PS surface. The results suggest that acclimated marine populations are capable of degrading weathered PS pieces.

  15. Thermomechanical properties of the silanized-kenaf/polystyrene composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the poor interfacial adhesion of the kenaf fiber and polystyrene (PS in their composite material, the surface of the kenaf fiber was modified using a synthesized polymeric coupling agent to promote adhesion with PS matrix. The dynamic thermo-mechanical properties of the composite composed of modified kenaf fiber and PS were also investigated. The polymeric coupling agent treatment of the kenaf fiber increased the fiber-matrix interaction through a condensation reaction between alkoxysilane and hydroxyl groups of kenaf cellulose. DMA (Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis results showed that the modified fiber composites have higher E′ and lower tanδ than those with untreated fiber indicating that a greater interfacial interaction between the matrix resin and the fiber. It was also found that the storage modulus increases in proportion with the Si/C ratio on the fiber surface.

  16. Evaluation of Recycling Polystyrene (PS) from a Microbiology Product

    OpenAIRE

    Eklöf, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Detta är ett beställningsarbete av Plastone Oy och i det undersöks möjligheterna vad man kan göra genom återvinning med avfallsmaterialet som uppstår då man tillverkar en mikrobiologisk produkt i deras plastfabrik. Produkten tillverkas genom formsprutning och materialet som används är polystyren (PS). Ur litteraturstudien fann man varierande möjligheter på hur man kan återvinna PS på bästa sätt, men ingen lösning som har varit effektiv i praktiken. Det framgick också att återvunnet PS inte är...

  17. Morphology Evolution of Polycarbonate-Polystyrene Blends During Compounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuai, Chengzhi; Almdal, Kristoffer; Johannsen, Ib

    2001-01-01

    The morphology evolution of polycarbonate-polystyrene (PC/PS) blends during the compounding process in three blending methods of industrial relevance, namely melt blending, re-melt blending in a twin-screw extruder and tri-melt blending in an injection-moulding machine, was investigated using......-empirical model. The results show that the formation of co-continuous morphology strongly depends on blend composition and melt blending method, whereas the model prediction for phase inversion deviates from the experimental values. Further, we found that the initial mechanism of morphology evolution involves...... scanning electron microscopy (SEM) Co examine nine blend compositions. Blends were prepared at compositions where phase inversion was expected to occur according to model predictions. The experimental results were compared to the values of the point of phase inversion calculated with the semi...

  18. Miscibility evolution of polycarbonate/polystyrene blends during compounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuai, Chengzhi; Almdal, Kristoffer; Johannsen, Ib

    2002-01-01

    The miscibility evolution of polycarbonate/polystyrene (PC/PS) blends during the compounding process in three blending methods of industrial relevance, namely melt blending, remelt blending in a twin-screw extruder and third melt blending in an injection molding machine, was investigated...... polymer in the other. The observed solubility strongly depends on blend composition and blending method. The T-g measurements showed maximum mutual solubility around 50/50 composition. The miscibility of PC/PS blended after the third stage (melt injection molding) was higher than that after the first...... by measuring their glass transition temperatures (T-g) and their specific heat increment (DeltaC(p)). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to examine nine blend compositions. Shifts in glass transition temperature (T-g) of the two phases in melt-mixed PC/PS blends suggest partial miscibility of one...

  19. Photoacoustic monitoring of inhomogeneous curing processes in polystyrene emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Luna, M.; Gutierrez-Juarez, G.; Rodriguez-Vizcaino, J.M.; Varela-Nsjera, J.B.; Rodriguez-Palencia, J.M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Sosa, M.; Alvarado-Gil, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The time evolution of the inhomogeneous curing process of polystyrene emulsions is studied using a variant of the conventional photoacoustic (PA) technique. The thermal effusivity, as a function of time, is determined in order to monitor the sintering process of a styrene emulsion in different steps of the manufacturing procedure. PA measurements of thermal effusivity show a sigmoidal growth as a function of time during the curing process. The parameterization of these curves permits the determination of the characteristic curing time and velocity of the process. A decreasing of the curing time and an increasing curing velocity for the final steps of the manufacturing process are observed. The feasibility of our approach and its potentiality for the characterization of other curing process are discussed. (author)

  20. Glass transition and thermal expansivity of polystyrene thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, R.; Kanaya, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Nishida, K.; Tsukushi, I.; Shibata, K.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied glass transition temperature and thermal expansivity of polystyrene thin films supported on silicon substrate using X-ray reflectivity and inelastic neutron scattering techniques. In annealing experiments, we have found that the reported apparent negative expansivity of polymer thin films is caused by unrelaxed structure due to insufficient annealing. Using well-annealed films, we have evaluated glass transition temperature T g and thermal expansivity as a function of film thickness. The glass transition temperature decreases with film thickness and is constant below about 10 nm, suggesting the surface glass transition temperature of 355 K, which is lower than that in bulk. We have also found that the thermal expansivity in the glassy state decreases with film thickness even after annealing. The decrease has been attributed to hardening of harmonic force constant arising from chain confinement in a thin film. This idea has been confirmed in the inelastic neutron scattering measurements

  1. Glass transition and thermal expansivity of polystyrene thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, R. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan); Kanaya, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan)]. E-mail: kanaya@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miyazaki, T. [Nitto Denko Corporation, 1-1-2 Shimohozumi, Ibaraki, Osaka-fu 567-8680 (Japan); Nishida, K. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan); Tsukushi, I. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba-ken 275-0023 (Japan); Shibata, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2006-12-20

    We have studied glass transition temperature and thermal expansivity of polystyrene thin films supported on silicon substrate using X-ray reflectivity and inelastic neutron scattering techniques. In annealing experiments, we have found that the reported apparent negative expansivity of polymer thin films is caused by unrelaxed structure due to insufficient annealing. Using well-annealed films, we have evaluated glass transition temperature T {sub g} and thermal expansivity as a function of film thickness. The glass transition temperature decreases with film thickness and is constant below about 10 nm, suggesting the surface glass transition temperature of 355 K, which is lower than that in bulk. We have also found that the thermal expansivity in the glassy state decreases with film thickness even after annealing. The decrease has been attributed to hardening of harmonic force constant arising from chain confinement in a thin film. This idea has been confirmed in the inelastic neutron scattering measurements.

  2. Nanostructured magnetic particles with polystyrene and their magnetorheological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fei Fei; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2011-03-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are known to be colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles in a non-magnetic fluid, and exposure to a magnetic field transforms the fluid into a plastic-like solid in milliseconds. To improve the stability against sedimentation and uniform dispersion, two different MR candidates, soft magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) microspheres and magnetite (Fe3O4) particles were modified with polystyrene to be applied for MR fluids in this study. After modification, their unique morphology, crystalline structure and magnetic properties were examined in addition to MR performance and sedimentation characteristics. It was found that this embedded morphology not only effectively prevents direct contact of the magnetic species thus improving particle dispersion but also leads to obvious change in their density, compared with the traditional polymer coating method with a core-shell structure.

  3. Influence of entanglements on glass transition temperature of polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougizawa, Toshiaki; Kinugasa, Yoshinori

    2013-03-01

    Chain entanglement is essential behavior of polymeric molecules and it seems to affect many physical properties such as not only viscosity of melt state but also glass transition temperature (Tg). But we have not attained the quantitative estimation because the entanglement density is considered as an intrinsic value of the polymer at melt state depending on the chemical structure. Freeze-drying method is known as one of the few ways to make different entanglement density sample from dilute solution. In this study, the influence of entanglements on Tg of polystyrene obtained by the freeze-dried method was estimated quantitatively. The freeze-dried samples showed Tg depression with decreasing the concentration of precursor solution due to the lower entanglement density and their depressed Tg would be saturated when the almost no intermolecular entanglement was formed. The molecular weight dependence of the maximum value of Tg depression was discussed.

  4. The expanding plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, M.C.M. van den.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis concerns the fundamental aspects of an argon plasma expanding from a cascaded arc. This type of plasma is not only used for fundamental research but also for technologically orientated research on plasma deposition and plasma sources. The important characteristics of the plasma are a strong supersonic expansion in which the neutral particle and ion densities decrease three orders of magnitude, followed by a stationary shock front. After the shock front the plasma expands further subsonically. A part of this thesis is devoted to the discussion of a newly constructed combined Thomson-Rayleigh scattering set up. With this set up the electron density, the electron temperature and the neutral particle density are measured locally in the plasma for different conditions. In the analysis of the measured spectra weak coherent effects and the measured apparatus profile are included. The inaccuracies are small, ranging from 1 to 4 percent for the electron density and 2 to 6 percent for the electron temperature, depending on the plasma conditions. The inaccuracy of the neutral particle density determination is larger and ranges from 10 to 50 percent. The detection limits for the electron and neutral particle density are 7.10 17 m -3 and 1.10 20 m -3 respectively. A side path in this thesis is the derivation of the Saha equation for a two-temperature plasma. The reason for this derivation was the dispute in the literature about the correct form of this equation. In this thesis it is shown, from the correct extension of the second law of thermodynamics and from the non-equilibrium formalism of Zubarev, That in the limit of m e /m h ->0 the generalized Saha equation depends on the electron temperature only. (author). 221 refs.; 54 figs.; 13 tabs

  5. Biodistribution studies of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-directed monoclonal antibodies in the EpCAM-transgenic mouse tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosterink, Jos G. W.; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Hendrikse, Harry H.; Van Zanten, Jacoba; Van Garderen, Evert; Harmsen, Martin C.; De Leij, Lou F. M. H.

    2007-01-01

    The human pancarcinoma-associated epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) (EGP-2, CO17-1A) is a well-known target for carcinoma-directed immunotherapy. Mouse-derived mAbs directed to EpCAM have been used to treat colon carcinoma patients showing well-tolerable toxic side effects but limited

  6. The Vasopressin Type-2 Receptor and Prostaglandin Receptors EP2 and EP4 can Increase Aquaporin-2 Plasma Membrane Targeting Through a cAMP Independent Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Moeller, Hanne Bjerregaard; Assentoft, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Apical membrane targeting of the collecting duct water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is essential for body water balance. As this event is regulated by Gs coupled 7-transmembrane receptors such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) and the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4, it is believed to be c...

  7. The contribution of polystyrene nanospheres towards the crystallization of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Kallio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallization is a slow process of trial and error and limits the amount of solved protein structures. Search of a universal heterogeneous nucleant is an effort to facilitate crystallizability of proteins. METHODOLOGY: The effect of polystyrene nanospheres on protein crystallization were tested with three commercial proteins: lysozyme, xylanase, xylose isomerase, and with five research target proteins: hydrophobins HFBI and HFBII, laccase, sarcosine dimethylglycine N-methyltransferase (SDMT, and anti-testosterone Fab fragment 5F2. The use of nanospheres both in screening and as an additive for known crystallization conditions was studied. In screening, the addition of an aqueous solution of nanosphere to the crystallization drop had a significant positive effect on crystallization success in comparison to the control screen. As an additive in hydrophobin crystallization, the nanospheres altered the crystal packing, most likely due to the amphiphilic nature of hydrophobins. In the case of laccase, nanospheres could be used as an alternative for streak-seeding, which insofar had remained the only technique to produce high-diffracting crystals. With methyltransferase SDMT the nanospheres, used also as an additive, produced fewer, larger crystals in less time. Nanospheres, combined with the streak-seeding method, produced single 5F2 Fab crystals in shorter equilibration times. CONCLUSIONS: All in all, the use of nanospheres in protein crystallization proved to be beneficial, both when screening new crystallization conditions to promote nucleation and when used as an additive to produce better quality crystals, faster. The polystyrene nanospheres are easy to use, commercially available and close to being inert, as even with amphiphilic proteins only the crystal packing is altered and the nanospheres do not interfere with the structure and function of the protein.

  8. X-ray excited luminescence of polystyrene composites loaded with SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkiv, T.M.; Halyatkin, O.O.; Vistovskyy, V.V. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8a Kyryla i Mefodiya St., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Hevyk, V.B. [Ivano-Frankivsk National Technical University of Oil and Gas, 15 Karpatska St., 76019 Ivano-Frankivsk (Ukraine); Yakibchuk, P.M. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8a Kyryla i Mefodiya St., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Gektin, A.V. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, NAS of Ukraine, 60 Lenina Ave, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Voloshinovskii, A.S. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8a Kyryla i Mefodiya St., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2017-03-01

    The polystyrene film nanocomposites of 0.3 mm thickness with embedded SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles up to 40 wt% have been synthesized. The luminescent and kinetic properties of the polystyrene composites with embedded SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles upon the pulse X-ray excitation have been investigated. The luminescence intensity of the pure polystyrene scintillator film significantly increases when it is loaded with the inorganic SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles. The film nanocomposites show fast (∼2.8 ns) and slow (∼700 ns) luminescence decay components typical for a luminescence of polystyrene activators (p-Terphenyl and POPOP) and SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles, respectively. It is revealed that the fast decay luminescence component of the polystyrene composites is caused by the excitation of polystyrene by the photoelectrons escaped from the nanoparticles due to photoeffect, and the slow component is caused by reabsorption of the self-trapped exciton luminescence of SrF{sub 2} nanoparticles by polystyrene.

  9. Family planning providers' role in offering PrEP to women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Dominika; Weber, Shannon; Carlson, Kimberly; Witt, Jacki

    2018-03-09

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) provides a radically different HIV prevention option for women. Not only is PrEP the first discrete, woman-controlled method that is taken in advance of exposure, but it is both safe and highly effective, offering over 90% protection if taken daily. While multiple modalities of PrEP are in development ranging from vaginal rings to injectables and implants, only PrEP with oral tenofovir/emtricitabine is currently FDA-approved. Family planning clinics provide key access points for many women to learn about and obtain PrEP. By incorporating PrEP services into family planning care, family planning providers have the opportunity to meet women's expectations, ensure women are aware of and offered comprehensive HIV prevention options, and reverse emerging disparities in PrEP access. Despite real and perceived barriers to integrating PrEP into family planning care, providing PrEP services, ranging from education to onsite provision, is not only possible but an important component of providing high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare to women. Lessons learned from early adopters will help guide those in family planning settings initiating or enhancing PrEP services. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. EPS-LASSO: Test for High-Dimensional Regression Under Extreme Phenotype Sampling of Continuous Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Fang, Jian; Shen, Hui; Wang, Yu-Ping; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2018-01-25

    Extreme phenotype sampling (EPS) is a broadly-used design to identify candidate genetic factors contributing to the variation of quantitative traits. By enriching the signals in extreme phenotypic samples, EPS can boost the association power compared to random sampling. Most existing statistical methods for EPS examine the genetic factors individually, despite many quantitative traits have multiple genetic factors underlying their variation. It is desirable to model the joint effects of genetic factors, which may increase the power and identify novel quantitative trait loci under EPS. The joint analysis of genetic data in high-dimensional situations requires specialized techniques, e.g., the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). Although there are extensive research and application related to LASSO, the statistical inference and testing for the sparse model under EPS remain unknown. We propose a novel sparse model (EPS-LASSO) with hypothesis test for high-dimensional regression under EPS based on a decorrelated score function. The comprehensive simulation shows EPS-LASSO outperforms existing methods with stable type I error and FDR control. EPS-LASSO can provide a consistent power for both low- and high-dimensional situations compared with the other methods dealing with high-dimensional situations. The power of EPS-LASSO is close to other low-dimensional methods when the causal effect sizes are small and is superior when the effects are large. Applying EPS-LASSO to a transcriptome-wide gene expression study for obesity reveals 10 significant body mass index associated genes. Our results indicate that EPS-LASSO is an effective method for EPS data analysis, which can account for correlated predictors. The source code is available at https://github.com/xu1912/EPSLASSO. hdeng2@tulane.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  11. Nuclear Ep-ICD expression is a predictor of poor prognosis in "low risk" prostate adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet Assi

    Full Text Available Molecular markers for predicting prostate cancer (PCa that would have poor prognosis are urgently needed for a more personalized treatment for patients. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule results in shedding of the extracellular domain (EpEx and release of its intracellular domain (Ep-ICD which triggers oncogenic signaling and might correlate to tumor aggressiveness. This study aimed to explore the potential of Ep-ICD and EpEx to identify PCa that have poor prognosis.Immunohistochemical analysis of Ep-ICD and EpEx was carried out in normal prostate tissues (n = 100, benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH, n = 83, and prostate cancer (n = 249 using domain specific antibodies. The expression of Ep-ICD and EpEx was correlated with clinico- pathological parameters and disease free survival (DFS.Reduced expression of nuclear Ep-ICD and membrane EpEx was observed in PCa in comparison with BPH and normal prostate tissues (p = 0.006, p < 0.001 respectively. For patients who had PCa with Gleason Score less than 7, preserved nuclear Ep-ICD emerged as the most significant marker in multivariate analysis for prolonged DFS, where these patients did not have recurrence during follow up of up to 12 years (p = 0.001.Reduced expression of nuclear Ep-ICD was associated with shorter disease free survival in patients with a Gleason Score less than 7 and may be useful in identifying patients likely to have aggressive tumors with poor prognosis. Furthermore, nuclear Ep-ICD can differentiate between normal and prostate cancer tissues for ambiguous cases.

  12. The Artful Universe Expanded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, B A

    2005-01-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  13. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  14. Search for first generation leptoquarks in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-07-15

    A search for first generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full H1 data sample is used in the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 446 pb{sup -1}. No evidence for the production of leptoquarks is observed in final states with a large transverse momentum electron or with large missing transverse momentum, and constraints on leptoquark models are derived. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength {lambda}=0.3, first generation leptoquarks with masses up to 800 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. (orig.)

  15. Inclusive measurements on diffractive processes in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Measurements from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process, ep → eXY, where Y is a proton or a low mass proton excitation, are presented for photon virtualities in the range 2.2 2 2 and squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex satisfying | t | 2 . Diffractive parton distribution functions and their uncertainties are determined from a next-to-leading order DGLAP QCD analysis. Combining measurements of the inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process with an analysis of diffractive di jet production allows a very sensitive determination of both quark and gluon distributions. (author)

  16. E6 exotic quark production in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, J.L.

    1987-06-01

    We examine the possibility of producing exotic quarks from E 6 theories via flavor changing couplings in high energy ep collisions at HERA and the proposed LEP x LHC. We find that the rate is rather small and very mixing angle dependent. Assuming maximal mixing, the production rates are ≅10 to 30 events per year at HERA (for masses up to 100 GeV) and ≅200 events per year at LEP x LHC (for masses up to 300 GeV)

  17. Search for First Generation Leptoquarks in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2011-10-25

    A search for first generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full H1 data sample is used in the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 446 pb^-1. No evidence for the production of leptoquarks is observed in final states with a large transverse momentum electron or with large missing transverse momentum, and constraints on leptoquark models are derived. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength lambda=0.3, first generation leptoquarks with masses up to 800 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  18. Search for Excited Quarks in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Asmone, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

    2009-01-01

    A search for excited quarks is performed using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 475 pb^-1. The electroweak decays of excited quarks q* -> q gamma, q* -> q Z and q* -> q W with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for first generation excited quark production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on q* production cross sections and on the ratio f/Lambda of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited quark searches.

  19. Heavy quark production in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.

    1987-01-01

    There are substantial production rates of heavy quarks from ep collisions at HERA. The center of mass energy of about 300 GeV is well above any b-quark threshold effects, and for b/bar b/ production, the cross section is estimated to be 3.3 nb per event, leading to rates approaching 10 6 b mesons per year. The rates for c/bar c/ production are about two orders of magnitude greater. Two major detectors are under construction and a program of heavy quark physics will start in 1990. 3 refs., 4 figs

  20. Tau Lepton Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    The production of tau leptons in ep collisions is investigated using data recorded by the H1 detector at HERA in the period 1994-2000. Tau leptons are identified by detecting their decay products, using leptonic and hadronic decay modes. The cross section for the production of tau lepton pairs is measured for the first time at HERA. Furthermore, a search for events with an energetic isolated tau lepton and with large missing transverse momentum is performed. The results are found to be in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  1. Tau lepton production in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-12-01

    The production of tau leptons in ep collisions is investigated using data recorded by the H1 detector at HERA in the period 1994 2000. Tau leptons are identified by detecting their decay products, using leptonic and hadronic decay modes. The cross section for the production of tau lepton pairs is measured for the first time at HERA. Furthermore, a search for events with an energetic isolated tau lepton and with large missing transverse momentum is performed. The results are found to be in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  2. Tau Lepton Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    OpenAIRE

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.

    2006-01-01

    The production of tau leptons in ep collisions is investigated using data recorded by the H1 detector at HERA in the period 1994-2000. Tau leptons are identified by detecting their decay products, using leptonic and hadronic decay modes. The cross section for the production of tau lepton pairs is measured for the first time at HERA. Furthermore, a search for events with an energetic isolated tau lepton and with large missing transverse momentum is performed. The results are found to be in agr...

  3. Thin-Film Polarizers for the OMEGA EP Laser System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Howe, J.D.; Keck, J.; Szczepanski, J.; Schmid, A.W.; Papernov, S.; Kozlov, A.; Kosc, T.Z.

    2006-01-01

    Thin-film polarizers are essential components of large laser systems such as OMEGA EP and the NIF because of the need to switch the beam out of the primary laser cavity (in conjunction with a plasma-electrode Pockels cell) as well as providing a well-defined linear polarization for frequency conversion and protecting the system from back-reflected light. The design and fabrication of polarizers for pulse-compressed laser systems is especially challenging because of the spectral bandwidth necessary for chirped-pulse amplification

  4. Conversion of Hazardous Motor Vehicle Used Tire and Polystyrene Waste Plastic Mixture into useful Chemical Products

    OpenAIRE

    Moinuddin Sarker; Mohammad Mamunor Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Motor vehicle used tire and polystyrene waste plastic mixture into fuel recovery using thermal degradation process in laboratory batch process. Motor vehicle used tire and polystyrene waste plastic was use 75 gm by weight. Motor vehicle tire was 25 gm and polystyrene waste plastic was 50 gm. In presence of oxygen experiment was performed under laboratory fume hood. Thermal degradation temperature range was 100 - 420 oC and experiment run time was 5 hours. Product fuel density is 0.84 gm/ml an...

  5. Solid-Phase Immunoassay of Polystyrene-Encapsulated Semiconductor Coreshells for Cardiac Marker Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghee Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A solid-phase immunoassay of polystyrene-encapsulated semiconductor nanoparticles was demonstrated for cardiac troponin I (cTnI detection. CdSe/ZnS coreshells were encapsulated with a carboxyl-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticle to capture the target antibody through a covalent bonding and to eliminate the photoblinking and toxicity of semiconductor luminescent immunosensor. The polystyrene-encapsulated CdSe/ZnS fluorophores on surface-modified glass chip identified cTnI antigens at the level of ~ng/mL. It was an initial demonstration of diagnostic chip for monitoring a cardiovascular disease.

  6. AFM-based force spectroscopy on polystyrene brushes: effect of brush thickness on protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Carsten; Wagner, Hendrik; Smiatek, Jens; Heuer, Andreas; Fuchs, Harald; Zhang, Xi; Studer, Armido; Chi, Lifeng

    2013-02-12

    Herein we present a study on nonspecific binding of proteins at highly dense packed hydrophobic polystyrene brushes. In this context, an atomic force microscopy tip was functionalized with concanavalin A to perform single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements on polystyrene brushes with thicknesses of 10 and 60 nm, respectively. Polystyrene brushes with thickness of 10 nm show an almost two times stronger protein adsorption than brushes with a thickness of 60 nm: 72 pN for the thinner and 38 pN for the thicker layer, which is in qualitative agreement with protein adsorption studies conducted macroscopically by fluorescence microscopy.

  7. Fabrication of microlens and microlens array on polystyrene using CO 2 laser

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2011-11-01

    This study presents a new process for fabricating microlens and microlens arrays directly on a surface of polystyrene using a CO2 laser. The working spot of the polystyrene is heated locally by a focused CO2 laser beam, which tends to have a hyperboloid profile due to the surface tension and can be used as a microlens. The microlenses with different dimensions were fabricated by changing the power of the laser beam. Microlens array was also fabricated with multiple scans of the laser beam on the polystyrene surface. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  8. Preparation of tritiated polystyrene and its application in radio luminescent paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, S.; Mathewy, K.M.; Seshadri, N.K.; Subramanian, T.K.

    2001-01-01

    Beta radiation emanating from tritiated polystyrene in close proximity with copper activated zinc sulphide phosphor will provide self-sustained light sources and are used for nocturnal illumination of watches and clocks, product advertisements, telephone numbers, exit signs etc. Phenylacetylene was partially reduced in diethyl ether medium with tritium using 5% Pd/C poisoned with quinoline to give styrene. Styrene formed was polymerised to polystyrene by subjecting it to irradiation with γ-radiation (20 mega rad dose). Copper activated zinc sulphide phosphor was coated with tritiated polystyrene to give self-sustained light sources. (author)

  9. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  10. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  11. Chemical Shift Assignments of the C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain-3 EH Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Steve; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    The C-terminal Eps15 homology (EH) domain 3 (EHD3) belongs to a eukaryotic family of endocytic regulatory proteins and is involved in the recycling of various receptors from the early endosome to the endocytic recycling compartment or in retrograde transport from the endosomes to the Golgi. EH domains are highly conserved in the EHD family and function as protein-protein interaction units that bind to Asn-Pro-Phe (NPF) motif-containing proteins. The EH domain of EHD1 was the first C-terminal EH domain from the EHD family to be solved by NMR. The differences observed between this domain and proteins with N-terminal EH domains helped describe a mechanism for the differential binding of NPF-containing proteins. Here, structural studies were expanded to include the EHD3 EH domain. While the EHD1 and EHD3 EH domains are highly homologous, they have different protein partners. A comparison of these structures will help determine the selectivity in protein binding between the EHD family members and lead to a better understanding of their unique roles in endocytic regulation. PMID:23754701

  12. Decrease in zinc adsorption onto soil in the presence of EPS-rich and EPS-poor Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdova, O Yu; Pokrovsky, O S; Lapitskiy, S A; Shirokova, L S; González, A G; Demin, V V

    2014-12-01

    The adsorption of Zn onto the humic and illuvial horizons of the podzol soil in the presence of soil bacteria was studied using a batch-reactor technique as a function of the pH (from 2 to 9) and the Zn concentration in solution (from 0.076mM to 0.760mM). Exopolysaccharides-forming aerobic heterotrophs Pseudomonas aureofaciens were added at 0.1 and 1.0gwetL(-1) concentrations to two different soil horizons, and Zn adsorption was monitored as a function of the pH and the dissolved-Zn concentration. The pH-dependent adsorption edge demonstrated more efficient Zn adsorption by the humic horizon than the mineral horizon at otherwise similar soil concentrations. The Zn adsorption onto the EPS-poor strain was on slightly lower than that onto EPS-rich bacteria. Similar differences in the adsorption capacities between the soil and bacteria were also detected by "langmuirian" constant-pH experiments conducted in soil-Zn and bacteria-Zn binary systems. The addition of 0.1gwetL(-1)P. aureofaciens to a soil-bacteria system (4gdryL(-1)soil) resulted in statistically significant decrease in the adsorption yield, which was detectable from both the pH-dependent adsorption edge and the constant-pH isotherm experiments. Increasing the amount of added bacteria to 1gwetL(-1) further decreased the overall adsorption in the full range of the pH. This decrease was maximal for the EPS-rich bacteria and minimal for the EPS-poor bacteria (a factor of 2.8 and 2.2 at pH=6.9, respectively). These observations in binary and ternary systems were further rationalized by linear-programming modeling of surface equilibria that revealed the systematic differences in the number of binding sites and the surface-adsorption constant of zinc onto the two soil horizons with and without bacteria. The main finding of this work is that the adsorption of Zn onto the humic soil-bacteria system is lower than that in pure, bacteria-free soil systems. This difference is statistically significant (psoil particles

  13. Beam-strahlung effects in e-p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.

    1982-09-01

    The electromagnetic fields produced by one beam in an interaction point of a colliding-beam facility cause to the emission of synchrotron radiation by the other beam. This effect, the beam strahlung, for the e+e - colliders has been considered by several authors, and they have pointed out that the effect is very important consideration at very-high-energy e+e - colliders. At the first glance, the beam-strahlung effect can play an important role in the e-p collision due to the fact that the circulating currents in the collider are much higher than those of the e+e - machine. However the detailed study shows that is not the case because of the collision geometry involved. What follows in this note is the beam-strahlung derivations using the method previously used by Hofmann and Keil. The difference between this note and that of Hofman and Keil is that in the case of e+e - collider, equal mass particles are involved in the consideration and, in the e-p case, the electrons radiate and the protons provide the electromagnetic fields

  14. Highlights from e-EPS: Physics for fun

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   For many who measure time according to a university calendar, summer is a time to unwind. My experience, however, is that it is rare to find physics departments empty over the summer break. Many of us use the vacation period without classes to catch up with research, and I imagine that a colleague of mine speaks for many when he says that summer provides him with the freedom to do the physics he wants to do, and this is all the break needed to prepare for the next academic year! This reminds me a little of the Wobbling Plate story in “Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman”? When Richard Feynman had just started at Cornell following his time at Los Alamos, he felt burned out, and was wondering why he did not feel the same enthusiasm for physics t...

  15. Design and approval of EPS diesel systems in German NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollmer, A.A., E-mail: anton.kollmer@tuev-sued.de [TUV SUD Industrie Service GmbH, Munich (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Not at least because of 'Fukushima accident', Emergency power supply (EPS) systems with diesel engines are regarded as higher safety-important as 20 years ago. This presentation shows the design and approval of the emergency power facilities of the German nuclear power plants. It deals with the essential details e. g.: EPS Diesel integration to main power grid of the German BWR and PWR; Procedure for 'Loss of off-site power (LOOP)-Design'; Design robustness of AC Power Supply (Design requirements: independent redundancies, airplane crash, explosion pressure wave, earth-quake); Cooling systems (chilled by river water, air, well water, stored water volume); Layout of the stationary emergency Diesel generator (fuel supply, starting system); Layout of the bunkered EDG with directly driven emergency feed water pump; Robustness of AC power supply beyond design; Layout of mobile chilling equipment for diesel engines; Layout of mobile Diesel gen-sets (200 kVA and 1250 kVA); German Requirements of KTA 3702 versus US-IEE 323; Construction, Materials and Testing of EDG; Maintenance (in-service inspections, operation, Repair); Lessons learned (e. g. crank house cracks, start failure due to too much oil in the combustion chamber) (author)

  16. Prostanoid receptor EP2 as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota

    2014-06-12

    Cycoloxygenase-2 (COX-2) induction is prevalent in a variety of (brain and peripheral) injury models where COX-2 levels correlate with disease progression. Thus, COX-2 has been widely explored for anti-inflammatory therapy with COX-2 inhibitors, which proved to be effective in reducing the pain and inflammation in patients with arthritis and menstrual cramps, but they have not provided any benefit to patients with chronic inflammatory neurodegenerative disease. Recently, two COX-2 drugs, rofecoxib and valdecoxib, were withdrawn from the United States market due to cardiovascular side effects. Thus, future anti-inflammatory therapy could be targeted through a specific prostanoid receptor downstream of COX-2. The PGE2 receptor EP2 is emerging as a pro-inflammatory target in a variety of CNS and peripheral diseases. Here we highlight the latest developments on the role of EP2 in diseases, mechanism of activation, and small molecule discovery targeted either to enhance or to block the function of this receptor.

  17. Synthesis of polystyrene, poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine), poly(p-nitrostyrene) and poly(p-aminostyrene)-coated silica and their extraction capabilities for amphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changmei; Zhang Shuanhong; Qu Rongjun; Sun Tao; Zhang Ying; Zhang Xiang; Song Jingyang

    2010-01-01

    Several novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials, including polystyrene-coated silica (SG-PS), poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine)-coated silica (SG-PVP), poly(p-nitrostyrene)-coated silica (SG-PS-NO 2 ) and poly(p-aminostyrene)-coated silica (SG-PS-NH 2 ), were synthesized in order to improve the extraction methods of harmful stimulants via solid phase extraction. The materials were characterized using infrared spectra (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement and thermogravimetric analysis (TG). The application of the new materials in solid phase extraction columns to extract methamphetamine revealed that the extraction capability of poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine)-coated silica is the best among the four materials, which provides novel supporter materials for extracting amphetamine-derived drugs.

  18. Synthesis of polystyrene, poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine), poly(p-nitrostyrene) and poly(p-aminostyrene)-coated silica and their extraction capabilities for amphetamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Changmei; Zhang Shuanhong [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Ludong University, Yantai, Shandong 264025 (China); Qu Rongjun, E-mail: qurongjun@eyou.com [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Ludong University, Yantai, Shandong 264025 (China); Sun Tao; Zhang Ying; Zhang Xiang; Song Jingyang [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Ludong University, Yantai, Shandong 264025 (China)

    2010-11-01

    Several novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials, including polystyrene-coated silica (SG-PS), poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine)-coated silica (SG-PVP), poly(p-nitrostyrene)-coated silica (SG-PS-NO{sub 2}) and poly(p-aminostyrene)-coated silica (SG-PS-NH{sub 2}), were synthesized in order to improve the extraction methods of harmful stimulants via solid phase extraction. The materials were characterized using infrared spectra (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement and thermogravimetric analysis (TG). The application of the new materials in solid phase extraction columns to extract methamphetamine revealed that the extraction capability of poly(styrene/4-vinylpyridine)-coated silica is the best among the four materials, which provides novel supporter materials for extracting amphetamine-derived drugs.

  19. Production low cost plastic scintillator by using commercial polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Plastic Scintillators can be described as solid materials which contain organic fluorescent compounds dissolved within a polymer matrix. Transparent plastics commonly used for light scintillation are Polystyrene (or PS, poly-vinyl-benzene) and polyvinyl-toluene (or PVT, poly-methyl-styron). By changing the composition of plastic Scintillators some features such as light yield, radiation hardening, decay time etc. can be controlled. Plastic scintillation detectors have been used in nuclear and high energy physics for many decades. Among their benefits are fast response, ease of manufacture and versatility. Their main drawbacks are radiation resistance and cost. Many research projects have concentrated on improving the fundamental properties of plastic scintillators, but little attention has focussed on their cost and easier manufacturing techniques. First plastic Scintillators were produced in 1950's. Activities for production of low cost Scintillators accelerated in second half of 1970's. In 1975 acrylic based Plexipop Scintillator was developed. Despite its low cost, since its structure was not aromatic the light yield of Plexipop was about one quarter of classical Scintillators. Problems arising from slow response time and weak mechanical properties in scintillators developed, has not been solved until 1980. Within the last decade extrusion method became very popular in preparation of low cost and high quality plastic scintillators. In this activity, preliminary studies for low cost plastic scintillator production by using commercial polystyrene pellets and extrusion plus compression method were aimed. For this purpose, PS blocks consist of commercial fluorescent dopant were prepared in June 2008 by use of the extruder and pres in SANAEM. Molds suitable for accoupling to extruder were designed and manufactured and optimum production parameters such as extrusion temperature profile, extrusion rate and moulding pressure were obtained hence, PS Scintillator Blocks

  20. PREFACE: The EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Roger

    2008-03-01

    HEPP2007, the EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference, was held in Manchester from July 19-26 2007. It brought together 580 delegates across the whole subject: from string theorists to detector technologists, from young postgraduate students to senior professors. Geographically they came from the UK, from the rest of Europe, from North America, and from the rest of the world. It covered the whole spectrum of the subject, not only accelerator-based experiments but also its astrophysical and cosmological aspects. The parallel and plenary talks can be found in these proceedings. A key feature of the conference, as always, was the award of the prizes: this year the EPS prize was awarded to Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for their explanation of CP violation with a 6 quark model—Kobayashi came to accept it in person. The Gribov medal went to Niklas Beisert, the outreach prize to Richard Jacobsson and Charles Timmermans and the Young Physicist prizer to I Furic, G Gomez-Ceballos and S Menzemer. Parallel sessions were held in Manchester University, and plenary talks were held in the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester Town centre, a magnificent modern venue whose positive and co-operative staff enabled the conference to make the most of the impressive surroundings. We were able to put the hall to its proper purpose one evening with a concert by the Fairey Band—one of the distinctive brass bands who form part of the rich musical tradition of the North of England, and came as something new and different to many of the delegates. The conference ran smoothly and successfully, thanks largely to hard work by the local organising committee who devoted a lot of time to planning, producing ideas, and anticipating potential problems. Many of them were not from Manchester itself but from other universities and laboratories in the North of England, so their dedication was especially appreciated. The EPS committee also played a major part, by the selection of plenary

  1. Influence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on Cd adsorption by bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Xing [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fang Linchuan [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Cai Peng, E-mail: cp@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang Qiaoyun [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Chen Hao [College of Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liang Wei; Rong, Xinming [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in Cd adsorption by Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida was investigated using a combination of batch adsorption experiments, potentiometric titrations, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). An increased adsorption capacity of Cd was observed for untreated bacteria relative to that for EPS-free bacteria. Surface complexation modeling of titration data showed the similar pK{sub a} values of functional groups (carboxyl, phosphate and hydroxyl) between untreated and EPS-free bacteria. However, site concentrations on the untreated bacteria were found to be higher than those on the EPS-free bacteria. FTIR spectra also showed that no significant difference in peak positions was observed between untreated and EPS-free bacteria and carboxyl and phosphate groups were responsible for Cd adsorption on bacterial cells. The information obtained in this study is of fundamental significance for understanding the interaction mechanisms between heavy metals and biofilms in natural environments. - Highlights: > The presence of EPS on bacterial surfaces facilitates the adsorption of Cd. > The promoting effects on Cd adsorption are more remarkable on Gram-positive B. subtilis cells than that on Gram-negative P. putida cells. > Carboxyl and phosphate groups are mostly responsible for Cd binding on untreated and EPS-free cells. > Intact bacterial cells and EPS-free cells have similar binding mechanisms for Cd. - Intact bacterial cells and EPS-free cells have similar binding mechanisms for Cd.

  2. Micellar aggregates of amylose-block-polystyrene rod-coil block copolymers in water and THF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, Katja; Böker, Alexander; Zettl, Heiko; Zhang, Mingfu; Krausch, Georg; Müller, Axel H.E.; Boker, A.; Zhang, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Amylose-block-polystyrenes with various block copolymer compositions were investigated in water and in THF solution. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light, scattering (DLS), and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation with multiangle light scattering detection indicate the presence

  3. Microscopy evidence of the face-centered cubic arrangement of monodisperse polystyrene nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hui [School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)]. E-mail: zhanghui14305@sohu.com; Duan Renguan [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Li Fan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Tang Qing [Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Li Wenchao [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation of polystyrene artificial opal achieved through self-assembly of monodisperse polystyrene nanospheres with a diameter of 250 nm from colloidal suspension after being ambient dried. A detailed analysis of the SEM images verifies that the face-centered cubic (fcc) phase is the most stable one for the polystyrene opal prepared. This finding provides a strong support for, by using polystyrene opal as template, fabricating a photonic crystal with inverse fcc structure of full band gap if the refractive index contrast is higher than 2.8 and the filling fraction of the high index materials is between 0.2 and 0.3.

  4. Microscopy evidence of the face-centered cubic arrangement of monodisperse polystyrene nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Duan Renguan; Li Fan; Tang Qing; Li Wenchao

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation of polystyrene artificial opal achieved through self-assembly of monodisperse polystyrene nanospheres with a diameter of 250 nm from colloidal suspension after being ambient dried. A detailed analysis of the SEM images verifies that the face-centered cubic (fcc) phase is the most stable one for the polystyrene opal prepared. This finding provides a strong support for, by using polystyrene opal as template, fabricating a photonic crystal with inverse fcc structure of full band gap if the refractive index contrast is higher than 2.8 and the filling fraction of the high index materials is between 0.2 and 0.3

  5. Coupling of carboxylic groups onto the surface of polystyrene parts during fused filament fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Philipp; Schubert, Oliver; Simon, Frank; Schlenstedt, Kornelia

    2017-11-01

    A method for the fabrication of polystyrene parts, modified with carboxylic groups during Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), is being introduced. This method is based on the application of a thin layer of a reactive polymer carrying carboxylic groups on a substrate surface. A polystyrene film is printed on top of this layer. During contact between the hot melt and the reactive layer, a Friedel-Crafts type acylation using a green catalyst takes place, which attaches the reactive polymer to the polystyrene surface. The modified surface is homogeneous, hydrophilic and able to bind copper ions. The method could be used to fabricate unique parts of polystyrene with tailored surface functionalisation. It could be applied for laboratory use, e.g. for the manufacture of lab-on-a-chip devices.

  6. Application of polystyrene - water calorimeter in determination of absorbed dose. Vol. 4.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, F A [Nuclear Materials Authority, Maadi, Cairo (Egypt); Ashry, H A; El-Behay, A Z; Abdou, S [National Center, for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The polystyrene-water calorimeter was investigated as a modification of the water calorimeter, where the polystyrene has a low specific heat and negligible known heat defect. This calorimeter was designed, constructed and calibrated for measurement of radiation absorbed dose. The system utilizes a thermistor to detect the radiation-induced temperature rise in the polystyrene absorber at certain point from the radiation source. A temperature stability of as low as 0.0018 degree C/min in a 42.0 degree C environment, and a gamma-radiation sensitivity of as high as 1.9720 ohm/Gy were obtained. Comparisons of the results obtained by using the polystyrene-water calorimeter with those obtained by applying other types of calorimeters i.e., water and graphite calorimeters were also done to aid in the possible realization of an accurate and efficient instrument for use under widely different irradiation conditions. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Thermo-mechanical properties of polystyrene-based shape memory nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, B.; Fu, Y.Q.; Ahmad, M.; Luo, J.K.; Huang, W.M.; Kraft, A.; Reuben, R.; Pei, Y.T.; Chen, Zhenguo; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    Shape memory nanocomposites were fabricated using chemically cross-linked polystyrene (PS) copolymer as a matrix and different nanofillers (including alumina, silica and clay) as the reinforcing agents. Their thermo-mechanical properties and shape memory effects were characterized. Experimental

  8. Effect of acid treated carbon nanotubes on mechanical, rheological and thermal properties of polystyrene nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Amr, Issam Thaher; Al-Amer, Adnan M J; Selvin, Thomas P.; Al-Harthi, Mamdouh Ahmed; Girei, Salihu Adamu; Sougrat, Rachid; Atieh, Muataz Ali

    2011-01-01

    In this work, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT) were functionalized by acid treatment and characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Polystyrene/CNT composites of both the untreated

  9. APPLICATION OF POLYSTYRENE FOAM CORE FUSIBLE PATTERNS IN PRODUCTION OF GAS TURBINES’ CAST PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Shinsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of replacing the LVM dissolves polystyrene molding on models is at the present time, technologically, economically and environmentally promising from the point of view of industrial applications for gas turbine plants in Ukraine. The authors proposed and tested manufacturing process of casting ceramic molds way to remove the polystyrene model of the dissolution of her organic solvents. Kinetic parameters of the process of dissolving and removing patterns of degradation products the polystyrene in the group of solvents depending on the type and amount of polystyrene were identified. The absence of surface defects of castings, reduction of roughness, increased their accuracy class in comparison to accepted technological regulations of the process of production, which reduced the cost of machined parts and increased utilization of expensive heat-resistant alloys were produced.

  10. A reactive polystyrene-block-polyisoprene star copolymer as a toughening agent in an epoxy thermoset

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Raju; Baby, Deepa K.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg A polystyrene-block-polyisoprene ((PS-b-PI)3) star polymer was synthesized by photochemical reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The obtained star polymer was epoxidized

  11. Polystyrene microplastics induce microbiota dysbiosis and inflammation in the gut of adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Xia, Jizhou; Pan, Zihong; Yang, Jiajing; Wang, Wenchao; Fu, Zhengwei

    2018-04-01

    Microplastic (MP) are environmental pollutants and have the potential to cause varying degrees of aquatic toxicity. In this study, the effects on gut microbiota of adult male zebrafish exposed for 14 days to 100 and 1000 μg/L of two sizes of polystyrene MP were evaluated. Both 0.5 and 50 μm-diameter spherical polystyrene MP increased the volume of mucus in the gut at a concentration of 1000 μg/L (about 1.456 × 10 10 particles/L for 0.5 μm and 1.456 × 10 4 particles/L for 50 μm). At the phylum level, the abundance of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria decreased significantly and the abundance of Firmicutes increased significantly in the gut after 14-day exposure to 1000 μg/L of both sizes of polystyrene MP. In addition, high throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3-V4 region revealed a significant change in the richness and diversity of microbiota in the gut of polystyrene MP-exposed zebrafish. A more in depth analysis, at the genus level, revealed that a total of 29 gut microbes identified by operational taxonomic unit (OTU) analysis were significantly changed in both 0.5 and 50 μm-diameter polystyrene MP-treated groups. Moreover, it was observed that 0.5 μm polystyrene MP not only increased mRNA levels of IL1α, IL1β and IFN but also their protein levels in the gut, indicating that inflammation occurred after polystyrene MP exposure. Our findings suggest that polystyrene MP could induce microbiota dysbiosis and inflammation in the gut of adult zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solvent effect on polystyrene surface roughness on top of QCM sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakti, Setyawan P., E-mail: sakti@ub.ac.id; Rahmawati, Eka; Robiandi, Fadli [Advanced System and Material Technology, Laboratory of Instrumentation and Measurement Department of Physics, Brawijaya University (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) has been used as a basis for many chemical sensors and biosensor. Its sensitivity to mass change which can detect a mass change on its surface down to sub ng/cm2 is one of its interesting aspects. Another interesting feature is its ability to work in liquid environment. However, there are many aspects which influence QCM sensor properties in contact with liquid. One of the aspects is surface roughness of the matrix layer where on top of it a biological sensitive layer will be immobilized. One of matrix layers in the immobilizing biological sensitive layer was polystyrene. Polystyrene was coated on the QCM sensor by using the spin coating method. During the coating process, polystyrene was solved using non-polar solvent. It is known that the physical and chemical properties of the solvent affect a transition process from soluble polymer becoming rigid polymer layer. In this work, we show that polystyrene solved in chloroform has a higher surface roughness compare to one solved in toluene, xylene, or tetrahydrofuran. Surface roughness of the polystyrene coating were measured using a non-contact profilometer. However, we also found that there is no difference on the electrical impedance of the QCM sensor coated with polystyrene resulted from differing solvent when the sensor was in contact with air and water. Thus, all of the mentioned solvent can be used to solve the polystyrene as a coating material for QCM sensor without affecting the electrical performance of the sensor, but the choice of the solution can be used as a simple method to control the difference roughness of the polystyrene coating.

  13. Role of EPS, Dispersant and Nutrients on the Microbial Response and MOS Formation in the Subarctic Northeast Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Gutierrez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we report the formation of marine oil snow (MOS, its associated microbial community, the factors influencing its formation, and the microbial response to crude oil in surface waters of the Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC. The FSC is a subarctic region that is hydrodynamically complex located in the northeast Atlantic where oil extraction is currently occurring and where exploration is likely to expand into its deeper waters (>500 m. A major oil spill in this region may mirror the aftermath that ensued following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, where the massive influx of Macondo crude oil triggered the formation of copious quantities of rapidly sinking MOS and successional blooms of opportunistic oil-degrading bacteria. In laboratory experiments, we simulated environmental conditions in sea surface waters of the FSC using water collected from this site during the winter of 2015. We demonstrated that the presence of dispersant triggers the formation of MOS, and that nutrient amendments magnify this. Illumina MiSeq sequencing revealed the enrichment on MOS of associated oil-degrading (Cycloclasticus, Thalassolituus, Marinobacter and EPS-producing (Halomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Alteromonas bacteria, and included major representation by Psychrobacter and Cobetia with putative oil-degrading/EPS-producing qualities. The formation of marine snow, in the absence of crude oil and dispersant, in seawater amended with nutrients alone indicated that the de novo synthesis of bacterial EPS is a key factor in MOS formation, and the glycoprotein composition of the MOS aggregates confirmed that its amorphous biopolymeric matrix was of microbial (likely bacterial origin. The presence of dispersants and crude oil with/without nutrients resulted in distinct microbial responses marked by intermittent, and in some cases short-lived, blooms of opportunistic heterotrophs, principally obligate hydrocarbonoclastic (Alcanivorax

  14. Metal-Containing Polystyrene Beads as Standards for Mass Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed I; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Kinach, Robert; Dai, Sheng; Thickett, Stuart C; Tanner, Scott; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2010-01-01

    We examine the suitability of metal-containing polystyrene beads for the calibration of a mass cytometer instrument, a single particle analyser based on an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a time of flight mass spectrometer. These metal-containing beads are also verified for their use as internal standards for this instrument. These beads were synthesized by multiple-stage dispersion polymerization with acrylic acid as a comonomer. Acrylic acid acts as a ligand to anchor the metal ions within the interior of the beads. Mass cytometry enabled the bead-by-bead measurement of the metal-content and determination of the metal-content distribution. Beads synthesized by dispersion polymerization that involved three stages were shown to have narrower bead-to-bead variation in their lanthanide content than beads synthesized by 2-stage dispersion polymerization. The beads exhibited insignificant release of their lanthanide content to aqueous solutions of different pHs over a period of six months. When mixed with KG1a or U937 cell lines, metal-containing polymer beads were shown not to affect the mass cytometry response to the metal content of element-tagged antibodies specifically attached to these cells.

  15. Coarse graining of atactic polystyrene and its derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-03-01

    Capturing large length scales in polymers and soft matter while retaining atomistic properties is imperative to computational studies of dynamic systems. Here we present a new methodology developing coarse-grain model based on atomistic simulation of atactic polystyrene (PS). Similar to previous work by Fritz et al., each monomer is described by two coarse grained beads. In contrast to this earlier work where intramolecular potentials were based on Monte Carlo simulation of both isotactic and syndiotactic single PS molecule to capture stereochemistry, we obtained intramolecular interactions from a single molecular dynamics simulation of an all-atom atactic PS melts. The non-bonded interactions are obtained using the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) scheme. This methodology has been extended to coarse graining of poly-(t-butyl-styrene) (PtBS). An additional coarse-grained bead is used to describe the t-butyl group. Similar to the process for PS, the intramolecular interactions are obtained from a single all atom atactic melt simulation. Starting from the non-bonded interactions for PS, we show that the IBI method for the non-bonded interactions of PtBS converges relatively fast. A generalized scheme for substituted PS is currently in development. We would like to acknowledge Prof. Kurt Kremer for helpful discussions during this work.

  16. Indentation deformation and fracture of thin polystyrene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Min; Palacio, Manuel L.; Barry Carter, C.; Gerberich, William W.

    2002-01-01

    Nanoindentation-induced deformation and fracture of thin polystyrene (PS) films on glass substrates were characterized using visible-light microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two film thicknesses, 2 and 3.5 μm were studied. It was difficult to induce delamination in the 2-μm film while the 3.5-μm film delaminated easily under indentation loads of 150 mN and higher. AFM cross-section analysis of the deformation and fracture geometry revealed that the ratio of the delamination radius to contact radius was between 3 and 4. Analysis of the fracture surface on the glass side indicates that substrate cracking acts as a trigger for initiation and propagation of interfacial cracks. Crack-arrest marks and process-zone marks were also observed by AFM imaging. The interfacial fracture toughness, or practical work of adhesion, was evaluated following two methods based on the indentation-induced delamination and a process-zone analysis. The fracture toughness was found to be approximately 0.6 J/m 2 for the 3.5-μm PS film on glass. AFM examination of the glass surface after indentation also showed fine flow lines around the indentation impression, indicating plastic deformation of glass

  17. Indentation deformation and fracture of thin polystyrene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Min; Palacio, Manuel L.; Barry Carter, C.; Gerberich, William W

    2002-09-02

    Nanoindentation-induced deformation and fracture of thin polystyrene (PS) films on glass substrates were characterized using visible-light microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two film thicknesses, 2 and 3.5 {mu}m were studied. It was difficult to induce delamination in the 2-{mu}m film while the 3.5-{mu}m film delaminated easily under indentation loads of 150 mN and higher. AFM cross-section analysis of the deformation and fracture geometry revealed that the ratio of the delamination radius to contact radius was between 3 and 4. Analysis of the fracture surface on the glass side indicates that substrate cracking acts as a trigger for initiation and propagation of interfacial cracks. Crack-arrest marks and process-zone marks were also observed by AFM imaging. The interfacial fracture toughness, or practical work of adhesion, was evaluated following two methods based on the indentation-induced delamination and a process-zone analysis. The fracture toughness was found to be approximately 0.6 J/m{sup 2} for the 3.5-{mu}m PS film on glass. AFM examination of the glass surface after indentation also showed fine flow lines around the indentation impression, indicating plastic deformation of glass.

  18. Positron states in polypropylene and polystyrene at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djourelov, N.; Dauwe, C.; Palacio, C.A.; Laforest, N.; Bas, C.

    2007-01-01

    The increase of the positronium (Ps) yield as a function of the positron (e + ) source exposure time at 20 K was monitored in polypropylene and polystyrene by positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) and Doppler broadening (DB) spectroscopy. The contributions of the different e + and Ps states as extracted from the PAL analysis were used to reproduce the behaviour of the sharpness parameter (S) as a function of the wing parameter (W) of the annihilation line as measured by DB spectroscopy. We find a remarkable non-linearity in the S -W plots, which seems to be related to the existence of a third component (C 3 ) in a four-component exponential analysis. We discuss the origin of C 3 in the frame of a ''blob'' analysis of the PAL spectra. It is shown that the simulated S-W dependence can satisfactorily fit the observed non-linearity only on the assumption that C 3 characterizes a e + -molecule complex. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Radioluminescence of aromatic molecule solutions in atactic and isotactic polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovskaya, I.A.; Alfimov, M.V.; Milinchuk, V.K.; Skvortsov, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    The generation of excited states of naphthalene-d 8 and carbazole molecules in polystyrene (PS) under X-ray illumination was investigated using luminescence method. A comparison of the concentration dependences of radioluminescence of the aromatic additives to solid PS and to toluene as well as the pattern of concentration versus photoluminescence of naphthalene-d 8 in PS demonstrates that unlike toluene there is no singlet-triplet conversion in PS owing to the formation of excimers. It is shown that the excited ststes of the aromatic additives in PS are populated under radiolysis via an energy transfer from singlet to triplet molecules of the matrix. Under the radiolysis the excited states of PS molecules may generate upon charge recombination. A comparison of radio luminescence spectra of the corresponding aromatic additives in two isomeric PS structures (atacting and isotactic) shows different processes with charge participation. The difference detected in the radioluminescence spectra of aromatic additives in the atactic and isotactic PS explained by the greater number of defects in atactic PS competing with the polymer molecule ion for charge capture

  20. The preparation of 125I labelled sodium polystyrene sulphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, I.; Higgo, J.J.W.; Williams, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    A radio-labelled polymeric colloid for use in field studies of colloidal migration was prepared. Sodium polystyrene p-sulphonate (PSSNa) with an average molecular weight of 500,000 Daltons was labelled with iodine 125. The report describes the preparation, purification and characterisation of this material. In order to use a standard technique for radio-iodination, by the iodinium ion, a very small number of phenolic groups had to be introduced into the polymer initially. This was done by a carefully controlled reaction with sodium hydroxide optimised so that a qualitative test for p-phenols gave a discernible positive result yet size exclusion chromatography indicated that no noticeable change in bulk properties of the PSSNa had occurred. The modified PSSNa was radio-iodinated and size exclusion chromatography was used to quantify the yield, activity and stability of the product. The radio-iodination of a bulk sample of the modified PSSNa was entrusted to Amersham who prepared a labelled product with an activity of 1.12 MBq per mg PSSNa. The mobility of this material was studied in the laboratory using spike injections onto columns of Drigg sand, sieved and unsieved, eluted with Drigg groundwater. The results indicated that transport of PSSNa in the field should give information on the structure of flow paths in the Drigg aquifer. (Author)

  1. Composite plasma polymerized sulfonated polystyrene membrane for PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Bhabesh Kumar; Khan, Aziz; Chutia, Joyanti, E-mail: jchutiaiasst@gmail.com

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) is used as the sulfonating agent. • The proton conductivity of the membrane is found to be 0.141 S cm{sup −1}. • Power density of fuel cell with styrene/MMS membrane is 0.5 W cm{sup −2}. • The membrane exhibits thermal stability up to 140 °C. - Abstract: This work presents the introduction of an organic compound methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) for the first time in fabrication of polystyrene based proton exchange membrane (PEM) by plasma polymerization process. The membrane is fabricated by co-polymerizing styrene and MMS in capacitively coupled continuous RF plasma. The chemical composition of the plasma polymerized polymer membrane is investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy which reveals the formation of composite structure of styrene and MMS. The surface morphology studied using AFM and SEM depicts the effect of higher partial pressure of MMS on surface topography of the membrane. The proton transport property of the membrane studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows the achievement of maximum proton conductivity of 0.141 S cm{sup −1} which is comparable to Nafion 117 membrane. Fuel cell performance test of the synthesized membrane shows a maximum power density of 500 mW cm{sup −2} and current density of 0.62 A cm{sup −2} at 0.6 V.

  2. The Evolution of Polystyrene as a Cell Culture Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Max J; Lembong, Josephine; Muramoto, Shin; Gillen, Greg; Fisher, John P

    2018-04-10

    Polystyrene (PS) has brought in vitro cell culture from its humble beginnings to the modern era, propelling dozens of research fields along the way. This review discusses the development of the material, fabrication, and treatment approaches to create the culture material. However, native PS surfaces poorly facilitate cell adhesion and growthin vitro. To overcome this, liquid surface deposition, energetic plasma activation, and emerging functionalization methods transform the surface chemistry. This review seeks to highlight the many potential applications of the first widely accepted polymer growth surface. Although the majority of in vitro research occurs on 2D surfaces, the importance of 3D culture models cannot be overlooked. Here the methods to transition PS to specialized 3D culture surfaces are also reviewed. Specifically, casting, electrospinning, 3D printing, and microcarrier approaches to shift PS to a 3D culture surface are highlighted. The breadth of applications of the material makes it impossible to highlight every use, but the aim remains to demonstrate the versatility and potential as both a general and custom cell culture surface. The review concludes with emerging scaffolding approaches and, based on the findings, presents our insights on the future steps for PS as a tissue culture platform.

  3. Nanocomposite of polystyrene foil grafted with metallaboranes for antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkocká, Monika; Kolářová, Kateřina; Matoušek, Jindřich; Semerádtová, Alena; Šícha, Václav; Kolská, Zdeňka

    2018-05-01

    The surface of polystyrene foil (PS) was chemically modified. Firstly, the surface was pre-treated with Piranha solution. The activated surface was grafted by selected amino-compounds (cysteamine, ethylenediamine or chitosan) and/or subsequently grafted with five members of inorganic metallaboranes. Selected surface properties were studied by using various methods in order to indicate significant changes before and after individual modification steps of polymer foil. Elemental composition of surface was conducted by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, chemistry and polarity by infrared spectroscopy and by electrokinetic analysis, wettability by goniometry, surface morphology by atomic force microscopy. Antimicrobial tests were performed on individual samples in order to confirm antimicrobial impact. Our results show slight antibacterial activity of PS modified with SK5 for Escherichia coli in comparison with the rest of the tested borane. On the other hand molecules of all tested metallaboranes could easier pierce through bacterial cell of Staphylococcus epidermidis due to absence of outer membrane (phospholipid bilayer). Some borane grafted on PS surface embodies the strong activity for Staphylococcus epidermidis and also for Desmodesmus quadricauda growth inhibition.

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced surface wettability modification of polystyrene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Wang, XinCai; Zheng, HongYu; Lam, YeeCheong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a simple method to create either a hydrophilic or hydrophobic surface. With femtosecond laser irradiation at different laser parameters, the water contact angle (WCA) on polystyrene's surface can be modified to either 12.7° or 156.2° from its original WCA of 88.2°. With properly spaced micro-pits created, the surface became hydrophilic probably due to the spread of the water droplets into the micro-pits. While with properly spaced micro-grooves created, the surface became rough and more hydrophobic. We investigated the effect of laser parameters on WCAs and analyzed the laser-treated surface roughness, profiles and chemical bonds by surface profilometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the laser-treated surface with low roughness, the polar (such as C—O, C=O, and O—C=O bonds) and non-polar (such as C—C or C—H bonds) groups were found to be responsible for the wettability changes. While for a rough surface, the surface roughness or the surface topography structure played a more significant role in the changes of the surface WCA. The mechanisms involved in the laser surface wettability modification process were discussed.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of polystyrene-starch polyblend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetty Kemala; M Syaeful Fahmi; Suminar S Achmadi

    2010-01-01

    Polystyrene foam (PS) is a polymer that is widely used but not biodegradable. Therefore, PS-starch polyblend was developed. In this research the effect of glycerol as plasticizer was evaluated based on mechanical and thermal analyses. PS-starch polyblends were produced by mixing PS and starch solution with composition ratios of 60:40, 65:35, 70:30, 75:25, and 80:20 percent by weight. Polylactic acid (20 %) was added as compatibilizer. The polyblends were analyzed its tensile strength, thermal properties, and density. The PS-starch polyblends were white opaque in color and fragile. The properties of tensile strength and density of the polyblends were in the range of that of pure PS. The tensile strength and density increases as PS constituents increasing with the best composition ratio of 80 PS to 20 of starch. Peak of glass transition and melting point seen a single on composition ration 80 PS to 20 of starch. Additional amount of glycerol did not affect the thermal property, but has caused a slight decrease in tensile strength and density. (author)

  6. Host polymer influence on dilute polystyrene segmental dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, T. R.

    2005-03-01

    We have utilized deuterium NMR to investigate the segmental dynamics of dilute (2%) d3-polystyrene (PS) chains in miscible polymer blends with polybutadiene, poly(vinyl ethylene), polyisoprene, poly(vinyl methylether) and poly(methyl methacrylate). In the dilute limit, we find qualitative differences depending upon whether the host polymer has dynamics that are faster or slower than that of pure PS. In blends where PS is the fast (low Tg) component, segmental dynamics are slowed upon blending and can be fit by the Lodge-McLeish model. When PS is the slow (high Tg) component, PS segmental dynamics speed up upon blending, but cannot be fit by the Lodge-McLeish model unless a temperature dependent self-concentration is employed. These results are qualitatively consistent with a recent suggestion by Kant, Kumar and Colby (Macromolecules, 2003, 10087), based upon data at higher concentrations. Furthermore, as the slow component, we find the segmental dynamics of PS has a temperature dependence similar to that of its host. This suggests viewing the high Tg component dynamics in a miscible blend as similar to a polymer in a low molecular weight solvent.

  7. The Expanding Universe: Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, Don [Fermilab; Nord, Brian [Fermilab

    2014-09-01

    In 1998, observations of distant supernovae led physicists that not only was the universe expanding, but the expansion was speeding up. In this article, we describe the evidence for an expanding universe and describe what physicists and cosmologists have learned in the intervening years. The target audience for this article is high school physics teachers and college physics professors at teaching institutions.

  8. The expanding universe: an introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Pössel, Markus

    2017-01-01

    An introduction to the physics and mathematics of the expanding universe, using no more than high-school level / undergraduate mathematics. Covered are the basics of scale factor expansion, the dynamics of the expanding universe, various distance concepts and the generalized redshift-luminosity relation, among other topics.

  9. Deposition kinetics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on silica in monovalent and divalent salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pingting; Long, Guoyu; Ni, Jinren; Tong, Meiping

    2009-08-01

    The deposition kinetics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on silica surfaces were examined in both monovalent and divalent solutions under a variety of environmentally relevant ionic strength and pH conditions by employing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (DCM-D). Soluble EPS (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) were extracted from four bacterial strains with different characteristics. Maximum favorable deposition rates (k(fa)) were observed for all EPS at low ionic strengths in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. With the increase of ionic strength, k(fa) decreased due to the simultaneous occurrence of EPS aggregation in solutions. Deposition efficiency (alpha; the ratio of deposition rates obtained under unfavorable versus corresponding favorable conditions) for all EPS increased with increasing ionic strength in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions, which agreed with the trends of zeta potentials and was consistent with the classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Comparison of alpha for SEPS and BEPS extracted from the same strain showed that the trends of alpha did not totally agree with trends of zeta potentials, indicating the deposition kinetics of EPS on silica surfaces were not only controlled by DLVO interactions, but also non-DLVO forces. Close comparison of alpha for EPS extracted from different sources showed alpha increased with increasing proteins to polysaccharides ratio. Subsequent experiments for EPS extracted from the same strain but with different proteins to polysaccharides ratios and from activated sludge also showed that alpha were largest for EPS with greatest proteins to polysaccharides ratio. Additional experiments for pure protein and solutions with different pure proteins to pure saccharides ratios further corroborated that larger proteins to polysaccharides ratio resulted in greater EPS deposition.

  10. COX-2 and Prostaglandin EP3/EP4 Signaling Regulate the Tumor Stromal Proangiogenic Microenvironment via CXCL12-CXCR4 Chemokine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Hosono, Kanako; Ito, Yoshiya; Suzuki, Tatsunori; Ogawa, Yasufumi; Kubo, Hidefumi; Kamata, Hiroki; Mishima, Toshiaki; Tamaki, Hideaki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)–derived hematopoietic cells, which are major components of tumor stroma, determine the tumor microenvironment and regulate tumor phenotypes. Cyclooxygenase (COX)−2 and endogenous prostaglandins are important determinants for tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis; however, their contributions to stromal formation and angiogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we observed that Lewis lung carcinoma cells implanted in wild-type mice formed a tumor mass with extensive stromal formation that was markedly suppressed by COX-2 inhibition, which reduced the recruitment of BM cells. Notably, COX-2 inhibition attenuated CXCL12/CXCR4 expression as well as expression of several other chemokines. Indeed, in a Matrigel model, prostaglandin (PG) E2 enhanced stromal formation and CXCL12/CXCR4 expression. In addition, a COX-2 inhibitor suppressed stromal formation and reduced expression of CXCL12/CXCR4 and a fibroblast marker (S100A4) in a micropore chamber model. Moreover, stromal formation after tumor implantation was suppressed in EP3−/− mice and EP4−/− mice, in which stromal expression of CXCL12/CXCR4 and S100A4 was reduced. The EP3 or EP4 knockout suppressed S100A4+ fibroblasts, CXCL12+, and/or CXCR4+ stromal cells as well. Immunofluorescent analyses revealed that CXCL12+CXCR4+S100A4+ fibroblasts mainly comprised stromal cells and most of these were recruited from the BM. Additionally, either EP3- or EP4-specific agonists stimulated CXCL12 expression by fibroblasts in vitro. The present results address the novel activities of COX-2/PGE2-EP3/EP4 signaling that modulate tumor biology and show that CXCL12/CXCR4 axis may play a crucial role in tumor stromal formation and angiogenesis under the control of prostaglandins. PMID:20110411

  11. Prostaglandin E2-Induced COX-2 Expressions via EP2 and EP4 Signaling Pathways in Human LoVo Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Hsien Hsu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most dangerous risk faced by patients with hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs has been observed in several types of human cancers and regulates the efficacy of many therapies. Here, we show that treatment with various concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2; 0, 1, 5 or 10 μM promotes the migration ability of the human LoVo colon cancer cell line. As demonstrated by mRNA and protein expression analyses, EP2 and EP4 are the major PGE2 receptors expressed on the LoVo cell membrane. The Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway was upregulated by EP2 and EP4 activation. Following the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, β-catenin translocated into the nucleus and triggered COX2 transcription via LEF-1 and TCF-4 and its subsequent translation. COX2 expression correlated with the elevation in the migration ability of LoVo cells. The experimental evidence shows a possible mechanism by which PGE2 induces cancer cell migration and further suggests PGE2 to be a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer metastasis. On inhibition of PGE2, in order to determine the downstream pathway, the levels of PI3K/Akt pathway were suppressed and the β-catenin expression was also modulated. Inhibition of EP2 and EP4 shows that PGE2 induces protein expression of COX-2 through EP2 and EP4 receptors in LoVo colon cancer cells.

  12. Machining of Molybdenum by EDM-EP and EDC Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. L.; Chen, H. J.; Lee, H. M.; Lo, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Molybdenum metal (Mo) can be machined with conventional tools and equipment, however, its refractory propertytends to chip when being machined. In this study, the nonconventional processes of electrical discharge machining (EDM) and electro-polishing (EP) have been conducted to investigate the machining of Mo metal and fabrication of Mo grid. Satisfactory surface quality was obtained using appropriate EDM parameters of Ip ≦ 3A and Ton EDMed Mo metal. Experimental results proved that the appropriate parameters of Ip = 5A and Ton = 50μs at Toff = 10μs can obtain the deposit with about 60μm thickness. The major phase of deposit on machined Mo surface was SiC ceramic, while the minor phases included MoSi2 and/or SiO2 with the presence of free Si due to improper discharging parameters and the use of silicone oil as the dielectric fluid.

  13. W- and Z-boson production at ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, U.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of W and Z production in high energy ep collisions are briefly summarized. The processes ep→eW ± X, ep→νW - X, ep→eZX and ep→νZX are investigated. The region of small momentum transfer in eW and eZ production, with a fermion exchanged in the u-channel, is treated using the photon structure function approach, and carefully matched to the deep inelastic region. Low momentum photon exchange contributions to νW and eZ production, are calculated using form factors and structure functions fitted directly to experimental data. (author) 9 refs.; 1 tab

  14. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental results using shock-wave acceleration (SWA) driven by a CO2 laser in a H2 gas-jet plasma have shown the possibility of producing proton beams with energy spreads emission from a UV ablated material. The desired characteristics optimal for SWA are met: (a) peak plasma density is overcritical for the 1- μm main pulse and (b) the plasma profile exponentially decays over a long scale length on the rear side. Results will be shown using a 4 ω probe to experimentally characterize the plasma density profile. Scaling from simulations of the SWA mechanism shows that ion energies in the range of 100 MeV/amu are achievable with a focused a0 of 5 from the OMEGA EP Laser System. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Uranium uptake by immobilized cells of Pseudomonas strain EPS 5028

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, M.P.; Fuste, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Polyacrylamide-gel-immobilized cells of Pseudomonas strain EPS 5028 were effective in the removal of uranium (U) from synthetic effluents. Metal accumulation was performed in an open system in columns filled with immobilized cells that were challenged with continuous flows containing U. Possible variable of the system were studied. Uranium uptake by the immobilized cells of this microorganism was affected by pH but not by temperature or flow rate. In addition, U binding could be interpreted in terms of the Freundlich adsorption isotherm indicating single-layer adsorption. The feasibility of reusing the immobilized cells was suggested after the recovery of U with a solution of 0.1 M sodium carbonate. (orig.)

  16. Safety Aspects of EPS-3000 Electron Beam Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Aiasah Hashim; Shari Jahar; Ayub Muhamad; Sarada Idris

    2011-01-01

    The EPS-3000 electron beam machine was installed and commission in 1991 at the Alurtron Electron Beam Irradiation Centre. It is utilized as a tool to enhance finished products through electron beam irradiation. The machine and its auxiliary systems were built with highest safety in mind due to the possible dangers that it can cause during the irradiation activities. Automatic stops may be activated via various interlocks to protect the integrity of the machine. This type of interlocks are controlled by the set upper and lower limits, mostly related to the machine high voltage (and beam) generation and cooling systems. Radiation safety is also taken care of by provision of shielding and area monitoring. Other potential hazards include ozone poisoning and electromagnetic field (EMF) could be generated by the high voltage. This paper describes the safety and security systems installed within the facility as measures to protect the workers and general public from radiation and other physical threats. (author)

  17. Neutronics analysis for integration of ITER diagnostics port EP10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colling, Bethany, E-mail: bethany.colling@ccfe.ac.uk [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Eade, Tim [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joyce, Malcolm J. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Pampin, Raul; Seyvet, Fabien [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Turner, Andrew [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Udintsev, Victor [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Shutdown dose rate calculations have been performed on an integrated ITER C-lite neutronics model with equatorial port 10. A ‘fully shielded’ configuration, optimised for a given set of diagnostic designs (i.e. shielding in all available space within the port plug drawers), results in a shutdown dose rate in the port interspace, from the activation of materials comprising equatorial port 10, in excess of 2000 μSv/h. Achieving dose rates of 100 μSv/h or less, as required in areas where hands-on maintenance can be performed, in the port interspace region will be challenging. A combination of methods will need to be implemented, such as reducing mass and/or the use of reduced activation steel in the port interspace, optimisation of the diagnostic designs and shielding of the port interspace floor. Further analysis is required to test these options and the ongoing design optimisation of the EP10 diagnostic systems.

  18. E-P instability in the NSNS accumulator ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, A.G.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    1997-08-01

    It has been speculated that the intensity limitation observed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is caused by a coherent instability induced by the presence of pockets of electrons generated by scattering with the molecules of the vacuum residual gas. A theoretical explanation of the e-p instability of course does exist, and is similar to the one developed for the ion-induced instability in electron storage rings. Considering the large beam power (3 MW) involved in the NSNS Accumulator Ring, and the consequences caused by even a small amount of beam loss, we need to carefully assess the effects of electrons that may be generated in the vacuum chamber.

  19. Initial Ferritic Wall Mode studies on HBT-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Navratil, G. A.

    2013-10-01

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective US component test facility and DEMO. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will provide crucial physics for these experiments. Although the ferritic wall mode (FWM) was seen in a linear machine, the FWM was not observed in JFT-2M, probably due to eddy current stabilization. Using its high-resolution magnetic diagnostics and positionable walls, HBT-EP has begun exploring the dynamics and stability of plasma interacting with high-permeability ferritic materials tiled to reduce eddy currents. We summarize a simple model for plasma-wall interaction in the presence of ferromagnetic material, describe the design of a recently-installed set of ferritic shell segments, and report initial results. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  20. Measurement of isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-09-15

    Isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}. Measurements were made in the isolated-photon transverse-energy and pseudo- rapidity ranges 45 GeV. Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive isolated photon production as functions of Q{sup 2}, x, E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} and {eta}{sup {gamma}}. Leading-logarithm parton-shower Monte Carlo simulations and perturbative QCD predictions give a reasonable description of the data over most of the kinematic range. (orig.)

  1. Diffractive photoproduction of dijets in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-09-01

    Diffractive photoproduction of dijets was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 77.2 pb -1 . The measurements were made in the kinematic range Q 2 2 , 0.20 P 2 is the photon virtuality, y is the inelasticity and x P is the fraction of the proton momentum taken by the diffractive exchange. The two jets with the highest transverse energy, E jet T , were required to satisfy E jet T >7.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to lie in the pseudorapidity range -1.5 jet <1.5. Differential cross sections were compared to perturbative QCD calculations using available parameterisations of diffractive parton distributions of the proton. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-09-01

    Isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 320 pb -1 . Measurements were made in the isolated-photon transverse-energy and pseudo- rapidity ranges 4 T γ γ 2 , in the range 10 2 2 and for invariant masses of the hadronic system W X >5 GeV. Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive isolated photon production as functions of Q 2 , x, E T γ and η γ . Leading-logarithm parton-shower Monte Carlo simulations and perturbative QCD predictions give a reasonable description of the data over most of the kinematic range. (orig.)

  3. Highlights from e-EPS: Coordinated Access to Light sources

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    The CALIPSO project, which runs until May 2015, will contribute to the effective exploitation of European synchrotrons and free electron lasers. CALIPSO (Coordinated Access to Light sources to Promote Standards and Optimisation) includes 20 partners forming one of the largest Research Networks in the world.   e-EPS interviewed M. Bertolo, CALIPSO project manager and his assistant C. Blasetti. Which challenges are addressed by CALIPSO? CALIPSO’s goal is to optimize the exploitation of the European synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers. With respect to previous projects funded by the European Commission, it foresees significant improvements in integration, innovation and user-friendliness in all three areas of networking, transnational access and instrumentation. The Transnational Access program potentially benefits a community of 25,000 estimated users offering free open access to 12 synchrotrons and 5 free electron lasers solely based on scientific merit. In ad...

  4. Muon Pair Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz, I.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Yan, W.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2003-01-01

    Cross sections for the production of two isolated muons up to high di-muon masses are measured in ep collisions at HERA with the H1 detector in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 71 pb^-1 at a centre of mass energy of sqrt{s} = 319 GeV. The results are in good agreement with Standard Model predictions, the dominant process being photon-photon interactions. Additional muons or electrons are searched for in events with two high transverse momentum muons using the full data sample corresponding to 114 pb^-1, where data at sqrt{s} = 301 GeV and sqrt{s} = 319 GeV are combined. Both the di-lepton sample and the tri-lepton sample agree well with the predictions.

  5. Transverse momentum of gluons in ep-scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholewa, A.

    2005-11-01

    A Monte Carlo analysis of the phase space of hard interacting gluons in ep-scattering is presented. The event generator CASCADE is used in combination with the program HZTOOL to identify the accessible regions of phase space of present HERA measurements. A map of the k t -x g -plane is presented to show that in the region -3≤log g ≤-1 transverse gluon momenta of up to k t >or sim 20 GeV are accessible to HERA measurements. Furthermore the observables x γ and the transverse jet energy E T are found to be highly sensitive to the transverse momentum and the longitudinal momentum fraction of gluons. (orig.) (orig.)

  6. A search for excited neutrinos in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2008-06-01

    A search for first generation excited neutrinos is performed using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV, corresponding to a total luminosity of 184 pb. The electroweak decays of excited neutrinos ν→νγ, ν→νZ and ν→eW with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for excited neutrino production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on ν production cross sections and on the ratio of the coupling to the compositeness scale f/Λ are derived within gauge mediated models. A limit on f/Λ, independent of the relative couplings to the SU(2) and U(1) gauge bosons, is also determined. These limits extend the excluded region to higher masses than has been possible in previous excited neutrino searches.

  7. NREL- and Sandia-Developed HyStEP Device Receives Far West FLC Award | News

    Science.gov (United States)

    | NREL NREL- and Sandia-Developed HyStEP Device Receives Far West FLC Award NREL- and Sandia -Developed HyStEP Device Receives Far West FLC Award September 1, 2016 The National Renewable Energy technologies and boost the regional economy. As FLC awards are granted for outstanding achievements in

  8. Transcription factors and molecular epigenetic marks underlying EpCAM overexpression in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, B. T. F.; de Groote, M. L.; Kazemier, H. G.; Arendzen, A. J.; Terpstra, P.; Ruiters, M. H. J.; McLaughlin, P. M. J.; Rots, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is overexpressed on carcinomas, and its downregulation inhibits the oncogenic potential of multiple tumour types. Here, we investigated underlying mechanisms of epcam overexpression in ovarian carcinoma. METHODS: Expression of EpCAM and DNA

  9. Social accountability and the finance sector: the case of Equator Principles (EP) institutionalisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Sullivan, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    In June 2003, the Equator Principles (EP) were launched by ten international commercial banks. The EP were designed as a set of voluntary environmental and social risk management guidelines for project finance. Whilst lauded as a revolutionary initiative by the financial sector, the Principles were

  10. Composition of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) produced by Flavobacterium columnare isolated from tropical fish in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alexandre Sebastião, Fernanda; Pilarski, Fabiana; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2013-01-01

    Thirty nine isolates of Flavobacterium columnare from Brazilian fish farms had their carbohydrate composition of EPS evaluated by high efficiency liquid chromatography, using the phenol-sulfuric acid method of EPS. The occurrence of capsules on F. columnare cells was not directly related to biofilm formation, and the predominant monosaccharide is glucose.

  11. A novel biosorbent for dye removal: Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiqiang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment of Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Laboratoire de Sciences Analytiques (UMR CNRS 5180), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Xia Siqing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment of Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: siqingxia@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Wang Xuejiang; Yang Aming; Xu Bin; Chen Ling; Zhu Zhiliang; Zhao Jianfu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment of Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Leonard, Didier [Laboratoire de Sciences Analytiques (UMR CNRS 5180), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2009-04-15

    This paper deals with the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 used as a novel biosorbent to remove dye from aqueous solution in batch systems. As a widely used and hazardous dye, basic blue 54 (BB54) was chosen as the model dye to examine the adsorption performance of the EPS. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature on the sorption of BB54 to the EPS were examined. At various initial dye concentrations (50-400 mg/L), the batch sorption equilibrium can be obtained in only 5 min. Kinetic studies suggested that the sorption followed the internal transport mechanism. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum BB54 uptake of 2.005 g/g was obtained. Chemical analysis of the EPS indicated the presence of protein (30.9%, w/w) and acid polysaccharide (63.1%, w/w). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the EPS with a crystal-linear structure was whole enwrapped by adsorbed dye molecules. FTIR spectrum result revealed the presence of adsorbing groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups in the EPS. High-molecular weight of the EPS with more binding-sites and stronger van der Waals forces together with its specific construct leads to the excellent performance of dye adsorption. The EPS shows potential board application as a biosorbent for both environmental protection and dye recovery.

  12. A novel biosorbent for dye removal: Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiqiang; Xia Siqing; Wang Xuejiang; Yang Aming; Xu Bin; Chen Ling; Zhu Zhiliang; Zhao Jianfu; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Leonard, Didier

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 used as a novel biosorbent to remove dye from aqueous solution in batch systems. As a widely used and hazardous dye, basic blue 54 (BB54) was chosen as the model dye to examine the adsorption performance of the EPS. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature on the sorption of BB54 to the EPS were examined. At various initial dye concentrations (50-400 mg/L), the batch sorption equilibrium can be obtained in only 5 min. Kinetic studies suggested that the sorption followed the internal transport mechanism. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum BB54 uptake of 2.005 g/g was obtained. Chemical analysis of the EPS indicated the presence of protein (30.9%, w/w) and acid polysaccharide (63.1%, w/w). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the EPS with a crystal-linear structure was whole enwrapped by adsorbed dye molecules. FTIR spectrum result revealed the presence of adsorbing groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups in the EPS. High-molecular weight of the EPS with more binding-sites and stronger van der Waals forces together with its specific construct leads to the excellent performance of dye adsorption. The EPS shows potential board application as a biosorbent for both environmental protection and dye recovery

  13. The Eps15 C. elegans homologue EHS-1 is implicated in synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Hilliard, M A; Croce, A

    2001-01-01

    implicated Eps15 in endocytosis, its function in the endocytic machinery remains unclear. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, zk1248.3 (ehs-1), is the orthologue of Eps15 in nematodes, and that its product, EHS-1, localizes to synaptic-rich regions. ehs-1-impaired worms showed temperature...

  14. Production of Z0 bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Kooijman, P.; Zotkin, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    The production of Z0 bosons in the reaction ep →eZ0 p(∗), where p(∗) stands for a proton or a lowmass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb−1 of integrated

  15. 30 CFR 250.226 - What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the EP? 250.226 Section 250.226 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.226 What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA...

  16. The entry of free radicals into polystyrene latex particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.E.; Trau, M.; Gilbert, R.C.; Napper, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the processes governing the kinetics of emulsion polymerization has both scientific and technical interest. One component of this process that is poorly understood at present is that of free radical entry into latex particles. Measurements were made of the entry rate coefficient as a function of temperature for free radicals entering polystyrene latex particles in seeded emulsion polymerizations initiated by γ-rays. The activation energy for entry was found to be less than 24 ± 3 kJ mol -1 , consistent with entry being controlled by a physical (e.g. diffusional) rather than a chemical process. Measurement of the entry rate coefficient as a function of the γ-ray dose rate suggested that the factors that determine the entry rate when the primary free radicals are uncharged are similar to those that determine the entry rate for charged free radicals derived from chemical initiation by peroxydisulfate. This result was consistent with measurements of the entry rate coefficient of charged free radicals derived from peroxydisulfate; these data were found to be virtually independent of both the extent of the latex surface coverage by the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate and the ionic strength of the continuous phase. The data refute several proposals given in the literature for the rate-determining step for entry, being inconsistent with control by collision of free radicals with the latex particles, surfactant desorption, and an electrostatic barrier arising from the colloidal nature of the entering free radical. The origin of the activation energy for entry remains obscure

  17. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Suquet, Marc; Thomas, Yoann; Lambert, Christophe; Fabioux, Caroline; Pernet, Marie Eve Julie; Le Goïc, Nelly; Quillien, Virgile; Mingant, Christian; Epelboin, Yanouk; Corporeau, Charlotte; Guyomarch, Julien; Robbens, Johan; Paul-Pont, Ika; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L−1) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (−38%), diameter (−5%), and sperm velocity (−23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring. PMID:26831072

  18. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Suquet, Marc; Thomas, Yoann; Lambert, Christophe; Fabioux, Caroline; Pernet, Marie Eve Julie; Le Goïc, Nelly; Quillien, Virgile; Mingant, Christian; Epelboin, Yanouk; Corporeau, Charlotte; Guyomarch, Julien; Robbens, Johan; Paul-Pont, Ika; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L(-1)) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (-38%), diameter (-5%), and sperm velocity (-23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring.

  19. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Geary

    Full Text Available Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1 expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1. Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism

  20. Low-voltage bendable pentacene thin-film transistor with stainless steel substrate and polystyrene-coated hafnium silicate dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seunghyup; Yong, Kijung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2012-04-01

    The hafnium silicate and aluminum oxide high-k dielectrics were deposited on stainless steel substrate using atomic layer deposition process and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and polystyrene (PS) were treated improve crystallinity of pentacene grown on them. Besides, the effects of the pentacene deposition condition on the morphologies, crystallinities and electrical properties of pentacene were characterized. Therefore, the surface treatment condition on dielectric and pentacene deposition conditions were optimized. The pentacene grown on polystyrene coated high-k dielectric at low deposition rate and temperature (0.2-0.3 Å/s and R.T.) showed the largest grain size (0.8-1.0 μm) and highest crystallinity among pentacenes deposited various deposition conditions, and the pentacene TFT with polystyrene coated high-k dielectric showed excellent device-performance. To decrease threshold voltage of pentacene TFT, the polystyrene-thickness on high-k dielectric was controlled using different concentration of polystyrene solution. As the polystyrene-thickness on hafnium silicate decreases, the dielectric constant of polystyrene/hafnium silicate increases, while the crystallinity of pentacene grown on polystyrene/hafnium silicate did not change. Using low-thickness polystyrene coated hafnium silicate dielectric, the high-performance and low voltage operating (pentacene thin film transistor (μ: ~2 cm(2)/(V s), on/off ratio, >1 × 10(4)) and complementary inverter (DC gains, ~20) could be fabricated.

  1. New generation expandable sand screens

    OpenAIRE

    Syltøy, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering This thesis aims to give a general insight into sand control and various sorts of sand control measures and applications of sand control tools. Special focus will be given to expandable sand screens – a technology which came about in the late 1990’s through the use of flexible, expandable tubulars as base pipe in sand screens. More specifically Darcy’s Hydraulic Endurance Screens, a compliant sand screen system using hydraulic activation, and the fu...

  2. Neutrinos in an expanding Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigmans, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Universe contains several billion neutrinos for each nucleon. In this paper, we follow the history of these relic neutrinos as the Universe expanded. At present, their typical velocity is a few hundred km/s and, therefore, their spectra are affected by gravitational forces. This may have led to a phenomenon that could explain two of todays great mysteries: The large-scale structure of the Universe and the increasing rate at which it expands. (paper)

  3. Effect of salivary secretory IgA on the adhesion of Candida albicans to polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Millán, R; Elguezabal, N; Regúlez, P; Moragues, M D; Quindós, G; Pontón, J

    2000-09-01

    Attachment of Candida albicans to plastic materials of dental prostheses or to salivary macromolecules adsorbed on their surface is believed to be a critical event in the development of denture stomatitis. In an earlier study, it was shown that adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene, a model system to study the adhesion of C. albicans to plastic materials, can be partially inhibited with an mAb directed against cell wall polysaccharides of C. albicans. In the present study, the role of whole saliva in the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene has been investigated, and three mAbs directed against epitopes of cell wall mannoproteins have been used to mimic the inhibitory effect observed with salivary secretory IgA (sIgA) on the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene. In the absence of whole saliva, adherence of C. albicans 3153 increased with germination. However, the presence of whole saliva enhanced the adhesion to polystyrene of C. albicans 3153 yeast cells but decreased the adhesion of germinated cells. The enhancement of adhesion of yeast cells to polystyrene mediated by saliva was confirmed with an agerminative mutant of C. albicans 3153. The inhibition of the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 germ tubes to polystyrene was due to the salivary sIgA since sIgA-depleted saliva enhanced the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 to polystyrene. The inhibitory effect mediated by sIgA was not related to the inhibition of germination but to the blockage of adhesins expressed on the cell wall surface of the germ tubes. The three mAbs studied reduced the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 to polystyrene at levels equivalent to those for purified sIgA. The highest reduction in the adhesion was obtained with the IgA mAb N3B. The best results were obtained when the three mAbs were combined. The results suggest that whole saliva plays a different role in the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene depending on the morphological phase of C. albicans. These results may give new insights into the

  4. Relation between EPS adherence, viscoelastic properties, and MBR operation: Biofouling study with QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweity, Amer; Ying, Wang; Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Yang, Fei; Bick, Amos; Oron, Gideon; Herzberg, Moshe

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fouling is one of the main constraints of the wide use of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology. The biomass in MBR systems includes extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), metabolic products of active microbial secretion that adversely affect the membrane performance. Solids retention time (SRT) in the MBR is one of the most important parameters affecting membrane fouling in MBR systems, where fouling is minimized at optimal SRT. Among the operating parameters in MBR systems, SRT is known to strongly influence the ratio of proteins to polysaccharides in the EPS matrix. In this study, we have direct evidence for changes in EPS adherence and viscoelastic properties due to changes in the sludge removal rate that strongly correlate with the membrane fouling rate and EPS composition. EPS were extracted from a UF membrane in a hybrid growth MBR operated at sludge removal rates of 59, 35.4, 17.7, and 5.9 L day(-1) (corresponding SRT of 3, 5, 10, and 30 days, respectively). The EPS adherence and adsorption kinetics were carried out in a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technology in several adsorption measurements to a gold sensor coated with Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF). EPS adsorption to the sensor surface is characterized by a decrease of the oscillation frequency and an increase in the dissipation energy of the sensor during parallel flow of aqueous media, supplemented with EPS, above the sensor surface. The results from these experiments were further modeled using the Voigt based model, in which the thickness, shear modulus, and shear viscosity values of the adsorbed EPS layers on the PVDF crystal were calculated. The observations in the QCM-D suggested that the elevated fouling of the UF membrane is due to higher adherence of the EPS as well as reduction in viscosity and elasticity of the EPS adsorbed layer and elevation of the EPS fluidity. These results corroborate with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) image

  5. Estimation of free volumes of polystyrene by positron annihilation life-time technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hong-Ling; Ujihira, Yusuke; Nanasawa, Atsushi.

    1996-01-01

    Differences of size, content, and size distribution of free volumes in linear and three-armed polystyrenes, synthesized by radical, and anionic processes, were observed by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. For the polystyrene samples of different architectures and molecular weight distributions, the temperature dependence of an average free volume radius was quite similar to each other. The radius increased with increasing temperature (T), from 0.27 nm (60 K) to 0.30 nm (glass transition temperature: T g = 363 K), then to 0.35 nm (423 K), showing αβ transition temperature about 300 K. With increasing T, the free volume content decreased from 35% (60 K) to 25% (260 K) for radically polymerized linear polystyrene and to 22% (320 K) for anionically polymerized three-armed polystyrene, and then turned to increase to 35% at 350 K and 400 K, respectively. In contrast, the content for anionically polymerized linear polystyrene decreased from 45% (60 K) to 33% (300 K) and turned to increase to 35% at 350-400 K. The free volume content decreased reciprocally with an increase in the molecular weight at 333 K, suggesting differences in molecular motion between the edge and middle portions of the chain molecule. (author)

  6. Effect of Surface Modification of Nanosilica on the Viscoelastic Properties of Its Polystyrene Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mortezaei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and characterization of the vinyltriethoxysilane-modified silica nanoparticles were investigated. Also the surface tension of polystyrene, native (hydrophilic silica and silane-modified (hydrophobic silica were determined. Two kinds of polystyrene/silica (treated and non-treated nanocomposites were prepared with different filler loadings by solution method. Their viscoelastic properties were studied by dynamic stress controlled rotary shear rheometer. Solid-like response of polystyrene/native silica nanocomposites were observed in the terminal zone. Solid inclusionsincrease the storage modulus more than the loss modulus, hence decrease the material damping. By increasing filler volume fraction, the particles tend to agglomerate and build clusters. The presence of clusters increases the viscosity, the moduli and the viscoelastic non-linearity of the composites.Treating the filler surface reduces its tendency to agglomerate as well as the adhesion between the particles and the polystyrene, leading to lower viscosity and interfacial slippage. Also the loss modulus peak is affected significantly by the particle surface area and its surface property in silica-filled polystyrene, which corresponds to its glass transition.

  7. Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates: cytoadherence and adherence to polystyrene, intrauterine device, and vaginal ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Odelta; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2017-12-01

    The parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis is complex and in part is mediated by cytoadherence accomplished via five surface proteins named adhesins and a glycoconjugate called lipophosphoglycan (TvLPG). In this study, we evaluated the ability of T. vaginalis isolates to adhere to cells, plastic (polystyrene microplates), intrauterine device (IUD), and vaginal ring. Of 32 T. vaginalis isolates, 4 (12.5%) were strong adherent. The T. vaginalis isolates TV-LACM6 and TV-LACM14 (strong polystyrene-adherent) were also able to adhere to IUD and vaginal ring. Following chemical treatments, results demonstrated that the T. vaginalis components, lipophosphoglycan, cytoskeletal proteins, and surface molecules, were involved in both adherence to polystyrene and cytoadherence. The gene expression level from four adhesion proteins was highest in trophozoites adhered to cells than trophozoites adhered to the abiotic surface (polystyrene microplate). Our data indicate the major involvement of TvLPG in adherence to polystyrene, and that adhesins are important for cytoadherence. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first report showing the T. vaginalis adherence to contraceptive devices, reaffirming its importance as pathogen among women in reproductive age.

  8. Impact of water chemistry on surface charge and aggregation of polystyrene microspheres suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Songhua; Zhu, Kairuo; Song, Wencheng; Song, Gang; Chen, Diyun; Hayat, Tasawar; Alharbi, Njud S; Chen, Changlun; Sun, Yubing

    2018-07-15

    The discharge of microplastics into aquatic environment poses the potential threat to the hydrocoles and human health. The fate and transport of microplastics in aqueous solutions are significantly influenced by water chemistry. In this study, the effect of water chemistry (i.e., pH, foreign salts and humic acid) on the surface charge and aggregation of polystyrene microsphere in aqueous solutions was conducted by batch, zeta potentials, hydrodynamic diameters, FT-IR and XPS analysis. Compared to Na + and K + , the lower negative zeta potentials and larger hydrodynamic diameters of polystyrene microspheres after introduction of Mg 2+ were observed within a wide range of pH (2.0-11.0) and ionic strength (IS, 0.01-500mmol/L). No effect of Cl - , HCO 3 - and SO 4 2- on the zeta potentials and hydrodynamic diameters of polystyrene microspheres was observed at low IS concentrations (10mmol/L). The zeta potentials of polystyrene microspheres after HA addition were decreased at pH2.0-11.0, whereas the lower hydrodynamic diameters were observed at pH<4.0. According to FT-IR and XPS analysis, the change in surface properties of polystyrene microspheres after addition of hydrated Mg 2+ and HA was attributed to surface electrostatic and/or steric repulsions. These investigations are crucial for understanding the effect of water chemistry on colloidal stability of microplastics in aquatic environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenotype-dependent effects of EpCAM expression on growth and invasion of human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martowicz, Agnieszka; Spizzo, Gilbert; Gastl, Guenther; Untergasser, Gerold

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer and stem cells and has emerged as an attractive target for immunotherapy of breast cancer patients. This study analyzes the effects of EpCAM on breast cancer cell lines with epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype. For this purpose, shRNA-mediated knockdown of EpCAM gene expression was performed in EpCAM high breast cancer cell lines with epithelial phenotype (MCF-7, T47D and SkBR3). Moreover, EpCAM low breast carcinoma cell lines with mesenchymal phenotype (MDA-MB-231, Hs578t) and inducible overexpression of EpCAM were used to study effects on proliferation, migration and in vivo growth. In comparison to non-specific silencing controls (n/s-crtl) knockdown of EpCAM (E#2) in EpCAM high cell lines resulted in reduced cell proliferation under serum-reduced culture conditions. Moreover, DNA synthesis under 3D culture conditions in collagen was significantly reduced. Xenografts of MCF-7 and T47D cells with knockdown of EpCAM formed smaller tumors that were less invasive. EpCAM low cell lines with tetracycline-inducible overexpression of EpCAM showed no increased cell proliferation or migration under serum-reduced growth conditions. MDA-MB-231 xenografts with EpCAM overexpression showed reduced invasion into host tissue and more infiltrates of chicken granulocytes. The role of EpCAM in breast cancer strongly depends on the epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype of tumor cells. Cancer cells with epithelial phenotype need EpCAM as a growth- and invasion-promoting factor, whereas tumor cells with a mesenchymal phenotype are independent of EpCAM in invasion processes and tumor progression. These findings might have clinical implications for EpCAM-based targeting strategies in patients with invasive breast cancer

  10. THE ECLIPSING SYSTEM EP ANDROMEDAE AND ITS CIRCUMBINARY COMPANIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius; Park, Jang-Ho, E-mail: jwlee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: tchinse@gmail.com, E-mail: pooh107162@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    We present new long-term CCD photometry for EP And acquired during the period 2007-2012. The light curves display total eclipses at primary minima and season-to-season light variability. Our synthesis for all available light curves indicates that the eclipsing pair is a W-type overcontact binary with parameters of q = 2.578, i = 83. Degree-Sign 3, {Delta}T = 27 K, f = 28%, and l{sub 3} = 2%-3%. The asymmetric light curves in 2007 were satisfactorily modeled by a cool spot on either of the eclipsing components from a magnetic dynamo. Including our 95 timing measurements, a total of 414 times of minimum light spanning about 82 yr was used for a period study. A detailed analysis of the eclipse timing diagram revealed that the orbital period of EP And has varied as a combination of an upward-opening parabola and two periodic variations, with cycle lengths of P{sub 3} = 44.6 yr and P{sub 4} = 1.834 yr and semi-amplitudes of K{sub 3} = 0.0100 days and K{sub 4} = 0.0039 days, respectively. The observed period increase at a fractional rate of +1.39 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} is in excellent agreement with that calculated from the W-D code and can be plausibly explained by some combination of mass transfer from the primary to the secondary star and angular momentum loss due to magnetic braking. The most reasonable explanation for both cycles is a pair of light-travel-time effects driven by the possible existence of a third and fourth component with projected masses of M{sub 3} = 0.25 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 4} = 0.90 M{sub Sun }. The more massive companion could be revealed using high-resolution spectroscopic data extending over the course of a few years and could also be a binary itself. It is possible that the circumbinary objects may have played an important role in the formation and evolution of the eclipsing pair, which would cause it to have a short initial orbital period and thus evolve into an overcontact configuration by angular momentum loss.

  11. Chondrocyte behavior on nanostructured micropillar polypropylene and polystyrene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prittinen, Juha [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Jiang, Yu [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu (Finland); Ylärinne, Janne H. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Pakkanen, Tapani A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu (Finland); Lammi, Mikko J., E-mail: mikko.lammi@uef.fi [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Qu, Chengjuan [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether patterned polypropylene (PP) or polystyrene (PS) could enhance the chondrocytes' extracellular matrix (ECM) production and phenotype maintenance. Bovine primary chondrocytes were cultured on smooth PP and PS, as well as on nanostructured micropillar PP (patterned PP) and PS (patterned PS) for 2 weeks. Subsequently, the samples were collected for fluorescein diacetate-based cell viability tests, for immunocytochemical assays of types I and II collagen, actin and vinculin, for scanning electronic microscopic analysis of cell morphology and distribution, and for gene expression assays of Sox9, aggrecan, procollagen α{sub 1}(II), procollagen α{sub 1}(X), and procollagen α{sub 2}(I) using quantitative RT-PCR assays. After two weeks of culture, the bovine primary chondrocytes had attached on both patterned PP and PS, while practically no adhesion was observed on smooth PP. However, the best adhesion of the cells was on smooth PS. The cells, which attached on patterned PP and PS surfaces synthesized types I and II collagen. The chondrocytes' morphology was extended, and an abundant ECM network formed around the attached chondrocytes on both patterned PP and PS. Upon passaging, no significant differences on the chondrocyte-specific gene expression were observed, although the highest expression level of aggrecan was observed on the patterned PS in passage 1 chondrocytes, and the expression level of procollagen α{sub 1}(II) appeared to decrease in passaged chondrocytes. However, the expressions of procollagen α{sub 2}(I) were increased in all passaged cell cultures. In conclusion, the bovine primary chondrocytes could be grown on patterned PS and PP surfaces, and they produced extracellular matrix network around the adhered cells. However, neither the patterned PS nor PP could prevent the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes. - Highlights: • Methods to avoid chondrocyte dedifferentiation would be useful for cartilage

  12. Is Ep-CAM Expression a Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker for Colorectal Cancer? A Systematic Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu Han

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The present findings suggest that Ep-CAM expression may be associated with CRC carcinogenesis, while the loss of Ep-CAM expression is correlated with the progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis of CRC. Ep-CAM expression may be a useful biomarker for the clinical diagnosis of CRC.

  13. 30 CFR 250.214 - What geological and geophysical (G&G) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What geological and geophysical (G&G... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.214 What geological and geophysical (G&G) information must accompany the EP? The following G&G information must accompany your EP: (a) Geological...

  14. 30 CFR 250.235 - If a State objects to the EP's coastal zone consistency certification, what can I do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If a State objects to the EP's coastal zone... EP's coastal zone consistency certification, what can I do? If an affected State objects to the coastal zone consistency certification accompanying your proposed EP within the timeframe prescribed in...

  15. The impact of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) on HIV epidemics in Africa and India: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C.J. Vissers (Debby); H.A.C.M. Voeten (Hélène); N.J.D. Nagelkerke (Nico); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); S.J. de Vlas (Sake)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising new HIV prevention method, especially for women. An urgent demand for implementation of PrEP is expected at the moment efficacy has been demonstrated in clinical trials. We explored the long-term impact of PrEP on HIV

  16. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  17. Merkel cell polyomavirus recruits MYCL to the EP400 complex to promote oncogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC frequently contains integrated copies of Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA that express a truncated form of Large T antigen (LT and an intact Small T antigen (ST. While LT binds RB and inactivates its tumor suppressor function, it is less clear how ST contributes to MCC tumorigenesis. Here we show that ST binds specifically to the MYC homolog MYCL (L-MYC and recruits it to the 15-component EP400 histone acetyltransferase and chromatin remodeling complex. We performed a large-scale immunoprecipitation for ST and identified co-precipitating proteins by mass spectrometry. In addition to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A subunits, we identified MYCL and its heterodimeric partner MAX plus the EP400 complex. Immunoprecipitation for MAX and EP400 complex components confirmed their association with ST. We determined that the ST-MYCL-EP400 complex binds together to specific gene promoters and activates their expression by integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq and RNA-seq. MYCL and EP400 were required for maintenance of cell viability and cooperated with ST to promote gene expression in MCC cell lines. A genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen confirmed the requirement for MYCL and EP400 in MCPyV-positive MCC cell lines. We demonstrate that ST can activate gene expression in a EP400 and MYCL dependent manner and this activity contributes to cellular transformation and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

  18. Merkel cell polyomavirus recruits MYCL to the EP400 complex to promote oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jingwei; Park, Donglim Esther; Berrios, Christian; White, Elizabeth A; Arora, Reety; Yoon, Rosa; Branigan, Timothy; Xiao, Tengfei; Westerling, Thomas; Federation, Alexander; Zeid, Rhamy; Strober, Benjamin; Swanson, Selene K; Florens, Laurence; Bradner, James E; Brown, Myles; Howley, Peter M; Padi, Megha; Washburn, Michael P; DeCaprio, James A

    2017-10-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) frequently contains integrated copies of Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA that express a truncated form of Large T antigen (LT) and an intact Small T antigen (ST). While LT binds RB and inactivates its tumor suppressor function, it is less clear how ST contributes to MCC tumorigenesis. Here we show that ST binds specifically to the MYC homolog MYCL (L-MYC) and recruits it to the 15-component EP400 histone acetyltransferase and chromatin remodeling complex. We performed a large-scale immunoprecipitation for ST and identified co-precipitating proteins by mass spectrometry. In addition to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) subunits, we identified MYCL and its heterodimeric partner MAX plus the EP400 complex. Immunoprecipitation for MAX and EP400 complex components confirmed their association with ST. We determined that the ST-MYCL-EP400 complex binds together to specific gene promoters and activates their expression by integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) and RNA-seq. MYCL and EP400 were required for maintenance of cell viability and cooperated with ST to promote gene expression in MCC cell lines. A genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen confirmed the requirement for MYCL and EP400 in MCPyV-positive MCC cell lines. We demonstrate that ST can activate gene expression in a EP400 and MYCL dependent manner and this activity contributes to cellular transformation and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

  19. Adsorption and photocatalytic activity of electron-irradiated polystyrene nanosphere multi-layer film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Oh; Yoo, Seung Hwa; Kim, Jea Joon; Kum, Jong Min

    2012-01-01

    Photocatalytic decomposition of aqueous organic pollutant on semiconductor materials has been widely studied as a simple and clean process for organic pollutant removal. The reaction mechanism have been revealed and some fundamental requirements should be satisfied for high photocatalytic activity, such as high chemical, thermal stability in water, intense light absorption, efficient charge separation, large surface area, high pollutant adsorption ability, etc. However, until now on, no single material fulfills all these requirements. Therefore, lots of efforts have been made to enhance the activity of photocatalysts by several approaches. By controlling the band-gap of photocatalyst or combining with narrow band-gap semiconductor, the light absorption can expand to the visible-light spectrum region that increases the charge-carrier generation. By adopting nanostructured morphologies, large surface area can provide huge amount of surface reaction sites and reduce the charge-carrier recombination before it reaches these sites. Also, several reports have shown that, by increasing the adsorption of pollutant on the photocatalyst surface, synergistic enhancement can occur in the photocatalytic activity. Along with these fundamental requirements, photocatalysts should be non-toxic, abundant, and easily synthesizable for economical and eco-friendly applications. During a few decades, various inorganic semiconductors, especially, metal oxides (TiO 2 , ZnO 2 , WO 3 , etc), metal sulfides (CdS, PbS, etc), and dye molecules with a metal core (Ru-, Ir- based single-molecules) have been widely studied as a photocatalyst. However, even though lots of studies have been made, issues related to the potential threat against human health by using these kinds of metal-containing inorganic semiconductors are still under dispute. Recently, metal-free organic photocatalyst (g-C 3 N 4 , C 3 N 3 S 3 ) have been synthesized, and showed outstanding photocatalytic activities for H 2

  20. Distinct roles of Eps8 in the maturation of cochlear and vestibular hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavazzani, Elisa; Spaiardi, Paolo; Zampini, Valeria; Contini, Donatella; Manca, Marco; Russo, Giancarlo; Prigioni, Ivo; Marcotti, Walter; Masetto, Sergio

    2016-07-22

    Several genetic mutations affecting the development and function of mammalian hair cells have been shown to cause deafness but not vestibular defects, most likely because vestibular deficits are sometimes centrally compensated. The study of hair cell physiology is thus a powerful direct approach to ascertain the functional status of the vestibular end organs. Deletion of Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (Eps8), a gene involved in actin remodeling, has been shown to cause deafness in mice. While both inner and outer hair cells from Eps8 knockout (KO) mice showed abnormally short stereocilia, inner hair cells (IHCs) also failed to acquire mature-type ion channels. Despite the fact that Eps8 is also expressed in vestibular hair cells, Eps8 KO mice show no vestibular deficits. In the present study we have investigated the properties of vestibular Type I and Type II hair cells in Eps8-KO mice and compared them to those of cochlear IHCs. In the absence of Eps8, vestibular hair cells show normally long kinocilia, significantly shorter stereocilia and a normal pattern of basolateral voltage-dependent ion channels. We have also found that while vestibular hair cells from Eps8 KO mice show normal voltage responses to injected sinusoidal currents, which were used to mimic the mechanoelectrical transducer current, IHCs lose their ability to synchronize their responses to the stimulus. We conclude that the absence of Eps8 produces a weaker phenotype in vestibular hair cells compared to cochlear IHCs, since it affects the hair bundle morphology but not the basolateral membrane currents. This difference is likely to explain the absence of obvious vestibular dysfunction in Eps8 KO mice. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of 60Co γ-ray irradiated polystyrene microplate for anti-HCV ELISA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Bo; Zeng Hongyan; Tang Yufang; Wang Lu

    2005-01-01

    In order to explore the effect of 60 Co γ-ray irradiation on minor polypeptides absorption of polystyrene microplate, an indirect ELISA detection of anti-HCV was established, 60 Co γ-ray irradiated polystyrene microplates and the controls (without irradiation or UV-irradiated) were applied to absorb recombinant HCV antigens respectively. Cooperated with Bovine antihuman IgG labelled HRP, their related indices of sensitivity, specificity, homogeneity and stability were determinate. The results indicated that, optimum dose of the γ-ray irradiation is 8 kGy, and compared with the controls, detection sensitivity and homogeneity of the polystyrene microplate irradiated to 8 kGy could be improved markedly. (authors)

  2. Synthesis of magnetic hollow silica using polystyrene bead as a template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, W.; Caruntu, D.; Martin, A.; Yu, M.H.; O'Connor, C.J.; Zhou, W.L.; Chen, J.-F.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report a new route to synthesize novel magnetic hollow silica nanospheres (MHSNs) using polystyrene particles as sacrificial templates, and TEOS and Fe 3 O 4 as precursors. TEM, EDS, XRD, and SQUID were applied to characterize MHSNs. TEM and EDS results show that the MHSNs consist of about 200 nm of hollow cores and ∼35 nm shells with ∼10 nm of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles embedded. The polystyrene beads were successfully removed by immersing the as-prepared silica nanocomposite in a toluene solution. XRD results demonstrate that the Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles still keep spinel structure even heated at low temperature. The surface status of the polystyrene beads and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles has an important effect on the formation of the MHSNs. The MHSNs present a superparamagnetism at room temperature by SQUID measurement. The MHSNs have potential applications in biosystem and nanomedicine

  3. Surface modification and particles size distribution control in nano-CdS/polystyrene composite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Zhirong; Ming Qiuzhang; Hai Chunliang; Han Minzeng

    2003-01-01

    Preparation of nano-CdS particles with surface thiol modification by microemulsion method and their influences on the particle size distribution in highly filled polystyrene-based composites were studied. The modified nano-CdS was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), light absorption and emission measurements to reveal the morphologies of the surface modifier, which are consistent with the surface molecules packing calculation. The morphologies of the surface modifier exerted a great influence not only on the optical performance of the particles themselves, but also on the size distribution of the particle in polystyrene matrix. A monolayer coverage with tightly packed thiol molecules was believed to be most effective in promoting a uniform particle size distribution and eliminating the surface defects that cause radiationless recombination. Control of the particles size distribution in polystyrene can be attained by adjusting surface coverage status of the thiol molecules based on the strong interaction between the surface modifier and the matrix

  4. Facile approach in fabricating superhydrophobic ZnO/polystyrene nanocomposite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Yongquan; Zheng, Yansheng; Hu, Chuanbo; Wang, Yong; He, Yi; Gong, Yong; Mo, Qian

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we report a simple and inexpensive method for fabricating modified-ZnO/polystyrene superhydrophobic surface on the cotton textiles. The surface wettability and topology of coating were characterized by contact angle measurement, Scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The results showed that the hydrophobic CH3 and CF2 group was introduced into ZnO particles via modification, the ZnO nanoparticles were modified from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. When the weight ratio of modified-ZnO to polystyrene was 7:3, the ZnO/polystyrene composite coating contact angle was 158°, coating surface with hierarchical micro/nano structures. Furthermore, the superhydrophobic cotton texiles have a very extensive application prospect in water-oil separation.

  5. Radiosynthesis and in vitro evaluation of the polystyrene particles as a promising probe in biomedical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianmin; Tan Mingguang; Wu Yuanfang; Zhang Guilin; Li Yan

    2005-01-01

    Polystyrene particles with precise monodisperse particle size distributions ranging from 20nm to 90μm is now commercially available and it has very useful and versatile applications in many life sciences research fields. A simple direct labeling method was used to synthesis the iodinated ultrafine polystyrene particles. The assay of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) as well as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated the formation of stable covalent bond to aryl group of the polymer particles. The purified radiosynthesis product was incubated with serum of rat, and then evaluated by in vitro stability test. The result showed that radioiodinated ultrafine polystyrene particles were largely unmetablized at 2 hours post-exposure, indicating the potential useful application of this widely used polymer particles as a promising probe in biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences.

  6. Few-layer graphene growth from polystyrene as solid carbon source utilizing simple APCVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Shahrokh; Afzalzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research article presents development of an economical, simple, immune and environment friendly process to grow few-layer graphene by controlling evaporation rate of polystyrene on copper foil as catalyst and substrate utilizing atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Evaporation rate of polystyrene depends on molecular structure, amount of used material and temperature. We have found controlling rate of evaporation of polystyrene by controlling the source temperature is easier than controlling the material weight. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as Raman Spectroscopy has been used for characterization of the layers. The frequency of G‧ to G band ratio intensity in some samples varied between 0.8 and 1.6 corresponding to few-layer graphene. Topography characterization by atomic force microscopy confirmed Raman results.

  7. Stigma, medical mistrust, and perceived racism may affect PrEP awareness and uptake in black compared to white gay and bisexual men in Jackson, Mississippi and Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Sean; Taylor, S Wade; Elsesser, Steven A; Mena, Leandro; Hickson, DeMarc; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-11-01

    Gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) account for more than two thirds of new HIV infections in the U.S., with Black MSM experiencing the greatest burden. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can reduce MSM's vulnerability to HIV infection. Uptake of PrEP has been limited, particularly among racial and ethnic minority MSM. Four semi-structured focus groups with gay and bisexual men and other MSM at risk for HIV infection were convened in Boston and Jackson in late 2013. The analysis plan utilized a within-case, across-case approach to code and analyze emerging themes, and to compare results across the two cities. Participants recruited in Jackson were primarily Black gay men, while Boston participants were mostly non-Hispanic White gay men. Participants in both sites shared concerns about medication side effects and culturally insensitive health care for gay men. Jackson participants described stronger medical mistrust, and more frequently described experiences of anti-gay and HIV related stigma. Multiple addressable barriers to PrEP uptake were described. Information about side effects should be explicitly addressed in PrEP education campaigns. Providers and health departments should address medical mistrust, especially among Black gay and bisexual men and other MSM, in part by training providers in how to provide affirming, culturally competent care. Medicaid should be expanded in Mississippi to cover low-income young Black gay and bisexual men and other MSM.

  8. Diffractive dijet photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2010-03-15

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb{sup -1}. The events are of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x{sub {gamma}} of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  9. Searches for excited fermions in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.

    2002-01-01

    Searches in ep collisions for heavy excited fermions have been performed with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Excited states of electrons and quarks have been searched for in e + p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 300 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 47.7 pb -1 . Excited electrons have been sought via the decays e*→eγ, e*→eZ and e*→νW. Excited quarks have been sought via the decays q*→qγ and q*→qW. A search for excited neutrinos decaying via ν*→νγ, ν*→νZ and ν*→eW is presented using e - p collisions at 318 GeV centre-of-mass energy, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 16.7 pb -1 . No evidence for any excited fermion is found, and limits on the characteristic couplings are derived for masses ≤250 GeV

  10. Calibrating the CERN ATLAS Experiment with $E/p$

    CERN Document Server

    Froeschl, R; Aleksa, M

    2009-01-01

    Inside the ATLAS experiment two proton beams will collide with a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. These proton beams will be delivered with unprecedented high collision rates by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Center of Particle Physics, CERN. For important parts of the physics program of ATLAS, e.g. the search for the Higgs boson, the performance of the electromagnetic calorimeter, whose primary task is to measure the energy of electrons and photons, is crucial. The main topic of this thesis is the intercalibration of the energy scale of the electromagnetic calorimeter and the momentum scale of the inner detector. This is an important consistency test for these two detectors. The intercalibration is performed by investigating the ratio E/p for electrons, i.e. the ratio of the energy E measured by the electromagnetic calorimeter and the momentum p measured by the inner detector. The starting point is the Combined Test Beam (CTB) 2004, where a segment of the ATLAS detector was exposed to differ...

  11. Diffractive photoproduction of dijets in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-09-15

    Diffractive photoproduction of dijets was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 77.2 pb{sup -1}. The measurements were made in the kinematic range Q{sup 2}<1 GeV{sup 2}, 0.207.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to lie in the pseudorapidity range -1.5<{eta}{sup jet}<1.5. Differential cross sections were compared to perturbative QCD calculations using available parameterisations of diffractive parton distributions of the proton. (orig.)

  12. The first ep collider run and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desy, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    After successful machine commissioning in 1991, the new electron-proton collider HERA was ready to start the experimental program in spring last year. Data taking at the ZEUS and H1 experiments began on June 26. The energy of the colliding beams was E e =26.7 GeV and E p = 820 GeV, in accord with the design. The peak luminosity obtained so far was 2.2x10 29 cm -2 s -1 . Until the end of the experimental run in November 1992 an integrated luminosity of 33 nb -1 was delivered to the experiments. Future plans concerning ep operation focus on increasing the number of colliding bunches in order to approach the design goal for the luminosity of 1.5x10 31 cm -2 s -1 . In the electron ring, up to 60% transverse spin polarization have been achieved. It is planned to install a polarized gas target experiment (Hermes, approved as the 3rd HERA experiment) which will require an electron beam with about 50% longitudinal polarization. The machine modifications required for HERMES are scheduled for the 93/94 winter shut down. Furthermore, the possibilities of installing a fixed target experiment for b-quark physics in the proton ring are being studied

  13. Diffractive Dijet Photoproduction in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Tabasco, J.E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb^-1. The events are of the type ep -> eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x_gamma of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models.

  14. Diffractive dijet photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy] (and others)

    2010-11-15

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb{sup -1}. The events are of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x{sub {gamma}} of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  15. Further case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to a deletion in EP300.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foley, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a heterogeneous disorder with approximately 45-55% of patients showing mutations in the CREB binding protein and a further 3% of patients having mutations in EP300. We report a male child with a deletion of exons 3-8 of the EP300 gene who has RSTS. He has a milder skeletal phenotype, a finding that has been described in other cases with EP300 mutations. The mother suffered from pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome in the pregnancy. She subsequently developed a mullerian tumor of her cervix 6 years after the birth of her son.

  16. Positron annihilation analysis of epoxy/hydroxyl terminated butyl nitrile rubber (EP/HTBN) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Minfeng; Chen Ning; Ji Genzhong; Sun Xudong; Zhao Rener; Xiao Huiquan; Qi Chenze; Wang Baoyi

    2007-01-01

    The free volume properties of epoxy/hydroxyl terminated butyl nitrile rubber (EP/HTBN) have been studied by means of positron annihilation technique. The toughness effect is found to be correlated with the content of HTBN and the free volume properties of the EP/HTBN interfaces. When the content of HTBN component is 5%, the free volume size in the interface is close to that of EP, and the toughness effect is strong. But with further addition of HTBN, holes with big size free volume are formed in the interface, and the toughness effect is limited. (authors)

  17. The utiquity and many roles of exopolymers (EPS in aquatic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Wotton

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Exopolymers (EPS are produced by unicellular and multicellular organisms. They consist largely of polysaccharides that hydrate rapidly on contact with water and link to form gels. EPS have many uses: in attachment; in locomotion on substrata; as a protection against predators, pathogens and changes in physico-chemical conditions; as a means of overcoming the threat of desiccation; in preventing abrasion; and in feeding. When free of organisms, some EPS form loosely associated polymer gels that are important in the development of organic matter aggregates. These aggregates, together with mucus-bound faecal pellets, play an essential role in nutrient cycling, and in the metabolism of ecosystems.;

  18. Site-specific fragmentation of polystyrene molecule using size-selected Ar gas cluster ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Mukai, Gen; Hashinokuchi, Michihiro; Mochiji, Kozo

    2009-01-01

    The secondary ion mass spectrum (SIMS) of a polystyrene thin film was investigated using a size-selected Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). The fragmentation in the SIM spectrum varied by kinetic energy per atom (E atom ); the E atom dependence of the secondary ion intensity of the fragment species of polystyrene can be essentially classified into three types based on the relationship between E atom and the dissociation energy of a specific bonding site in the molecule. These results indicate that adjusting E atom of size-selected GCIB may realize site-specific bond breaking within a molecule. (author)

  19. Synthesis and characterization of the polystyrene - asphaltene graft copolymer BY FT-IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leo, Adan Yovani; Salazar Ramiro

    2008-01-01

    The creation of new polymer compounds to be added to asphalt has drawn considerable attention because these substances have succeeded in modifying the asphalt rheological characteristics and physical properties for the enhancement of its behavior during the time of use. This work explains the synthesis of a new graft copolymer based on an asphalt fraction called asphaltene, modified with maleic anhydride. Polystyrene functionalization is conducted in a parallel fashion in order to obtain polybenzylamine resin with an amine - NH2 free group that reacts with the anhydride graft groups in the asphaltene, thus obtaining the new Polystyrene/Asphaltene graft copolymer

  20. Altered behavior, physiology, and metabolism in fish exposed to polystyrene nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Karin; Ekvall, Mikael T; Hansson, Lars-Anders

    2015-01-01

    that enter natural ecosystems, such as oceans and lakes, is increasing, and degradation of the disposed plastics produces smaller particles toward the nano scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to gain knowledge about how plastic nanoparticles enter and affect living organisms. Here we have...... administered 24 and 27 nm polystyrene nanoparticles to fish through an aquatic food chain, from algae through Daphnia, and studied the effects on behavior and metabolism. We found severe effects on feeding and shoaling behavior as well as metabolism of the fish; hence, we conclude that polystyrene...

  1. Measuring thermal conductivity of polystyrene nanowires using the dual-cantilever technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Carlo; Guo, Samuel; Narayanaswamy, Arvind

    2014-10-01

    Thermal conductance measurements are performed on individual polystyrene nanowires using a novel measurement technique in which the wires are suspended between two bi-material microcantilever sensors. The nanowires are fabricated via electrospinning process. Thermal conductivity of the nanowire samples is found to be between 6.6 and 14.4 W m(-1) K(-1) depending on sample, a significant increase above typical bulk conductivity values for polystyrene. The high strain rates characteristic of electrospinning are believed to lead to alignment of molecular polymer chains, and hence the increase in thermal conductivity, along the axis of the nanowire.

  2. POTENTIAL USE OF GRAFT COPOLYMERS OF MERCERIZED FLAX AS FILLER IN POLYSTYRENE COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheel Kalia

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Graft copolymerization of binary vinyl monomers onto mercerized flax fiber was carried out for the enhancement of mechanical properties of polystyrene composites. Binary vinyl monomer mixture of AA+AN has been found to show maximum grafting (33.55% onto mercerized flax. Graft copolymers thus synthesized were characterized with FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM, and TGA techniques. Mercerized flax (MF showed maximum thermal stability in comparison to graft copolymers. It has been found that polystyrene composites reinforced with graft copolymers showed improvement in mechanical properties such as wear resistance, compressive strength, and tensile strength.

  3. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Ignazio; Bottino, Francesco A.; Cicala, Gianluca; Cozzo, Giulia; Latteri, Alberta; Recca, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted

  4. Flow boiling in expanding microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, Tamanna

    2017-01-01

    This Brief presents an up to date summary of details of the flow boiling heat transfer, pressure drop and instability characteristics; two phase flow patterns of expanding microchannels. Results obtained from the different expanding microscale geometries are presented for comparison and addition to that, comparison with literatures is also performed. Finally, parametric studies are performed and presented in the brief. The findings from this study could help in understanding the complex microscale flow boiling behavior and aid in the design and implementation of reliable compact heat sinks for practical applications.

  5. Overview of the 2014 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2014-10-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is a widely recognized world class program. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Integral data from the IRPhEP Handbook is used by reactor safety and design, nuclear data, criticality safety, and analytical methods development specialists, worldwide, to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques. The IRPhEP Handbook is among the most frequently quoted reference in the nuclear industry and is expected to be a valuable resource for future decades.

  6. Immunohistochemical analysis based Ep-ICD subcellular localization index (ESLI) is a novel marker for metastatic papillary thyroid microcarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunavisarut, Tada; Kak, Ipshita; MacMillan, Christina; Ralhan, Ranju; Walfish, Paul G

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is among the fastest growing malignancies; almost fifty-percent of these rapidly increasing incidence tumors are less than or equal to 1cm in size, termed papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC). The management of PTMC remains a controversy due to differing natural history of these patients. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is comprised of an extracellular domain (EpEx), a single transmembrane domain and an intracellular domain (Ep-ICD). Our group reported nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor prognosis in thyroid cancer (Ralhan et al., BMC Cancer 2010,10:331). Here in, we hypothesized nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD and loss of membranous EpEx may aid in distinguishing metastatic from non-metastatic PTMC, which is an important current clinical challenge. To test our hypothesis, Ep-ICD and EpEx expression levels were analyzed in PTMC and the staining was correlated with metastatic potential of these carcinomas. Thirty-six PTMC patients (tumor size 0.5 - 1cm; metastatic 8 cases and non-metastatic 28 cases) who underwent total thyroidectomy were selected. The metastatic group consisted of patients who developed lymph node or distant metastasis at diagnosis or during follow up. The patients’ tissues were stained for Ep-ICD and EpEx using domain specific antibodies by immunohistochemistry and evaluated. PTMC patients with metastasis had higher scores for nuclear and cytoplasmic Ep-ICD immunostaining than the patients without metastasis (1.96 ± 0.86 vs. 1.22 ± 0.45; p = 0.007 and 5.37 ± 0.33 vs. 4.72 ± 1.07; p = 0.016, respectively). Concomitantly, the former had lower scores for membrane EpEx than the non-metastatic group (4.64 ± 1.08 vs. 5.64 ± 1.51; p = 0.026). An index of aggressiveness, Ep-ICD subcellular localization index (ESLI), was defined as sum of the IHC scores for accumulation of nuclear and cytoplasmic Ep-ICD and loss of membranous EpEx; ESLI = [Ep − ICD nuc + Ep − ICD cyt + loss of membranous EpEx]. Notably

  7. Synchrotron X-ray scattering characterization of the molecular structures of star polystyrenes with varying numbers of arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sangwoo; Higashihara, Tomoya; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yoon, Jinhwan; Rho, Yecheol; Ahn, Byungcheol; Kim, Jehan; Hirao, Akira; Ree, Moonhor

    2010-05-20

    We have synthesized well-defined multiarmed star polystyrenes, with 6, 9, 17, 33, and 57 arms, and studied their molecular shapes and structural characteristics in a good solvent (tetrahydrofuran at 25 degrees C) and in a theta (Theta) solvent (cyclohexane at 35 degrees C) by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) using a synchrotron radiation source. Analysis of the SAXS data provided a detailed characterization of the molecular shapes, including the contributions of the blob morphology of the arms, the radius of gyration, the paired distance distribution, the radial electron density distribution, and the Zimm-Stockmayer and Roovers g-factor, for the multiarmed star polystyrenes. In particular, the molecular shapes of the star polystyrenes were found to change from a fuzzy ellipsoid, for the 6-armed polystyrene, to a fuzzy sphere, for the 57-armed polystyrene, with an increasing number of arms. The ellipsoidal character of the star polystyrenes with fewer arms may originate from the extended anisotropically branched architecture at the center of the molecule. The arms of the star polystyrenes were found to be more extended than those of the linear polystyrenes. Furthermore, the degree of chain extension in the arms increased with the number of arms.

  8. A study of the effect of polystyrene sulfonation on the performance of terephthaloyl chloride-dihydroxydiphenyl sulfone copolymer/polystyrene system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, R.; Kahn, K. A.; Ali, S. A.; Hamid, S. H.; Sahin, A. Z.

    1998-12-01

    Thermal, morphological, and mechanical properties of composites of a liquid crystalline copolymer (LCP) poly(terephthaloyl chloride)-co-(p,p’-dihydroxydiphenyl sulfone) with polystyrene (PS) and sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) are presented and discussed. Sulfonation of polystyrene was expected to improve the interfacial adhesion by introducing hydrogen bonding in the LCP/PS system. The degree of sulfonation was 11 %. The incompatibility (lack of proper interfacial adhesion) of the LCP/PS system resulted in sharp decrease in the composite tensile strength with LCP addition. The performance of the system did not change when processed at a higher temperature (270 °C instead of 225 °C). While a composite plate of 25% LCP/PS could not be fabricated, it was possible for LCP/SPS (processed at 215 °C), indicating some improvement in interfacial bonding by sulfonation. Sulfonation of PS resulted in fracture with some degree of plastic deformation for pure SPS matrix and also the LCP/SPS system with the lowest LCP content (1 wt%), whereas plastic deformation was not observed for PS used as received. The strength of the LCP/SPS system also decreased with increase in LCP content, indicating that 11% sulfonation is not sufficient to introduce significant compatibility, but it was not as dramatic as that for LCP/PS. The performance of the LCP/SPS system was not affected significantly by heat treatment at the process temperature.

  9. Determination of several trace metals in biological materials by PIXE analysis after solvent extraction and polystyrene-film collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Korenaga, Tatsumi; Suzuki, Nobuo

    1991-01-01

    Traces of vanadium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc were quantitatively extracted with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) in benzene from a digested solution of biological materials and the metal-DDTC complexes were collected into a small amount of polystyrene foam produced by lyophilization of the benzene extract after addition of polystyrene. The polystyrene foam was dissolved in benzene and spread on Mylar film. After drying, a polystyrene film containing metal-DDTC complexes was produced on Mylar film, and then the polystyrene film was peeled from the Mylar film. This film was subjected to PIXE analysis. This method was applied to NBS SRM 1572 citrus leaves and a marine macroalgal sample, and 6 trace metals were simultaneously and accurately determined. (author)

  10. Tuning the wettability of calcite cubes by varying the sizes of the polystyrene nanoparticles attached to their surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yongjun; Li Tanliang; Yu Xiangyang; Zhao Shiyong; Lu Jianhua; He Jia

    2007-01-01

    The wettability of calcite cubes was tuned by varying the sizes of the polystyrene nanoparticles attached to their surfaces via a dispersion polymerization. The products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) and Fourier transformation infrared spectrum (FTIR). The results showed that the hydrophobicity of the calcite cubes was enhanced with the increase of the size of the polystyrene nanoparticles attached. Using polystyrene nanoparticle-attached calcite cubes (PNACC) as emulsifiers, stable water-in-tricaprylin Pickering emulsions were produced. By gelling the water droplets of the Pickering emulsions, the hierarchical structures of polystyrene nanoparticle-attached calcite cube-armored microspheres were obtained. The polystyrene nanoparticle-attached calcite cubes were expected to have novel surface properties similar neither to traditional Pickering particles, nor to macroscopically asymmetrical Janus particles

  11. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen Leader Protein Coactivates EP300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Zhou, Hufeng; Xue, Yong; Liang, Jun; Narita, Yohei; Gerdt, Catherine; Zheng, Amy Y; Jiang, Runsheng; Trudeau, Stephen; Peng, Chih-Wen; Gewurz, Benjamin E; Zhao, Bo

    2018-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA) leader protein (EBNALP) is one of the first viral genes expressed upon B-cell infection. EBNALP is essential for EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. EBNALP is thought to function primarily by coactivating EBNA2-mediated transcription. Chromatin immune precipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) studies highlight that EBNALP frequently cooccupies DNA sites with host cell transcription factors (TFs), in particular, EP300, implicating a broader role in transcription regulation. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of EBNALP transcription coactivation through EP300. EBNALP greatly enhanced EP300 transcription activation when EP300 was tethered to a promoter. EBNALP coimmunoprecipitated endogenous EP300 from lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). EBNALP W repeat serine residues 34, 36, and 63 were required for EP300 association and coactivation. Deletion of the EP300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain greatly reduced EBNALP coactivation and abolished the EBNALP association. An EP300 bromodomain inhibitor also abolished EBNALP coactivation and blocked the EP300 association with EBNALP. EBNALP sites cooccupied by EP300 had significantly higher ChIP-seq signals for sequence-specific TFs, including SPI1, RelA, EBF1, IRF4, BATF, and PAX5. EBNALP- and EP300-cooccurring sites also had much higher H3K4me1 and H3K27ac signals, indicative of activated enhancers. EBNALP-only sites had much higher signals for DNA looping factors, including CTCF and RAD21. EBNALP coactivated reporters under the control of NF-κB or SPI1. EP300 inhibition abolished EBNALP coactivation of these reporters. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat interference targeting of EBNALP enhancer sites significantly reduced target gene expression, including that of EP300 itself. These data suggest a previously unrecognized mechanism by which EBNALP coactivates transcription through subverting of EP300 and thus affects the expression of

  12. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of Vibrio cholerae EpsG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jens, Jason; Raghunathan, Kannan; Vago, Frank; Arvidson, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant V. cholerae EpsG has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.26 Å resolution. EpsG is the major pseudopilin protein of the Vibrio cholerae type II secretion system. An expression plasmid that encodes an N-terminally truncated form of EpsG with a C-terminal noncleavable His tag was constructed. Recombinant EpsG was expressed in Escherichia coli; the truncated protein was purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion against a reservoir containing 6 mM zinc sulfate, 60 mM MES pH 6.5, 15% PEG MME 550. The crystals diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.26 Å and belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 88.61, b = 70.02, c = 131.54 Å

  13. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer.

  14. TOMS/EP UV Reflectivity Daily and Monthly Zonal Means V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/EP UV Reflectivity Daily and Monthly Zonal Means Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this Level-3 Earth Probe TOMS...

  15. Corporate actions for the climate - Greenhouse gas reduction practices at EpE member companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalendar, Pierre-Andre de

    2012-11-01

    Corporate awareness of the reality of climate change and the impact of human activity on global warming goes back some twenty years. It was at this time that EpE members decided to take voluntary action towards lowering greenhouse gas emissions. EpE member companies started out by measuring their emissions (see EpE publication entitled 'Measuring and Controlling Greenhouse Gas Emissions'), then worked to identify initiatives easiest to implement and those that would have the best reduction potential. This booklet is prepared to contribute to other businesses improving their knowledge and understanding of the best practices identified and implemented by EpE members, in order to speed up the reduction of global emissions, without hampering their competitiveness. The practices showcased here have intentionally been detailed so that they can be easier to adopt. (authors)

  16. A Precision Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wallny, R.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive deep-inelastic neutral current e+p scattering cross section is reported in the region of four-momentum transfer squared, 12<=Q^2<=150 GeV^2, and Bjorken x, 2x10^-4<=x<=0.1. The results are based on data collected by the H1 Collaboration at the ep collider HERA at positron and proton beam energies of E_e=27.6 GeV and E_p=920 GeV, respectively. The data are combined with previously published data, taken at E_p=820 GeV. The accuracy of the combined measurement is typically in the range of 1.3-2%. A QCD analysis at next-to-leading order is performed to determine the parton distributions in the proton based on H1 data.

  17. Optical Parametric Chirped-Pulse Amplifier as the Front End for the OMEGA EP Laser Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Guardalben, M.J.; Keegan, J.; Puth, J.; Waxer, L.J.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    A 145-mJ optical parametric amplifier has been developed as a front-end source prototype for the OEMGA EP laser chain. The system definition is presented together with experimental results that show 30% conversion efficiency

  18. Added economic value of limited area multi-EPS weather forecasting applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Deckmyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We compare the GLAMEPS system, a pan-European limited area ensemble prediction system, with ECMWF's EPS over Belgium for an extended period from March 2010 until the end of December 2010. In agreement with a previous study, we find GLAMEPS scores considerably better than ECMWF's EPS. To compute the economic value, we introduce a new relative economic value score for continuous forecasts. The added value of combining the GLAMEPS system with the LAEF system over Belgium is studied. We conclude that adding LAEF to GLAMEPS increases the value, although the increase is small compared to the improvement of GLAMEPS to ECMWF's EPS. As an added benefit we find that the combined GLAMEPS-LAEF multi-EPS system is more robust, that is, it is less vulnerable to the (accidental removal of one of its components.

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Co-overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purpose:The overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) ... Half LIM domain protein2), and the transcription factor Lef1 that is cleaved by presenilin-2 ..... and self-renewal capability, producing a rapidly dividing tumor mass.

  20. Invited and contributed papers presented at the 22. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    In this report one invited and fifteen contributed papers by researchers of the `Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasmas`, Lausanne, to the 22. EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics are assembled. figs., tabs., refs.

  1. Stability of expanded plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the stabilization of the expanded plasma focus formed by 4.5 kJ plasma focus device of Mather type by magnetic field is presented. The experimental results of the induced axial magnetic field and electric probe measurements of the expanded plasma focus show that, the plasma consists of three plasmoids, electron temperature measurements off the plasmoids at a point close to the muzzle are 26 eV, 30 eV and 27 eV respectively and the electron densities are 6.6 x 10 14 , 6.1 x 10 14 / cm 3 respectively. The presence of external axial magnetic field (B 2 = 1.6 kg) at the mid distance between the breech and the muzzle has a less effect on the stability of expanded focus and it causes a restriction for the plasma motion. the electron temperature of the three plasmoids are found to increase in that case by 23%, 18.5% respectively. When this axial magnetic field is applied at the muzzle end, it leads to a more stable expanded plasma focus which consists mainly of one plasmoid with electron temperature of 39 eV and density of 3.4 x 10 14 / cm 3 . 5 figs

  2. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  3. Expanding the Universe of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Definitions of "education" and "rural" are debunked and expanded. The three major tasks of rural education are educating people to understand their own needs, the unavoidable changes that will transform rural Australia within their lifetimes, and the range of technologies that can enhance their well-being. Presents a strategy…

  4. Role of the Prostaglandin E2 EP1 Receptor in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushakov, Alexander V.; Fazal, Jawad A.; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Brain injuries promote upregulation of so-called proinflammatory prostaglandins, notably prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leading to overactivation of a class of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptors, including EP1, which is considered a promising target for treatment of ischemic stroke. However, the role of the EP1 receptor is complex and depends on the type of brain injury. This study is focused on the investigation of the role of the EP1 receptor in a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model, a preclinical model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The therapeutic effects of post-treatments with a widely studied EP1 receptor antagonist, SC-51089, were examined in wildtype and EP1 receptor knockout C57BL/6 mice. Neurological deficit scores (NDS) were assessed 24 and 48 h following CCI or sham surgery, and brain immunohistochemical pathology was assessed 48 h after surgery. In wildtype mice, CCI resulted in an obvious cortical lesion and localized hippocampal edema with an associated significant increase in NDS compared to sham-operated animals. Post-treatments with the selective EP1 receptor antagonist SC-51089 or genetic knockout of EP1 receptor had no significant effects on cortical lesions and hippocampal swelling or on the NDS 24 and 48 h after CCI. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed CCI-induced gliosis and microglial activation in selected ipsilateral brain regions that were not affected by SC-51089 or in the EP1 receptor-deleted mice. This study provides further clarification on the respective contribution of the EP1 receptor in TBI and suggests that, under this experimental paradigm, the EP1 receptor would have limited effects in modulating acute neurological and anatomical pathologies following contusive brain trauma. Findings from this protocol, in combination with previous studies demonstrating differential roles of EP1 receptor in ischemic, neurotoxic, and hemorrhagic conditions, provide scientific background and further clarification of potential therapeutic

  5. Small angle X-ray scattering study on the conformation of polystyrene in the anti-solvent process of supercritical fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yi; Wang Hongli; Zhao Xin; Chen Na; Li Dan; Liu Zhimin; Han Buxing; Rong Lixia; Zhao Hui; Wang Jun; Dong Baozhong

    2003-01-01

    The conformation of polystyrene in the anti-solvent process of supercritical fluids (compressed CO 2 + polystyrene + tetrahydrofuran) is studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray small angle scattering (SAXS). Coil-to-globule transform of polystyrene chain is observed with increasing the concentration of CO 2 . It is found that polystyrene coils at the pressure lower than cloud point pressure (p c ) and changes into globule with uniform density at the pressure higher than p c

  6. The EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation (EPS-SG) micro-wave imaging (MWI) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojkov, B. R.; Accadia, C.; Klaes, D.; Canestri, A.; Cohen, M.

    2017-12-01

    The EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) will be followed by a second generation system called EPS-SG. This new family of missions will contribute to the Joint Polar System being jointly set up with NOAA in the timeframe 2020-2040. These satellites will fly, like Metop (EPS), in a sun synchronous, low earth orbit at 830 km altitude and 09:30 local time descending node, providing observations over the full globe with revisit times of 12 hours. EPS-SG consists of two different satellites configurations, the EPS-SGa series dedicated to IR and MW sounding, and the EPS-SGb series dedicated to microwave imaging and scatterometry. The EPS-SG family will consist of three successive launches of each satellite-type. The Microwave Imager (MWI) will be hosted on Metop-SGb series of satellites, with the primary objective of supporting Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) at regional and global scales. Other applications will be observation of surface parameters such as sea ice concentration and hydrology applications. The 18 MWI instrument frequencies range from 18.7 GHz to 183 GHz. All MWI channels up to 89 GHz will measure V- and H polarizations. The MWI was also designed to provide continuity of measurements for select heritage microwave imager channels (e.g. SSM/I, AMSR-E). The additional sounding channels such as the 50-55 and 118 GHz bands will provide additional cloud and precipitation information over sea and land. This combination of channels was successfully tested on the NPOESS Aircraft Sounder Testbed - Microwave Sounder (NAST-M) airborne radiometer, and it is the first time that will be implemented in a conical scanning configuration in a single instrument. An overview of the EPS-SG programme and the MWI instrument will be presented.

  7. PMU Placement Based on Heuristic Methods, when Solving the Problem of EPS State Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    I. N. Kolosok; E. S. Korkina; A. M. Glazunova

    2014-01-01

    Creation of satellite communication systems gave rise to a new generation of measurement equipment – Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU). Integrated into the measurement system WAMS, the PMU sensors provide a real picture of state of energy power system (EPS). The issues of PMU placement when solving the problem of EPS state estimation (SE) are discussed in many papers. PMU placement is a complex combinatorial problem, and there is not any analytical function to optimize its variables. Therefore,...

  8. Commentary: the value of PrEP for people who inject drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalind L Coleman; Susie McLean

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The offer of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended as an additional option for HIV prevention for people at substantial risk of HIV infection as part of combination HIV prevention approaches. Implementing this depends on integrating PrEP in public health programmes that address risky practices with evidence-based interventions, and that operate in an enabling legal and policy environment for the delivery of health services to those at higher risk of HIV infection. What ...

  9. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Caleb C. Roth; Ronald A. Barnes Jr.; Bennett L. Ibey; Hope T. Beier; L. Christopher Mimun; Saher M. Maswadi; Mehdi Shadaram; Randolph D. Glickman

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, el...

  10. Slepton and squark production and decay in ep collision at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, A.; Majerotto, W.; Oshimo, N.; Moesslacher, B.

    1991-06-01

    We present a detailed study of e+p → e+q+X and e+p → v+q+X and the subsequent decays of e,v, and q at the LHC (√s = 1.4 TeV). We explore the relevant supersymmetry parameter range. We calculate the cross section as well as the rates for interesting signatures such as the production of one or two leptons on the lepton side. (authors)

  11. Barriers and Facilitators to Oral PrEP Use Among Transgender Women in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rael, Christine Tagliaferri; Martinez, Michelle; Giguere, Rebecca; Bockting, Walter; MacCrate, Caitlin; Mellman, Will; Valente, Pablo; Greene, George J; Sherman, Susan; Footer, Katherine H A; D'Aquila, Richard T; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex

    2018-03-27

    Transgender women may face a disparate risk for HIV/AIDS compared to other groups. In 2012, Truvada was approved for daily use as HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). However, there is a dearth of research about barriers and facilitators to PrEP in transgender women. This paper will shed light on transgender women living in New York City's perceived and actual challenges to using PrEP and potential strategies to overcome them. After completing an initial screening process, four 90-min focus groups were completed with n = 18 transgender women. Participants were asked what they like and dislike about PrEP. Participants identified the following barriers: uncomfortable side effects, difficulty taking pills, stigma, exclusion of transgender women in advertising, and lack of research on transgender women and PrEP. Facilitators included: reducing pill size, increasing the types of available HIV prevention products, and conducting scientific studies to evaluate PrEP in transgender women.

  12. Adhesion strength and spreading characteristics of EPS on membrane surfaces during lateral and central growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Tansel, Derya Z

    2013-11-01

    Deposition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on membrane surfaces is a precursor step for bacterial attachment. The purpose of this study was to analyze the morphological changes on a clean polysulfone ultrafilration membrane after exposure to effluent from a membrane bioreactor. The effluent was filtered to remove bacteria before exposing the membrane. The morphological characterization was performed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The lateral (2D) and central growth characteristics (3D) of the EPS deposits were evaluated by section and topographical analyses of the height images. The contact angle of single EPS units was 9.07 ± 0.50° which increased to 24.41 ± 1.00° for large clusters (over 10 units) and decreased to 18.68 ± 1.00° for the multilayered clusters. The surface tension of the single EPS units was 49.34 ± 1.70 mNm(-1). The surface tension of single layered small and large EPS clusters were 51.26 ± 2.05 and 53.48 ± 2.01 mNm(-1), respectively. For the multilayered clusters, the surface tension was 51.43 ± 2.05 mNm(-1). The spreading values were negative for all deposits on the polysulfone membrane indicating that the EPS clusters did not have tendency to spread but preferred to retain their shapes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.williams@oxfordtechnologies.co.uk [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sanders, Stephen [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Weder, Gerard [Tree-C Technology BV, Buys Ballotstraat 8, 6716 BL Ede (Netherlands); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  14. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Adrian; Sanders, Stephen; Weder, Gerard; Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  15. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes Jr., Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Christopher Mimun, L.; Maswadi, Saher M.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane. PMID:26450165

  16. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C; Barnes, Ronald A; Ibey, Bennett L; Beier, Hope T; Christopher Mimun, L; Maswadi, Saher M; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D

    2015-10-09

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane.

  17. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-05

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects.

  18. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stabilizing Effects of Bacterial Biofilms: EPS Penetration and Redistribution of Bed Stability Down the Sediment Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. D.; Zhang, C. K.; Zhou, Z.; Gong, Z.; Zhou, J. J.; Tao, J. F.; Paterson, D. M.; Feng, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms, consisting of microorganisms and their secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), serve as "ecosystem engineers" stabilizing sedimentary environments. Natural sediment bed provides an excellent substratum for biofilm growth. The porous structure and rich nutrients allow the EPS matrix to spread deeper into the bed. A series of laboratory-controlled experiments were conducted to investigate sediment colonization of Bacillus subtilis and the penetration of EPS into the sediment bed with incubation time. In addition to EPS accumulation on the bed surface, EPS also penetrated downward. However, EPS distribution developed strong vertical heterogeneity with a much higher content in the surface layer than in the bottom layer. Scanning electron microscope images of vertical layers also displayed different micromorphological properties of sediment-EPS matrix. In addition, colloidal and bound EPSs exhibited distinctive distribution patterns. After the full incubation, the biosedimentary beds were eroded to test the variation of bed stability induced by biological effects. This research provides an important reference for the prediction of sediment transport and hence deepens the understanding of the biologically mediated sediment system and broadens the scope of the burgeoning research field of "biomorphodynamics."

  20. Preparation, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Cement Board with Expanded Perlite Based Composite Phase Change Material for Improving Buildings Thermal Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongda Ye

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we demonstrate the mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of construction elements made of cement and form-stable PCM-Rubitherm® RT 28 HC (RT28/expanded perlite (EP composite phase change materials (PCMs. The composite PCMs were prepared by adsorbing RT28 into the pores of EP, in which the mass fraction of RT28 should be limited to be no more than 40 wt %. The adsorbed RT28 is observed to be uniformly confined into the pores of EP. The phase change temperatures of the RT28/EP composite PCMs are very close to that of the pure RT28. The apparent density and compression strength of the composite cubes increase linearly with the mass fraction of RT28. Compared with the thermal conductivity of the boards composed of cement and EP, the thermal conductivities of the composite boards containing RT28 increase by 15%–35% with the mass fraction increasing of RT28. The cubic test rooms that consist of six boards were built to evaluate the thermal energy storage performance, it is found that the maximum temperature different between the outside surface of the top board with the indoor temperature using the composite boards is 13.3 °C higher than that of the boards containing no RT28. The thermal mass increase of the built environment due to the application of composite boards can contribute to improving the indoor thermal comfort and reducing the energy consumption in the buildings.