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Sample records for expanded natural graphite

  1. A comparative study of electrochemical performance of graphene sheets, expanded graphite and natural graphite as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Li-Zhong; Zhao, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Tai-Ming; Xie, Wei-Gang; Zhang, Ji-Ming; Shen, Zeng-Min

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene sheets (GSs), expanded graphite (EG) and natural graphite (NG) were comparatively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. • The reversible capacity of GS electrode was almost twice that of EG electrode and three times that of NG electrode. • The first-cycle coulombic efficiency and capacity retention of NG were much bigger than those of GSs and EG. • GS and EG electrodes exhibited higher electrochemical activity and more favorable kinetic properties. -- Abstract: Three kinds of carbon materials, i.e., graphene sheets (GSs), expanded graphite (EG) and natural graphite (NG) were comparatively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries via scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. The test results showed that the reversible capacities of GS electrode were 1130 and 636 mA h g −1 at the current densities of 0.2 and 1 mA cm −2 , respectively, which were almost twice those of EG electrode and three times those of NG electrode. The first-cycle coulombic efficiency and capacity retention of NG were much bigger than those of GSs and EG. The notable capacity fading observed in GSs and EG may be ascribed to the disorder-induced structure instability. The larger voltage hysteresis in GS and EG electrodes was not only related to the surface functional groups, but also to the active defects in GSs and EG, which results in greater hindrance and higher overvoltage during lithium extraction from electrode. The kinetics properties of GSs, EG and NG electrodes were compared by AC impedance measurements. GS and EG electrodes exhibited higher electrochemical activity and more favorable kinetic properties during charge and discharge process

  2. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  3. Crystallization degree change of expanded graphite by milling and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qunwei; Wu Jihuai; Sun Hui; Fang Shijun

    2009-01-01

    Expanded graphite was ball milled with a planetary mill in air atmosphere, and subsequently thermal annealed. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in the milling initial stage (less than 12 h), the crystallization degree of the expanded graphite declined gradually, but after milling more than 16 h, a recrystallization of the expanded graphite toke place, and ordered nanoscale expanded graphite was formed gradually. In the annealing initial stage, the non-crystallization of the graphite occurred, but, beyond an annealing time, recrystallizations of the graphite arise. Higher annealing temperature supported the recrystallization. The milled and annealed expanded graphite still preserved the crystalline structure as raw material and hold high thermal stability.

  4. Preparation, quantitative surface analysis, intercalation characteristics and industrial implications of low temperature expandable graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tiefeng; Liu, Bin; Gao, Xuechao; Luo, Liqun; Sun, Hongjuan

    2018-06-01

    Expandable graphite is widely used as a new functional carbon material, especially as fire-retardant; however, its practical application is limited due to the high expansion temperature. In this work, preparation process of low temperature and highly expandable graphite was studied, using natural flake graphite as raw material and KMnO4/HClO4/NH4NO3 as oxidative intercalations. The structure, morphology, functional groups and thermal properties were characterized during expanding process by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectra, thermo-gravimetry differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analysis showed that by oxidation intercalation, some oxygen-containing groups were grafted on the edge and within the graphite layer. The intercalation reagent entered the graphite layer to increase the interlayer spacing. After expansion, the original flaky expandable graphite was completely transformed into worm-like expanded graphite. The order of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) was proposed and determined to be 3 for the prepared expandable graphite, based on quantitative XRD peak analysis. Meanwhile, the detailed intercalation mechanisms were also proposed. The comprehensive investigation paved a benchmark for the industrial application of such sulfur-free expanded graphite.

  5. Influence of Particle Size on Properties of Expanded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurajica, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Expanded graphite has been applied widely in thermal insulation, adsorption, vibration damping, gasketing, electromagnetic interference shielding etc. It is made by intercalation of natural flake graphite followed by thermal expansion. Intercalation is a process whereby an intercalant material is inserted between the graphene layers of a graphite crystal. Exfoliation, a huge unidirectional expansion of the starting intercalated flakes, occurs when the graphene layers are forced apart by the sudden decomposition and vaporization of the intercalated species by thermal shock. Along with production methodologies, such as the intercalation process and heat treatment, the raw material characteristics, especially particle size, strongly influence the properties of the final product.This report evaluates the influence of the particle size of the raw material on the intercalation and expansion processes and consequently the properties of the exfoliated graphite. Natural crystalline flake graphite with wide particle diameter distribution (between dp = 80 and 425 µm was divided into four size-range portions by sieving. Graphite was intercalated via perchloric acid, glacial acetic acid and potassium dichromate oxidation and intercalation procedure. 5.0 g of graphite, 7.0 g of perchloric acid, 4.0 g of glacial acetic acid and 2.0 g of potassium dichromate were placed in glass reactor. The mixture was stirred with n = 200 min–1 at temperature of 45 °C during 60 min. Then it was filtered and washed with distilled water until pH~6 and dried at 60 °C during 24 h. Expansion was accomplished by thermal shock at 1000 °C for 1 min. The prepared samples were characterized by means of exfoliation volume measurements, simultaneous differential thermal analysis and thermo-gravimetry (DTA/TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, BET measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.X-ray diffraction indicated a change of distance

  6. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  7. Effect of expansion temperature of expandable graphite on microstructure evolution of expanded graphite during high-energy ball-milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Xueqing; Li Liang; Zhang Ruijun; Zhang Fucheng

    2009-01-01

    Two expanded graphites (EG), marked as EG-1 and EG-2, were prepared by rapid heating of expandable graphite to 600 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, and ball milled in a high-energy mill (planetary-type) under air atmosphere. The microstructure evolution of the ball-milled samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD analysis shows that the evolution degree of the average crystallite thickness along the c-axis (L c ) of EG-2 is lower than that of EG-1 during the milling process. From the HRTEM images of the samples after 100 h ball-milling, slightly curved graphene planes can be frequently observed both in the two EGs, however, EG-1 and EG-2 exhibit sharply curved graphene planes and smoothly curved graphene planes with high bending angles, respectively.

  8. Adsorption Characteristics of Polyvinyl Alcohols in Solution on Expanded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Yan Pang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Expanded graphite (EG adsorbent was prepared with 50 mesh graphite as raw materials, potassium permanganate as oxidant, and vitriol as intercalation compound. Three kinds of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA with different degree of polymerization (DP in aqueous solution were used as adsorbates. We have studied the influence of initial PVA concentration, temperature and ionic strength on adsorption capacity. Langmuir constants and Gibbs free energy change (⊿G° were calculated according to experimental data respectively. Thermodynamic analysis indicates the equilibrium adsorbance of PVA on EG increase with the rise of SO42– concentration. Adsorption isotherms of PVA with different degree of polymerization are all types and we deduce PVA molecules lie flat on EG surface. Adsorption processes are all spontaneous. Kinetic studies show that the kinetic data can be described by pseudo second-order kinetic model. Second-order rate constants and the initial adsorption rate rise with the increasing of temperature and half-adsorption time decreases with the increasing of temperature. The adsorption activation energy of each PVA is less than 20 kJ•mol−1, physical adsorption is the major mode of the overall adsorption process.

  9. Electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shazly, O.; El-Wahidy, E.F.; Elanany, N.; Saad, N.A.

    1992-06-01

    The electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite flakes, obtained from the graphite schists of Wadi Bent, Eastern Desert, were measured. The flakes were ground and compressed into pellets. The standard four probe dc method was used to measure the temperature dependence of the electric resistivity from room temperature down to 12 K. The transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance were measured in the low magnetic field range at temperatures 300 K, 77 K and 12 K. The transverse magnetoresistance data was used to estimate the average mobility, assuming a simple two-band model. (author). 20 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  10. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  11. Study on paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change thermal energy storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhengguo; Fang Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    A paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change thermal energy storage material was prepared by absorbing the paraffin into an expanded graphite that has an excellent absorbability. In such a composite, the paraffin serves as a latent heat storage material and the expanded graphite acts as the supporting material, which prevents leakage of the melted paraffin from its porous structure due to the capillary and surface tension forces. The inherent structure of the expanded graphite did not change in the composite material. The solid-liquid phase change temperature of the composite PCM was the same as that of the paraffin, and the latent heat of the paraffin/expanded graphite composite material was equivalent to the calculated value based on the mass ratio of the paraffin in the composite. The heat transfer rate of the paraffin/expanded graphite composite was obviously higher than that of the paraffin due to the combination with the expanded graphite that had a high thermal conductivity. The prepared paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change material had a large thermal storage capacity and improved thermal conductivity and did not experience liquid leakage during its solid-liquid phase change

  12. Non-activated high surface area expanded graphite oxide for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermisoglou, E.C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G.E.; Boukos, N.; Giannouri, M. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology “Demokritos”, 153 43 Ag. Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece); Lei, C.; Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology “Demokritos”, 153 43 Ag. Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One-step exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide via microwave irradiation. • Effect of pristine graphite (type, flake size) on the microwave expanded material. • Effect of pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the produced expanded material. • Expanded graphene materials with high BET surface areas (940 m{sup 2}/g–2490 m{sup 2}/g). • Non-activated graphene based materials suitable for supercapacitors. - Abstract: Microwave irradiation of graphite oxide constitutes a facile route toward production of reduced graphene oxide, since during this treatment both exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide occurs. In this work, the effect of pristine graphite (type, size of flakes), pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the finally produced expanded material was examined. All the types of graphite that were tested afforded materials with high BET surface areas ranging from 940 m{sup 2}/g to 2490 m{sup 2}/g, without intervening an activation stage at elevated temperature. SEM and TEM images displayed exfoliated structures, where the flakes were significantly detached and curved. The quality of the reduced graphene oxide sheets was evidenced both by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrode material capacitance was determined via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The materials with PEDOT binder had better performance (∼97 F/g) at low operation rates while those with PVDF binder performed better (∼20 F/g) at higher rates, opening up perspectives for their application in supercapacitors.

  13. Expanded graphite as an intercalation anode material for lithium systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makovička, J.; Sedlaříková, M.; Arenillas, A.; Velická, Jana; Vondrák, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2009), s. 1467-1471 ISSN 1432-8488 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB208130604; GA MŽP SN/3/171/05; GA ČR(CZ) GA104/06/1471 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : graphite * anode * mild oxidation CO2 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.821, year: 2009

  14. Developments in natural uranium - graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, J.

    1964-01-01

    The French natural uranium-graphite power-reactor programme has been developing - from EDF 1 to EDF 4 - in the direction of an increase of the unit power of the installations, of the specific and volume powers, and of an improvement in the operational security conditions. The high power of EDF 4 (500 MWe) and the integration of the primary circuit into the reactor vessel, which is itself made of pre-stressed concrete, make it possible to make the most of the annular fuel elements already in use in EDF 1, and to arrive thus at a very satisfactory solution. The use of an internally cooled fuel element (an annular element) has led to a further step forward: it now becomes possible to increase the pressure of the cooling gas without danger of causing creep in the uranium tube. The use of a pre-stressed concrete vessel makes this pressure increase possible, and the integration of the primary circuit avoids the risk of a rapid depressurization which would be in this case a major danger. This report deals with the main problems presented by this new type of nuclear power station, and gives the main lines of research and studies now being carried out in France. - Neutronic and thermal research has made it possible to consider using large size fuel elements (internal diameter = 77 mm, external diameter 95 mm) while still using natural uranium. - The problems connected with the production of these elements and with their in pile behaviour are the subject of a large programme, both out of pile and in power reactors (EDF 2) and test reactors (Pegase). - The increase in the size of the element leads to a large lattice pitch (35 to 40 cm). This makes it possible to consider having one charging aperture per channel or for a small number of channels, whether the charge machine be inside or outside the pressure vessel. In conclusion are given the main characteristics of a project for a 500 MWe power station using such a fuel element. In particular this project is compared to EDF 4

  15. Influence of expanded graphite (EG) and graphene oxide (GO) on physical properties of PET based nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Paszkiewicz Sandra; Nachman Małgorzata; Szymczyk Anna; Špitalský Zdeno; Mosnáček Jaroslav; Rosłaniec Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    This work is the continuation and refinement of already published communications based on PET/EG nanocomposites prepared by in situ polymerization1, 2. In this study, nanocomposites based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) with expanded graphite were compared to those with functionalized graphite sheets (GO). The results suggest that the degree of dispersion of nanoparticles in the PET matrix has important effect on the structure and physical properties of the nanocomposites. The existence of gr...

  16. Effect of Graphite on the Properties of Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda jabber Braihi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber-graphite composites (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 pphr graphite were prepared on a laboratory two-roll mill. Swelling measurements were used to evaluate the impacts of graphite on the properties of natural rubber. Swelling results showed that the volume fraction of natural rubber in the swollen gel, the interaction parameter, and the cross-link density decreased by increasing graphite loadings, while the average molecular weight of natural rubber between cross-links increased. Vulcanization results showed that only scorch time parameter increased with increasing graphite loadings, while other parameters (Max. torque, Min. torque, cure rate and cure rate index decreased. Both thermal and AC conductivities increased.

  17. Preparation and characterization of stearic acid/expanded graphite composites as thermal energy storage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Guiyin; Li, Hui; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Stearic acid/expanded graphite composites with different mass ratios were prepared by absorbing liquid stearic acid into the expanded graphite. In the composite materials, the stearic acid was used as the phase change material for thermal energy storage, and the expanded graphite acted as the supporting material. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and thermal diffusivity measurement were used to determine the chemical structure, crystalline phase, microstructure and thermal diffusivity of the composites, respectively. The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The thermal analysis results indicated that the materials exhibited the same phase transition characteristics as the stearic acid and their latent heats were approximately the same as the values calculated based on the weight fraction of the stearic acid in the composites. The microstructural analysis results showed that the stearic acid was well absorbed in the porous network of the expanded graphite, and there was no leakage of the stearic acid from the composites even when it was in the molten state.

  18. A comparative investigation on absorption performances of three expanded graphite-based complex materials for toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shande; Tian Shuanghong; Feng Yunfeng; Lei Jiajia; Wang, Piaopiao; Xiong Ya

    2010-01-01

    Three kinds of expanded graphite-based complex materials were prepared to absorb toluene by dispersing plant oil, animal oil and mineral oil on the surface of expanded graphite, respectively. These complex materials were characterized by scanning electronic micrograph, contact angle meter and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area. And their absorption capacities for toluene were comparatively investigated. The results showed that the surfaces of the three types of sorbents were very hydrophobic and nonporous, but they all had excellent absorption capacities for toluene. And their absorption capacities were proportional to the toluene concentration in streams and decreased differently with increasing the absorption temperature. It was noteworthy that the absorption capacities varied with the unsaturated degree of the complex materials and kept unchanged under different relative humidities of streams. Moreover, the regeneration experiments showed that after 15-run regeneration the absorption capacities of expanded graphite modified by mineral oil almost kept unchanged, while that of expanded graphite loaded plant oil and animal oil dropped by 157 and 93.6 mg g -1 , respectively. The losses of their absorption capacities were ascribed to the destruction of their unsaturated carbon bounds.

  19. Adsorption isotherm, kinetic and mechanism of expanded graphite for sulfadiazine antibiotics removal from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yong; Jin, SuWan; Lu, QunZan; Ji, Jiang

    2017-10-01

    The adsorption of sulfadiazine from water by expanded graphite (EG), a low cost and environmental-friendly adsorbent, was investigated. Several adsorption parameters (including the initial sulfadiazine concentration, contact time, pH of solution, ionic strength and temperature) were studied. Results of equilibrium experiments indicated that adsorption of sulfadiazine onto EG were better described by the Langmuir and Tempkin models than by the Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity is calculated to be 16.586 mg/g at 298 K. The kinetic data were analyzed by pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle models. The results indicated that the adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and may be controlled by two steps. Moreover, the pH significantly influenced the adsorption process, with the relatively high adsorption capacity at pH 2-10. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions are manifested to be two main mechanisms for sulfadiazine adsorption of EG. Meanwhile, the ionic concentration of Cl - slightly impacted the removal of sulfadiazine. Results of thermodynamics analysis showed spontaneous and exothermic nature of sulfadiazine adsorption on EG. In addition, regeneration experiments imply that the saturated EG could be reused for sulfadiazine removal by immersing sodium hydroxide.

  20. Ex situ integration of iron oxide nanoparticles onto the exfoliated expanded graphite flakes in water suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid structures composed of exfoliated expanded graphite (EG and iron oxide nanocrystals have been produced by an ex situ process. The iron oxide nanoparticles coated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, or poly(acrylic acid (PAA were integrated onto the exfoliated EG flakes by mixing their aqueous suspensions at room temperature under support of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide (EDC and N-hydroxysuccin-nimide (NHS. EG flakes have been used both, naked and functionalized with branched polyethylenimine (PEI. Complete integration of two constituents has been achieved and mainteined stable for more than 12 months. No preferential spatial distribution of anchoring sites for attachement of iron oxide nanoparticles has been observed, regardless EG flakes have been used naked or functionalized with PEI molecules. The structural and physico-chemical characteristics of the exfoliated expanded graphite and its hybrids nanostructures has been investigated by SEM, TEM, FTIR and Raman techniques. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45015

  1. Fe_3C@carbon nanocapsules/expanded graphite as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, You-Guo; Lin, Xi-Le; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Qi-Chang; Yan, Zhi-Xiong; Wang, Hong-Qiang; Chen, Jian-Jun; Li, Qing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Fe_3C@carbonnanocapsules(*)/expanded graphite composite was successfully prepared by a new and facile method, including mix of starting materials and heat treatment of the precursor. It is featured by unique 3-D structure, where expanded graphite acts as scaffold to ensure a continuous entity, and Fe_3C particles coated by carbon nanocapsules are embedded intimately. The Fe_3C nanoparticles encased in carbon nanocapsules act as catalyst in the modification of SEI film during the cycles. The interesting 3-D architecture which aligns the conductivity paths in the planar direction with expanded graphite and in the axial direction with carbon nanocapsules minimizes the resistance and enhances the reversible capacity. The prepared composite exhibits a high reversible capacity and excellent rate performance as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The composite maintains a reversible capacity of 1226.2 mAh/g after 75 cycles at 66 mA/g. When the current density increases to 200 mA/g, the reversible capacity maintains 451.5 mAh/g. The facile synthesis method and excellent electrochemical performances make the composite expected to be one of the most potential anode material for lithium ion batteries.

  2. Non-activated high surface area expanded graphite oxide for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermisoglou, E. C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G. E.; Boukos, N.; Giannouri, M.; Lei, C.; Lekakou, C.; Trapalis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Microwave irradiation of graphite oxide constitutes a facile route toward production of reduced graphene oxide, since during this treatment both exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide occurs. In this work, the effect of pristine graphite (type, size of flakes), pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the finally produced expanded material was examined. All the types of graphite that were tested afforded materials with high BET surface areas ranging from 940 m2/g to 2490 m2/g, without intervening an activation stage at elevated temperature. SEM and TEM images displayed exfoliated structures, where the flakes were significantly detached and curved. The quality of the reduced graphene oxide sheets was evidenced both by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrode material capacitance was determined via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The materials with PEDOT binder had better performance (∼97 F/g) at low operation rates while those with PVDF binder performed better (∼20 F/g) at higher rates, opening up perspectives for their application in supercapacitors.

  3. Influence of expanded graphite (EG and graphene oxide (GO on physical properties of PET based nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paszkiewicz Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is the continuation and refinement of already published communications based on PET/EG nanocomposites prepared by in situ polymerization1, 2. In this study, nanocomposites based on poly(ethylene terephthalate with expanded graphite were compared to those with functionalized graphite sheets (GO. The results suggest that the degree of dispersion of nanoparticles in the PET matrix has important effect on the structure and physical properties of the nanocomposites. The existence of graphene sheets nanoparticles enhances the crystallization rate of PET. It has been confirmed that in situ polymerization is the effective method for preparation nanocomposites which can avoid the agglomeration of nanoparticles in polymer matrices and improve the interfacial interaction between nanofiller and polymer matrix. The obtained results have shown also that due to the presence of functional groups on GO surface the interactions with PET matrix can be stronger than in the case of exfoliated graphene (EG and matrix.

  4. Adsorption and regeneration of expanded graphite modified by CTAB-KBr/H3PO4 for marine oil pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Congbin; Jiao, Chunlei; Yao, Ruihua; Lin, Aijun; Jiao, Wentao

    2018-02-01

    The cleaning-up of viscous oil spilled in ocean is a global challenge, especially in Bohai, due to its slow current movement and poor self-purification capacity. Frequent oil-spill accidents not only cause severe and long-term damages to marine ecosystems, but also lead to a great loss of valuable resources. To eliminate the environmental pollution of oil spills, an efficient and environment-friendly oil-recovery approach is necessary. In this study, 1 expanded graphite (EG) modified by CTAB-KBr/H 3 PO 4 was synthesized via composite intercalation agents of CTAB-KBr and natural flake graphite, followed by the activation of phosphoric acid at low temperature. The resultant modified expanded graphite (M-EG) obtained an interconnected and continuous open microstructure with lower polarity surface, more and larger pores, and increased surface hydrophobicity. Due to these characteristics, M-EG exhibited a superior adsorption capacity towards marine oil. The saturated adsorption capacities of M-EG were as large as 7.44  g/g for engine oil, 6.12 g/g for crude oil, 5.34 g/g for diesel oil and 4.10 g/g for gasoline oil in 120min, exceeding the capacity of pristine EG. Furthermore, M-EG maintained good removal efficiency under different adsorption conditions, such as temperature, oil types, and sodium salt concentration. In addition, oils sorbed into M-EG could be recovered either by a simple compression or filtration-drying treatment with a recovery ratio of 58-83%. However, filtration-drying treatment shows better performance in preserving microstructures of M-EG, which ensures the adsorbents can be recycled several times. High removal capability, fast adsorption efficiency, excellent stability and good recycling performance make M-EG an ideal candidate for treating marine oil pollution in practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlMaadeed, M.A., E-mail: m.alali@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Labidi, Sami [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Krupa, Igor [QAPCO Polymer Chair, Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Karkri, Mustapha [Université Paris-Est CERTES, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France)

    2015-01-20

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  6. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlMaadeed, M.A.; Labidi, Sami; Krupa, Igor; Karkri, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  7. Influence of expandable graphite on fire resistance and water resistance of flame-retardant coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Han, Enhou; Ke, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Expandable graphite (EG) coating and ammonium polyphosphate-pentaerythritol-melamine (APP-PER-MEL) coating were prepared. Thermal degradation and char formation of the coatings were investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results have shown that the anti-oxidation and fire-resistant properties of expandable graphite coating containing EG with size of 74 μm are better than those of APP-PER-MEL coating. The static immersion test was applied to study water resistance of the coatings, and the fire protection test and mechanical test were used to analyse heat insulation and mechanical properties of coatings before and after water immersion. The fire-resistant and mechanical properties of APP-PER-MEL coating were severely damaged by water immersion, whereas EG coating containing 8.5% EG with size of 74 μm could retain the good fire resistance even after 500 h water immersion

  8. Nano-Sn embedded in expanded graphite as anode for lithium ion batteries with improved low temperature electrochemical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yong; Ben, Liubin; Zhan, Yuanjie; Huang, Xuejie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nano-Sn embedded in interlayers of expanded graphite is fabricated. • The graphene/nano-Sn/graphene stacked structure promotes cycling stability of Sn. • The Sn/EG shows improved low temperature electrochemical performance. • Chemical diffusion coefficients of the Sn/EG are obtained by GITT. • The Sn/EG exhibits faster Li-ion intercalation kinetics than graphite. - Abstract: Metallic tin (Sn) used as anode material for lithium ion batteries has long been proposed, but its low temperature electrochemical performance has been rarely concerned. Here, a Sn/C composite with nano-Sn embedded in expanded graphite (Sn/EG) is synthesized. The nano-Sn particles (∼30 nm) are uniformly distributed in the interlayers of expanded graphite forming a tightly stacked layered structure. The electrochemical performance of the Sn/EG, particularly at low temperature, is carefully investigated compared with graphite. At -20 °C, the Sn/EG shows capacities of 200 mAh g −1 at 0.1C and 130 mAh g −1 at 0.2C, which is much superior to graphite (<10 mAh g −1 ). EIS measurements suggest that the charge transfer impedance of the Sn/EG increases less rapidly than graphite with decreasing temperatures, which is responsible for the improved low temperature electrochemical performance. The Li-ion chemical diffusion coefficients of the Sn/EG obtained by GITT are an order of magnitude higher at room temperature than that at -20 °C. Furthermore, the Sn/EG exhibits faster Li-ion intercalation kinetics than graphite in the asymmetric charge/discharge measurements, which shows great promise for the application in electric vehicles charged at low temperature.

  9. Life cycle inventory of sodium acetate and expanded graphite: Short report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungbluth, N. [ESU-Services Ltd., Uster (Switzerland); Nguyen, B. [Haute Ecole d' Ingenierie et de Gestion du canton de Vaud, Laboratoire d' Energetique Solaire et de Physique du BATiment, HEIG-VD / LESBAT, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    This short report for the Laboratory for Solar Energy and Building Physics at the University of Applied Sciences in Yverdon, Switzerland, takes a look at work being done on the issue of solar energy storage. The use of sodium acetate as a phase-change material is reviewed and considered as being a good way of optimising solar heating systems. The goal of this study was to assess if the energy gain resulting from the use of sodium acetate is balanced out or not by its embodied energy. The study investigated sodium acetate with and without expanded graphite. The paper discusses the life cycle inventory analysis of the two materials and provides some aggregated key indicators for further analysis. In general the ecoinvent methodology has been followed in order to achieve full consistency with the background data used and to provide an assessment of the materials' impact on the environment.

  10. Performance enhancement of spherical natural graphite by phenol resin in lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.-S.; Wang, Y.-H.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2006-01-01

    The capacity of natural graphite in the lithium ion battery anode decays seriously. The phenol resin is used as a reaction material to modify the electrochemical performance of spherical graphite as the anode material in lithium ion batteries. Measuring the reversible capacity indicates change in the surface structure of spherical graphite. A dense layer of methyl groups was thus formed. Some structural imperfections are removed and the stability of the graphite structure is increased. Clearly, reducing the irreversible capacity is beneficial in controlling the uniformity of the spherical graphite surface structure

  11. Adsorption and decomposition of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) on expanded graphite/metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Che; Wang, Je-Chuang; Wu, Kuo-Hui

    2018-06-01

    Composites based on expanded graphite (EG) and metal oxides (MOs) were prepared by an explosive combustion and blending method. A metal oxide (Ag2O, CuO or ZnO)-containing phase was employed as a component with reactive functionality, which was supported on EG as a component with adsorptive functionality. The physical properties of the EG/MO composites were examined using SEM and FTIR spectroscopy, the results of which indicated that the MOs were incorporated in the EG matrix after impregnation. Solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H, 31P and cross polarization (CP) MAS 13C NMR studies of the EG/MO composites were performed after adsorption of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The FTIR and NMR data showed that the initial uptake occurred through both molecular and reactive adsorption. Molecular adsorption occurred by van der Waals interaction of M(Zn, Cu, Ag)⋯Odbnd P and hydrogen-bond formation to isolated hydroxyl groups. Reactive chemisorption appeared to occur through interaction with both Lewis acid sites and active oxygen species present on the MO surface. The FTIR and NMR results exhibited a trend of reactivity towards DMMP in the order Ag2O > ZnO > CuO, which indicated stronger interaction between the Lewis acid sites and the phosphoryl O atom of DMMP for Ag2O as compared with ZnO and CuO, with concomitant formation of surface-coordinated DMMP and bridge-bonded Osbnd Psbnd O phosphorus oxide species.

  12. Preparation and characterization of expanded graphite/metal oxides for antimicrobial application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Che; Wu, Kuo-Hui; Lyu, Dong-Yi; Cheng, Ken-Fa; Huang, Wen-Chien

    2017-06-01

    Composite materials based on expanded graphite (EG) and metal oxide (MO) particles was prepared by an explosive combustion and blending method. The objective of the study was to develop EG impregnated with metal oxide particulates (Ag 2 O, CuO and ZnO) and evaluate the level of protection the materials conferred against biological agents. The physical properties of the EG/MO composites were examined using SEM, EDX and XRD spectroscopy, and the results indicated that the MO particles were incorporated into the EG matrix after impregnation. The antimicrobial activities of the EG/MO composites against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and Bacillus anthracis were investigated using zone of inhibition, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and plate-counting methods. EG/Ag 2 O exhibited a stronger antibacterial activity than EG/CuO and EG/ZnO, with a MIC of 0.3mg/mL and a MBC of 0.5mg/mL. To the best of our knowledge, few studies have demonstrated that EG/MO composites can inhibit the growth of Bacillus anthracis-adhered cells, thus preventing the process of biofilm formation. Nanoscale metal oxides display enhanced reactive properties toward bacteria due to their high surface area, large number of highly reactive edges, corner defect sites and high surface to volume ratio. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal Characterization of Lauric-Stearic Acid/Expanded Graphite Eutectic Mixture as Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhaonan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) is a desirable phase change material (PCM) due to the constant melting temperature and large latent heat. However, its poor thermal conductivity has hampered its broad utilization. In the present study, pure LA, SA and the mixtures with various mass fractions of LA-SA were used as the basic PCMs, and 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG) was added to enhance the thermal conductivities. The phase change behaviors, microstructural analysis, thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of the mixtures of PCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transient plane source (TPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the LA-SA binary mixture of mixture ratio of 76.3 wt%: 23.7 wt% forms an eutectic mixture, which melts at 38.99 °C and has a latent heat of 159.94 J/g. The melted fatty acids are well absorbed by the porous network of EG and they have a good thermal stability. Furthermore, poor thermal conductivities can be well enhanced by the addition of EG.

  14. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhang, Ni; Peng, Jing; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Fang, Yutang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► EG was obtained by microwave irradiation to prepare the paraffin/EG composite PCM. ► Composite PCM was characterized by XRD to investigate the chemical compatibility. ► Temperature profiles of the composite PCM were obtained during thermal energy storage. -- Abstract: The paraffin/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by absorbing liquid paraffin into EG, in which paraffin was chosen as the PCM. EG was produced by microwave irradiation performed at room temperature. It was found that the EG prepared at 800 W irradiation power for 10 s exhibited the maximum sorption capacity of 92 wt% for paraffin. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that paraffin was uniformly dispersed in the pores of EG. Differential scanning calorimeter analysis indicated that the melting temperature of the composite PCM was close to that of paraffin, and its latent heat was equivalent to the calculated value based on the mass fraction of paraffin in the composite. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the composite PCM was just a combination of paraffin with EG, and no new substance was produced. Thermal energy storage performance of the composite PCM was tested in a latent thermal energy storage (LTES) system. Transients of axial and radial temperature profiles were obtained in the LTES for the composite PCM and paraffin. The thermal energy storage charging duration for the composite PCM was reduced obviously compared to paraffin.

  15. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Styrene-Isoprene-Styrene Copolymer Doped with Expanded Graphite Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Špitalský

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular dynamics of a triblock copolymer and of expanded graphite nanoplatelets were investigated. Composites were prepared using the solution technique. The effects of filler addition and of filler-matrix interactions were investigated using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Only one relaxation was observed by DRS, which was associated with the relaxation of the main polymer chain. Both DRS and DMA demonstrated that the addition of the filler does not cause a significant change in either the temperature of the relaxation or its activation energy, which suggests the presence of weak interactions between the filler and matrix. The storage modulus of the composites increased with increasing filler content. The composite containing 8% filler exhibited a storage modulus increase of approximately 394% in the rubber area. Using the DC electrical conductivity measurements, the electrical percolation threshold was determined to be approximately 5%. The dielectric permittivity and conductivity in the microwave region were determined, confirming that percolating behavior and the critical threshold concentration.

  16. Developments in natural uranium - graphite reactors; Developpement des reacteurs a graphite et uranium naturel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Saitcevsky, B [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The French natural uranium-graphite power-reactor programme has been developing - from EDF 1 to EDF 4 - in the direction of an increase of the unit power of the installations, of the specific and volume powers, and of an improvement in the operational security conditions. The high power of EDF 4 (500 MWe) and the integration of the primary circuit into the reactor vessel, which is itself made of pre-stressed concrete, make it possible to make the most of the annular fuel elements already in use in EDF 1, and to arrive thus at a very satisfactory solution. The use of an internally cooled fuel element (an annular element) has led to a further step forward: it now becomes possible to increase the pressure of the cooling gas without danger of causing creep in the uranium tube. The use of a pre-stressed concrete vessel makes this pressure increase possible, and the integration of the primary circuit avoids the risk of a rapid depressurization which would be in this case a major danger. This report deals with the main problems presented by this new type of nuclear power station, and gives the main lines of research and studies now being carried out in France. - Neutronic and thermal research has made it possible to consider using large size fuel elements (internal diameter = 77 mm, external diameter 95 mm) while still using natural uranium. - The problems connected with the production of these elements and with their in pile behaviour are the subject of a large programme, both out of pile and in power reactors (EDF 2) and test reactors (Pegase). - The increase in the size of the element leads to a large lattice pitch (35 to 40 cm). This makes it possible to consider having one charging aperture per channel or for a small number of channels, whether the charge machine be inside or outside the pressure vessel. In conclusion are given the main characteristics of a project for a 500 MWe power station using such a fuel element. In particular this project is compared to EDF 4

  17. Developments in natural uranium - graphite reactors; Developpement des reacteurs a graphite et uranium naturel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Saitcevsky, B. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The French natural uranium-graphite power-reactor programme has been developing - from EDF 1 to EDF 4 - in the direction of an increase of the unit power of the installations, of the specific and volume powers, and of an improvement in the operational security conditions. The high power of EDF 4 (500 MWe) and the integration of the primary circuit into the reactor vessel, which is itself made of pre-stressed concrete, make it possible to make the most of the annular fuel elements already in use in EDF 1, and to arrive thus at a very satisfactory solution. The use of an internally cooled fuel element (an annular element) has led to a further step forward: it now becomes possible to increase the pressure of the cooling gas without danger of causing creep in the uranium tube. The use of a pre-stressed concrete vessel makes this pressure increase possible, and the integration of the primary circuit avoids the risk of a rapid depressurization which would be in this case a major danger. This report deals with the main problems presented by this new type of nuclear power station, and gives the main lines of research and studies now being carried out in France. - Neutronic and thermal research has made it possible to consider using large size fuel elements (internal diameter = 77 mm, external diameter 95 mm) while still using natural uranium. - The problems connected with the production of these elements and with their in pile behaviour are the subject of a large programme, both out of pile and in power reactors (EDF 2) and test reactors (Pegase). - The increase in the size of the element leads to a large lattice pitch (35 to 40 cm). This makes it possible to consider having one charging aperture per channel or for a small number of channels, whether the charge machine be inside or outside the pressure vessel. In conclusion are given the main characteristics of a project for a 500 MWe power station using such a fuel element. In particular this project is compared to EDF 4

  18. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  19. Natural graphite demand and supply - Implications for electric vehicle battery requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Donald W.; Virta, Robert L.; Mahdavi, Mahbood; Sangine, Elizabeth S.; Fortier, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Electric vehicles have been promoted to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lessen U.S. dependence on petroleum for transportation. Growth in U.S. sales of electric vehicles has been hindered by technical difficulties and the high cost of the lithium-ion batteries used to power many electric vehicles (more than 50% of the vehicle cost). Groundbreaking has begun for a lithium-ion battery factory in Nevada that, at capacity, could manufacture enough batteries to power 500,000 electric vehicles of various types and provide economies of scale to reduce the cost of batteries. Currently, primary synthetic graphite derived from petroleum coke is used in the anode of most lithium-ion batteries. An alternate may be the use of natural flake graphite, which would result in estimated graphite cost reductions of more than US$400 per vehicle at 2013 prices. Most natural flake graphite is sourced from China, the world's leading graphite producer. Sourcing natural flake graphite from deposits in North America could reduce raw material transportation costs and, given China's growing internal demand for flake graphite for its industries and ongoing environmental, labor, and mining issues, may ensure a more reliable and environmentally conscious supply of graphite. North America has flake graphite resources, and Canada is currently a producer, but most new mining projects in the United States require more than 10 yr to reach production, and demand could exceed supplies of flake graphite. Natural flake graphite may serve only to supplement synthetic graphite, at least for the short-term outlook.

  20. Purification process of natural graphite as anode for Li-ion batteries: chemical versus thermal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghib, K.; Song, X.; Guerfi, A.; Rioux, R.; Kinoshita, K.

    The intercalation of Li ions in natural graphite that was purified by chemical and thermal processes was investigated. A new chemical process was developed that involved a mixed aqueous solution containing 30% H 2SO 4 and 30% NH xF y heated to 90 °C. The results of this process are compared to those obtained by heating the natural graphite from 1500 to 2400 °C in an inert environment (thermal process). The first-cycle coulombic efficiency of the purified natural graphite obtained by the chemical process is 91 and 84% after the thermal process at 2400 °C. Grinding the natural graphite before or after purification had no significant effect on electrochemical performance at low currents. However, grinding to a very small particle size before purification permitted optimization of the size distribution of the particles, which gives rise to a more homogenous electrode. The impurities in the graphite play a role as microabrasion agents during grinding which enhances its hardness and improves its mechanical properties. Grinding also modifies the particle morphology from a 2- to a 3-D structure (similar in shape to a potato). This potato-shaped natural graphite shows high reversible capacity at high current densities (about 90% at 1 C rate). Our analysis suggests that thermal processing is considerably more expensive than the chemical process to obtain purified natural graphite.

  1. Powder, paper and foam of few-layer graphene prepared in high yield by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation of expanded graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liqiong; Li, Weiwei; Li, Peng; Liao, Shutian; Qiu, Shengqiang; Chen, Mingliang; Guo, Yufen; Li, Qi; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Liwei

    2014-04-09

    A facile and high-yield approach to the preparation of few-layer graphene (FLG) by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation (EIE) of expanded graphite in sulfuric acid electrolyte is reported. Stage-1 H2SO4-graphite intercalation compound is used as a key intermediate in EIE to realize the efficient exfoliation. The yield of the FLG sheets (papers made of the FLG flakes retain excellent conductivity (≈24,500 S m(-1)). Three-dimensional (3D) graphene foams with light weight are fabricated from the FLG flakes by the use of Ni foams as self-sacrifice templates. Furthermore, 3D graphene/Ni foams without any binders, which are used as supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolyte, provide the specific capacitance of 113.2 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), retaining 90% capacitance after 1000 cycles. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D.; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research. PMID:22826262

  3. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2012-08-07

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research.

  4. Commercial expanded graphite as a low-cost, long-cycling life anode for potassium-ion batteries with conventional carbonate electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yongling; Fei, Huifang; Zeng, Guifang; Ci, Lijie; Xi, Baojuan; Xiong, Shenglin; Feng, Jinkui

    2018-02-01

    Design and synthesis of capable anode materials that can store the large size K+ is the key of development for potassium-ion batteries. The low-cost and commercial expanded graphite with large particles is a graphite-derived material with good conductivity and enlarged interlayer spaces to boost the potassium ion diffusion coefficient during charge/discharge process. Thus, we achieve excellent anode performance for potassium-ion batteries based on an expanded graphite. It can deliver a capacity of 263 mAh g-1 at the rate of 10 mA g-1 and the reversible capacity remains almost unchanged after 500 cycles at a high rate of 200 mA g-1 with a coulombic efficiency of around 100%. The potassium storage mechanism is investigated by the ex situ XRD technique. This excellent potassium storage performance will make the expanded graphite promising anode candidate for potassium ion batteries.

  5. Study of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of expanded graphite gaskets; Etude du comportement et de l`etancheite de joints en graphite expnase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patron, E. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    The poro-mechanical behaviour models developed by O. Coussy permit to consider various phenomena observed experimentally: thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings, plasticity, etc. The aim of this study is to implement the simplest poro-mechanical model (i.e. the isotropic linear poro-elastic model) to model the gasket hydro-mechanical behaviour. First, isotropic poro-elastic characteristics of expanded graphite have been estimated from these tests conducted at Departement Mecanique et Technologie des Composants (MTC) and data from literature. Then, analytical solutions of the tightness tests developed at the MTC Department have been carried out. These calculations provide a first estimation of porosity variations during a tightness tests with metal/metal contact or in elastic recovery, and during a `hot thermal transient`. Thickness controlled numerical calculations have proved the analytical calculations relevance. With regard to simulation of tests with metal/metal contact or `hot thermal transient`, stress controlled numerical calculations have pointed out: - a greater vertical displacement on the inner side of the graphite ring and - a z dependence of the radial displacement and thus a porous differential variation between the upper and lower faces of the ring. (author). 21 refs.

  6. Urea-assisted liquid-phase exfoliation of natural graphite into few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dandan; Liu, Qinfu; Wang, Xianshuai; Qiao, Zhichuan; Wu, Yingke; Xu, Bohui; Ding, Shuli

    2018-05-01

    The mass production of graphene with high quality is desirable for its wide applications. Here, we demonstrated a facile method to exfoliate natural graphite into graphene in organic solvent by assisting of urea. The exfoliation of graphite may originate from the "molecular wedge" effect of urea, which can intercalate into the edge of natural graphite, thus facilitating the production of graphene dispersion with a high concentration up to 1.2 mg/mL. The obtained graphene is non-oxidized with negligible defects. Therefore, this approach has great promise in bulk production of graphene with superior quality for a variety of applications.

  7. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kun Hyung [Korea Gas Corporation, Incheon, 406-130 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  8. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun; Choe, Kun Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  9. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun; Choe, Kun Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity

  10. The effect of 150μm expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Sami, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com; Shariff, A. M., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Bustam, M. A., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my [Research Center for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia); Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmadster@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150μm expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 °C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char.

  11. The effect of 150μm expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, Sami; Shariff, A. M.; Bustam, M. A.; Ahmad, Faiz

    2014-01-01

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150μm expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 °C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char

  12. Synthesis of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide by needle platy natural vein graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnayake, R.M.N.M.; Wijayasinghe, H.W.M.A.C.; Pitawala, H.M.T.G.A.; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Huang, Hsin-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The high purity of this form of needle platy natural vein graphite is expected to synthesize GO and rGO readily and efficiently, as compared to the synthetic and less pure graphite raw materials. • Production of large-scale GO and rGO for industrial applications can be achieved by using this highly crystalline NPG vein graphite, and it adds value to the natural resources. • High quality, few-layer, and cost effective GO and rGO can achieve great results using this low cost, natural graphite. - Abstract: Among natural graphite varieties, needle platy vein graphite (NPG) has very high purity. Therefore, it is readily used to prepare graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). In this study, GO and rGO were prepared using chemical oxidation and reduction process, respectively. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. XRD studies confirmed the increase of the interlayer spacing of GO and rGO in between 3.35 to 8.66 A°. AFM studies showed the layer height of rGO to be 1.05 nm after the reduction process. TEM micrographs clearly illustrated that the prepared GO has more than 25 layers, while the rGO has only less than 15 layers. Furthermore, the effect of chemical oxidation and reduction processes on surface morphology of graphite were clearly observed in FESEM micrographs. The calculated R_O_/_C of GO and rGO using XPS analysis are 5.37% and 1.77%, respectively. The present study revealed the successful and cost effective nature of the chemical oxidation, and the reduction processes for the production of GO and rGO out of natural vein graphite.

  13. Synthesis of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide by needle platy natural vein graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathnayake, R.M.N.M. [National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy (Sri Lanka); Graduate School of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Wijayasinghe, H.W.M.A.C., E-mail: athulawijaya@gmail.com [National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy (Sri Lanka); Pitawala, H.M.T.G.A. [Department of Geology, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Yoshimura, Masamichi; Huang, Hsin-Hui [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • The high purity of this form of needle platy natural vein graphite is expected to synthesize GO and rGO readily and efficiently, as compared to the synthetic and less pure graphite raw materials. • Production of large-scale GO and rGO for industrial applications can be achieved by using this highly crystalline NPG vein graphite, and it adds value to the natural resources. • High quality, few-layer, and cost effective GO and rGO can achieve great results using this low cost, natural graphite. - Abstract: Among natural graphite varieties, needle platy vein graphite (NPG) has very high purity. Therefore, it is readily used to prepare graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). In this study, GO and rGO were prepared using chemical oxidation and reduction process, respectively. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. XRD studies confirmed the increase of the interlayer spacing of GO and rGO in between 3.35 to 8.66 A°. AFM studies showed the layer height of rGO to be 1.05 nm after the reduction process. TEM micrographs clearly illustrated that the prepared GO has more than 25 layers, while the rGO has only less than 15 layers. Furthermore, the effect of chemical oxidation and reduction processes on surface morphology of graphite were clearly observed in FESEM micrographs. The calculated R{sub O/C} of GO and rGO using XPS analysis are 5.37% and 1.77%, respectively. The present study revealed the successful and cost effective nature of the chemical oxidation, and the reduction processes for the production of GO and rGO out of natural vein graphite.

  14. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite as composite phase change material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Junbing [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Huang, Jin, E-mail: huangjiner@126.com [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Zhu, Panpan; Wang, Changhong [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Li, Xinxi [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Center for Nanochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The expanded graphite enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient greatly. • The aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic was utilized to disperse EG. • The combination of composite was physical without chemical reaction. • The reduction on total latent heat was slight after the adding EG. - Abstract: The binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) were prepared via adding different mass rate of EG to binary nitrate salts consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} (6:4) by aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic. The morphology and chemical composition of EG and the composite PCM were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scan electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. Laser thermal conductivity instrument and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were employed to measure thermo physical properties. Drawing the conclusion from investigation, that EG had enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient which largely increased to 4.884 W/(m K) and reduced total latent heat by mostly 11.0%. The morphology and phase structure results indicated that EG were well dispersed into and physically combined with molten salts. In general, the prepared composite PCM could be a suitable phase change material for thermal energy storage.

  15. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite as composite phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Junbing; Huang, Jin; Zhu, Panpan; Wang, Changhong; Li, Xinxi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The expanded graphite enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient greatly. • The aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic was utilized to disperse EG. • The combination of composite was physical without chemical reaction. • The reduction on total latent heat was slight after the adding EG. - Abstract: The binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) were prepared via adding different mass rate of EG to binary nitrate salts consisting of NaNO 3 and KNO 3 (6:4) by aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic. The morphology and chemical composition of EG and the composite PCM were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scan electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. Laser thermal conductivity instrument and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were employed to measure thermo physical properties. Drawing the conclusion from investigation, that EG had enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient which largely increased to 4.884 W/(m K) and reduced total latent heat by mostly 11.0%. The morphology and phase structure results indicated that EG were well dispersed into and physically combined with molten salts. In general, the prepared composite PCM could be a suitable phase change material for thermal energy storage

  16. Study on the adsorption performance of composite adsorbent of CaCl2 and expanded graphite with ammonia as adsorbate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.L.; Wu, J.Y.; Xia, Z.Z.; Wang, R.Z.

    2009-01-01

    A novel constant volume test unit was built to study the adsorption performance of a new type composite adsorbent. This test unit can measure the adsorption isosteres of the working pairs. The adsorption isosteres are the curves of the adsorption pressure variation with the adsorption temperatures at constant adsorption quantities. Compared to the former test results of isothermals and isobars, the isosteres are better for the calculation of the adsorption heat, desorption heat and the selection the adsorption working pairs. Three experimental results were obtained: the first result was that the expanded graphite powders were superior to the expandable graphite powders to facilitate the transportation of working fluid in the composite adsorbent. The second one was that the composite adsorbent treated by solution is more homogeneous than the simple mixed composite adsorbent and the treated composite adsorbent has a better mass transfer performance. The last one was that the adsorption isosteres was the same one not only in the heating process but also in the cooling process and this performance was not relevant to the homogeneity of the composite adsorbent

  17. Thermal characterization of nitrates and nitrates/expanded graphite mixture phase change materials for solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, X.; Zhang, P.; Li, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The addition of expanded graphite improved apparent thermal conductivity significantly. • The quadratic parallel model was used to predict the effective thermal conductivity. • The melting/freezing temperatures of mixture PCMs shifted slightly with adding of EG. - Abstract: Solar energy storage has become more attractive in recent years. In particular, latent thermal energy storage (LTES) with large energy storage density and isothermal heat storage/retrieval characteristics is a hot research topic. In the present study, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate and their mixture were used as the base materials, and expanded graphite (EG) with high thermal conductivity and thermo-chemical stability was used as an additive to enhance the thermal conductivity. EG with various mass fractions was added to the base materials to form mixture phase change materials (PCMs), and the thermal characteristics of the mixtures were studied extensively. The transient hot-wire tests showed that the addition of EG enhanced the apparent thermal conductivity significantly, e.g. the apparent thermal conductivity of the nitrates/10 wt.% EG mixture PCM was increased by about 30–40%. The test results showed good agreement with theoretical calculations of the quadratic parallel model. Tests with differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) revealed that the melting/freezing temperatures of the mixture PCMs shifted slightly, compared with those of pure nitrates

  18. Electrochemical Determination of Brilliant Blue and Tartrazine Based on an Ionic Liquid-Modified Expanded Graphite Paste Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenchang; Chen, Ye; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xue; Chen, Zhidong

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive electrochemical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of Brilliant Blue (BB) and tartrazine (Tz) using an ionic liquid-modified expanded graphite paste electrode (IL-EGPE). The IL-EGPE was prepared by mixing ionic liquid-expanded graphite composite (IL-EG) with solid paraffin. Compared with the EGPE, the IL-EGPE remarkably enhanced the electrocatalytic oxidation signals of BB and Tz. Under optimal experimental conditions, the designed IL-EGPE exhibited wide linear responses to BB and Tz ranging from 5.0×10(-9) to 4.0×10(-6) M and 1.0×10(-8) to 1.0×10(-6) M, respectively. The detection limits for BB and Tz were 2.0×10(-9) M (1.6 ng/mL) and 3.3×10(-9) M (1.8 ng/mL) at an S/N of 3, respectively. This electrode showed good reproducibility, stability, and reusability. The proposed method was successfully applied in the simultaneous determination of BB and Tz in a soft drink with satisfactory results.

  19. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  20. Hierarchically porous graphene in natural graphitic globules from silicate magmatic rocks

    OpenAIRE

    PONOMARCHUK V.A.; TITOV A.T.; MOROZ T.N.; PYRYAEV A.N.; PONOMARCHUK A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally-occurring nanostructured graphites from silicate magmatic rocks, which are rare, were characterized using electron microscope and X-ray spectroscopy. This graphite consists of porous carbon, nanographite layers, microand nanotubes. The porous carbon is classified as macroporous matter with a small amount of mezopores. Evidence for the unusual properties of porous carbon are given: nanographite layers are created at the exposed surface of sample and the nanotubes occurs in the bulk o...

  1. Chapter 8: Exponential experiments on graphite moderated lattices fuelled by natural uranium tubes containing cylindrical graphite cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out using a fuel element comprising a 2.75 in. o.d./2.40 in. i.d. natural uranium tube containing a graphite core of diameter 2.0 in. Values of material buckling and migration area asymmetry for lattices at 7 in., 8 in. and 8/2 in. pitch have been obtained, and correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) to derive an effective resonance integral for the cored element. By comparison with the resonance integral for the same fuel tube without a core, a value for the constant 'γ' of the theory of Stace (1959) is obtained. (author)

  2. One-step electrochemically expanded graphite foil for flexible all-solid supercapacitor with high rate performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Han-Yu; Yu, Yao; Liu, Lang; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Flexible solid-state supercapacitors (SSCs) as a candidate for energy storage source, have been attracting intensive attention. Graphene-based materials for SSCs have been widely studied. However, most reported preparation methods for graphene-based materials are energy-consuming, time-consuming and environmentally hazardous, what’s more, the assembling of SSCs need additives, such as current collectors, flexible substrates. So, it is necessary to develop simpler and greener attempts to achieve high-performance, cost-effective, substrates/additives-free and flexible electrodes for SSC devices. Herein, we reported a green and facile one-step process of electrochemical oxidation and expansion in salt solution to activate graphite foil (GF) for fabricating expanded graphite foil (EGF). The EGF electrode with unique structure and high conductivity showed high supercapacitor performance of 65 mF cm −2 , remarkable rate-capability maintaining at a level of 80% even at a current density of 20 mA cm −2 and excellent cycling stability with ∼95% capacitance remaining after 10000 cycles at a current density of 20 mA cm −2 . Moreover, a symmetric flexible all-solid supercapacitor (SSC) device was integrated using EGFs without any current collectors and additives. The flexible EGF-based device showed a high capacitance capacity of 30.5 mF cm −2 , excellent rate performance and good cycle stability which make it holds promise for applications in flexible, portable and wearable electronic devices.

  3. Cost-efficient high performance polyetheretherketone/expanded graphite nanocomposites with high conductivity for EMI shielding application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, R.K., E-mail: rkgoyal72@yahoo.co.in

    2013-10-01

    The cost efficient expanded graphite (EG) filled polyetheretherketone (PEEK) nanocomposites were prepared by hot pressing, which exhibited an electrical conductivity percolation threshold of 1.5 wt%. The electrical conductivity of the 1.5 wt% nanocomposite increased approximately eleven orders of magnitude than that of pure PEEK. The conductivities of 5 wt% and 10 wt% nanocomposites were increased to about 3.24 S cm{sup −1} and 12.3 S cm{sup −1}, respectively. Scanning electron microscope showed 3-dimensional conductive network of EG across the PEEK matrix. The significant increase in electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites leads to the tremendous increase in electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness. - Highlights: • A sharp increase in conductivity was observed at 1.5 wt% EG content. • The conductivity of 10 wt% nanocomposites is about 12.3 S cm{sup −1}. • This conductivity is the highest among reported value in literature.

  4. Untreated Natural Graphite as a Graphene Source for High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Simón

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene nanosheets (GNS are synthesized from untreated natural graphite (NG for use as electroactive materials in Li-ion batteries (LIBs, which avoids the pollution-generating steps of purifying graphite. Through a modified Hummer method and subsequent thermal exfoliation, graphitic oxide and graphene were synthesized and characterized structurally, morphologically and chemically. Untreated natural graphite samples contain 45–50% carbon by weight; the rest is composed of different elements such as aluminium, calcium, iron, silicon and oxygen, which are present as calcium carbonate and silicates of aluminium and iron. Our results confirm that in the GO and GNS synthesized, calcium is removed due to oxidation, though other impurities are maintained because they are not affected by the synthesis. Despite the remaining mineral phases, the energy storage capacity of GNS electrodes is very promising. In addition, an electrochemical comparison between GNS and NG demonstrated that the specific capacity in GNS is higher during the whole cycling process, 770 mA·g−1 at 100th cycle, which is twice that of graphite.

  5. Electron transfer kinetics on natural crystals of MoS2 and graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velický, Matěj; Bissett, Mark A; Toth, Peter S; Patten, Hollie V; Worrall, Stephen D; Rodgers, Andrew N J; Hill, Ernie W; Kinloch, Ian A; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Georgiou, Thanasis; Britnell, Liam; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2015-07-21

    Here, we evaluate the electrochemical performance of sparsely studied natural crystals of molybdenite and graphite, which have increasingly been used for fabrication of next generation monolayer molybdenum disulphide and graphene energy storage devices. Heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics of several redox mediators, including Fe(CN)6(3-/4-), Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) and IrCl6(2-/3-) are determined using voltammetry in a micro-droplet cell. The kinetics on both materials are studied as a function of surface defectiveness, surface ageing, applied potential and illumination. We find that the basal planes of both natural MoS2 and graphite show significant electroactivity, but a large decrease in electron transfer kinetics is observed on atmosphere-aged surfaces in comparison to in situ freshly cleaved surfaces of both materials. This is attributed to surface oxidation and adsorption of airborne contaminants at the surface exposed to an ambient environment. In contrast to semimetallic graphite, the electrode kinetics on semiconducting MoS2 are strongly dependent on the surface illumination and applied potential. Furthermore, while visibly present defects/cracks do not significantly affect the response of graphite, the kinetics on MoS2 systematically accelerate with small increase in disorder. These findings have direct implications for use of MoS2 and graphene/graphite as electrode materials in electrochemistry-related applications.

  6. Comparative study of organovermiculites using natural and expanded vermiculite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, L.S.; Hudson, A.B.; Francisco, K.S.; Romualdo, R.M.; Gelmires, A.N.; Lisiane, N.L.S.

    2012-01-01

    Organovermiculites were obtained using vermiculite clay in its natural state and expanded in order to use these new materials in the adsorption of organic contaminants from water. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were performed to obtain confirmation of these organovermiculites. Foster swelling and sorption tests were used to test the compatibility between the treated clay and organic solvents. The organophilization process has provided an increase in basal distance of vermiculite and it was observed an expressive increase in distance between the clay layers. The organovermiculite showed adsorption capacity by organic solvents tested, the best results were observed for diesel oil. (author)

  7. Advanced Surface and Microstructural Characterization of Natural Graphite Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Yoon, Steve [A123 Systems, Inc.; Denlinger, Matthew [A123 Systems, Inc.; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Natural graphite powders were subjected to a series of thermal treatments in order to improve the anode irreversible capacity loss (ICL) and capacity retention during long-term cycling of lithium ion batteries. A baseline thermal treatment in inert Ar or N2 atmosphere was compared to cases with a proprietary additive to the furnace gas environment. This additive substantially altered the surface chemistry of the natural graphite powders and resulted in significantly improved long-term cycling performance of the lithium ion batteries over the commercial natural graphite baseline. Different heat-treatment temperatures were investigated ranging from 950-2900 C with the intent of achieving the desired long-term cycling performance with as low of a maximum temperature and thermal budget as possible. A detailed summary of the characterization data is also presented, which includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS). This characterization data was correlated to the observed capacity fade improvements over the course of long-term cycling at high charge-discharge rates in full lithium-ion coin cells. It is believed that the long-term performance improvements are a result of forming a more stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the anode graphite surfaces, which is directly related to the surface chemistry modifications imparted by the proprietary gas environment during thermal treatment.

  8. Effect of additional nickel on crystallization degree evolution of expanded graphite during ball-milling and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liqin; Yue Xueqing; Zhang Fucheng; Zhang Ruijun

    2010-01-01

    Expanded graphite (EG) and a mixture of EG and nickel (EG-Ni system) were ball-milled and subsequently annealed, respectively. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After 100 h milling, the average crystallite thickness (L c ) of EG and EG-Ni system deceases from 14.5 to 8.0 and 9.6 nm, respectively, while the interlayer spacing (d 002 ) increases from 0.3341 to 0.3371 and 0.3348 nm, respectively. It can be concluded that ball-milling decreases the crystallization degree of EG, while the additional nickel restrains this process. For the samples ball-milled for 80 h, the disorder parameter I D /(I D + I G ) ratio of EG and EG-Ni system is in the range of 20.7-55.8% and 31.7-45.8%, respectively, implying that the presence of nickel is beneficial to more homogeneous ball-milling of EG. When the samples after ball-milling for 80 h were annealed for 4 h, the average crystallite thickness of EG and EG-Ni system increases from 8.5 to 9.0 nm and from 11.8 to 15.5 nm, respectively. It is deduced that annealing improves the crystallization degree of ball-milled EG, and the additional nickel is helpful for this process.

  9. Experimental Investigation on Thermal Management of Electric Vehicle Battery Module with Paraffin/Expanded Graphite Composite Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangyun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature has to be controlled adequately to maintain the electric vehicles (EVs within a safety range. Using paraffin as the heat dissipation source to control the temperature rise is developed. And the expanded graphite (EG is applied to improve the thermal conductivity. In this study, the paraffin and EG composite phase change material (PCM was prepared and characterized. And then, the composite PCM have been applied in the 42110 LiFePO4 battery module (48 V/10 Ah for experimental research. Different discharge rate and pulse experiments were carried out at various working conditions, including room temperature (25°C, high temperature (35°C, and low temperature (−20°C. Furthermore, in order to obtain the practical loading test data, a battery pack with the similar specifications by 2S∗2P with PCM-based modules were installed in the EVs for various practical road experiments including the flat ground, 5°, 10°, and 20° slope. Testing results indicated that the PCM cooling system can control the peak temperature under 42°C and balance the maximum temperature difference within 5°C. Even in extreme high-discharge pulse current process, peak temperature can be controlled within 50°C. The aforementioned results exhibit that PCM cooling in battery thermal management has promising advantages over traditional air cooling.

  10. Synthesis and CO2 adsorption study of modified MOF-5 with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and expandable graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, Sami; Bustam, M. A.; Shariff, A. M.; Elkhalifah, Ali E. I.; Murshid, G.; Riaz, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    MOF-5 was synthesized by solvothermal method and its reactivation under anhydrous conditions. This research is conducted to investigate the effect of MOF-5 and MOF-5 modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and expandable graphite (EG) on the performance of CO 2 adsorption. The synthesized MOFs were characterized using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for surface morphology, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for thermal stability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for crystals plane, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) for surface area and CO 2 adsorption. The result had showed that the modified MOF-5 enhanced the CO 2 adsorption compared to the pure MOF-5. The increment in the CO 2 uptake capacities of MOF materials was attributed to the decrease in the pore size and enhancement of micropore volume of MOF-5 by multi-walled carbon nanotube and EG incorporation. The BET surface area of the synthesized MOF-5@MWCNTs is more than MOF-5. The CO 2 sorption capacities of MOF-5 and MOF-5@MWCNTs were observed to increase from 0.00008 to 0.00048 mol g-1 at 298 K and 1 bar. The modified MOF-5@MWCNTs resulted in the highest CO 2 adsorption followed by the modified MOF-5@ EG and lastly, MOF-5

  11. LiFePO4/polymer/natural graphite: low cost Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghib, K.; Striebel, K.; Guerfi, A.; Shim, J.; Armand, M.; Gauthier, M

    2004-01-01

    The aging and performance of natural graphite/PEO-based gel electrolyte/LiFePO 4 cells are reported. The gel polymer electrolytes were produced by electron-beam irradiation and then soaked in a liquid electrolyte. The natural graphite anode in gel electrolyte containing LiBF4-EC/GBL exhibited high reversible capacity (345 mAh/g) and high coulombic efficiency (91%). The LiFePO 4 cathode in the same gel-polymer exhibited a reversible capacity of 160 mAh/g and 93% coulombic efficiency. Better performance was obtained at high-rate discharge with 6% carbon additive in the cathode, however the graphite anode performance suffers at high rate. The Li-ion gel polymer battery shows a capacity fade of 13% after 180 cycles and has poor performance at low temperature due to low diffusion of the lithium to the graphite in the GBL system. The LiFePO 4 /gel/Li system has an excellent rate capacity. LiFePO 4 cathode material is suitable for HEV application

  12. Exfoliation approach for preparing high conductive reduced graphite oxide and its application in natural rubber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wipatkrut, Pattharaporn [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Poompradub, Sirilux, E-mail: sirilux.p@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center for Petroleum, Petrochemical and Advanced Material, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite waste was exfoliated by oxidation and chemical and thermal reduction. • The obtained graphene-T was a single layer sheet with a high electrical conductivity. • Graphene-T incorporation at 5 phr improved the electrical conductivity of NR. • Graphene-T incorporation at 5–25 phr improved the mechanical properties of NR. - Abstract: High conductivity reduced graphite oxide (RGO) was prepared by exfoliation of graphite waste from the metal smelting industry. To improve the surface properties of the RGO, the graphite oxide obtained based on Hummers’ method was reduced by L-ascorbic acid to give RGOV, which was then subjected to thermal reduction to obtain RGOT. The residual oxygen-containing groups in RGOV were almost completely removed by the thermal reduction and the conjugated graphene networks were restored in RGOT. The effect of the RGOT content in natural rubber (NR) on the cure, electrical and mechanical properties of the NR-RGOT (NG) composites was evaluated. The electrical conductivity of NR was increased by the inclusion of RGOT at a percolation threshold of 5 phr, with an electrical conductivity of 8.71 × 10{sup −6} S/m. The mechanical properties, i.e., the modulus, tensile strength and hardness, of NG were comparable with those of conductive carbon black filled NR ones.

  13. Experimental and numerical study of heat transfer performance of nitrate/expanded graphite composite PCM for solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, X.; Zhang, P.; Li, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity of nitrate/EG composite was accurately measured by considering thermal contact resistance. • Heat storage and retrieval tests were conducted with binary nitrates and nitrates/EG composites. • A comprehensive model was built to interpret the heat transfer characteristics. - Abstract: Eutectic molten salt can be used as the latent thermal energy storage medium in solar energy applications. Nitrates and their binary mixtures are suitable phase change material (PCM) for solar energy applications in middle-temperature-range of 200–300 °C. In the present study, binary nitrate (50 wt.% NaNO_3, 50 wt.% KNO_3) with a melting temperature of about 220 °C was employed as the PCM, and expanded graphite (EG) with the mass fraction of 5%, 10% or 20% was used to enhance the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivities of pure nitrates and nitrate/EG shape-stabilized composites were measured with a steady-state test rig firstly. Results showed that the addition of EG significantly enhanced the thermal conductivities, e.g., the thermal conductivities of sodium nitrate/20 wt.% EG composite PCM were measured to be 6.66–7.70 W/(m K) in the temperature range of 20–120 °C, indicating about seven times larger than those of pure sodium nitrate. Furthermore, pure binary nitrate and nitrate/EG composite PCM were encapsulated in a cylindrical storage unit with a diameter of 70.0 mm and a length of 280.0 mm. Heat storage and retrieval tests were conducted extensively at different heating temperatures of 250 °C, 260 °C and 270 °C, and different cooling temperatures of 30 °C, 70 °C and 110 °C. Time-durations from temperature evolutions showed that both the melting and solidification processes were accelerated by EG, and the heat transfer characteristics were interpreted by the numerical analysis based on enthalpy–porosity and volume-of-fluid models. The evolution of nitrate/air interface caused by volume expansion ascended gradually

  14. Integral measurements of lattice properties in the natural uranium-graphite critical facility Marius; Mesures globales de reseaux a graphite dans l'empilement critique marius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A systematic study of natural uranium-graphite lattices has been undertaken in the critical facility MARIUS, which was built in 1959 in Marcoule. Integral measurement of lattice properties are carried out by the progressive replacement method. This report describes the experimental methods, the analysis of the experiments and the results obtained for lattices with pitches ranging from 192 to 317 mm and fuel elements with cross sections ranging from 6 to 20 cm{sup 2}. The principles of correlation of the results are also outlined. Additional experimental results are also given, pertaining to the determination of the anisotropy, of both the axial and the radial migration areas, and of the age in graphite. (author) [French] L'empilement critique MARIUS, construit en 1959 a Marcoule, a ete utilise pour l'etude systematique des reseaux a graphite-uranium naturel. Les mesures globales de reseaux sont faites par la methode de remplacement progressif. On decrit ici les methodes experimentales utilisees pour ces mesures globales, les principes du depouillement et les resultats obtenus pour des pas de 192 a 317 mm et des combustibles de 6 a 20 cm{sup 2} d'uranium naturel. On donne d'autre part le principe de correlation des mesures. Un certain nombre de resultats experimentaux complementaires sont donnes, en permettant de determiner l'anisotropie, les aires de migration axiale et radiale, l'age dans le graphite. (auteur)

  15. Characterization and application of expanded graphite modified with phosphoric acid and glucose for the removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hai; Guo, Zizhang; Kang, Yan; Li, Yiran; Xu, Jingtao

    2015-12-01

    Three kinds of modified expanded graphite (EG), impregnated with phosphoric acid (H3PO4) (P-EG), impregnated with glucose (G-EG), and impregnated with H3PO4 and glucose (G-P-EG), were prepared under a low temperature (150 °C). The adsorption capacity of G-P-EG (Qm = 7.016 mg/g) is much higher than original expanded graphite (EG Qm = 0.423 mg/g) and other two kinds of modified expanded graphite (P-EG Qm = 0.770 mg/g; G-EG Qm = 0.507 mg/g). The physicochemical properties of EG and G-P-EG were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, Boehm's titration and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). EG exhibited higher values of BET surface area (11.357 m2/g) and total pore volume (0.0303 cm3/g) than that of G-P-EG (4.808 m3/g and 0.0109 cm3/g). However, the results of Bohm's titration and XPS showed that G-P-EG contained more surface oxygen-containing functional groups. The Ni(II) adsorption equilibrium data agreed well with the Langmuir model. And the experimental data of EG and G-P-EG fitted better by pseudo-second order model. Based on the results of batch adsorption experiments and XPS analysis, there were several possible mechanisms for Ni(II) adsorption on the G-P-EG, including chemical adsorption, cation exchange, electrostatic attraction and surface complication.

  16. Characterization and application of expanded graphite modified with phosphoric acid and glucose for the removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Li [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Jian, E-mail: zhangjian00@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Xu, Xiaoli [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Jie [Shandong Experimental High School, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Hai; Guo, Zizhang; Kang, Yan; Li, Yiran [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Xu, Jingtao [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Glucose and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, single or together, were used to modify expanded graphite. • The modified condition was at a low temperature (150 °C). • The properties of EG and the highest adsorption ability modified EG were compared. • G-P-EG has the highest adsorption ability, which is much higher than that of EG. - Abstract: Three kinds of modified expanded graphite (EG), impregnated with phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) (P-EG), impregnated with glucose (G-EG), and impregnated with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and glucose (G-P-EG), were prepared under a low temperature (150 °C). The adsorption capacity of G-P-EG (Q{sub m} = 7.016 mg/g) is much higher than original expanded graphite (EG Q{sub m} = 0.423 mg/g) and other two kinds of modified expanded graphite (P-EG Q{sub m} = 0.770 mg/g; G-EG Q{sub m} = 0.507 mg/g). The physicochemical properties of EG and G-P-EG were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, Boehm's titration and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). EG exhibited higher values of BET surface area (11.357 m{sup 2}/g) and total pore volume (0.0303 cm{sup 3}/g) than that of G-P-EG (4.808 m{sup 3}/g and 0.0109 cm{sup 3}/g). However, the results of Bohm's titration and XPS showed that G-P-EG contained more surface oxygen-containing functional groups. The Ni(II) adsorption equilibrium data agreed well with the Langmuir model. And the experimental data of EG and G-P-EG fitted better by pseudo-second order model. Based on the results of batch adsorption experiments and XPS analysis, there were several possible mechanisms for Ni(II) adsorption on the G-P-EG, including chemical adsorption, cation exchange, electrostatic attraction and surface complication.

  17. Characterization and application of expanded graphite modified with phosphoric acid and glucose for the removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hai; Guo, Zizhang; Kang, Yan; Li, Yiran; Xu, Jingtao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Glucose and H 3 PO 4 , single or together, were used to modify expanded graphite. • The modified condition was at a low temperature (150 °C). • The properties of EG and the highest adsorption ability modified EG were compared. • G-P-EG has the highest adsorption ability, which is much higher than that of EG. - Abstract: Three kinds of modified expanded graphite (EG), impregnated with phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) (P-EG), impregnated with glucose (G-EG), and impregnated with H 3 PO 4 and glucose (G-P-EG), were prepared under a low temperature (150 °C). The adsorption capacity of G-P-EG (Q m = 7.016 mg/g) is much higher than original expanded graphite (EG Q m = 0.423 mg/g) and other two kinds of modified expanded graphite (P-EG Q m = 0.770 mg/g; G-EG Q m = 0.507 mg/g). The physicochemical properties of EG and G-P-EG were characterized by N 2 adsorption/desorption, Boehm's titration and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). EG exhibited higher values of BET surface area (11.357 m 2 /g) and total pore volume (0.0303 cm 3 /g) than that of G-P-EG (4.808 m 3 /g and 0.0109 cm 3 /g). However, the results of Bohm's titration and XPS showed that G-P-EG contained more surface oxygen-containing functional groups. The Ni(II) adsorption equilibrium data agreed well with the Langmuir model. And the experimental data of EG and G-P-EG fitted better by pseudo-second order model. Based on the results of batch adsorption experiments and XPS analysis, there were several possible mechanisms for Ni(II) adsorption on the G-P-EG, including chemical adsorption, cation exchange, electrostatic attraction and surface complication.

  18. Combination Carbon Nanotubes with Graphene Modified Natural Graphite and Its Electrochemical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Ling-feng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The CNTs/rGO/NG composite lithiumion battery anode material was synthesized by thermal reducing, using graphene oxide (GO and carbon nanotubes (CNTs as precursors for a 5 ∶ 3 proportion. The morphology, structure, and electrochemical performance of the composite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy(SEM, X-ray diffractometry(XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR and electrochemical measurements. The results show that reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes form a perfect three-dimensional network structure on the surface of natural graphite. CNTs/rGO/NG composite has good rate performance and cycle life,compared with pure natural graphite.The initial discharge capacity of designed anode is 479mAh/g at 0.1C, the reversible capacity up to 473mAh/g after 100 cycles,the capacity is still 439.5mAh/g, the capacity retention rate is 92%,and the capacity is 457, 433, 394mAh/g at 0.5, 1, 5C, respectively.

  19. Paraffin/expanded graphite phase change composites with enhanced thermal conductivity prepared by implanted β-SiC nanowires with chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaoyu; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Huang, Zhaohui; Liu, Silin; Zhang, Weiyi; Liu, Yan'gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Fang, Minghao; Min, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Expanded graphite/β-SiC nanowires composites (ESNC) were prepared through chemical vapor deposition, and paraffin/expanded graphite/β-SiC nanowires composites (PESNC) were made through vacuum impregnation to overcome liquid leakage during phase transition and enhance the thermal conductivity of paraffin. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed no chemical interactions between the paraffin and ESNC. Differential scanning calorimetry estimated the temperature and latent heat of PESNC during melting to 45.73 °C and 124.31 J g-1, respectively. The respective values of these quantities during freezing were recorded as 48.93 °C and 124.14 J g-1. The thermal conductivity of PESNC was estimated to 0.75 W mK-1, which was 3.26-folds that of pure paraffin (0.23 W mK-1). PESNC perfectly maintained its phase transition after 200 melting-freezing cycles. The resulting ideal thermal conductivity, good chemical stability, thermal properties and thermal reliability of PESNC are promising for use in energy efficient buildings and solar energy systems.

  20. Thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material/expanded graphite composite across the phase change temperature range and a novel thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Ziye; Chen, Jiajie; Xu, Tao; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of RT44HC by 20–60 times. • Thermal conductivity of PCM/EG composites keeps constant before/after melting. • Thermal conductivity of PCMs nearly doubled during phase changing. • Thermal conductivity of composite PCM increases with density and percentage of EG. • The simple model predicts thermal conductivity of EG-based composites accurately. - Abstract: This work studies factors that affect the thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material (PCM), RT44HC/expanded graphite (EG) composite, which include: EG mass fraction, composite PCM density and temperature. The increase of EG mass fraction and bulk density will both enhance thermal conductivity of composite PCMs, by up to 60 times. Thermal conductivity of RT44HC/EG composites remains independent on temperature outside the phase change range (40–45 °C), but nearly doubles during the phase change. The narrow temperature change during the phase change allows the maximum heat flux or minimum temperature for heat source if attaching PCMs to a first (constant temperature) or second (constant heat flux) thermal boundary. At last, a simple thermal conductivity model for EG-based composites is put forward, based on only two parameters: mass fraction of EG and bulk density of the composite. This model is validated with experiment data presented in this paper and in literature, showing this model has general applicability to any composite of EG and poor thermal conductive materials

  1. Study of the morphology of corrosion features of natural graphite oxidised by dry and humid air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senevat, Jean

    1965-12-01

    The author reports a study which aimed at highlighting the morphology differences between corrosion features which affect flakes of natural graphite oxidised by dry air and by humid air. The study is based on observations made by optical and transmission electronic microscopy, this last one being performed on replicates. As the so-called 'Hennig' replicates did not result in a sufficient resolution of corrosion feature details, another method has been developed. Three classes of samples (in relationship with the rate of impurities present in samples) have been studied. Flakes have thus been sorted and each flake has then been oxidised at different wear rates. This highlights the influence of damages created by impurities in the lattice [fr

  2. Preparation and properties of palmitic-stearic acid eutectic mixture/expanded graphite composite as phase change material for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yuan, Yanping; Du, Yanxia; Cao, Xiaoling; Yuan, Yaguang

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite PCM (phase change material) with PA-SA (palmitic-stearic acid) eutectic mixture as PCM and EG (expanded graphite) as supporting material was prepared. The optimum absorption ratio of PA-SA/EG (Palmitic-stearic acid/expanded graphite) composite PCM was determined as PA-SA:EG = 13:1 (by mass). Scanning electron microscope and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy results show that PA-SA was uniformly distributed in the porous network structure of EG due to the physical action. Thermal property and thermal stability of the PA-SA/EG composite PCM were characterized by DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and TGA (thermogravimetric analysis). DSC results indicated that the melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of PA-SA/EG were measured as 53.89 °C and 54.37 °C, and 166.27 J/g and 166.13 J/g. TGA test results revealed that PA-SA/EG had a good thermal stability in working temperature range. Thermal cycling test results showed PA-SA/EG had a good thermal reliability after 720 thermal cycles. Thermal conductivity of the composite PCM was measured as 2.51 W/m K, much higher than that of PA-SA. The thermal energy storage and release rates of PA-SA/EG were also increased due to the high thermal conductivity of EG. In conclusion, the prepared PA-SA/EG composite PCM can be acted as a potential material for thermal energy storage due to the acceptable thermal properties, good thermal reliability and stability, high thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • PA-SA/EG (Palmitic-stearic acid/expanded graphite) composite PCM was prepared. • Optimum absorption ratio of PA-SA in EG was obtained as 13:1 (by mass). • Thermal conductivity and performance of PA-SA/EG have been significate improved. • PA-SA/EG has a good thermal reliability and thermal stability

  3. Chapter 5: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. II: Correlation of results with the method of Syrett (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    The results are given of exponential experiments on graphite moderated systems with fuel elements consisting of single rods and tubes of natural uranium metal. A correlation is given with the method of calculation proposed by Syrett (1961) and new consistent values of neutron yield and effective resonance integral are derived. (author)

  4. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  5. In-situ confined formation of NiFe layered double hydroxide quantum dots in expanded graphite for active electrocatalytic oxygen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinxue; Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Yanfang; Liu, Qingyun; Quan, Zhenlan; Zhang, Xiao

    2018-06-01

    Development of noble-metal-free catalysts towards highly efficient electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is critical but challenging in the renewable energy area. Herein, we firstly embed NiFe LDHs quantum dots (QDs) into expanded graphite (NiFe LDHs/EG) via in-situ confined formation process. The interlayer spacing of EG layers acts as nanoreactors for spatially confined formation of NiFe LDHs QDs. The QDs supply huge catalytic sites for OER. The in-situ decoration endows the strong affinity between QDs with EG, thus inducing fast charge transfer. Based on the aforementioned benefits, the designed catalyst exhibits outstanding OER properties, in terms of small overpotential (220 mV required to generate 10 mA cm-2), low Tafel slope, and good durable stability, making it a promising candidate for inexpensive OER catalyst.

  6. Fine structure and spectral index measurements in natural uranium - graphite lattices; Mesures fines dans des reseaux a graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogne, F; Journet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The experiments described in this report have been carried out for the most part in the critical facility MARIUS, and a few during the start up of the EDF-1 power reactor. The first part deals with the fine structure measurements made in various lattices and with their analysis. Integration over the neutron spectrum of the mono-kinetic disadvantage factor derived by the A.B.H method yields results in good agreement with the experiments. The second part deals with spectral indexes measurements (Pu/U, In/Mn) made at room temperature in MARIUS. Comparison are made of experiments with calculations using various thermalization models. Experiments carried out at higher temperatures in EDF-1 are also described. (authors) [French] Les mesures decrites dans ce rapport ont ete faites pour la plupart dans l'empilement critique MARIUS sur des reseaux a graphite-uranium naturel. Une premiere partie traite des mesures de structure fine faites dans differents reseaux et de leur interpretation. On montre en particulier qu'une integration sur le spectre d'un calcul monocinetique type A.B.H. rend bien compte des experiences. Dans une deuxieme partie, on donne les resultats de mesures d'indices de spectre Pu/U et In/Mn faites sur des reseaux froids a MARIUS et leur comparaison avec les differents modeles de calculs de thermalisation. On donne egalement les resultats de quelques mesures en temperature effectuees lors du demarrage du reacteur EDF-1. (auteurs)

  7. Properties of form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide/expanded graphite phase change composites prepared by sol–gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Wu, Zhishen; Tan, Jinmiao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite PCM was prepared with sol–gel method. ► The thermal conductivity of SiO 2 /paraffin/EG is 94.7% higher than paraffin. ► The latent heat of paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite is 104.4 J/g. -- Abstract: A form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 )/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by sol–gel method. Silica gel acts as the supporting material and EG is used to increase the thermal conductivity. The mass fractions of silicon oxide and graphite are 20.8% and 7.2%, respectively. The composite PCM was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Thermal properties and thermal stability of the composite PCM were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The result shows that paraffin was well dispersed in the network of silica gel and there is no chemical reaction between them. The phase change temperature of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 27.53 °C and 27.72 °C, respectively. The latent heat of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 112.8 J/g and 104.4 J/g, respectively. The thermal conductivity of the SiO 2 /paraffin composite and the SiO 2 /paraffin/EG composite are 28.2% and 94.7% higher than that of paraffin.

  8. NATURAL GAS LIQUEFACTION UNITS ON THE BASE OF EXPANDER NITROGEN CYCLES

    OpenAIRE

    Кузьменко, И. Ф.; Передельский, В. А.; Довбиш, А. Л.

    2014-01-01

    It is necessary to create large-capacity LNG-units for natural gas peaks consumption shaving and also to expand liquefied natural gas (LNG) marketing. It is proposed to create such natural gas liquefaction units with the use of outer nitrogen cryogenic thermodynamic cycles. It is necessary to use turboexpander-compressor sets (TECS) in them for maximizing cycles efficiency. Different technological schemes of LNG-units including nitrogen cryogenic units with TECS from one to four have been exa...

  9. Organic free radicals and micropores in solid graphitic carbonaceous matter at the Oklo natural fission reactors, Gabon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigali, M.J.; Nagy, B.

    1997-01-01

    The presence, concentration, and distribution of organic free radicals as well as their association with specific surface areas and microporosities help characterize the evolution and behavior of the Oklo carbonaceous matter. Such information is necessary in order to evaluate uranium mineralization, liquid bitumen solidification, and radio nuclide containment at Oklo. In the Oklo ore deposits and natural fission reactors carbonaceous matter is often referred to as solid graphitic bitumen. The carbonaceous parts of the natural reactors may contain as much as 65.9% organic C by weight in heterogeneous distribution within the clay-rich matrix. The solid carbonaceous matter immobilized small uraninite crystals and some fission products enclosed in this uraninite and thereby facilitated radio nuclide containment in the reactors. Hence, the Oklo natural fission reactors are currently the subjects of detailed studies because they may be useful analogues to support performance assessment of radio nuclide containment at anthropogenic radioactive waste repository sites. Seven carbonaceous matter rich samples from the 1968 ± 50 Ma old natural fission reactors and the associated Oklo uranium ore deposit were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and by measurements of specific surface areas (BET method). Humic acid, fulvic acid, and fully crystalline graphite standards were also examined by ESR spectroscopy for comparison with the Oklo solid graphitic bitumens. With one exception, the ancient Oklo bitumens have higher organic free radical concentrations than the modem humic and fulvic acid samples. The presence of carbon free radicals in the graphite standard could not be determined due to the conductivity of this material. 72 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  10. Comparative analysis of calculations and experiment for uranium-graphite lattices with natural and slightly-enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, N.N.; Shchukin, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Three sets of experiments carried out at different times and in different laboratories on measuring the material parameter for uranium-graphite lattices using natural and slightly enriched uranium are analyzed. Comparison with the calculations by the TRIFOGR and MCU (the Monte Carlo method) codes reveals resonable agreement between the calculation and experiment (of the order of 0.4% in K eff ). 17 refs.; 3 tabs

  11. Assisted heterogeneous multinucleation and bubble growth in semicrystalline ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer/expanded graphite nanocomposite foams: Control of morphology and viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yousefzade

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite foams of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA reinforced by expanded graphite (EG were prepared using supercritical nitrogen in batch foaming process. Effects of EG particle size, crosslinking of EVA chains and foaming temperature on the cell morphology and foam viscoelastic properties were investigated. EG sheet surface interestingly provide multiple heterogeneous nucleation sites for bubbles. This role is considerably intensified by incorporating lower loadings of EG with higher aspect ratio. The amorphous and non-crosslinked domains of EVA matrix constitute denser bubble areas. Higher void fraction and more uniform cell structure is achieved for non-crosslinked EVA/EG nanocomposites foamed at higher temperatures. With regard to the structural variation, the void fraction of foam samples decreases with increasing the EG content. Storage and loss moduli were analyzed to study the viscoelastic properties of nanocomposite foams. Surprisingly, the foaming process of EVA results in a drastic reduction in loss and storage moduli regardless of whether the thermoplastic matrix contains EG nanofiller or not. For the EVA/EG foams with the same composition, the nanocomposite having higher void fraction shows relatively lower loss modulus and more restricted molecular movements. The study findings have verified that the dynamics of polymer chains varies after foaming EVA matrix in the presence of EG.

  12. Synthesis and CO{sub 2} adsorption study of modified MOF-5 with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and expandable graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Sami, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Bustam, M. A., E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Shariff, A. M., E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Elkhalifah, Ali E. I., E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Murshid, G., E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com; Riaz, Nadia, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: lkhlfh@gmail.com, E-mail: hmurshid@gmail.com, E-mail: nadiariazz@gmail.com [Research Center for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    MOF-5 was synthesized by solvothermal method and its reactivation under anhydrous conditions. This research is conducted to investigate the effect of MOF-5 and MOF-5 modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and expandable graphite (EG) on the performance of CO{sub 2} adsorption. The synthesized MOFs were characterized using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for surface morphology, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for thermal stability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for crystals plane, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) for surface area and CO{sub 2} adsorption. The result had showed that the modified MOF-5 enhanced the CO{sub 2} adsorption compared to the pure MOF-5. The increment in the CO{sub 2} uptake capacities of MOF materials was attributed to the decrease in the pore size and enhancement of micropore volume of MOF-5 by multi-walled carbon nanotube and EG incorporation. The BET surface area of the synthesized MOF-5@MWCNTs is more than MOF-5. The CO{sub 2} sorption capacities of MOF-5 and MOF-5@MWCNTs were observed to increase from 0.00008 to 0.00048 mol g-1 at 298 K and 1 bar. The modified MOF-5@MWCNTs resulted in the highest CO{sub 2} adsorption followed by the modified MOF-5@ EG and lastly, MOF-5.

  13. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Molecular-Bridged Expanded Graphite/Polyethylene Glycol Composite Phase Change Materials for Building Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Chen, Meizhu; Liu, Quantao; Wan, Jiuming; Hu, Jinxuan

    2018-05-16

    Using phase change materials (PCMs) in building envelopes became a reliable method to improve indoor comfort and reduce buildings' energy consumption. This research developed molecular-bridged expanded graphite (EG)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) composite PCMs (m-EPs) to conserve energy in buildings. The m-EPs were prepared through a vacuum absorption technique, and a titanate coupling agent was used to build a molecular bridge between EG and PEG. SEM, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), the leakage test, microcalorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were conducted to characterize the morphology, pore structure, absorbability, and modifying effects of the m-EPs. The phase change temperature, latent heat, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity of the m-EPs were determined by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), TGA, and a thermal constants analyzer. Results showed that the maximum mass ratio of PEG to EG without leakage was 1:7, and a stable connection was established in the m-EPs after modification. Compared with the unmodified EPs, the supercooling degree of the m-EPs reduced by about 3 °C, but the latent heats and initial decomposition temperatures increased by approximately 10% and 20 °C, respectively, which indicated an improvement in the thermal energy storage efficiency. The thermal conductivities of the m-EPs were 10 times higher than those of the pristine PEGs, which ensured a rapid responding to building temperature fluctuations.

  14. The influence of expanded graphite on thermal properties for paraffin/high density polyethylene/chlorinated paraffin/antimony trioxide as a flame retardant phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ping; Song Lei; Lu Hongdian; Wang Jian; Hu Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The influences of expanded graphite (EG) on the thermal properties of chlorinated paraffin (CP) and antimony trioxide (AT) on phase change material which bases on paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) are studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TGA-FTIR), microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC) and cone calorimeter (CONE) were used to evaluate the influence of EG on paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT system. The DSC results indicated that the latent heat value of PCM could be increased when the mass fraction of HDPE was decreased in the PCM, and EG could confine the molecular heat movement of paraffin. EG could improve the thermal stability and increase the char residue at high temperature for paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT hybrid. The volatilized products formed on thermal degradation of paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT with EG showed the release of CO 2 gas was hastened and increased, and the amount of combustible gases were decreased by TGA-FTIR analysis. The MCC and CONE results presented that the flame retardant efficiency of CP/AT could be improved by adding EG in paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT system.

  15. Chapter 3: Exponential experiments on graphite-moderated lattices fuelled with near-natural uranium metal rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Clarke, W.G.; Ashworth, F.P.O.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Exponential experiments have been carried out on graphite lattices fuelled by 1.2 in. diameter uranium metal rods at three near-natural U 235 compositions, 0.6 Co, 1.3 Co and 1.6 Co. The results, together with those already existing from earlier exponential or critical measurements on these and similar natural uranium rods, have been correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) and also with the modified form of this theory given in Vol.1, Ch. 7. (author)

  16. Some economic aspects of natural uranium graphite gas reactor types. Present status and trends of costs in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, J.; Tanguy, P.

    1964-01-01

    The first part of this report defines the economic advantages of natural uranium fuels, which are as follows: the restricted number and relatively simple fabrication processes of the fuel elements, the low cost per kWh of the finished product and the reasonable capital investments involved in this type of fuel cycle as compared to that of enriched uranium. All these factors combine to reduce the arbitrary nature of cost estimates, which is particularly marked in the case of enriched uranium due to the complexity of its cycle and the uncertainties of plutonium prices). Finally, the wide availability of yellowcake, as opposed to the present day virtual monopoly of isotope separation, and the low cost of natural uranium stockpiling, offer appreciable guarantees in the way of security of supply and economic and political independence as compared with the use of enriched uranium. As far as overall capital investments are concerned, it is shown that, although graphite-gas reactor costs are higher than those of light water reactors in certain capacity ranges, the situation becomes far less clear when we start taking into account, in the interest of national independence, the cost of nuclear fuel production equipment in the case of each of these types of reactor. Finally, the marginal cost of the power capacity of a graphite-gas reactor is low and its technological limitations have receded (owing particularly to the use of prestressed concrete). It is a well known fact that the trend is now towards larger power station units, which means that the rentability of natural uranium graphite reactors as compared to other types of reactors will become more and more pronounced. The second section aims at presenting a realistic short and medium term view of the fuel, running, and investment costs of French natural uranium graphite gas, reactors. Finally, the economic goals which this type of reactor can reach in the very near future are given. It is thus shown that considerable

  17. Photocatalytic self-cleaning poly(L-lactide) materials based on a hybrid between nanosized zinc oxide and expanded graphite or fullerene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virovska, Daniela [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Paneva, Dilyana, E-mail: panevad@polymer.bas.bg [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Manolova, Nevena [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Rashkov, Iliya, E-mail: rashkov@polymer.bas.bg [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Karashanova, Daniela [Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 109, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-03-01

    New self-cleaning materials of polymer fibers decorated with a hybrid between nanosized zinc oxide and expanded graphite (EG) or fullerene (C{sub 60}) were obtained. The new materials were prepared by applying electrospinning in conjunction with electrospraying. Poly(L-lactide) (PLA) was selected as a biocompatible and (bio)degradable polymer carrier. PLA solution was electrospun in combination with electrospraying of a suspension that contained the ZnO/EG or ZnO/C{sub 60} hybrid. Mats with different content of EG or C{sub 60} were obtained. The new materials were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The photocatalytic activity of the materials was evaluated by using model dyes. The formation of a hybrid between ZnO and EG led to enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of the mats at ZnO/EG weight ratios of 90/10 and 85/15. Increase in the photocatalytic activity of the ZnO-containing mats was also achieved by the formation of a hybrid between ZnO and C{sub 60} at a fullerene content of 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% in respect to ZnO weight. The new materials exhibited antibacterial activity as evidenced by the performed studies against Staphylococcus aureus. - Highlights: • New self-cleaning materials are fabricated by electrospinning/electrospraying. • PLA fibers decorated with nanosized ZnO/EG or ZnO/C{sub 60} hybrid are obtained. • Their photocatalytic activity is enhanced as compared to fibers with bare ZnO. • The new materials can be used repeatedly for degradation of MB and RR dyes. • The new self-cleaning materials exhibit antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

  18. Photocatalytic self-cleaning poly(L-lactide) materials based on a hybrid between nanosized zinc oxide and expanded graphite or fullerene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virovska, Daniela; Paneva, Dilyana; Manolova, Nevena; Rashkov, Iliya; Karashanova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    New self-cleaning materials of polymer fibers decorated with a hybrid between nanosized zinc oxide and expanded graphite (EG) or fullerene (C_6_0) were obtained. The new materials were prepared by applying electrospinning in conjunction with electrospraying. Poly(L-lactide) (PLA) was selected as a biocompatible and (bio)degradable polymer carrier. PLA solution was electrospun in combination with electrospraying of a suspension that contained the ZnO/EG or ZnO/C_6_0 hybrid. Mats with different content of EG or C_6_0 were obtained. The new materials were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The photocatalytic activity of the materials was evaluated by using model dyes. The formation of a hybrid between ZnO and EG led to enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of the mats at ZnO/EG weight ratios of 90/10 and 85/15. Increase in the photocatalytic activity of the ZnO-containing mats was also achieved by the formation of a hybrid between ZnO and C_6_0 at a fullerene content of 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% in respect to ZnO weight. The new materials exhibited antibacterial activity as evidenced by the performed studies against Staphylococcus aureus. - Highlights: • New self-cleaning materials are fabricated by electrospinning/electrospraying. • PLA fibers decorated with nanosized ZnO/EG or ZnO/C_6_0 hybrid are obtained. • Their photocatalytic activity is enhanced as compared to fibers with bare ZnO. • The new materials can be used repeatedly for degradation of MB and RR dyes. • The new self-cleaning materials exhibit antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

  19. Chapter 4: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. I: Performance and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    A description is given of the methods used on the first BICEP stack for the performance and analysis of graphite exponential experiments. These differ in many respects from the methods formerly employed at A.E.R.E. The accuracy of the measurements has been increased, and the time taken to carry out and analyse an experiment has been reduced by approximately a factor of four. The following have contributed to the experimental work reported in this paper: J. R. Dyson, W. M. Holderay, R. M. Turner, S. D. R. Summers. (author)

  20. The natural history of Becker expandable breast implants: a single-center 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindali, Katia; Davis, Marcus; Mughal, Maleeha; Orkar, Kusu S

    2013-09-01

    Use of Becker expandable breast implants in single-stage breast surgery is a well-established technique; however, replacement with fixed-volume implants is common. The authors sought to analyze the long-term natural history of these implants over a wide range of surgical indications. A retrospective review of 330 consecutive patients who underwent 384 Becker expander breast reconstructions over a 10-year period in a dedicated plastic surgery unit was undertaken. Implant indication, Becker type, volume and site, complications, expander lifespan, and explant reasons were assessed. Two hundred twenty-eight patients (267 implants) and 102 patients (117 implants) underwent implantation for congenital deformities and breast cancer reconstruction, respectively. One hundred eighty-seven (48 percent) were explanted at a median period of 13.0 months (range, 9.0 to 26.0 months), 149 (39 percent) for aesthetic reasons and 38 (10 percent) for complications. Complication rates were higher in breast cancer reconstruction compared with congenital patients (19.6 percent versus 7.9 percent; p = 0.002), driven by an increased rate of wound complications (13.7 percent versus 4.4 percent; p = 0.003). Cancer-related surgery and advancing age were the only predictors of complication risk. The overall Becker expander retention rate was 24.9 percent and 46.8 percent at 150 months in the cancer reconstruction and congenital groups, respectively. Forty-seven percent of Becker implants were retained long term after congenital corrective surgery; only 25 percent were retained after postmastectomy reconstruction. Poor aesthetics was driving the exchange for fixed-volume implants, indicating that after breast cancer reconstruction, Becker expanders were being used as part of a two-stage reconstructive strategy.

  1. Synthesis of graphene nanoplatelets from peroxosulfate graphite intercalation compounds

    OpenAIRE

    MELEZHYK A.V.; TKACHEV A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite compound obtained by cold expansion of graphite intercalated with peroxodisulfuric acid was shown to allow the creation of graphene nanoplatelets with thickness of about 5-10 nm. The resulting graphene material contained surface oxide groups. The expanded graphite intercalation compound was exfoliated by ultrasound much easier than thermally expanded graphite. A mechanism for the cleavage of graphite to graphene nanoplatelets is proposed. It include...

  2. Expanding the Enzyme Universe: Accessing Non-Natural Reactions by Mechanism-Guided Directed Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renata, Hans; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-01-01

    High selectivities and exquisite control over reaction outcomes entice chemists to use biocatalysts in organic synthesis. However, many useful reactions are not accessible because they are not in nature’s known repertoire. We will use this review to outline an evolutionary approach to engineering enzymes to catalyze reactions not found in nature. We begin with examples of how nature has discovered new catalytic functions and how such evolutionary progressions have been recapitulated in the laboratory starting from extant enzymes. We then examine non-native enzyme activities that have been discovered and exploited for chemical synthesis, emphasizing reactions that do not have natural counterparts. The new functions have mechanistic parallels to the native reaction mechanisms that often manifest as catalytic promiscuity and the ability to convert from one function to the other with minimal mutation. We present examples of how non-natural activities have been improved by directed evolution, mimicking the process used by nature to create new catalysts. Examples of new enzyme functions include epoxide opening reactions with non-natural nucleophiles catalyzed by a laboratory-evolved halohydrin dehalogenase, cyclopropanation and other carbene transfer reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 variants, and non-natural modes of cyclization by a modified terpene synthase. Lastly, we describe discoveries of non-native catalytic functions that may provide future opportunities for expanding the enzyme universe. PMID:25649694

  3. Comparative study of organovermiculites using natural and expanded vermiculite; Estudo comparativo de organovermiculitas utilizando vermiculita natural e expandida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea, L.S.; Hudson, A.B.; Francisco, K.S.; Romualdo, R.M.; Gelmires, A.N.; Lisiane, N.L.S., E-mail: dea_lopes@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    Organovermiculites were obtained using vermiculite clay in its natural state and expanded in order to use these new materials in the adsorption of organic contaminants from water. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were performed to obtain confirmation of these organovermiculites. Foster swelling and sorption tests were used to test the compatibility between the treated clay and organic solvents. The organophilization process has provided an increase in basal distance of vermiculite and it was observed an expressive increase in distance between the clay layers. The organovermiculite showed adsorption capacity by organic solvents tested, the best results were observed for diesel oil. (author)

  4. Shock wave calibration of under-expanded natural gas fuel jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T. R.; Milton, B. E.

    2008-10-01

    Natural gas, a fuel abundant in nature, cannot be used by itself in conventional diesel engines because of its low cetane number. However, it can be used as the primary fuel with ignition by a pilot diesel spray. This is called dual-fuelling. The gas may be introduced either into the inlet manifold or, preferably, directly into the cylinder where it is injected as a short duration, intermittent, sonic jet. For accurate delivery in the latter case, a constant flow-rate from the injector is required into the constantly varying pressure in the cylinder. Thus, a sonic (choked) jet is required which is generally highly under-expanded. Immediately at the nozzle exit, a shock structure develops which can provide essential information about the downstream flow. This shock structure, generally referred to as a “barrel” shock, provides a key to understanding the full injection process. It is examined both experimentally and numerically in this paper.

  5. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  6. A preliminary definition of the parameters of an experimental natural - uranium, graphite - moderated, helium - cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltazar, O.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study of the technical characteristic of an experiment at 32 MWe power with a natural uconium, graphite-moderated, helium cooled reactor is described. The national participation and the use of reactor as an instrument for the technological development of future high temperature gas cooled reactor is considered in the choice of the reactor type. Considerations about nuclear power plants components based in extensive bibliography about similar english GCR reactor is presented. The main thermal, neutronic an static characteristic and in core management of the nuclear fuel is stablished. A simplified scheme of the secondary system and its thermodynamic performance is determined. A scheme of parameters calculation of the reactor type is defined based in the present capacity of calculation developed by Coordenadoria de Engenharia Nuclear and Centro de Processamento de Dados, IEA, Brazil [pt

  7. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  8. Ideal quantum gas in an expanding cavity: nature of nonadiabatic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Avazbaev, S K; Sobirov, Z A; Matrasulov, D U; Monnai, T

    2011-04-01

    We consider a quantum gas of noninteracting particles confined in the expanding cavity and investigate the nature of the nonadiabatic force which is generated from the gas and acts on the cavity wall. First, with use of the time-dependent canonical transformation, which transforms the expanding cavity to the nonexpanding one, we can define the force operator. Second, applying the perturbative theory, which works when the cavity wall begins to move at time origin, we find that the nonadiabatic force is quadratic in the wall velocity and thereby does not break the time-reversal symmetry, in contrast with general belief. Finally, using an assembly of the transitionless quantum states, we obtain the nonadiabatic force exactly. The exact result justifies the validity of both the definition of the force operator and the issue of the perturbative theory. The mysterious mechanism of nonadiabatic transition with the use of transitionless quantum states is also explained. The study is done for both cases of the hard- and soft-wall confinement with the time-dependent confining length. ©2011 American Physical Society

  9. ANT: Software for Generating and Evaluating Degenerate Codons for Natural and Expanded Genetic Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, Martin K M; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-21

    The Ambiguous Nucleotide Tool (ANT) is a desktop application that generates and evaluates degenerate codons. Degenerate codons are used to represent DNA positions that have multiple possible nucleotide alternatives. This is useful for protein engineering and directed evolution, where primers specified with degenerate codons are used as a basis for generating libraries of protein sequences. ANT is intuitive and can be used in a graphical user interface or by interacting with the code through a defined application programming interface. ANT comes with full support for nonstandard, user-defined, or expanded genetic codes (translation tables), which is important because synthetic biology is being applied to an ever widening range of natural and engineered organisms. The Python source code for ANT is freely distributed so that it may be used without restriction, modified, and incorporated in other software or custom data pipelines.

  10. The anti-canine distemper virus activities of ex vivo-expanded canine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yun; Shin, Dong-Jun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2015-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in induction of antiviral effects against various viruses of humans and animals. However, few data on NK cell activities during canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are available. Recently, we established a culture system allowing activation and expansion of canine non-B, non-T, large granular NK lymphocytes from PBMCs of normal dogs. In the present study, we explored the ability of such expanded NK cells to inhibit CDV infection in vitro. Cultured CD3-CD5-CD21- NK cells produced large amounts of IFN-γ, exhibited highly upregulated expression of mRNAs encoding NK-cell-associated receptors, and demonstrated strong natural killing activity against canine tumor cells. Although the expanded NK cells were dose-dependently cytotoxic to both normal and CDV-infected Vero cells, CDV infection rendered Vero cells more susceptible to NK cells. Pretreatment with anti-CDV serum from hyperimmunized dogs enhanced the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of NK cells against CDV-infected Vero cells. The culture supernatants of NK cells, added before or after infection, dose-dependently inhibited both CDV replication and development of CDV-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in Vero cells. Anti-IFN-γ antibody neutralized the inhibitory effects of NK cell culture supernatants on CDV replication and CPE induction in Vero cells. Such results emphasize the potential significance of NK cells in controlling CDV infection, and indicate that NK cells may play roles both during CDV infection and in combating such infections, under certain conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Frequency dependence of electrical properties of polyvinylidene fluoride/graphite electrode waste/natural carbon black composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insiyanda, D. R.; Indayaningsih, N.; Prihandoko, B.; Subhan, A.; Khaerudini, D. S.; Widodo, H.; Destyorini, F.; Chaer, A.

    2018-03-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) is a semi-crystalline thermoplastic material with remarkably high piezoelectric coefficient and an attractive polymer matrix for micro-composite with superior mechanical and electrical properties. The conductive filler is obtained from Graphite Electrode Waste (GEW) and Natural Carbon Black (NCB). The variation of composite content (%) of PVdF/NCB/GEW were 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 95/0/5, 95/2.5/2.5. This experiment employed dry dispersion method for material mixing. The materials were then moulded using hot press machine with compression parameters of P = 5.5 MPa, T = 150 °C, t = 60 minutes, A = 5×5×(0.2 - 0.4) cm3. The electrical conductivity properties of pure PVdF, as well as PVdF/GEW, PVdF/NCB, and PVdF/NCB/GEW composites were investigated in a frequency range of 100 to 100000 Hz. The PVdF/GEW sample obtained the highest electrical conductivity. It is concluded that GEW and NCB can be incorporated into PVdF as a conductive filler to increase the conductivity of conductive material composite without solvent.

  12. Simple Technique of Exfoliation and Dispersion of Multilayer Graphene from Natural Graphite by Ozone-Assisted Sonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zaw; Karthik, Paneer Selvam; Hada, Masaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-27

    Owing to its unique properties, graphene has attracted tremendous attention in many research fields. There is a great space to develop graphene synthesis techniques by an efficient and environmentally friendly approach. In this paper, we report a facile method to synthesize well-dispersed multilayer graphene (MLG) without using any chemical reagents or organic solvents. This was achieved by the ozone-assisted sonication of the natural graphite in a water medium. The frequency or number of ozone treatments plays an important role for the dispersion in the process. The possible mechanism of graphene exfoliation and the introduction of functional groups have been postulated. The experimental setup is unique for ozone treatment and enables the elimination of ozone off-gas. The heat generated by the dissipation of ultrasonic waves was used as it is, and no additional heat was supplied. The graphene dispersion was stable, and no evidence of aggregation was observed---even after several months. The characterization results show that well-dispersed MLG was successfully synthesized without any significant damage to the overall structure. The graphene obtained by this method has potential applications in composite materials, conductive coatings, energy storage, and electronic devices.

  13. Simple Technique of Exfoliation and Dispersion of Multilayer Graphene from Natural Graphite by Ozone-Assisted Sonication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaw Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its unique properties, graphene has attracted tremendous attention in many research fields. There is a great space to develop graphene synthesis techniques by an efficient and environmentally friendly approach. In this paper, we report a facile method to synthesize well-dispersed multilayer graphene (MLG without using any chemical reagents or organic solvents. This was achieved by the ozone-assisted sonication of the natural graphite in a water medium. The frequency or number of ozone treatments plays an important role for the dispersion in the process. The possible mechanism of graphene exfoliation and the introduction of functional groups have been postulated. The experimental setup is unique for ozone treatment and enables the elimination of ozone off-gas. The heat generated by the dissipation of ultrasonic waves was used as it is, and no additional heat was supplied. The graphene dispersion was stable, and no evidence of aggregation was observed---even after several months. The characterization results show that well-dispersed MLG was successfully synthesized without any significant damage to the overall structure. The graphene obtained by this method has potential applications in composite materials, conductive coatings, energy storage, and electronic devices.

  14. Influence of the Surfactant Nature on the Occurrence of Self-Assembly between Rubber Particles and Thermally Reduced Graphite Oxide during the Preparation of Natural Rubber Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Aguilar-Bolados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural rubber (NR latex consists of polymer particles charged negatively due to the adsorbed phospholipids and proteins molecules. The addition of stable aqueous suspension of thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO stabilized by ionic surfactants to NR latex can favor the occurrence of interaction between the stabilized TRGO and NR particles. Herein, the use of two surfactants of different nature, namely, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB, for the preparation of (TRGO/NR nanocomposites, is reported. Zeta potential and particle size measurements indicated that the use of DTAB as cationic surfactant results in the flocculation of NR particles and promoted the formation of ion-pair interactions between TRGO and the proteins and/or phospholipids present on the NR surface. This indicates that the use of DTAB can promote a self-assembly phenomenon between TRGO with adsorbed DTAB molecules and NR particles. The occurrence of self-assembly phenomenon allows obtaining homogenous dispersion of TRGO particles in the polymer matrix. The TRGO/NR nanocomposites prepared by the use of DTAB exhibited superior mechanical properties and excellent electrical conductivities reaching values of stress at 500% strain of 3.02 MPa and 10−4 S/cm, respectively.

  15. Effect of expanded graphite and PEI-co-Silicon Rubber on the thermo mechanical, morphological as well as rheological properties of in situ composites based on poly (ether imide) and liquid crystalline polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatui, Goutam, E-mail: hatui.goutam@gmail.com; Malas, Asish, E-mail: malasasish@gmail.com; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Dhibar, Saptarshi, E-mail: saptaaus2007@gmail.com; Kundu, Mrinal Kanti, E-mail: kanti.mrinal19@gmail.com; Kumar Das, Chapal, E-mail: chapal12@yahoo.co.in

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • PEI/LCP/ PEI-co-Silicon Rubber/EG and PEI/LCP/MWCNT nano composites are prepared by melt blending method. • The dispersions of acid modified expanded graphite were improved in presence of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. • Thermal stability was found to be highest for PLGC composite. • Storage modulus and Young’s modulus showed an upward trend with incorporation of only EG and EG in presence of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. • Among the nano composites PLGC has highest viscosity. - Abstract: Nanocomposites of polyether imide (PEI) and liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) with either MWCNT, Expanded Graphite (EG) or in combination of both EG and PEI-co-Silicon Rubber were prepared by melt blending process. The compatibility between the polymeric phases (PEI and LCP) was observed to be increased by the addition of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber while the only MWCNT added system (PLC) resulted in smaller LCP droplets. A continuous morphology was produced in presence of both PEI-co-Silicon Rubber and EG both added system (PLGR). This was due to the compatibilizing effect of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. FTIR analysis revealed interaction between PEI and LCP in presence of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. Remarkable increment of storage modulus was observed with the addition of EG and PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis showed better dispersion of multiple graphene layers of EG in presence of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber compatibilized system. Tensile and Young’s modulus both were highest for EG/ PEI-co-Silicon Rubber added system. This is due to flexible compatibilizing effect of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber which delayed the detachment of LCP domain from the PEI matrix and thus detains the fracture.

  16. Effect of expanded graphite and PEI-co-Silicon Rubber on the thermo mechanical, morphological as well as rheological properties of in situ composites based on poly (ether imide) and liquid crystalline polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatui, Goutam; Malas, Asish; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Dhibar, Saptarshi; Kundu, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar Das, Chapal

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PEI/LCP/ PEI-co-Silicon Rubber/EG and PEI/LCP/MWCNT nano composites are prepared by melt blending method. • The dispersions of acid modified expanded graphite were improved in presence of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. • Thermal stability was found to be highest for PLGC composite. • Storage modulus and Young’s modulus showed an upward trend with incorporation of only EG and EG in presence of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. • Among the nano composites PLGC has highest viscosity. - Abstract: Nanocomposites of polyether imide (PEI) and liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) with either MWCNT, Expanded Graphite (EG) or in combination of both EG and PEI-co-Silicon Rubber were prepared by melt blending process. The compatibility between the polymeric phases (PEI and LCP) was observed to be increased by the addition of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber while the only MWCNT added system (PLC) resulted in smaller LCP droplets. A continuous morphology was produced in presence of both PEI-co-Silicon Rubber and EG both added system (PLGR). This was due to the compatibilizing effect of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. FTIR analysis revealed interaction between PEI and LCP in presence of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. Remarkable increment of storage modulus was observed with the addition of EG and PEI-co-Silicon Rubber. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis showed better dispersion of multiple graphene layers of EG in presence of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber compatibilized system. Tensile and Young’s modulus both were highest for EG/ PEI-co-Silicon Rubber added system. This is due to flexible compatibilizing effect of PEI-co-Silicon Rubber which delayed the detachment of LCP domain from the PEI matrix and thus detains the fracture

  17. Utilization of waste expanded polystyrene: Blends with silica-filled natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekharan, Renju Vaikathusseril; Abraham, Beena Thattekatt; Thachil, Eby Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Tensile strength of the silica filled blend is comparable with silica filled NR. ► Modulus and compression set were the best for compatibilized NR/EPS blends. ► Tear strength has increased by 25% for compatibilized blends. ► A 5% waste EPS can be incorporated into NR compounds as a waste management measure. -- Abstract: Expanded polystyrene (EPS) constitutes a considerable part of thermoplastic waste in the environment in terms of volume. In this study, this waste material has been utilized for blending with silica-reinforced natural rubber (NR). The NR/EPS (35/5) blends were prepared by melt mixing in a Brabender Plasticorder. Since NR and EPS are incompatible and immiscible a method has been devised to improve compatibility. For this, EPS and NR were initially grafted with maleic anhydride (MA) using dicumyl peroxide (DCP) to give a graft copolymer. Grafting was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. This grafted blend was subsequently blended with more of NR during mill compounding. Morphological studies using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed better dispersion of EPS in the compatibilized blend compared to the noncompatibilized blend. By this technique, the tensile strength, elongation at break, modulus, tear strength, compression set and hardness of the blend were found to be either at par with or better than that of virgin silica filled NR compound. It is also noted that the thermal properties of the blends are equivalent with that of virgin NR. The study establishes the potential of this method for utilising waste EPS.

  18. Some economic aspects of natural uranium graphite gas reactor types. Present status and trends of costs in France; Quelques aspects economiques de la filiere uranium naturel - Graphite - gaz. Etat actuel et tendance des couts en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaussens, J; Tanguy, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Leo, B [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The first part of this report defines the economic advantages of natural uranium fuels, which are as follows: the restricted number and relatively simple fabrication processes of the fuel elements, the low cost per kWh of the finished product and the reasonable capital investments involved in this type of fuel cycle as compared to that of enriched uranium. All these factors combine to reduce the arbitrary nature of cost estimates, which is particularly marked in the case of enriched uranium due to the complexity of its cycle and the uncertainties of plutonium prices). Finally, the wide availability of yellowcake, as opposed to the present day virtual monopoly of isotope separation, and the low cost of natural uranium stockpiling, offer appreciable guarantees in the way of security of supply and economic and political independence as compared with the use of enriched uranium. As far as overall capital investments are concerned, it is shown that, although graphite-gas reactor costs are higher than those of light water reactors in certain capacity ranges, the situation becomes far less clear when we start taking into account, in the interest of national independence, the cost of nuclear fuel production equipment in the case of each of these types of reactor. Finally, the marginal cost of the power capacity of a graphite-gas reactor is low and its technological limitations have receded (owing particularly to the use of prestressed concrete). It is a well known fact that the trend is now towards larger power station units, which means that the rentability of natural uranium graphite reactors as compared to other types of reactors will become more and more pronounced. The second section aims at presenting a realistic short and medium term view of the fuel, running, and investment costs of French natural uranium graphite gas, reactors. Finally, the economic goals which this type of reactor can reach in the very near future are given. It is thus shown that considerable

  19. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  20. A novel vortex tube-based N2-expander liquefaction process for enhancing the energy efficiency of natural gas liquefaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qyyum Muhammad Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work unfolds a simple, safe, and environment-friendly energy efficient novel vortex tube-based natural gas liquefaction process (LNG. A vortex tube was introduced to the popular N2-expander liquefaction process to enhance the liquefaction efficiency. The process structure and condition were modified and optimized to take a potential advantage of the vortex tube on the natural gas liquefaction cycle. Two commercial simulators ANSYS® and Aspen HYSYS® were used to investigate the application of vortex tube in the refrigeration cycle of LNG process. The Computational fluid dynamics (CFD model was used to simulate the vortex tube with nitrogen (N2 as a working fluid. Subsequently, the results of the CFD model were embedded in the Aspen HYSYS® to validate the proposed LNG liquefaction process. The proposed natural gas liquefaction process was optimized using the knowledge-based optimization (KBO approach. The overall energy consumption was chosen as an objective function for optimization. The performance of the proposed liquefaction process was compared with the conventional N2-expander liquefaction process. The vortex tube-based LNG process showed a significant improvement of energy efficiency by 20% in comparison with the conventional N2-expander liquefaction process. This high energy efficiency was mainly due to the isentropic expansion of the vortex tube. It turned out that the high energy efficiency of vortex tube-based process is totally dependent on the refrigerant cold fraction, operating conditions as well as refrigerant cycle configurations.

  1. A novel vortex tube-based N2-expander liquefaction process for enhancing the energy efficiency of natural gas liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qyyum, Muhammad Abdul; Wei, Feng; Hussain, Arif; Ali, Wahid; Sehee, Oh; Lee, Moonyong

    2017-11-01

    This research work unfolds a simple, safe, and environment-friendly energy efficient novel vortex tube-based natural gas liquefaction process (LNG). A vortex tube was introduced to the popular N2-expander liquefaction process to enhance the liquefaction efficiency. The process structure and condition were modified and optimized to take a potential advantage of the vortex tube on the natural gas liquefaction cycle. Two commercial simulators ANSYS® and Aspen HYSYS® were used to investigate the application of vortex tube in the refrigeration cycle of LNG process. The Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used to simulate the vortex tube with nitrogen (N2) as a working fluid. Subsequently, the results of the CFD model were embedded in the Aspen HYSYS® to validate the proposed LNG liquefaction process. The proposed natural gas liquefaction process was optimized using the knowledge-based optimization (KBO) approach. The overall energy consumption was chosen as an objective function for optimization. The performance of the proposed liquefaction process was compared with the conventional N2-expander liquefaction process. The vortex tube-based LNG process showed a significant improvement of energy efficiency by 20% in comparison with the conventional N2-expander liquefaction process. This high energy efficiency was mainly due to the isentropic expansion of the vortex tube. It turned out that the high energy efficiency of vortex tube-based process is totally dependent on the refrigerant cold fraction, operating conditions as well as refrigerant cycle configurations.

  2. Expanding the enzyme universe: accessing non-natural reactions by mechanism-guided directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renata, Hans; Wang, Z Jane; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-03-09

    High selectivity and exquisite control over the outcome of reactions entice chemists to use biocatalysts in organic synthesis. However, many useful reactions are not accessible because they are not in nature's known repertoire. In this Review, we outline an evolutionary approach to engineering enzymes to catalyze reactions not found in nature. We begin with examples of how nature has discovered new catalytic functions and how such evolutionary progression has been recapitulated in the laboratory starting from extant enzymes. We then examine non-native enzyme activities that have been exploited for chemical synthesis, with an emphasis on reactions that do not have natural counterparts. Non-natural activities can be improved by directed evolution, thus mimicking the process used by nature to create new catalysts. Finally, we describe the discovery of non-native catalytic functions that may provide future opportunities for the expansion of the enzyme universe. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Environmental benefits and economic rationale of expanding the Italian natural gas private car fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballardin, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    There are several concerns which bring to consider natural gas as a viable alternative to liquid fuels in transport. First, natural gas allows the curbing of global pollution in this steadily growing industry. Indeed, decoupling greenhouse gas emissions from transport growth has become a major issue in tackling climate change. Second, a more extensive use of natural gas would relieve city air quality, which is presently at levels harmful of human health. Nonetheless, this is just one side of the coin. The other side entails building a refuelling station network, and this carries financial requirements. The financing fraction holds a pivotal role in deciding whether natural gas for automotive purposes is an efficient solution. The final aim of this work is, therefore, to compare the natural gas advantages, stemming from avoided global and local emission, with the economic rationale of engaging in supplementary model network investments. A system dynamics model underlies this study's economic reasoning and is taken as reference for quantitative assertions. The model, named CH 4 CleanerAir, contains data referring to two scenarios: a Business As Usual Scenario and an Expansion Scenario. Simulation runs in Expansion Scenario serve to understand how gaseous pollution diminishes and network investments rise when the natural gas-fuelled fleet, as share of the total fleet, increases. Are new infrastructures needs compatible with existing refuelling facilities? What is the extent by which the natural gas-fuelled fleet can actually reduce global and local emission? The scenarios' gap analysis lead to the work's final considerations. The sounder reductions of gaseous pollutants in the last years of the considered time lag make the overall assessment lean towards a positive evaluation of natural gas employment in this industry. The beneficial effects of increasing the natural gas-fuel-led fleet take some time to unfold, but they eventually prevail. This study shows how natural

  4. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  5. Expanding Canadian natural gas production will strengthen growth of LP-gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    In 1992, over 86% of Canadian propane and 70% of Canadian butane production originated in gas plants. Propane and butane production not recovered at gas plants is recovered in other processing facilities, primarily refineries and heavy oil upgraders. As a result, supplies of both products are largely tied to natural gas production, and the outlook for natural gas therefore provides the basis for any discussion on the outlook for gas processing and NGL industry infrastructure. The paper discusses gas processing, economies of scale, NGL supply, expected declines, industry structure and infrastructure, the two major centers of the Canadian NGL industry, new shippers, and required pipeline expansion

  6. Expanding the range of 'druggable' targets with natural product-based libraries: an academic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Renato A; Wurst, Jacqueline M; Tan, Derek S

    2010-06-01

    Existing drugs address a relatively narrow range of biological targets. As a result, libraries of drug-like molecules have proven ineffective against a variety of challenging targets, such as protein-protein interactions, nucleic acid complexes, and antibacterial modalities. In contrast, natural products are known to be effective at modulating such targets, and new libraries are being developed based on underrepresented scaffolds and regions of chemical space associated with natural products. This has led to several recent successes in identifying new chemical probes that address these challenging targets. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Techno-economic analysis of expander-based configurations for natural gas liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Matteo; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Elmegaard, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a marine fuel is rapidly growing because of the possible economic advantages over conventional fuels and stricter environmental regulations. Production of LNG is energy-intensive because of the required temperature level of around -160°C. Three main types...

  8. Canada - United States Natural Gas Trade - A Model for Expanding Regional Energy Trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D ArcyMcGee, T.

    1996-01-01

    This document deals with the expansion of Canadian natural gas exports to the United States. Over the past decade, these exports have more than tripled. The expansion of energy trade requires a growing market, a competitive supply source, deregulation of markets and free trade agreements, capital investment and eventually a transparent market with many buyers and sellers. Even if all these factors coexisted, there have been problems linked to this expansion of exports, such as the construction of transportation capacity. (TEC)

  9. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    development of these waste disposal strategies. UKAEA is liasing closely with the disposal organisations to ensure that all their concerns are addressed satisfactorily. This paper will describe: i. the varied nature, inventory and history of UKAEA's graphite liabilities; ii. the options that have been considered for the long-term storage and disposal of UKAEA's graphite liabilities; iii. the technical issues that have been considered in the development of these options; iv. the recent developments in the consideration of Wigner energy. The paper will summarise the current status and future plans of the UKAEA graphite waste packaging strategies, and describe the interactions with the disposal organisations. (author)

  10. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  11. Electrolysis of acidic sodium chloride solution with a graphite anode. I. Graphite electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.J.J.; Hoogland, J.G.

    1969-01-01

    A graphite anode evolving Cl from a chloride soln. is slowly oxidized to CO and CO2. This oxidn. causes a change in the characteristics of the electrode in aging, comprising a change of the nature of the graphite surface and an increase of the surface area. It appears that a new graphite electrode

  12. Ocean warming expands habitat of a rich natural resource and benefits a national economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Post, Søren Lorenzen; Kristiansen, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Geographic redistribution of living natural resources changes access and thereby harvesting opportunities between countries. Internationally shared fish resources can be sensitive to shifts in the marine environment and this may have great impact on the economies of countries and regions that rely...... northwest in the Atlantic. This change in migration pattern was followed by a rapid development of a large-scale fishery of substantial importance for the national economy of Greenland (23% of Greenland's export value of all goods in 2014). A pelagic trawl survey was conducted in mid-summer 2014...

  13. Expanding the chemical space for natural products by Aspergillus-Streptomyces co-cultivation and biotransformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changsheng; Zacchetti, Boris; Ram, Arthur F.J.; van Wezel, Gilles P.; Claessen, Dennis; Hae Choi, Young

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes and filamentous fungi produce a wide range of bioactive compounds, with applications as antimicrobials, anticancer agents or agrochemicals. Their genomes contain a far larger number of gene clusters for natural products than originally anticipated, and novel approaches are required to exploit this potential reservoir of new drugs. Here, we show that co-cultivation of the filamentous model microbes Streptomyces coelicolor and Aspergillus niger has a major impact on their secondary metabolism. NMR-based metabolomics combined with multivariate data analysis revealed several compounds that correlated specifically to co-cultures, including the cyclic dipeptide cyclo(Phe-Phe) and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, both of which were produced by A. niger in response to S. coelicolor. Furthermore, biotransformation studies with o-coumaric acid and caffeic acid resulted in the production of the novel compounds (E)-2-(3-hydroxyprop-1-en-1-yl)-phenol and (2E,4E)-3-(2-carboxy-1-hydroxyethyl)-2,4-hexadienedioxic acid, respectively. This highlights the utility of microbial co-cultivation combined with NMR-based metabolomics as an efficient pipeline for the discovery of novel natural products. PMID:26040782

  14. Flexible PVC flame retarded with expandable graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Focke, WW

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available this outstanding fire resistance. Thus flame-retardant (FR) and smoke-suppressant (SS) additives must be incorporated in order to meet product test specifications such as oxygen index, heat release rate, smoke evolution, or the extent of burning [1]. Levchik... plot for the composites fabricated in this work. For a material to be effectively flame retarded both the fire load and the fire growth index should assume low values. Figure 11 shows a dramatic decrease for all the EG composites relative to the neat...

  15. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  16. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  17. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  18. GMP-compliant, large-scale expanded allogeneic natural killer cells have potent cytolytic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae Lim

    Full Text Available Ex vivo-expanded, allogeneic natural killer (NK cells can be used for the treatment of various types of cancer. In allogeneic NK cell therapy, NK cells from healthy donors must be expanded in order to obtain a sufficient number of highly purified, activated NK cells. In the present study, we established a simplified and efficient method for the large-scale expansion and activation of NK cells from healthy donors under good manufacturing practice (GMP conditions. After a single step of magnetic depletion of CD3(+ T cells, the depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were stimulated and expanded with irradiated autologous PBMCs in the presence of OKT3 and IL-2 for 14 days, resulting in a highly pure population of CD3(-CD16(+CD56(+ NK cells which is desired for allogeneic purpose. Compared with freshly isolated NK cells, these expanded NK cells showed robust cytokine production and potent cytolytic activity against various cancer cell lines. Of note, expanded NK cells selectively killed cancer cells without demonstrating cytotoxicity against allogeneic non-tumor cells in coculture assays. The anti-tumor activity of expanded human NK cells was examined in SCID mice injected with human lymphoma cells. In this model, expanded NK cells efficiently controlled lymphoma progression. In conclusion, allogeneic NK cells were efficiently expanded in a GMP-compliant facility and demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  20. Effect of expanded organoclay by stearic acid to curing, mechanical and swelling properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, A.; Fathurrohman, M. Irfan; Falaah, A. F.; Setyawan, N.; Soegijono, B.

    2017-07-01

    The interlayer basal spacing of organoclay (OC) could be increased with stearic acid (SA) added, thus OC changed into expanded organoclay by SA (OCSA). The effect of various loadings of OCSA on the curing, mechanical and swelling properties of natural rubber (NR) nanocomposites were studied. The natural rubber/expanded organoclay (NR/OCSA) nanocomposites were prepared by melt intercalation using a laboratory open mill. The curing characteristics of NR compounds were determined using a Moving Die Rheometer (MDR). The X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared (ATR-IR) Spectroscopy and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) were used to study the dispersion of OCSA in the NR matrix. The mechanical properties of NR/OCSA nanocomposites such as tensile strength, elongation at break and hardness were determined using ISO standard and swelling of NR/OCSA nanocomposites in toluene were determined using ISO 1817. The results showed that the SA intercalated into the gallery of OC and reacted with the hydroxyl groups in OC. It was indicated with the shifting of the negative peak 1,700 to 1,723 cm-1 in the ATR-IR spectrum and increase the d-spacing of OC. The adding of various loadings of OCSA into NR could increase the torque and accelerate the curing of nanocomposites and it also could increase the mechanical and swelling properties of nanocomposites. The change in modulus at 100% elongation significantly increased with increasing the OCSA load until maximum loading at 10 phr. This trend was same with the hardness and modulus at 300% elongation. Meanwhile, the improvement of tensile strength and elongation at break was higher at 4 phr OCSA compared with the other loading. The increase of mechanical and swelling properties of NR/OCSA nanocomposites was due to intercalation/exfoliation of OCSA in NR matrix. It was revealed by appearing of the out-of-plane Si-O-(Al) stretch with peak value 1080 cm-1 in the ATR-IR spectrum and the peaks of OCSA

  1. Structural analysis of polycrystalline (graphitized) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, M.M.; Kravchik, A.E.; Osmakov, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Specific features of the structure of polycrystal carbon materials (CM), characterized by high enough degree of structural perfection and different genesis are analyzed. From the viewpoint of fine and supercrystallite structure analysis of the most characteristic groups of graphitized CM: artificial graphites, and natural graphites, as well, has been carried out. It is ascertained that in paracrystal CM a monolayer of hexagonally-bound carbon atoms is the basic element of the structure, and in graphitized CM - a microlayer. The importance of the evaluation of the degree of three-dimensional ordering of the microlayer is shown

  2. Pencil graphite electrodes for improved electrochemical detection of oleuropein by the combination of Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Federico J V; Spisso, Adrian; Fernanda Silva, María

    2017-11-01

    A novel methodology is presented for the enhanced electrochemical detection of oleuropein in complex plant matrices by Graphene Oxide Pencil Grahite Electrode (GOPGE) in combination with a buffer modified with a Natural Deep Eutectic Solvent, containing 10% (v/v) of Lactic acid, Glucose and H 2 O (LGH). The electrochemical behavior of oleuropein in the modified-working buffer was examined using differential pulse voltammetry. The combination of both modifications, NADES modified buffer and nanomaterial modified electrode, LGH-GOPGE, resulted on a signal enhancement of 5.3 times higher than the bare electrode with unmodified buffer. A calibration curve of oleuropein was performed between 0.10 to 37 μM and a good linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient of 0.989. Detection and quantification limits of the method were obtained as 30 and 102 nM, respectively. In addition, precision studies indicated that the voltammetric method was sufficiently repeatable, %RSD 0.01 and 3.16 (n = 5) for potential and intensity, respectively. Finally, the proposed electrochemical sensor was successfully applied to the determination of oleuropein in an olive leaf extract prepared by ultrasound-assisted extraction. The results obtained with the proposed electrochemical sensor were compared with Capillary Zone Electrophoresis analysis with satisfactory results. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Study by electronic microscopy of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation (air, 620 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodon de Villeroche, Suzanne

    1968-01-01

    The author reports the study of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation in the air at 620 C. It is based on observations made by electronic microscopy. This study comes after another one dedicated to oxidation features obtained by hot corrosion of natural graphite, and aims at comparing pyrolytic graphite before and after irradiation in an atomic pile, and at performing tests on a graphite processed with ozone. After a recall of generalities about natural graphite and of some issues related to hot corrosion of natural graphite, the author presents some characteristics and features of irradiated and non-irradiated pyrolytic graphite. He reports the study of the oxidation of samples of pyrolytic graphite: production of thin lamellae, production of glaze-carbon replicates, oxidation of irradiated and of non-irradiated graphite, healing of irradiation defects, and oxidation of ozone-processed natural graphite [fr

  4. The role of graphite morphology and matrix structure on low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Thermal cycling resistance; graphite morphology; grey cast iron; austempered ductile iron; compacted/vermicular graphite iron; matrix decompo- sition. 1. Introduction. When a material is subjected to a temperature gradient, it tends to expand differentially. During this process, thermal stresses are induced. The source of ...

  5. Substituição de amianto por silicato de alumínio e grafite expansível em compósito de poliuretano utilizado em motor-foguete Substitution of asbestos for aluminosiliacate and expandable graphite in polyurethane composites used in rocket motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Crespim

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Compósitos de poliuretano e amianto (liner são utilizados como revestimento interno em paredes de motor-foguete, conferindo proteção térmica e garantindo a adesão entre o propelente e as paredes do motor. No entanto, o uso do amianto tem sido restringido devido à sua toxidade. No presente trabalho, o amianto foi substituído por um silicato de alumínio hidratado (SA e pelo grafite expansível (GE em diferentes teores no liner. Resultados de análise termogravimétrica (TG mostraram que a estabilidade térmica do liner praticamente não é afetada pela substituição das cargas, embora a energia de ativação (Ea obtida para a decomposição tenha mudado, mostrando maiores valores para as amostras contendo as cargas SA e GE. A análise termomecânica (TMA mostrou que o coeficiente de expansão térmica linear do liner contendo SA foi menor que aquele encontrado para o liner contendo amianto. O liner contendo a carga SA também apresentou os maiores valores de tensão nos testes mecânicos de tração.Composites of polyurethane (PU and asbestos (liner are used as internal coating of rocket motors, providing thermal protection and assuring the adhesion between propellant and the motor walls. However, the use of asbestos has been restricted due to its hazardous nature. In the present work, asbestos was replaced by hydrated alumina silicate (SA and expandable graphite (GE in different contents. Thermogravimetric analysis (TG showed that the thermal stability of liners was practically unaffected by the filler replacement although the activation energy obtained for the decomposition has changed. Thermomechanical analysis (TMA showed that coefficients of thermal expansion of SA/liners were lower than asbestos/liner. SA/liners also presented the highest tension values in mechanical tests.

  6. KNO3/NaNO3 - Graphite materials for thermal energy storage at high temperature: Part I. - Elaboration methods and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acem, Zoubir; Lopez, Jerome; Palomo Del Barrio, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Composites graphite/salt for thermal energy storage at high temperature (∼200 deg. C) have been developed and tested. As at low temperature in the past, graphite has been used to enhance the thermal conductivity of the eutectic system KNO 3 /NaNO 3 . A new elaboration method has been proposed as an alternative to graphite foams infiltration. It consists of cold-compression of a physical mixing of expanded natural graphite particles and salt powder. Two different compression routes have been investigated: uni-axial compression and isostatic compression. The first part of the paper has been devoted to the analysis of the thermal properties of these new graphite/salt composites. It is proven that cold-compression is a simple and efficient technique for improving the salt thermal conductivity. For instance, graphite amounts between 15 and 20%wt lead to apparent thermal conductivities close to 20 W/m/K (20 times greater than the thermal conductivity of the salt). Furthermore, some advantages in terms of cost and safety are expected because materials elaboration is carried out at room temperature. The second part of the paper is focused on the analyses of the phase transition properties of these graphite/salt composites materials.

  7. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  8. Gas expanders at M/R Stations in the natural gas distribution network. Pre-project, subreport; Gasexpandere paa distributionsnettets M/R-stationer. Forprojekt, delrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Niels Bjarne

    2010-05-15

    Danish Gas Technology Centre has been carrying out a feasibility project to clarify the possibilities of installing gas expanders at M/R-stations (Measuring and Regulating) in the Distribution system of the natural gas grid. A large number of such expanders are installed around the world. The novelty of this project is to use a heat pump to perform the necessary heating of the gas before the expander, and to ''export'' to the electricity grid the remaining electricity from the generator connected to the expander. The present project includes the small M/R-stations at the gas Distribution grid where pressure is reduced from 40 or 20 bar to 4 bar. The preliminary project (year 1 of project) has investigated whether components for such smaller systems can be found, and it has investigated prices for different quantities. A technical feasibility study has been done. Also, preliminary calculations of payback times has been carried out. A large potential of CO{sub 2}-reduction is present with this technology based on saving of natural gas combustion and on new electricity production displacing existing production without any use of primary energy. The main results and conclusions are: 1) There are component suppliers for expander systems suitable to the size of distribution network M/R stations. 2) Pressure regulators provided at the stations are laid out with significant overcapacity, enabling a simplified installation of the expander systems. 3) If the system is being rolled out across the Danish distribution grid, the realistic saving potential is approx. 2.3 million Nm3 of gas per year and a production of almost 40 million kWh of electricity. 4) If the price is 0.60 DKK/kWh for electricity sold, the simple pay-back is 6-7 years on average, covering a variation from 3 to 16 years at the various stations. The smallest stations are omitted. The best stations covering more than half of the gas flow have a pay-back time between 3 and 6 years. 5) The

  9. Method of producing exfoliated graphite composite compositions for fuel cell flow field plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-04-08

    A method of producing an electrically conductive composite composition, which is particularly useful for fuel cell bipolar plate applications. The method comprises: (a) providing a supply of expandable graphite powder; (b) providing a supply of a non-expandable powder component comprising a binder or matrix material; (c) blending the expandable graphite with the non-expandable powder component to form a powder mixture wherein the non-expandable powder component is in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the powder mixture; (d) exposing the powder mixture to a temperature sufficient for exfoliating the expandable graphite to obtain a compressible mixture comprising expanded graphite worms and the non-expandable component; (e) compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi to about 50,000 psi in predetermined directions into predetermined forms of cohered graphite composite compact; and (f) treating the so-formed cohered graphite composite to activate the binder or matrix material thereby promoting adhesion within the compact to produce the desired composite composition. Preferably, the non-expandable powder component further comprises an isotropy-promoting agent such as non-expandable graphite particles. Further preferably, step (e) comprises compressing the mixture in at least two directions. The method leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

  10. Expanding the linear dynamic range for quantitative liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry utilizing natural isotopologue signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hanghui; Lam, Lily; Yan, Lin; Chi, Bert; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Less abundant isotopologue ions were utilized to decrease detector saturation. • A 25–50 fold increase in the upper limit of dynamic range was demonstrated. • Linear dynamic range was expanded without compromising mass resolution. - Abstract: The linear dynamic range (LDR) for quantitative liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry can be extended until ionization saturation is reached by using a number of target isotopologue ions in addition to the normally used target ion that provides the highest sensitivity. Less abundant isotopologue ions extend the LDR: the lower ion abundance decreases the probability of ion detector saturation. Effectively the sensitivity decreases and the upper limit of the LDR increases. We show in this paper that the technique is particularly powerful with a high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer because the data for all ions are automatically acquired, and we demonstrated this for four small organic molecules; the upper limits of LDRs increased by 25–50 times

  11. Speaking more broadly: an examination of the nature, antecedents, and consequences of an expanded set of employee voice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Timothy D; Podsakoff, Philip M

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly interest in employee voice behavior has increased dramatically over the past 15 years. Although this research has produced valuable knowledge, it has focused almost exclusively on voice as a positively intended challenge to the status quo, even though some scholars have argued that it need not challenge the status quo or be well intentioned. Thus, in this paper, we create an expanded view of voice; one that extends beyond voice as a positively intended challenge to the status quo to include voice that supports how things are being done in organizations as well as voice that may not be well intentioned. We construct a framework based on this expanded view that identifies 4 different types of voice behavior (supportive, constructive, defensive, and destructive). We then develop and validate survey measures for each of these. Evidence from 5 studies across 4 samples provides strong support for our new measures in that (a) a 4-factor confirmatory factor analysis model fit the data significantly better than 1-, 2-, or 3-factor models; (b) the voice measures converged with and yet remained distinct from conceptually related comparison constructs; (c) personality predictors exhibited unique patterns of relationships with the different types of voice; (d) variations in actual voice behaviors had a direct causal impact on responses to the survey items; and (e) each type of voice significantly impacted important outcomes for voicing employees (e.g., likelihood of relying on a voicing employee's opinions and evaluations of a voicing employee's overall performance). Implications of our findings are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  12. Low cost sic coated erosion resistant graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, M.F.; Nicholls, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of materials with unique and improved properties using low cost processes is essential to increase performance and reduce cost of the solid rocket motors. Specifically advancements are needed for boost phase nozzle. As these motors operate at very high pressure and temperatures, the nozzle must survive high thermal stresses with minimal erosion to maintain performance. Currently three material choices are being exploited; which are refractory metals, graphite and carbon-carbon composites. Of these three materials graphite is the most attractive choice because of its low cost, light weight, and easy forming. However graphite is prone to erosion, both chemical and mechanical, which may affect the ballistic conditions and mechanical properties of the nozzle. To minimize this erosion high density graphite is usually preferred; which is again very expensive. Another technique used to minimize the erosion is Pyrolytic Graphite (PG) coating inside the nozzle. However PG coating is prone to cracking and spallation along with very cumbersome deposition process. Another possible methodology to avoid this erosion is to convert the inside surface of the rocket nozzle to Silicon Carbide (SiC), which is very erosion resistant and have much better thermal stability compared to graphite and even PG. Due to its functionally gradient nature such a layer will be very adherent and resistant to spallation. The current research is focused on synthesizing, characterizing and oxidation testing of such a converted SiC layer on commercial grade graphite. (author)

  13. Structure and Performance of Epoxy Resin Cladded Graphite Used as Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhentao; Li, Haijun

    This paper is concerning to prepare modified natural graphite which is low-cost and advanced materials used as lithium ion battery anode using the way of cladding natural graphite with epoxy resin. The results shows that the specific capacity and circular performance of the modified natural graphite, which is prepared in the range of 600°C and 1000°C, have been apparently improved compare with the not-modified natural graphite. The first reversible capacity of the modified natural graphite is 338mAh/g and maintain more than 330mAh/g after 20 charge/discharge circles.

  14. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  15. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  16. Preparation of in-house graphite reference material for boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Swain, Kallola K.; Manisha, V.; Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja P.; Remya Devi, P.S.; Ghosh, M.; Verma, R.

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is extensively used in nuclear technology. Boron concentration in graphite is one of the important parameters that decide its acceptability for nuclear applications. Reliable analytical methods are essential for the determination of boron in graphite at concentration about 5 mg kg -1 . Reference materials are used for validation of existing analytical methods and developing new methodologies. In view of the importance of determination of boron in graphite and unavailability of graphite reference material, an In-house graphite reference material was prepared in Analytical Chemistry Division. Graphite source material was procured, processed to obtain powder of ≤ 75 μm (200 mesh) and bottled. Procedures were developed for the determination of boron in graphite using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques. Homogeneity testing was carried out on the bottled units and boron content along with the combined and expanded uncertainties were established. The assigned boron concentration in the In-house graphite reference material is (7.3±0.46) mg kg -1 . (author)

  17. Recent developments concerning French fuel elements used in natural uranium - graphite - CO{sub 2} reactor systems; Developpements recents des elements combustibles francais de la filiere uranium naturel - graphite - CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salesse, M; Stohr, J A; Jeanpierre, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The policy followed in France for the development of fuel elements for reactors belonging to the Electricite de France has been to benefit as much as possible, for each new pile from the most recent technical progress by developing in each case a fuel element allowing the maximum power per channel. The two latest fuel elements thus studied by the French Atomic Energy Commission are of two different types: a tubular uranium element closed at both ends and cooled externally. (This type of element, chosen for the reactors EDF 2, EDF 3 and EDF 4 makes it possible to attain maximum specific powers of the order of 6 MW/metric ton.); an open tubular uranium element cooled both internally and externally, called an annular element which in being studied as a possibility for EDF 5. Such an element makes it possible to attain specific powers of over 12 MW/metric ton. The two types of element have the following common characteristics: - the can, for external cooling, has herning-bone type fins. This type of profile which has been vastly improved recently thereby increasing its thermal efficiency, has the important advantage of avoiding vibration of the element, but has posed problems of resistance to thermal cycling necessitating much research. - the fuel rods are placed inside graphite jackets, this limiting the vertical forces to which they are subjected and protecting them during charging and discharging. On the other hand, these elements present very different problems as for as the following points are concerned: - the characteristics required of the uranium tubes apart of course from a good dimensional stability during irradiation in the two cases are in the case of the closed tubes a very high resistance to external pressure, and in the case of the annular elements a low neutron absorption. Thus for each of these two cases it has been necessary to develop a suitable type of alloy. - a possible loosening of the can during thermal cycling, which is peculiar to the

  18. Effects of natural disaster trends: a case study for expanding the pre-positioning network of CARE International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Melda; Duran, Serhan

    2012-08-01

    The increasing number of natural disasters in the last decade necessitates the increase in capacity and agility while delivering humanitarian relief. A common logistics strategy used by humanitarian organizations to respond this need is the establishment of pre-positioning warehouse networks. In the pre-positioning strategy, critical relief inventories are located near the regions at which they will be needed in advance of the onset of the disaster. Therefore, pre-positioning reduces the response time by totally or partially eliminating the procurement phase and increasing the availability of relief items just after the disaster strikes. Once the pre-positioning warehouse locations are decided and warehouses on those locations become operational, they will be in use for a long time. Therefore, the chosen locations should be robust enough to enable extensions, and to cope with changing trends in disaster types, locations and magnitudes. In this study, we analyze the effects of natural disaster trends on the expansion plan of pre-positioning warehouse network implemented by CARE International. We utilize a facility location model to identify the additional warehouse location(s) for relief items to be stored as an extension of the current warehouse network operated by CARE International, considering changing natural disaster trends observed over the past three decades.

  19. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  20. Adoptive immunotherapy mediated by ex vivo expanded natural killer T cells against CD1d-expressing lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnara, Davide; Ibatici, Adalberto; Corselli, Mirko; Sessarego, Nadia; Tenca, Claudya; De Santanna, Amleto; Mazzarello, Andrea; Daga, Antonio; Corvò, Renzo; De Rossi, Giulio; Frassoni, Francesco; Ciccone, Ermanno; Fais, Franco

    2009-07-01

    CD1d is a monomorphic antigen presentation molecule expressed in several hematologic malignancies. Alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) is a glycolipid that can be presented to cytotoxic CD1d-restricted T cells. These reagents represent a potentially powerful tool for cell mediated immunotherapy. We set up an experimental model to evaluate the use of adoptively transferred cytotoxic CD1d-restricted T cells and alpha-GalCer in the treatment of mice engrafted with CD1d(+) lymphoid neoplastic cells. To this end the C1R cell line was transfected with CD1c or CD1d molecules. In addition, upon retroviral infection firefly luciferase was expressed on C1R transfected cell lines allowing the evaluation of tumor growth in xenografted immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice. The C1R-CD1d cell line was highly susceptible to specific CD1d-restricted T cell cytotoxicity in the presence alpha-GalCer in vitro. After adoptive transfer of CD1d-restricted T cells and alpha-GalCer to mice engrafted with both C1R-CD1c and C1R-CD1d, a reduction in tumor growth was observed only in CD1d(+) masses. In addition, CD1d-restricted T-cell treatment plus alpha-GalCer eradicated small C1R-CD1d(+) nodules. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that infiltrating NKT cells were mainly observed in CD1d nodules. Our results indicate that ex vivo expanded cytotoxic CD1d-restricted T cells and alpha-GalCer may represent a new immunotherapeutic tool for treatment of CD1d(+) hematologic malignancies.

  1. New composites graphite/salt for high temperature thermal energy storage: From elaboration to development of thermal characterization methods for orthotropic conductive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acem, Zoubir

    2007-01-01

    This PhD is carried out within the framework of DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French) projects, which have for objective to conceive and study new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage (>200 deg. C). She is split into two distinct part. The first one focused mainly on works linked with elaboration and thermal characterisation of these new composites. The different composites ways of elaboration (Dispersion, uniaxial compression, isostatic) associated to the different kind of graphite (Natural expanded graphite (ENG), synthetic graphite) investigated during the PhD are presented. The results of the thermal characterization campaign of these composites are also presented and permit to highlight the impact of graphite in the thermal behaviour of studied materials. Based on these results, modelling studies of the evolution of the thermal conductivity have been undertaken to deepen the understanding of the effect of graphite (quantity, size of particles) on the effective conductivity composites. The second one describes the thermal characterization devices and associated thermo-kinetics models which had to be developed and adapted to the specificities of newly developed materials. This concerns mainly the materials prepared by compression, which present orthotropic properties and are difficult to reproduce. So, the characterization of this kind of material is very difficult and tedious. That is why we are committed to develop and adapt existing methods of characterization to allow the complete thermal characterisation of an orthotropic conductive material from a single experimentation on a single sample. (author) [fr

  2. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool......-Saxon and continental traditions, this special issue provides examples of the use of researcher subjectivity, informed by psychoanalytic thinking, in expanding research understanding....

  3. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  4. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  5. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  6. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  7. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  8. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  9. Influence of the lithium salt nature over the surface film formation on a graphite electrode in Li-ion batteries: An XPS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, S.; Martinez, H.; Dedryvere, R.; Lemordant, D.; Gonbeau, D.

    2007-01-01

    The formation of a passivation film (solid electrolyte interphase, SEI) at the surface of the negative electrode of full LiCoO 2 /graphite lithium-ion cells using different salts (LiBF 4 , LiPF 6 , LiTFSI, LiBETI) in carbonate solvents as electrolyte was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The analyzes were carried out at different potential stages of the first cycle, showing the potential-dependent character of the surface film species formation and the specificity of each salt. At 3.8 V, for all salts, we have mainly identified carbonated species. Beyond this potential, the specific behavior of LiPF 6 was identified with a high LiF deposit, whereas for other salts, the formation process of the SEI appears controlled by the solvent decomposition of the electrolyte

  10. Floatability study of graphite ore from southeast Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florena, Fenfen Fenda; Syarifuddin, Fahmi; Hanam, Eko Sulistio; Trisko, Nici; Kustiyanto, Eko; Enilisiana, Rianto, Anton; Arinton, Ghenadi

    2016-02-01

    Graphite ore obtained from Kolaka Regency, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia have been succesfully investigated for beneficiation by froth flotation technique. Preliminary study have been done to determine the minerals types, fixed carbon content and liberation size of the graphite. Graphite is naturally floatable due to its hydrophobic property. Some suitable reagents are usually added to increase effectiveness of recovery. In this article, enrichment of graphite by froth flotation was studied by investigating the effect of reagents concentrations, rotation speed and particle size on the carbon grade and recovery of the concentrate. The carbon grade increased from 3.00% to 60.00% at the optimum flotation conditions.

  11. Graphite structure and its relation to mechanical engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.; Kelly, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    The inhomogeneous nature of polycrystalline graphite requires property measurements to be made over dimensions large enough to average the local variations in the structure. This is particularly true for mechanical integrity, and experimental data are presented which illustrate the importance of the real aggregate structure of graphite and the difficulties of interpreting strength data from different tests. The classical statistical treatments do not hold generally, and the problem of defining a failure criterion for graphite is discussed. It is suggested that the stress conditions in graphite components might be classified in terms of the dimensions and stress gradients related to the characteristic flaw size of the material as determined experimentally. (author)

  12. Development of synthetic graphite resistive elements for sintering furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, C.; Rezende, Mirabel C.; Polidoro, H.A.; Otani, S.

    1987-01-01

    The synthetic graphites have been produced using lignin coke, natural graphite and phenolic resin. The bulk density, porosity, flexural strength and eletrical resistivity measurements have been performed on specimens at about 2400 0 C. The performance of these materials, as heating elements, was evaluated in a sintering furnace prototype. This paper reports the fabrication process and the experimental results. (Author) [pt

  13. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  14. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  15. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  16. Expandable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, J C; Carrasco, H

    1996-05-01

    Expandable metallic stents are effective in selected patients with malignant or benign airway stenoses. When used for malignant lesions, the primary purpose of the stent is to improve the quality of life; stents are usually chosen for palliation of symptoms in recognition of the low likelihood of success for other therapy. For patients with benign stenoses, the stents provide a permanent source of structural support to alleviate the narrowed segment. The advantages of the expandable metallic stents are as follows: (1) they can be inserted through an endotracheal tube or under local anesthesia with relative simplicity under fluoroscopic guidance; (2) they do not impair the drainage of sputum because ciliary movement is not interrupted; (3) over a period of a few weeks, the meshwork is gradually covered with mucosa as the stent becomes incorporated into the airway wall; (4) ventilation usually is not impaired if the metallic mesh stent covers another nonstenosed bronchus, because the interstices of the stent are nonobstructive; and (5) they are dynamic and continue to expand over time, particularly if concurrent treatment achieves an effect on the lesion that caused stenosis. Disadvantages of the expandable stent include (1) they often are only temporarily effective for tracheobronchial stenosis due to intraluminal tumor or granulation tissue, both of which can grow between the wires; (2) they are considered permanent stents because removal is difficult; and (3) they can be poorly positioned during placement or can become displaced by progressive migration after placement, and they cannot be repositioned. A relative contraindication to insertion is an inflammatory process or infection that can predispose to granulation formation, particularly at the points of maximal contact pressure of the stent to the airway mucosa. In the presence of inflammation, it may be better to use a silicone prosthesis until the inflammatory process subsides and fibrosis occurs. Granulation

  17. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  18. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  19. Expander Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Expander Codes - The Sipser–Spielman Construction. Priti Shankar. General Article Volume 10 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  20. Association of Expanded Disability Status Scale and Cytokines after Intervention with Co-supplemented Hemp Seed, Evening Primrose Oils and Hot-natured Diet in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Baradaran

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Because of limited efficacy and adverse side effects, identifying novel therapeutic and protective agents is important. The aim of this study is to examine the correlations between expanded disability status scale (EDSS and cytokines after intervention with co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils and hot-natured diet in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS. Methods: We studied a group of 23 patients with clinically definite RRMS, with EDSS<6 who received co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils with advising hot-natured diet. Clinically EDSS and immunological factors (plasma cytokines of IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-17 were assessed at baseline and after 6 months. Results: Mean follow-up was 180±2.9 days (N=23, 7 Male and 16 Females aged 25.0±7.5 years with disease duration 6.26±3.9 years. After 6 months, significant improvements in extended disability status score were found in the patients in agreement with decrease cytokines of IFN-γ and IL-17 and increase cytokines of IL-4. Clinical and immunological parameters showed improvement in the patients after the intervention. Conclusion: Our study shows that co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils with hot-natured diet can have beneficial effects in improving clinical symptoms in relapsing remitting MS patients and significant correlation was found between EDSS and immunological findings.

  1. Reduced graphite oxide in supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Belén; Vretenár, Viliam; Kotrusz, Peter; Hulman, Martin; Centeno, Teresa A

    2015-05-15

    The current energy needs have put the focus on highly efficient energy storage systems such as supercapacitors. At present, much attention focuses on graphene-like materials as promising supercapacitor electrodes. Here we show that reduced graphite oxide offers a very interesting potential. Materials obtained by oxidation of natural graphite and subsequent sonication and reduction by hydrazine achieve specific capacitances as high as 170 F/g in H2SO4 and 84F/g in (C2H5)4NBF4/acetonitrile. Although the particle size of the raw graphite has no significant effect on the physico-chemical characteristics of the reduced materials, that exfoliated from smaller particles (materials may suffer from a drop in their specific surface area upon fabrication of electrodes with features of the existing commercial devices. This should be taken into account for a reliable interpretation of their performance in supercapacitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  3. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  4. Research on the phenomenon of graphitization. Crystallographic study - Study of bromine sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, Jacques

    1967-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the mechanism of graphitization of carbon by using X-ray diffraction analysis and the physical and chemical study of lamellar reactions between carbon and bromine. The author first presents generalities and results of preliminary studies (meaning of graphitization, presentation of the various carbon groups and classes), and then reports the study of the graphitization of compact carbons (soft carbons). More precisely, he reports the crystallographic study of partially graphitized carbons: methods and principles, experimental results and their analysis, discussion of the graphitization mechanism. In the next part, the author reports the study of bromine sorption on carbons: experimental method, isotherms of a natural graphite and of a graphitized carbon, structure of carbon-bromine complexes, isotherms of graphitizable carbons and of all other carbons, distribution of bromine layers in partially graphitized carbons, bromine sorption and Fermi level

  5. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  6. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  7. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  8. Distinct and overlapping effector functions of expanded human CD4+, CD8α+ and CD4-CD8α- invariant natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent O'Reilly

    Full Text Available CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells have diverse immune stimulatory/regulatory activities through their ability to release cytokines and to kill or transactivate other cells. Activation of iNKT cells can protect against multiple diseases in mice but clinical trials in humans have had limited impact. Clinical studies to date have targeted polyclonal mixtures of iNKT cells and we proposed that their subset compositions will influence therapeutic outcomes. We sorted and expanded iNKT cells from healthy donors and compared the phenotypes, cytotoxic activities and cytokine profiles of the CD4(+, CD8α(+ and CD4(-CD8α(- double-negative (DN subsets. CD4(+ iNKT cells expanded more readily than CD8α(+ and DN iNKT cells upon mitogen stimulation. CD8α(+ and DN iNKT cells most frequently expressed CD56, CD161 and NKG2D and most potently killed CD1d(+ cell lines and primary leukemia cells. All iNKT subsets released Th1 (IFN-γ and TNF-α and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines. Relative amounts followed a CD8α>DN>CD4 pattern for Th1 and CD4>DN>CD8α for Th2. All iNKT subsets could simultaneously produce IFN-γ and IL-4, but single-positivity for IFN-γ or IL-4 was strikingly rare in CD4(+ and CD8α(+ fractions, respectively. Only CD4(+ iNKT cells produced IL-9 and IL-10; DN cells released IL-17; and none produced IL-22. All iNKT subsets upregulated CD40L upon glycolipid stimulation and induced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, subset composition of iNKT cells is a major determinant of function. Use of enriched CD8α(+, DN or CD4(+ iNKT cells may optimally harness the immunoregulatory properties of iNKT cells for treatment of disease.

  9. Partition expanders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavinsky, Dmitry; Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2017), s. 378-395 ISSN 1432-4350 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : expanders * pseudorandomness * communication complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00224-016-9738-5

  10. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  11. Physics experiments in graphite lattices (1962); Experiences sur les reseaux a graphite (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A review is made of the various experimental methods used to determine the physics of graphite, natural uranium lattices: integral lattice experiments; both absolute and differential, effective cross section measurements, both by activation methods and by analysis of irradiated fuels, fine structure measurements. A number of experimental results are also given. (authors) [French] On decrit les differentes methodes experimentales utilisees pour determiner les parametres physiques de reseaux a uranium-graphite. Il s'agit d'experiences globales: mesures absolues et relatives de laplaciens, mesures de sections efficaces effectives par activation et par analyses de combustibles irradies, mesures de structures fines. Un certain nombre de resultats experimentaux sont communiques. (auteurs)

  12. Highly conductive bridges between graphite spheres to improve the cycle performance of a graphite anode in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, Yoga-machi 1341, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Umeno, Tatsuo; Mizuma, Koutarou [Research Center, Mitsui Mining Co. Ltd., Hibiki-machi 1-3, Wakamatsu-ku, Kitakyushu 808-0021 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Saga University, Yoga-machi 1341, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-01-10

    Spherical carbon-coated natural graphite (SCCNG) is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries, but the smooth surface of graphite spheres is difficult to wet with an aqueous binder solution, and lacks electrical contacts. As a result, the cycle performance of such a graphite anode material is not satisfactory. An effective method has been introduced to tightly connect adjacent SCCNG particles by a highly conductive binder, viz. acetylene black bridges. The effect of the conductive bridges on the cyclability of SCCNG electrode has been investigated. (author)

  13. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  14. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  15. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  16. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  17. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  18. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  19. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  20. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  1. Protection of nuclear graphite toward fluoride molten salt by glassy carbon deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardet, V.; Gomes, S.; Delpeux, S.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Avignant, D.; Renaudin, G.; Duclaux, L.

    2009-01-01

    Molten salt reactor represents one of the promising future Generation IV nuclear reactors families where the fuel, a liquid molten fluoride salt, is circulating through the graphite reactor core. The interactions between nuclear graphite and fluoride molten salt and also the graphite surface protection were investigated in this paper by powder X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray microanalysis. Nuclear graphite discs were covered by two kinds of protection deposit: a glassy carbon coating and a double coating of pyrolitic carbon/glassy carbon. Different behaviours have been highlighted according to the presence and the nature of the coated protection film. Intercalation of molten salt between the graphite layers did not occur. Nevertheless the molten salt adhered more or less to the surface of the graphite disc, filled more or less the graphite surface porosity and perturbed more or less the graphite stacking order at the disc surface. The behaviour of unprotected graphite was far to be satisfactory after two days of immersion of graphite in molten salt at 500 deg. C. The best protection of the graphite disc surface, with the maximum of inertness towards molten salt, has been obtained with the double coating of pyrolitic carbon/glassy carbon

  2. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  3. The preliminary feasibility of intercalated graphite railgun armatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaier, J.R.; Yashan, D.; Naud, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on graphite intercalation compounds which may provide an excellent material for the fabrication of electro-magnetic railgun armatures. As a pulse of power is fed into the armature the intercalate could be excited into the plasma state around the edges of the armature, while the bulk of the current would be carried through the graphite block. Such an armature would have desirable characteristics of both diffuse plasma armatures and bulk conduction armatures. In addition, the highly anisotropic nature of these materials could enable the electrical and thermal conductivity to be tailored to meet the specific requirements of electromagnetic railgun armatures. Preliminary investigations have been performed in an attempt to determine the feasibility of using graphite intercalation compounds as railgun armatures. Issues of fabrication, resistivity, stability, and electrical current spreading have been addressed for the case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

  4. TAPIR, Thermal Analysis of HTGR with Graphite Sleeve Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weicht, U.; Mueller, W.

    1983-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: Thermal analysis of a reactor core containing internally and/or externally gas cooled prismatic fuel elements of various geometries, rating, power distribution, and material properties. 2 - Method of solution: A fuel element in this programme is regarded as a sector of a fuelled annulus with graphite sleeves of any shape on either side and optional annular gaps between fuel and graphite and/or within the graphite. It may have any centre angle and the fuelled annulus may become a solid cylindrical rod. Heat generation in the fuel is assumed to be uniform over the cross section and peripheral heat flux into adjacent sectors is ignored. Fuel elements and coolant channels are treated separately, then linked together to fit a specified pattern. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of: 50 fuel elements; 50 cooled channels; 25 fuel geometries; 25 coolant channel geometries; 10 axial power distributions; 10 graphite conductivities

  5. Electrical and thermal properties of graphite/polyaniline composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdo, Shawn E., E-mail: sxbourdo@ualr.edu [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Warford, Brock A.; Viswanathan, Tito [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    A composite of a carbon allotrope (graphite) and an inherently conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI), has been prepared that exhibits an electrical conductivity greater than either of the two components. An almost 2-fold increase in the bulk conductivity occurs when only a small mass fraction of polyaniline exists in the composite (91% graphite/ 9% polyaniline, by mass). This increase in dc electrical conductivity is curious since in most cases a composite material will exhibit a conductivity somewhere between the two individual components, unless a modification to the electronic nature of the material occurs. In order to elucidate the fundamental electrical properties of the composite we have performed variable temperature conductivity measurements to better understand the nature of conduction in these materials. The results from these studies suggest a change in the mechanism of conduction as the amount of polyaniline is increased in the composite. Along with superior electrical properties, the composites exhibit an increase in thermal stability as compared to the graphite. - Graphical abstract: (Left) Room temperature electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at different mass ratios. (Right) Electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at temperatures from 5 K to 300 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites of graphite and polyaniline have been synthesized with unique electrical and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Certain G-PANI composites are more conductive and more thermally stable than graphite alone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-PANI composites exhibit a larger conductivity ratio with respect to temperature than graphite alone.

  6. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santha Kumar, Arunjunai Raja Shankar [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Piana, Francesco [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Mičušík, Matej [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 41, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pionteck, Jürgen, E-mail: pionteck@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Banerjee, Susanta [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Voit, Brigitte [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Heavily oxidized and ordered graphene nanoplatelets were produced from natural graphite by oxidation using a mixture of phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate (Marcano's method). The atomic percentage of oxygen in the graphite oxide produced was more than 30% confirmed by XPS studies. The graphite oxide produced had intact basal planes and remains in a layered structure with interlayer distance of 0.8 nm, analyzed by WAXS. The graphite oxide was treated with 4,4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to produce grafted isocyanate functionalization. Introduction of these bulky functional groups widens the interlayer distance to 1.3 nm. In addition, two reduction methods, namely benzyl alcohol mediated reduction and thermal reduction were carried out on isocyanate modified and unmodified graphite oxides and compared to each other. The decrease in the oxygen content and the sp{sup 3} defect-repair were studied with XPS and RAMAN spectroscopy. Compared to the thermal reduction process, which is connected with large material loss, the benzyl alcohol mediated reduction process is highly effective in defect repair. This resulted in an increase of conductivity of at least 9 orders of magnitude compared to the graphite oxide. - Highlights: • Preparation of GO by Marcano's method results in defined interlayer spacing. • Treatment of GO with diisocyanate widens the interlayer spacing to 1.3 nm. • Chemical reduction of GO with benzyl alcohol is effective in defect repair. • Electrical conductivity increases by 9 orders of magnitude during chemical reduction. • The isocyanate functionalization is stable under chemical reducing conditions.

  7. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  8. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  9. Spectroscopical determination of impurities in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.; Tognini, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for the direct determination of B, Cd, Si, Hg, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Ni, Al, Mo, Ti, Sr, Na, Zn, and As in nuclear grade graphite is described. A 9:1 ratio of graphite to copper difluoride is used in the preparation of samples and standards. The excitation is carried out in a d-c at 10 amperes. The copper fluoride used as spectrographic buffer serves to increase the volatilization rate of the impurities and to diminish the differences in the nature of the analytical and calibration samples. The relative standard deviations for the determination of the 16 trace elements, except Sr, Fe, Cd, Al and Si, are in the range of 8 - 20% in their appropriate calibration levels. For the latter five elements they are approximately 20-40%

  10. Low-energy electron observation of graphite and molybdenite crystals. Application to the study of graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, G.

    1969-01-01

    The LEED study of cleaved (0001) faces of crystals having a layered structure allowed to investigate flakes free of steps on graphite and molybdenite, to show twinning on natural graphite. By intensity measurements and computation in the case of a kinematical approximation it has been possible to determine an inner potential of 19 eV for graphite and to identify the direction of the Mo-S bond of the surface layer of molybdenite. The oxidation of graphite has been studied by observing changes, in symmetry of the diffraction patterns and by mass spectrometry of the gases evolved during the oxidation. No surface compounds have been detected and the carbon layers appeared to be peeled off one after the other. The oxidation took place at temperatures higher than 520 C under an oxygen pressure of 10 -5 torr. (author) [fr

  11. Reliability of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the comparative efficiency of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) for trace analysis of arsenic (As) in natural herbal products (NHPs). Method: Arsenic analysis in natural herbal products and standard reference ...

  12. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  13. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  14. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  15. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latunde-Dada, S; Cheesman, C; Day, D; Harrison, W; Price, S

    2011-01-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms -1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  16. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  17. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  18. {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C behaviour in UNGG graphite during leaching experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, C.; Guy, C.; Comte, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - C.E.A., Laboratoire d' Analyses Radiochimiques et Chimiques (L.A.R.C.) 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    Graphite has been used as a moderator in Natural Uranium Graphite Gas reactors. Among the radionuclides, the long-lived activation product {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C, which are abundant in graphite after irradiation can be the main contributors to the dose during disposal. This paper deals with the first results obtained on irradiated graphite from French G2 reactor. Both leaching and diffusion experiments have been performed in order to understand and quantify the radionuclides behaviour. Chlorine leaching seems to be controlled by diffusion transport through graphite matrix. On the contrary {sup 14}C leaching is very low, probably because after irradiation, the remaining {sup 14}C was produced from {sup 13}C activation in the crystalline structure of graphite. (authors)

  19. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  20. Raw material of the Corumbatai formation at the region of ceramic pole of Santa Gertrudes - Sao Paulo, Brazil, with natural characteristics for fabrication of expanded clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, M.M.T.; Zanardo, A.; Rocha, R.R.; Roveri, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper refers to the study of the bases material of the Corumbatai Formation (Parana Basin) from a clay mine, which presents limits for its use in ceramic tiles in dry grinding process due to its hardness and, especially, the high content of organic matter in relation to the clay overlaid. The characterization of the raw material and the product was accomplished by organic carbon analysis, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and test-firing. Firing conditions were determined to get expanded clay, using fast firing static kiln and a continuous roller kiln, both from laboratory equipment, getting samples with variable density up to the limit of expansion, with density that can reach values lower than 0,5g.cm -3 because of the formation of closed pores and an external vitreous foil which provide a high mechanical resistance to the particles. (author)

  1. Characterization of Ignalina NPP RBMK Reactors Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Levinskas, R.; Milcius, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the investigations of the initial physical properties of graphite used in production of graphite bricks of Ignalina NPP. These graphite bricks are used as nuclear moderator and major core structural components. Graphite bulk density is calculated by mensuration, pore volumes are measured by investigation of helium gas penetration in graphite pore network, the Young's modulus is determined using an ultrasonic time of flight method, the coefficient of thermal expansion is determined using a Netzsch dilatometer 402C, the fractured and machined graphite surfaces are studied using SEM, impurities are investigated qualitatively by EDAX, the degree of graphitization of the material is tested using X-ray diffraction. (author)

  2. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  3. Mesostructure of graphite composite and its lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Generally, the review relies, on the original results and concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear p...

  4. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  5. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  6. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  7. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  8. Derivation of a radionuclide inventory for irradiated graphite-chlorine-36 inventory determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.J.; Palmer, J.D.; Wood, P.

    2001-01-01

    fraction of the chlorine is released from the graphite during irradiation, both in natural precursor and activated form. The release rate of inactive chlorine and of chlorine-36 was modelled, to allow the calculation of a residual chlorine-36 inventory in operational and decommissioning wastes; actual measurements on operational wastes have confirmed this release. This has subsequently been used to assess the effect on disposal risks. This paper provides a description of the work undertaken by Nirex to establish the residual inventory of chlorine-36 in irradiated nuclear graphite, and outline the implications for disposal of these wastes. (author)

  9. Graphite reactor physics; Physique des piles a graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Noc, B [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The study of graphite-natural uranium power reactor physics, undertaken ten years ago when the Marcoule piles were built, has continued to keep in step with the development of this type of pile. From 1960 onwards the critical facility Marius has been available for a systematic study of the properties of lattices as a function of their pitch, of fuel geometry and of the diameter of cooling channels. This study has covered a very wide field: lattice pitch varying from 19 to 38 cm. uranium rods and tubes of cross-sections from 6 to 35 cm{sup 2}, channels with diameters between 70 and 140 mm. The lattice calculation methods could thus be checked and where necessary adapted. The running of the Marcoule piles and the experiments carried out on them during the last few years have supplied valuable information on the overall evolution of the neutronic properties of the fuel as a function of irradiation. More detailed experiments have also been performed in Marius with plutonium-containing fuels (irradiated or synthetic fuels), and will be undertaken at the beginning of 1965 at high temperature in the critical facility Cesar, which is just being completed at Cadarache. Spent fuel analyses complement these results and help in their interpretation. The thermalization and spectra theories developed in France can thus be verified over the whole valid temperature range. The efficiency of control rods as a function of their dimensions, the materials of which they are made and the lattices surrounding them has been measured in Marius, and the results compared with calculation on the one hand and with the measurements carried out in EDF 1 on the other. Studies on the control proper of graphite piles were concerned essentially with the risks of spatial instability and the means of detecting and controlling them, and with flux distortions caused by the control rods. (authors) [French] Entreprise il y a dix ans a l'occasion de la construction des piles de Marcoule, l'etude de la

  10. Elaboration of aluminum oxide-based graphite containing castables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ningsheng

    The aim of this work was set to develop effective and practicable new methods to incorporate natural flake graphite (FG) into the Al2O 3 based castables for iron and steel making applications. Three approaches, viz. micro-pelletized graphite (PG), crushed briquette of Al2O3-graphite (BAG) and TiO2 coated graphite (CFG), have been developed to insert flake graphite into Al2O 3 rich Al2O3-SiC based and Al2O 3-MgO based castables. These approaches were put into effect as countermeasures against the problems caused by FG in order: (1) to agglomerate the FG powders so as to decrease the specific surface area; (2) to diminish the density difference by using crushed carbon bonded compact of oxide-FG mixture; (3) to modify the surface of the flake graphite by forming hydrophilic coating; (4) to control the dispersion state of the graphite in the castable to maintain enough bonding strength; and (5) to use appropriate antioxidants to inhibit the oxidation of FG. The whole work was divided into two stages. In stage one, Al2O 3-SiC-C castables were dealt with to compare 4 modes of inserting graphite, i.e., by PG, BAG, CFG and FG. Overall properties were measured, all in correlation with graphite amount and incorporating mode. In stage two, efforts were made to reduce water demand in the Al2O3-MgO castables system. For this purpose, the matrix portion of the castable mixes was extracted and a coaxial double cylinder viscometer was adopted to investigate rheological characteristics of the matrix slurries vs. 4 kinds of deflocculants, through which the best deflocculant and its appropriate amount were found. Efforts were then made to add up to 30% MgO into the castables, using a limited amount of powders (antioxidants, Si, SiC, B4C and ZrB2, were added respectively or in combination. Overall properties of the castables, were investigated in correlation with MgO amount and graphite and antioxidant packages. Optimization work on oxidation and slag resistance was pursued. Finally

  11. An Investigation of Reverse Flotation Separation of Sericite from Graphite by Using a Surfactant: MF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangshuai Qiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a surfactant, atlox4862 (formaldehyde condensate of methyl naphthalene sulfonic sodium salt (MF, was introduced as a depressant for reverse flotation separation of sericite from graphite. Natural flake graphite has a strong hydrophobic property. After interacting with MF, the graphite became moderately hydrophilic. The flotation results showed that MF had a depressing ability for both sericite and graphite and that the flotation separation of sericite from graphite was attributed to the different declining levels of recovery between graphite and sericite with increased MF concentration. For a pulp pH of 8 and a MF concentration of 250 mg/L, the recovery rates of sericite and graphite were 89.7% and 11.3%, respectively. The results of the FTIR spectra and zeta potential measurements demonstrated that the interaction of MF with graphite and sericite is mainly through electrostatic attraction. MF was preferred to adsorb on the surface of graphite, decreasing its zeta potential and improving its hydrophilicity more than that of sericite.

  12. An enhanced hydrogen adsorption enthalpy for fluoride intercalated graphite compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hansong; Sha, Xianwei; Chen, Liang; Cooper, Alan C; Foo, Maw-Lin; Lau, Garret C; Bailey, Wade H; Pez, Guido P

    2009-12-16

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study on H(2) physisorption in partially fluorinated graphite. This material, first predicted computationally using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and subsequently synthesized and characterized experimentally, represents a novel class of "acceptor type" graphite intercalated compounds that exhibit significantly higher isosteric heat of adsorption for H(2) at near ambient temperatures than previously demonstrated for commonly available porous carbon-based materials. The unusually strong interaction arises from the semi-ionic nature of the C-F bonds. Although a high H(2) storage capacity (>4 wt %) at room temperature is predicted not to be feasible due to the low heat of adsorption, enhanced storage properties can be envisaged by doping the graphitic host with appropriate species to promote higher levels of charge transfer from graphene to F(-) anions.

  13. Gravity Effects on the Free Vibration of a Graphite Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Dong-Ok; Kim, Jong-Bum; Park, Keun-Bae; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    The gravity effects on the free vibration of a graphite column are studied. Graphite block is a key component of a HTGR (High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor). The major core elements, such as the fuel blocks and neutron reflector blocks, of HTTR (High Temperature Test Reactor, Japan) and GT-MHR (Gas Turbine- Modular Helium Reactor, USA) consist of stacked hexagonal graphite blocks forming a group of columns. The vibration of the columns induced by earthquakes may lead to solid impacts between graphite blocks and structural integrity problems. The study of free vibration characteristics of the graphite block column is the first step in the core internal structure dynamic analysis. Gravity force bring a negative stiffness term to the transverse vibration analysis of heavy long column structures, and results in natural frequency reductions. Generally it is not considered in the not so tall structure cases, because the gravity term makes the analysis and design complicated. Therefore it is important to check whether the gravity effect is severe or not

  14. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  15. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  16. Porous (Swiss-Cheese Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Abrahamson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous graphite was prepared without the use of template by rapidly heating the carbonization products from mixtures of anthracene, fluorene, and pyrene with a CO2 laser. Rapid CO2 laser heating at a rate of 1.8 × 106 °C/s vaporizes out the fluorene-pyrene derived pitch while annealing the anthracene coke. The resulting structure is that of graphite with 100 nm spherical pores. The graphitizablity of the porous material is the same as pure anthracene coke. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfaces between graphitic layers and the pore walls are unimpeded. Traditional furnace annealing does not result in the porous structure as the heating rates are too slow to vaporize out the pitch, thereby illustrating the advantage of fast thermal processing. The resultant porous graphite was prelithiated and used as an anode in lithium ion capacitors. The porous graphite when lithiated had a specific capacity of 200 mAh/g at 100 mA/g. The assembled lithium ion capacitor demonstrated an energy density as high as 75 Wh/kg when cycled between 2.2 V and 4.2 V.

  17. The Artful Universe Expanded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, B A

    2005-01-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  18. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  19. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  20. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  1. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  2. Nanosecond formation of diamond and lonsdaleite by shock compression of graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D; Ravasio, A; Gauthier, M; Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Frydrych, S; Helfrich, J; Fletcher, L B; Schaumann, G; Nagler, B; Barbrel, B; Bachmann, B; Gamboa, E J; Göde, S; Granados, E; Gregori, G; Lee, H J; Neumayer, P; Schumaker, W; Döppner, T; Falcone, R W; Glenzer, S H; Roth, M

    2016-03-14

    The shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond has been of great scientific and technological interest since the discovery of microscopic diamonds in remnants of explosively driven graphite. Furthermore, shock synthesis of diamond and lonsdaleite, a speculative hexagonal carbon polymorph with unique hardness, is expected to happen during violent meteor impacts. Here, we show unprecedented in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of diamond formation on nanosecond timescales by shock compression of pyrolytic as well as polycrystalline graphite to pressures from 19 GPa up to 228 GPa. While we observe the transition to diamond starting at 50 GPa for both pyrolytic and polycrystalline graphite, we also record the direct formation of lonsdaleite above 170 GPa for pyrolytic samples only. Our experiment provides new insights into the processes of the shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond and uniquely resolves the dynamics that explain the main natural occurrence of the lonsdaleite crystal structure being close to meteor impact sites.

  3. A High Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitor with Both Electrodes Prepared from Sri Lanka Graphite Ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Changzhen; Yu, Xiaoliang; Liang, Qinghua; Lv, Ruitao; Gai, Guosheng; Shen, Wanci; Kang, Feiyu; Huang, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-14

    The natural Sri Lanka graphite (vein graphite) is widely-used as anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), due to its high crystallinity and low cost. In this work, graphitic porous carbon (GPC) and high-purity vein graphite (PVG) were prepared from Sri Lanka graphite ore by KOH activation, and high temperature purification, respectively. Furthermore, a lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is fabricated with GPC as cathode, and PVG as anode. The assembled GPC//PVG LIC shows a notable electrochemical performance with a maximum energy density of 86 W·h·kg -1 at 150 W·kg -1 , and 48 W·h·kg -1 at a high-power density of 7.4 kW·kg -1 . This high-performance LIC based on PVG and GPC is believed to be promising for practical applications, due to its low-cost raw materials and industrially feasible production.

  4. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio (δ13C Measurement of Graphite Using EA-IRMS System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Garbaras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available δ13C values in non-irradiated natural graphite were measured. The measurements were carried out using an elemental analyzer combined with stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer (EA-IRMS. The samples were prepared with ground and non-ground graphite, the part of which was mixed with Mg (ClO42. The best combustion of graphite in the oxidation furnace of the elemental analyzer was achieved when the amount of pulverized graphite ranged from 200 to 490 µg and the mass ratio C:Mg(ClO42 was approximately 1:10. The method for the graphite burning avoiding the isotope fractionation is proposed.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.2.6873

  5. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  6. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  7. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  8. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  9. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  10. NMR studies on graphite-methanol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akkad, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times for protons of methanol on graphite have been studied. The perpendicular and the transversal magnetization as a function of temperature were measured. The results show that the presence of graphite slowed down the methanol movement compared with that in the pure alcohol, and that the methanol molecules are attached to the graphite surface via methyl groups. (author)

  11. Studies on the development of special graphite for use in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, G.; Aggarwal, R.K.; Saha, M.; Sengupta, P.R.; Mishra, A. [National Physical Lab., New Delhi (India). Carbon Technology Unit

    2002-07-01

    Special graphite is considered as a critical component of the present-day tokamaks wherein it acts as the armour material for plasma-facing components. This graphite is required to possess, besides other characteristics, high values of bulk density, bending strength and electrical and thermal conductivities and a low value of ash content. Since such graphite was not commercially available in the country, efforts to develop it were initiated at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi. The basic approach to develop this graphite was based on green coke method of making the high density graphite, wherein the green coke was modified by incorporating in it small amounts of conducting carbon materials, i.e. needle coke, synthetic graphite and natural graphite. The resulting graphites were characterized with respect to various physical characteristics, namely, green density, weight loss, volume shrinkage, linear shrinkage, bulk density, bending strength, Young's modulus and electrical resistivity, etc. The results are described and discussed in the present paper. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Microstructural characterization and pore structure analysis of nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, J.; Karthik, C.; Butt, D.P.; Windes, W.E.; Ubic, R.

    2011-01-01

    Graphite will be used as a structural and moderator material in next-generation nuclear reactors. While the overall nature of the production of nuclear graphite is well understood, the historic nuclear grades of graphite are no longer available. This paper reports the virgin microstructural characteristics of filler particles and macro-scale porosity in virgin nuclear graphite grades of interest to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. Optical microscopy was used to characterize filler particle size and shape as well as the arrangement of shrinkage cracks. Computer aided image analysis was applied to optical images to quantitatively determine the variation of pore structure, area, eccentricity, and orientation within and between grades. The overall porosity ranged between ∼14% and 21%. A few large pores constitute the majority of the overall porosity. The distribution of pore area in all grades was roughly logarithmic in nature. The average pore was best fit by an ellipse with aspect ratio of ∼2. An estimated 0.6-0.9% of observed porosity was attributed to shrinkage cracks in the filler particles. Finally, a preferred orientation of the porosity was observed in all grades.

  13. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  14. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P.M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC 6 and YbC 6 in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition

  15. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  16. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1965-01-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m 3 and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m 2 /g (graphite particles about 1 μ), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m 2 /g (all the particles less than 0.3 μ). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [fr

  17. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ A. DE FREITAS PACHECO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  18. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  19. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  20. Solid state {sup 13}C NMR study on the synthesis of graphite oxide from different graphitic precursors; Estudo atravéS de RMN de {sup 13}C no estado sólido sobre a síntese de oxido de grafite utilizando diferentes precursores grafíticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Mariana A.; Frasson, Carolina Maria R.; Costa, Tainara Luiza G.; Cipriano, Daniel F.; Schettino Junior, Miguel A.; Cunha, Alfredo G.; Freitas, Jair C.C., E-mail: marianaarpini@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Carbonosos e Cerâmicos

    2017-10-15

    The influence of the structural and microstructural characteristics of graphitic precursors on the production of graphite oxide (GO) is investigated in the present work. Six different graphitic precursors were used to produce GO following a modified Hummers method, namely: natural graphite, commercial lubricant graphite, milled graphite, graphite flakes, high-purity graphite and graphite recycled from Li-ion batteries. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry, solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). {sup 13}C NMR spectra revealed the presence of epoxy, hydroxyl, carbonyl and lactol groups in the synthesized GOs. However, the oxidation degree of each product was found to be dependent on the average crystallite size (Lc) and particle size of the graphitic precursors, with the best GO samples being produced from the milled graphite and the graphite recycled from ion-Li batteries. These results were rationalized in terms of the structural and microstructural differences among the graphitic precursors, as revealed by the XRD patterns and SEM images, evidencing the importance of the correct choice of the precursor aiming the achievement of a well-developed structure for the GO product. (author)

  1. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  2. Contact Angle Hysteresis on Graphene Surfaces and Hysteresis-free Behavior on Oil-infused Graphite Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Woon, Wei-Yen [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane, E-mail: yjsheng@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong, E-mail: hktsao@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Contact angle hysteresis(CAH) on four graphitic surfacesisinvestigated. • The hysteresis loopof water drops on the polished graphite sheetshowsparticularly small receding contact angle. • The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis. • An oil-infused surface of a graphite sheet is produced by imbibition of hexadecane into its porous structure. • The hysteresis-free property for water drops on such a surface is examined and quantitatively explained. - Abstract: Contact angle hysteresis (CAH) on graphitic surfaces, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, reduced electrophoretic deposition (EPD) graphene, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and polished graphite sheet, has been investigated. The hysteresis loops of water drops on the first three samples are similar but the receding contact angle is particularly small for the polished graphite sheet.The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and HOPG associated with atom-scale roughness has to be attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis (surface relaxation), instead of roughness or defects.The difference of the wetting behavior among those four graphitic samples has been further demonstrated by hexadecane drops. On the surface of HOPG or CVD graphene,the contact line expands continuously with time, indicating total wetting for which the contact angle does not exist and contact line pinning disappears. In contrast, on the surface of reduced EPD graphene, spontaneous spreading is halted by spikes on it and partial wetting with small contact angle (θ≈4°) is obtained. On the surface of polished graphite sheet, the superlipophilicity and porous structure are demonstrated by imbibition and capillary rise of hexadecane. Consequently, an oil-infused graphite surface can be fabricated and the ultralow CAH of water (∆θ≈2°) is achieved.

  3. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  4. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  6. Modification of graphite structure by irradiation, revealed by thermal oxidation. Examination by electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouaud, Michel

    1969-01-01

    Based on the analysis of images obtained by electronic microscopy, this document reports the comparative study of the action of neutrons on three different graphites: a natural one (Ticonderoga) and two pyrolytic ones (Carbone-Lorraine and Raytheon). The approach is based on the modification of features of thermal oxidation of graphites by dry air after irradiation. Different corrosion features are identified. The author states that there seems to be a relationship between the number and shape of these features, and defects existing on the irradiated graphite before oxidation. For low doses, the feature aspect varies with depth at which oxidation occurs. For higher doses, the aspect remains the same [fr

  7. Studies on low-voltage x-ray radiography for graphite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Susumu; Itami, Hiroharu

    1978-09-01

    Low-voltage radiography has been studied to provide optimum technique for graphite less than 50 mm thick. First we determined the exposure conditions under which the most appropriate photographic density can be obtained. By parametric studies, an exposure chart was prepared. Then we studied how the environment of photographing affected the film density. Thirdly, by use of graphite materials with artificial flaws, Image Quality Indicator (I.Q.I.) sensitivity was determined. Detectability of a crack depended on an incidence angle of X-rays onto a crack. Finally, we photographed graphites having natural flaws and gained a useful information. (author)

  8. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kage, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 442, Nov (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * cast iron * graphite structure * pearlite content Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2016

  9. Initial Comparison of Baseline Physical and Mechanical Properties for the VHTR Candidate Graphite Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Mark C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). VHTR Program

    2014-09-01

    process. An analysis of the comparison between each of these grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in the overall variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for predicting in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear-grade graphites will naturally continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized with regard to strength, physical properties, and thermal performance from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  10. Graphitic structure formation in ion implanted polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavenner, E., E-mail: tazman1492@gmail.com [Creative Polymers Pty. Ltd., 41 Wilkinson Street, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Wood, B. [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Curry, M.; Jankovic, A.; Patel, R. [Center for Applied Science and Engineering, Missouri State University, 524 North Boonville Avenue, Springfield, MO 65806 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ion implantation is a technique that is used to change the electrical, optical, hardness and biocompatibility of a wide range of inorganic materials. This technique also imparts similar changes to organic or polymer based materials. With polymers, ion implantation can produce a carbon enriched volume. Knowledge as to the nature of this enrichment and its relative concentration is necessary to produce accurate models of the physical properties of the modified material. One technique that can achieve this is X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In this study the formation of graphite like structures in the near surface of polyetheretherketone by ion implantation has been elucidated from detailed analysis of the C 1s and valence band peak structures generated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further evidence is given by both Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection.

  11. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  12. Contribution to the study of internal friction in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, J.

    1969-03-01

    A study has been made of the internal friction in different graphites between -180 C and +500 C using a torsion pendulum; the graphites had been previously treated thermo-mechanically, by neutron irradiation and subjected to partial annealings. It has been shown that there occurs: a hysteretic type dissipation of energy, connected with interactions between dislocations and other defects in the matrix; a dissipation having a partially hysteretic character which can be interpreted by a Granato-Luke type formalism and which is connected with the presence of an 'ultra-micro porosity'; a dissipation by a relaxation mechanism after a small dose of irradiation; this is attributed to the reorientation of bi-interstitials; a dissipation having the characteristics of a solid state transformation, this during an annealing after irradiation. It is attributed to the reorganization of interstitial defects. Some information has thus been obtained concerning graphites, in particular: their behaviour at low mechanical stresses, the nature of irradiation defects and their behaviour during annealing, the structural changes occurring during graphitization, the relationship between internal friction and macroscopic mechanical properties. (author) [fr

  13. Graphite moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a 252 Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the 252 Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  14. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  15. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  16. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  17. Ferric chloride-graphite intercalation compounds as anode materials for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yongchun; Guo, Cong; Zhu, Xiaobo; Liang, Jianwen; Qian, Yitai

    2014-01-01

    Ferric chloride-graphite intercalation compounds (FeCl3 -GICs) with stage 1 and stage 2 structures were synthesized by reacting FeCl3 and expanded graphite (EG) in air in a stainless-steel autoclave. As rechargeable Li-ion batteries, these FeCl3 -GICs exhibit high capacity, excellent cycling stability, and superior rate capability, which could be attributed to their unique intercalation features. This work may enable new possibilities for the fabrication of Li-ion batteries. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Production technique of vermicular graphite iron cylinder head of vehicle diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Gen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The 25 years’production and application have proved that vermicular graphite iron cylinder heads with vermicularity ≥50% satisfy the machinability and performance demand of diesel engine. The method, in which using cupola-induction furnace duplex melting and pour-over process with rare earth-ferrosilicon or rare earthsilicon compound as vermicularizing alloy plus rare earth-magnesium-ferrosilicon as stirring alloy, is an optimal vermicularizing process for obtaining satisfi ed vermicularity. Using top kiss risers, enlarging kissing areas and expanding covering width and making ingates to freeze earlier are the effective measures to eliminate shrinkage, blowhole and oxide inclusions in the vermicular graphite iron cylinder heads.

  19. Comparative analysis of graphite oxidation behaviour based on microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badenhorst, Heinrich, E-mail: heinrich.badenhorst@up.ac.za; Focke, Walter

    2013-11-15

    Two unidentified powdered graphite samples, from a natural and a synthetic origin respectively, were examined. These materials are intended for use in nuclear applications, but have an unknown treatment history since they are considered proprietary. In order to establish a baseline for comparison, the samples were compared to two commercial flake natural graphite samples with varying impurity levels. The samples were characterized by conventional techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence. The results indicated that all four samples were very similar, with low impurity levels and good crystallinity, yet they exhibit remarkably different oxidation behaviours. The oxidized microstructures of the materials were examined using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy at low acceleration voltages. The relative influence of each factor affecting the oxidation was established, enabling a structured comparison of the different oxidative behaviours. Based on this analysis, it was possible to account for the measured differences in oxidative reactivity. The material with the lowest reactivity was a flake natural graphite which was characterized as having highly visible crystalline perfection, large particles with a high aspect ratio and no traces of catalytic activity. The second sample, which had an identical inherent microstructure, was found to have an increased reactivity due to the presence of small catalytic impurities. This material also exhibited a more gradual reduction in the oxidation rate at higher conversion, caused by the accumulation of particles which impede the oxidation. The sample with the highest reactivity was found to be a milled, natural graphite material, despite its evident crystallinity. The increased reactivity was attributable to a smaller particle size, the presence of catalytic impurities and extensive damage to the particle structure caused by jet milling. Despite displaying the lowest levels of

  20. Contribution to the study of internal friction in graphites; Contribution a l'etude du frottement interieur des graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlin, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    A study has been made of the internal friction in different graphites between -180 C and +500 C using a torsion pendulum; the graphites had been previously treated thermo-mechanically, by neutron irradiation and subjected to partial annealings. It has been shown that there occurs: a hysteretic type dissipation of energy, connected with interactions between dislocations and other defects in the matrix; a dissipation having a partially hysteretic character which can be interpreted by a Granato-Luke type formalism and which is connected with the presence of an 'ultra-micro porosity'; a dissipation by a relaxation mechanism after a small dose of irradiation; this is attributed to the reorientation of bi-interstitials; a dissipation having the characteristics of a solid state transformation, this during an annealing after irradiation. It is attributed to the reorganization of interstitial defects. Some information has thus been obtained concerning graphites, in particular: their behaviour at low mechanical stresses, the nature of irradiation defects and their behaviour during annealing, the structural changes occurring during graphitization, the relationship between internal friction and macroscopic mechanical properties. (author) [French] L'etude du coefficient de frottement interieur au moyen d'un pendule de torsion entre -180 C et +500 C a ete realisee pour differents graphites apres des traitements thermo-mecaniques, des irradiations neutroniques et des guerisons partielles. Il a ete mis en evidence: une dissipation d'energie a caractere hysteretique, reliee aux interactions des dislocations avec les autres defauts de la matrice; une dissipation a caractere partiellement hysteretique, interpretable par un formalisme type Granato-Lucke et reliee a la presence d'une ''ultra-microporosite''; une dissipation par un mecanisme de relaxation, apres irradiation a faible dose, attribuee a la reorientation de di-interstitiels; une dissipation presentant les caracteristiques d

  1. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  2. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  3. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  4. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  5. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  6. Dynamics of graphite flake on a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K.; Tsuda, D.; Kaneta, Y.; Harada, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Sasaki, N.

    2006-11-01

    One-directional motion, where graphite flakes are driven by a nanotip on an octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) liquid surface, is presented. A transition from quasiperiodic to chaotic motions occurs in the dynamics of a graphite flake when its velocity is increased. The dynamics of graphite flakes pulled by the nanotip on an OMCTS liquid surface can be treated as that of a nanobody on a liquid.

  7. Sealing nuclear graphite with pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shanglei; Xu, Li; Li, Li; Bai, Shuo; Yang, Xinmei; Zhou, Xingtai

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings were deposited on IG-110 nuclear graphite by thermal decomposition of methane at ∼1830 °C. The PyC coatings are anisotropic and airtight enough to protect IG-110 nuclear graphite against the permeation of molten fluoride salts and the diffusion of gases. The investigations indicate that the sealing nuclear graphite with PyC coating is a promising method for its application in Molten Salt Reactor (MSR)

  8. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  9. Production of nuclear graphite in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L.; Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H.

    1955-01-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [fr

  10. AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger

    2017-08-22

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam. An energy conversion device utilizes heat energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a heat energy consuming function. A device for heating a fluid and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  11. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  12. Principle design and data of graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Oku, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled reactor with prismatic fuel elements of hexagonal blocks. The reactor internal structures of the HTTR are mainly made up of graphite components. As well known, the graphite is a brittle material and there were no available design criteria for brittle materials. Therefore, JAERI had to develop the design criteria taking account of the brittle fracture behavior. In this paper, concept and key specification of the developed graphite design criteria is described, and also an outline of the quality control specified in the design criteria is mentioned

  13. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  14. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  15. Transformation of graphite by tectonic and hydrothermal processes in an active plate boundary fault zone, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Matina; Toy, Virginia; Timms, Nicholas; Halfpenny, Angela; Menzies, Catriona; Craw, Dave; Rooney, Jeremy; Giorgetti, Carolina

    2017-04-01

    Graphite is a material with one of the lowest frictional strengths, with coefficient of friction of 0.1 and thus in natural fault zones it may act as a natural solid lubricant. Graphitization, or the transformation of organic matter (carbonaceous material, or CM) into crystalline graphite, is induced by compositional and structural changes during diagenesis and metamorphism. The supposed irreversible nature of this process has allowed the degree of graphite crystallinity to be calibrated as an indicator of the peak temperatures reached during progressive metamorphism. We examine processes of graphite emplacement and deformation in the Alpine Fault Zone, New Zealand's active continental tectonic plate boundary. Raman spectrometry indicates that graphite in the distal, amphibolite-facies Alpine Schist, which experienced peak metamorphic temperatures up to 640 ◦C, is highly crystalline and occurs mainly along grain boundaries within quartzo-feldspathic domains. The subsequent mylonitisation in the Alpine Fault Zone resulted in progressive reworking of CM under lower temperature conditions (500◦C-600◦C) in a structurally controlled environment, resulting in spatial clustering in lower-strain protomylonites, and further foliation-alignment in higher-strain mylonites. Subsequent brittle deformation of the mylonitised schists resulted in cataclasites that contain over three-fold increase in the abundance of graphite than mylonites. Furthermore, cataclasites contain graphite with two different habits: highly-crystalline, foliated forms that are inherited mylonitic graphite; and lower-crystallinity, less mature patches of finer-grained graphite. The observed graphite enrichment and the occurrence of poorly-organised graphite in the Alpine Fault cataclasites could result from: i) hydrothermal precipitation from carbon-supersaturated fluids; and/or ii) mechanical degradation by structural disordering of mylonitic graphite combined with strain-induced graphite

  16. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  17. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  18. Bearingless helicopter main rotor development. Volume 2: Combined load fatigue evaluation of weathered graphite/epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackiewicz, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Small scale combined load fatigue tests were conducted on six artificially and six naturally weathered test specimens. The test specimen material was unidirectionally oriented A-S graphite - woven glass scrim epoxy resin laminate.

  19. Exponential experiment on a uranium-graphite lattice; Experience exponentielle sur un reseau uranium-graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, J; Martelly, J

    1958-12-01

    An exponential experiment on a natural uranium and graphite lattice is described. The critical buckling for a cubic pile made with this lattice is B{sup 2} = 0.726 {+-} 0.011 m{sup -2} and the anisotropy {alpha} = (B{sub L}{sup 2}/B{sub T}{sup 2}) is 0.987 {+-} 0.006. The behavior of the neutron density in the lattice near the reflector and sources is discussed in detail. (authors) [French] Une experience exponentielle sur reseau a uranium naturel et graphite est decrite. Le Laplacien de la pile cubique nue, critique, constituee avec un tel reseau serait: B{sup 2} = 0.726 {+-} 0.011 m{sup -2} et l'anisotropie {alpha} (B{sub L}{sup 2}/B{sub T}{sup 2}) est egale a 0.987 {+-} 0.006. La perturbation apportee a la densite de neutrons dans le reseau par le voisinage du reflecteur est discutee en detail. (auteurs)

  20. Thermodynamic Analysis of Cast Irons Solidification With Various Types of Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbel T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution summarises the results of oxygen activity determinations, which were measured and registered continuously in castings from cast irons with various types of graphite. The results were used to find the relationship between two variables: natural logarithm of oxygen activities and reverse value of thermodynamic temperature 1 /T. Obtained regression lines were used to calculate oxygen activity at different temperatures, to calculate Gibbs free energy ΔG at the different temperatures and to calculate the single ΔG value for significant temperature of the graphite solidification. The results were processed by a statistical analysis of data files for the different types of graphite with flake, vermicular and spheroidal graphite. Each material has its proper typical oxygen activities range and individual temperature function of Gibbs free energy for analysing and governing casting quality.

  1. Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with graphite nanoparticles and carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang [Lexington, KY; Lockwood, Frances E [Georgetown, KY

    2008-03-25

    A fluid media such as oil or water, and a selected effective amount of carbon nanomaterials necessary to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fluid. One of the preferred carbon nanomaterials is a high thermal conductivity graphite, exceeding that of the neat fluid to be dispersed therein in thermal conductivity, and ground, milled, or naturally prepared with mean particle size less than 500 nm, and preferably less than 200 nm, and most preferably less than 100 nm. The graphite is dispersed in the fluid by one or more of various methods, including ultrasonication, milling, and chemical dispersion. Carbon nanotubes with graphitic structure is another preferred source of carbon nanomaterial, although other carbon nanomaterials are acceptable. To confer long term stability, the use of one or more chemical dispersants is preferred. The thermal conductivity enhancement, compared to the fluid without carbon nanomaterial, is proportional to the amount of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and/or graphite) added.

  2. Hydrogen storage in graphitic nanofibres

    OpenAIRE

    McCaldin, Simon Roger

    2007-01-01

    There is huge need to develop an alternative to hydrocarbons fuel, which does not produce CO2 or contribute to global warming - 'the hydrogen economy' is such an alternative, however the storage of hydrogen is the key technical barrier that must be overcome. The potential of graphitic nanofibres (GNFs) to be used as materials to allow the solid-state storage of hydrogen has thus been investigated. This has been conducted with a view to further developing the understanding of the mechanism(s) ...

  3. A-coupled-expanding and distributional chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cholsan; Ju, Hyonhui; Chen, Minghao; Raith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The concept of A-coupled-expanding maps is one of the more natural and useful ideas generalized from the horseshoe map which is commonly known as a criterion of chaos. It is well known that distributional chaos is one of the concepts which reflect strong chaotic behavior. In this paper, we focus on the relationship between A-coupled-expanding and distributional chaos. We prove two theorems which give sufficient conditions for a strictly A-coupled-expanding map to be distributionally chaotic in the senses of two kinds, where A is an m × m irreducible transition matrix

  4. Mixed graphite cast iron for automotive exhaust component applications

    OpenAIRE

    De-lin Li

    2017-01-01

    Both spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron are used in the automotive industry. A recently proposed mixed graphite iron exhibits a microstructure between the conventional spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron. Evaluation results clearly indicate the suitability and benefits of mixed graphite iron for exhaust component applications with respect to casting, machining, mechanical, thermophysical, oxidation, and thermal fatigue properties. A new ASTM standard speci...

  5. Nuclear graphite waste management. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the seminar was to bring together the specialists dealing with various aspects of radioactive graphite waste management to exchange and review information on the decommissioning, characterisation, processing and disposal of irradiated graphite from reactor cores and other graphite waste associated with reactor operation. The seminar covered radioactive graphite characterisation, the effect of irradiation on graphite components, Wigner energy, radioactive graphite waste treatment, conditioning, interim storage and long term disposal options. Individual papers presented at the seminar were indexed separately

  6. Surface science. Adhesion and friction in mesoscopic graphite contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Elad; Lörtscher, Emanuel; Rawlings, Colin; Knoll, Armin W; Duerig, Urs

    2015-05-08

    The weak interlayer binding in two-dimensional layered materials such as graphite gives rise to poorly understood low-friction characteristics. Accurate measurements of the adhesion forces governing the overall mechanical stability have also remained elusive. We report on the direct mechanical measurement of line tension and friction forces acting in sheared mesoscale graphite structures. We show that the friction is fundamentally stochastic in nature and is attributable to the interaction between the incommensurate interface lattices. We also measured an adhesion energy of 0.227 ± 0.005 joules per square meter, in excellent agreement with theoretical models. In addition, bistable all-mechanical memory cell structures and rotational bearings have been realized by exploiting position locking, which is provided solely by the adhesion energy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Analysis of Wigner energy release process in graphite stack of shut-down uranium-graphite reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bespala, E. V.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Data, which finding during thermal differential analysis of sampled irradiated graphite are presented. Results of computational modeling of Winger energy release process from irradiated graphite staking are demonstrated. It's shown, that spontaneous combustion of graphite possible only in adiabatic case.

  8. Mixed graphite cast iron for automotive exhaust component applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-lin Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Both spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron are used in the automotive industry. A recently proposed mixed graphite iron exhibits a microstructure between the conventional spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron. Evaluation results clearly indicate the suitability and benefits of mixed graphite iron for exhaust component applications with respect to casting, machining, mechanical, thermophysical, oxidation, and thermal fatigue properties. A new ASTM standard specification (A1095 has been created for compacted, mixed, and spheroidal graphite silicon-molybdenum iron castings. This paper attempts to outline the latest progress in mixed graphite iron published.

  9. Methodology of characterization of radioactive graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Lara, E.; Magro, E.; Gascon, J. L.; Leganes, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the dismantling of Vandellos I, ENRESA has promoted the precise knowledge of the inventory of irradiated graphite (graphite-i) through establishing methodologies for radiological characterization of the vector of radionuclides of interest and their correlations as the primary means of characterization strategy to establish the safer management of this material in its life cycle. (Author)

  10. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux...

  11. Inhibition of oxidation in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.; Windes, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off-normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high-temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off-normal design basis event where an oxidising atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high-temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postulated air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B 4 C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. The proposed addition of B 4 C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimise B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed. (authors)

  12. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1989-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particularly in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metallic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite used in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapor pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  13. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particulary in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metalic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite and in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapour pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. (author)

  14. Tire containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A tire, tire lining or inner tube, containing a polymer composite, made of at least one rubber and/or at least one elastomer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g.

  15. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  16. Mechanical and tribological properties of acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber filled with graphite and carbon black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei Lei; Zhang, Li Qun; Tian, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Graphite/carbon black/rubber micro- and nano-composites were prepared. ► Nanocomposites showed better mechanical properties and wear resistance. ► The effect of load and sliding speed on friction and wear is significant. ► Graphite lubricant film can reduce friction coefficient and wear rate. -- Abstract: In this work, acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber (NBR)/expanded graphite (EG)/carbon black (CB) micro- and nanocomposites were prepared by two different methods, and the resulting mechanical and tribological properties were compared with those of NBR/CB composites. Meanwhile, the effects of graphite dispersion and loading content, as well as the applied load and sliding velocity on the tribological behavior of the above composites under dry friction condition were also evaluated. The worn surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to disclose wear mechanism. As expected, the better the dispersion of graphite, the more remarkable enhancement on tensile and dynamic mechanical properties, and the greater reduction in the coefficient of friction (COF) and specific wear rate (W s ). It was found that a small amount of EG could effectively decrease COF and W s of NBR/CB composites because of the formation of graphite lubricant films. The COF and W s of NBR/CB/EG composites show a decreasing trend with a rise in applied load and sliding velocity. NBR/CB/EG nanocomposite always shows a stable wearing process with relatively low COF and W s . It is thought that well-dispersed graphite nano-sheets were beneficial to the formation of a fine and durable lubricant film.

  17. Effect of covalently bonded polysiloxane multilayers on the electrochemical behavior of graphite electrode in lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Qinmin; Jiang, Yinghua [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Polysiloxane multilayers were covalently bonded to the surface of natural graphite particles via diazonium chemistry and silylation reaction. The as-prepared graphite exhibited excellent discharge-charge behavior as negative electrode materials in lithium ion batteries. The improvement in the electrochemical performance of the graphite electrodes was attributed to the formation of a stable and flexible passive film on their surfaces. It was also revealed that the chemical compositions of the multilayers exerted influence on the electrochemical behavior of the graphite electrodes. The result of this study presents a new strategy to the formation of elastic and strong passive film on the graphite electrode via molecular design. Owing to the diversity of polysilxoane multilayers, this method also enables researchers to control the surface chemistries of carbonaceous materials with flexibility. (author)

  18. Methane generated from graphite--tritium interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    When hydrogen isotopes are separated by cryogenic distillation, as little as 1 ppM of methane will eventually plug the still as frost accumulates on the column packings. Elemental carbon exposed to tritium generates methane spontaneously, and yet some dry transfer pumps, otherwise compatible with tritium, convey the gas with graphite rotors. This study was to determine the methane production rate for graphite in tritium. A pump manufacturer supplied graphite samples that we exposed to tritium gas at 0.8 atm. After 137 days we measured a methane synthesis rate of 6 ng/h per cm 2 of graphite exposed. At this rate methane might grow to a concentration of 0.01 ppM when pure tritium is transferred once through a typical graphite--rotor transfer pump. Such a low methane level will not cause column blockage, even if the cryogenic still is operated continuously for many years

  19. Chemical sputtering of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, N.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Y.V.

    1976-01-01

    In a study of the sputtering coefficient S for the sputtering of graphite by 10-keV H + ions as a function of the graphite temperature during the bombardment, it is found that at T> or =750degreeC the coefficient S is independent of the target temperature and has an anomalously high value, S=0.085 atom/ion. The high rate of sputtering of graphite by atomic hydrogen ions is shown to be due to chemical sputtering of the graphite, resulting primarily in the formation of CH 4 molecules. At T=1100degreeC, S falls off by a factor of about 3. A model for the chemical sputtering of graphite is proposed

  20. Graphite selection for the FMIT test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-06-01

    This document provides the basis for procuring a grade of graphite, at minimum cost, having minimum dimensional changes at low irradiation temperatures (nominal range 90 to 140 0 C). In light of those constraints, the author concludes that the most feasible approach is to attempt to reproduce a grade of graphite (TSGBF) which has exhibited a high degree of dimensional stability during low-temperature irradiations and on which irradiation-induced changes in other physical properties have been measured. The effects of differences in raw materials, especially coke morphology, and processing conditions, primarily graphitization temperture are briefly reviewed in terms of the practicality of producing a new grade of graphite with physical properties and irradiation-induced changes which would be very similar to those of TSGBF graphite. The production history and physical properties of TSGBF are also reviewed; no attempt is made, to project changes in dimensions or physical properties under the projected irradiation conditions

  1. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  2. Irradiation test plan of oxidation-resistant graphite in WWR-K Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Sakaba, Nariaki; Osaki, Hirotaka; Kato, Hideki; Fujitsuka, Kunihiro; Muto, Takenori; Gizatulin, Shamil; Shaimerdenov, Asset; Dyussambayev, Daulet; Chakrov, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Graphite materials are used for the in-core components of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor. In the case of air ingress accident in HTGR, SiO_2 protective layer is formed on the surface of SiC layer in TRISO CFP and oxidation of SiC does not proceed and fission products are retained inside the fuel particle. A new safety concept for the HTGR, called Naturally Safe HTGR, has been recently proposed. To enhance the safety of Naturally Safe HTGR ultimately, it is expected that oxidation-resistant graphite is used for graphite components to prevent the TRISO CFPs and fuel compacts from failure. SiC coating is one of candidate methods for oxidation-resistant graphite. JAEA and four graphite companies launched R&Ds to develop the oxidation-resistant graphite and the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) partner project with JAEA and INP was launched to investigate the irradiation effects on the oxidation-resistant graphite. To determine grades of the oxidation-resistant graphite which will be adopted as irradiation test, a preliminary oxidation test was carried out. This paper described the results of the preliminary oxidation test, the plan of out-of-pile test, irradiation test and post-irradiation test (PIE) of the oxidation-resistant graphite. The results of the preliminary oxidation test showed that the integrity of the oxidation resistant graphite was confirmed and that all of grades used in the preliminary test can be adopted as the irradiation test. Target irradiation temperature was determined to be 1473 (K) and neutron fluence was determined to be from 0.54 × 10"2"5through 1.4 × 10"2"5 (/m"2, E>0.18MeV). Weight change, oxidation rate, activation energy, surface condition, etc. will be evaluated in out-of-pile test and weight change, irradiation effect on oxidation rate and activation energy, surface condition, etc. will be evaluated in PIE. (author)

  3. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed

  4. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  5. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  6. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  7. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  8. Study of graphite reactivity worth on well-defined cores assembled on LR-0 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Košťál, Michal; Rypar, Vojtěch; Milčák, Ján; Juříček, Vlastimil; Losa, Evžen; Forget, Benoit; Harper, Sterling

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A light water critical facility for graphite reactivity worth measurements. • Comparison of calculated and measured k eff . • Effect of graphite description on k eff . - Abstract: Graphite is an often-used moderating material on the basis of its good moderating power and very low absorption cross section. This small absorption cross section permits the use of natural or low-enriched uranium in graphite moderated reactors. Graphite is now being considered as the moderator for Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR). The critical moderator level was measured for various graphite block configurations in an experimental dry assembly of the LR-0 reactor. Comparisons with experiments were performed between Monte Carlo simulation tools for which satisfactory agreement was obtained with the exception of some systematic discrepancies. The larger discrepancies were observed when using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. To decrease the uncertainties, based on conservative assumptions, relative comparisons were done. The results provided by the different nuclear data libraries are within 3 sigma interval of experimental uncertainties. It has been determined that differences between the results of calculations are caused by variations in the (n,n), (n,n′), (n,g) reactions and also by various angular distributions, while the (n,g) cross section variations play only a minor role for these configurations.

  9. Study on efficient methods for removal and treatment of graphite blocks in a gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, S.; Shirakawa, M.; Murakami, T.

    2001-01-01

    Tokai Power Station (GCR, 166 MWe) started its commercial operation on July 1966 and ceased activities at the end of March 1998 after 32 years of operation. The decommissioning plans are being developed, to prepare for near future dismantling. In the study, the methods for removal of the graphite blocks of about 1,600 ton have been developed to carrying it out safely and in a short period of time, and the methods of treatment of graphite have also been developed. All technological items have been identified for which R and D work will be required for removal from the core and treatment for disposal. (1) In order to reduce the programme required for the dismantling of reactor internals, an efficient method for removal of the graphite blocks is necessary. For this purpose the design of a dismantling machine has been investigated which can extract several blocks at a time. The conceptual design has being developed and the model has been manufactured and tested in a mock-up facility. (2) In order to reduce disposal costs, it will be necessary to segment the graphite blocks, maximising the packing density available in the disposal containers. Some of the graphite blocks will be cut into pieces longitudinally by a remote machine. Relevant technical matters have been identified, such as graphite cutting methods, the nature of fine particles arising from the cutting operation, the treatment of fine particles for disposal, and the method of mortar filling inside the waste container. (author)

  10. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  11. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  12. Decolorizing of azo dye Reactive red 24 aqueous solution using exfoliated graphite and H2O2 under ultrasound irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Li, Ji-Tai; Sun, Han-Wen

    2008-07-01

    At its natural pH (6.95), the decolorization of Reactive red 24 in ultrasound, ultrasound/H2O2, exfoliated graphite, ultrasound/exfoliated graphite, exfoliated graphite/H2O2 and ultrasound/exfoliated graphite/H2O2 systems were compared. An enhancement was observed for the decolorization in ultrasound/exfoliated graphite/H2O2 system. The effect of solution pH, H2O2 and exfoliated graphite dosages, and temperature on the decolorization of Reactive red 24 was investigated. The sonochemical treatment in combination with exfoliated graphite/H2O2 showed a synergistic effect for the decolorization of Reactive red 24. The results indicated that under proper conditions, there was a possibility to remove Reactive red 24 very efficient from aqueous solution. The decolorization of other azo dyes (Reactive red 2, Methyl orange, Acid red 1, Acid red 73, Acid red 249, Acid orange 7, Acid blue 113, Acid brown 75, Acid green 20, Acid yellow 42, Acid mordant brown 33, Acid mordant yellow 10 and Direct green 1) was also investigated, at their natural pH.

  13. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Bratton, Rob; Marsden, Barry; Srinivasan, Makuteswara; Penfield, Scott; Mitchell, Mark; Windes, Will

    2008-01-01

    ) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation

  14. Channel uranium-graphite reactor mounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polushkin, K.K.; Kuznetsov, A.G.; Zheleznyakov, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    According to theoretical principles of general engineering technology the engineering experience of construction-mounting works at the NPP with channel uranium-graphite reactors is systematized. Main parameters and structural features of the 1000 MW channel uranium-graphite reactors are considered. The succession of mounting operations, premounting equipment and pipelines preparation and mounting works technique are described. The most efficient methods of fitting, welding and machining of reactor elements are recommended. Main problems of technical control service are discussed. A typical netted diagram of main equipment of channel uranium-graphite reactors mounting is given

  15. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  17. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  18. Electron spin resonance in neutron-irradiated graphite. Dependence on temperature and effect of annealing; Resonance paramagnetique du graphite irradie aux neutrons. Variation en fonction de la temperature et experiences de recuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kester, T [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Laboratoire de resonance magnetique

    1967-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin resonance signal from neutron irradiated graphite has been studied. The results lead to an interpretation of the nature of the paramagnetic centers created by irradiation. In annealing experiments on graphite samples, which had been irradiated at low temperature, two annealing peaks and one anti-annealing peak were found. Interpretations are proposed for these peaks. (author) [French] Le graphite irradie aux neutrons a ete etudie par resonance paramagnetique electronique en fonction de la temperature. La nature des centres paramagnetiques crees par irradiation est interpretee a l'aide des resultats. Des experiences de recuit sur des echantillons de graphite irradie a 77 deg. K ont permis de mettre en evidence deux pics de recuit et un pic d'anti-recuit, pour lesquels des interpretations sont proposees. (auteur)

  19. Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids by electrochemical exfoliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Ming; Lai, Wei-Hao [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-14

    Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids are obtained by electrochemical exfoliation with hydrophobic graphite electrodes. Such counterintuitive characteristics are caused by partial oxidation and investigated by examining both graphite electrodes and exfoliated particles after electrolysis. The extent of surface oxidation can be explored through contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, electrical sheet resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta-potential analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-visible, and Raman spectroscopy. The degree of wettability of the graphite anode can be altered by the electrolytic current and time. The water contact angle declines generally with increasing the electrolytic current or time. After a sufficient time, the graphite anode becomes superhydrophilic and its hydrophobicity can be recovered by peeling with adhesive tape. This consequence reveals that the anodic graphite is oxidized by oxygen bubbles but the oxidation just occurs at the outer layers of the graphite sheet. Moreover, the characteristics of oxidation revealed by UV peak shift, peak ratio between D and G bands, and negative zeta-potential indicate the presence of graphite oxide on the outer shell of the exfoliated colloids. However, thermogravimetric analysis for the extent of decomposition of oxygen functional groups verifies that the amount of oxygen groups is significantly less than that of graphite oxide prepared via Hummer method. The structure of this partially oxidized graphite may consist of a graphite core covered with an oxidized shell. The properties of the exfoliated colloids are also influenced by pH of the electrolytic solution. As pH is increased, the extent of oxidation descends and the thickness of oxidized shell decreases. Those results reveal that the degree of oxidation of exfoliated nanoparticles can be manipulated simply by controlling pH.

  20. Performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Department of Applied Chemistry, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The effect of negative to positive electrode materials' weight ratio on the electrochemical performance of both activated carbon (AC)/AC and AC/graphite capacitors has been investigated, especially in the terms of capacity and cycle-ability. The limited capacity charge mode has been proposed to improve the cycle performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite. (author)

  1. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  2. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an radioactive waste processing of graphite from graphite moderated nuclear reactors at its decommissioning is discussed. Methods of processing of irradiated graphite are presented. It can be concluded that advanced methods for graphite radioactive waste handling are available nowadays. Implementation of these methods will allow to enhance environmental safety of nuclear power that will benefit its progress in the future

  3. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  4. Seismic research on graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Shigang; Sun Libin; Zhang Zhengming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reactors with graphite core structure include production reactor, water-cooled graphite reactor, gas-cooled reactor, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and so on. Multi-body graphite core structure has nonlinear response under seismic excitation, which is different from the response of general civil structure, metal connection structure or bolted structure. Purpose: In order to provide references for the designing and construction of HTR-PM. This paper reviews the history of reactor seismic research evaluation from certain countries, and summarizes the research methods and research results. Methods: By comparing the methods adopted in different gas-cooled reactor cores, inspiration for our own HTR seismic research was achieved. Results and Conclusions: In this paper, the research ideas of graphite core seismic during the process of designing, constructing and operating HTR-10 are expounded. Also the project progress of HTR-PM and the research on side reflection with the theory of similarity is introduced. (authors)

  5. Review: BNL Tokamak graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The BNL minimum activity graphite blanket designs are reviewed, and three are discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a 30 cm or thicker graphite screen. Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy, which is then radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma. (Auth.)

  6. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report

  7. Optical motion control of maglev graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Abe, Jiro

    2012-12-26

    Graphite has been known as a typical diamagnetic material and can be levitated in the strong magnetic field. Here we show that the magnetically levitating pyrolytic graphite can be moved in the arbitrary place by simple photoirradiation. It is notable that the optical motion control system described in this paper requires only NdFeB permanent magnets and light source. The optical movement is driven by photothermally induced changes in the magnetic susceptibility of the graphite. Moreover, we demonstrate that light energy can be converted into rotational kinetic energy by means of the photothermal property. We find that the levitating graphite disk rotates at over 200 rpm under the sunlight, making it possible to develop a new class of light energy conversion system.

  8. Study on graphite samples for nuclear usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.M.; Silva Roseira, M. da

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The graphite, due to its properties (mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, high-temperature stability, machinability etc.) have many industrial applications, and consequently, an important strategic value. In the nuclear area, it has been used as moderator and reflector of neutrons in the fission process of uranium. The graphite can be produced from many types of carbonaceous materials by a variety of process dominated by the manufactures. This is the reason why there are in the world market a lot of graphite types with different physical and mechanical properties. The present investigation studies some physical characteristics of the graphite samples destined to use in a nuclear reactor. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  9. Collective modes in superconducting rhombohedral graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppila, Ville [O.V. Lounasmaa Laboratory, Aalto University (Finland); Hyart, Timo; Heikkilae, Tero [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2015-07-01

    Recently it was realized that coupling particles with a Dirac dispersion (such as electrons in graphene) can lead to a topologically protected state with flat band dispersion. Such a state could support superconductivity with unusually high critical temperatures. Perhaps the most promising way to realize such coupling in real materials is in the surface of rhombohedrally stacked graphite. We consider collective excitations (i.e. the Higgs modes) in surface superconducting rhombohedral graphite. We find two amplitude and two phase modes corresponding to the two surfaces of the graphite where the superconductivity lives. We calculate the dispersion of these modes. We also derive the Ginzburg-Landau theory for this material. We show that in superconducting rhombohedral graphite, the collective modes, unlike in conventional BCS superconductors, give a large contribution to thermodynamic properties of the material.

  10. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction...

  11. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  12. Vapour pressure of caesium over nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Pummery, F.C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The vapour pressure of caesium over a fine-grained isotropic moulded gilsocarbon nuclear graphite intended for use in the manufacture of fuel tubes for the high temperature reactor has been determined as a function of temperature and concentration by means of the Knudsen effusion technique. The concentration range 0 to 10 μg caesium/g graphite was investigated and it was concluded that a Langmuir adsorption situation exists under these conditions. (author)

  13. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayasse, J.-B.

    1977-01-01

    The graphite elastic constants C 33 and C 44 , reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated [fr

  14. Energy evaluations, graphite corrosion in Bugey I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Fiche, C.

    1967-01-01

    Bugey I presents a problem of radiolytic corrosion of the graphite by the CO 2 under pressure at high temperature. This report aims to evaluate the energy transferred to the gas by a Bugey I core cell, in normal operating conditions. The water, the carbon oxides and the hydrogen formed quantities are deduced as the consumed graphite and methane. Experimental studies are realized in parallel to validate the presented results. (A.L.B.)

  15. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  16. Effect of structural disorder on quantum oscillations in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, B. C., E-mail: b.c-camargo@yahoo.com.br; Kopelevich, Y. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Usher, A.; Hubbard, S. B. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-18

    We have studied the effect of structural disorder on the de Haas van Alphen and Shubnikov de Haas quantum oscillations measured in natural, Kish, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples at temperatures down to 30 mK and at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The measurements were performed on different samples characterized by means of x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy techniques. Our results reveal a correlation between the amplitude of quantum oscillations and the sample surface roughness.

  17. Monte Carlo calculations of fast effects in uranium graphite lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beardwood, J.E.; Tyror, J.G.

    1962-12-01

    Details are given of the results of a series of computations of fast neutron effects in natural uranium metal/graphite cells. The computations were performed using the Monte Carlo code SPEC. It is shown that neutron capture in U238 is conveniently discussed in terms of a capture escape probability ζ as well as the conventional probability p. The latter is associated with the slowing down flux and has the classical exponential dependence on fuel-to-moderator volume ratio whilst the former is identified with the component of neutron flux above 1/E. (author)

  18. Some equipment for graphite research in swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, M.; Arragon, Ph.; Dupont, G.; Gentil, J.; Tanis, G.

    1964-01-01

    The irradiation devices described are used for research concerning reactors of the natural uranium type, moderated by graphite and cooled by carbon dioxide. The devices are generally designed for use in swimming pool reactors. The following points have been particularly studied: - maximum use of the irradiation volume, - use of the simplest technological solutions, - standardization of certain constituent parts. This standardization calls for precision machining and careful assembling; these requirements are also true when a relatively low irradiation temperature is required and the nuclear heating is pronounced. Finally, the design of these devices is suitable for the irradiation of other fissile or non-fissile materials. (authors) [fr

  19. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  20. SHEAR ACCELERATION IN EXPANDING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, F. M. [ZAH, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Duffy, P., E-mail: frank.rieger@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: peter.duffy@ucd.ie [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2016-12-10

    Shear flows are naturally expected to occur in astrophysical environments and potential sites of continuous non-thermal Fermi-type particle acceleration. Here we investigate the efficiency of expanding relativistic outflows to facilitate the acceleration of energetic charged particles to higher energies. To this end, the gradual shear acceleration coefficient is derived based on an analytical treatment. The results are applied to the context of the relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. The inferred acceleration timescale is investigated for a variety of conical flow profiles (i.e., power law, Gaussian, Fermi–Dirac) and compared to the relevant radiative and non-radiative loss timescales. The results exemplify that relativistic shear flows are capable of boosting cosmic-rays to extreme energies. Efficient electron acceleration, on the other hand, requires weak magnetic fields and may thus be accompanied by a delayed onset of particle energization and affect the overall jet appearance (e.g., core, ridge line, and limb-brightening).

  1. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  2. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  3. Expanding Your Horizon 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaltenhauser, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Expanding your horizons is a bi-annual “Science Day” for girls aged 11 to 14, held at the University of Geneva on 14 November. The girls had the opportunity to take part in hands-on workshops held by local professional women in the field of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. For the fourth time, CERN was part of this event, offering three workshops as well as a booth at the Discovery Fair, including Higgnite, an interactive visualization of the Higgs Field.

  4. Pressure and graphite effects on electrical conductivity in pyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Liu, T.; Shen, K.; Li, B.

    2017-12-01

    The geophysical observations including magnetotelluric (MT) and geomagnetic deep sounding show the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Earth's interior. The laboratory-based conductivity measurements of minerals and rocks are usually used to interpret the geophysical observations. Pyroxene is the second most abundant components in the upper mantle, and the electrical conductivity of pyroxene is important to understanding the bulk electrical conductivity. The electrical conductivity of a mineral is affected by many factors, such as its chemical composition, temperature, pressure. Here we report the effects of pressure and graphite on the electrical conductivity of pyroxene and applied to interpretation of MT observation. The starting materials are natural of orthopyroxene and clinopyroxe crystals. A powder sample with grain size 10 um was packed in a Mo capsule and hot-pressed at high pressures and temperatures using a 1000-ton Walker-type uniaxial split-cylinder apparatus. A mixture of pyroxene and a few percent of diamond was annealed at high pressure and temperature. All the hot-pressed samples before and after electrical conductivity measurements, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-Transform Infrared and Raman spectroscopy. High pressure conductivity experiments were carried out in a Walker-type multi-anvil apparatus using a 14/8 assembly. We use a Solartron 1260 Impedance/Gain -phase analyzer with 1V applied voltage within a frequency range of 1M-0.1 Hz to collect data. Complex impedance data on were collected in several heating and cooling cycles The electrical conductivity of pyroxene was made at 4,7,10 GPa, and electrical conductivity of the graphite-bearing pyroxene was measured at 4GPa. The results show the electrical conductivity decrease with the increasing of pressure, which may correspond to the transform from orthopyroxene to clinopyroxene. The results can be used to explain a drop of the electrical conductivity in

  5. Production of nuclear graphite in France; Production de graphite nucleaire en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, P; Mondet, L [Societe Pechiney, 74 - Chedde (France); Arragon, Ph; Cornuault, P; Gueron, J; Hering, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [French] Le graphite destine a la construction des reacteurs est obtenu par le procede usuel: confection d'une pate a partir de coke de petrole et de brai, cuisson de cette pate (au four electrique) puis graphitation du produit cuit, egalement par chauffage electrique. L'usage du transport pneumatique et le controle des conditions cuisson et de graphitation ont permit d'augmenter la production de graphite nucleaire ainsi que de mieux controler ses proprietes physiques et mecaniques et de reduire au minimum les souillures accidentelles. (M.B.)

  6. Temperature distribution in graphite during annealing in air cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, C.R. de.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the evaluation temperature distributions in graphite during annealing operation in graphite. Moderated an-cooled reactors, is presented. One single channel and one dimension for air and graphite were considered. A numerical method based on finite control volumes was used for partioning the mathematical equations. The problem solution involves the use of unsteady equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for air, and energy conservation for graphite. The source term was considered as stored energy release during annealing for describing energy conservation in the graphite. The coupling of energy conservation equations in air and graphite is performed by the heat transfer term betwen air and graphite. The results agree with experimental data. A sensitivity analysis shown that the termal conductivity of graphite and the maximum inlet channel temperature have great effect on the maximum temperature reached in graphite during the annealing. (author)

  7. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudur Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  8. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masudur; Neff, David; Green, Nathaniel; Norton, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material. PMID:28335324

  9. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept

  10. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) project is a NASA-industry partnership with Bigelow Aerospace (BA) that has developing the first human-rated expandable...

  11. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  12. EEL Calculations and Measurements of Graphite and Graphitic-CNx Core-Losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepujak, A; Bangert, U; Harvey, A J; Blank, V D; Kulnitskiy, B A; Batov, D V

    2006-01-01

    Core EEL spectra of MWCNTs (multi-wall carbon nanotubes) grown in a nitrogen atmosphere were acquired utilising a dedicated STEM equipped with a Gatan Enfina system. Splitting of the carbon K-edge π* resonance into two peaks provided evidence of two nondegenerate carbon bonding states. In order to confirm the presence of a CN x bonding state, a full-potential linearised augmented plane-wave method was utilised to simulate core EEL spectra of graphite and graphitic-CN x compounds. The simulations confirmed splitting of the carbon K-edge π* resonance in graphitic-CN x materials, with the pristine graphite π* resonance remaining unsplit. The simulations also confirmed the increasing degree of amorphicity with higher concentrations (25%) of substitutional nitrogen in graphite

  13. Removal of 14C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the chemical form of 14 C in irradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approximately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 14 C, with a half-life of 5730 years.

  14. Energy-momentum density of graphite by electron-momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, M.; Fang, Z.; Canney, S.; Kheifets, A.; McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1996-11-01

    The energy-resolved electron momentum density of graphite has been measured along a series of well-defined directions using electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). This is the first measurement of this kind performed on a single-crystal target with a thoroughly controlled orientation which clearly demonstrates the different nature of the σ and π bands in graphite. Good agreement between the calculated density and the measured one is found, further establishing that fact that EMS yields more direct and complete information on the valence electronic structure that any other method. 12 refs., 2 figs

  15. Near-field thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials: Graphite and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2013-11-18

    The near-field radiative heat transfer for two hyperbolic metamaterials, namely, graphite and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), is investigated. Graphite is a naturally existing uniaxial medium, while CNT arrays can be modeled as an effective anisotropic medium. Different hyperbolic modes can be separately supported by these materials in certain infrared regions, resulting in a strong enhancement in near-field heat transfer. It is predicted that the heat flux between two CNT arrays can exceed that between SiC plates at any vacuum gap distance and is about 10 times higher with a 10 nm gap.

  16. Tissue expander infections in children: look beyond the expander pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A C; Davison, S P; Manders, E K

    1999-11-01

    Infection of the expander pocket is the most common complication encountered with soft-tissue expansion. It is usually due to direct inoculation with skin flora either at the time of expander insertion or from extrusion of the device. The authors report two cases of infection of tissue expanders in which the children had concomitant infected sites distant from the prosthesis. Etiological bacteria of common pediatric infections like otitis media and pharyngitis were cultured from the infected expander pocket, raising suspicion that translocation of the organism to the expander had occurred. Aggressive antibiotic treatment, removal of the prosthesis, and flap advancement is advocated.

  17. Gas transport in graphitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, E.

    1995-02-01

    The characterization of the gas transport properties of porous solids is of interest in several fields of science and technology. Many catalysts, adsorbents, soils, graphites and carbons are porous. The gas transport through most porous solids can be well described by the dusty gas model invented by Evans, Watson and Mason. This model includes all modes of gas tranport under steady-state conditions, which are Knudsen diffusion, combined Knudsen/continuum diffusion and continuum diffusion, both for gas pairs with equal and different molecular weights. In the absence of a pressure difference gas transport in a pore system can be described by the combined Knudsen/continuum diffusion coefficient D 1 for component 1 in the pores, the Knudsen diffusion coefficient D 1K in the pores, and the continuum diffusion coefficient D 12 for a binary mixture in the pores. The resistance to stationary continuum diffusion of the pores is characterized by a geometrical factor (ε/τ) 12 = (ε/τ)D 12 , were D 12 is the continuum diffusion coefficient for a binary mixture in free space. The Wicke-Kallenbach method was often used to measure D 1 as function of pressure. D 12 and D 1K can be derived from a plot 1/D 1 νs P, and ε/τcan be calculated since D 12 is known. D 1K and the volume of dead end pores can be derived from transient measurements of the diffusional flux at low pressures. From D 1K the expression (ε/τ c ) anti l por may be calculated, which characterizes the pore system for molecular diffusion, where collisions with the pore walls are predominant. (orig.)

  18. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  19. The expanding EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zank, Wolfgang

    In this paper I try to explore whether the EU can go on expanding and thereby become culturally ever more diversified, and at the same retain its stability. The answer is, in principle, affirmative. Europe has always been much diversified, and therefore it is not possible to define a European...... identity in terms of particular cultural traditions. However, in spite of their diversity, the EU-member countries are united by their adherence to the principles of democracy, rule by law and human rights. Countries which do not share this basic consensus would not be accepted as members, nor is it likely...... that they would apply for it. An essential part is the willingness of member states to accept a reduction of national sovereignty on some important policy fields. The EU project is basically about lifting the principles of democracy and rule by law on the international level, most and foremost among the member...

  20. Expanding hollow metal rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Harold B [Evans, GA; Imrich, Kenneth J [Grovetown, GA

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  1. The expanding plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, M.C.M. van den.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis concerns the fundamental aspects of an argon plasma expanding from a cascaded arc. This type of plasma is not only used for fundamental research but also for technologically orientated research on plasma deposition and plasma sources. The important characteristics of the plasma are a strong supersonic expansion in which the neutral particle and ion densities decrease three orders of magnitude, followed by a stationary shock front. After the shock front the plasma expands further subsonically. A part of this thesis is devoted to the discussion of a newly constructed combined Thomson-Rayleigh scattering set up. With this set up the electron density, the electron temperature and the neutral particle density are measured locally in the plasma for different conditions. In the analysis of the measured spectra weak coherent effects and the measured apparatus profile are included. The inaccuracies are small, ranging from 1 to 4 percent for the electron density and 2 to 6 percent for the electron temperature, depending on the plasma conditions. The inaccuracy of the neutral particle density determination is larger and ranges from 10 to 50 percent. The detection limits for the electron and neutral particle density are 7.10 17 m -3 and 1.10 20 m -3 respectively. A side path in this thesis is the derivation of the Saha equation for a two-temperature plasma. The reason for this derivation was the dispute in the literature about the correct form of this equation. In this thesis it is shown, from the correct extension of the second law of thermodynamics and from the non-equilibrium formalism of Zubarev, That in the limit of m e /m h ->0 the generalized Saha equation depends on the electron temperature only. (author). 221 refs.; 54 figs.; 13 tabs

  2. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  3. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  4. Rules for design of nuclear graphite core components - some considerations and approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Stilwell, T.C.; Zudans, Z.

    1978-01-01

    The use of graphite as a structural element presents unusual problems both for the designer and stress analysist. When the structure happens to be a nuclear reactor core, these problems are significantly magnified both by the environment and the attendant safety requirements. In the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) core a large number of elements are constructed of nuclear graphite. This paper discusses the attendant difficulties, and presents some approaches, for ASME code safety-consistent design and analysis. The statistical scatter of material properties, which complicates even the definitions of allowable stress, as well as the brittle, anisotropic, inhomogeneous nature of the graphite was considered. The study of this subject was undertaken under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. (Auth.)

  5. Covalent modification of graphene and graphite using diazonium chemistry: tunable grafting and nanomanipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, John; Phan, Thanh Hai; Fujita, Yasuhiko; Li, Zhi; Ivasenko, Oleksandr; Vanderlinden, Willem; Van Gorp, Hans; Frederickx, Wout; Lu, Gang; Tahara, Kazukuni; Tobe, Yoshito; Uji-I, Hiroshi; Mertens, Stijn F L; De Feyter, Steven

    2015-05-26

    We shine light on the covalent modification of graphite and graphene substrates using diazonium chemistry under ambient conditions. We report on the nature of the chemical modification of these graphitic substrates, the relation between molecular structure and film morphology, and the impact of the covalent modification on the properties of the substrates, as revealed by local microscopy and spectroscopy techniques and electrochemistry. By careful selection of the reagents and optimizing reaction conditions, a high density of covalently grafted molecules is obtained, a result that is demonstrated in an unprecedented way by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ambient conditions. With nanomanipulation, i.e., nanoshaving using STM, surface structuring and functionalization at the nanoscale is achieved. This manipulation leads to the removal of the covalently anchored molecules, regenerating pristine sp(2) hybridized graphene or graphite patches, as proven by space-resolved Raman microscopy and molecular self-assembly studies.

  6. Diamond growth on Fe-Cr-Al alloy by H2-plasma enhanced graphite etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y. S.; Hirose, A.

    2007-01-01

    Without intermediate layer and surface pretreatment, adherent diamond films with high initial nucleation density have been deposited on Fe-15Cr-5Al (wt. %) alloy substrate. The deposition was performed using microwave hydrogen plasma enhanced graphite etching in a wide temperature range from 370 to 740 degree sign C. The high nucleation density and growth rate of diamond are primarily attributed to the unique precursors used (hydrogen plasma etched graphite) and the chemical nature of the substrate. The improvement in diamond adhesion to steel alloys is ascribed to the important role played by Al, mitigation of the catalytic function of iron by suppressing the preferential formation of loose graphite intermediate phase on steel surface

  7. Exfoliated graphite/titanium dioxide nanocomposites for photodegradation of eosin yellow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndlovu, Thabile, E-mail: atkuvarega@gmail.com [University of Swaziland, Department of Chemistry, Private Bag 4, Kwaluseni (Swaziland); Kuvarega, Alex T.; Arotiba, Omotayo A. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Applied Chemistry, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg (South Africa); Sampath, Srinivasan [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Bangalore 560012 (India); Krause, Rui W. [Rhodes University, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown 6140 South Africa (South Africa); Mamba, Bhekie B., E-mail: bmamba@uj.ac.za [University of Johannesburg, Department of Applied Chemistry, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Preparation of exfoliated graphite (EG) from natural graphite. • Sol–gel anchoring of TiO{sub 2} on exfoliated graphite. • High adsorption and photoactivity was observed for the EG-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite. • Mechanism of enhancement was proposed. - Abstract: An improved photocatalyst consisting of a nanocomposite of exfoliated graphite and titanium dioxide (EG-TiO{sub 2}) was prepared. SEM and TEM micrographs showed that the spherical TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were evenly distributed on the surface of the EG sheets. A four times photocatalytic enhancement was observed for this floating nanocomposite compared to TiO{sub 2} and EG alone for the degradation of eosin yellow. For all the materials, the reactions followed first order kinetics where for EG-TiO{sub 2}, the rate constant was much higher than for EG and TiO{sub 2} under visible light irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of EG-TiO{sub 2} was ascribed to the capability of graphitic layers to accept and transport electrons from the excited TiO{sub 2}, promoting charge separation. This indicates that carbon, a cheap and abundant material, can be a good candidate as an electron attracting reservoir for photocatalytic organic pollutant degradation.

  8. Exfoliated graphite/titanium dioxide nanocomposites for photodegradation of eosin yellow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndlovu, Thabile; Kuvarega, Alex T.; Arotiba, Omotayo A.; Sampath, Srinivasan; Krause, Rui W.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Preparation of exfoliated graphite (EG) from natural graphite. • Sol–gel anchoring of TiO 2 on exfoliated graphite. • High adsorption and photoactivity was observed for the EG-TiO 2 nanocomposite. • Mechanism of enhancement was proposed. - Abstract: An improved photocatalyst consisting of a nanocomposite of exfoliated graphite and titanium dioxide (EG-TiO 2 ) was prepared. SEM and TEM micrographs showed that the spherical TiO 2 nanoparticles were evenly distributed on the surface of the EG sheets. A four times photocatalytic enhancement was observed for this floating nanocomposite compared to TiO 2 and EG alone for the degradation of eosin yellow. For all the materials, the reactions followed first order kinetics where for EG-TiO 2 , the rate constant was much higher than for EG and TiO 2 under visible light irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of EG-TiO 2 was ascribed to the capability of graphitic layers to accept and transport electrons from the excited TiO 2 , promoting charge separation. This indicates that carbon, a cheap and abundant material, can be a good candidate as an electron attracting reservoir for photocatalytic organic pollutant degradation

  9. Contribution to the study of the reactivity of graphite with respect to carbon dioxide and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, M.

    1959-09-01

    The oxidation of nuclear-quality graphite by air and carbon dioxide has been studied at temperatures at which the reaction becomes measurable. These experiments have been carried out on graphites differing in the concentration and nature of their ash, and in their mode of preparation. The reaction velocities measured have been compared in an attempt to correlate these two factors. Ten types of graphite have thus been studied. Since the oxidation reactions are of the type gas-solid, their velocities have also been compared to the BET surface areas of the graphite studied and to the diameter distribution of the pores of this surface. The conclusion is that, even for these low impurity contents, the law relating the reaction velocity to the surface is masked by the impurities which appear to behave as preferential reaction sites. This has been shown by carrying out successive purifications on various types of graphite, which treatment results in an important decrease in the reactivity of all the samples studied. (author) [fr

  10. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  11. Hydrogen adsorption on and solubility in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashenko, S.L.; Wampler, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental data on adsorption and solubility of hydrogen isotopes in graphite over a wide range of temperatures and pressures are reviewed. Langmuir adsorption isotherms are proposed for the hydrogen-graphite interaction. The entropy and enthalpy of adsorption are estimated, allowing for effects of relaxation of dangling sp 2 bonds. Three kinds of traps are proposed: edge carbon atoms of interstitial loops with an adsorption enthalpy relative to H 2 gas of -4.4 eV/H 2 (unrelaxed, Trap 1), edge carbon atoms at grain surfaces with an adsorption enthalpy of -2.3 eV/H 2 (relaxed, Trap 2), and basal plane adsorption sites with an enthalpy of +2.43 eV/H 2 (Trap 3). The adsorption capacity of different types of graphite depends on the concentration of traps which depends on the crystalline microstructure of the material. The number of potential sites for the 'true solubility' (Trap 3) is assumed to be about one site per carbon atom in all types of graphite, but the endothermic character of this solubility leads to a negligible H inventory compared to the concentration of hydrogen in type 1 and type 2 traps for temperatures and gas pressures used in the experiments. Irradiation with neutrons or carbon atoms increases the concentration of type 1 and type 2 traps from about 20 and 200 appm respectively for unirradiated (POCO AXF-5Q) graphite to about 1500 and 5000 appm, respectively, at damage levels above 1 dpa. (orig.)

  12. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  13. Design of Elastomer Structure to Facilitate Incorporation of Expanded Graphite in Silicones Without Compromising Electromechanical Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassouneh, Suzan Sager; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The development of elastomer materials with a high dielectric permittivity has attracted increased interest over the past years due to their use in, for example, dielectric elastomers. For this particular use, both the electrically insulating properties - as well as the mechanical properties......-functional crosslinker, which allows for development of a suitable network matrix. The dielectric permittivity was increased by almost a factor of 4 compared to a benchmark silicone elastomer....

  14. High dielectric permittivity elastomers from well-dispersed expanded graphite in low concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hassouneh, Suzan Sager; Kostrzewska, Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The development of elastomer materials with a high dielectric permittivity has attracted increased interest over the last years due to their use in for example dielectric electroactive polymers. For this particular use, both the electrically insulating properties - as well as the mechanical...

  15. Reduced percolation concentration in polypropylene/expanded graphite composites: effect of viscosity and polypyrrole

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pionteck, J.; Melchor Valdez, E. M.; Piana, Francesco; Omastová, M.; Luyt, A. S.; Voit, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 20 (2015), 41994_1-41994_12 ISSN 0021-8995 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : composites * graphene and fullerenes * morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.866, year: 2015

  16. Study on the adsorption isosteres of the composite adsorbent CaCl2 and expanded graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.L.; Wu, J.Y.; Xia, Z.Z.; Wang, R.Z.

    2011-01-01

    A test setup was built to study the adsorption performance of the composite adsorbent used in the adsorption system. The isovolume measurement method is adopted in the test setup to measure the adsorption isosteres of the composite adsorbent and ammonia working pair. The adsorption isosteres are the curves of the adsorption pressures variation with adsorption temperatures at constant adsorption quantity, which are convenient for the calculation of the adsorption heat and selection of the adsorption working pairs. The adsorption heats were calculated according to the adsorption isosteres, three clear crest values indicate that there were three types of reaction during the reaction processes of ammoniate calcium chloride and ammonia. The kinetic model of adsorption isosteres is obtained by the Temkin model, it is useful to estimate the adsorption performance of the working pairs and useful to guide the design of adsorption system.

  17. Cone calorimeter study of polyethylene flame retarded with expandable graphite and intumescent fire-retardant additives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, HR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Ofosu2_2014_ABSTRACT.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1510 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Ofosu2_2014_ABSTRACT.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Journal...

  18. Poly(lactic acid)-starch/expandable graphite (PLA-starch/EG) flame retardant composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mngomezulu, ME

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available to the ability of EG to exfoliate at increased temperatures during which time three effects occurred: i) cooling due to an endothermic exfoliation process, ii) dilution due to release of H(sub2)O, SO(sub2) and CO(sub2) gases, and iii) formation of a protective...

  19. Polyethylene flame retarded with expandable graphite and a novel intumescent additive

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Focke, WW

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel intumescent additive was synthesized by neutralizing 3,5-diaminobenzoic acid hydrochloride salt with ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. This compound, which melts at 257 C, decomposes concurrently to release carbon dioxide gas. The flame...

  20. Dislocation density and graphitization of diamond crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantea, C.; Voronin, G.A.; Zerda, T.W.; Gubicza, J.; Ungar, T.

    2002-01-01

    Two sets of diamond specimens compressed at 2 GPa at temperatures varying between 1060 K and 1760 K were prepared; one in which graphitization was promoted by the presence of water and another in which graphitization of diamond was practically absent. X-ray diffraction peak profiles of both sets were analyzed for the microstructure by using the modified Williamson-Hall method and by fitting the Fourier coefficients of the measured profiles by theoretical functions for crystallite size and lattice strain. The procedures determined mean size and size distribution of crystallites as well as the density and the character of the dislocations. The same experimental conditions resulted in different microstructures for the two sets of samples. They were explained in terms of hydrostatic conditions present in the graphitized samples

  1. Capacitive behavior of highly-oxidized graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Mateusz; Mianowski, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Capacitive behavior of a highly-oxidized graphite is presented in this paper. The graphite oxide was synthesized using an oxidizing mixture of potassium chlorate and concentrated fuming nitric acid. As-oxidized graphite was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed with respect to the oxygen content and the species of oxygen-containing groups. Electrochemical measurements were performed in a two-electrode symmetric cell using KOH electrolyte. It was shown that prolonged oxidation causes an increase in the oxygen content while the interlayer distance remains constant. Specific capacitance increased with oxygen content in the electrode as a result of pseudo-capacitive effects, from 0.47 to 0.54 F/g for a scan rate of 20 mV/s and 0.67 to 1.15 F/g for a scan rate of 5 mV/s. Better cyclability was observed for the electrode with a higher oxygen amount.

  2. Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S.S.; Allain, J.P.; Hassanein, A.; Hendricks, M.R.; Nieto-Perez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium as a plasma-facing component has many attractive features in fusion devices. We investigated chemical properties of the lithiated graphite surfaces during deposition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. In this study we try to address some of the known issues during lithium deposition, viz., the chemical state of lithium on graphite substrate, oxide layer formation mechanisms, Li passivation effects over time, and chemical change during exposure of the sample to ambient air. X-ray photoelectron studies indicate changes in the chemical composition with various thickness of lithium on graphite during deposition. An oxide layer formation is noticed during lithium deposition even though all the experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum. The metal oxide is immediately transformed into carbonate when the deposited sample is exposed to air.

  3. Graphite core design in UK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    The cores in the first power producing Magnox reactors in the UK were designed with only a limited amount of information available regarding the anisotropic dimensional change behaviour of Pile Grade graphite. As more information was gained it was necessary to make modifications to the design, some minor, some major. As the cores being built became larger, and with the switch to the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) with its much higher power density, additional problems had to be overcome such as increased dimensional change and radiolytic oxidation by the carbon dioxide coolant. For the AGRs a more isotropic graphite was required, with a lower initial open pore volume and higher strength. Gilsocarbon graphite was developed and was selected for all the AGRs built in the UK. Methane bearing coolants are used to limit radiolytic oxidation. (author). 5 figs

  4. Sensing capabilities of graphite based MR elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, T F; Li, W H; Deng, Y M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents both experimental and theoretical investigations of the sensing capabilities of graphite based magnetorheological elastomers (MREs). In this study, eight MRE samples with varying graphite weight fractions were fabricated and their resistance under different magnetic fields and external loadings were measured with a multi-meter. With an increment of graphite weight fraction, the resistance of MRE sample decreases steadily. Higher magnetic fields result in a resistance increase. Based on an ideal assumption of a perfect chain structure, a mathematical model was developed to investigate the relationship between the MRE resistance with external loading. In this model, the current flowing through the chain structure consists of both a tunnel current and a conductivity current, both of which depend on external loadings. The modelling parameters have been identified and reconstructed from comparison with experimental results. The comparison indicates that both experimental results and modelling predictions agree favourably well

  5. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter....

  6. Graphite based Schottky diodes formed semiconducting substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Todd; Tongay, Sefaattin; Hebard, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the formation of semimetal graphite/semiconductor Schottky barriers where the semiconductor is either silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs) or 4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC). The fabrication can be as easy as allowing a dab of graphite paint to air dry on any one of the investigated semiconductors. Near room temperature, the forward-bias diode characteristics are well described by thermionic emission, and the extracted barrier heights, which are confirmed by capacitance voltage measurements, roughly follow the Schottky-Mott relation. Since the outermost layer of the graphite electrode is a single graphene sheet, we expect that graphene/semiconductor barriers will manifest similar behavior.

  7. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.

    2012-05-01

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  9. Electrostatic Manipulation of Graphene On Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, Carlos; Rubio-Verdu, Carmen; Saenz-Arce, Giovanni; Martinez-Asencio, Jesús; Milan, David C.; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan J.; Caturla, Maria Jose

    2015-03-01

    Here we report the use of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) under ambient and vacuum conditions to study the controlled exfoliation of the last layer of a graphite surface when an electrostatic force is applied from a STM tip. In this work we have focused on the study of two parameters: the applied voltage needed to compensate the graphite interlayer attractive force and the one needed to break atomic bonds to produce folded structures. Additionally, we have studied the influence of edge structure in the breaking geometry. Independently of the edge orientation the graphite layer is found to tear through the zig-zag direction and the lifled layer shows a zig-zag folding direction. Molecular Dinamics simulations and DFT calculations have been performed to understand our results, showing a strong correlation with the experiments. Comunidad Valenciana through Prometeo project.

  10. THE EFFECT OF APPLIED STRESS ON THE GRAPHITIZATION OF PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg, R H; Crooks, D D; Fenn, Jr, R W; Hammond, M L

    1963-06-15

    Metallographic and x-ray diffraction studies were made of the effect of applied stress at high temperature on the structure of pyrolytic graphite (PG). The dominant factor was whether the PG was above or below its graphitization temperature, which, in turn, was not strongly dependent on applied stress. Below the graphitization temperature, the PG showed a high proportion of disordered layers (0.9), a fairly large mean tilt angle (20 deg ) and a small crystailite size (La --150 A). Fracture occurred at low stress and strain and the materiai exhibited a high apparent Young's modulus ( approximates 4 x 10/sup 6/ psi). Above the graphitization temperature, graphitization was considerably enhanced by strain up to about 8%. The disorder parameter was decreased from a zero strain value of 0.3 to 0.l5 with strain, the mean tilt angle was decreased to 4 deg , and a fivefold increase in crystallite size occurred. When the strainenhanced graphitization was complete, the material exhibited a low apparent modulus ( approximates 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ psi) and large plastic strains (>100%) for a constant stress ( approximates 55 ksi). Graphitization was shown to be a spontaneous process that is promoted by breaking cross-links thermally, and the process is furthered by chemical attack and plastic strain. (auth)

  11. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  12. ON THE REACTIONS IN ILMENITE, ALUMINUM AND GRAPHITE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Khoshhal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3/TiC composites are used as cutting tools for machining gray cast iron and steels. The addition of iron improves the toughness of Al2O3/TiC composites. Ilmenite, aluminum and graphite can be used to produce in-situ Al2O3/TiC–Fe composites. However, the formation mechanism and reaction sequences of this system are not clear enough. Therefore, the present research is designed to determine the reactions mechanism of the first step of reactions that may be occurred between raw materials. In this research, pure ilmenite was synthesized to eliminate the effects of impurities available in the natural ilmenite in the system. The milled and pressed samples, prepared from the synthesized ilmenite, aluminum and graphite mixture with a molar ratio of 1:2:1, were heat treated at 720°C for 48h. In addition, two samples one containing ilmenite and aluminum with a molar ratio of 1:2 and ilmenite and graphite with a molar ratio of 1:1 were heat treated at 720°C for 48h. The final products were analyzed with XRD. It was found that at 720°C, aluminum reacts with FeTiO3, forming Fe, TiO2 and Al2O3. Since the aluminum content used in the mixture was more than the stoichiometry for reaction of ilmenite and aluminum, some unreacted aluminum remains. Therefore, the residual aluminum reacts with the reduced Fe to form Fe2Al5.

  13. Graphite crystals grown within electromagnetically levitated metallic droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Shaahin; Kalaantari, Haamun; Mojgani, Sasan; Abbaschian, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Various graphite morphologies were observed to grow within the electromagnetically levitated nickel–carbon melts, including primary flakes and spheres, curved surface graphite and eutectic flakes, as well as engulfed and entrapped particles. As the supersaturated metallic solutions were cooled within the electromagnetic (EM) levitation coil, the primary graphite flakes and spheres formed and accumulated near the periphery of the droplet due to EM circulation. The primary graphite islands, moreover, nucleated and grew on the droplet surface which eventually formed a macroscopic curved graphite crystal covering the entire liquid. Upon further cooling, the liquid surrounding the primary graphite went under a coupled eutectic reaction while the liquid in the center formed a divorced eutectic due to EM mixing. This brought about the formation of graphite fine flakes and agglomerated particles close to the surface and in the center of the droplet, respectively. The graphite morphologies, growth mechanisms, defects, irregularities and growth instabilities were interpreted with detailed optical and scanning electron microscopies.

  14. Expansion and exfoliation of graphite to form graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Shashikan P.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene production methods are described based on subjecting non- covalent graphite intercalated compounds, such as graphite bisulfate, to expansion conditions such as shocks of heat and/or microwaves followed by turbulence-assisted exfoliation

  15. A 2-D nucleation-growth model of spheroidal graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, Jacques; Bourdie, Jacques; Castro-Román, Manuel Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of recent experimental investigations, in particular by transmission electron microscopy, suggests spheroidal graphite grows by 2-D nucleation of new graphite layers at the outer surface of the nodules. These layers spread over the surface along the prismatic direction of graphite which is the energetically preferred growth direction of graphite when the apparent growth direction of the nodules is along the basal direction of graphite. 2-D nucleation-growth models first developed for precipitation of pure substances are then adapted to graphite growth from the liquid in spheroidal graphite cast irons. Lateral extension of the new graphite layers is controlled by carbon diffusion in the liquid. This allows describing quantitatively previous experimental results giving strong support to this approach.

  16. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  17. Thermal Properties of G-348 Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental measurements have been obtained in the INL Graphite Characterization Laboratory to deduce the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for G-348 isotropic graphite, which has been used by City College of New York in thermal experiments related to gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, mass, volume and thermal expansion were converted to thermal conductivity in accordance with ASTM Standard Practice C781-08 (R-2014). Data are tabulated and a preliminary correlation for the thermal conductivity is presented as a function of temperature from laboratory temperature to 1000C.

  18. London forces in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Poperenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with terrace steps was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy with high spatial resolution. Spots with positive and negative charges were found in the vicinity of the steps. Values of the charges depended both on the microscope needle scan velocity and on its motion direction. The observed effect was theoretically explained with account of London forces that arise between the needle tip and the graphite surface. In this scheme, a terrace step works as a nanoscale diode for surface electric currents.

  19. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  20. Chemical atomization of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, I.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.

    A simple model of the mechanism of chemical atomization is given, on whose basis a decrease in chemical atomization is qualitatively predicted for high temperatures. Mass spectrometric investigations of the atomization products cited, which found CH 4 and CH 3 molecules during the irradiation of graphite and H + ions thereby confirmed the presence of chemical atomization. A relationship of S and temperature of graphite T during irradiation was obtained which showed a decrease in the coefficient of atomization of a high temperature. (U.S.)

  1. The electrochemical properties of graphite and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeager, E.; Gupta, S.; Molla, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon and graphite are often used as supports for electrocatalysts, but also have an electrocatalytic function in such electrode reactions as O 2 reduction in alkaline electrolytes, Cl 2 generation in brine and SOCl 2 reduction in lithium-thionyl chloride batteries. These catalytic functions involve specific chemical functional groups bound to the carbon and graphite surfaces. The factors controlling O 2 reduction with various types of carbon electrodes of both low and high surface area are reviewed. Of particular importance is the role of hydrogen peroxide. The role of the functionality of the carbon in the electrocatalysis will be discussed

  2. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackstone, R [Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). Joint Nuclear Research Center

    1977-03-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted.

  3. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behavior compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted

  4. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted. (Auth.)

  5. Direct reading spectrochemical analysis of nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca Adell, M.; Becerro Ruiz, E.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1964-01-01

    A description is given about the application of a direct-reading spectrometer the Quantometer, to the determination of boron. calcium, iron, titanium and vanadium in nuclear grade graphite. for boron the powdered sample is mixed with 1% cupric fluoride and excited in a 10-amperes direct current arc and graphite electrodes with a crater 7 mm wide and 10 mm deep. For the other elements a smaller crater has been used and dilution with a number of matrices has been investigated; the best results are achieved by employing 25% cupric fluoride. The sensitivity limit for boron is 0,15 ppm. (Author) 21 refs

  6. Graphite target for the spiral project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J.; Loiselet, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo calculation of standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results of calculation of neutron flux space and energy distribution in the standard graphite block (SGB) obtained by the MCNP TM code. VMCCS nuclear data library, based on the ENDF / B-VI release 4 evaluation file, is used. MCNP model of the SGB considers detailed material, geometric and spectral properties of the neutron source, source carrier, graphite moderator medium, aluminium foil holders and proximate surrounding of SGB Geometric model is organised to provide the simplest homogeneous volume cells in order to obtain the maximum acceleration of neutron history tracking (author)

  8. Radioactive Contamination Near Natural Uranium - Graphite - Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassany, J.; Pouthier, J.

    1967-01-01

    The authors give the results of numerous assessments of contamination in connection with reactors in operation during maintenance; reactors shut down during overhaul and repair work (coolants, exchangers, interior of the tank, etc.) ; and accidents in the cooling circuit and ruptured cladding. They show that, except in special cases, it is mainly activation products that predominate. Moreover, after eight years of operation the points where contamination likely to give considerable dose rates accumulates remain very localized, and there has been no need to reinforce personnel protection measures. (author) [fr

  9. STS Observations of Landau Levels at Graphite Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Niimi, Y.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements were made on surfaces of two different kinds of graphite samples, Kish graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), at very low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. We observed a series of peaks in the tunnel spectra, which grow with increasing field, both at positive and negative bias voltages. These are associated with Landau quantization of the quasi two-dimensional electrons and holes in graphite in magnetic fields perpendicular...

  10. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  11. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  12. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  13. Oxidation behavior of IG and NBG nuclear graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woong-Ki; Kim, Byung-Joo [Jeonju Institute of Machinery and Carbon Composites Palbokdong-2ga, 817, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Seon; Chi, Se-Hwan [Dept. of Nuclear Hydrogen Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.k [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha Univ., 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Water contact angles on nuclear graphite before and after oxidation treatments: the pictures show the contact angles obtained under deionized water on oxidation-treated and untreated nuclear graphite. The water contact angles are decreased after oxidation due to the increase in the hydrophilic. Display Omitted Research highlights: The average pore size of graphites shows an increase after the oxidation treatments. They also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. - Abstract: This work studies the oxidation-induced characteristics of four nuclear graphites (NBG-17, NBG-25, IG-110, and IG-430). The oxidation characteristics of the nuclear graphites were measured at 600 {sup o}C. The surface properties of the oxidation graphites were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle methods. The N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherm characteristics, including the specific surface area and micropore volume, were investigated by means of BET and t-plot methods. The experimental results show an increase in the average pore size of graphites; they also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. For example the surface area of NBG-17 increases slightly whereas the surface area of IG-110 increases significantly. This result confirms that the original surface state of each graphite is unique.

  14. Influence of irradiation on high-strength graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu.S.; Grebennik, V.N.; Kalyagina, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    To ensure efficiency of the graphite elements of the construction of the masonry of reactors, the graphite must possess high radiation stability, strength, and heat resistance. In this connection, the physical properties of graphites based on uncalcined petroleum coke with a binder - high-temperature hard coal pitch - the amount of which reaches 40% are considered in this paper

  15. Porous graphite electrodes for rechargeable ion-transfer batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, P; Scheifele, W; Haas, O [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The influence of preparation pressure and pore-forming additives on the properties of graphite-based, Li{sup +}-intercalating electrodes for ion-transfer batteries have been investigated. The electrochemical performance of graphite electrodes could be improved by adjusting the porosity. Specific charge of >300 Ah/kg (with respect to the graphite mass) could be achieved. (author) 4 figs., 2 refs.

  16. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, A. R. S. S.; Piana, Francesco; Mičušík, M.; Pionteck, J.; Banerjee, S.; Voit, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 182, 1 October (2016), s. 237-245 ISSN 0254-0584 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphite oxide * surface modification * conductive nanoparticles Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.084, year: 2016

  17. Adsorption of charged albumin subdomains on a graphite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2006-03-01

    We report some new molecular dynamics simulation results about the adsorption on a hydrophobic graphite surface of two albumin subdomains, each formed by three different alpha-helices, considering the correctly charged side groups at pH = 7 instead of the neutral ones as done in our previous exploratory paper (Raffaini and Ganazzoli, Langmuir 2003;19:3403-3412). We find that the presence of charges affects somewhat the initial adsorption stage on the electrostatically neutral surface, but not the final one. Thus, we recover the result that a monolayer of aminoacids is eventually formed, with a rough parallelism of distant strands to optimize both the intramolecular and the surface interactions. This feature is consistent with the adsorption on the hydrophobic surface being driven by dispersion forces only, and with the "soft" nature of albumin. Additional optimizations of the final monolayer carried out at pH = 3 and 11 do not modify appreciably this picture, suggesting that adsorption on graphite is basically independent of pH. The enhanced hydration of the final adsorption state due to the (delocalized) charges of the side groups is also discussed in comparison with similar results of the neutralized subdomains. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  19. Polyphase diffusion of fission products in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannert, V.

    1989-05-01

    The report attempts to give an introduction into the subject of fission product transport in nuclear graphite and results in an extended proposal of a transport-model. Beginning with a rough description of the graphite in question, an idea about the physical transport-phenomena in graphite is developed. Some of the basic experimental methods, especially techniques of porosimetry, determination of sorption-isotherms and of course several transport-experiments, are briefly described and their results are discussed. Some of the most frequent transport models are introduced and assessed with the criteria emphasized in this report. An extended model is proposed including the following main ideas: The transport of the fission-products is regarded as a two-phase-diffusion process through the open pores of the graphite. The two phases are: surface-diffusion and gas-diffusion. A time-dependent coupling of the two diffusion-phases by sorption-isotherms and a concentration-dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient, also related to the physical behaviour of the sorption-isotherms, are the basic properties of the proposed model. (orig./HP) [de

  20. US graphite reactor D ampersand D experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE)

  1. Analysis of a T-10 graphite limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Laux, M.; Lingertat, J.; Pech, P.; Reiner, H.D.; Strusny, H.; Wolff, H.

    1981-01-01

    Parts of a T-10 graphite limiter used during ohmic heated discharges have been investigated. Erosion and deposition phenomena have been studied by morphological and elemental surface analysis methods. From the results estimates of the plasma parameters near the limiter surface have been made. (orig.)

  2. Raw materials for reflector graphite (for reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, G.; Mindermann, D.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing concept for the core components of German high temperature reactor (HTR) types of graphite was previously entirely directed to the use of German tar coke (St coke). As the plants for producing this material no longer complied technically with the current environmental protection requirements, one had to assume that they would soon be shut down. To prevent bottlenecks in the erection of future HTR plants, alternative cokes produced by modern processes by Japanese manufacturers were checked for their suitability for the manufacture of reactor graphite. This report describes the investigations carried out on these materials from the safe delayed coking process. The project work, apart from analysis of the main data of the candidate coke considered, included the processing of the raw materials into directly and secondarily extruded graphite rods on the laboratory scale, including characterisation. As the results show, the material data achieved with the previous raw material can be reproduced with Japanese St coke. The tar coke LPC-A from the Nippon Steel Chemical Co., Ltd was decided on as the new standard coke for manufacturing reflector graphite. (orig.) With 15 tabs., 2 figs [de

  3. Formation of dislocation dipoles in irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwase, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a dislocation dipole accumulation model to explain the irradiation-induced amorphization of graphite. However, the structure of dislocation dipole in the hexagonal networks is still an open question at the atomic-level. In this paper, we propose a possible formation process of the dislocation dipole

  4. Functional interface of polymer modified graphite anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaba, S.; Ozeki, T.; Okushi, K. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    Graphite electrodes were modified by polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Their electrochemical properties were examined in 1 mol dm{sup -3} LiClO{sub 4} ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solutions as an anode of lithium ion batteries. Generally, lithium ions hardly intercalate into graphite in the PC electrolyte due to a decomposition of the PC electrolyte at ca. 0.8 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}, and it results in the exfoliation of the graphene layers. However, the modified graphite electrodes with PAA, PMA, and PVA demonstrated the stable charge-discharge performance due to the reversible lithium intercalation not only in the EC:DMC but also in the PC electrolytes since the electrolyte decomposition and co-intercalation of solvent were successfully suppressed by the polymer modification. It is thought that these improvements were attributed to the interfacial function of the polymer layer on the graphite which interacted with the solvated lithium ions at the electrode interface. (author)

  5. Functional interface of polymer modified graphite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaba, S.; Ozeki, T.; Okushi, K.

    Graphite electrodes were modified by polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Their electrochemical properties were examined in 1 mol dm -3 LiClO 4 ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solutions as an anode of lithium ion batteries. Generally, lithium ions hardly intercalate into graphite in the PC electrolyte due to a decomposition of the PC electrolyte at ca. 0.8 V vs. Li/Li +, and it results in the exfoliation of the graphene layers. However, the modified graphite electrodes with PAA, PMA, and PVA demonstrated the stable charge-discharge performance due to the reversible lithium intercalation not only in the EC:DMC but also in the PC electrolytes since the electrolyte decomposition and co-intercalation of solvent were successfully suppressed by the polymer modification. It is thought that these improvements were attributed to the interfacial function of the polymer layer on the graphite which interacted with the solvated lithium ions at the electrode interface.

  6. Removal of iron from impure graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

    1979-01-01

    Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I 2 at 900 0 C. With addition of H 2 , the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl 2 . I 2 has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr

  7. Structural strength of core graphite bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Futakawa, M.

    1987-01-01

    A HTR core consists of fuel, hot plenum, reflector and thermal barrier blocks. Each graphite block is supported by three thin cylindrical graphite bars called support post. Static and dynamic core loads are transmitted by the support posts to the thermal barrier blocks and a support plate. These posts are in contact with the blocks through hemispherical post seats to absorb the relative displacement caused by seismic force and the difference of thermal expansion of materials at the time of the start-up and shutdown of a reactor. The mixed fracture criterion of principal stress and modified Mohr-Coulomb's theory as well as the fracture criterion of principal stress based on elastic stress analysis was discussed in connection with the application to HTR graphite components. The buckling fracture of a support post was taken in consideration as one of the fracture modes. The effect that the length/diameter ratio of a post, small rotation and the curvature of post ends and seats exerted on the fracture strength was studied by using IG-110 graphite. Contacting stress analysis was carried out by using the structural analysis code 'COSMOS-7'. The experimental method, the analysis of buckling strength and the results are reported. The fracture of a support post is caused by the mixed mode of bending deformation, split fracture and shearing fracture. (Kako, I.)

  8. Thermoexpanded graphite modification by titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semko, L.S.; Gorbik, P.P.; Chujko, O.O.; Kruchek, Ya.Yi.; Dzyubenko, L.S.; Orans'ka, O.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    A method of the synthesis of thermoexpanded graphite (TEG) powders coated by titanium dioxide is developed. The conversion of n-buthylorthotitanate into TiO 2 on the TEG surface is investigated. The optimal parameters of the synthesis and the structure of titanium dioxide clusters on the TEG surface are determined

  9. GRAPHITIZED STEELS IN MACHINE-BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Akimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that graphitized steels in some cases due to its intermediate disposition by structure and characteristics among low-carbon steels and cast irons, can provide the necessary combination of characteristics of construction material and consequently to increase safety and durability of details of metallurgical and machinebuilding industry machines.

  10. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  11. Acceptance test for graphite components and construction status of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, T.; Ishihara, M.; Maruyama, S.; Shiozawa, S.; Tsuji, N.; Miki, T.

    1996-01-01

    In March, 1991, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started to constructed the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) which is a 30-MW(thermal) helium gas-cooled reactor with a core composed of prismatic graphite blocks piled on the core support graphite structures. Two types of graphite materials are used in the HTTR. One is the garde IG-110, isotropic fine grain graphite, another is the grade PGX, medium-to-fine grained molded graphite. These materials were selected on the basis of the appropriate properties required by the HTTR reactor design. Industry-wide standards for an acceptance test of graphite materials used as main components of a nuclear reactor had not been established. The acceptance standard for graphite components of the HTTR, therefore, was drafted by JAERI and reviewed by specialists outside JAERI. The acceptance standard consists of the material testing, non-destructive examination such as the ultrasonic and eddy current testings, dimensional and visual inspections and assembly test. Ultrasonic and eddy current testings are applied to graphite logs to detect an internal flaw and to graphite components to detect a surface flaw, respectively. The assembly test is performed at the works, prior to their installation in the reactor pressure vessel, to examine fabricating precision of each component and alignment of piled-up structures. The graphite components of the HTTR had been tested on the basis of the acceptance standard. It was confirmed that the graphite manufacturing process was well controlled and high quality graphite components were provided to the HTTR. All graphite components except for the fuel graphite blocks are to be installed in the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR in September 1995. The paper describes the construction status of the HTTR focusing on the graphite components. The acceptance test results are also presented in this paper. (author). Figs

  12. Graphene nanosheets preparation using magnetic nanoparticle assisted liquid phase exfoliation of graphite: The coupled effect of ultrasound and wedging nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Alireza; Zahirifar, Jafar; Karimi-Sabet, Javad; Dastbaz, Abolfazl

    2018-06-01

    This study aims to investigate a novel technique to improve the yield of liquid phase exfoliation of graphite to graphene sheets. The method is based on the utilization of magnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles as "particle wedge" to facilitate delamination of graphitic layers. Strong shear forces resulted from the collision of Fe 3 O 4 particles with graphite particles, and intense ultrasonic waves lead to enhanced exfoliation of graphite. High quality of graphene sheets along with the ease of Fe 3 O 4 particle separation from graphene solution which arises from the magnetic nature of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles are the unique features of this approach. Initial graphite flakes and produced graphene sheets were characterized by various methods including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Zeta potential analysis. Moreover, the effect of process factors comprising initial graphite concentration, Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles concentration, sonication time, and sonication power were investigated. Results revealed that graphene preparation yield and the number of layers could be manipulated by the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantifying microstructural dynamics and electrochemical activity of graphite and silicon-graphite lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Eller, Jens; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Schmidt, Volker; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-09-01

    Despite numerous studies presenting advances in tomographic imaging and analysis of lithium ion batteries, graphite-based anodes have received little attention. Weak X-ray attenuation of graphite and, as a result, poor contrast between graphite and the other carbon-based components in an electrode pore space renders data analysis challenging. Here we demonstrate operando tomography of weakly attenuating electrodes during electrochemical (de)lithiation. We use propagation-based phase contrast tomography to facilitate the differentiation between weakly attenuating materials and apply digital volume correlation to capture the dynamics of the electrodes during operation. After validating that we can quantify the local electrochemical activity and microstructural changes throughout graphite electrodes, we apply our technique to graphite-silicon composite electrodes. We show that microstructural changes that occur during (de)lithiation of a pure graphite electrode are of the same order of magnitude as spatial inhomogeneities within it, while strain in composite electrodes is locally pronounced and introduces significant microstructural changes.

  14. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  15. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  16. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  17. Graphite waste incineration in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiroy, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    French gas-cooled reactors belonging to the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Electricite de France (EDF), Hifrensa (Spain), etc., commissioned between the 1950s and 1970s, have generated large quantities of graphite wastes, mainly in the form of spent fuel sleeves. Furthermore, some of these reactors scheduled for dismantling in the near future (such as the G2 and G3 reactors at Marcoule) have cores consisting of graphite blocks. Consequently, a fraction of the contaminated graphite, amounting to 6000 t in France for example, must be processed in the coming years. For this processing, incineration using a circulating fluidized bed combustor has been selected as a possible solution and validated. However, the first operation to be performed involves recovering this graphite waste, and particularly, first of all, the spent fuel sleeves that were stored in silos during the years of reactor operation. Subsequent to the final shutdown of the Spanish gas-cooled reactor unit, Vandellos 1, the operating utility Hifrensa awarded contracts to a Framatome Iberica SA/ENSA consortium for removing, sorting, and prepackaging of the waste stored in three silos on the Vandellos site, essentially graphite sleeves. On the other hand, a program to validate the Framatome fluidized bed incineration process was carried out using a prototype incinerator installed at Le Creusot, France. The validation program included 22 twelve-hour tests and one 120-hour test. Particular attention was paid to the safety aspects of this project. During the performance of the validation program, a preliminary safety assessment was carried out. An impact assessment was performed with the help of the French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety, taking into account the preliminary spectra supplied by the CEA and EDF, and the activities of the radionuclides susceptible of being released into the atmosphere during the incineration. (author). 4 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  18. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  19. Some equipment for graphite research in swimming pool reactors; Quelques dispositifs d'etude du graphite dans les piles piscines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, M; Arragon, Ph; Dupont, G; Gentil, J; Tanis, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The irradiation devices described are used for research concerning reactors of the natural uranium type, moderated by graphite and cooled by carbon dioxide. The devices are generally designed for use in swimming pool reactors. The following points have been particularly studied: - maximum use of the irradiation volume, - use of the simplest technological solutions, - standardization of certain constituent parts. This standardization calls for precision machining and careful assembling; these requirements are also true when a relatively low irradiation temperature is required and the nuclear heating is pronounced. Finally, the design of these devices is suitable for the irradiation of other fissile or non-fissile materials. (authors) [French] Les dispositifs d'irradiation decrits servent aux etudes relatives a la filiere des reacteurs a uranium naturel, moderes au graphite et refroidis par le gaz carbonique. Ils sont generalement concus pour etre utilises dans des piles piscines. L'accent a ete mis sur: - l'utilisation au maximum du volume d'irradiation, - le recours aux solutions technologiques les plus simples, - la standardisation de certaines parties constitutives. Cette standardisation impose un usinage precis et un montage soigne, lesquels sont egalement necessaires lorsqu'on doit obtenir une temperature d'irradiation relativement basse alors que l'echauffement nucleaire est important. Enfin, la conception de ces dispositifs est valable pour irradier d'autres materiaux non fissiles ou fissiles. (auteurs)

  20. The Expanding Universe: Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, Don [Fermilab; Nord, Brian [Fermilab

    2014-09-01

    In 1998, observations of distant supernovae led physicists that not only was the universe expanding, but the expansion was speeding up. In this article, we describe the evidence for an expanding universe and describe what physicists and cosmologists have learned in the intervening years. The target audience for this article is high school physics teachers and college physics professors at teaching institutions.

  1. The expanding universe: an introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Pössel, Markus

    2017-01-01

    An introduction to the physics and mathematics of the expanding universe, using no more than high-school level / undergraduate mathematics. Covered are the basics of scale factor expansion, the dynamics of the expanding universe, various distance concepts and the generalized redshift-luminosity relation, among other topics.

  2. Method of manufacturing a graphite coated fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Koichi; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the close bondability and homogeneity of a graphite coating formed at the inner surface of a fuel can. Method: A coating containing graphite dispersed in a volatile organic solvent is used and a graphite coating is formed to the inner surface of a fuel can by way of a plunger method. After applying graphite coating, an inert gas is caused to flow at a certain flow rate to the inside of the fuel can horizontally rotaged so that gassification and evaporation of the volatile organic solvent contained in the graphite coating may be promoted. Since drying of the graphite coating coated to the inner surface of the fuel can thus be controlled, a graphite coating with satisfactory close bondability and homogeneity can be formed. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  4. GRAPHITIZATION OF METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE WESTERN KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic-Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in the study area are metacarbonate, metachert, metapelite, metasandstone and metaconglomerate. Graphite layers are 1cm to 2m thick, extend laterally for tens of meters and are intercalated with metasedimentary rocks. Generally, the graphite is black in color, with a well developed cleavage which is concordant with the cleavage of the host rocks. In addition, the crystal and flake graphites formed in metasedimentary rocks are mostly aligned parallel to the cleavage planes. These metamorphic rocks are subjected to shearing and granulation providing structural control for the development of graphite. It was probably this phenomenon that first led to emphasize the relationship between graphite and metasedimentary rocks. Graphite mineralization has been controlled by bedding, microfractures and granulations. Briefly, the metamorphism has converted carbonaceous matter into graphite .

  5. Hydrophilization of graphite using plasma above/in a solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shuhei; Kawahara, Kazuma; Takeuchi, Nozomi

    2018-01-01

    A hydrophilization method for graphite is required for applications such as conductive ink. In typical chemical oxidation methods for graphite have the problems of producing many defects in graphite and a large environmental impact. In recent years, the plasma treatment has attracted attention because of the high quality of the treated samples and the low environmental impact. In this study, we proposed an above-solution plasma treatment with a high contact probability of graphite and plasma since graphite accumulates on the solution surface due to its hydrophobicity, which we compared with a so-called solution plasma treatment. Graphite was hydrophilized via reactions with OH radicals generated by the plasma. It was confirmed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were modified to the graphite and the dispersibility was improved. The above-solution plasma achieved more energy-efficient hydrophilization than the solution plasma and it was possible to enhance the dispersibility by increasing the plasma-solution contact area.

  6. Contribution to the study of the reactivity of graphite with respect to carbon dioxide and air; Contribution a l'etude de la reactivite du graphite vis-a-vis du gaz corbonique et de l'air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-09-15

    The oxidation of nuclear-quality graphite by air and carbon dioxide has been studied at temperatures at which the reaction becomes measurable. These experiments have been carried out on graphites differing in the concentration and nature of their ash, and in their mode of preparation. The reaction velocities measured have been compared in an attempt to correlate these two factors. Ten types of graphite have thus been studied. Since the oxidation reactions are of the type gas-solid, their velocities have also been compared to the BET surface areas of the graphite studied and to the diameter distribution of the pores of this surface. The conclusion is that, even for these low impurity contents, the law relating the reaction velocity to the surface is masked by the impurities which appear to behave as preferential reaction sites. This has been shown by carrying out successive purifications on various types of graphite, which treatment results in an important decrease in the reactivity of all the samples studied. (author) [French] On a etudie l'oxydation de graphites de qualites nucleaires par l'air et par le gaz carbonique, a des temperatures telles que la reaction commence a etre mesurable. Ces essais ont porte sur des graphites differents aux points de vue de la concentration et de la nature des cendres, et differents par le mode de preparation. Les vitesses de reaction mesurees ont ete comparees afin de tenter de les relier a ces deux facteurs. Dix qualites de graphite ont ainsi ete etudiees. Les reactions d'oxydation etant des reactions gaz-solide, les vitesses ont ete egalement comparees aux surfaces specifiques B.E.T. des echantillons de graphite etudies et a la repartition par diametres des pores de cette surface. La conclusion est que, meme a ces teneurs faibles en impuretes, la loi de variation de la vitesse de reaction en fonction de la surface est masquee par les impuretes qui paraissent jouer le role de sites privilegies de reaction comme l'ont montre les

  7. Two-stage preparation of magnetic sorbent based on exfoliated graphite with ferrite phases for sorption of oil and liquid hydrocarbons from the water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Julia A.; Ivanov, Andrei V.; Maksimova, Natalia V.; Pokholok, Konstantin V.; Vasiliev, Alexander V.; Malakho, Artem P.; Avdeev, Victor V.

    2018-05-01

    Due to the macropore structure and the hydrophobic properties, exfoliated graphite (EG) is considered as a perspective sorbent for oil and liquid hydrocarbons from the water surface. However, there is the problem of EG collection from the water surface. One of the solutions is the modification of EG by a magnetic compound and the collection of EG with sorbed oil using the magnetic field. In this work, the method of the two-stage preparation of exfoliated graphite with ferrite phases is proposed. This method includes the impregnation of expandable graphite in the mixed solution of iron (III) chloride and cobalt (II) or nickel (II) nitrate in the first stage and the thermal exfoliation of impregnated expandable graphite with the formation of exfoliated graphite containing cobalt and nickel ferrites in the second stage. Such two-stage method makes it possible to obtain the sorbent based on EG modified by ferrimagnetic phases with high sorption capacity toward oil (up to 45-51 g/g) and high saturation magnetization (up to 42 emu/g). On the other hand, this method allows to produce the magnetic sorbent in a short period of time (up to 10 s) during which the thermal exfoliation is carried out in the air atmosphere.

  8. Low-energy electron observation of graphite and molybdenite crystals. Application to the study of graphite oxidation; Observation au moyen d'electrons de faible energie de cristaux de graphite et de molybdenite. Application a l'etude de l'oxydation du graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The LEED study of cleaved (0001) faces of crystals having a layered structure allowed to investigate flakes free of steps on graphite and molybdenite, to show twinning on natural graphite. By intensity measurements and computation in the case of a kinematical approximation it has been possible to determine an inner potential of 19 eV for graphite and to identify the direction of the Mo-S bond of the surface layer of molybdenite. The oxidation of graphite has been studied by observing changes, in symmetry of the diffraction patterns and by mass spectrometry of the gases evolved during the oxidation. No surface compounds have been detected and the carbon layers appeared to be peeled off one after the other. The oxidation took place at temperatures higher than 520 C under an oxygen pressure of 10{sup -5} torr. (author) [French] L'etude par diffraction des electrons lents des faces (0001) de cristaux ayant une structure en feuillet a permis de mettre en evidence des plages sans gradins sur des clivages de graphite et de molybdenite caracterisees par la symetrie ternaire des diagrammes, de montrer l'existence de macles sur des cristaux de graphite naturel. Un calcul utilisant une approximation cinematique a ete applique aux intensites mesurees des taches de diffraction; il a ete ainsi possible de determiner un potentiel interne de 19 eV pour le graphite et de preciser la direction de la liaison Mo-S du feuillet superficiel de la molybdenite. L'oxydation du graphite a ete etudiee en mettant en relation des changements de symetrie des diagrammes de diffraction avec l'analyse des gaz provenant de la reaction carbone-oxygene. Il a ete montre qu'il n'y avait pas formation de composes de surface et que les couches de carbone etaient enlevees les unes apres les autres. L'oxydation a ete observee sous une pression d'oxygene de 10{sup -5} torr au-dessus de 520 C. (auteur)

  9. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  10. Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids in bainite during graphitization annealing of a medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.X.; Wei, B.Q.; Li, D.D.; He, K.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in bainite during graphitization annealing at 680 °C of Jominy-quenched bars of an Al-Si bearing medium carbon (0.4C wt%) steel has been studied and compared with that in martensite by using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the graphitization process in bainite is different from that in martensite in many aspects such as the initial carbon state, the behavior of cementite, the nucleation-growth feature and kinetics of formation of graphite spheroids during graphitization annealing, and the shape, size and distribution of these graphite spheroids. The fact that the graphitization in bainite can produce more homogeneous graphite spheroids with more spherical shape and finer size in a shorter annealing time without the help of preexisting coring particles implies that bainite should be a better starting structure than martensite for making graphitic steel. - Highlights: • This article presents a microstructural characterization of formation of graphite spheroids in bainite. • Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids formed in bainite and martensite are compared. • Bainite should be a better starting structure for making graphitic steel as results show.

  11. Erosion of pyrolytic graphite and Ti-doped graphite due to high flux irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Yusuke; Ohashi, Junpei; Ueda, Yoshio; Isobe, Michiro; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    The erosion of pyrolytic graphite and titanium doped graphite RG-Ti above 1,780 K was investigated by 5 keV Ar beam irradiation with the flux from 4x10 19 to 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . The total erosion yields were significantly reduced with the flux. This reduction would be attributed to the reduction of RES (radiation enhanced sublimation) yield, which was observed in the case of isotropic graphite with the flux dependence of RES yield of φ -0.26 (φ: flux) obtained in our previous work. The yield of pyrolytic graphite was roughly 30% higher than that of isotropic graphite below the flux of 10 20 m -2 ·s -1 whereas each yield approached to very close value at the highest flux of 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . This result indicated that the effect of graphite structure on the RES yield, which was apparent in the low flux region, would disappear in the high flux region probably due to the disordering of crystal structure. In the case of irradiation to RG-Ti at 1,780 K, the surface undulations evolved with a mean height of about 3 μm at 1.2x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 , while at higher flux of 8.0x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 they were unrecognizable. These phenomena can be explained by the reduction of RES of graphite parts excluding TiC grains. (author)

  12. Experimental study on air ingress during a primary pipe rupture accident with a graphite reactor core simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tetsuaki; Hishida, Makoto; Baba, Shinichi

    1991-11-01

    When a primary coolant pipe of a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) ruptures, helium gas in the reactor core blows out into the container, and the primary cooling system reduces the pressure. After the pressures are balanced between the reactor and the container, air is expected to enter into the reactor core from the breach. It seems to be probable that the graphite structures is oxidized by air. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the air ingress process and the behavior of the generating gases by the oxidation reactions. The previous experimental study is performed on the molecular diffusion and natural convection of the two component gas mixtures using a test model simulating simply the reactor. Objective of the study was to investigate the air ingress process during the early stage of the primary pipe rupture accident. However, since the model did not have any kind of graphite components, the reaction between graphite and oxygen was not simulated. The present model includes the reactor core and the high temperature plenum simulators made of graphite. The major results obtained in the present study are summarized in the followings: (1) The air ingress process with graphite oxidation reaction is similar to that without the reaction qualitatively. (2) When the reactor core simulator is maintained at low temperatures (lower than 450degC), the initiation time of the natural circulation of air is almost equal to that of the natural circulation of nitrogen. On the other hand, when the temperature of the reactor core simulator is high (more than 500degC), the initiation time of the natural circulation of air is earlier than that of nitrogen. (3) When the temperature of the reactor core simulator is higher than 600degC, oxygen is almost dissipated by the graphite structures. When the temperature of the reactor core simulator is below 700degC, carbon dioxide mainly is generated by the oxidation reactions. (author)

  13. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  14. ZnO/graphite composites and its antibacterial activity at different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dědková, Kateřina; Janíková, Barbora; Matějová, Kateřina; Čabanová, Kristina; Váňa, Rostislav; Kalup, Aleš; Hundáková, Marianna; Kukutschová, Jana

    2015-10-01

    The paper reports laboratory preparation, characterization and in vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of ZnO/graphite nanocomposites. Zinc chloride and sodium carbonate served as precursors for synthesis of zinc oxide, while micromilled and natural graphite were used as the matrix for ZnO nanoparticles anchoring. During the reaction of ZnCl2 with saturated aqueous solution of Na2CO3a new compound is created. During the calcination at the temperature of 500 °C this new precursors decomposes and ZnO nanoparticles are formed. Composites ZnO/graphite with 50 wt.% of ZnO particles were prepared. X-ray powder diffraction and Raman microspectroscopy served as phase-analytical methods. Scanning electron microscopy technique was used for morphology characterization of the prepared samples and EDS mapping for visualization of elemental distribution. A developed modification of the standard microdilution test was used for in vitro evaluation of daylight induced antibacterial activity and antibacterial activity at dark conditions. Common human pathogens served as microorganism for antibacterial assay. Antibacterial activity of ZnO/graphite composites could be based on photocatalytic reaction; however there is a role of Zn(2+) ions on the resulting antibacterial activity which proved the experiments in dark condition. There is synergistic effect between Zn(2+) caused and reactive oxygen species caused antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelling of pulsed electron beam induced graphite ablation: Sublimation versus melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muddassir; Henda, Redhouane

    2017-12-01

    Pulsed electron beam ablation (PEBA) has recently emerged as a very promising technique for the deposition of thin films with superior properties. Interaction of the pulsed electron beam with the target material is a complex process, which consists of heating, phase transition, and erosion of a small portion from the target surface. Ablation can be significantly affected by the nature of thermal phenomena taking place at the target surface, with subsequent bearing on the properties, stoichiometry and structure of deposited thin films. A two stage, one-dimensional heat conduction model is presented to describe two different thermal phenomena accounting for interaction of a graphite target with a polyenergetic electron beam. In the first instance, the thermal phenomena are comprised of heating, melting and vaporization of the target surface, while in the second instance the thermal phenomena are described in terms of heating and sublimation of the graphite surface. In this work, the electron beam delivers intense electron pulses of ∼100 ns with energies up to 16 keV and an electric current of ∼400 A to a graphite target. The temperature distribution, surface recession velocity, ablated mass per unit area, and ablation depth for the graphite target are numerically simulated by the finite element method for each case. Based on calculation findings and available experimental data, ablation appears to occur mainly in the regime of melting and vaporization from the surface.

  16. Electrochemical behaviour of rhenium-graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varypaev, V.N.; Krasikov, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of combination electrode from graphite with electrodeposited thin coating of electrolytic rhenium is studied. Solution of 0.5 m NaCl+0.04 m AlCl 3 served as an electrolite. Polarization galvanostatic curves of hydrogen evolution upon electrodes with conditional rhenium thickness of 3.5 and 0.35 μm, 35 and 3.5 nm are obtained. Possibility of preparation of rhenium-graphite cathode with extremely low rhenium consume, electro-chemical properties of which are simu-lar to purely rhenium cathode is shown. Such electrode is characterized with stable in time low cathode potential of hydrogen evolution in chloride electrolyte and during cathode polarization it is not affected by corrosion

  17. Graphite moderated {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a {sup 252}Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the {sup 252}Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  18. Magnetic response of certain curved graphitic geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Davids, P.S.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-particle energy spectra associated with some members of buckyfamily (curved graphitic geometries), in particular C 50 , C 60 , C 70 and related fullerenes as well as coaxial helical microtubules of graphite, are obtained analytically within the mean-field approximation. These energy spectra are then used to calculate various response functions. Specifically, we calculate the specific heat, magnetization and magnetic susceptibility in the presence of an external magnetic field at low temperatures. For a single microtubule an extra peak superimposed on the first de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation in magnetic susceptibility is found in the 50--170 Tesla range depending on the radius which is possibly accessible in special (explosive flux compression) experiments. Finally, we point to important potential applications of these novel mesoscopic structures in nanotechnology

  19. Imaging of tritium implanted into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Causey, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The extensive use of graphite in plasma-facing surfaces of tokamaks such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, which has planned tritium discharges, makes two-dimensional tritium detection techniques important in helping to determine torus tritium inventories. We have performed experiments in which highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were first tritium implanted with fluences of ∼10 16 T/cm 2 at energies approx. 0 C resulted in no discernible motion of tritium along the basal plane, but did show that significant desorption of the implanted tritium occurred. The current results indicate that tritium in quantities of 10 12 T/cm 2 in tritiated components could be readily detected by imaging at lower magnifications

  20. Preparation of nanoporous carbons from graphite nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung-Joo [Department of Green Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, PO Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-14

    In this study we manufactured highly porous graphite nanofibres (GNFs) by physical activation in order to develop promising energy storage materials. The activation was performed at activation temperatures in the range of 800-1050 deg. C. The pore structures of the porous GNFs were analysed using N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. After the activation, the porous GNFs showed a decrease in diameter and scratches on their surfaces, resulting from surface oxidation and the opening of the graphitic layers, respectively. It was found that the specific surface area of the porous GNFs prepared at 1050 deg. C was more than 2000 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} without loss of their fibre shape or serious increase in electrical resistivity. This result indicates that porous GNFs prepared under optimal conditions can have a much higher specific surface area and are promising materials for energy storage technologies.

  1. Effect of total pressure on graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, R.D.; Hoot, C.G.

    1983-04-01

    Graphite corrosion in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is calculated using two key assumptions: (1) the kinetic, catalysis, and transport characteristics of graphite determined by bench-scale tests apply to large components at reactor conditions and (2) the effects of high pressure and turbulent flow are predictable. To better understand the differences between laboratory tests and reactor conditions, a high-pressure test loop (HPTL) has been constructed and used to perform tests at reactor temperature, pressure, and flow conditions. The HPTL is intended to determine the functional dependence of oxidation rate and characteristics on total pressure and gas velocity and to compare the oxidation results with calculations using models and codes developed for the reactor

  2. Plastic strain caused by contraction of pores in polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Yoda, Shinichi; Konishi, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of porosity on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of four isotropic polycrystalline graphites were studied. The pore size distributions of the graphites were measured using a conventional mercury penetration technique. The average pore radius of ISO-88 graphite was about one-tenth of that of ISEM-1, IG-11 or IG-15 graphites. Young's modulus of the graphites decreased with increasing porosity. The stress-strain curve of each graphite was measured in its lateral and axial directions. Young's modulus of graphite decreased with increasing load. The plastic strain at a given compressive load was calculated from the stress-strain curve and the initial gradient of the unloading curve at the load. The ratio of lateral plastic strain to axial plastic strain for the graphites was less than 0.5, indicating that the volume of the graphites decreased during compressive loading. By assuming that the volume change was caused by contraction of pores, plastic strain associated with contraction of pores was calculated from the axial plastic strain and lateral plastic strain by slips along the basal planes. The plastic strain increased with increasing axial plastic strain and porosity of graphite. (author)

  3. Effect of graphite reflector on activation of fusion breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young-Ouk; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The graphite reflector concept has been applied in the design of the Korea HCCR TBM for ITER and this concept is also a candidate design option for Korea Demo. • In the graphite reflector, C-14, B-11 and Be-10 are produced after an irradiation. Impurities in both case of beryllium and graphite is dominant in the shutdown dose after an irradiation. • Based on the evaluation, the graphite reflector is a good alternative of the beryllium multiplier in the view of induced activity and shutdown dose. But C-14 produced in the graphite reflector should be considered carefully in the view of radwaste management. - Abstract: Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. In this paper, activity analysis was performed and the effect of graphite reflector in the view of activation was compared to the beryllium multiplier. As a result, it is expected that using the graphite reflector instead of the beryllium multiplier decreases total activity very effectively. But the graphite reflector produces C-14 about 17.2 times than the beryllium multiplier. Therefore, C-14 produced in the graphite reflector is expected as a significant nuclide in the view of radwaste management.

  4. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan [Nano Science and Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), PO Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-26

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F{sub 2g} vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond.

  5. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F 2g vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond

  6. Graphite-graphite oxide composite electrode for vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenyue; Liu Jianguo; Yan Chuanwei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new composite electrode is designed for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). → The graphite oxide (GO) is used as electrode reactions catalyst. → The excellent electrode activity is attributed to the oxygen-containing groups attached on the GO surface. → A catalytic mechanism of the GO towards the redox reactions is presumed. - Abstract: A graphite/graphite oxide (GO) composite electrode for vanadium redox battery (VRB) was prepared successfully in this paper. The materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area was measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. The redox reactions of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ were studied with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicated that the electrochemical performances of the electrode were improved greatly when 3 wt% GO was added into graphite electrode. The redox peak currents of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ couples on the composite electrode were increased nearly twice as large as that on the graphite electrode, and the charge transfer resistances of the redox pairs on the composite electrode are also reduced. The enhanced electrochemical activity could be ascribed to the presence of plentiful oxygen functional groups on the basal planes and sheet edges of the GO and large specific surface areas introduced by the GO.

  7. Determining the future for irradiated graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Wickham, A.J.; Hacker, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, proposals have been made for the long-term treatment of radioactive graphite waste which have ranged from sea dumping through incineration to land-based disposal, sometimes preceded by a variable period of 'safe storage' within the original reactor containment. Nuclear regulators are challenging the proposed length of 'safe storage' on the basis that essential knowledge may be lost. More recently, political constraints have further complicated the issue by eliminating disposal at sea and imposing a 'near-zero release' philosophy, while public opinion is opposed to land-based disposal and has induced a continual drive towards minimizing radioactivity release to the environment from disposal. This paper proposes that, despite various international agreements, it is time to review technically all options for disposal of irradiated graphite waste as a framework for the eventual decision-making process. It is recognized that the socio-economic and political pressures are high and therefore, given that all currently identified options satisfy the present safety limits, the need to minimize the objective risk is shown to be a minor need in comparison to the public's want of demonstrable control, responsiveness and ability to reverse/change the disposal options in the future. Further, it is shown that the eventual decision-making process for a post-dismantling option for graphite waste must optimize the beneficial attributes of subjective risk experienced by the general public. In addition, in advocating and preferred option to the general public, it is recommended that the industry should communicate at a level commensurate with the public understanding and initiate a process of facilitation which enables the public to arrive at their own solution and constituting a social exchange. Otherwise it is concluded that if the indecision over disposal options is allowed to continue then, by default, graphite will remain in long-term supervised storage. (author)

  8. Graphite-to-Graphene: Total Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzaglo, Matat; Bar, Ilan Pri; Varenik, Maxim; Shunak, Liran; Pevzner, Svetlana; Regev, Oren

    2017-02-01

    The rush to develop graphene applications mandates mass production of graphene sheets. However, the currently available complex and expensive production technologies are limiting the graphene commercialization. The addition of a protective diluent to graphite during ball-milling is demonstrated to result in a game-changer yield (>90%) of defect-free graphene, whose size is controlled by the milling energy and the diluent type. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Electron oxidation of graphite by fluorospecies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    The fluoride-ion affinity (A/sub F - /) of phosphorus pentafluoride was determined to be 100 kcal/mole from the heats of reaction of the Lewis bases SF 4 and ClO 2 F with PF 5 near room temperature. The fluoride-ion affinity of boron trifluoride was determined to be 92 kcal/mole from the heat of reaction of ClO 2 F with BF 3 . The crystal structure of ClO 2 BF 4 was determined and a precise lattice energy was calculated from this structure and used to determined A/sub F - /. Both PF 5 and BF 3 were found to react with graphite in the presence of fluorine gas to yield a variety of non-stoichiometric compounds. The fluoride-ion affinity of silicon tetrafluoride is not known, but it does not react with graphite and F 2 except at high pressures. These and previous results suggested a threshold in oxidizing power of intercalating species below which the oxidative intercalation reaction would not occur. The reduction of C/sub x/PF 6 by PF 3 proved that the reaction is thermodynamically controlled to some extent. The displacement of PF 5 in C/sub x/PF 6 by BF 3 (with a smaller A/sub F - /) suggested that two BF 3 molecules may have a larger fluoride-ion affinity than one PF 5 and that B 2 F 7 - may be a stable anion in graphite. Conductivity studies of PF/sub x/ and BF/sub y/ salts showed that a large drop in conductivity when the reaction reaches first stage is due in the most part to direct fluorination of carbon in graphite

  10. Temperature dependence of phonons in pyrolitic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockhouse, B.N.; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Dispersion curves for longitudinal and transverse phonons propagating along and near the c-axis in pyrolitic graphite at temperatures between 4 0 K and 1500 0 C have been measured by neutron spectroscopy. The observed frequencies decrease markedly with increasing temperature (except for the transverse optical ''rippling'' modes in the hexagonal planes). The neutron groups show interesting asymmetrical broadening ascribed to interference between one phonon and many phonon processes

  11. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  12. High thermoelectric performance of graphite nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Van-Truong; Saint-Martin, Jérôme; Dollfus, Philippe; Volz, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs) have been demonstrated to be a promising material for hydrogen storage and heat management in electronic devices. Here, by means of first-principles and transport simulations, we show that GNFs can also be an excellent material for thermoelectric applications thanks to the interlayer weak van der Waals interaction that induces low thermal conductance and a step-like shape in the electronic transmission with mini-gaps, which are necessary ingredients to achieve high ...

  13. Increase of the density of commercial graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, H.; Meyerstein, D.

    1977-12-01

    The increase of the density of commercial graphite of the type ATJ by polymerization of an impregnated monomer, followed by pyrolysis, is described. The monomer which was either styrene or acrylonitrile, was irradiated by a 60 Co source and pyrolized in a standard vacuum system. The irradiation dose for the polymerization of the monomer was determined. Suggestions for the establishment of the optimum conditions are offered

  14. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  15. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  16. New generation expandable sand screens

    OpenAIRE

    Syltøy, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering This thesis aims to give a general insight into sand control and various sorts of sand control measures and applications of sand control tools. Special focus will be given to expandable sand screens – a technology which came about in the late 1990’s through the use of flexible, expandable tubulars as base pipe in sand screens. More specifically Darcy’s Hydraulic Endurance Screens, a compliant sand screen system using hydraulic activation, and the fu...

  17. Neutrinos in an expanding Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigmans, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Universe contains several billion neutrinos for each nucleon. In this paper, we follow the history of these relic neutrinos as the Universe expanded. At present, their typical velocity is a few hundred km/s and, therefore, their spectra are affected by gravitational forces. This may have led to a phenomenon that could explain two of todays great mysteries: The large-scale structure of the Universe and the increasing rate at which it expands. (paper)

  18. Lattice dynamical appraisal of the anisotropic Debye-Waller factors in graphite lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haridasan, T.M.; Sathyamurthy, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Debye-Waller factors in graphite for the atomic motions within the basal plane and also across the basal planes have been calculated using the various lattice dynamical models available to date and a critical comparison is made with the existing experimental data from X ray and neutron scattering studies. The present study reveals the need for further investigation on the nature of atomic motion across the basal planes. (author). 15 refs, 1 tab

  19. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphite driven by 2D networks of point defects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červenka, Jiří; Katsnelson, M.I.; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 11 (2009), s. 840-844 ISSN 1745-2473 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ferromagnetism * graphite * defects * magnetic force microscopy * superconductive quantum interference device Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 15.491, year: 2009 http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/v5/n11/full/nphys1399.html

  20. Understanding of mechanical properties of graphite on the basis of mesoscopic microstructure (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, M.; Shibata, T.; Takahashi, T.; Baba, S.; Hoshiya, T.

    2002-01-01

    With the aim of nuclear application of ceramics in the high-temperature engineering field, the authors have investigated the mesoscopic microstructure related to the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramics. In this paper, recent activities concerning mechanical properties, strength and Young's modulus are presented. In the strength research field, the brittle fracture model considering pore/grain mesoscopic microstructure was expanded so as to render possible an estimation of the strength under stress gradient conditions. Furthermore, the model was expanded to treat the pore/crack interaction effect. The performance of the developed model was investigated from a comparison with experimental data and the Weibull strength theory. In the field of Young's modulus research, ultrasonic wave propagation was investigated using the pore/wave interaction model. Three kinds of interaction modes are treated in the model. The model was applied to the graphite, and its applicability was investigated through comparison with experimental data. (authors)