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Sample records for expanded criteria donors

  1. Expanding criteria for living kidney donors: what are the limits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, Stephen; Taler, Sandra

    2008-07-01

    The need to evaluate potential living kidney donors is more pressing than ever before. Evaluating the potential medical risks to individual donors presents both medical and ethical questions related to quantitative hazards of donor nephrectomy. These include conditions commonly associated with age, such as the decline in glomerular filtration rate, the rise in arterial pressures, and weight gain. The "normal" ranges for many of these characteristics are changing as their importance as predictors of cardiovascular risk is reevaluated and the duration of exposure for a lifetime is considered. Many older donors in good health favor donating a kidney to a spouse, despite the presence of elevated blood pressure or even impaired glucose tolerance. The Mayo Kidney/Pancreas transplant program established an "extended criteria workgroup" to address these issues on an individual basis. Our program now stratifies medical criteria based upon age, allowing more liberal criteria for older donors. As a result, we accept treated hypertension in white donors, emphasizing the importance of informed consent and the need for vigilant follow-up. Our greatest concern relates to the development of obesity, particularly in younger individuals. Many of the long-term results of kidney donation are likely to hinge upon future behavior, including smoking, weight management, and medical follow-up care. Older donors are more likely to have established behavior patterns, an element that makes them better candidates in many respects. Studies to closely track the impact of donor nephrectomy in the current era with changing population demographics and expectations are essential.

  2. Comparative study between kidney transplantation with deceased donor expanded criteria and donor standard criteria in a single center in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Luana Soriano; Oliveira, Claudia Maria Costa de; Pinheiro, Francisco Martho Leal; Santos, Larissa Costa de Oliveira; Nóbrega, Danilo Gonçalves; Fernandes, Paula Fbc; Costa, Alda Angélica de Melo; Silva, Sônia Leite da

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplants with expanded criteria donor have been associated with improved patient survival compared to those who remain on dialysis. To compare renal function and survival of the kidney graft of deceased donor with expanded criteria and standard criteria over a year in a single transplant center. 255 kidney transplant recipients with deceased donor were included in the study between the years 2011 to 2013 and they were separated into two groups according to the type of donor (expanded criteria donor - ECD - and standard criteria donor - SCD). 231 deceased donor transplants (90.6%) were performed with standard criteria donor (SCD) and 24 (9.4%) with expanded criteria donor (ECD). There was no difference in the prevalence of delayed graft function - DGF - (62.9% vs. 70.8%; p = 0.44). Expanded criteria donor group had lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at the end of the 1st year (56.8 ± 26.9 vs. 76.9 ± 23.7; p = 0.001). Patient survival was significantly lower in the ECD group, but the graft survival was not different after death-censored analysis. The ECD group was associated with significantly lower levels of GFR during the first year of transplant and a lower patient survival at the 1st year when compared to the SCD. A aceitação dos rins com critério expandido de doação tem sido associada com melhor sobrevida do paciente em comparação àqueles que permanecem em terapia dialítica. Comparar a função renal e a sobrevida do enxerto renal de doador falecido critério expandido com os de doador falecido critério padrão ao longo de um ano em um único centro de transplantes. Foram incluídos 255 receptores de transplante renal com doador falecido, realizados entre os anos de 2011 a 2013, sendo divididos em dois grupos segundo o tipo de doador (critério expandido - DCE - ou padrão -DCP). Foram avaliados 231 receptores com doador critério ideal (90,6%) e 24 com doador critério expandido (9,4%). Não houve diferença na prevalência de fun

  3. Predictors of liver donation without kidney recovery in a cohort of expanded criteria donors: identifying opportunities to improve expanded criteria donor kidney utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S L; Leichtman, A B; O'Connor, K; Lipkowitz, G; Pietroski, R; Stoff, J S; Luskin, R S; Belcher, J; Meyer, K; Merion, R M; Port, F K; Delmonico, F L

    2012-09-01

    To maximize deceased donation, it is necessary to facilitate organ recovery from expanded criteria donors (ECDs). Utilization of donors meeting the kidney definition for ECDs increases access to kidney transplantation and reduces waiting times; however, ECDs often do not proceed to kidney recovery. Based on a prospective study of three Organ Procurement Organizations in the United States, we describe the characteristics of donors meeting the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (OPTN) ECD kidney definition (donor age 60+ or donor age 50-60 years with two of the following: final serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL, history of hypertension, or death from cerebral vascular accident) who donated a liver without kidney recovery. ECDs with organs recovered between February 2003 and September 2005 by New England Organ Bank, Gift of Life Michigan, and LifeChoice Donor Services were studied (n = 324). All donors were declared dead by neurological criteria. Data on a wide range of donor characteristics were collected, including donor demographics, medical history, cause of death, donor status during hospitalization, serological status, and donor kidney quality. Logistic regression models were used to identify donor characteristics predictive of liver-alone donation. Seventy-four of the 324 donors fulfilling the ECD definition for kidneys donated a liver alone (23%). History of diabetes, final serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL, age 70+, and presence of proteinuria were associated with liver-alone donation in univariate models. On multivariate analysis, only final serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL and age 70+ were independently predictive of liver donation alone. Older age and elevated serum creatinine may be perceived as stronger contraindications to kidney donation than the remaining elements of the ECD definition. It is likely that at least a proportion of these liver-alone donors represent missed opportunities for kidney transplantation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Effect of Donor-Recipient Age Match in Expanded Criteria Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, K; Kim, Y H; Kim, M H; Jun, K W; Hwang, J K; Kim, S D; Park, S C; Kim, J I; Moon, I S

    2017-06-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effects of age on patient and graft survival in expanded criteria donor (ECD) renal transplantation. Between February 2000 and December 2015, we analyzed 405 deceased donor renal transplants, including 128 grafts (31.9%) from ECDs. Based on recipient age and ECD criteria classification, the recipients were divided into four groups: Group I, non-ECD to recipient age age ≥50 years; Group III, ECD to recipient age age ≥50 years. Among the four groups, there were significant differences in baseline characteristics (age, body mass index [BMI], cause of end-stage renal disease [ESRD], number of kidney transplantations, and use of induction agent). The mean modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) glomerular filtration rate (GFR) level at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years after transplantation was significantly lower in patients with ECDs but MDRD GFR level at 7, 9, and 10 years did not differ significantly (P = .183, .041, and .388, respectively). There were no significant differences in graft survival (P = .400) and patient survival (P = .147). Our result shows that, regardless of recipient age, kidney transplants donated by deceased ECDs have similar graft and patient survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Validation of KDRI/KDPI for the selection of expanded criteria kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Moral Martín, Raimundo M García; Retamero Díaz, Juan Antonio; Cava Molina, Mercedes; Cobacho Tornel, Belen M; Bravo Soto, Juan; Osuna Ortega, Antonio; O'Valle Ravassa, Francisco

    2017-11-11

    KDRI / KDPI are tools use in kidney donor evaluation. It has been proposed as a substitute of, or complementary to preimplantation renal biopsy. These scores has not been validated in Spain. 1) To investigate the concordance between KDPI and histological scores (preimplantation renal biopsy) and 2) To assess the relationship between KDRI, KDPI and histological score on graft survival in the expanded criteria donors group. Retrospective cohort study from 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2010. During the study 120 donors were recruited, that resulted in 220 preimplantation renal biopsies. 144 (65%) grafts were considered suitable for kidney transplantation. 76 (34.5%) were discarded. Median follow up has been 6.4 years (sd 3.9). Median age 63.1 years (sd 8.2), males (145; 65.9%), non-diabetic (191; 86.8%) and without another cardiovascular risk factors (173; 78.6%). 153 (69.5%) donors died of cerebrovascular disease. There were significant differences in KDRI/KDPI score in both groups 1.56/89 (sd 0.22) vs 1.66/93 (sd 0.15), p<0.01). The KDPI showed moderate concordance and correlation with the histological score (AUC 0.64 / correlation coefficient 0.24, p <0.01). KDPI (HR 24.3, p<0.01) and KDRI (HR 23.3, p<0.01) scores were associated with graft survival in multivariate analysis. 1) KPDI and histological scores show moderate concordance. The utility of both scores as combined tools it has to be determined. 2) KDPI score, and especially KDRI score, are valid for estimating graft survival and combined with the biopsy can help to individualized decision making in the expanded criteria donors pool. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The risk of cancer in recipients of living-donor, standard and expanded criteria deceased donor kidney transplants: a registry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Maggie K M; Lim, Wai H; Turner, Robin M; Chapman, Jeremy R; Craig, Jonathan C; Wong, Germaine

    2014-12-27

    Kidneys from expanded criteria deceased donors may elicit a strong inflammatory response, predisposing recipients to an increased risk of cancer after transplantation. We aimed to determine the association between donor types and cancer risk after kidney transplantation. Using the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, we assessed the association between different donor types (living donor, standard, and expanded criteria deceased donors) and the risk of cancer after kidney transplantation using adjusted Cox proportional hazard and competing risk models. Over a median follow-up period of 4.4 years in 7,040 patients (34,684 patient-years), 468 patients (6.6%) developed cancer. The overall risks for cancer were 1,080, 1,444, and 2,018 per 100,000 patient-years for recipients of living donor, standard, and expanded criteria deceased donor kidneys, respectively. Compared to recipients of living-donor kidneys, recipients of expanded criteria deceased donor kidneys were at an increased risk of cancer (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.52; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.15-2.02; P = 0.004), particularly for genitourinary cancer (adjusted HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.10; P = 0.038) and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (adjusted HR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.38-5.37; P = 0.004). Recipients of expanded criteria deceased donor kidneys are at substantially increased risk of cancer, especially cancers with a viral etiology. Allocation of expanded criteria deceased donor kidneys to potential recipients should balance the harms, such as the excess risk of cancer against the survival gains and quality-of-life benefits associated with transplantation.

  7. Dual kidney transplantation involving organs from expanded criteria donors: a review of our series and an update on current indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Polo, J; Pamplona-Casamayor, M; Miranda-Utrera, N; González-Monte, E; Passas-Martínez, J B; Andrés Belmonte, A

    2014-12-01

    Our purpose was to review our kidney transplantation program based on the use of expanded criteria donors, and to determine current indications for dual kidney transplantation (DKT). In 1996, a program was initiated to transplant kidneys from donors of over 60 years performing single or dual transplantation. In 1996, a program was initiated to transplant kidneys from donors of over 60 years performing single or dual transplantation. DKT were performed with donors >75 and donors between 60 and 74 years of age and glomerulosclerosis of >15%. The kidneys of donors between 60 and 74 years of age and with glomerulosclerosis of transplantation (SKT). In 2005, we started to perform SKT despite glomerulosclerosis being >15%, taking into account donor and recipient characteristics. From 1996 to 2004, 222 SKTs and 88 DKTs were performed. Graft survival after 1 and 4 years was, respectively, 91% and 78% for SKT and 95% and 79% for DKT. In 2005, we started to perform SKT despite glomerulosclerosis being >15%, taking into account donor and recipient characteristics. From 2005 to 2011, 328 SKT and 32 DKT were performed. During this period most kidneys used for DKT were from female donors >75 years old, weighing 1 mg/dL and glomerulosclerosis of >15%. The recipients for DKT were mostly male, 75 kg. DKT from expanded criteria donors shows good outcomes. However, in many cases SKT may fulfill the need of the recipient. The archetype for DKT is an older female weighing <65 kg and the most common recipient is an overweight male who is <70 years old. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lung donor selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; van Berkel, Victor

    2014-08-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant.

  9. Impact of Early Low-Grade Proteinuria and Allograft Dysfunction on Survival in Expanded Criteria Donor Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, V; Cabello, M; Ruíz-Esteban, P; Sola, E; Gutiérrez, C; Jironda, C; Burgos, D; González-Molina, M; Hernández, D

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between low-grade proteinuria and worse graft survival, but this has not been fully studied in expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidney transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to assess whether the combination of early low-grade proteinuria (proteinuria (300 mg/d) and median creatinine (Cr; 1.7 mg/dL; interquartile range, 1.4-2.1 mg/dL) at the third month post-transplantation: Group A (Cr proteinuria proteinuria ≥300 mg/24 h; n = 38), Group C (Cr ≥1.7 mg/dL and proteinuria proteinuria ≥300 mg/24 h; n = 55). Death-censored graft survival was significantly lower in Group D compared with the rest (P proteinuria and a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as associated with graft failure (hazard rate [HR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-5.97; P = .03). The early association of low-grade proteinuria and allograft dysfunction represents an important risk factor for graft loss in ECD kidney transplant recipients. Strategies to optimize renal function could improve the outcome in this specific population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypothermic machine perfusion reduces delayed graft function and improves one-year graft survival of kidneys from expanded criteria donors: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Jiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expanded criteria donors (ECDs are currently accepted as potential sources to increase the donor pool and to provide more chances of kidney transplantation for elderly recipients who would not survive long waiting periods. Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP is designed to mitigate the deleterious effects of simple cold storage (CS on the quality of preserved organs, particularly when the donor is in a marginal status. METHODS: We compared the transplant outcomes in patients receiving ECD kidneys with either HMP or CS graft preservation. Articles from the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched and all studies reporting outcomes from HMP versus CS methods of kidney preservation were included in this meta-analysis. The parameters analyzed included the incidence of delayed graft function (DGF, primary non-function (PNF and one-year graft and patient survival. RESULTS: A total of seven studies qualified for the review, involving 2374 and 8716 kidney grafts with HMP or CS preservation respectively, all from ECD donors. The incidence of delayed graft function (DGF was significantly reduced with an odd ratio(OR of 0.59 (95% CI 0.54-0.66, P<0.001 and one-year graft survival was significantly improved with an OR of 1.12 (95% CI 1.03-1.21, P = 0.005 in HMP preservation compared to CS. However, there was no difference in the incidence of PNF (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.21-1.40, P = 0.20, and one-year patient survival (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.02, P = 0.36 between HMP and CS preservation. CONCLUSIONS: HMP was associated with a reduced incidence of DGF and an with increased one-year graft survival, but it was not associated with the incidence of PNF and one-year patient survival.

  11. Strategies for an Expanded Use of Kidneys From Elderly Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sáez, María José; Montero, Núria; Redondo-Pachón, Dolores; Crespo, Marta; Pascual, Julio

    2017-04-01

    The old-for-old allocation policy used for kidney transplantation (KT) has confirmed the survival benefit compared to remaining listed on dialysis. Shortage of standard donors has stimulated the development of strategies aimed to expand acceptance criteria, particularly of kidneys from elderly donors. We have systematically reviewed the literature on those different strategies. In addition to the review of outcomes of expanded criteria donor or advanced age kidneys, we assessed the value of the Kidney Donor Profile Index policy, preimplantation biopsy, dual KT, machine perfusion and special immunosuppressive protocols. Survival and functional outcomes achieved with expanded criteria donor, high Kidney Donor Profile Index or advanced age kidneys are poorer than those with standard ones. Outcomes using advanced age brain-dead or cardiac-dead donor kidneys are similar. Preimplantation biopsies and related scores have been useful to predict function, but their applicability to transplant or refuse a kidney graft has probably been overestimated. Machine perfusion techniques have decreased delayed graft function and could improve graft survival. Investing 2 kidneys in 1 recipient does not make sense when a single KT would be enough, particularly in elderly recipients. Tailored immunosuppression when transplanting an old kidney may be useful, but no formal trials are available.Old donors constitute an enormous source of useful kidneys, but their retrieval in many countries is infrequent. The assumption of limited but precious functional expectancy for an old kidney and substantial reduction of discard rates should be generalized to mitigate these limitations.

  12. Expanding the live kidney donor pool: ethical considerations regarding altruistic donors, paired and pooled programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shaneel Rajendra; Chadha, Priyanka; Papalois, Vassilios

    2011-06-01

    In renal transplant, there is a well-known deficiency in organ supply relative to demand. Live donation provides superior results when compared with deceased donation including a better rate of graft success and fewer immunologic complications. This deficiency in organs leads to significant morbidity and mortality rates. Alternative avenues have been extensively explored that may expand the live donor pool. They include altruistic donation as well as paired and pooled exchange programs. Altruistic donation is a truly selfless act from a donor unknown to the recipient. Kidney paired donation involves 2 incompatible donor-recipient pairs swapping donors to produce compatibility. Pooled donation involves at least 2 pairs, and can take the form of domino chains in which altruistic input sets up a chain of transplants, in which each recipient's incompatible donor makes a donation for the next recipient. Despite application of these various methods, there lie extensive ethical issues surrounding them. Misconceptions frequently occur; for instance, the perceived benefit that donating an organ to a loved one is greater for a related donor than for an altruistic one. Additionally, it is frequently believed that immunologic incompatibility offers coerced donors liberation from surgery, and that overcoming these barriers by introducing exchange programs provides vulnerable donors less protection. This article explores these and other complex ethical issues surrounding the various methods of expanding the donor pool. The authors offer opinions that challenge the ethical issues and attempt to overcome those views that hinder progress in the field.

  13. Expanded carrier screening in gamete donors of Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Maria Teresa; Benjamin, Isaac; Medina, Randolfo; Jiménez, José; Trías, Laura; Lerner, Jorge

    2017-12-01

    To discuss the implications of expanded genetic carrier screening for preconception purposes based on our practice. One hundred and forty-three potential gamete donors aged 20-32 years old (µ=24, 127 females and 16 males), signed informed consent forms and were selected according to the REDLARA guidelines. Blood or saliva samples were examined by one of these genetic carrier screening methods: Genzyme screening for Cystic Fibrosis (CF), Fragile X and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA); Counsyl Universal panel or Recombine Carrier Map. Genotyping results for all donors were analyzed; 41% (58/143) of donors were identified as carriers for at least one condition. We found a carrier frequency of 1/24 for CF, 1/72 for SMA and 0/120 for Fragile X syndrome. Among the high-impact most prevalent conditions in our study (Carrier Map group) were: 21-Hydroxilase-Deficient Congenital Nonclassical Adrenal Hyperplasia (1/8), Factor V deficiency (1/12), Hemochromatosis: Type 1: HFE Related (1/12), Short Chain Acyl-CoA (1/14) and MTHFR deficiency 1/3 (39%). The rate of gamete donors identified as carriers of at least one condition was 41%, which supports the offering of expanded carrier screening to our population. Studies in Latin American populations could help customize screening panels. The ART patient population has a unique opportunity to be offered expanded carrier screening and appropriate counseling, to make its best-informed decisions.

  14. Ex-vivo partial nephrectomy after living donor nephrectomy: Surgical technique for expanding kidney donor pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw A Nyame

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation has profound improvements in mortality, morbidity, and overall quality of life compared to renal replacement therapy. This report aims to illustrate the use of ex-vivo partial nephrectomy in a patient with a renal angiomyolipoma prior to living donor transplantation. The surgical outcomes of the donor nephrectomy and recipient transplantation are reported with 2 years of follow-up. Both the donor and recipient are healthy and without any significant comorbidities. In conclusion, urologic techniques such as partial nephrectomy can be used to expand the living donor pool in carefully selected and well informed transplant recipients. Our experience demonstrated a safe and positive outcome for both the recipient and donor, and is consistent with other reported outcomes in the literature.

  15. DCD lung donation : donor criteria, procedural criteria, pulmonary graft function validation, and preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, Michiel E.; van Raemdonck, Dirk; Akhtar, Mohammed Zeeshan; Neyrinck, Arne; de Antonio, David Gomez; Varela, Andreas; Dark, John

    In an era where there is a shortage of lungs for transplantation is increased utilization of lungs from donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors. We review the reports of 11 controlled and 1 uncontrolled DCD programs focusing on donor criteria, procedural criteria, graft assessment, and

  16. Expanding the use of hepatitis C-viremic kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawinski, Deirdre; Wyatt, Christina M; Locke, Jayme E

    2017-11-01

    Direct-acting antivirals have revolutionized the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with chronic kidney disease, with implications for the timing of antiviral treatment among kidney transplant candidates and for the use of HCV viremic donors. A recent consensus conference reviewed the available data on the safety and cost-effectiveness of expanding access to HCV-positive organs to HCV-negative recipients. Early trials are promising, but larger trials and a plan for obtaining HCV therapy in the posttransplantation period are needed. Implications for the larger transplant community also need to be considered. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Accepting Hearts From Hepatitis C-Positive Donor: Can We Expand the Donor Pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Jonathan; Lourenco, Laura M; Te, Helen S; Renz, John F; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Uriel, Nir

    2017-10-01

    Until recently, transplantation from hepatitis C-positive donors was relatively contraindicated as eradication of active hepatitis C previously required an interferon-based regimen that has been associated with rejection in solid organ transplantation. New interferon-free treatment regimens for hepatitis C have fewer adverse events and higher cure rates than interferon-based regimens. Interferon-free regimens have been shown to be safe in the liver transplantation literature, but little is known about the safety and efficacy of treatment in heart transplantation. Here we report a case of successful eradication of hepatitis C with a non-interferon-based regimen using ledipasvir-sofosbuvir following combined orthotopic heart and liver transplantation. Based on the prevalence of hepatitis C in the general population, inclusion of hepatitis C-positive donors for heart transplantation can expand this component of the donor pool 3- to 6-fold. In carefully selected patients and recipients, inclusion of hepatitis C-positive donors may allow for expansion of the donor pool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. International variation in volunteer whole blood donor eligibility criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Julie K; King, Karen E

    2010-02-01

    This study assesses international variation in volunteer whole blood donor eligibility criteria. In February 2008, Web sites of major blood collection organizations in 17 countries were queried for the volume of whole blood donations and six donor eligibility criteria: allowed donation frequency, donor age, hemoglobin (Hb), weight, and deferrals for tattoo and pregnancy/breast-feeding. The allowed frequency of whole blood donation ranged from 56 to 120 days, some with sex- and age-specific limitations. While blood collection agencies in three countries did not have an upper age limit for donation, the remainder mandated donor retirement at ages from 60 to 81 years. The minimum Hb level was 11.5 to 12.5 g/dL for women and 12.5 to 13.5 g/dL for men. Blood collection organizations in only three countries required a minimum donor weight of less than 50 kg. Tattoo and pregnancy deferrals ranged from 4 to 12 months and 6 weeks to 12 months, respectively. The volume of whole blood donations ranged from 300 to 500 mL. The percentage of total blood volume donated, the absolute grams of Hb expected to be restored per deferral period and per day of donor deferral, and the concentration of Hb expected to be restored per deferral period were calculated. International volunteer whole blood donor eligibility criteria demonstrate marked variation. These differences likely cause international variation in the prevalence of adverse donor reactions and iron deficiency anemia. The reasons underlying these dissimilarities are unclear, but may include varying cultural influences and average donor body habitus.

  19. DONOR CRITERIA FOR LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION - A COMPARATIVE-STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DONOR LIVER SELECTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PRUIM, J; TENVERGERT, EM; DEKEMPENAER, MGV; BONSEL, GJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1993-01-01

    In a case-control study, the relevance of donor parameters used for donor selection on final transplant outcome was studied. Two matched groups of 17 donors were created: one group of 'ideal' donors and a control group not meeting the criteria for 'ideal' donors. Recipients of livers from both

  20. A decade of extended-criteria lung donors in a single center: was it justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Jana; Ruttens, David; Verleden, Stijn E; Cox, Bianca; Stanzi, Alessia; Vandermeulen, Elly; Vos, Robin; Vanaudenaerde, Bart M; Verleden, Geert M; Van Veer, Hans; Coosemans, Willy; Decaluwe, Herbert; Nafteux, Philippe; De Leyn, Paul; Van Raemdonck, Dirk E

    2015-02-01

    Despite a worldwide need to expand the lung donor pool, approximately 75% of lung offers are not accepted for transplantation. We investigated the impact of liberalizing lung donor acceptance criteria during the last decade on the number of effective transplants and early and late outcomes in our center. All 514 consecutive lung transplants (LTx) performed between Jan 2000 and Oct 2011 were included. Donors were classified as matching standard criteria (SCD; n = 159) or extended criteria (ECD; n = 272) in case they fulfilled at least one of the following criteria: age >55 years, PaO2 /FiO2 at PEEP 5 cmH2 O death. Outcome parameters were primary graft dysfunction (PGD) grade at 0, 12, 24, and 48 h after LTx, time to extubation, stay in intensive care unit (ICU), early and late infection, acute rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), and survival. Two hundred and seventy-two recipients (63.1%) received ECD lungs. PGD grade at T0 was similar between groups, while at T12 (Accepting ECDs contributed in increasing the number of lung transplants performed in our center. Although this lung donor strategy has an impact on early postoperative outcome, liberalizing criteria did not influence long-term outcome after LTx. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  1. Dual kidney transplantation with organs from extended criteria cadaveric donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Frank T; O'Connor, Kevin M; Shields, William; Zimmerman, Jose A; Mohan, Ponnusamy; Eng, Molly; Little, Dilly M; Power, Richard; Dorman, Anthony; Hickey, David P

    2009-10-01

    The critical shortage of kidneys available for transplantation has led to alternate strategies to expand the pool. Transplantation of the 2 kidneys into a single recipient using organs suboptimal for single kidney transplantation was suggested. We assessed results in 24 grafts allocated for dual kidney transplantation vs those in a control group of 44 designated for single kidney transplantation. Each group underwent pretransplant biopsy and recipients were age matched. Dual kidney transplantation was done in 24 of 1,091 transplants (2.1%) from 2001 to 2008. In patients with dual kidney transplant vs single kidney transplant mean recipient age was 60.6 vs 60.8 years, mean HLA-A, B and DR mismatches were 3.3 vs 2.9, and average patient waiting time was 15.6 vs 13.9 months. All grafts were perfused with University of Wisconsin solution with a mean cold ischemia time of 17.9 hours. On donor dual kidney biopsy in the dual kidney transplant vs single kidney transplant group the average fibrosis rate was 30% (range 25% to 45%) vs 25% (range 3% to 40%) and the glomerulosclerosis rate was 17.9% (range 3.2% to 40.7%) vs 7.1% (range 0% to 50%). Good postoperative renal function was noted in 14 dual kidney transplantation cases. Acute tubular necrosis requiring dialysis developed in 5 patients as well as acute rejection in 1. Two dual kidney recipients (8%) died in the postoperative period with no single kidney deaths. One patient underwent bilateral transplantectomy. Mean anesthesia time was longer in the dual group (371 vs 212 minutes). Patient and graft survival was equivalent to that in the control group at 36 months. Careful selection of marginal kidneys based on clinical and histological criteria allows the use of organs that would not ordinarily be sufficient for transplantation with acceptable outcomes. This is a valid strategy to address the organ shortage.

  2. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peck, C.C.; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F.; Schiffman, E.L.; Alstergren, P.; Anderson, G.C.; De Leeuw, R.; Jensen, R.; Michelotti, A.; Ohrbach, R.; Petersson, A.; List, T.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for

  3. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility f...

  4. Expanding the taxonomy of the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C; Goulet, J-P; Lobbezoo, F; Schiffman, E L; Alstergren, P; Anderson, G C; de Leeuw, R; Jensen, R; Michelotti, A; Ohrbach, R; Petersson, A; List, T

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) classification to include less common but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing and further criteria refinement. A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria and the ability to operationalise and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMDs taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalised diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. The expanded TMDs taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalise and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Optimising expanded donor organs through dual kidney transplantation: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, Miguel Á; Mansilla, Juan J; Cabello, Mercedes; Soler, Jorge; Ruiz, Pilar; Lebron, Miguel; Baena, Víctor; Hernández, Domingo

    2012-05-14

    In order to take full advantage of ECD kidneys, which may not provide sufficient renal mass if used individually, it has been suggested that such organs be used in dual or bilateral kidney transplantation (DTx). We analysed the experience in a single hospital between May 2007 and March 2011 in a case-control study. Criteria for determining whether to perform single or dual Tx were defined in a protocol in which the biopsy score was important, but not the only factor. Donor's age, medical history, kidney size and creatinine clearance were also considered. During this time period, 80 kidneys from donors over age 65 were transplanted. Single transplants (STx) accounted for 40 of the organs, and another 40 were used in DTx. Mean donor age for STx was 68.7 ± 3.0 years; for DTx, it was 74.2 ± 4.3 years (Porgans having characteristics that probably make them unsuitable for STx. The decision to perform DTx makes using ECD kidneys easier, and it should be based on a combination of pre-transplant histological criteria and the donor's clinical characteristics.

  6. Dual kidney transplantation with organs from extended criteria cadaveric donors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Arcy, Frank T

    2009-10-01

    The critical shortage of kidneys available for transplantation has led to alternate strategies to expand the pool. Transplantation of the 2 kidneys into a single recipient using organs suboptimal for single kidney transplantation was suggested. We assessed results in 24 grafts allocated for dual kidney transplantation vs those in a control group of 44 designated for single kidney transplantation. Each group underwent pretransplant biopsy and recipients were age matched.

  7. A description of the costs of living and standard criteria deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnieh, L; Manns, B J; Klarenbach, S; McLaughlin, K; Yilmaz, S; Hemmelgarn, B R

    2011-03-01

    Kidney transplantation improves quality of life and survival and is associated with lower health care costs compared with dialysis. We described and compared the costs of living and standard criteria for deceased donor kidney transplantation. Patients included adult recipients of a first kidney-only transplant between April 1, 1998, and March 31, 2006, as well as their donor information. All costs (outpatient care, diagnostic imaging, inpatient care, physician claims, laboratory tests and transplant medications) for 2 years after transplant for recipients and transplant-related costs prior to transplant (donor workup and management) were included. Complete cost information was available for 357 recipients. The mean total 2-year cost of transplantation, including donor costs, for recipients of living and deceased donors was $118 347 (95% confidence interval [CI], 110 395-126 299) and $121 121 (95% CI 114 287-127 956), respectively (p = 0.7). The mean cost for a living donor was $18 129 (95% CI 16 845-19 414) and for a deceased donor was $36 989 (95% CI 34 421-39 558). Living donor kidney transplantation has similar costs at 2 years compared with deceased donor transplantation. These results can be used by health care decision makers to inform strategies to increase donation. ©2011 The Authors Journal compilation©2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. Non-compliance to infectious disease deferral criteria among Hong Kong's blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S S; Cheung, E K H; Leung, J N S; Lee, C K

    2017-07-01

    Donor screening alone cannot eliminate the risk of transfusion-transmitted HIV infection. Donor deferral according to established criteria is a supplemental strategy, which has focused largely on men who have sex with men (MSM). A study was conducted to determine the compliance of non-MSM donors with such criteria and examine its implications on blood safety. Chinese donors who have just donated blood at blood donor centres in Hong Kong were recruited. Based on the contents of the routinely administered predonation Health Screening Questionnaires, participants were requested to complete a survey to assess their practice of deferrable risk behaviours and lifestyle encounters, using tablet computers. Over an 8-week period in mid-2016, 1614 donors (male-to-female ratio 1·23) had enrolled in the survey, accounting for 40% of donors giving blood on the survey days. The proportion of respondents who gave blood despite having deferrable HIV risk was 5%: MSM 1·2% (of the male donors); non-MSM risk behaviours 2·6%; risky lifestyle encounters 2·1%. If inconsistent declaration and suspected risk behaviours were included, the total non-compliance rate became 10·8%. Male donors had a higher prevalence of deferrable behavioural risk, even after excluding MSM. Unawareness and non-acceptability were main reasons for non-compliance. The non-compliance rate of donors to deferral was high, although the ultimate infection risk might be small in the presence of universal screening. Simplification of questionnaires, focus on time-limited deferral and a reduction of deferral items may improve the deferral mechanism without compromising blood safety. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  9. Expanding the donor pool: can the Spanish model work in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, George J; Mahanty, Harish D; Ascher, Nancy L; Roberts, John P

    2003-10-01

    Since the creation of the Organizacion Nacional de Trasplantes (ONT) in 1989, the organ donation rate in Spain has doubled. Although often attributed to improved donor recruitment efforts, this increase may also represent higher utilization of marginal donors. Therefore, age-related donor recruitment in Spain and the US was evaluated. Data from the ONT, the US Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR), the US Census Bureau, and the Tempus databank of Spain's Instituto Nacional de Estadistica (INE) were analyzed. Between 1989 and 1999, the number of donors in Spain increased from 14.3 to 33.7 per million population (pmp; 136% increase) compared with an increase in the US from 16.2 to 21.5 donors pmp (33%). The largest difference between Spain and the US in the increased number of donors was in the 45-year-old group, representing 30.3% of donors in Spain in 1999 (44 donors pmp). If the US increased its older donor rates to match Spain's, an incremental 1235 donors per year would be realized. The high Spanish organ donation rates are largely attributable to increased use of older donors. Utilizing similar proportions of older donors in the US would increase the donor pool by almost 40%.

  10. Utility of pre-procurement bedside liver biopsy in the deceased extended-criteria liver donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangus, Richard S; Borup, Tim C; Popa, Sam; Saxena, Romil; Cummings, Oscar; Tector, A Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The Indiana Organ Procurement Organization (IOPO) utilizes preoperative bedside liver biopsies in certain extended-criteria donors (ECDs), obtained by the on-site coordinator, to determine the utility of pursuing donation. This study reports the clinical and financial outcomes for this management strategy. All bedside liver biopsies obtained in ECDs over a five-yr period were reviewed. Study variables included the following: indication for biopsy, biopsy results, taking the case to the operating room, transplantation of the donor liver, and graft survival. All biopsies were processed at a single university center. There were 110 donors biopsied. Primary indications included the following: old age (29%), extensive/current alcohol abuse (26%), hepatitis C-positive serology (21%), obesity (25%), and severely elevated liver function enzymes (18%). Biopsy results demonstrated a potentially transplantable liver in 73 cases (66%), all of whom were taken to the OR (while 37 ruled out for donation based upon liver biopsy [34%]). Of all biopsied livers, 49 ultimately were transplanted (45%). Intra-operative decisions included the following: transplant 51/73 (70%), surgeon decision to exclude 20/73 (27%), nonuse due to finding of malignancy two (3%). Bedside liver biopsy may be a valuable tool to determine the utility in pursuing donation in ECDs, particularly with liver-only donors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Studies of the Effects of Career Interest Inventories Expanding Outcome Criteria to Include Women's Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittle, Carol Kehr

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of relating women's experience to studies of effects of career inventories and interest measures are to: (1) understand individual satisfaction with work is attained through perception of work's fit into life patterns; and (2) use type of role explored and decision area to expand outcome criteria. (Author/HLM)

  12. Criteria for viability assessment of discarded human donor livers during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Sutton

    Full Text Available Although normothermic machine perfusion of donor livers may allow assessment of graft viability prior to transplantation, there are currently no data on what would be a good parameter of graft viability. To determine whether bile production is a suitable biomarker that can be used to discriminate viable from non-viable livers we have studied functional performance as well as biochemical and histological evidence of hepatobiliary injury during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers. After a median duration of cold storage of 6.5 h, twelve extended criteria human donor livers that were declined for transplantation were ex vivo perfused for 6 h at 37 °C with an oxygenated solution based on red blood cells and plasma, using pressure controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous portal perfusion. During perfusion, two patterns of bile flow were identified: (1 steadily increasing bile production, resulting in a cumulative output of ≥ 30 g after 6 h (high bile output group, and (2 a cumulative bile production <20 g in 6 h (low bile output group. Concentrations of transaminases and potassium in the perfusion fluid were significantly higher in the low bile output group, compared to the high bile output group. Biliary concentrations of bilirubin and bicarbonate were respectively 4 times and 2 times higher in the high bile output group. Livers in the low bile output group displayed more signs of hepatic necrosis and venous congestion, compared to the high bile output group. In conclusion, bile production could be an easily assessable biomarker of hepatic viability during ex vivo machine perfusion of human donor livers. It could potentially be used to identify extended criteria livers that are suitable for transplantation. These ex vivo findings need to be confirmed in a transplant experiment or a clinical trial.

  13. Expanding the Taxonomy of the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Christopher C.; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Lobbezoo, Frank; Schiffman, Eric L.; Alstergren, Per; Anderson, Gary C.; de Leeuw, Reny; Jensen, Rigmor; Michelotti, Ambra; Ohrbach, Richard; Petersson, Arne; List, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorder (TMD) classification to include less common, but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing, and further criteria refinement. Methods A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria, and the ability to operationalize and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMD taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Results Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders, and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalized diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. Conclusions The expanded TMD taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalize and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. PMID:24443898

  14. Expression of the activation antigen CD69 predicts functionality of in vitro expanded peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Ersbøll, A K

    1998-01-01

    Gene therapy for AIDS necessitates harvest and expansion of PBMC from HIV-infected patients. We expanded PBMC from healthy blood donors and HIV-infected patients for up to 14 days using four expansion protocols: 3 days of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, continuous PHA stimulation, 3 days...... cytometry. PBMC from healthy donors and HIV-infected patients were readily expanded. The best expansion was obtained using stimulation for 3 days. After expansion, functionality of PBMC measured as proliferative response was partly conserved. PBMC expanded with stimulation for 3 days exhibited more...... preserved functionality than PBMC stimulated continuously (P healthy donors expanded with PHA stimulation for 3 days...

  15. Expanding the donor pool: regional variation in pediatric organ donation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godown, Justin; McKane, Meghann; Wujcik, Kari; Mettler, Bret A; Dodd, Debra A

    2016-12-01

    There are limited published data on pediatric organ donation rates. The aim of this study was to describe the trends in pediatric organ donation over time and to assess the regional variation in pediatric deceased organ donation. OPTN data were utilized to assess the trends in pediatric organ donation over time. The number of deceased pediatric organ donors was indexed using regional mortality data obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics and compared across UNOS regions and two different eras. The number of pediatric deceased organ donors has declined in the recent era, largely driven by fewer adolescent donors. For all age groups, there is significant regional variation in organ donation rates, with identifiable high- and low-performing regions. Expansion of the donor pool may be possible by optimizing organ donation in regions demonstrating lower recruitment of pediatric donors. Using the region with the highest donation rate for each age group as the gold standard, we estimate a potential 24% increase in the number of donors if all regions performed comparably, equating to 215 new pediatric donors annually. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Risk factors for acute renal injury in living donor liver transplantation: evaluation of the RIFLE criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Masashi; Umeda, Yuzo; Sadamori, Hiroshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Takaki, Akinobu; Matsuda, Hiroaki; Shinoura, Susumu; Yoshida, Ryuichi; Nobuoka, Daisuke; Satoh, Daisuke; Fuji, Tomokazu; Yagi, Takahito; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Acute renal injury (ARI) is a serious complication after liver transplantation. This study investigated the usefulness of the RIFLE criteria in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and the prognostic impact of ARI after LDLT. We analyzed 200 consecutive adult LDLT patients, categorized as risk (R), injury (I), or failure (F), according to the RIFLE criteria. ARI occurred in 60.5% of patients: R-class, 23.5%; I-class, 21%; and F-class, 16%. Four patients in Group-A (normal renal function and R-class) and 26 patients in Group-B (severe ARI: I- and F-class) required renal replacement therapy (P 55 ml/kg (OR 3.7), overexposure to calcineurin inhibitor (OR 2.5), and preoperative diabetes mellitus (OR 3.2). The RIFLE criteria offer a useful predictive tool after LDLT. Severe ARI, defined beyond class-I, could have negative prognostic impact in the acute and late postoperative phases. Perioperative treatment strategies should be designed and balanced based on the risk factors for the further improvement of transplant prognosis. © 2013 Steunstichting ESOT. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Urological complications after kidney transplantation from extended criteria donors: Ureteroneocystostomy versus pyelo-ureterostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promeyrat, X; Alechinsky, L; Duarte, R-C; Martin, X; Paparel, P; Timsit, M-O; Badet, L

    2016-05-01

    The use of transplants from extended criteria donors increases the number of urological complications after renal transplantation. Two different anastomosis techniques used to restore urinary continuity are compared in this study. Retrospective study, bi-center over a period of 5 years. One hundred and seventy six patients operated at Hospices Civils de Lyon benefited from ureteroneocystostomy according to De Campos-Freire (group 1) and 167 patients operated at the Necker Hospital in Paris had a pyelo-ureterostomy (group 2). The various urological complications (fistulas, strictures, seromas, haematomas and vesico-ureteric reflux) and their care were compared. Risk factors were sought. The waiting time before transplantation was longer in group 2 than in group 1 (51 and 33.84 months) as the percentage of anuric patients (52.9 % against 32.9 %) (Panuria, sex of recipients and donor age as independent risk factors in the onset of complications and the double J stent as a protective factor. This study does not demonstrate the superiority of a urinary anastomosis technique. The establishment of a double J stent reduces the risk of complications. Analysis of risk factors allows to propose a decision tree to guide the surgical strategy, particularly in the population of anuric recipients. 5. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Extracorporeal support for organ donation after cardiac death effectively expands the donor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliocca, Joseph F; Magee, John C; Rowe, Stephen A; Gravel, Mark T; Chenault, Richard H; Merion, Robert M; Punch, Jeffrey D; Bartlett, Robert H; Hemmila, Mark R

    2005-06-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect on short-term outcomes of normothermic, extracorporeal perfusion (ECMO) for donation of abdominal organs for transplantation after cardiac death (DCD). Study parameters included increase in number of donors and organs, types of organs procured, and viability of kidneys transplanted. We retrospectively reviewed medical record data for all patients enrolled in our ECMO-supported DCD donor protocol between 10/1/2000 to 2/01/2004. We also reviewed the records for all patients undergoing organ donation after brain-death (DBD) during the study period at our institution. Recipient data were obtained and analyzed for all kidneys procured from both groups. Twenty patients were enrolled in our DCD protocol and underwent attempted organ donation. Fifteen patients completed the protocol; 3 maintained cardiac function throughout the prescribed 60 minutes after withdrawal of life support, and two patients' organs were deemed unsuitable for transplantation. Fourteen (70%) of the DCD donor patients originated on the trauma service and six (30%) were from other clinical services. The DCD program increased the potential donor pool by 33% (61 versus 81 patients) and the number of kidneys transplanted by 24% (100 versus 124). A total of 24 kidney, 5 liver, and 1 pancreas transplants were performed with these organs. Two of 24 (8.3%) DCD kidneys had delayed graft function. There were no perioperative rejection episodes or deaths. The implementation of a DCD protocol using extracorporeal perfusion increased the potential organ donor pool at our institution by 33%. This was accomplished without short term adverse effect on organ function compared with kidneys transplanted from DBD donors.

  19. Expanded criteria for debulking of liver metastasis also apply to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rosemary E; Pommier, SuEllen J; Pommier, Rodney F

    2017-11-02

    Recently, there has been a move toward decreasing the threshold for liver debulking for metastatic carcinoid tumors from 90% to 70%. The debulking threshold and factors that predict outcomes of liver debulking operations specifically among pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are not well defined. Records of patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors undergoing liver debulking with a threshold of 70% from 2006 to 2016 were reviewed. Extrahepatic metastases and positive margins by enucleation were allowed. Liver progression-free survival and overall survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method for various factors and compared by log-rank. Factors also were correlated with liver progression-free survival and overall survival by multivariate regression analyses. Forty-two patients underwent 44 operations, of which 24 resulted in 100% debulking, 12 resulted in ≥90% debulking, and 8 resulted in ≥70% debulking. Median liver progression-free survival was 11 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 81%. There were no significant differences in outcome based on percent debulked. Only liver metastasis ≥5 cm correlated with liver progression-free survival and overall survival. Consideration should be given to expanding the criteria for liver debulking in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors to include a new threshold of >70% debulking, intermediate grade tumors, positive margins, and extrahepatic metastases; these criteria yield results indistinguishable from complete resection. Using these expanded criteria will increase the number of patients eligible for an operation and maintain high survival rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Defining an extended criteria donor lung : an empirical approach based on the Eurotransplant experience1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Jacqueline M.; van der Bij, Wim; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; de Vries, Erwin; Rahmel, Axel; Laufer, Guenther; De Pauw, Michel; Meiser, Bruno

    P>The aim of this study was to design and validate a lung donor score that reflects experts' perceived risk of allograft failure. All lung donors reported to Eurotransplant from 1999 to 2007 [N = 6080] were used to create a lung donor score. Based on observed discard rates and using multivariate

  1. Single pediatric kidney transplantation in adult recipients: comparable outcomes with standard-criteria deceased-donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Behnke, Martha; Fisher, Robert; Posner, Marc

    2013-06-15

    Single pediatric kidney transplantation (SKT) in adult recipients has traditionally been considered a high risk because of concerns of technical complications leading to poor graft outcomes. The primary goal of this single-center, retrospective analysis was to compare outcomes after SKT to standard-criteria deceased-donor kidney transplantation (SCDKT). We compared outcomes in adult recipients after SKT (n=31; mean donor weight, 27 kg); SCDKT (n=283); pediatric en bloc (n=21), living-donor (n=275), and extended criteria-donor (n=100) kidney transplantations. The death-censored 5-year graft survival after SKT was significantly superior to SCDKT (81.4% vs. 74.5%, P=0.02). The serum creatinine level at 5 years after transplantation was significantly lower in SKT compared with that in SCDKT (1.2 vs. 1.6 mg/dL, P<0.0001). There was a significantly higher incidence of arterial anastomotic stenosis (6.8% vs. 0.4%, P=0.02) and hydronephrosis (12.9% vs. 5.3%, P=0.02) in the SKT cohort compared with SCDKT. Subgroup analysis of the SKT cohort by donor age less than 5 years vs. 6 to 10 years (mean weight, 16.4 vs. 32.7 kg) revealed no differences in patient or graft survival. Despite a higher incidence of posttransplantation vascular and urological complications, long-term graft survival after SKT (in weight-matched pediatric donors and selected adult recipients) was comparable with that after SCDKT. SKT from very small donors (age, ≤5 years) yielded excellent long-term patient and graft survivals. The use of pediatric donor kidneys should be encouraged to address the problem of organ shortage.

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as Anti-Inflammatory and Regenerative Mediators for Donor Kidneys During Normothermic Machine Perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierra-Parraga, Jesus Maria; Eijken, Marco; Hunter, James; Moers, Cyril; Leuvenink, Henri; Moller, Bjarne; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Baan, Carla C.; Jespersen, Bente; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    There is great demand for transplant kidneys for the treatment of end-stage kidney disease patients. To expand the donor pool, organs from older and comorbid brain death donors, so-called expanded criteria donors (ECD), as well as donation after circulatory death donors, are considered for

  3. Preserving and evaluating hearts with ex vivo machine perfusion: an avenue to improve early graft performance and expand the donor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael J; Moainie, Sina L; Griffith, Bartley P; Poston, Robert S

    2008-08-01

    Cardiac transplantation remains the first choice for the surgical treatment of end stage heart failure. An inadequate supply of donor grafts that meet existing criteria has limited the application of this therapy to suitable candidates and increased interest in extended criteria donors. Although cold storage (CS) is a time-tested method for the preservation of hearts during the ex vivo transport interval, its disadvantages are highlighted in hearts from the extended criteria donor. In contrast, transport of high-risk hearts using hypothermic machine perfusion (MP) provides continuous support of aerobic metabolism and ongoing washout of metabolic byproducts. Perhaps more importantly, monitoring the organ's response to this intervention provides insight into the viability of a heart initially deemed as extended criteria. Obviously, ex vivo MP introduces challenges, such as ensuring homogeneous tissue perfusion and avoiding myocardial edema. Though numerous groups have experimented with this technology, the best perfusate and perfusion parameters needed to achieve optimal results remain unclear. In the present review, we outline the benefits of ex vivo MP with particular attention to how the challenges can be addressed in order to achieve the most consistent results in a large animal model of the ideal heart donor. We provide evidence that MP can be used to resuscitate and evaluate hearts from animal and human extended criteria donors, including the non-heart beating donor, which we feel is the most compelling argument for why this technology is likely to impact the donor pool.

  4. Dermal Autograft Using Donor Breast as Alternative to Acellular Dermal Matrices in Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction: A Comparative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, William Darden; Kubajak, Christopher S; St Martin, Brad; Rinker, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Shifting preference for implant-based breast reconstruction has resulted in an increased use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in tissue-expander breast reconstruction. The benefits afforded by ADM must be weighed against a potential increased risk for postoperative complications. Dermal autograft-assisted breast reconstruction using autograft harvest from the lower abdomen has been shown to result in equivalent aesthetics and patient satisfaction compared with ADM at a lower cost, with fewer complications. The purpose of this study was to review a series of patients who underwent bilateral mastectomy and immediate dermal autograft-assisted tissue expander (TE) breast reconstruction using the non-cancerous breast as a donor site, comparing the outcomes with a concurrent cohort of patients undergoing ADM-assisted reconstruction to determine the relative safety, cost, and effectiveness of the 2 procedures. The study population included all patients who underwent dermal autograft-assisted TE breast reconstruction, using the contralateral cancer-free breast as the source of dermal autograft, between 2010 and 2015. The ADM cohort consisted of patients who underwent bilateral mastectomy and immediate ADM-assisted TE breast reconstruction during the same period. Univariate analysis was performed for demographic data, complications, operative cost, and operative time. Data were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test for nonparametric data and χ analyses for continuous and categorical variables. Significance was defined as P value less than 0.05. Seventeen patients received dermal autograft using the non-cancerous breast donor site. Twenty-seven patients who underwent ADM-assisted reconstruction during the same period were identified. Significantly higher cost was demonstrated between groups (ADM, US $9999.87; autograft, US $3924.19; P autograft, 97 min; ADM, 120 min). No difference was found in wound healing complications (ADM, 14.8%; autograft, 23.53%; P = 0.47). No

  5. Opportunities and challenges of expanded criteria organs in liver and kidney transplantation as a response to organ shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    In 1989, there were 19,000 patients on the UNOS (United Network of Organ Sharing) wait list for organs compared to 110,000 today. Without an equivalent increase in donors, the patients awaiting these organs for transplant face increasing severity of illness and risk of dying without receiving a transplant. This disparity in supply and demand has led to acceptance of organs with lower than expected success rates compared to previous standard donors variously defined as extended criteria donors in order to increase transplantation. The reluctance to wider use of these types of organs is based on the less than expected transplant center graft and patient survival results associated with their use, as well as the increased resources required to care for the patients who receive these organs. The benefits need to be compared to the survival of not receiving a transplant and remaining on the waiting list rather than on outcomes of receiving a standard donor. A lack of a systematic risk outcomes adjustment is one of the most important factors preventing more extensive utilization as transplant centers are held to patient and graft survival statistics as a performance measure by multiple regulatory organizations and insurers. Newer classification systems of such donors may allow a more systematic approach to analyzing the specific risks to individualized patients. Due to changes in donor policies across the country, there has been an increase in Extended Criteria Donors (ECD) organs procured by organ procurement organizations (OPO) but their uneven acceptance by the transplant centers has contributed to an increase in discards and organs not being used. This is one of the reasons that wider sharing of organs is currently receiving much attention. Transplanting ECD organs presents unique challenges and innovative approaches to achieve satisfactory results. Improved logistics and information technology combined strategies for improving donor quality with may prevent discards

  6. Criteria for Viability Assessment of Discarded Human Donor Livers during Ex Vivo Normothermic Machine Perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutton, Michael E.; op den Dries, Sanna; Karimian, Negin; Weeder, Pepijn D.; de Boer, Marieke T.; Wiersema-Buist, Janneke; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Although normothermic machine perfusion of donor livers may allow assessment of graft viability prior to transplantation, there are currently no data on what would be a good parameter of graft viability. To determine whether bile production is a suitable biomarker that can be used to discriminate

  7. Expanding the Donor Pool Through Intensive Care to Facilitate Organ Donation: Results of a Spanish Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Gil, Beatriz; Coll, Elisabeth; Elizalde, José; Herrero, Jaime E; Pont, Teresa; Quindós, Brígida; Marcelo, Bella; Bodí, María A; Martínez, Adolfo; Nebra, Agustín; Guerrero, Francisco; Manciño, José M; Galán, Juan; Lebrón, Miguel; Miñambres, Eduardo; Matesanz, Rafael

    2017-08-01

    Intensive Care to facilitate Organ Donation (ICOD) may help to increase the donor pool. We describe the Spanish experience with ICOD. Achieving Comprehensive Coordination in Organ Donation (ACCORD)-Spain consisted of an audit of the donation pathway from patients who died as a result of a devastating brain injury (possible donors) in 68 hospitals during November 1, 2014, to April 30, 2015. We focused on possible donors whose families were interviewed to discuss organ donation once intensive care with a therapeutic purpose was deemed futile and brain death (BD) was a likely outcome. Of the 1970 possible donors in ACCORD-Spain, in 257, the family was interviewed once the decision had been made not to intubate/ventilate (n = 105), with the patient under intubation/ventilation outside of the intensive care unit (n = 59), or with the patient intubated/ventilated within the intensive care unit (n = 93).Consent to ICOD was obtained in 174 cases. Consent was higher when the donor coordinator participated in the interview (odds ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-4.11; P = 0.003). One hundred thirty-one patients developed BD, of whom 117 transitioned to actual donation after BD. Of the 35 patients who did not develop BD, 2 transitioned to actual donation after circulatory death. Sixteen patients subject to ICOD were finally medically unsuitable organ donors.ICOD contributed to 24% of the 491 actual donors registered in ACCORD-Spain. Despite the complexity of the interview, the majority of families consented to ICOD. Estimating the probability of BD and assessing medical suitability are additional challenges of the practice. ICOD represents a clear opportunity to increase the donor pool and ensures organ donation is posed at every end-of-life care pathway.

  8. Transplanting hearts after death measured by cardiac criteria: the challenge to the dead donor rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Robert M

    2010-06-01

    The current definition of death used for donation after cardiac death relies on a determination of the irreversible cessation of the cardiac function. Although this criterion can be compatible with transplantation of most organs, it is not compatible with heart transplantation since heart transplants by definition involve the resuscitation of the supposedly "irreversibly" stopped heart. Subsequently, the definition of "irreversible" has been altered so as to permit heart transplantation in some circumstances, but this is unsatisfactory. There are three available strategies for solving this "irreversibility problem": altering the definition of death so as to rely on circulatory irreversibility, rather than cardiac; defining death strictly on the basis of brain death (either whole-brain or more pragmatically some higher brain criteria); or redefining death in traditional terms and simultaneously legalizing some limited instances of medical killing to procure viable hearts. The first two strategies are the most ethically justifiable and practical.

  9. ENVIROCARE OF UTAH: EXPANDING WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA TO PROVIDE LOW-LEVEL AND MIXED WASTE DISPOSAL OPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, B.; Loveland, K.

    2003-02-27

    Envirocare of Utah operates a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility 80 miles west of Salt Lake City in Clive, Utah. Accepted waste types includes NORM, 11e2 byproduct material, Class A low-level waste, and mixed waste. Since 1988, Envirocare has offered disposal options for environmental restoration waste for both government and commercial remediation projects. Annual waste receipts exceed 12 million cubic feet. The waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the Envirocare facility have significantly expanded to accommodate the changing needs of restoration projects and waste generators since its inception, including acceptable physical waste forms, radiological acceptance criteria, RCRA requirements and treatment capabilities, PCB acceptance, and liquids acceptance. Additionally, there are many packaging, transportation, and waste management options for waste streams acceptable at Envirocare. Many subcontracting vehicles are also available to waste generators for both government and commercial activities.

  10. Identifying Homelessness among Veterans Using VA Administrative Data: Opportunities to Expand Detection Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rachel; Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Metraux, Stephen; Carter, Marjorie E.; Palmer, Miland; Redd, Andrew; Samore, Matthew H.; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have used administrative criteria to identify homelessness among U.S. Veterans. Our objective was to explore the use of these codes in VA health care facilities. We examined VA health records (2002-2012) of Veterans recently separated from the military and identified as homeless using VA conventional identification criteria (ICD-9-CM code V60.0, VA specific codes for homeless services), plus closely allied V60 codes indicating housing instability. Logistic regression analyses examined differences between Veterans who received these codes. Health care services and co-morbidities were analyzed in the 90 days post-identification of homelessness. VA conventional criteria identified 21,021 homeless Veterans from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (rate 2.5%). Adding allied V60 codes increased that to 31,260 (rate 3.3%). While certain demographic differences were noted, Veterans identified as homeless using conventional or allied codes were similar with regards to utilization of homeless, mental health, and substance abuse services, as well as co-morbidities. Differences were noted in the pattern of usage of homelessness-related diagnostic codes in VA facilities nation-wide. Creating an official VA case definition for homelessness, which would include additional ICD-9-CM and other administrative codes for VA homeless services, would likely allow improved identification of homeless and at-risk Veterans. This also presents an opportunity for encouraging uniformity in applying these codes in VA facilities nationwide as well as in other large health care organizations. PMID:26172386

  11. Identifying Homelessness among Veterans Using VA Administrative Data: Opportunities to Expand Detection Criteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Peterson

    Full Text Available Researchers at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA have used administrative criteria to identify homelessness among U.S. Veterans. Our objective was to explore the use of these codes in VA health care facilities. We examined VA health records (2002-2012 of Veterans recently separated from the military and identified as homeless using VA conventional identification criteria (ICD-9-CM code V60.0, VA specific codes for homeless services, plus closely allied V60 codes indicating housing instability. Logistic regression analyses examined differences between Veterans who received these codes. Health care services and co-morbidities were analyzed in the 90 days post-identification of homelessness. VA conventional criteria identified 21,021 homeless Veterans from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (rate 2.5%. Adding allied V60 codes increased that to 31,260 (rate 3.3%. While certain demographic differences were noted, Veterans identified as homeless using conventional or allied codes were similar with regards to utilization of homeless, mental health, and substance abuse services, as well as co-morbidities. Differences were noted in the pattern of usage of homelessness-related diagnostic codes in VA facilities nation-wide. Creating an official VA case definition for homelessness, which would include additional ICD-9-CM and other administrative codes for VA homeless services, would likely allow improved identification of homeless and at-risk Veterans. This also presents an opportunity for encouraging uniformity in applying these codes in VA facilities nationwide as well as in other large health care organizations.

  12. Economic impact of the introduction of machine perfusion preservation in a kidney transplantation program in the expanded donor era: cost-effectiveness assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, V; Galeano, C; Diez, V; Bueno, C; Díaz, F; Burgos, F J

    2012-11-01

    Kidney transplantations (KT) from expanded criteria donors (ECD) show a higher rate of delayed graft function (DGF) that increases postoperative costs because of the prolonged hospital stay as well as the needs for dialysis and additional diagnostic procedures. Hypothermic machine perfusion (MP) might be superior to cold storage (CS) to reduce the relative risks of DGF and primary nonfunction (PNF) as well as to increase 1-year graft survival. The aim of the study was to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of two different storage methods: MP versus CS. A probabilistic decision tree was developed to compare MP and CS as graft preservation methods. The structure of the model was populated by review of the literature and outcomes of KT from ECD in our center. The model estimated budget impact and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in terms of DGF and PNF cases. The cost comparison of methods for KT preservation included: hospitalization and intermediate care unit stay; post-KT dialysis; graft removal; immunosuppressive regimen; treatment of acute rejection episodes; as well as costs of preservation solutions and pulsatile preservation device or storage containers. Resource consumption for CS stratified by graft function varied from $8,159 for immediate graft function (IGF) recipients to $10,865 for DGF recipients to $25,933 for PNF recipients. Meanwhile, resource consumption for MP varied from $9,522 for IGF to $12,228 for DGF to $27,297 for PNF recipients. The main components of resource consumption were hospitalization stay (41.5%-53.9%); graft explantation (20.2%), and the need for dialysis (16.0%). The budget impact per patient for the introduction of MP was $505. However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $3,369 for each DGF- or PNF- saved case. The introduction of the MP preservation technology in a KT program form ECD is cost-effective in terms of savings for DGF and PNF cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lipid peroxidation products in machine perfusion of older donor kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelschmidt, Manfred; Minor, Thomas; Gallinat, Anja; Moers, Cyril; Jochmans, Ina; Pirenne, Jacques; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Paul, Andreas; Treckmann, Juergen

    Background: Owing to the shortage of donors, organs with an increased risk potential such as grafts recovered from expanded criteria donors are increasingly being used in transplants. Machine perfusion (MP) technology offers the possibility of determining the biomarkers in the perfusion solution so

  14. Expanding the CRISPR/Cas9 toolkit for Pichia pastoris with efficient donor integration and alternative resistance markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Astrid; Fischer, Jasmin E; Raschmanová, Hana; Kniely, Claudia; Vogl, Thomas; Glieder, Anton

    2018-04-01

    Komagataella phaffii (syn. Pichia pastoris) is one of the most commonly used host systems for recombinant protein expression. Achieving targeted genetic modifications had been hindered by low frequencies of homologous recombination (HR). Recently, a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system has been implemented for P. pastoris enabling gene knockouts based on indels (insertion, deletions) via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) at near 100% efficiency. However, specifically integrating homologous donor cassettes via HR for replacement studies had proven difficult resulting at most in ∼20% correct integration using CRISPR/Cas9. Here, we demonstrate the CRISPR/Cas9 mediated integration of markerless donor cassettes at efficiencies approaching 100% using a ku70 deletion strain. The Ku70p is involved in NHEJ repair and lack of the protein appears to favor repair via HR near exclusively. While the absolute number of transformants in the Δku70 strain is reduced, virtually all surviving transformants showed correct integration. In the wildtype strain, markerless donor cassette integration was also improved up to 25-fold by placing an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) on the donor cassette. Alternative strategies for improving donor cassette integration using a Cas9 nickase variant or reducing off targeting associated toxicity using a high fidelity Cas9 variant were so far not successful in our hands in P. pastoris. Furthermore we provide Cas9/gRNA expression plasmids with a Geneticin resistance marker which proved to be versatile tools for marker recycling. The reported CRSIPR-Cas9 tools can be applied for modifying existing production strains and also pave the way for markerless whole genome modification studies in P. pastoris. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A stromal-free, serum-free system to expand ex vivo hematopoietic stem cells from mobilized peripheral blood of patients with hematologic malignancies and healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chao-Ling; Hsu, Shu-Ching; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Lee, Wei-Chi; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye

    2013-09-01

    The number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is critical for transplantation. The ex vivo expansion of mobilized peripheral blood (MPB) HSCs is of clinical value for reconstitution to meet clinical need. This study proposed a simple, defined, stromal-free and serum-free culture system (SF-HSC medium) for clinical use, which is composed of Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium, cytokine cocktails and serum substitutes. This study also characterized the cellular properties of expanded MPB CD133(+) HSCs from patients with hematologic malignancies and healthy donors by surface antigen, colony-forming cell, long-term culture-initiating cell, gene expression and in vivo engraftment assays. The expanded fold values of CD45(+) white blood cells and CD34(+), CD133(+), CD34(+)CD38(-), CD133(+)CD38(-), CD34(+)CD133(+), colony-forming and long-term culture-initiating cells at the end of 7-day culture from CD133(+) MPB of hematologic malignancies were 9.4-fold, 5.9-fold, 4.0-fold, 35.8-fold, 21.9-fold, 3.8-fold, 11.8-fold and 6.7-fold, and values from healthy donor CD133(+) MPB were 20.7-fold, 14.5-fold, 8.5-fold, 83.8-fold, 37.3-fold, 6.2-fold, 19.1-fold and 14.6-fold. The high enrichment of CD38(-) cells, which were either CD34(+) or CD133(+), sustained the proliferation of early uncommitted HSCs. The expanded cells showed high levels of messenger RNA expression of HOBX4, ABCG2 and HTERT and had the in vivo ability to re-populate NOD/SCID mice. Our results demonstrated that an initial, limited number of MPB CD133(+) HSCs could be expanded functionally in SF-HSC medium. We believe that this serum-free expansion technique can be employed in both basic research and clinical transplantation. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phase 1 clinical trial using mbIL21 ex vivo-expanded donor-derived NK cells after haploidentical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurea, Stefan O; Schafer, Jolie R; Bassett, Roland; Denman, Cecele J; Cao, Kai; Willis, Dana; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Soebbing, Doris; Kaur, Indreshpal; Gulbis, Alison; Ahmed, Sairah; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E

    2017-10-19

    Relapse has emerged as the most important cause of treatment failure after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To test the hypothesis that natural killer (NK) cells can decrease the risk of leukemia relapse, we initiated a phase 1 dose-escalation study of membrane-bound interleukin 21 (mbIL21) expanded donor NK cells infused before and after haploidentical HSCT for high-risk myeloid malignancies. The goals were to determine the safety, feasibility, and maximum tolerated dose. Patients received a melphalan-based reduced-intensity conditioning regimen and posttransplant cyclophosphamide-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. NK cells were infused on days -2, +7, and +28 posttransplant. All NK expansions achieved the required cell number, and 11 of 13 patients enrolled received all 3 planned NK-cell doses (1 × 105/kg to 1 × 108/kg per dose). No infusional reactions or dose-limiting toxicities occurred. All patients engrafted with donor cells. Seven patients (54%) developed grade 1-2 acute GVHD (aGVHD), none developed grade 3-4 aGVHD or chronic GVHD, and a low incidence of viral complications was observed. One patient died of nonrelapse mortality; 1 patient relapsed. All others were alive and in remission at last follow-up (median, 14.7 months). NK-cell reconstitution was quantitatively, phenotypically, and functionally superior compared with a similar group of patients not receiving NK cells. In conclusion, this trial demonstrated production feasibility and safety of infusing high doses of ex vivo-expanded NK cells after haploidentical HSCT without adverse effects, increased GVHD, or higher mortality, and was associated with significantly improved NK-cell number and function, lower viral infections, and low relapse rate posttransplant. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Intravenous Alteplase for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Taiwan: Can We Expand the National Health Insurance's Reimbursement Criteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Yang

    2017-03-15

    lization of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase was very low in Taiwanese patients with acute ischemic stroke(1). One of the reasons is the strict reimbursement guideline made by the Bureau of National Health Insurance (NHI) in 2004(2). In this issue of the Acta Neurologica Taiwanica, Yu-Hsiang Su and co-authors(3) retrospectively evaluated outcomes of their thrombolysed stroke patients who were "mismatched" between updated clinical practice guideline and NHI reimbursement criteria. They concluded that the outcomes of patients treated according to guidelines were comparable between the reimbursement and non-reimbursement groups. Despite the inherent selection bias and no comparison with the non-treated patients in this observational study, it might serve the an important local evidence for physicians in Taiwan when evaluating intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. SO, CAN WE EXPAND THE REIMBURSEMENT CRITERIA FOR INTRAVENOUS ALTEPLASE IN STROKE PATIENTS? At the present time, the answer may still probably be NO! The insurance payer, usually after an economic evaluation, may decide to pay a pharmaceutical product for its beneficiaries. As a rule of thumb, insurance reimbursement criteria should not be greater than the labelled prescribing information. Thus, the essence of this question should be back to the labelled indications and contraindications of alteplase for stroke, made by Taiwanese regulator in Nov 2002(4). Although data from high-quality meta-analyses(5,6) of new trials in the past decade challenged some of the major contraindications, such as onset > 3 hours or age > 80 years, the Taiwan's Food and Drug Administration has turned down twice the application by the manufacturer to change the package insert regarding those two contraindications. The reasons were mostly "insufficient of benefits". Without the change of labelled prescribing information, the NHI reimbursement criteria cannot be expanded. WHAT CAN WE DO NOW? Pragmatically

  18. Added-value from a multi-criteria selection of donor catchments in the prediction of continuous streamflow series at ungauged pollution control-sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Drogue

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We explore the potential of a multi-criteria selection of donor catchments in the prediction of continuous streamflow series by the spatial proximity method. Three criteria have been used: (1 spatial proximity; (2 physical similarity; (3 stream gauging network topology. An extensive assessment of our spatial proximity method variant is made on a 149 catchment-data set located in the Rhine-Meuse catchment. The competitiveness of the method is evaluated against spatial interpolation of catchment model parameters with ordinary kriging. We found that the spatial proximity approach is more efficient than ordinary kriging. When distance to upstream/downstream stream gauge stations is considered as a second order criterion in the selection of donor catchments, an unprecedented level of efficiency is reached for nested catchments. Nevertheless, the spatial proximity method does not take advantage from physical similarity between donor catchments and receiver catchments because catchments that are the most hydrologically similar to each catchment poorly match with the catchments that are the most physically similar to each catchment.

  19. Support for a comprehensive background check requirement and expanded denial criteria for firearm transfers: findings from the firearms licensee survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintemute, Garen J

    2014-04-01

    Federal and state policies on eligibility to purchase and possess firearms and background check requirements for firearm transfers are undergoing intensive review and, in some cases, modification. Our objective in this third report from the Firearms Licensee Survey (FLS) is to assess support among federally licensed firearms retailers (gun dealers and pawnbrokers) for a background check requirement on all firearm transfers and selected criteria for denying the purchase of handguns based on criminal convictions, alcohol abuse, and serious mental illness. The FLS was conducted by mail during June-August, 2011 on a random sample of 1,601 licensed dealers and pawnbrokers in 43 states who were believed to sell at least 50 firearms annually. The response rate was 36.9%, typical of establishment surveys using such methods. Most respondents (55.4%) endorsed a comprehensive background check requirement; 37.5% strongly favored it. Support was more common and stronger among pawnbrokers than dealers and among respondents who believed that "it is too easy for criminals to get guns." Support was positively associated with many establishment characteristics, including sales of inexpensive handguns, sales that were denied when the purchasers failed background checks, and sales of firearms that were later subjected to ownership tracing, and were negatively associated with sales at gun shows. Support for three existing and nine potential criteria for denial of handgun purchase involving criminal activity, alcohol abuse, and mental illness exceeded 90% in six cases and fell below 2/3 in one. Support again increased with sales of inexpensive handguns and denied sales and decreased with sales of tactical (assault-type) rifles. In this survey, which was conducted prior to mass shootings in Aurora, Colorado; Oak Creek, Wisconsin; Newtown, Connecticut; and elsewhere, licensed firearm sellers exhibited moderate support for a comprehensive background check requirement and very strong

  20. Modernizing Water Quality Criteria in the United States: A Need to Expand the Definition of Acceptable Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwalter, David B; Clements, William H; Luoma, Samuel N

    2017-02-01

    The development of water quality criteria (WQC) for the protection of aquatic life is a fundamental component of the Clean Water Act-the primary US legislation responsible for protecting aquatic ecosystems from pollution. Water quality criteria define acceptable levels of contamination in the environment and thus play an important role in society. Rules for how science is used to develop WQC were created in 1985. Most rely on only data and knowledge obtained through a single methodology, the single-species laboratory toxicity test. Since 1985, understanding of the fate and effects of environmental contaminants has advanced markedly from multiple perspectives and disciplines. However, many of these advances are routinely discarded in WQC development because they do not adhere to data limits imposed by the 1985 guidelines. The present Focus article outlines how multiple lines of inquiry have played important roles in improving understanding of the ecological implications of environmental contaminants. The authors focus on gains in understanding that would not have been possible through traditional toxicity bioassays alone and argue that more robust scientific understanding can be used to modernize WQC development. In particular, the present article highlights ways to increase the relevance of toxicity testing (at different spatiotemporal scales) and incorporate all relevant lines of evidence into WQC modernization. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:285-291. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  1. Does size matter? Kidney transplant donor size determines kidney function among living donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhamurthy, Meenakshi; Smith, Lachlan M.; Machan, Jason T.; Reinert, Steven E.; Gohh, Reginald Y.; Dworkin, Lance D.; Merhi, Basma; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Beland, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Kidney donor outcomes are gaining attention, particularly as donor eligibility criteria continue to expand. Kidney size, a useful predictor of recipient kidney function, also likely correlates with donor outcomes. Although donor evaluation includes donor kidney size measurements, the association between kidney size and outcomes are poorly defined. Methods We examined the relationship between kidney size (body surface area-adjusted total volume, cortical volume and length) and renal outcomes (post-operative recovery and longer-term kidney function) among 85 kidney donors using general linear models and time-to-chronic kidney disease data. Results Donors with the largest adjusted cortical volume were more likely to achieve an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 over a median 24-month follow-up than those with smaller cortical volumes (P kidney donors were more likely to achieve an eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 with renal recovery over a shorter duration due to higher pre-donation and initial post-nephrectomy eGFRs. PMID:28638611

  2. Outcomes of Live Kidney Donors Who Develop End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaale, Abimereki D; Massie, Allan B; Kucirka, Lauren M; Luo, Xun; Kumar, Komal; Brown, Ryan S; Anjum, Saad; Montgomery, Robert A; Lentine, Krista L; Segev, Dorry L

    2016-06-01

    Kidney donors can develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) after donation, but the outcomes of those who do remain poorly characterized. Using United States Renal Data System and Scientific Registry for Transplant Research data, we compared access to kidney transplantation (KT), time from ESRD to listing, time from listing to KT, and post-KT graft failure and death between donors and matched nondonors with ESRD. Among 99 donors between April 1994 and November 2011 who developed ESRD, 78 initially received dialysis (of whom 37 listed for KT, 2 received live donor KT without listing, and 39 never listed for or received a KT), 20 listed preemptively (of whom 19 were subsequently transplanted), and 1 received a preemptive live donor KT without listing or ever receiving dialysis. Donors were listed earlier (median time to listing, 17 months vs 120 for nondonors; P live donor, 87% standard criteria, and 0% expanded criteria deceased donor KT (39%, 50%, and 11% in nondonors). Post-KT graft (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.9 to 4.1; P = 0.1) and patient (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.2 to 2.4; P = 0.5) survival were comparable in donors and nondonors. Our finding that 39 of 99 donors who developed ESRD never listed for a transplant warrants further study to ascertain why these donors with ESRD never gained access to the waiting list.

  3. Sand production prediction in oil wellbores : a set of criteria for design of reticulated expandable completion techniques based on large-scale transient experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouri, A.; Kuru, E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Vaziri, H. [BP America, Cleveland, OH (United States). E and P Technology Group; Islam, R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Various issues regarding supported wellbores in weakly consolidated and unconsolidated reservoir formations were discussed. Nearly 70 per cent of the total world's oil and gas reserves are found in poorly consolidated reservoirs, which are the most problematic in terms of sand production. Field studies also show a strong link between sand production and water influx. This paper describes a hollow cylindrical experiment of an expandable completion using both single-and two-phase fluid flow. Criteria were also provided for the possible severity of sand production under various aperture size versus sand grain size distribution conditions. The experiments on weakly-consolidated sandstones showed that expandable completions can successfully prevent shear failure around the wellbore. Pore collapse proved to be a potential failure mechanism under excessive drawdown or depletion. The study also evaluated the various aspects of interaction between a supporting liner and unconsolidated well and weakly consolidated rock formations. Shear failure was shown to be an important factor in almost all sanding issues. A stiffener proved capable of eliminating shear failure in the material around the well. In addition, the study evaluated the level of possible effects of a supported wellbore on productivity. While the sample compacted, its porosity and permeability was shown to decrease. However, supporting the wellbore provided room for higher drawdown which compensated the loss of permeability. The mechanism under which such completion techniques control mobilization of sand grains was also presented along with long-term performance and effectiveness. 20 refs., 4 tabs., 15 figs.

  4. Changing blood donor screening criteria from permanent deferral for men who have sex with men to individual sexual risk assessment: no evidence of a significant impact on the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suligoi, Barbara; Pupella, Simonetta; Regine, Vincenza; Raimondo, Mariangela; Velati, Claudio; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2013-07-01

    In 2001, the criteria for blood donor eligibility in Italy were modified by a ministerial decree from a permanent deferral for "men who have sex with men" to an individual risk assessment of sexual behaviours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of this change in donor screening criteria on the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic among blood donors in Italy. We used the data obtained from the Italian blood donor epidemiological surveillance system. We compared data collected in 2009 and 2010, when the individual risk assessment policy was applied, with data collected in 1999 when permanent deferral was applied for men who have sex with men based on a declaration of sexual orientation. We evaluated the change over time in the relative proportion of HIV antibody-positive donors who likely acquired the infection from men who have sex with men vs heterosexual sexual exposure; the relative risk was calculated using 1999 as the reference year. In all 3 years, the majority of HIV antibody-positive donors reported sexual exposure as a risk factor for HIV infection; this proportion increased over time, although not statistically significantly. Heterosexuals always accounted for at least 40% of all HIV antibody-positive cases. The rate of HIV antibody-positive donors increased similarly in men who have sex with men and heterosexuals; specifically, the rate of HIV antibody-positive cases per 100,000 donors was more than 2-fold higher among men who have sex with men in 2009-2010 than in 1999 (2009-2010 vs 1999, RR =2.8; P =0.06), and that among heterosexuals was 1.5 fold higher (P =0.18). When comparing the period before (1999) and after (2009-2010), the implementation of the individual risk assessment policy in 2001, no significant increase in the proportion of men who have sex with men compared to heterosexuals was observed among HIV antibody-positive blood donors, suggesting that the change in donor deferral policy did not lead to a disproportionate increase

  5. Structure and diagnosis of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: analysis of expanded symptom criteria from the Adult ADHD Clinical Diagnostic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Green, Jennifer Greif; Adler, Lenard A; Barkley, Russell A; Chatterji, Somnath; Faraone, Stephen V; Finkelman, Matthew; Greenhill, Laurence L; Gruber, Michael J; Jewell, Mark; Russo, Leo J; Sampson, Nancy A; Van Brunt, David L

    2010-11-01

    Controversy exists about the appropriate criteria for a diagnosis of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To examine the structure and symptoms most predictive of DSM-IV adult ADHD. The data are from clinical interviews in enriched subsamples of the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (n = 131) and a survey of a large managed health care plan (n = 214). The physician-administered Adult ADHD Clinical Diagnostic Scale (ACDS) was used to assess childhood ADHD and expanded symptoms of current adult ADHD. Analyses examined the stability of symptoms from childhood to adulthood, the structure of adult ADHD, and the adult symptoms most predictive of current clinical diagnoses. The ACDS was administered telephonically by clinical research interviewers with extensive experience in the diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD. An enriched sample of community respondents. Diagnoses of DSM-IV /ACDS adult ADHD. Almost half of the respondents (45.7%) who had childhood ADHD continued to meet the full DSM-IV criteria for current adult ADHD, with 94.9% of these patients having current attention-deficit disorder and 34.6% having current hyperactivity disorder. Adult persistence was much greater for inattention than for hyperactivity/impulsivity. Additional respondents met the full criteria for current adult ADHD despite not having met the full childhood criteria. A 3-factor structure of adult symptoms included executive functioning (EF), inattention/hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Stepwise logistic regression found EF problems to be the most consistent and discriminating predictors of adult DSM-IV /ACDS ADHD. These findings document the greater persistence of inattentive than of hyperactive/impulsive childhood symptoms of ADHD in adulthood but also show that inattention is not specific to ADHD because it is strongly associated with other adult mental disorders. In comparison, EF problems are more specific and consistently important predictors of DSM-IV adult ADHD

  6. Profile of cadaveric liver donors of the OPO-UNICAMP From 2002 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boin, I F S F; Kajikawa, P; Palmiero, H O M; Zambelli, H; Bello Stucchi, R; Iracema Leonardi, M; Sergio Leonardi, L

    2008-04-01

    Four decades after the first successful liver transplantation, the organ donation shortage challenges the scientific community to create various new strategies. We sought to analyze the profile of registered cadaveric liver donors for an Organ Procurement Organization (OPO) during the period of 2002 through 2006. This retrospective analysis of 122 deceased donors in the OPO-Unicamp corresponded to the period of 2002 through 2006. Men were identified as 57.14% of donors and the overall average age was 32.88 years with 16.53% over 50 years of age. Analyzing the causes of brain death, cerebral trauma (CET) was responsible for 46.22% and cerebral vascular accidents, 33.61%. The percentage of use of vasoactive drugs was 88.43%. Observing the donors' backgrounds, we observed that 11.90% had alcoholism, 1.23% drug addiction and 27.78% infection. We verified cardiac arrest in 9.43%. In accordance with the expanded criteria of donation, 89.26% of donors fulfilled some of the criteria: 73.55%, one criterion; 14.05%, two; 1.65%, three; and no donor fulfilled 4 or 5. The donor profile in our unit is a young man with CET and who fulfills at least one expanded donation criterion. Finally, to increase the number of donors, the use of vasoactive drugs (89.26%), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (9.43%), and infection (27.78%) were not considered reasons to discard the liver.

  7. National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    replacement business analyst to continue working on business and system requirements for HapLogic Phase III ! 100f2l National Marrow Donor Program® NOOOO...NOOOO 14-1 0-1-0204 IID.I. Task 3: Expand Immuno - biology Research QUARTER PROGRESS REPORT Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response

  8. Flow cytometric characterization of culture expanded multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from horse adipose tissue: towards the definition of minimal stemness criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, L; Curina, G; Mercati, F; Marini, C; Dall'Aglio, C; Paternesi, B; Ceccarelli, P

    2011-12-15

    In the last decades, multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells have been isolated from many adult tissues of different species. The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) has recently established that multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is the currently recommended designation. In this study, we used flow cytometry to evaluate the expression of several molecules related to stemness (CD90, CD44, CD73 and STRO-1) in undifferentiated, early-passaged MSCs isolated from adipose tissue of four donor horses (AdMSCs). The four populations unanimously expressed high levels of CD90 and CD44. On the contrary, they were unexpectedly negative to CD73. A small percentage of the cells, finally, showed the expression of STRO-1. This last result might be due to the existence of a small subpopulation of STRO-1+ cells or to a poor cross-reactivity of the antibody. A remarkable donor-to-donor consistency and reproducibility of these findings was demonstrated. The data presented herein support the idea that equine AdMSCs may be easily isolated and selected by adherence to tissue culture plastic and exhibit a surface profile characterized by some peculiar differences in comparison to those described in other species. Continued characterization of these cells will help to clarify several aspects of their biology and may ultimately enable the isolation of specific, purified subpopulations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The egg-sharing model for human therapeutic cloning research: managing donor selection criteria, the proportion of shared oocytes allocated to research, and amount of financial subsidy given to the donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Tong, Guo Qing; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in human therapeutic cloning made by Hwang and colleagues have opened up new avenues of therapy for various human diseases. However, the major bottleneck of this new technology is the severe shortage of human donor oocytes. Egg-sharing in return for subsidized fertility treatment has been suggested as an ethically justifiable and practical solution to overcome the shortage of donor oocytes for therapeutic cloning. Because the utilization of shared oocytes in therapeutic cloning research does not result in any therapeutic benefit to a second party, this would necessitate a different management strategy compared to their use for the assisted conception of infertile women who are unable to produce any oocytes of their own. It is proposed that the pool of prospective egg-sharers in therapeutic cloning research be limited only to younger women (below 30 years of age) with indications for either male partner sub-fertility or tubal blockage. With regards to the proportion of the shared gametes being allocated to research, a threshold number of retrieved oocytes should be set that if not exceeded, would result in the patient being automatically removed from the egg-sharing scheme. Any excess supernumerary oocyte above this threshold number can be contributed to science, and allocation should be done in a randomized manner. Perhaps, a total of 10 retrieved oocytes from the patient may be considered a suitable threshold, since the chances of conception are unlikely to be impaired. With regards to the amount of subsidy being given to the patient, it is suggested that the proportion of financial subsidy should be equal to the proportion of the patient's oocytes being allocated to research. No doubt, the promise of future therapeutic benefit may be offered to the patient instead of financial subsidy. However, this is ethically controversial because therapeutic cloning has not yet been demonstrated to be a viable model of clinical therapy and any promises made to

  10. Can we expand active surveillance criteria to include biopsy Gleason 3+4 prostate cancer? A multi-institutional study of 2,323 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploussard, G.; Isbarn, H.; Briganti, A.; Sooriakumaran, P.; Surcel, C.I.; Salomon, L.; Freschi, M.; Mirvald, C.; Poel, H.G. van der; Jenkins, A.; Ost, P.; Oort, I.M. van; Yossepowitch, O.; Giannarini, G.; Bergh, R.C. van den

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the expandability of active surveillance (AS) to Gleason score 3+4 cancers by assessing the unfavorable disease risk in a large multi-institutional cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis including 2,323 patients with localized Gleason score 3+4

  11. Long-term recurrence-free survival after liver transplantation from an ABO-incompatible living donor for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma exceeding Milano criteria in a patient with hepatitis B virus cirrhosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y; Hama, K; Iwamoto, H; Yokoyama, T; Kihara, Y; Konno, O; Jojima, Y; Shimazu, M

    2012-03-01

    The early results of liver transplantations (OLT) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were poor because of frequent tumor recurrence. However, OLT has significant, theoretical advantage that it removes both the tumor and the organ that is at a risk of malignancy. The Japanese law on organ transplantation limited the availability of cadaveric liver donors until its revision on July 17, 2011. ABO-incompatible OLT was formerly contraindicated because performed anti-A/B antibodies on recipient endothelial cells raised the risk of antibody-mediated humoral graft rejection. We have herein described four successful cases of steroid withdrawal among adult patients who underwent living donor OLT from ABO-incompatible donors. In addition, we transplanted a liver from a living donor into an ABO-incompatible recipient on August 9, 2004. The 55-year-old man with HCC due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) a cirrhosis had a Child-Pugh score of C, and Model for End-stage Liver Disease score of 22. Two tumors greater than 5 cm, exceeded the Milan criteria. His des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin level was 6 mAu/mL, and alpha-fetoprotein, 18.78 ng/mL. Antirejection therapy included multiple perioperative plasmaphereses and splenectomy; with an immunosuppressive regimen consisting of tacrolimus, methylprednisolone, and mycophenolate mofetil. The maintenance dose of immunosuppression did not differ from that of ABO-identical cases. After transplantation, we used intrahepatic arterial infusion therapy with prostaglandin E1 (PG E1). The patient had complications of portal vein thrombosis, hepatic artery thrombosis, and acute myocardial infarction, which were treated by interventional radiology in the posttransplantation period. We controlled the HBsAb titer by administering hepatitis B immunoglobulin and lamivudine (200 IU/L doses) for 1 year after OLT and 100 IU/L doses thereafter. As a result, the patient achieved long-term, disease-free graft survival without steroids. He

  12. Comparison of Two Questionnaires on Informed Consent in "Marginal" Donor Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, P; Balla, A; Quaresima, S; Seitaj, A; Intini, G; Giannarelli, D; Paganini, A M

    2016-03-01

    The necessity of liver donors has contributed to overcoming the traditional criteria and to propose new ones for the acceptance of livers for transplantation. For this reason expanded or extended criteria donation (ECD) or even overextended criteria for marginal or high-risk organ donors have been developed. Ethical, Legal and Psychological Aspects of Organ Transplantation (ELPAT) and European Liver and Intestine Transplant Association (ELITA) - European Liver Transplantation Registry (ELTR) coordinated the distribution of a previously reported questionnaire that was sent to 53 European liver transplant centers. Criteria were divided based on the response rate. Donor criteria such as steatosis and serum sodium >165 mmol/L, as well as recipient criteria such as previous history of cancer, were not considered contraindications to transplantation in more than 60% of cases. Criteria such as ICU (intensive care unit) stay, body mass index >30, serum bilirubin >3 mg/dL, and HIV infection or critical illness were not considered adequate for transplantation in 30% to 59% of cases. On the other hand, there was no agreement on other extended liver donor and recipient criteria, such as age up to 80 years, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase >90 U/L, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase >105 U/L, high-risk sex practices, drug users, patients older than 65 years, and patients younger than 65 years, respectively. Criteria such as serum sodium could not be considered ECD criteria. In conclusion, development of more studies and inclusion of more liver transplantation centers are required to confirm these data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Deceased donor uterine transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyckt, Rebecca; Kotlyar, Alexander; Arian, Sara; Eghtesad, Bijan; Falcone, Tommaso; Tzakis, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    To share our experience in performing the first-ever deceased-donor uterine transplant in the United States. This video uses an animation and footage from a uterine transplantation procedure to review the steps and techniques involved in performing a uterine transplant. Academic, multisite medical center. A reproductive-age patient with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome. Transplantation of a viable uterus from a deceased donor. Assessment of posttransplantation uterine graft viability. This video article describes the essential steps in the uterine transplant process, including selecting an appropriate donor with no history of infertility or uterine malformations. Furthermore, a deceased donor should exhibit brain death but not cardiac death. We also review our inclusion criteria for suitable recipients. In this video we outline the key steps in a uterine transplantation procedure and demonstrate footage from an actual transplant procedure. These steps include establishing bilateral end-to-side vascular anastomoses between the donor uterine artery and vein and the recipient's external iliac vessels. Once this has been completed and reperfusion noted of the donor uterus, connection to the recipient vaginal cuff is then performed. Uterine transplantation, although currently experimental, has gained the potential to become the first true treatment for uterine factor infertility. This procedure can become a promising option for the approximately 1.5 million women worldwide for whom pregnancy is not possible because of the absence of the uterus or presence of a nonfunctional uterus. Deceased donor uterine transplantation will further serve to broaden accessibility for this procedure. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Donor Tag Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Donor Tag Game Donor Tag Game This feature requires version 6 or later of ... of Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Make a ...

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as Anti-Inflammatory and Regenerative Mediators for Donor Kidneys During Normothermic Machine Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Parraga, Jesus Maria; Eijken, Marco; Hunter, James; Moers, Cyril; Leuvenink, Henri; Møller, Bjarne; Ploeg, Rutger J; Baan, Carla C; Jespersen, Bente; Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2017-08-15

    There is great demand for transplant kidneys for the treatment of end-stage kidney disease patients. To expand the donor pool, organs from older and comorbid brain death donors, so-called expanded criteria donors (ECD), as well as donation after circulatory death donors, are considered for transplantation. However, the quality of these organs may be inferior to standard donor organs. A major issue affecting graft function and survival is ischemia/reperfusion injury, which particularly affects kidneys from deceased donors. The development of hypothermic machine perfusion has been introduced in kidney transplantation as a preservation technique and has improved outcomes in ECD and marginal organs compared to static cold storage. Normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) is the most recent evolution of perfusion technology and allows assessment of the donor organ before transplantation. The possibility to control the content of the perfusion fluid offers opportunities for damage control and reparative therapies during machine perfusion. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been demonstrated to possess potent regenerative properties via the release of paracrine effectors. The combination of NMP and MSC administration at the same time is a promising procedure in the field of transplantation. Therefore, the MePEP consortium has been created to study this novel modality of treatment in preparation for human trials. MePEP aims to assess the therapeutic effects of MSC administered ex vivo by NMP in the mechanisms of injury and repair in a porcine kidney autotransplantation model.

  16. Organ quality metrics are a poor predictor of costs and resource utilization in deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Christopher C; Wima, Koffi; Hanseman, Dennis J; Hoehn, Richard S; Ertel, Audrey; Midura, Emily F; Hohmann, Samuel F; Paquette, Ian M; Shah, Shimul A; Abbott, Daniel E

    2015-12-01

    The desire to provide cost-effective care has lead to an investigation of the costs of therapy for end-stage renal disease. Organ quality metrics are one way to attempt to stratify kidney transplants, although the ability of these metrics to predict costs and resource use is undetermined. The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database was linked to the University HealthSystem Consortium Database to identify adult deceased donor kidney transplant recipients from 2009 to 2012. Patients were divided into cohorts by kidney criteria (standard vs expanded) or kidney donor profile index (KDPI) score (Cost was defined as reimbursement based on Medicare cost/charge ratios and included the costs of readmission when applicable. More than 19,500 patients populated the final dataset. Lower-quality kidneys (expanded criteria donor or KDPI 85+) were more likely to be transplanted in older (both P costs compared with standard criteria donor transplants (risk ratio [RR] 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-1.00, P = .07). KDPI 85+ was associated with slightly lower costs than KDPI quality metrics are less influential predictors of short-term costs than recipient factors. Future studies should focus on recipient characteristics as a way to discern high versus low cost transplantation procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quality of life of elderly live kidney donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, K.W.; Dols, L.F.; Weimar, W.; Dooper, I.; Ijzermans, J.N.M.; Kok, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Expanding the use of elderly live donors may help meet the demand for kidney transplants. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the surgical procedure on the quality of life (QOL) of elderly donors compared with younger donors. METHODS: Alongside three prospective studies

  18. Liver transplantation using donor organs with markedly elevated liver enzymes: how far can we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunz, Sonia; Paul, Andreas; Nowak, Knut; Treckmann, Jürgen W; Saner, Fuat H; Mathé, Zoltan

    2011-08-01

    The disparity between the demand for solid organs and the current supply is a growing problem for patients with end-stage liver disease. To overcome organ shortage, extended criteria donor organs are also accepted for liver transplantation. We here unprecedentedly report the clinical course of patients receiving livers with markedly elevated liver enzymes. Between November 2007 and December 2010, 15 donor livers with markedly elevated liver enzymes [median aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 1400 (500-7538) U/l, median alanine aminotransferase (ALT) 1026 (308-9179) U/l] were offered to our transplant centre. Based on elaborate judgment, seven of these donor livers were rejected and eight donor livers were transplanted. All eight transplanted patients showed a liver enzyme peak on the day of surgery (AST 2076 ± 1808 U/l, ALT 1087 ± 833 U/l) and a statistically significant decrease from day 0 to day 7 post-liver transplantation. INR decreased and platelet count increased statistically significantly within 1 week after liver transplantation. The patients were discharged from the hospital 28 ± 11 days after liver transplantation in good clinical condition. These data demonstrate that using donor livers with markedly elevated liver enzymes may be an acceptable option to expand the donor pool. Universal objective parameters for acceptance should be defined in future studies. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Histopathological analysis of pre-implantation donor kidney biopsies: association with graft survival and function in one year post-transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lais Pêgas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pre-implantation kidney biopsy is a decision-making tool when considering the use of grafts from deceased donors with expanded criteria, implanting one or two kidneys and comparing this to post-transplantation biopsies. The role of histopathological alterations in kidney compartments as a prognostic factor in graft survival and function has had conflicting results. Objective: This study evaluated the prevalence of chronic alterations in pre-implant biopsies of kidney grafts and the association of findings with graft function and survival in one year post-transplant. Methods: 110 biopsies were analyzed between 2006 and 2009 at Santa Casa de Porto Alegre, including live donors, ideal deceased donors and those with expanded criteria. The score was computed according to criteria suggested by Remuzzi. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR was calculated using the abbreviated MDRD formula. Results: No statistical difference was found in the survival of donors stratified according to Remuzzi criteria. The GFR was significantly associated with the total scores in the groups with mild and moderate alterations, and in the kidney compartments alone, by univariate analysis. The multivariate model found an association with the presence of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, acute rejection and delayed graft function. Conclusion: Pre-transplant chronic kidney alterations did not influence the post-transplantation one-year graft survival, but arteriosclerosis and glomerulosclerosis is predictive of a worse GFR. Delayed graft function and acute rejection are independent prognostic factors.

  20. [Kidney transplantation from living donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laca, L; Grandtnerová, B; Lacková, E

    2000-10-01

    From Jan. 1, 1994 till August 31, 1999 in the Transplantation Centre of the F. D. Roosevelt Hospital and Policlinic 202 transplantations of the kidneys were made, incl. 11 from live donors. The survival of patients and renal grafts in our group is 100%, i.e. all transplanted kidneys are so far functional. In transplantations of kidneys from dead donors the one-year survival of grafts was 85% and the 5-year survival only 70%. During removal of kidneys from live donors we had only one minor complication--a surface infection of the surgical wound. The authors describe their own experience with assessing the indication criteria, criteria for selection of the most suitable donor-recipient pair. Consistently with work of authors from abroad, they consider transplantations of the kidneys from live donors as one of the best alternatives how to increase the number and quality of renal transplantations and to prevent thus an increase of the number of patients on the waiting list.

  1. Donor risk factors for graft failure in the cornea donor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Joel; Montoya, Monty; Dontchev, Mariya; Tanner, Jean Paul; Beck, Roy; Gal, Robin; Gallagher, Shawn; Gaster, Ronald; Heck, Ellen; Holland, Edward J; Kollman, Craig; Malling, Jackie; Mannis, Mark J; Woody, Jason

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between donor factors and 5-year corneal graft survival in the Cornea Donor Study. Donor corneas met criteria established by the Eye Bank Association of America, had an endothelial cell density of 2300 to 3300/mm, and were determined to be of good to excellent quality by the eye banks. Donor corneas were assigned using a random approach and surgeons were masked to information about the donor cornea including donor age. Surgery and postoperative care were performed according to the surgeons' usual routines and subjects were followed for 5 years. Donor and donor cornea factors were evaluated for their association with graft failure, which was defined as a regraft or a cloudy cornea that was sufficiently opaque to compromise vision for a minimum of 3 consecutive months. Graft failure was not significantly associated with the type of tissue retrieval (enucleation versus in situ), processing factors, timing of use of the cornea, or characteristics of the donor or the donor cornea. Adjusting for donor age did not affect the results. Donor and donor cornea characteristics do not impact graft survival rates for corneas comparable in quality to those used in this study.

  2. SELECTION CRITERIA FOR LIVER DONATION - A REVIEW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PRUIM, J; KLOMPMAKER, IJ; HAAGSMA, EB; BIJLEVELD, CMA; SLOOFF, MJH

    An overview of the criteria that are currently being used for the selection of liver donors is presented. The validity of the different criteria is discussed. The potential benefits of introducing other modalities is dealt with.

  3. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  4. Expander Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Expander Codes - The Sipser–Spielman Construction. Priti Shankar. General Article Volume 10 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  5. MULTIFACTORIAL ASSESSMENT OF POSTMORTEM LUNG DONOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Khubutiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate evaluation and the development of special measures to protect donor lungs are important factors for successful lung transplantation. Aim. To develop and determine the effectiveness of the protocol of morpho- functional assessment of potential lung donor. Methods and results. During the period from May, 2011 to May, 2012, 37 donors with diagnoses of brain death were surveyed. 5 bilateral lung transplantations were performed only in 2 cases donors have been evaluated as «ideal». In the majority of recipients early postoperative period was evaluated as satisfactory. Conclusion. Designed multivariate algorithm of donor with brain death assess- ment, effectively implemented through the selection of donors for lung transplantation with satisfactory results in the early postoperative period. However, compliance with ideal criteria will not allow to effectively provide care for patients with terminal lung disease under conditions of continuous growth of «waiting list». 

  6. Liver Transplantation From Donors With a History of Malignancy: A Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Benkö, MD, PhD

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions. Liver transplantation with organs from donors with a medical history of malignancy is feasible, and the risk of donor-transmitted malignancy appears to be low in this single-center analysis. A careful selection of donors remains mandatory and can expand the donor pool.

  7. Outcomes of kidney transplants and risk of infection transmission from increased infectious risk donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limkemann, Ashley J; Wolfe, Luke; Sharma, Amit; King, Anne L; Behnke, Martha; Shah, Mili Jay; Posner, Marc P; Cotterell, Adrian H; Bhati, Chandra S; Gupta, Ankur; Kumar, Dhiren; Gupta, Gaurav

    2016-08-01

    Concern over transmission of viral infections has been reported to result in higher discard rates of high infectious risk kidneys (HIR) although data on actual viral transmission rates are lacking. At our center, we performed 89 HIR and 533 non-HIR kidney transplants (KTs) between 2004 and 2011. Follow-up screening labs in recipients of HIR kidneys tested for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus did not reveal any cases of viral transmission over median follow-up of 4.3 years. Patient and graft outcomes were similar at 5 years between HIR and non-HIR KTs. An updated analysis of the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (OPTN) registry of deceased-donor kidney transplants between 2008 and 2012 included 57 526 transplants was performed. Retrospective calculation of KDRI (kidney donor risk index) differed (P<.001) between all groups with median KDRI of 0.99 for HIR kidneys, 1.07 for non-HIR standard criteria donor kidneys, and 1.81 for non-HIR expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidneys. This was reflected in the significantly improved 5-year graft survival for HIR KTs when compared with non-HIR ECD KTs (84% vs 78%; P<.001). Our data can guide counseling of KT candidates about the safety and benefits of HIR kidneys. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Partition expanders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavinsky, Dmitry; Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2017), s. 378-395 ISSN 1432-4350 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : expanders * pseudorandomness * communication complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00224-016-9738-5

  9. Donors with a prior history of cardiac surgery are a viable source of lung allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Joseph; Sreekanth, Sowmyashree; Kossar, Alex; Raza, Kashif; Robbins, Hilary; Shah, Lori; Sonett, Joshua R; Arcasoy, Selim; D'Ovidio, Frank

    2016-11-01

    End-stage lung disease continues to rise despite the lack of suitable lung donors, limiting the numbers of lung transplants performed each year. Expanded donor criteria, use of donation after cardiac death donors and the advent of ex vivo lung perfusion have resulted only in a slight increase in donor lung utilization. Organ donors with prior cardiac surgery (DPCS) present risks and technical challenges; however, they may be a potential source of suitable lung allografts with an experienced procurement surgeon. We present our experience having evaluated potential lung donors with a prior history of cardiac surgery, resulting in successful transplant outcomes. This is a single-institution retrospective review of brain-dead organ donors that were evaluated for lung donation in the period 2012-15. Donor and recipient characteristics were collected. Post-lung transplant survival was recorded. From 2012 to 2015, 259 donors were evaluated, 12 with a prior history of cardiac surgery of which 4 had coronary artery bypass, 3 had aortic root replacement, 2 had aortic valve replacement, 1 pulmonary embolectomy, 1 two-time reoperative valve replacement and 1 paediatric congenital ventricular septal defect repair. DPCS, 6/12 (50% dry run) provided suitable allografts generating six single-lung transplants (three right and three left, 1 donor provided twin single-lung transplants) and one double-lung transplant. Interval between cardiac surgery and procurement for those rejected was median 5840 (IQR 2350-8640) days and interval for the donors that provided allografts was median 438 (IQR 336-1095) days (Mann-Whitney, P = 0.07). Recipient 1-year survival from DPCS is 100%. Recipient 1-year survival was 92% in allografts explanted from donors with no prior cardiac surgery (2012-13). To date, this is the largest single-centre experience using lung allografts from brain-dead DPCS. Our experience shows despite predicted technical difficulties, with good communication between thoracic

  10. Imaging in Lung Transplantation: Surgical Considerations of Donor and Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhus, Leah M; Mulligan, Michael S; Ha, Richard; Shriki, Jabi E; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2016-03-01

    Modifications in recipient and donor criteria and innovations in donor management hold promise for increasing rates of lung transplantation, yet availability of donors remains a limiting resource. Imaging is critical in the work-up of donor and recipient including identification of conditions that may portend to poor posttransplant outcomes or necessitate modifications in surgical technique. This article describes the radiologic principles that guide selection of patients and surgical procedures in lung transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Quality of life of liver donors following donor hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Biju; Bharathan, Viju Kumar; Shaji Mathew, Johns; Amma, Binoj Sivasankara Pillai Thankamony; Gopalakrishnan, Unnikrishnan; Balakrishnan, Dinesh; Menon, Ramachandran Narayana; Dhar, Puneet; Vayoth, Sudheer Othiyil; Surendran, Sudhindran

    2017-03-01

    Although morbidity following living liver donation is well characterized, there is sparse data regarding health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of donors. HRQOL of 200 consecutive live liver donors from 2011-2014 performed at an Indian center were prospectively collected using the SF-36 version 2, 1 year after surgery. The effect of donor demographics, operative details, post-operative complications (Clavien-Dindo and 50-50 criteria), and recipient mortality on the quality-of-life (QOL) scoring was analyzed. Among 200 donors (female/male=141:59), 77 (38.5%) had complications (14.5%, 16.5%, 4.5%, and 3.5%, Clavien-Dindo grades I-IV, respectively). The physical composite score (PCS) of donors 1 year after surgery was less than ideal (48.75±9.5) while the mental composite score (MCS) was good (53.37±6.16). Recipient death was the only factor that showed a statistically significant correlation with both PCS (prepent the decision to donate.

  12. Expanding versus non expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Alfonso-Faus, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In cosmology the number of scientists using the framework of an expanding universe is very high. This model, the big-bang, is now overwhelmingly present in almost all aspects of society. It is the main stream cosmology of today. A small number of scientists are researching on the possibility of a non-expanding universe. The existence of these two groups, one very large and the other very small, is a good proof of the use of the scientific method: it does not drive to an absolute certainty. All models have to be permanently validated, falsified. Ockham's razor, a powerful philosophical tool, will probably change the amount of scientists working in each of these groups. We present here a model where a big-bang is unnecessary. It ends, in a finite time, in a second INFLATION, or a disaggregation to infinity. We also discuss the possibilities of a non-expanding universe model. Only a few references will be cited, mainly concerned with our own work in the past, thus purposely avoiding citing the many thousands of ...

  13. Kidney transplantation with organs from donors after circulatory death type 3: a prospective multicentric Spanish study (GEODAS 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés Pérez, J; Lafuente, O; Sánchez-Sobrino, B; Pérez Sáez, M J; Fernández García, A; Llamas, F; López-Sánchez, P; Rodriguez-Ferrero, M L; Zarraga, S; Ramos, A; Pascual, J

    2015-01-01

    To increase the number of kidney donors, new strategies are needed such as living donor programs, expanded criteria donors, or donors after circulatory death (DCD) kidney transplantation programs. The GEODAS group has started an observational, prospective, multicenter clinical study, collecting data from all DCD type-3 kidney transplantations performed in seven Spanish hospitals from January 2012 to January 2014. The preliminary results have shown a delayed graft function of 40.4% and graft survival of 93.7% with a nadir creatinine of 1.3 mg/dL. From all 33 potential donors included in the study, 32 were effective and 63 kidney grafts were transplanted with a utilization rate of 98.5%. Creatinine evolution (median [range]) was in the first month: 2.1 [0.6-5.6]; third month: 1.6 [0.8, 4.2]; first year: 1.6 [0.9-2.2]. These results are similar to kidney transplantation from donors after brain death as shown in the literature, especially in the graft and recipient survival rates. In addition, the controlled programs are easier and less expensive than uncontrolled DCD programs with a higher rate of graft use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expanded Dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, D B; Salvi, Sonali; Chandanwale, Ajay

    2016-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has coined the term expanded dengue to describe cases which do not fall into either dengue shock syndrome or dengue hemorrhagic fever. This has incorporated several atypical findings of dengue. Dengue virus has not been enlisted as a common etiological agent in several conditions like encephalitis, Guillain Barre syndrome. Moreover it is a great mimic of co-existing epidemics like Malaria, Chikungunya and Zika virus disease, which are also mosquito-borne diseases. The atypical manifestations noted in dengue can be mutisystemic and multifacetal. In clinical practice, the occurrence of atypical presentation should prompt us to investigate for dengue. Knowledge of expanded dengue helps to clinch the diagnosis of dengue early, especially during ongoing epidemics, avoiding further battery of investigations. Dengue has proved to be the epidemic with the ability to recur and has a diverse array of presentation as seen in large series from India, Srilanka, Indonesia and Taiwan. WHO has given the case definition of dengue fever in their comprehensive guidelines. Accordingly, a probable case is defined as acute febrile illness with two or more of any findings viz. headache, retro-orbital pain, myalgia, arthralgia, rash, hemorrhagic manifestations, leucopenia and supportive serology. There have been cases of patients admitted with fever, altered mentation with or without neck stiffness and pyramidal tract signs. Some had seizures or status epilepticus as presentation. When they were tested for serology, dengue was positive. After ruling out other causes, dengue remained the only culprit. We have come across varied presentations of dengue fever in clinical practice and the present article throws light on atypical manifestations of dengue. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  15. PATHOMORPHOLOGY OF ZERO BIOPSIES OF DONOR KIDNEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Arefjev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is well known fact that kidney transplants from Extended Criteria Donors may increase risk of De- layed Graft Function and Primary Non-Function of transplants. We have collected and tested 65 «zero» kidney biopsies from cadaver donors aged from 19 to 71 years old. In the pool of elderly donors who died from cerebrovascular accident the frequency of nephrosclerosis presentation was higher than in donors of yonger age who died from craniocephalic trauma. Nevertheless in the general donor pool the number of sclerosed glomeruli was no more than 12%. We did not meet at all in the whole volume of material any bi- opsy with the severe degree of arteriosclerosis. The «zero» biopsies of cadaver kidneys is quite usable and unexpensive tool to measure the degree of nephrosclerosis in order to exclude kidneys which are not fitable for transplantation. 

  16. Criteria for and Appropriateness of Renal Transplantation in Elderly Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Literature Review and Position Statement on Behalf of the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association Descartes Working Group and European Renal Best Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Liviu; Nistor, Ionuţ; Pascual, Julio; Mucsi, Istvan; Guirado, Lluis; Higgins, Robert; Van Laecke, Steven; Oberbauer, Rainer; Van Biesen, Wim; Abramowicz, Daniel; Gavrilovici, Cristina; Farrington, Ken; Covic, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    During the last 20 years, waiting lists for renal transplantation (RT) have grown significantly older. However, elderly patients (ie ≥65 years of age) are still more rarely referred or accepted to waiting lists and, if enlisted, have less chances of actually receiving a kidney allograft, than younger counterparts. In this review, we looked at evidence for the benefits and risks of RT in the elderly trying to answer the following questions: Should RT be advocated for elderly patients? What should be the criteria to accept elderly patients on the waiting list for RT? What strategies might be used to increase the rate of RT in waitlisted elderly candidates? For selected elderly patients, RT was shown to be superior to dialysis in terms of patient survival. Virtually all guidelines recommend that patients should not be deemed ineligible for RT based on age alone, although a short life expectancy generally might preclude RT. Concerning the assessment of comorbidities in the elderly, special attention should be paid to cardiac evaluation and screening for malignancy. Comorbidity scores and frailty assessment scales might help the decision making on eligibility. Psychosocial issues should also be evaluated. To overcome the scarcity of organ donors, elderly RT candidates should be encouraged to consider expanded criteria donors and living donors, as alternatives to deceased standard criteria donors. It has been demonstrated that expanded criteria donor RT in patients 60 years or older is associated with higher survival rates than remaining on dialysis, whereas living donor RT is superior to all other options.

  17. Expanding horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear Friends, The debate of whether Stem Cell Therapy is a hype or hope has been raging for quite some time and has been rekindled in the current year. Stem Cell Scientists have been particularly enthused by the bold standard taken by Barack Obama in passing an Executive Order that lifted the ban on federal funding of Research on Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC lines created after August 9, 2001. With the lifting of the ban more money is expected to be poured into ESC and Stem Cell Research in general and this augurs well for this emerging science. This is hope. Amariglio et al have reported the occurrence of a multifocal brain tumor in a boy with ataxia telengectasia four years after he was treated with intracerebella and intrathecal injection of human fetal neural stem cells. Molecular and Cytogenetic studies showed that the tumor was of non host origin raising the possibility of it being derived from transplanted neural stem cell. This is the first report of a donor-derived brain tumor in neural stem cell therapy and opens a Pandora’s Box of questions about the safety of such therapies. This signifies the hype surrounding the therapy. However controversies are a part of any emerging science. Our goals should be to march forward conducting our research under strict ethical principles and rigorous oversight, ironing out even minor flaws, always being on the lookout for adverse events and identifying ways and means of preventing their occurrence in future. JSRM has been in receipt of six articles, which speaks well for the interest people have for stem cell science in general and our journal in particular. The articles we have received for this edition of JSRM cover all aspects necessary for a science. Rosen et al have described the percentage variation of adipose stromal cells isolated from two different inbred mouse strains and Bhonde et al have reported the existence of multipotent stem cells in human fallopian tube. If cells can be identified

  18. Blood donor well-being: a primary responsibility of blood collection agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Current FDA regulations and AABB standards do not adequately protect the well-being of blood donors. Several practices have adverse consequences for donors, including: elevated incidence of donation related reactions and injuries, iron deficiency anemia in premenopausal women, and inadequate counseling of donors to obtain medical follow-up for health risks identified during pre-donation health screening. These practices can be improved without impacting negatively on the national blood supply. In addition to revising current blood collection operations, blood centers should explore the feasibility of establishing expanded donor health screening programs and determining their effectiveness in improving donor health, donor recruitment, and donor retention.

  19. Context and social perceptions of blood donation in donors found positive for human immunodeficiency virus in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, Alice; Danic, Bruno; Santos, Aurélie; Martinaud, Christophe; Woimant, Geneviève; Laperche, Syria; Tiberghien, Pierre; Jauffret-Roustide, Marie; Pillonel, Josiane

    2017-09-01

    In France, information collected during postdonation interviews showed that a majority of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected donors were not eligible to donate as per donor selection criteria. In the interest of blood safety, this study aimed to explore the mechanisms of noncompliance with blood donor selection criteria, notably the permanent deferral of men who have sex with men (MSM). Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 32 blood donors found positive for HIV between mid-2011 and 2014. Topics such as the experience and motivations for donating blood, understanding of selection criteria, sexual risk management, and opinions on donor selection were discussed. Transcripts were analyzed inductively. More than 50% of study participants were noncompliant with donor selection criteria. Reasons for nondisclosure of risk factors in the predonation questionnaire or the predonation interview included stigma, test-seeking motivations, symbolic attachment to blood donation, and context of donation. Compliance to donor criteria was seen as secondary by donors who reaped personal benefits from the symbolism of their donation. Donors lacked self-reflexivity in their assessment of risky sexual behavior. The "window period" and the underlying epidemiologic arguments for donor selection criteria were poorly understood. Nearly all participants disapproved of the permanent ban on blood donations from MSM. This study demonstrated the need for more communication on the epidemiologic basis for donor selection criteria and on the window period to facilitate donor compliance. These findings have already advanced improvements to predonation documents, in a larger context of 2016 donor selection criteria revision. © 2017 AABB.

  20. Evidence on changes in aid allocation criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, S.; Cassimon, D.; Van Campenhout, B.

    2009-01-01

    Have donors changed their aid-allocation criteria over the past three decades toward greater selectivity, a frequently stated goal of the international development community? Using data on how 22 donors allocated their bilateral aid among 147 countries over 1970-2004, the article finds that after

  1. Transplantation With Livers From Deceased Donors Older Than 75 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Trygve; Aandahl, Einar Martin; Bennet, William

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of donor organs limits the number of patients in need who are offered liver transplantation. Measures to expand the donor pool are crucial to prevent on-list mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of livers from deceased donors who were older than 75...... years. METHODS: Fifty-four patients who received a first liver transplant (D75 group) from 2001 to 2011 were included. Donor and recipient data were collected from the Nordic Liver Transplant Registry and medical records. The outcome was compared with a control group of 54 patients who received a liver...

  2. Prevalence of HIV positive blood donors among screened ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two thousand five hundred and thirty two (2,532) males, aged 25 – 50 years potential blood donors were randomly selected from the total number of volunteer blood donors who satisfied the initial screening criteria for donating blood, and were screened for HIV using Immunocomb II (HIV 1 and 2 Bispot) and Recombigen ...

  3. Estimation of donor usability for islet isolation with the modified Ricordi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S; Noguchi, H; Hatanaka, N; Kobayashi, N; Jackson, A; Naziruddin, B; Levy, M F

    2008-03-01

    The quality of donor pancreata is important for successful islet isolation. However, in some countries like Japan, the number of donor pancreata is low. Therefore, marginal donor pancreata have been used with less restrictive donor criteria. In order to use marginal donor pancreata, we established the modified Ricordi method. According to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) in 2005, more than 6000 pancreata were not clinically usable in the United States. In this study, we reevaluated donor usability based on the Japanese islet donor criteria. We reviewed donor charts with well-documented cases in Texas from 2005 to 2006. We counted the number of pancreata for pancreas transplantation or islet transplantation. If not used clinically, the reason was also reviewed. Donors were reevaluated based on the Japanese islet donor criteria. We reviewed 236 donor charts, including 29 pancreata used for whole pancreas transplantations and 13 for islet isolation; therefore, 194 pancreata were not used. Among the 194 cases, we were able to identify the reasons that the pancreata were not used in 186 cases. When we applied the Japanese acceptance criteria, an additional 82 of 186 cases (44%) seemed suitable for islet isolations. With the modified Ricordi method, more than 2500 donor pancreata might be used for islet isolation in the United States when the Japanese criteria are applied.

  4. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Nitin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the various options for patients with end stage renal disease, kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a suitable patient. The kidney for transplantation is retrieved from either a cadaver or a live donor. Living donor nephrectomy has been developed as a method to address the shortfall in cadaveric kidneys available for transplantation. Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN, by reducing postoperative pain, shortening convalescence, and improving the cosmetic outcome of the donor nephrectomy, has shown the potential to increase the number of living kidney donations further by removing some of the disincentives inherent to donation itself. The technique of LLDN has undergone evolution at different transplant centers and many modifications have been done to improve donor safety and recipient outcome. Virtually all donors eligible for an open surgical procedure may also undergo the laparoscopic operation. Various earlier contraindications to LDN, such as right donor kidney, multiple vessels, anomalous vasculature and obesity have been overcome with increasing experience. Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy can be done transperitoneally or retroperitoneally on either side. The approach is most commonly transperitoneal, which allows adequate working space and easy dissection. A review of literature and our experience with regards to standard approach and the modifications is presented including a cost saving model for the developing countries. An assessment has been made, of the impact of LDN on the outcome of donor and the recipient.

  5. Blood donor selection in European Union directives: room for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kort, Wim; Mayr, Wolfgang; Jungbauer, Christof; Vuk, Tomislav; Kullaste, Riin; Seifried, Erhard; Grazzini, Giuliano; De Wit, Jeroen; Folléa, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Transfusion-transmissible infections have made both blood bankers and health authorities overly cautious. The general public expects and hence reinforces this policy. To obtain a high level of blood product safety, blood and plasma donors have to meet increasingly stringent eligibility criteria; however, it is not known whether this policy translates into improved outcomes for patients. There is a risk that the management of donors does not match the ambition of greater safety for patients. European directives related to the collection process and donor selection will probably be reconsidered in the next few years. The development of European directives on donor selection and their basis in the literature were reviewed with an emphasis on the background and considerations for eligibility criteria to be included in the directives. The precautionary principle appears to be the predominant reason behind the set of eligibility criteria. However, the formal eligibility criteria, put into force in 2004, do not balance with the developments of the past decade in laboratory tests and measures that have substantially reduced actual infection risks. In no cases were the effects of eligibility criteria on the donor pool and donor well-being quantified. Regional differences in the epidemiology of transfusion-transmissible infections were not taken into consideration either. First, the Authors promote the collection of epidemiological data on the incidence and prevalence of conditions in the general population and in blood and plasma donors which could pose a risk for transfused patients, in order to use these data as a basis for decision-making in donor-selection policies. Second, the Authors suggest including allowance for differential deferral criteria throughout Europe, based on factual risk levels. There should be an accepted balance between donor and patient welfare, and also between risk to transfusion safety and risk of compromising the blood supply.

  6. ESHRE Task Force on Ethics and Law 21: genetic screening of gamete donors: ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondorp, W; De Wert, G; Pennings, G; Shenfield, F; Devroey, P; Tarlatzis, B; Barri, P; Diedrich, K; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U; Tüttelmann, F; Provoost, V

    2014-07-01

    This Task Force document explores the ethical issues involved in the debate about the scope of genetic screening of gamete donors. Calls for expanded donor screening arise against the background of both occasional findings of serious but rare genetic conditions in donors or donor offspring that were not detected through present screening procedures and the advent of new genomic technologies promising affordable testing of donors for a wide range of conditions. Ethical principles require that all stakeholders' interests are taken into account, including those of candidate donors. The message of the profession should be that avoiding all risks is impossible and that testing should remain proportional.

  7. Dealing with Donor Anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Mike

    1995-01-01

    Techniques that reduce donors' resistance to college fund-raising requests, either direct mail or telephone solicitations, are offered. These include: respecting the prospects' concerns about privacy; offering nonintrusive giving options; honesty and clarity of communication; reinforcing donor sense of control; connecting with prospects'…

  8. Donor Smoking and Older Age Increases Morbidity and Mortality After Lung Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, H H; Møller, C H; Zemtsovski, M

    2017-01-01

    survival as well as CLAD-free survival was significantly lower with donors ≥55 years. CONCLUSIONS: Donor smoking history and older donor age impact lung function, mortality, and CLAD-free survival after transplantation. Because of a shortage of organs, extended donor criteria may be considered while taking......BACKGROUND: The lack of lung transplant donors has necessitated the use of donors with a smoking history and donors of older age. We have evaluated the effects of donor smoking history and age on recipient morbidity and mortality with baseline values of pulmonary function and survival free...... of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) as morbidity variables. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of 588 consecutive lung transplant recipients and their corresponding 454 donors. Donors were divided into three groups: group 1 included smokers, group 2 nonsmokers, and group 3 had unknown smoking...

  9. Longer-term outcomes after kidney transplantation from seronegative deceased donors at increased risk for blood-borne viral infection 1 – 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Peter P.; Halpern, Scott D.; Asch, David; Bloom, Roy; Nathan, Howard; Hasz, Richard; Roth, Joseph; Reitsma, William; Krefski, Louis; Goerlitz, Fred; DeLauro, Gina; Blumberg, Emily; Weng, Francis L.; Caplan, Arthur; Thomasson, Arwin; Shults, Justine; Feldman, Harold I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C to transplant recipients has drawn attention to the use of allografts from seronegative donors at increased risk for viral infection (DIRVI). Methods We performed a cohort study of 7,803 kidney transplant recipients whose kidneys were recovered through one of two organ procurement organizations (OPO) from 1996 to 2007. Detailed OPO data on donor risk factors were linked to recipient data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. Results Median recipient follow-up was 3.9 years. 368 (5%) patients received DIRVI kidneys, a third of which were procured from donors with a history of injection drug use or commercial sex work. Compared to standard criteria kidney recipients, DIRVI kidney recipients were more likely to be HIV-positive or Black. In multivariable Cox regression, using DIRVI recipients as the reference, recipients of standard criteria donor kidneys had lower mortality (HR 0.71, p<0.01) and no difference in death-censored allograft failure (HR 1.09, p=0.62), whereas recipients of expanded criteria donor kidneys had no significant difference in mortality (HR 0.98, p=0.83), but a higher allograft failure rate (HR 1.93, p<0.01). High-quality data on post-transplant recipient viral testing were not available. Conclusions DIRVI kidney recipients experienced higher mortality than standard criteria kidney recipients. This finding could be explained if sicker patients received DIRVI kidneys (i.e., residual confounding) or the less likely possibility of undetected transmission of viral infections. Given the limitations of registry data used in this analysis, prospective studies are needed to further elucidate these findings. PMID:21527872

  10. Approach to the Pretransplant Evaluation of the Living Kidney Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala Sachdeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the potential kidney donor is a complex activity that differs substantially from other types of preoperative assessments. The well being of the donor, who derives no medical benefit from this surgery, must be assured in both the short term and long term, and the potential adverse consequences to the recipient must be determined as well. The criteria that must be met for a person to donate a kidney are rigorous and include medical, social, psychosocial, ethical, and legal issues. Donor evaluation can be divided into assessments to protect the health and safety of the donor and assessments to protect the health and safety of the recipient. This article provides an approach to evaluating a donor, focusing on the complex issues that an evaluator is faced with. A careful assessment of risks and benefits to both the donor and recipient can lead to favorable outcomes.

  11. Marginal kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Gopalakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for a medically eligible patient with end stage renal disease. The number of renal transplants has increased rapidly over the last two decades. However, the demand for organs has increased even more. This disparity between the availability of organs and waitlisted patients for transplants has forced many transplant centers across the world to use marginal kidneys and donors. We performed a Medline search to establish the current status of marginal kidney donors in the world. Transplant programs using marginal deceased renal grafts is well established. The focus is now on efforts to improve their results. Utilization of non-heart-beating donors is still in a plateau phase and comprises a minor percentage of deceased donations. The main concern is primary non-function of the renal graft apart from legal and ethical issues. Transplants with living donors outnumbered cadaveric transplants at many centers in the last decade. There has been an increased use of marginal living kidney donors with some acceptable medical risks. Our primary concern is the safety of the living donor. There is not enough scientific data available to quantify the risks involved for such donation. The definition of marginal living donor is still not clear and there are no uniform recommendations. The decision must be tailored to each donor who in turn should be actively involved at all levels of the decision-making process. In the current circumstances, our responsibility is very crucial in making decisions for either accepting or rejecting a marginal living donor.

  12. Meet the donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olejaz, Maria; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, gross anatomy teaching and anatomical dissection have been fundamental elements in the training of medical doctors and surgeons across the world. Anatomy education and research rely on a stable and reliable supply of bodies in order to take place. Based on qualitative in-depth inte......For centuries, gross anatomy teaching and anatomical dissection have been fundamental elements in the training of medical doctors and surgeons across the world. Anatomy education and research rely on a stable and reliable supply of bodies in order to take place. Based on qualitative in......-depth interviews with 13 whole body donors in Denmark, this article explores what donors think about donation and thus offers a supplement to previous primarily quantitative work on donor motivation. The article presents how interviewed donors relate to three topics: their body, their social relations...

  13. Quality of life of elderly live kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, Karel W J; Dols, Leonienke F C; Weimar, Willem; Dooper, Ine M; IJzermans, Jan N M; Kok, Niels F M

    2013-10-15

    Expanding the use of elderly live donors may help meet the demand for kidney transplants. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the surgical procedure on the quality of life (QOL) of elderly donors compared with younger donors. Alongside three prospective studies (two randomized) running between May 2001 and October 2010, we asked 501 live donors to fill out the Short Form-36 questionnaire preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. We defined live donors 60 years or older as elderly. Between-group analyses regarding QOL were adjusted for baseline values and gender. One hundred thirty-five donors were older and 366 donors were younger than 60 years. The response rate was high, with 87% at 12 months postoperatively. Elderly donors less often scored as American Society of Anaesthesiology classification 1 (60% vs. 81%; Pvitality" (5 points; P=0.008). At 3 months, "bodily pain" (3 points, P=0.04) and "role physical" (8 points, P=0.02) were still in favor of the older group. At 6 and 12 months, "physical function" was in favor of the younger group (3 and 5 points, respectively; P=0.04 and P<0.001). This study demonstrates that elderly donors recover relatively fast. The perspective of excellent postoperative QOL may help convince elderly individuals to donate.

  14. Prevalence of Babesia antibody in a selected blood donor population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovsky, M A; Lindberg, L E; Syrek, A L; Page, P L

    1988-01-01

    Human babesiosis, a parasitic disease transmitted by the tick, Ixodes dammini, was confined previously to limited areas of the northeastern United States. It is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of transfusion. Red cells and platelets prepared from asymptomatic donors have been implicated in transfusion-transmitted cases. More cases of babesiosis are being reported as the range of the vector expands in the United States. Blood donors from an endemic area were tested for antibody to Babesia microti during the summer. Only 3.7 percent of the 779 donors were seropositive, compared with 4.7 percent (p greater than 0.05) of donors from a nonendemic area. An epidemiologic survey of seropositive and matched seronegative controls demonstrated no significant differences that would assist in screening donors.

  15. Frequency and risk factors for donor reactions in an anonymous blood donor survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mindy; Osmond, Lori; Yi, Qi-Long; Cameron-Choi, Keltie; O'Brien, Sheila F

    2013-09-01

    Adverse donor reactions can result in injury and decrease the likelihood of donor return. Reaction reports captured in the blood center's database provide an incomplete picture of reaction rates and risk factors. We performed an anonymous survey, mailed to 40,000 donors in 2008, including questions about symptoms, height, weight, sex, and donation status. Reaction rates were compared to those recorded in our database. Possible risk factors were assessed for various reactions. The response rate was 45.5%. A total of 32% of first-time and 14% of repeat donors reported having any adverse symptom, most frequently bruising (84.9 per 1000 donors) or feeling faint or weak (66.2 per 1000). Faint reactions were two to eight times higher than reported in our database, although direct comparison was difficult. Younger age, female sex, and first-time donation status were risk factors for systemic and arm symptoms. In females, low estimated blood volume (EBV) was a risk factor for systemic symptoms. Only 51% of donors who consulted an outside physician also called Canadian Blood Services. A total of 10% of first-time donors with reactions found adverse effects information inadequate. This study allowed us to collect more information about adverse reactions, including minor symptoms and delayed reactions. Based on our findings of the risk factors and frequency of adverse reactions, we are implementing more stringent EBV criteria for younger donors and providing more detailed information to donors about possible adverse effects and their management. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Expanding role of a blood center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaisy Mathai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials and Methods: The study was performed on prospective donors who reported to the Department of Transfusion Medicine. Individuals deferred due to hypertension contributed the study population. They were compared with age and sex matched donor controls. Demographic details were recorded in a proforma. On identification of a hypertensive individual, consequent two comparable donors were taken as controls with a total of 50 hypertensive subjects. Hypertensive status of the subjects were assessed based on the criteria formulated by the WHO-ISH and US Seventh Joint National Committee report on prevention, detection, evaluation and treatment of high blood pressure. Results: About 0.95% of healthy blood donors had undetected hypertension. Mean age at detection of hypertension in the study group was 35.44 ± 7.69 years. Higher BMI was observed in the hypertensive group compared to normotensive control group with P value significant at 0.0001. Conclusion: About 1% of healthy individuals were found to have undetected hypertension. Though the study was not designed to determine the prevalence of hypertension in the region, it is a rough estimate of the proportion of undetected hypertension in the local population as donors are considered as representative of healthy population.

  17. Enhancing the tissue donor pool through donation after death in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroff, Adam M; Gale, Stephen C; Merlin, Mark A; Crystal, Jessica S; Linger, Matt; Shah, Anar D; Beaumont, Erin; Lustiger, Elie; Tabakin, Erica; Gracias, Vicente H

    2013-04-01

    Tissue transplantation is an important adjunct to modern medical care and is used daily to save or improve patient lives. Tissue allografts include bone, tendon, corneas, heart valves and others. Increasing utilization may lead to tissue shortages, and tissue procurement organizations continue to explore ways to expand the cadaveric donor pool. Currently more than half of all deaths occur outside the acute care setting. Many who suffer prehospital deaths might be eligible for non-organ tissue donation. A retrospective review of electronic prehospital medical records was conducted from May 1, 2008 through December 31, 2009. All prehospital deaths were included irrespective of cause. Once identified, additional medical history was obtained from prehospital, inpatient, and emergency department records. Age, medical history, and time of death were compared to exclusion criteria for four tissue procurement organizations (MTF, LifeNet, LifeCell, EyeBank). After analysis, percentages of eligible donors were calculated. Over 50,000 prehospital records were reviewed; 432 subjects died in the field and were eligible for analysis. Ages ranged from four to 103 years of age; the average was 68.3 (SD = 20.1) years. After exclusion for age, medical conditions, and time of death, 185 unique patients (42.8%) were eligible for donation to at least one of the four tissue procurement organizations (range 11.6%-34.3%). After prehospital death, many individuals may be eligible for tissue donation. These findings suggest that future prospective studies exploring tissue donation after prehospital death are indicated. These studies should aim to clarify eligibility criteria, create protocols and infrastructure, and explore the ethical implications of expanding tissue donation to include this population.

  18. Very small pediatric donor kidney transplantation in pediatric recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, H C; Friedmann, P; Kayler, L K

    2017-08-01

    Kidneys from very small pediatric donors (age <5 years, weight <21 kg) may be a means to increase the donor pool for pediatric recipients. Transplantation of small pediatric kidneys is more commonly performed in adult recipients due to the increased risks of technical complications, thrombosis, and early graft failure. While these risks are abrogated in adult recipients by limiting the donor weight to ≥10 kg and using the EB technique, it is unknown whether pediatric recipients achieve comparable results. US national data were assessed for all first-time, deceased-donor, kidney-only pediatric recipients, 1/1996-10/2013, who received very small pediatric donor grafts or grafts from ideal adult donors. We identified 57 pediatric EB, 110 pediatric SK, and 2350 adult transplants. The primary outcome was 3-year all-cause graft survival. Kaplan-Meier curves showed worse outcomes for pediatric grafts compared to adult ideal grafts (P=.042). On multivariate analysis, pediatric recipients of SK grafts had significantly higher HRs (aHR 2.01, 95% CI 1.34-3.00) and pediatric recipients of EB grafts had somewhat higher non-significant HRs (1.57; 95% CI 0.88-2.79) for graft survival. These results suggest cautionary use of very small pediatric donors as a source to expand the donor pool for pediatric candidates. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Potential use and perspectives of nitric oxide donors in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano

    2017-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged in the last 30 years as a key molecule involved in many physiological processes in plants, animals and bacteria. Current research has shown that NO can be delivered via donor molecules. In such cases, the NO release rate is dependent on the chemical structure of the donor itself and on the chemical environment. Despite NO's powerful signaling effect in plants and animals, the application of NO donors in agriculture is currently not implemented and research remains mainly at the experimental level. Technological development in the field of NO donors is rapidly expanding in scope to include controlling seed germination, plant development, ripening and increasing shelf-life of produce. Potential applications in animal production have also been identified. This concise review focuses on the use of donors that have shown potential biotechnological applications in agriculture. Insights are provided into (i) the role of donors in plant production, (ii) the potential use of donors in animal production and (iii) future approaches to explore the use and applications of donors for the benefit of agriculture. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Advanced Donation Programs and Deceased Donor-Initiated Chains-2 Innovations in Kidney Paired Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Anji E; Veale, Jeffrey L; Melcher, Marc L

    2017-12-01

    Kidney paired donation (KPD) strategies have facilitated compatible living-donor kidney transplants for end-stage renal disease patients with willing but incompatible living donors. Success has inspired further innovations that expand opportunities for kidney-paired donation. Two such innovations are the advanced donation strategy in which a donor provides a kidney before their recipient is matched, or even in need of, a kidney transplant, and deceased donor initiated chains in which chains are started with deceased donors rather than altruistic living donors. Although these innovations may expand KPD, they raise several ethical issues. Specific concerns raised by advanced donation include the management of uncertainty, the extent of donor and recipient consent, the scope of the obligation that the organization has to the kidney exchange paired recipient, the naming of alternative recipients, and the potential to unfairly advantage the recipient. Use of deceased donors for chain-initiating kidneys raises ethical issues concerning the consent process for each involved party, the prioritization of deceased donor kidneys, the allocation of chain ending kidneys, and the value of a living donor kidney versus a deceased donor kidney. We outline each ethical issue and discuss how it can be conceptualized and managed so that these KPD innovations programs are ultimately successful.

  1. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ A. DE FREITAS PACHECO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  2. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  3. Nyretransplantation med levende donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Løkkegaard, H; Rasmussen, F

    2000-01-01

    with only few complications. The long-term outcome for kidney donors is good without increase in mortality or risk for development of hypertension and renal failure; proteinuria may be seen. Living kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment of end-stage renal disease with better graft survival than...

  4. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion Sanguine of Geneva will be held at CERN on Tuesday 13 March 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  5. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion d'Annemasse will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  6. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tuesday 19 March 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion sanguine of Geneva If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  7. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 13 November 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs will be held a blood donors campaign, organized by the Etablissement de Transfusion de Haute-Savoie If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  8. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Établissement de Transfusion de Rhône-Alpes will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2000 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  9. Kidneys from donors after cardiac death provide survival benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Snoeijs (Maarten); D.E. Schaubel (Douglas); R. Hené (Ronald); A.J. Hoitsma (Andries); M.M. Idu (Mirza); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); R.J. Ploeg (Rutger); J. Ringers (Jan); M.H. Christiaans (Maarten); W.A. Buurman (Wim); L.W.E. van Heurn (Ernest)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe continuing shortage of kidneys for transplantation requires major efforts to expand the donor pool. Donation after cardiac death (DCD) increases the number of available kidneys, but it is unknown whether patients who receive a DCD kidney live longer than patients who remain on

  10. Kidneys from Donors after Cardiac Death Provide Survival Benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeijs, Maarten G.; Schaubel, Douglas E.; Hene, Ronald; Hoitsma, Andries J.; Idu, Mirza M.; Ijzermans, Jan N.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Ringers, Jan; Christiaans, Maarten H.; Buurman, Wim A.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest

    The continuing shortage of kidneys for transplantation requires major efforts to expand the donor pool. Donation after cardiac death (DCD) increases the number of available kidneys, but it is unknown whether patients who receive a DCD kidney live longer than patients who remain on dialysis and wait

  11. Kidneys from donors after cardiac death provide survival benefit.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeijs, M.G.; Schaubel, D.E.; Hene, R.; Hoitsma, A.J.; Idu, M.M.; Ijzermans, J.N.M.; Ploeg, R.J.; Ringers, J.; Christiaans, M.H.; Buurman, W.A.; Heurn, L.W.E. van

    2010-01-01

    The continuing shortage of kidneys for transplantation requires major efforts to expand the donor pool. Donation after cardiac death (DCD) increases the number of available kidneys, but it is unknown whether patients who receive a DCD kidney live longer than patients who remain on dialysis and wait

  12. Kidneys from donors after cardiac death provide survival benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeijs, Maarten G.; Schaubel, Douglas E.; Hené, Ronald; Hoitsma, Andries J.; Idu, Mirza M.; Ijzermans, Jan N.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Ringers, Jan; Christiaans, Maarten H.; Buurman, Wim A.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest

    2010-01-01

    The continuing shortage of kidneys for transplantation requires major efforts to expand the donor pool. Donation after cardiac death (DCD) increases the number of available kidneys, but it is unknown whether patients who receive a DCD kidney live longer than patients who remain on dialysis and wait

  13. Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    of EM Business systems analyst wrote detailed technical requirements for HapLogic Phase ill. Haplotype Logic • • Created a series of Hap Logic...Marrow Donor Program® NOOOO 14-08-1-1207 IID.I Task 2: Research with NMDPDonors IID.I Task 3: Expand Immuno - biology Research QUARTER PROGRESS

  14. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... for blood transfusions Medication side effects Abdominal hernia Death Potential long-term organ specific donor complications blank - ...

  15. Liver transplantation with donors older than 75 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, B; Cabezas, J; Fábrega, E; Casafont, F; Pons-Romero, F

    2011-04-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation has shown successful results over the last years. For this reason there are increased numbers of patients on waiting lists. To expand the pool of liver donors, elderly donors have been used as a strategy. We report our experience comparing donors of ≥ 75 years with younger ages for their characteristics, clinical outcomes, and survivals. From January 2001 to December 2009, we performed 174 consecutive liver transplantation from cadaveric donors in 166 patients. During this period, we used 24 liver grafts from donors ≥ 75 years. We analyzed their outcomes retrospectively, describing donors and recipient characteristics and their clinical evolution. The mean follow-up time among the entire study population was 42 ± 39 months. We observed an overall survival of 68.3% with similar incidences in both groups: 83% in the younger versus 78% in the older group at 1 year, and 69% versus 63%, at 5 years respectively. Both groups showed similar lengths of intensive care unit stay, cold and warm ischemia times, and intraoperative transfusion requirements. The older group had a total operative time than was longer and fewer hypotensive episodes than the younger group. There were no significant differences in the rates of rejection and retransplantation between the groups. The use of older donor livers was associated with a significantly higher rate of poor initial graft function (P = .027), an increased number of reinterventions (P = .013) in the older donor group, as well as more frequent vascular and biliar complications, without reaching significance. Our data suggested that donor age alone did not engendered a survival disadvantage for graft or recipient. However, careful donor selection is needed to avoid additional risk factors that can increase the morbidity or mortality of the procedure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving and expanding NGO programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, A

    1993-06-01

    India has massive problems and is in need of improving and expanding non governmental organization (NGO) programs by broadening the scope of NGO activities, identifying successful NGO activities, and by moving closer to the community to participate in their activities. The problems and experience in the last few decades indicate that with expansion bureaucratization takes place. The institution begins to depend on donors and follows donor-driven agendas. As more money is given by the government, many more so called GONGO or Government-NGO projects materialize. Another problem is that the government almost always approaches the NGOs for the implementation of a project, and there is complete lack of cooperation at the planning stage. The government is considering a loan from the World Bank and UNICEF to launch a mother and child health program, but there has not been any discussion with the dozens of people who have worked on issues concerning mother and child health issues for many years. There is a need to be more demanding of the government about the various programs that are implemented for the government. Very few NGO health and family welfare projects are run by ordinary nurses or ordinary Ayurvedic doctors under ordinary conditions. Since successful NGO work has to be extended to other parts of the country, they will have to be run by ordinary people with very ordinary resources. Over the years, the NGO community has become preoccupied with its own agenda. Today, despite very sophisticated equipment and infrastructure, they are not able to reach the 60,000-70,000 workers and employees. Some of the ideas with respect to the strengthens and weaknesses of community participation have to be shared. NGOs should include all the existing non governmental organizations throughout the country, and have a dialogue with other nongovernmental bodies such as trade unions. The challenge is to adjust the current agenda, prevailing style, and present way of operating and move

  17. Long term follow-up and outcome of liver transplantation from hepatitis B surface antigen positive donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarin, Roberto; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Magistri, Paolo; Cescon, Matteo; Cillo, Umberto; Burra, Patrizia; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    Liver transplant for hepatitis B virus (HBV) currently yields excellent outcomes: it allows to rescue patients with an HBV-related advanced liver disease, resulting in a demographical modification of the waiting list for liver transplant. In an age of patient-tailored treatments, in liver transplantation as well the aim is to offer the best suitable graft to the patient who can benefit from it, also expanding the criteria for organ acceptance and allocation. With the intent of developing strategies to increase the donor pool, we set-up a multicenter study involving 3 Liver Transplant Centers in Italy: patients undergoing liver transplantation between March 03, 2004, and May 21, 2010, were retrospectively evaluated. 1408 patients underwent liver transplantation during the study period, 28 (2%) received the graft from hepatitis B surface antigen positive (HBsAg)-positive deceased donors. The average follow-up after liver transplantation was 63.7 mo [range: 0.1-119.4; SD ± 35.8]. None Primary non-function, re-liver transplantation, early or late hepatic artery thrombosis occurred. The 1-, 3- and 5-year graft and patient survival resulted of 85.7%, 82.1%, 78.4%. Our results suggest that the use of HBsAg-positive donors liver grafts is feasible, since HBV can be controlled without affecting graft stability. However, the selection of grafts and the postoperative antiviral therapy should be managed appropriately. PMID:28405138

  18. Utilization of increased risk for transmission of infectious disease donor organs in solid organ transplantation: Retrospective analysis of disease transmission and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Linda; Kotton, Camille N; Elias, Nahel; Palafox, Julie; Basler, Debra; Shao, Sarah H; Lester, William; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Kimball, Brendan; Trencher, Carrie; Fishman, Jay A

    2017-12-01

    The inadequate supply of transplantable organs necessitates new approaches to organ availability. Serologies and nucleic acid testing (NAT) for hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are used in microbiologic screening of potential organ donors. Organs from donors considered at "high risk" (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC 1994) or "increased risk" (U.S. Public Health Service, PHS 2013) for transmission of viral infection to recipients may provide an expanded source of organs for transplantation. We review a single-center experience with 257 adult organ recipients of organs from donors meeting either CDC 1994 or PHS 2013 risk criteria between 2011 and 2016. Tracking these transplants required modification of the Transplant Center electronic database to identify all recipients of increased-risk donor (IRD) organs, documentation of informed consent, and microbiologic testing data. No transmissions of HIV, HBV, or HCV were identified by NAT or clinically. Nine patients developed positive serologic assays for one of the tested viruses; all recipients were retested and remain negative by NAT. Notably, post-transplant HBV core serologies reverted to negative on re-testing; these positive serologies are likely false positives caused by receipt of blood products. Use of IRD organs can be performed safely with appropriate informed consent and rigorous pre- and post-transplant microbiological testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Analysis of blood donor pre-donation deferral in Dubai: characteristics and reasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Shaer L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laila Al Shaer,1 Ranjita Sharma,2 Mahera AbdulRahman2 1College of Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, UAE; 2Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE Background: To ensure an adequate and safe blood supply, it is crucial to select suitable donors according to stringent eligibility criteria. Understanding the reasons for donor deferral can help in planning more efficient recruitment strategies and evaluating donor selection criteria. This study aims to define donor pre-donation deferral rates, causes of deferral, and characteristics of deferred donors in Dubai.Materials and methods: This retrospective study was conducted on all donors who presented for allogeneic blood donation between January 1, 2010, until June 30, 2013, in Dubai Blood Donation Centre, accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks. The donation and deferral data were analyzed to determine the demographic characteristics of accepted and deferred donors, and frequency analyses were also conducted.Results: Among 142,431 individuals presenting during the study period, 114,827 (80.6% were accepted for donation, and 27,604 (19.4% were deferred. The overall proportion of deferrals was higher among individuals less than 21 years old (35%, P<0.000, females (44% were deferred compared to 15% of males, P<0.0001, and first-time donors (22% were deferred vs 14% of repeat donors, P<0.0001. The main causes for a temporary deferral were low hemoglobin and high blood pressure.Discussion: The deferral rate among blood donors in Dubai is relatively high compared to the internationally reported rates. This rate was higher among first-time donors and females, with low hemoglobin as the major factor leading to a temporary deferral of donors. Strategies to mitigate deferral and improve blood donor retention are urged in Dubai to avoid additional stress on the blood supply. Keywords: blood donation, blood safety, donor deferral, selection criteria 

  20. Layouts of Expander Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Dujmović, Vida; Sidiropoulos, Anastasios; Wood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Bourgain and Yehudayoff recently constructed $O(1)$-monotone bipartite expanders. By combining this result with a generalisation of the unraveling method of Kannan, we construct 3-monotone bipartite expanders, which is best possible. We then show that the same graphs admit 3-page book embeddings, 2-queue layouts, 4-track layouts, and have simple thickness 2. All these results are best possible.

  1. National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-17

    radiological exposure event. Period 8 Activity: • Attended a meeting with the EBMT Nuclear Accident Committee Ulm, Germany from June 30 to July 1st... nuclear Safety, Bonn o Cullen Case United States National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota o Nelson Chao... radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses o Dieter Graessle, Dipl.- Math. Oec. Germany Radiation Medicine Research Group, Ulm

  2. Impact of predictive scoring model and e-mail messages on African American blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachegowda, Lohith S; Timm, Brad; Dasgupta, Pinaki; Hillyer, Christopher D; Kessler, Debra; Rebosa, Mark; France, Christopher R; Shaz, Beth H

    2017-06-01

    Expanding the African American (AA) donor pool is critical to sustain transfusion support for sickle cell disease patients. The aims were to: 1) apply cognitive computing on donation related metrics to develop a predictive model that effectively identifies repeat AA donors, 2) determine whether a single e-mail communication could improve AA donor retention and compare retention results on higher versus lower predictive score donors, and 3) evaluate the effect of e-mail marketing on AA donor retention with culturally versus nonculturally tailored message. Between 2011 and 2012, 30,786 AA donors donated blood at least once on whom predictive repeat donor scores (PRDSs) was generated from donor-related metrics (frequency of donations, duration between donations, age, blood type, and sex). In 2013, 28% (8657/30,786) of 2011 to 2012 donors returned to donate on whom PRDS was validated. Returning blood donors had a higher mean PRDS compared to nonreturning donors (0.649 vs. 0.268; p e-mail pilot, high PRDS (≥0.6) compared to low PRDS (e-mail opening rate (p e-mail, 159% higher presentation rate (p e-mail communication has the potential to increase the efficiency of donor marketing. © 2017 AABB.

  3. Universal donor education and consent: what we know and where we should go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrli, Gay; Sazama, Kathleen

    2010-11-01

    Each day thousands of blood donors across the country are given educational materials and sign a consent form, thus fulfilling two blood collection accreditation requirements. Very few donors will experience a documented adverse event, although a disproportionate number of these events occur in the youngest donor cohort. The literature reflects this disproportion and suggests mitigation strategies. Studies describe subjective, undocumented donor reactions and decreased donor return rates after a documented or subjective reaction. Additionally, studies have shown donor consent form variability among blood collection facilities and that donor comprehension of the educational materials and consent is limited. There are few standardized donor education materials or consent documents. Current accreditation standards for educational materials are limited to aspects of transfusion-transmitted diseases and for donor consent process and documentation are vague and nonspecific. Recent experiences with young donors and current research compel our community to engage in creating standardized, expanded donor educational materials and standardized donor consent processes and documents. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  4. Current status of adult living donor liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Wentao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the establishment of reasonable selection criteria and continuous technical refinement, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT has been widely performed in the world. Right-lobe LDLT has become the conventional procedure performed at many centers. In recent years, due to the considerations of donor safety, other graft types have become important choices for adult-adult LDLT, especially left-lobe LDLT, and good outcome has been achieved. Although the minimally invasive technique has certain technical and safety issues, it will play an important role in donor hepatectomy due to its unique advantages. At present, the research data for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are controversial, but LDLT can be applied in the treatment for these patients. The therapeutic regimens for LDLT should be selected on the basis of the individualized principle and comprehensive analysis of donor safety, surgical risk, and the recipient’s survival.

  5. Living and cadaver donor transplant programs in the maghreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Hachicha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Maghreb, organ failure constitutes a major public health problem, especially given the increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure and the high cost of care. In this study, we attempted to seek the recommendations, through a questionnaire, of various officials related to organ transplantation as well as leaders of ethics committees and religious groups in different countries of the Maghreb. The objective was to improve the rate of organ donation and transplantation. We received 36 replies (62% within the prescribed time limit. In our survey, 83% of the respondents felt that living donor transplantation should be promoted initially, followed gradually by measures to increase cadaver donor transplantation to achieve a target of about 30 transplants with cadaver kidney donors per million inhabitants. To expand the donor pool, 83% of the respondents proposed to expand the family circle to include the spouse and inlaws. To improve the cadaver donation activity, one should improve the organizational aspects to ensure at least 50 renal transplantations per year (100% and provide material motivation to the treatment team proportional to the activity of organ donation and transplantation. Finally, 93% of the respondents suggested suitable moral motivation of the donors.

  6. Assessment Methods of Quality of Life of Living Organ Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gautier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of quality of life of living organ donors in transplantation by questionnaires has increasingly become the subject of clinical studies. However, there are no unified criteria and standard norms of quality of life. Each questionnaire has its own criteria and evaluation scale. This review presents the main general questionnaires that have been applied worldwide for the quality of life assessment of living kidney and liver donors. Special questionnaires used to refine the parameters of quality of life and their coordination with common questionnaires are considered. Optimal questionnaire to detect quality of life in modern research for living organ donors is identified.

  7. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  8. Prevalence of HIV positive blood donors among screened ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2006-04-03

    Apr 3, 2006 ... Department of Physiology, Obafemi Awolowo College of Health Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching. Hospital, Sagamu ... prevalence of HIV positive donors among the screened volunteers who satisfied the criteria for blood donation was ... effect on life and socio-economic activities (Fredrikson.

  9. Liver transplantation utilizing old donor organs: a German single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchfuss, F; Voigt, R; Dittmar, Y; Heise, M; Settmacher, U

    2010-01-01

    Due to the current profound lack of suitable donor organs, transplant centers are increasingly forced to accept so-called marginal organs. One criterion for marginal donors is the donor age >65 years. We have presented herein the impact of higher donor age on graft and patient survival. Since 2004, 230 liver transplantations have been performed at our center, including 54 donor organs (23.5%) from individuals >65 years of age. We performed a retrospective analysis of recipient and graft survivals. The overall 1-year mortality was 22.2% (12/54) among recipients of organs from older donors versus 19.5% among recipients whose donors were organs were grouped according to age, the 1-year mortality in patients receiving organs from donors aged 65-69 years was 30% (6/20); 70-74 years, 29.4% (5/17); and donors >75 years, 5.9% (1/17). There was no significant correlation between mortality rate and the number of additional criteria of a marginal donor organ. The current lack of donor organs forces transplant centers to accept organs from older individuals; increasingly older patients are being recruited for the donor pool. Our results showed that older organs may be transplanted with acceptable outcomes. This observation was consistent with data from the current literature. It should be emphasized, however, that caution is advised when considering the acceptance of older organs for patients with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis.

  10. Validation of the donor risk index in orthotopic liver transplantation within the Eurotransplant region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Joris J.; Braat, Andries E.; Adam, Rene; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Putter, Hein; Kooreman, Nigel G.; Rahmel, Axel O.; Porte, Robert J.; Rogiers, Xavier; Ringers, Jan

    In Eurotransplant, more than 50% of liver allografts come from extended criteria donors (ECDs). However, not every ECD is the same. The limits of their use are being explored. A continuous scoring system for analyzing donor risk has been developed within the Organ Procurement and Transplantation

  11. Donor attention to reading materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S F; Osmond, L; Choquet, K; Yi, Q-L; Goldman, M

    2015-11-01

    Mandatory predonation reading materials inform donors about risk factors for transmissible disease, possible complications of donation and changes to the donation process. We aimed to assess the attention to predonation reading materials and factors which may affect attention. A national survey in 2008 of 18,108 blood donors asked about self-assessed attention to reading the materials. In face-to-face interviews, 441 donors completed additional questions about reading the materials and a literacy test. Qualitative interviews of 27 donors assessed their approach to reading. In the national survey, most of the first-time donors said they read all or most of the materials (90.9% first-time vs. 57.6% repeat donors, P reading them carefully (P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read, most knew that donors are informed of positive transmissible disease test results (97.1%, 95.5, 98.0 P > 0.05), but fewer recalled seeing the definition of sex (77.2%, 56.9, 24.2 P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read were compared (P > 0.05). Qualitative interviews showed that donors are reluctant to read any more than necessary and decide based on perceived importance or relevance. Attention to predonation reading materials tends to be better among first-time donors. The effectiveness is limited by low motivation to read, especially for repeat donors, as well as poor literacy. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. Lung Procurement from a Donor on ECMO Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewei, Ren; Abu Saleh, Walid K; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Bruckner, Brian A; Suarez, Eddie; Loebe, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old man with congestive heart failure who became a candidate for organ donation after anoxic brain injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) who was on a venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. On visualization, the donor's lung was acceptable for lung transplantation to a 68-year-old male patient with a chronic history of pulmonary fibrosis. Right single-lung implantation was successfully performed in the recipient. Herein, we report a case that highlights our institution's result suggesting that the use of a lung previously on ECMO support can safely and potentially expand the donor lung pool in carefully selected patients.

  13. Knee donor-site morbidity after mosaicplasty - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Renato; Vasta, Sebastiano; Pereira, Rogério; Pereira, Hélder; Papalia, Rocco; Karahan, Mustafa; Oliveira, J Miguel; Reis, Rui L; Espregueira-Mendes, João

    2016-12-01

    Mosaicplasty has been associated with good short- to long-term results. Nevertheless, the osteochondral harvesting is restricted to the donor-site area available and it may lead to significant donor-site morbidity. Provide an overview of donor-site morbidity associated with harvesting of osteochondral plugs from the knee joint in mosaicplasty procedure. Comprehensive search using Pubmed, Cochrane Library, SPORTDiscus and CINAHL databases was carried out through 10(th) October of 2016. As inclusion criteria, all English-language studies that assessed the knee donor-site morbidity after mosaicplasty were accepted. The outcomes were the description and rate of knee donor-site morbidity, sample's and cartilage defect's characterization and mosaicplasty-related features. Correlation between mosaicplasty features and rate of morbidity was performed. The methodological and reporting quality were assessed according to Coleman's methodology score. Twenty-one studies were included, comprising a total of 1726 patients, with 1473 and 268 knee and ankle cartilage defects were included. The defect size ranged from 0.85 cm(2) to 4.9 cm(2) and most commonly 3 or less plugs (averaging 2.9 to 9.4 mm) were used. Donor-site for osteochondral harvesting included margins of the femoral trochlea (condyles), intercondylar notch, patellofemoral joint and upper tibio-fibular joint. Mean donor-site morbidity was 5.9 % and 19.6 % for knee and ankle mosaicplasty procedures, respectively. Concerning knee-to-knee mosaicplasty procedures, the most common donor-site morbidity complaints were patellofemoral disturbances (22 %) and crepitation (31 %), and in knee-to-ankle procedures there was a clear tendency for pain or instability during daily living or sports activities (44 %), followed by patellofemoral disturbances, knee stiffness and persistent pain (13 % each). There was no significant correlation between rate of donor-site morbidity and size of the defect, number and size of the

  14. Impact of donor cardiac arrest on heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerland, Kevin W; Castleberry, Anthony W; Williams, Judson B; Daneshmand, Mani A; Ali, Ayyaz A; Milano, Carmelo A

    2013-08-01

    Cardiac transplantation is an effective therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure, but it is still hindered by the lack of donor organs. A history of donor cardiac arrest raises trepidation regarding the possibility of poor post-transplant outcomes. The impact of donor cardiac arrest following successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation on heart transplant outcomes is unknown. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the impact of donor cardiac arrest on orthotropic heart transplantation using the United Network for Organ Sharing database. We performed a secondary longitudinal analysis of all cardiac transplants performed between April 1994 and December 2011 through the United Network for Organ Sharing registry. Multiorgan transplants, repeat transplants, and pediatric recipients were excluded. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier methods as well as multivariate adjusted logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard models. A total of 19,980 patients were analyzed. In 856 cases, the donors had histories of cardiac arrest, and in the remaining 19,124 cases, there was no history of donor cardiac arrest. The unadjusted 1-, 5-, and 10-year actuarial survival rates between the arrest and the nonarrest groups were not significantly different. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated no difference in survival in the donor arrest group at 30 days, 1 year, or 3 years. Furthermore, the adjusted Cox proportional hazard model for cumulative survival also showed no survival difference between the 2 groups. If standard recipient and donor transplantation criteria are met, a history of donor cardiac arrest should not prohibit the potential consideration of an organ for transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Haemovigilance donors: methods and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebibo, Danielle; Danic, Bruno

    2007-05-01

    There is no official definition of haemovigilance donors. However, it concerns the observation and management of Serious Adverse Events observed in blood donors (SAEDs), Post Donation Informations (PDI), and donor epidemiologic survey. The French Decree of 1 February 2006 imposes the declaration of the SAEDs. In 2006, 196 SAEDs were notified for 2599978 donations (7.5/100,000 donations). The incidence of the SAEDs was of 7/100,000 whole blood donations and 10.7/100,000 aphaeresis donations. Donors that are more susceptible to present a SAED are: women, women under 30, repeat donor and aphaeresis donor. For 2/3 of donors having presented a SAED, a medical consultation was prescribed and 1/3 was hospitalized. Vasovagal reaction is the most frequent category. Seven thousand three hundred and sixty one PDI were notified in 2005. The risks of infection represented the principal cause (mainly ENT). Concerning donor epidemiologic survey, the viral residual risk clearly decreased since 1992 and for the period of 2003-2005 it 1/2600000 for HIV, 1/6500000 for HCV and 1/1000000 for HBV. The first national data already give useful information. This information will permit a better care of blood donors and of blood component recipients as well.

  16. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  17. TRIPLE ACTION PALATE EXPANDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Yordanova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Malocclusion correction essentially involves expansion of the maxilla, protrusion of anterior teeth and opening the bite. Expansion is often the stage preceding the treatment with fixed appliances. The elevation of the occlusion using accomplished with different devices (bite planes -fixed or removable, composite material on the occlusall surface of molars carries the risk of breaking or debonding them.The present article proposes an expanding appliance with triple action as a therapeutic means of choice in an orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. The expander can simultaneously be used to protrude upper teeth, to expand the upper jaw and disarticulate the occlusion. It can be easily fabricated in clinical conditions, causes no discomfort and does not hamper oral hygiene because it can be removed and cleaned.

  18. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute retrovirus epidemiology donor studies (Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study and Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II): twenty years of research to advance blood product safety and availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Steven; King, Melissa R; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L; Glynn, Simone A

    2012-10-01

    The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS), conducted from 1989 to 2001, and the REDS-II, conducted from 2004 to 2012, were National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded, multicenter programs focused on improving blood safety and availability in the United States. The REDS-II also included international study sites in Brazil and China. The 3 major research domains of REDS/REDS-II have been infectious disease risk evaluation, blood donation availability, and blood donor characterization. Both programs have made significant contributions to transfusion medicine research methodology by the use of mathematical modeling, large-scale donor surveys, innovative methods of repository sample storage, and establishing an infrastructure that responded to potential emerging blood safety threats such as xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus. Blood safety studies have included protocols evaluating epidemiologic and/or laboratory aspects of human immunodeficiency virus, human T-lymphotropic virus 1/2, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, West Nile virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 8, parvovirus B19, malaria, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, influenza, and Trypanosoma cruzi infections. Other analyses have characterized blood donor demographics, motivations to donate, factors influencing donor return, behavioral risk factors, donors' perception of the blood donation screening process, and aspects of donor deferral. In REDS-II, 2 large-scale blood donor protocols examined iron deficiency in donors and the prevalence of leukocyte antibodies. This review describes the major study results from over 150 peer-reviewed articles published by these 2 REDS programs. In 2011, a new 7-year program, the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III, was launched. The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III expands beyond donor-based research to include studies of blood transfusion recipients in the hospital setting and adds a third country, South Africa

  19. Artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID): heterogeneity in sperm banking facilities in a single country (Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, A; Dhont, N; Vandormael, E; Cox, A; Klerkx, E; Creemers, E; Ombelet, W

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high inflow of foreign patients seeking cross-border reproductive care in Belgium and the increased number of lesbian couples and single women who call for artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID), Belgian sperm banks nowadays face a shortage in donor sperm. However, since there is no central registration system for sperm donors in Belgium, no figures are currently available supporting this statement. Therefore a study was performed to obtain a detailed overview of the sperm banking facilities in Belgium. Questionnaires were sent to all Belgian centres for assisted reproduction with laboratory facilities (n = 18) to report on their sperm banking methods. The results showed that 82% of the centres rely partially or completely on foreign donor sperm. Moreover, four of the thirteen centres that have their own sperm bank use imported donor sperm in > 95% AID cycles. Our results show that in 63% of the Belgian AID cycles imported Danish donor sperm is being used. Donor recruitment is mainly performed through the centre's website (61%) or by distributing flyers in the centre (46%) and 9 to 180 potential donors have been recruited per centre in 2013. Eventually, 15 to 50% of these candidate donors were accepted. Different criteria for donor acceptance are handled by the centres: donor age limits range from 18-25 to 36-46 years old, and thresholds for sperm normality differ considerably. We can conclude that a wide variation in methods associated with sperm banking is observed in Belgian centres.

  20. Negative peri-donation events among whole blood donors in a blood bank in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foluke A. Fasola

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence and sustenance of the blood bank depends on blood donors. It is imperative that the donation experience is satisfactory for the donors. Therefore this study was carried out to determine the frequency of undesirable events experienced by the blood donor as part of donor haemovigilance. This was a retrospective descriptive study of the events that occurred amongst the blood donors of the blood bank of a tertiary institution. The blood donor incident book was reviewed for the period of six months. Negative undesirable events occurred in 2% of the donor populations, of which 45.8% could not complete the blood donation process while only 16.7% completed the blood donation process. Mild vasovagal attack occurred in 0.2% of the donor population. Undisclosed deferrable risk factors/ behaviours were identified by the phlebotomist in the bleeding room which made donors unfit for donation even though they had passed the donor screening criteria. This accounted for 20.8% of those with negative experience. Guidelines are required to identify donors that are not likely to complete donation to avoid wastage of time, blood, resources and reduce undesirable experiences.

  1. National decline in donor heart utilization with regional variability: 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khush, K K; Zaroff, J G; Nguyen, J; Menza, R; Goldstein, B A

    2015-03-01

    The severe shortage of donor hearts limits the availability of transplantation for the growing population of patients with end-stage heart disease. We examined national trends in donor heart acceptance for transplant. OPTN data were analyzed for all potential adult cardiac organ donors between 1995 and 2010. Donor heart disposition was categorized as transplanted, declined for transplant or other. We studied changes in the probability of donor heart acceptance according to demographic and clinical characteristics, nationwide and by UNOS region. Of 82 053 potential donor hearts, 34% were accepted and 48% were declined (18% used for other purposes). There was a significant decrease in donor heart acceptance from 44% in 1995 to 29% in 2006, and subsequent increase to 32% in 2010. Older donor age, female sex and medical co-morbidities predicted non-acceptance. Donor age and co-morbidities increased during the study period, with a concomitant decrease in acceptance of hearts from donors with undesirable characteristics. Overall, predictors of heart non-use were similar across UNOS regions, although utilization varied between regions. Regional variation suggests a potential to improve heart acceptance rates in under-performing regions, and supports research and policy efforts aimed at establishing evidence-based criteria for donor heart evaluation and acceptance for transplantation. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Transplantation Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Use of donors who have suffered cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarczyk, Kevin; Osswald, Brigitte R; Pizanis, Nikolaus; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Massoudy, Parwis; Heckmann, Jens; Jakob, Heinz G; Kamler, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Shortage of donors is one of the major limitations in lung transplantation (LuTX) and an aggressive expansion of criteria for donor selection has been proposed. This study evaluates the outcome of recipients of pulmonary grafts coming from resuscitated donors when compared with recipients of non-resuscitated donors. We retrospectively analyzed the donor and recipient charts of all double LuTX performed at our institution between 2000 and 2008 with regard to the performance of donor-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Out of 186 eligible transplants, 22 patients (11.8%) received lungs from donors who have suffered cardiac arrest (CA) and subsequent CPR. Mean duration of CPR was 15.2 ± 11.3 min. Terminal laboratory profiles of CPR donors and non-CPR donors were similar as were ventilation time and paO(2)/FiO(2) ratio before organ harvesting or chest X-ray. CPR-donor status did not affect the following indices of graft function: length of postoperative ventilation, paO(2)/FiO(2) ratio up to 48 h and lung function up to 60 months. Length of intensive care and hospital stay, need for inotropic support and 30-day mortality were not significantly different for the transplantation of CPR or no-CPR donor lungs. One- and 3-year survival rates were comparable as well with 84.4% and 66.3% for CPR donors versus 88.5% and 69.8% no-CPR donors. This study indicates that transplantation of lungs from resuscitated donors may not affect outcome after LuTX. Therefore, donor history of CA should not automatically preclude LuTX. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Laparoscopy-Assisted Spleen-Preserving Distal Pancreatectomy for Living-Donor Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, S; Noguchi, H; Kaku, K; Kurihara, K; Miyasaka, Y; Okabe, Y; Nakamura, U; Ohtsuka, T; Nakamura, M

    2017-06-01

    Living pancreas transplantation plays an important role in the treatment of patients with severe type 1 diabetes. However, pancreatectomy is very invasive for the donor, and less-invasive surgical procedures are needed. Although some reports have described hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery for distal pancreatectomy in living-donor operations, less-invasive laparoscopy-assisted (LA) procedures are expected to increase the donor pool. We herein report the outcomes of four cases of LA spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy (Warshaw technique [WT]) in living pancreas donors. Four living pancreas donors underwent LA-WT at our institution from September 2010 to January 2013. All donors fulfilled the donor criteria established by the Japan Society for Pancreas and Islet Transplantation. The median donor age was 54 years. Two donors underwent left nephrectomy in addition to LA-WT for simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation. The median donor operation time for pancreatectomy was 340.5 minutes. The median pancreas warm ischemic time was 3 minutes. The median donor blood loss was 246 g. All recipients immediately achieved insulin independence. One donor required reoperation because of obstructive ileus resulting from a port-site hernia. Another donor developed a pancreatic fistula (International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula grade B), which was controlled with conservative management. After a maximum follow-up of 73 months, no clinically relevant adverse events had occurred. These results were comparable with those of previous studies concerning living-donor pancreas transplantation. The LA-WT is a safe and acceptable operation for living-donor pancreas transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Which Donor for Uterus Transplants: Brain-Dead Donor or Living Donor? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoué, Vincent; Vigneau, Cécile; Duros, Solène; Boudjema, Karim; Levêque, Jean; Piver, Pascal; Aubard, Yves; Gauthier, Tristan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate and compare the pros and cons of using living donors or brain-dead donors in uterus transplantation programs, 2 years after the first worldwide live birth after uterus transplantation. The Medline database and the Central Cochrane Library were used to locate uterine transplantation studies carried out in human or nonhuman primates. All types of articles (case reports, original studies, meta-analyses, reviews) in English or French were considered for inclusion. Overall, 92 articles were screened and 44 were retained for review. Proof of concept for human uterine transplantation was demonstrated in 2014 with a living donor. Compared with a brain-dead donor strategy, a living donor strategy offers greater possibilities for planning surgery and also decreases cold ischemia time, potentially translating into a higher success rate. However, this approach poses ethical problems, given that the donor is exposed to surgery risks but does not derive any direct benefit. A brain-dead donor strategy is more acceptable from an ethical viewpoint, but its feasibility is currently unproven, potentially owing to a lack of compatible donors, and is associated with a longer cold ischemia time and a potentially higher rejection rate. The systematic review demonstrates that uterine transplantation is a major surgical innovation for the treatment of absolute uterine factor infertility. Living and brain-dead donor strategies are not mutually exclusive and, in view of the current scarcity of uterine grafts and the anticipated future rise in demand, both will probably be necessary.

  5. Risk factors for HIV seropositivity among first-time blood donors in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, W; Mvere, D; Shamu, R; Katzenstein, D

    1998-03-01

    Factors associated with an increased likelihood of HIV infection among newly recruited blood donors in Zimbabwe are identified. Their feasibility as criteria for exclusion from donation is assessed. A self-administered survey including demographic and behavioral questions was completed by 1199 first-time, volunteer blood donors in Harare, Zimbabwe. Methods for subject recruitment and laboratory screening followed usual blood bank protocols. Fifteen percent of subjects were HIV positive. Factors significantly associated with HIV seropositivity at the pblood safety and reducing operating costs worldwide. Identification of efficient donor selection criteria requires knowledge of the local epidemiology of HIV infection and the asking of questions that are likely to be answered accurately.

  6. Heart Procurement from a Donor on Venovenous ECMO Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gopal; Tsukashita, Masaki; Biscotti, Mauer; Costa, Joseph; Lambert, Daniel; Bacchetta, Matthew; Takayama, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old woman with acute respiratory distress syndrome and became a candidate for organ donation after anoxic brain injury and was on a venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) support. On preoperative evaluation and gross examination, the donor's heart was acceptable for heart transplantation to a 62-year-old female patient with a history of nonischemic cardiomyopathy with a HeartMate II mechanical assist device. Orthotopic heart transplantation was successfully performed in the recipient. We report a case that suggests that the procurement of a heart from a donor on ECMO support can potentially expand the donor heart pool in carefully selected patients.

  7. Expandable gastroretentive dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausner, Eytan A; Lavy, Eran; Friedman, Michael; Hoffman, Amnon

    2003-06-24

    Expandable gastroretentive dosage forms (GRDFs) have been designed for the past 3 decades. They were originally created for possible veterinary use, but later the design was modified for enhanced drug therapy in humans. These GRDFs are easily swallowed and reach a significantly larger size in the stomach due to swelling or unfolding processes that prolong their gastric retention time (GRT). After drug release, their dimensions are minimized with subsequent evacuation from the stomach. Gastroretentivity is enhanced by the combination of substantial dimensions with high rigidity of the dosage form to withstand the peristalsis and mechanical contractility of the stomach. Positive results were obtained in preclinical and clinical studies evaluating GRT of expandable GRDFs. Narrow absorption window drugs compounded in such systems have improved in vivo absorption properties. These findings are an important step towards the implementation of expandable GRDFs in the clinical setting. The current review deals with expandable GRDFs reported in articles and patents, and describes the physiological basis of their design. Using the dog as a preclinical screening model prior to human studies, relevant imaging techniques and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic aspects of such delivery systems are also discussed.

  8. Assessment of dysplastic hematopoiesis: lessons from healthy bone marrow donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Stefani; Schetelig, Johannes; Lorenz, Kerstin; Kramer, Michael; Ireland, Robin; Schuler, Ulrich; Ordemann, Rainer; Rall, Gabi; Schaich, Markus; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Kroschinsky, Frank

    2012-05-01

    According to WHO 2008 guidelines, the required percentage of cells manifesting dysplasia in the bone marrow to qualify as significant is 10% or over in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages, but this threshold is controversial. No 'normal' values have been established. Therefore, we investigated dyshematopoiesis in bone marrow aspirate squash preparations of 120 healthy bone marrow donors. Bone marrow squash slides of 120 healthy unrelated bone marrow donors were examined independently by 4 experienced morphologists. Samples were taken from the first aspiration during the harvest. Bone marrow preparation and assessment were performed according to WHO recommendations and ICSH guidelines. More than 10% dysmyelopoiesis could be detected in 46% of bone marrow aspirate squash preparations with 26% in 2 or more cell lineages and 7% in 3 cell lineages in healthy bone marrow donors. Donors under the age of 30 years exhibited more dysgranulopoietic changes and dysmegakaryopoietic changes (Pdonors. Female donors showed more dysgranulopoietic changes than male donors (P = 0.025). The concordance rate between the 4 investigators was modest in dysgranulopoiesis but poor in dyserythropoiesis and dysmegakaryopoiesis. The poor reliability of the 10% cut off was partly related to the proximity of the current criteria to the observed cut-off mean values of the normal population. These findings question the current WHO threshold of the 10% or over necessary for the percentage of cells manifesting dysplasia to be considered significant, and suggest that either a higher threshold would be more appropriate or different thresholds should be set for each lineage.

  9. Urinary biomarkers after donor nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendijk-van den Akker, Judith M; Warlé, Michiel C; van Zuilen, Arjan D.; Kloke, Heinrich J; Wever, Kim E; d'Ancona, Frank C H; Ӧzdemir, Denise M D; Wetzels, Jack F M; Hoitsma, Andries J

    2015-01-01

    As the beginning of living-donor kidney transplantation, physicians have expressed concern about the possibility that unilateral nephrectomy can be harmful to a healthy individual. To investigate whether the elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) during laparoscopic donor nephrectomy causes early

  10. Successful heart transplantation after prolonged cardiac arrest and extracorporeal life support in organ donor-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Diego; Gasche, Yvan; Banfi, Carlo; Stiasny, Brian; Bendjelid, Karim; Giraud, Raphaël

    2015-12-18

    Although heart transplantation is a successful therapy for patients suffering from end-stage heart failure, the therapeutic is limited by the lack of organs. Donor cardiac arrest is a classic hindrance to heart retrieval as it raises issues on post-transplant outcomes. The present case reports a successful heart transplantation after prolonged donor cardiac arrest (total lowflow time of 95 minutes) due to anaphylactic shock necessitating extracorporeal life support. We further provide an overview of the current evidence and outcomes of heart transplantation in cases of donor cardiac arrest. Providing that donor and recipient criteria are respected, donor cardiac arrest does not seem to be an adverse predictor in heart transplantation.

  11. Donor anxiety, needle pain, and syncopal reactions combine to determine retention: a path analysis of two-year donor return data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Christopher R; France, Janis L; Wissel, Mary Ellen; Ditto, Blaine; Dickert, Tara; Himawan, Lina K

    2013-09-01

    Efforts to expand the donor pool by recruiting younger donors have resulted in higher numbers of initial donations, but retention of young donors continues to be challenging. Path analysis was used to examine the simultaneous relationships among syncopal reactions, donation anxiety, needle pain, donor satisfaction, and donation intention in predicting repeat donation. Participants included 421 first- and second-time donors recruited for a study comparing the effects of predonation water loading with and without the use of applied muscle tension during donation (52% female, 60.8% first-time donor, mean age 20.3 years). For this longitudinal follow-up study, donor database records were accessed 2 years after the index donation to assess repeat donation. Results of a series of path analyses demonstrated the influential role of donor anxiety in shaping donor retention (final model χ(2) = 35.75, root mean square error of approximation 0.03, comparative fit index 0.98, weighted root mean square residual 0.74). First, anxiety exerted a direct negative influence on donation intention, the proximal and sole direct predictor of repeat donation. Second, anxiety increased the likelihood of donor-reported needle pain, adversely affecting donation satisfaction and, subsequently, donation intention. Finally, anxiety was associated with donor ratings of syncopal reactions through its impact on needle pain, which also contributed to decreased donation intention. These results provide novel evidence that donation anxiety plays a central role in shaping future donation behavior. Individual differences in anxiety must be considered when developing and testing strategies to enhance blood donor retention. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  12. Attitudes towards organ donor advocacy among Swedish intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Anna; Lennerling, Annette; Fridh, Isabell; Rizell, Magnus; Lovén, Charlotte; Flodén, Anne

    2015-05-01

    To explore the attitudes of Swedish intensive care nurses towards organ donor advocacy. The concept of organ donor advocacy is critical to nurses who care for potential donors in order to facilitate organ donation (OD). A retrospective cross-sectional study was employed. Inclusion criteria in this survey were to be a registered nurse and to work in a Swedish intensive care unit (ICU). Participants were identified by the Swedish association of health professionals. A number of 502 Swedish ICU nurses answered the 32-item questionnaire Attitudes Towards Organ Donor Advocacy Scale (ATODAS), covering the five dimensions of organ donor advocacy: attitudes towards championing organ donation at a structural hospital level, or at a political and research level, attitudes towards actively and personally safeguarding the will and wishes of the potential organ donor, or by using a more professional approach and finally to safeguard the will and wishes of the relatives. Data were analysed with the SPSS version 18·0 and the results were assessed by using Student's t-test and post hoc test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), χ(2) , Pearson's correlation and regression analysis. The most favoured advocacy action was safeguarding the POD's will and wishes by a professional approach, closely followed by actively and personally safeguarding the POD's will and wishes. Nurses at local hospitals reported a more positive attitude towards organ donor advocacy overall compared with nurses at larger regional or university hospitals. Important factors leading to positive attitudes were seniority, working experience, participating in conversations with relatives, caring for brain-dead persons and private experiences from OD or organ transplantation. Intensive and critical care nurses with short working experience in university hospitals showed the least positive attitude towards organ donor advocacy. This is problematic because many ODs and all transplantations are performed in university

  13. Ethical issues relating to renal transplantation from prediabetic living donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Valdez-Martínez, Edith; Bedolla, Miguel

    2014-06-16

    In Mexico, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end - stage kidney disease, and some patients may be transplant candidates. Organ supply is limited because of cultural issues. And, there is a lack of standardized clinical guidelines regarding organ donation. These issues highlight the tension surrounding the fact that living donors are being selected despite being prediabetic. This article presents, examines and discusses using the principles of non-maleficience, autonomy, justice and the constitutionally guaranteed right to health, the ethical considerations that arise from considering a prediabetic person as a potential kidney donor. Diabetes is an absolute contraindication for donating a kidney. However, the transplant protocols most frequently used in Mexico do not consider prediabetes as exclusion criteria. In prediabetic persons there are well known metabolic alterations that may compromise the long - term outcomes of the transplant if such donors are accepted. Even so, many of them are finally included because there are not enough donor candidates. Both, families and hospitals face the need to rapidly accept prediabetic donors before the clinical conditions of the recipient and the evolution of the disease exclude him/her as a transplant candidate; however, when using a kidney potentially damaged by prediabetes, neither the donor's nor the recipient's long term health is usually considered.Considering the ethical implication as well as the clinical and epidemiological evidence, we conclude that prediabetic persons are not suitable candidates for kidney donation. This recommendation should be taken into consideration by Mexican health institutions who should rewrite their transplant protocols. We argue that the decision to use a kidney from a living donor known to be pre-diabetic or from those persons with family history of T2DM, obesity, hypertension, or renal failure, should be considered unethical in Mexico if the donor bases the decision to

  14. Organ utilization from increased infectious risk donors: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Humar, Atul; Payne, Clare; Kumar, Deepali

    2017-12-01

    Donors with an increased risk of transmitting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), or hepatitis C virus (HCV) (increased risk donors [IRDs]) are a potential source of organs for transplant. Organs from IRDs can be utilized with appropriate recipient consent and post-transplant follow-up. We reviewed the characteristics and utilization of IRDs in our Organ Procurement Organization (OPO) over a 2-year period. Donor information from April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2015 was obtained through the OPO database. Only consented donors were included. Donors were categorized as IRDs according to Health Canada/Canadian Standards Association (CSA) criteria. A total of 494 potential donors were identified, of which 92 (18.6%) were IRDs. Of these, at least one organ was transplanted from 76 (82.6%). Risk factors for IRDs included injection drug user (IDU) (12%), men having sex with men (MSM) (7%), commercial sex worker (CSW) (4%), and incarceration (24%). Fifty-nine percent (253/429) of IRD organs were utilized. The most frequently used organ was kidney, followed by liver. Median number of organs recovered per IRD was 3 (interquartile range: 2-5). Nucleic acid testing (NAT) was performed in 18.5% (17/92) of IRDs. Reasons for NAT were IDU (n = 2), MSM (n = 2), CSW (n = 2), and previous incarceration (n = 7). Organ utilization from donors that had NAT was similar to donors who did not (94% vs 80%, P = .29). Follow-up NAT was done in infectious risk from such organs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. An update of blood donor recruitment and retention in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A healthy blood donor pool has to be well maintained in order to achieve self sufficiency in blood supply. Not only should new and young donors should be attracted and recruited into the pool so as to compensate the loss from drop out and deferred donors. At the same time, previous donors should be also actively retained to ensure they can come regularly. The status of donor recruitment and retention in Hong Kong is reviewed here to highlight the current difficulties in coping with increasing blood demand from an ageing population, stringent donor eligibility criteria and quality requirement in the blood collection. With a systemic analysis of the donation pattern, proposal is put forward to tackle the challenging problems.

  16. Perioperative period in cardiac transplantation from donors with brain death due to methanol poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful use of donor hearts from people died of methanol poisoning helps reducing the deficit of donor organs for patients requiring urgent cardiac transplantation [3]. We present our experience of successful cardiac transplantations from 2 donors who died due to methanol poisoning. Given the possibility of performing a cardiac transplant from this group of donors a protocol has been developed at the V.I. Shumakov Federal Research Center of Transplantology and Artificial Organs of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation which includes clinical, laboratory and instrumental criteria for the selection of heart donor and recipient. The possibility of delayed onset myocardial contractile dysfunction due to methanol poisoning means that a longer conditioningperiod is vital as well as compulsory clinical, laboratory and expert chocardiographic examinations of the potential donor heart.

  17. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of lung transplantations is limited by a general lack of donor organs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to optimise and evaluate marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. We describe our experiences with EVLP in Denmark during the first year after its...... introduction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted by prospective registration of donor offers and lung transplantations in Denmark from 1 May 2012 to 30 April 2013. Donor lungs without any contraindications were transplanted in the traditional manner. Taken for EVLP were donor lungs that were...... otherwise considered transplantable, but failed to meet the usual criteria due to possible contusions or because they were from donors with sepsis or unable to pass the oxygenation test. RESULTS: In the study period, seven of 33 Danish lung transplantations were made possible due to EVLP. One patient died...

  18. NORMOTHERMIC EXTRACORPOREAL PERFUSION IN SITU IN DECEASED ORGAN DONORS WITH IRREVERSIBLE CARDIAC ARREST AND ONE HOUR OF ASYSTOLE. 5-YEAR OUTCOMES OF KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Skvortsov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The global shortage of deceased organ donors caused increasing interest to the transplant program based on the use of organs from the donors with sudden irreversible cardiac arrest, or asystolic donors (DCD. Ischemia-reperfusion injury as a result of cardiac arrest remains a key problem that limits the use of organs from DCD. Our clinical study was intended to determine the acceptability of renal transplants derived from the DCD using extracorporeal perfusion in situ after 60 minutes of asystole. Materials and methods. In 2009–2014, St. Petersburg Organ Procurement Organization (OPO obtained kidneys from 29 DCD with critically expanded warm ischemic time (WIT. The design of this study was approved by the Scientifi c Board and Ethics Committee of the State Research Institute for Emergency Medicine (Decision 7/0615/09. Initially, no one of died patients was considered as potential organ donors. In case of failed advanced CPR the death of a patient was declared initiating the protocol of subnormothermic extracorporeal abdominal perfusion with ECMO, thrombolytics (strepokinase 1.5 mln U, and LD. The procedures were established by the authorized OPO team which arrived with perfusion equipment in 30–40 minutes after declaration of donors’ death. Mean WIT was 58.1 (19.39 minutes (Mean (SD. Resuscitated grafts were transplanted into 58 recipients. The outcomes of transplantation of resuscitated kidneys were compared to those of 112 KTx from 115 brain death donors (BDDs. Results. Immediate functioning of kidney grafts was observed in 28 (48.3% of 58 recipients. There were 4 cases of primary graft non-function. By the end of the fi rst post-transplant year there was an acute rejection rate of 12.1% (9 episodes of rejection in the DCD group vs. 23.2% (26 episodes of rejection in the BDD group (p < 0.05. The actuarial 5-year graft survival rate was 82.8% (n = 48 in DCD group, and 87.5% (n = 98 in BDD group (p > 0.05. Creatinine levels at the end

  19. Voluntary whole-blood donors, and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors: motivation to donate, altruism and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Michael; Lattacher, Helene; Janda, Monika

    2005-10-01

    To establish if voluntary whole-blood donors and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors may differ in their motivation to donate, altruism, aggression and autoaggression. Whole-blood (n=51), platelet (n=52) and plasma donors (n=48) completed a battery of validated questionnaires while waiting to donate. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of variance and t-tests were performed to detect differences between groups as noted. Altruism (mean=40.2) was slightly higher in whole-blood donors than in platelet (mean=38.3) and plasma donors (mean=39.1) (p=0.07). Blood donors (mean=2.8) scored lower in the spontaneous aggression measure than platelet (mean=4.1) and plasma donors (mean=4.4) (p=0.01). Plasma donors (mean=4.9) had higher auto-aggression than whole-blood donors and platelet donors (mean for both groups=3.4) (p=0.01). Differences between the three groups were mediated by sociodemographic variables (MANCOVA). Whole-blood donors donated to help others, platelet and plasma donors mostly to receive the compensation. However, those platelet and plasma donors, who would continue to donate without compensation were similar in altruism and aggression to whole-blood donors. While most platelet donors and plasma donors were motivated by the compensation, those who stated that they would continue to donate without compensation had altruism and aggression scores similar to voluntary whole-blood donors.

  20. Expandable LED array interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  1. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  2. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  3. Malaria parasitemia in apparently healthy blood donors in north-central Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen, James G; Barnabas, Obioma; Damulak, Dapus; Ntuhun, Bala D; Lugos, M D; Nyary, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of transmissible malaria in apparently healthy blood donors in the city of Jos in north-central Nigeria. We collected blood specimens from individuals who had passed the screening criteria for blood donation. We created thin and thick blood films using the blood film template provided by the World Health Organization (WHO). The films were allowed to air dry; then, we stained them using a 3% Giemsa solution and examined them microscopically. In specimens that tested positive the malaria species was identified. The highest prevalence of malaria was in donors aged between 31 and 40 years (65.1%), whereas the lowest prevalence was in donors aged 20 years or younger (25.0%). Plasmodium falciparum was the predominant species (98.0%); the least prevalent was Plasmodium malariae (2.0%). In male donors the prevalence of malaria parasitemia was 62.0%; the prevalence in female donors was 62.5%. Among paid donors the malaria parasitemia rate was 82.3%, compared with 22.4% in volunteer donors. Donors who reported their occupation as businessperson (individual who engages in commercial trade, mostly outdoors in a market environment) had the highest prevalence, at 94.3%; students had the lowest prevalence, at 31.9%. A high percentage of blood donors in Jos, Nigeria, actually harbor malaria, which is cause for concern and more careful donor screening by healthcare professionals in that region is warranted. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  4. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    Apheresis Centers No Activity ImmunO !!enetic Studies Ob.iective 1 - Influence ofHLA Mismatches Task 1 - Donor Recipient Pair Proiect No Activity...Haplotype Logic and performance of the algorithm. • Hired replacement business analyst to continue working on business and system requirements for HapLogic...operational processes needed to implement the protocol for long-term donor follow-up. IID.I. Task 3: Period 8 Activity: Expand Immuno - The CIBMTR

  5. Donor milk: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Giuliani,1 Ilaria Rovelli,1 Chiara Peila,1 Stefania Alfonsina Liguori,2 Enrico Bertino,1 Alessandra Coscia1 1SCDU Neonatologia, Dipartimento di Scienze Pediatriche e dell'Adolescenza, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy; 2SC Neonatologia, Ospedale Maria Vittoria, Torino, Italy Abstract: Mother's own milk is widely recognized as the optimal feeding for term infants, but increasing evidence exists of its benefits also for sick and preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units. However, the nutritional needs for appropriate growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of such a particular population of infants should be attentively evaluated, considering also the indication to an appropriate fortification of human milk. The target is to achieve growth potential for preterm newborns while ensuring good metabolic outcomes and normal neurological development. When mother's milk is unavailable or in short supply, donor human milk (DHM represents the second best choice and, although somewhat modified by the Holder pasteurization process, it preserves many benefits when compared to formula, as documented by more and more reports, randomized controlled trials, and meta-analyses published in the past few years. Evidence exists of the protection exerted by DHM from necrotizing enterocolitis, while further studies are required to look at possible beneficial effects regarding infections, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, long-term cardiovascular risk factors, feeding tolerance, neurological outcome, and allergy. Finally, the concern that the use of DHM might decrease preterm infant breastfeeding is being raised. Conversely, publications exist showing that the use of DHM in the neonatal unit increases breastfeeding rates at discharge for infants of very low birth weight. Keywords: human milk, preterm infant feeding, milk bank, breast milk, mother's own milk, pasteurized human milk, fortification

  6. [Long live the kidney donor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fijter, Johan W; Meinders, Arend E

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation offers longer life expectancy and improves quality of life in selected patients with end-stage renal failure. The availability of living donors is critical, particularly to meet the increasing demand and potentially pre-emptive transplantation. In addition, living donor transplantation is associated with better outcomes on comparison with dialysis or transplants from deceased donors. The major disadvantage of living donation is that complications may occur both directly perioperatively and in the long-term. Two recent studies confirmed that the risk of renal failure among selected living donors is extremely low. This implies that there is no need to alter the existing positive attitude towards living donation. Finding a comparable long-term control group with relevant genetic and non-genetic risk factors remains a challenge to studies looking at long-term effects.

  7. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A. S.; Pedersen, O. B.; Magnussen, K.

    2017-01-01

    and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark......, is that routine ferritin measurements and iron supplementation are feasible and effective ways of reducing the proportion of donors with low haemoglobin levels....

  8. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  9. Expanding Your Horizon 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaltenhauser, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Expanding your horizons is a bi-annual “Science Day” for girls aged 11 to 14, held at the University of Geneva on 14 November. The girls had the opportunity to take part in hands-on workshops held by local professional women in the field of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. For the fourth time, CERN was part of this event, offering three workshops as well as a booth at the Discovery Fair, including Higgnite, an interactive visualization of the Higgs Field.

  10. Adverse events and retention of donors of double red cell units by apheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshelashvili, Ketevan; O'meara, Alix; Stern, Martin; Jirout, Zuzana; Pehlic, Vildana; Holbro, Andreas; Buser, Andreas; Sigle, Jörg; Infanti, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Safety of double-erythrocyte (2RBC) collection and reasons for ceasing 2RBC donation were retrospectively analysed in the blood donor population of Basel, Switzerland. Donors with at least 1 2RBC apheresis were included in the study. Minimal requirements were Hb ≥140 g/L and body weight ≥70 kg; serum ferritin (SF) values were measured routinely, but were not part of the selection criteria. 2RBC collections were performed with ALYX devices at 6-month intervals. Adverse events (AEs) were systematically recorded and classified according to the ISBT EHN 2008 criteria. Data of procedures were retrieved from the ALYX software. Demographics, apheresis data and AEs were analysed with descriptive statistics. Data of 4,377 2RBC aphereses performed in 793 donors (779 males) between 1(st) January 2003 and 31(st) May 2015 were evaluated. Mean donor age at first 2RBC donation was 44 years (standard deviation [SD] 21), median number of donations was 4 (interquartile range [IQR] 8); 32% of the donors underwent a single procedure. There were 161 AEs, mostly local haematomas (55%) and vasovagal reactions (20%); fatigue was reported in 6% of the cases and was more frequent than citrate toxicity. Two severe AEs were observed. The most frequent reasons for abandoning 2RBC donation were low SF levels and donor choice (both 11%), but most donors simply did not reply to invitations (16%). Overall, procedure-related causes (AEs, low SF levels, no time for apheresis, inadequate venous access) were observed in 14% of the cases. At the end of the observation period, 40% of the donors were still active blood donors, but only 20% were donating 2RBC. 2RBC donation is overall safe. Donor retention was low over a period of 11 years. An important reason for abandoning 2RBC was the detection of low SF levels. The impact of fatigue on donor retention and the course of iron stores after repeated 6-monthly 2RBC apheresis require further investigation.

  11. Philanthropic Motivations of Community College Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Linnie S.; Duggan, Molly H.

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study surveyed current, lapsed, and major gift donors to explore the impact of college communications on donors' decisions to contribute to the college, the likelihood of donor financial support for various college projects, and the philanthropic motivation profiles of the donors of a midsized, multicampus community college in…

  12. Kidney transplant outcomes from older deceased donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pippias, Maria; Jager, Kitty J; Caskey, Fergus

    2018-01-01

    As the median age of deceased kidney donors rises, updated knowledge of transplant outcomes from older deceased donors in differing donor-recipient age groups is required. Using ERA-EDTA Registry data we determined survival outcomes of kidney allografts donated from the same older deceased donor ...

  13. Transfusion transmissible infections among blood donors from a sub-Himalayan rural tertiary care centre in Darjeeling, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupali Mandal

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Deployment of implicit inclusion-exclusion criteria is high on demand for reducing the prevalence of TTIs, to increase the donor subpopulation strength and ultimately to institute a safe transfusion protocol.

  14. Expanding hollow metal rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Harold B [Evans, GA; Imrich, Kenneth J [Grovetown, GA

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  15. Donor body mass index is an important factor that affects peripheral blood progenitor cell yield in healthy donors after mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Burns, Kevin M; Babic, Aleksandar; Carrum, George; Kennedy, Martha; Segura, Francisco J; Garcia, Salvador; Potts, Sandra; Leveque, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The use of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has rapidly expanded in recent years. Currently, several sources of HPCs are available for transplantation including peripheral blood HPCs (PBPCs), cord blood cells, and marrow cells. Of these, PBPC collection has become the major source of HPCs. An important variable in PBPC collection is the response to PBPC mobilization, which varies significantly and sometime causes mobilization failure. A retrospective study of 69 healthy donors who underwent PBPC donation by leukapheresis was performed. All of these donors received 10 μg/kg/day or more granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for 5 days before PBPC harvest. Donor factors were evaluated and correlated with mobilization responses, as indicated by the precollection CD34 count (pre-CD34). Donors with a pre-CD34 of more than 100 × 10(6) /L had higher body mass index (BMI) compared with donors whose pre-CD34 was 38 × 10(6) to 99 × 10(6) /L or less than 38 × 10(6) /L (32.0 ± 1.04 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 ± 0.93 kg/m(2) vs. 25.9 ± 1.27 kg/m(2) , respectively; p donors with high BMIs had higher pre-CD34 on a per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis compared with donors with low BMIs. BMI is an important factor that affects donor's response to mobilization and consequently the HPC yield. This effect may be due to a relatively high dose of G-CSF administered to donors with higher BMI or due to the presence of unknown intrinsic factors affecting mobilization that correlate with the amount of adipose tissue in each donor. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Healthy donor effect: its magnitude in health research among blood donors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsma, F.; Veldhuizen, I.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Kort, W. de; Vegt, F. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The healthy donor effect has been mentioned as a methodologic problem in blood donor health research. The aim of this study was to investigate different elements of the healthy donor effect. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: First, recent donors (<4 years registered as a donor) were compared

  17. Expanding Slayer Statutes to Elder Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    Common law has a dictum that people must not benefit from their crimes. In years past, states have enacted slayer rules to prevent killers from inheriting from their victims. The specific criteria and applicability of slayer rules vary by jurisdiction. Recently, several states, including Washington, have expanded their slayer rules to disqualify persons from inheriting if they have been involved in abuse or financial exploitation of the deceased. Reviewed herein are the abuse disinheritance laws, the relationship of the laws to concepts of testamentary capacity and undue influence, and the relevance to forensic psychiatric evaluations. © 2015 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  18. Four Criteria for Design Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hodges

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that the adoption of the four criteria we outline will strengthen future design theories and encourage existing design theories to expand or reconfigure in useful directions. We propose four criteria for design theory creation and evaluation. These are (1 the theory should have substantial design applications, and be applicable to any topic; (2 the theory should use propositions—if-then language—as a way of describing, explaining, and predicting actual and existing aspects of designing; (3 where appropriate, a new theory should accept and adopt propositions and language contained in other design theories; and (4 the theory should accommodate, or at least acknowledge, generative activity. We are not proposing a new general design theory—this paper outlines a strong approach to studying and building theory. Please also note that this essay does not pretend to exhaust a topic that has been discussed for at least the last 50 years.

  19. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications.

  20. The use of neoplastic donors to increase the donor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschetti, P; Pretagostini, R; Stabile, D; Peritore, D; Oliveti, A; Gabbrielli, F; Cenci, S; Ricci, A; Vespasiano, F; Grigioni, W F

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the experience of the Centre-Sud Transplant Organization (OCST) area using cadaveric donor with neoplastic diseases to evaluate the possibility of transmission to recipients. From January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2010, the neoplastic risk has been reported to be 5.4% (377/4654 referred donors). In 2003, the number of donors with a tumor and their mean age were respectively: 60 (10.3%) and 59.6 ± 19.9; 2004: 33 (5.2%) and 61.4 ± 15.9; 2005: 32 (6%) and 62.8 ± 15.5; 2006: 46 (7%) and 60.7 ± 19.1; 2007: 51 (7%) and 58.9 ± 16; in 2008: 58 (7%) and 59.7 ± 19.6; 2009: 47 (7%) and 57 ± 26; 2010: 49 (7%) and 64 ± 16. The organ most affected by tumor has been the central nervous system (18%). The tumor was diagnosed before in 325 (86%) cases, versus during organ retrieval in 48 (12.7%) donor operations but before, which four cases (1%) occured after transplantation. According to the histological types and grades, 28 evaluated donors (8.2%) were suitable for transplantation. The histological types were: thyroid carcinoma (n = 3); prostate carcinoma (n = 8), renal clear cell carcinoma (n = 7), oncocytoma (n = 1), meningiomas (n = 2), dermofibrosarcoma (n = 1); verrucous carcinoma of the vulva (n = 1), colon adenocarcinoma (n = 1), grade II astrocytoma (n = 1), adrenal gland tumor (n = 1), gastric GIST (n = 1), oligodendroglioma (n = 1). Forty-five organs were retrieved (22 livers, 19 kidneys, 3 hearts, and 1 pancreas) and transplanted into 44 recipients with 1 liver-kidney combined transplantation. Four recipients died due to causes not related to the tumor. No donor-transmitted tumor was detected among the recipients. Donation is absolutely not indicated in cases of tumors with high metastatic potential and high grades. Performing an accurate evaluation of the donor, taking into account the histological grade, currently can allow, organ retrieval and transplantation with an acceptable risk. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier

  1. Expander chunked codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Yang, Shenghao; Ye, Baoliu; Yin, Yitong; Lu, Sanglu

    2015-12-01

    Chunked codes are efficient random linear network coding (RLNC) schemes with low computational cost, where the input packets are encoded into small chunks (i.e., subsets of the coded packets). During the network transmission, RLNC is performed within each chunk. In this paper, we first introduce a simple transfer matrix model to characterize the transmission of chunks and derive some basic properties of the model to facilitate the performance analysis. We then focus on the design of overlapped chunked codes, a class of chunked codes whose chunks are non-disjoint subsets of input packets, which are of special interest since they can be encoded with negligible computational cost and in a causal fashion. We propose expander chunked (EC) codes, the first class of overlapped chunked codes that have an analyzable performance, where the construction of the chunks makes use of regular graphs. Numerical and simulation results show that in some practical settings, EC codes can achieve rates within 91 to 97 % of the optimum and outperform the state-of-the-art overlapped chunked codes significantly.

  2. The dead donor rule: effect on the virtuous practice of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaten, Frank C

    2014-07-01

    The President's Council on Bioethics in 2008 reaffirmed the necessity of the dead donor rule and the legitimacy of the current criteria for diagnosing both neurological and cardiac death. In spite of this report,many have continued to express concerns about the ethics of donation after circulatory death, the validity of determining death using neurological criteria and the necessity for maintaining the dead donor rule for organ donation. I analysed the dead donor rule for its effect on the virtuous practice of medicine by physicians caring for potential organ donors. The dead donor rule consistently impedes physicians in fulfilling their primary duty to act for the good of their prospective donor patients. This compromises the virtue of fidelity. It also weakens many other virtues necessary for physicians to provide excellent end-of-life care. The dead donor rule, while ethically powerful in theory, loses its force during translation to the bedside. This is so because the rule mandates simultaneous life and death within the same body for organ donation, a biological status that is inherently contradictory. The rule should be rejected as an ethical norm governing vital organ transplantation at the end of life. Its elimination will strengthen the doctor–patient relationship and foster trustworthiness in organ procurement.

  3. Does the Presence of a Measurable Blood Alcohol Level in a Potential Organ Donor Affect the Outcome of Liver Transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Tarek I.; Gavaler, Judith S.; Fishkin, David; Gordon, Robert; Starzl, Thomas E.; Van Thiel, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The widespread application of hepatic transplantation has created a tremendous demand for donor organs. An assessment of donor parameters is thought to be important in selecting good donors; however, the criteria utilized have not been standardized. This study was performed to determine the effect of a measurable donor blood alcohol level on graft survival. Fifty-two patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation at the University of Pittsburgh were included in the study. Twenty-five patients received liver grafts from donors having a blood alcohol level between 0.04 and 0.4 g/l with a mean of 0.17 g/l. Twenty-seven patients received a liver graft from a donor who had no measurable blood alcohol. There were no differences between these two groups of donors regarding the time of initial hospitalization until the time of donation. Graft failure within the first 30 days was 24% for those receiving an organ from an alcohol-positive donor as compared with 22.2% in those receiving an organ from an alcohol negative donor. The recipient mortality rate was 16% and 11%, respectively. No relationships between the donor blood alcohol level and organ performance, frequency of primary graft nonfunction, or number of episodes of acute cellular rejection were evident. Based upon these data, the presence of a measurable blood alcohol level in a donor should not mitigate against organ donation. PMID:2058808

  4. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  5. Liver transplant using octogenarian donors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferla, Fabio; De Carlis, Riccardo; Mariani, Anna; De Carlis, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    ... that liver transplantations (LTs) from octogenarian donors increased constantly between 2001 (3.5%) and 2010 (16.1%); this result is consistent with data from Spain and from the European Liver Transplant Registry. In our series (1571 liver transplants performed between December 1985 and December 2015), the first LT with an octogenarian do...

  6. Strategies to increase the donor pool and access to kidney transplantation: an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, U.; Oberbauer, R.; Pascual, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this position article, DESCARTES (Developing Education Science and Care for Renal Transplantation in European States) board members describe the current strategies aimed at expanding living and deceased donor kidney pools. The article focuses on the recent progress in desensitization and kidney...

  7. DONOR-TRANSMITTED CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Mironkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate opportunities, prospects and safety of using heart transplants from aged donors who are at high risk of coronary atherosclerosis.Materials and methods. Over the period from March 1987 to May 2014450 heart transplantations (HTx were performed in V.I.Shumakov Federal Research Center of Transplantology and Artifi cial Organs. During the fi rst month after HTx coronarography was made to 152 (37,8% recipients inorder to exclude/confi rm donor-transmitted coronary atherosclerosis (DTCA and to identify tactics of treatment. Coronary atherosclerosis was detected among 16 patients (3,6% of total number of HTx, 15 (93,8% men and 1 (6,2% women. Mean age of recipients with DTCA at the moment of HTx was 48,3 ± 13,1 years.Results. Hemodynamically relevant coronary atherosclerosis was not detected and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI was not made in the group of patients with the mean age of 42,24 ± 8,91 years. Using heart transplants from aged donors is connected with increasing risk of DTCA among the recipients. DTCA-dependent PCI is not connected with coronary mortality. Actuarial survival rate of patients who underwent PCI is comparable with the same one in the total population of HTx recipients and is equal to 87,5% at 5 years and less.Conclusion. Hearts from aged donors (older than 50 years may be used for HTx with suffi cient level of safety. Due to high level of DTCA using of hearts from such donors is preferable for completing urgent HTx to recipients 1А–В UNOS.

  8. Transfusion safety in francophone African countries: an analysis of strategies for the medical selection of blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagny, Claude Tayou; Kouao, Maxime Diané; Touré, Hamane; Gargouri, Jalel; Fazul, Ahamada Said; Ouattara, Siaka; Anani, Ludovic; Othmani, Habiba; Feteke, Lochina; Dahourou, Honorine; Mbensa, Guy Olivier; Molé, Simplice; Nébié, Yacouba; Mbangue, Madeleine; Toukam, Michel; Boulahi, Mahommed Ould; Andriambelo, Lalatiana Valisoa; Rakoto, Olivat; Baby, Mounirou; Yahaya, Rakia; Bokilo, Amelia; Senyana, Florent; Mbanya, Dora; Shiboski, Caroline; Murphy, Edward L; Lefrère, Jean Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The goal of selecting a healthy blood donor is to safeguard donors and reduce the risks of infections and immunologic complications for recipients. To evaluate the blood donor selection process, a survey was conducted in 28 blood transfusion centers located in 15 francophone African countries. Data collected included availability of blood products, risk factors for infection identified among blood donor candidates, the processing of the information collected before blood collection, the review process for the medical history of blood donor candidates, and deferral criteria for donor candidates. During the year 2009, participating transfusion centers identified 366,924 blood donor candidates. A mean of 13% (range, 0%-36%) of the donor candidates were excluded based solely on their medical status. The main risk factors for blood-borne infections were having multiple sex partners, sexual intercourse with occasional partners, and religious scarification. Most transfusion centers collected this information verbally instead of having a written questionnaire. The topics least addressed were the possible complications relating to the donation, religious scarifications, and history of sickle cell anemia and hemorrhage. Only three centers recorded the temperature of the blood donors. The deferral criteria least reported were sickle cell anemia, piercing, scarification, and tattoo. The medical selection process was not performed systemically and thoroughly enough, given the regional epidemiologic risks. It is essential to identify the risk factors specific to francophone African countries and modify the current medical history questionnaires to develop a more effective and relevant selection process. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Evaluation of proteinuria in healthy living kidney donor candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischner, M P; Naratadam, G O; Hou, S H; Singh, A K; Leehey, D J

    2006-11-01

    Evaluation of living kidney donor candidates includes careful assessment for the presence or absence of kidney disease. Kidney donation has been considered to be at least relatively contraindicated if urinary total protein excretion is above the normal range. However, at the present time, there is no uniformly accepted level of urine total protein excretion that would exclude donation. Albumin excretion instead of total protein excretion as a criterion has not previously been evaluated. This was a prospective observational study over a 3-year period in a single tertiary care center designed to assess current selection criteria for kidney donation with respect to urine total protein and albumin excretion. Twenty four percent (25 of 105) of healthy adult kidney donor candidates had elevated urinary total protein excretion rates (150 to 292 mg/24 h). Of these 105 candidates, 39 had simultaneous measurements of both urinary total protein and albumin. Although one-third (13/39) had elevated 24-hour urine total protein values, none had elevated urine albumin excretion. Measurement of albumin, the most common single protein found in urine, appears to be helpful in the evaluation of proteinuria in donor candidates. Many healthy adult kidney donor candidates have mildly elevated total protein excretion but normal albumin excretion. We believe that such patients should not be excluded from donation.

  10. The dead donor rule: can it withstand critical scrutiny?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin G; Truog, Robert D; Brock, Dan W

    2010-06-01

    Transplantation of vital organs has been premised ethically and legally on "the dead donor rule" (DDR)-the requirement that donors are determined to be dead before these organs are procured. Nevertheless, scholars have argued cogently that donors of vital organs, including those diagnosed as "brain dead" and those declared dead according to cardiopulmonary criteria, are not in fact dead at the time that vital organs are being procured. In this article, we challenge the normative rationale for the DDR by rejecting the underlying premise that it is necessarily wrong for physicians to cause the death of patients and the claim that abandoning this rule would exploit vulnerable patients. We contend that it is ethical to procure vital organs from living patients sustained on life support prior to treatment withdrawal, provided that there is valid consent for both withdrawing treatment and organ donation. However, the conservatism of medical ethics and practical concerns make it doubtful that the DDR will be abandoned in the near future. This leaves the current practice of organ transplantation based on the "moral fiction" that donors are dead when vital organs are procured.

  11. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, M; Mochtar, M H; de Melker, A A; van der Veen, F; Repping, S; Gerrits, T

    2016-05-01

    What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial counselling at the time that donor-offspring actually sought contact. Most studies on sperm donors are on anonymous donors and focus on recruitment, financial compensation, anonymity and motivations. There is limited knowledge on the value that identifiable sperm donors place on psychosocial counselling and what their needs are in this respect. We performed a qualitative study from March until June 2014 with 25 identifiable sperm donors, who were or had been a donor at the Centre for Reproductive Medicine of the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam any time between 1989 and 2014. We held semi-structured in-depth interviews with identifiable sperm donors with an average age of 44 years. The interviews were fully transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method of grounded theory. Twelve out of 15 donors (former donors ITALIC! n = 8, active donors ITALIC! n = 7) who had received a counselling session during their intake procedure found it important that they had been able to talk about issues such as the emotional consequences of donation, disclosure to their own children, family and friends, future contact with donor-offspring and rules and regulations. Of the 10 former donors who had received no counselling session, 8 had regretted the lack of intensive counselling. In the years following their donation, most donors simply wanted to know how many offspring had been born using their sperm and had no need for further counselling. Nevertheless, they frequently mentioned that they were concerned about the well-being of 'their' offspring. In addition, they would value the availability of psychosocial counselling in the event that donor-offspring actually sought contact. A limitation of our study is its

  12. The effect of pre-donation hypotension on whole blood donor adverse reactions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Nele S; Cusack, Leila; De Buck, Emmy; Compernolle, Veerle; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    Blood services are reliant upon healthy blood donors to provide a safe and adequate supply of blood products. Inappropriate variables contained within blood donor exclusion criteria can defer potentially appropriate donors. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effect of low pre-donation blood pressure, as compared with normal blood pressure, on adverse events in allogeneic whole blood donors. A systematic review was performed using highly sensitive search strategies within five databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, and Web of Science) from inception date until April 12, 2013. Out of 8305 records, 10 observational studies were identified that addressed the question. Five of these studies (with a combined total of 1,482,020 donations and 2903 donors) included either a statistical analysis or an appropriate study design that controlled for possible confounding factors. Based on the currently available evidence, hypotension has not been shown to be an independent predictive factor for donor complications. However, the overall quality of evidence was rather limited and rated 'low,' using the GRADE approach. In conclusion there is currently no evidence that hypotensive blood donors have a greater risk for donor adverse events compared with their normotensive counterparts. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Donor hypernatremia before procurement and early outcomes following pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseje, Neema; McLin, Valerie; Toso, Christian; Poncet, Antoine; Wildhaber, Barbara E

    2015-08-01

    The demand for transplantable organs far outweighs the supply. Recently, efforts have been made to increase the donor pool by adopting extended criteria for livers, including those from hypernatremic donors. Currently, there is no clear evidence that the use of organs from hypernatremic donors has detrimental effects on pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients. Our aim was to use the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database to evaluate the effects of donor hypernatremia on 30-day outcomes in pediatric LT recipients. We performed an analysis of 2325 children who underwent whole or partial LT between 2005 and 2010. First, we sought to determine a donor sodium threshold for increased mortality following pediatric LT. Second, we examined rates of mortality and graft failure at 30 days after LT in patients receiving grafts from hypernatremic donors compared to patients receiving grafts from normonatremic donors. Hypernatremia was defined as a donor sodium level of ≥160 µmol/L. The primary outcome measure was mortality at 30 days after transplant. The secondary outcome measure was graft failure at 30 days after transplant. There was no threshold sodium level for increased 30-day mortality following pediatric LT. Mean recipient ages/weights, Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease/Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores, and mean cold and warm ischemia times were similar between the 2 study groups. There were no significant differences in mortality rates (3.9% versus 4.5%; P = 0.87) and graft failure rates (2.2% versus 1.9%; P = 1.00) in patients receiving grafts from hypernatremic donors compared to patients receiving grafts from normonatremic donors at 30 days after LT. In conclusion, donor hypernatremia just before procurement does not appear to have negative effects on mortality and graft failure rates at 30 days following pediatric LT. © 2015 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Associations of health status with subsequent blood donor behavior-An alternative perspective on the Healthy Donor Effect from Donor InSight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, Katja; Zalpuri, Saurabh; Prinsze, Femmeke J.; Merz, Eva-Maria; de Kort, Wim L. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In donor health research, the 'Healthy Donor Effect' (HDE) often biases study results and hampers their interpretation. This refers to the fact that donors are a selected 'healthier' subset of a population due to both donor selection procedures and self-selection. Donors with long versus short donor

  15. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a ...

  19. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Mochtar, M.H.; de Melker, A.A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  3. Blood donor deferral: time for change? An evidence-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borra V

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vere Borra,1 Giovani Vandewalle,1 Hans Van Remoortel,1 Veerle Compernolle,1,2 Emmy De Buck,1 Philippe Vandekerckhove1–31Belgian Red Cross-Flanders, Mechelen, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Ghent, Ghent, 3Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, KU Leuven, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Donor selection remains an important part in the safety of the blood supply all over the world. Yet, donor deferral criteria seem to be strongly based on the precautionary principle protecting safety and quality, and on supply and expense considerations. This review therefore provides an overview of the available evidence on donor exclusion criteria, as well as on their cost-effectiveness, for the most frequent reasons of donor deferral in our region. PubMed was queried to retrieve primary research studies, systematic reviews, and health technology assessments (HTAs concerning donor exclusion criteria. With a similar approach, HTAs about the different blood-banking safety interventions were included. Reasons for donor deferral were recorded via the blood bank information system of the Belgian Red Cross-Flanders. Seven systematic reviews were identified: four on donor safety (hypotension, hypertension/type 2 diabetes, epilepsy, and higher age and three on recipient safety (hemochromatosis, men who have sex with men, and endoscopy. Forty-three low-quality observational studies were included, as well as 16 HTAs: three about donor exclusion criteria and 13 cost-utility analyses about blood-banking safety interventions. In general, the available evidence for deferral reasons was of low quality, and for 60% of the top 30 reasons for excluding donors, no evidence was found. Blood banking shows its unique position as many safety measures far exceed the normally accepted cost of €50,000/quality-adjusted life-years. The historical model based on the precautionary principle and on supply and expense considerations provides adequate supplies of

  4. Tele-recruitment for Donor Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Amit; Tiwari, A.

    2012-01-01

    Blood transfusion services are the integral part of health care system and these services have safe blood transfusion as the major goal. Voluntary blood donation is the key to safe blood and this safety is further enhanced when the voluntary blood donors become repeat/regular donors. Retention of donors is therefore a very crucial strategy to ensure enhanced blood safety. Tele-recruitment is an effective medium of recruiting and more importantly retaining donors via means of telephone/Short M...

  5. The Expanding Universe: Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, Don [Fermilab; Nord, Brian [Fermilab

    2014-09-01

    In 1998, observations of distant supernovae led physicists that not only was the universe expanding, but the expansion was speeding up. In this article, we describe the evidence for an expanding universe and describe what physicists and cosmologists have learned in the intervening years. The target audience for this article is high school physics teachers and college physics professors at teaching institutions.

  6. Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Improving Education Outside of Transplant Centers about Live Donor Transplantation--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Amy D; Morgievich, Marie; Cohen, David J; Butt, Zeeshan; Chakkera, Harini A; Lindower, Carrie; Hays, Rebecca E; Hiller, Janet M; Lentine, Krista L; Matas, Arthur J; Poggio, Emilio D; Rees, Michael A; Rodrigue, James R; LaPointe Rudow, Dianne

    2015-09-04

    Living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) offers better quality of life and clinical outcomes, including patient survival, compared with remaining on dialysis or receiving a deceased donor kidney transplant. Although LDKT education within transplant centers for both potential recipients and living donors is very important, outreach and education to kidney patients in settings other than transplant centers and to the general public is also critical to increase access to this highly beneficial treatment. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation's Live Donor Community of Practice, with the support of 10 additional sponsors, convened a consensus conference to determine best practices in LDKT, including a workgroup focused on developing a set of recommendations for optimizing outreach and LDKT education outside of transplant centers. Members of this workgroup performed a structured literature review, conducted teleconference meetings, and met in person at the 2-day conference. Their efforts resulted in consensus around the following recommendations. First, preemptive transplantation should be promoted through increased LDKT education by primary care physicians and community nephrologists. Second, dialysis providers should be trained to educate their own patients about LDKT and deceased donor kidney transplantation. Third, partnerships between community organizations, organ procurement organizations, religious organizations, and transplant centers should be fostered to support transplantation. Fourth, use of technology should be improved or expanded to better educate kidney patients and their support networks. Fifth, LDKT education and outreach should be improved for kidney patients in rural areas. Finally, a consensus-driven, evidence-based public message about LDKT should be developed. Discussion of the effect and potential for implementation around each recommendation is featured, particularly regarding reducing racial and socioeconomic disparities in

  7. A Retrospective Analysis of Apheresis Donor Deferral and Adverse Reactions at a Tertiary Care Centre in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Disha; Garg, Ketan; Kaushik, Ankit; Sharma, Richa; Rawat, D S; Mandal, A K

    2016-11-01

    With increasing demand of platelet component each day, blood bank plays a pivotal role in ensuring supply of safe blood as and when required. Plateletpheresis procedure is a relatively simple, safe and important adjunct to blood bank inventory. However, recruitment of healthy blood donors is a challenge that the health industry is facing today. To determine the reasons and rates of apheresis donor deferral along with investigation of adverse reactions encountered during the procedure. Records of single donor apheresis were retrospectively analysed from 1st January 2010 to 31st December 2014. The study was carried out at Blood Bank, Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India. The donor details that were studied included - age, sex, type of donation (voluntary/replacement/ repeat), reason for donor deferral and type of adverse reaction, if encountered during the procedure. Among the 478 donors screened for plateletpheresis procedure during a study period of 5 years, 134 (28.03%) were deferred. Temporary deferrals accounted for majority (93.28%) of the deferrals. Low platelet count (50.75%) was the main reason of donor deferral followed by low haemoglobin (20.89%). Amongst the 344 selected donors, 15 (4.36%) had some type of adverse reaction associated with the procedure. We suggest that the selection criteria for plateletpheresis donors should be revised to deal with shortage of apheresis donors. The criteria regarding minimum pre-procedure platelet count (above1.5 lac/μl) and haemoglobin (above 12.5 g/dl) need to be lowered so as to suit the Indian scenario. The lower adverse reaction rates, 14/344 (4.06%) associated with this procedure encourages safety of donors and is important in recruitment of new donors.

  8. Blood donor: nursing care plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The standardized nursing care plan can be used as a means through which the nurse will assess and identify the particular needs of the blood donor.To draw up the care plan, we have conducted the evaluation on the basis of the Marjory Gordon’s functional health patterns.The more prevailing diagnosis according to the NANDA taxonomy have been identified, results have been established according to the NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification taxonomy, and nursing interventions have been suggested according to the NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification taxonomy. Also, certain potential complications, which are infrequent, must be observed and controlled in the blood donation process. Our main aim with this article has been to offer to professionals resources that grant to the caring activity scientific rigor, professional recognition and an unique and valid tool to evaluate the assistance with the best levels of quality for the blood donor.

  9. Cancer in the organ donor

    OpenAIRE

    DETRY, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Organ Donation and Cancer Pr Olivier Detry, Dpt of Abdominal Surgery and Transplantation, University of Liege The risk of transmission of cancer with the transplanted organ has been known since the pioneering years of solid organ transplantation, and is enhanced by immunosuppression and particularly the calcineurin inhibitors. Therefore, classically, potential organ donors with past history of cancer are excluded from donation, with the exception of low-grade malignant tumours of the...

  10. Hyperbilirubinemia in normal healthy donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Veena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out in B.A.R.C. Hospital Blood Bank over a span of five years, and includes 2734 donors. All the bags were screened for HIV, HBsAg, HCV and VDRL and the plasma in the pilot tubes of the blood bags was observed to detect any abnormality in color. In 27 cases plasma was found to be icteric and liver function tests were carried out on these samples. Two donors showed higher SGPT level, and were excluded. No significant increases in liver enzymes were recorded in the others. Causes of icteric plasma in these apparently healthy donors are discussed. Differential diagnosis includes Gilbert′s disease, hemolytic anemia, drug-induced anemia and other hepatic causes of hyperbilirubinemia, of which Gilbert′s disease is most probable cause with a prevalence of 0.91% in our population. As there are no studies to document the safety of the recipients receiving such abnormal colored plasma as well as to document the hazards in its transfusion, the question arises whether to transfuse such units or not. This study highlights this dilemma. A reassessment of existing policies and regulations is merited.

  11. Mental health status after living donor hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Szu-Han; Lin, Ping-Yi; Wang, Jiun-Yi; Huang, Mei-Feng; Lin, Hui-Chuan; Hsieh, Chia-En; Hsu, Ya-Lan; Chen, Yao-Li

    2017-05-01

    Donor safety and preservation of donor health after living liver donation are of paramount importance. In addition, the preoperative mental state of a donor is an important factor in determining the psychological impact of donor hepatectomy. Thus, we aimed to explore the mental health status of living liver donors after hepatectomy. We enrolled 60 donors who were scheduled to undergo living donor hepatectomy during the period January 2014 to March 2015 at a single medical center. Mental health status was measured before and 3 months after surgery using 3 self-report questionnaires, namely the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) to assess depressive symptoms, the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire to measure quality of life, and the Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ) to screen for minor psychiatric disorders. A comparison of the pre- and postdonation CES-D scores revealed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms after surgery (P = .031). There were significant improvements in the physical health domain (P = .031), the psychological health domain (P = .005), the social relationships domain (P = .005), and the environmental health domain (P = .010) of the WHOQOL-BREF. There were no significant changes in CHQ scores after donor hepatectomy (P = .136). All donors reported that they would donate again if required. Approximately one-third (33.3%) of donors experienced more pain than they had anticipated in the immediate postoperative period, and 20.0% of donors had complications after donor hepatectomy. Donor mental health status tended to improve as donors regained physical function during the 1st 3 months of recovery. Long-term monitoring of living donors' mental health is needed to minimize the adverse psychological outcomes of living liver donation.

  12. Transfusion-transmitted malaria: case report of asymptomatic donor harboring Plasmodium malariae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Scuracchio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria in Brazil is endemic in the Amazon region, but autochthonous cases with low parasitaemia occur in the Atlantic Forest area of the country. According to Brazilian legislation no test is mandatory for blood donors from non-endemic areas. However if they have traveled to malaria transmission regions they are deferred for six months before they can donate. This report describes a transfusion-transmitted malaria case in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where one recipient received infected blood and developed the disease. He lived in Sao Paulo and had no previous transfusion or trips to endemic areas, including those of low endemicity, such as Atlantic Forest. Thick blood smears confirmed Plasmodiummalariae. All donors lived in Sao Paulo and one of them (Donor 045-0 showed positive hemoscopy and PCR. This asymptomatic donor had traveled to Juquia, in the Atlantic Forest area of S ao Paulo State, where sporadic cases of autochthonous malaria are described. DNA assay revealed P. malariae in the donor's (Donor 045-0 blood. Serum archives of the recipient and of all blood donors were analyzed by ELISA using both P. vivax and P. falciparum antigens, and IFAT with P. malariae. Donor 045-0's serum was P. malariae IFAT positive and the P. vivax ELISA was reactive. In addition, two out of 44 donors' archive sera were also P. vivax ELISA reactive. All sera were P. falciparum ELISA negative. This case suggests the need of reviewing donor selection criteria and deferral strategies to prevent possible cases of transfusion-transmitted malaria.

  13. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V.; Giani, Anette S.; Hofmann, Jan A.; Schmidt, Alexander H.

    2016-02-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors.

  14. Utilization of organs from donors after circulatory death for vascularized pancreas and islet of Langerhans transplantation: recommendations from an expert group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Thierry; Boffa, Catherine; Augustine, Titus; Badet, Lionel; de Koning, Eelco; Pratschke, Johann; Socci, Carlo; Friend, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors are increasingly being used as a source of pancreas allografts for vascularized organ and islet transplantation. We provide practice guidelines aiming to increase DCD pancreas utilization. We review risk assessment and donor selection criteria. We report suggested factors in donor and recipient clinical management and provide an overview of the activities and outcomes of vascularized pancreas and islet transplantation. © 2015 Steunstichting ESOT.

  15. Artificial corneas versus donor corneas for repeat corneal transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpek, Esen K; Alkharashi, Majed; Hwang, Frank S; Ng, Sueko M; Lindsley, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals who have failed one or more full thickness penetrating keratoplasties (PKs) may be offered repeat corneal surgery using an artificial or donor cornea. An artificial or prosthetic cornea is known as a keratoprosthesis. Both donor and artificial corneal transplantations involve removal of the diseased and opaque recipient cornea (or the previously failed cornea) and replacement with another donor or prosthetic cornea. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of artificial versus donor corneas in individuals who have had one or more failed donor corneal transplantations. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2013, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to November 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 27 November 2013. Selection criteria Two review authors independently assessed reports from the electronic searches to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials (CCTs). We resolved discrepancies by discussion or consultation with a third review author. Data collection and analysis For discussion purposes, we assessed findings from observational cohort studies and non-comparative case series. No data synthesis was performed. Main results We did not identify any RCTs or CCTs comparing artificial corneas with donor corneas for repeat corneal transplantations. Authors

  16. Donor hypernatremia influences outcomes following pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseje, Neema; Lüthold, Samuel; Mentha, Gilles; Toso, Christian; Belli, Dominique; McLin, Valérie; Wildhaber, Barbara

    2013-02-01

    With the rising demand for liver transplantations (LTs), and the shortage of organs, extended criteria including donor hypernatremia have been adopted to increase the donor pool. Currently, there is conflicting evidence on the effect of donor hypernatremia on outcomes following LT. Our aim was to investigate differences in outcome in patients receiving grafts from hypernatremic donors compared with patients receiving grafts from normonatremic donors in the pediatric population. We retrospectively reviewed 94 pediatric patients with LTs from 1994 to 2011. We divided the patients into two groups: patients receiving organs from donors with sodium levels study groups (16.0 vs. 15.9 and 21.2 vs. 22.0, respectively). There were no significant differences in mean cold ischemia times 6.4 versus 6.9 hours (p = 0.29), and mean intraoperative transfusion volumes 1,068.5 mL versus 1,068.8 mL (p = 0.89). There were no statistically significant differences in mortality rates (7.3 vs. 11.1%, p = 0.68). Prothrombin time (PT) at day 10 post-LT was significantly lower in group 2 (79 vs. 64, p = 0.017), and there was a higher relative risk (RR) for early thrombotic vascular complications in group 2 (RR = 2.48); however, this was not significant (p = 0.26). No significant differences in RR for rejection (0.97, p = 0.86), viral infections (1.24, p = 0.31), bacterial infections (0.86, p = 0.62), or early biliary complications (1.03, p = 1.00) were observed. In pediatric LT patients receiving grafts from hypernatremic donors, there are no significant increases in rates of mortality, rejection, early biliary, and infectious complications. However, there is a statistically significant lower PT at postoperative day 10 following transplantation, and a more than double RR for early thrombotic vascular complications although this was not statistically significant. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Donor age of human platelet lysate affects proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lohmann

    Full Text Available The regenerative potential declines upon aging. This might be due to cell-intrinsic changes in stem and progenitor cells or to influences by the microenvironment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC raise high hopes in regenerative medicine. They are usually culture expanded in media with fetal calf serum (FCS or other serum supplements such as human platelet lysate (HPL. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of HPL-donor age on culture expansion. 31 single donor derived HPLs (25 to 57 years old were simultaneously compared for culture of MSC. Proliferation of MSC did not reveal a clear association with platelet counts of HPL donors or growth factors concentrations (PDGF-AB, TGF-β1, bFGF, or IGF-1, but it was significantly higher with HPLs from younger donors (45 years. Furthermore, HPLs from older donors increased activity of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-βgal. HPL-donor age did not affect the fibroblastoid colony-forming unit (CFU-f frequency, immunophenotype or induction of adipogenic differentiation, whereas osteogenic differentiation was significantly lower with HPLs from older donors. Concentrations of various growth factors (PDGF-AB, TGF-β1, bFGF, IGF-1 or hormones (estradiol, parathormone, leptin, 1,25 vitamin D3 were not associated with HPL-donor age or MSC growth. Taken together, our data support the notion that aging is associated with systemic feedback mechanisms acting on stem and progenitor cells, and this is also relevant for serum supplements in cell culture: HPLs derived from younger donors facilitate enhanced expansion and more pronounced osteogenic differentiation.

  18. Donor age of human platelet lysate affects proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Michael; Walenda, Gudrun; Hemeda, Hatim; Joussen, Sylvia; Drescher, Wolf; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Hutschenreuter, Gabriele; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The regenerative potential declines upon aging. This might be due to cell-intrinsic changes in stem and progenitor cells or to influences by the microenvironment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) raise high hopes in regenerative medicine. They are usually culture expanded in media with fetal calf serum (FCS) or other serum supplements such as human platelet lysate (HPL). In this study, we have analyzed the impact of HPL-donor age on culture expansion. 31 single donor derived HPLs (25 to 57 years old) were simultaneously compared for culture of MSC. Proliferation of MSC did not reveal a clear association with platelet counts of HPL donors or growth factors concentrations (PDGF-AB, TGF-β1, bFGF, or IGF-1), but it was significantly higher with HPLs from younger donors (45 years). Furthermore, HPLs from older donors increased activity of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-βgal). HPL-donor age did not affect the fibroblastoid colony-forming unit (CFU-f) frequency, immunophenotype or induction of adipogenic differentiation, whereas osteogenic differentiation was significantly lower with HPLs from older donors. Concentrations of various growth factors (PDGF-AB, TGF-β1, bFGF, IGF-1) or hormones (estradiol, parathormone, leptin, 1,25 vitamin D3) were not associated with HPL-donor age or MSC growth. Taken together, our data support the notion that aging is associated with systemic feedback mechanisms acting on stem and progenitor cells, and this is also relevant for serum supplements in cell culture: HPLs derived from younger donors facilitate enhanced expansion and more pronounced osteogenic differentiation.

  19. Imminent brain death: Point of departure for potential heart-beating organ donor recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.J. de Groot (Yorick); N.E. Jansen (Nichon); J. Bakker (Jan); M.A. Kuiper (Michael); S. Aerdts (Stan); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); E.F.M. Wijdicks (Eelco); H.A. van Leiden (Hendrik); A.J. Hoitsma (Andries); H.P.H. Kremer (Berry); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: There is, in European countries that conduct medical chart review of intensive care unit (ICU) deaths, no consensus on uniform criteria for defining a potential organ donor. Although the term is increasingly being used in recent literature, it is seldom defined in detail. We

  20. Utilization of organs from donors after circulatory death for vascularized pancreas and islet of Langerhans transplantation : recommendations from an expert group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berney, Thierry; Boffa, Catherine; Augustine, Titus; Badet, Lionel; de Koning, Eelco; Pratschke, Johann; Socci, Carlo; Friend, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors are increasingly being used as a source of pancreas allografts for vascularized organ and islet transplantation. We provide practice guidelines aiming to increase DCD pancreas utilization. We review risk assessment and donor selection criteria. We report

  1. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar I. Mitre

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  2. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitre Anuar I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  3. Family donor care management: principles and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Walraven, S M; Nicoloso-de Faveri, G; Axdorph-Nygell, U A I; Douglas, K W; Jones, D A; Lee, S J; Pulsipher, M; Ritchie, L; Halter, J; Shaw, B E

    2010-08-01

    The World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA) is an international organization fostering collaboration in clinical transplantation and promoting the interests of unrelated stem cell donors. The WMDA has developed standards for the recruitment, counseling, work-up and subsequent donations to protect the interests of donors. Although the care of family donors has been carefully considered and managed in transplant centers (TCs) internationally over numerous years (and increasingly TCs are facing accreditation programs, which address this issue) there is currently a lack of standardized guidelines for the management of family donors. The underlying principles of family donor care are in many ways identical to those concerning unrelated donors, although key ethical considerations differ. Although the WMDA is primarily involved in the field of unrelated donors, we believe that it is important to collaborate with those involved with family donors, to standardize the care. This document hopes to encourage increased collaboration between those caring for related and unrelated donors, and build on the extensive work, which has already been undertaken in this field to homogenize care. We recognize that there will be financial, regulatory and logistic differences in different countries and that the manner in which these principles are achieved may vary.

  4. Living kidney donors: current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Connie L

    2009-07-01

    Living kidney donation continues as the cornerstone of transplantation. In order to determine with ever-renewing assurance that living donation is safe for the donor, we need to periodically review the literature, review the United Network for Organ Sharing database for donor characteristics that may put them in danger, and scour databases for donors starting dialysis and/or listed for transplant. Additionally, we must encourage financing studies that follow large diverse cohorts of donors over their entire lifetimes in order to detect key characteristics that influence outcomes. Currently, it can be stated that living donation is, on the whole, safe, with few perioperative deaths, complications, or long-term medical issues. Additionally, the living donor reflects the demographics of the general population including increased rates of obesity with some donors having hypertension and low-grade proteinuria. In the long run, death rates (for the white donor) are no different than for the general population, whereas end-stage renal disease rates are slightly increased over the general population, ranging from 0.1% to 1.1%. The higher risk is especially notable in the black donor. Preeclampsia in female donors may also be marginally greater than in those with 2 kidneys. Thus, the new health age brings a rejuvenated responsibility of the medical community and those in governance to design systems that allow more complete and continued follow-up of the living kidney donor, especially those of color.

  5. Biological Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page contains links to Technical Documents pertaining to Biological Water Quality Criteria, including, technical assistance documents for states, tribes and territories, program overviews, and case studies.

  6. Reduced ischemia-reperfusion injury with isoproterenol in non-heart-beating donor lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D R; Hoffmann, S C; Sellars, M; Egan, T M

    1997-05-01

    Transplantation of lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donors could expand the donor pool. Recent studies suggest that the ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) to the lung can be attenuated by increasing intracellular cAMP concentrations. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of IRI on capillary permeability, as measured by Kfc, in lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donors and reperfused with or without isoproterenol (iso). Using an in situ isolated perfused lung model, lungs were retrieved from non-heart-beating donor rats ventilated with O2 or not at varying intervals after death. The lungs were reperfused with or without iso (10 microM). Kfc, lung viability, and pulmonary hemodynamics were measured, and tissue levels of adenine nucleotides and cAMP were measured by HPLC. Iso-reperfusion decreased Kfc significantly (P Kfc in non-iso-reperfused (r = 0.65) and iso-perfused (r = 0.84) lungs. cAMP levels increased significantly with iso-reperfusion. cAMP levels correlated with Kfc (r = 0.87) in iso-reperfused lungs. Iso-reperfusion of lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donor rats results in decreased capillary permeability and increased lung tissue cAMP levels. Pharmacologic augmentation of tissue TAN and cAMP levels may further ameliorate the increased capillary permeability seen in lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donors.

  7. Successful domino liver transplantation in maple syrup urine disease using a related living donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H. Feier

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD is an autosomal recessive disease associated with high levels of branched-chain amino acids. Children with MSUD can present severe neurological damage, but liver transplantation (LT allows the patient to resume a normal diet and avoid further neurological damage. The use of living related donors has been controversial because parents are obligatory heterozygotes. We report a case of a 2-year-old child with MSUD who underwent a living donor LT. The donor was the patient's mother, and his liver was then used as a domino graft. The postoperative course was uneventful in all three subjects. DNA analysis performed after the transplantation (sequencing of the coding regions of BCKDHA, BCKDHB, and DBT genes showed that the MSUD patient was heterozygous for a pathogenic mutation in the BCKDHB gene. This mutation was not found in his mother, who is an obligatory carrier for MSUD according to the family history and, as expected, presented both normal clinical phenotype and levels of branched-chain amino acids. In conclusion, our data suggest that the use of a related donor in LT for MSUD was effective, and the liver of the MSUD patient was successfully used in domino transplantation. Routine donor genotyping may not be feasible, because the test is not widely available, and, most importantly, the disease is associated with both the presence of allelic and locus heterogeneity. Further studies with this population of patients are required to expand the use of related donors in MSUD.

  8. Survival and spirometry outcomes after lung transplantation from donors aged 70 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Wiebke; Ius, Fabio; Salman, Jawad; Avsar, Murat; Tudorache, Igor; Kühn, Christian; Wiegmann, Bettina; Marsch, Georg; Kaufeld, Tim; Zinne, Norman; Fuehner, Thomas; Greer, Mark; Gottlieb, Jens; Boethig, Dietmar; Haverich, Axel; Welte, Tobias; Warnecke, Gregor

    2015-10-01

    Mediocre donation rates and increasing demand for lung transplantation leads transplant centers to consider extended-criteria donor lungs. Arguably, the largest remaining non-utilized lung donor segment is the elderly individual, already considered for visceral organ donation but not thoracic. So far, transplantation of donor lungs aged ≥ 70 years is rarely reported, and recipient outcomes are unknown. Accordingly, we report a single-center series of lung transplantations from donors aged ≥ 70 years and compare outcomes with contemporary lung transplantations from younger donors. All bilateral lung transplantations performed at our center between March 2011 and July 2014 were analyzed, and 2 cohorts were built according to lung donor age. A total of 440 bilateral lung transplantations were performed from 413 donors aged history (43.7% vs 14.8%, p = 0.003) or for abnormal bronchoscopy results (52.9% vs 15.8%, p = 0.002). Recipients receiving donor lungs aged <70 years were younger than those receiving older donor lungs ≥ 70 (49.8 [range, 35-58] vs 58 [range, 53-62] years, p < 0.0001). Underlying diagnoses did not differ significantly between the groups. Post-operative mechanical ventilation times (15 [range, 10-59] vs 27.5 [range, 10-75.8] hours), intensive care unit stays (3 [range, 1-5] vs 3 [range, 1-8] days), and total hospital lengths of stay (24 [range, 22-40.5] vs 24 [range, 22-40] days) of the recipients did not differ significantly between the two groups. The percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 86.5% ± 26.2% 12 months after transplantation of younger lungs vs 72.2% ± 23.8% (p = 0.01) after transplantation of older lungs. Differentiating the spirometry findings according to underlying diseases showed significantly lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second values after transplantation of donor lungs aged ≥70 only in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis recipients but not in emphysema patients. Patient survival up to 36 months was

  9. Attitudes among transplant professionals regarding shifting paradigms in eligibility criteria for live kidney donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoon, Emerentia Q. W.; van de Wetering, Jacqueline; IJzermans, Jan N. M.; Dor, Frank J. M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Background The transplant community increasingly accepts extended criteria live kidney donors, however, great (geographical) differences are present in policies regarding the acceptance of these donors, and guidelines do not offer clarity. The aim of this survey was to reveal these differences and to get an insight in both centre policies as well as personal beliefs of transplant professionals. Methods An online survey was sent to 1128 ESOT-members. Questions were included about several extended donor criteria; overweight/obesity, older age, vascular multiplicity, minors as donors and comorbidities; hypertension, impaired fasting glucose, kidney stones, malignancies and renal cysts. Comparisons were made between transplant centres of three regions in Europe and between Europe and other countries worldwide. Results 331 questionnaires were completed by professionals from 55 countries. Significant differences exist between regions in Europe in acceptance of donors with several extended criteria. Median refusal rate for potential live donors is 15%. Furthermore, differences are seen regarding pre-operative work-up, both in specialists who perform screening as in preoperative imaging. Conclusions Remarkably, 23.4% of transplant professionals sometimes deviate from their centre policy, resulting in more or less comparable personal beliefs regarding extended criteria. Variety is seen, proving the need for a standardized approach in selection, preferably evidence based. PMID:28732093

  10. Attitudes among transplant professionals regarding shifting paradigms in eligibility criteria for live kidney donation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Lafranca

    Full Text Available The transplant community increasingly accepts extended criteria live kidney donors, however, great (geographical differences are present in policies regarding the acceptance of these donors, and guidelines do not offer clarity. The aim of this survey was to reveal these differences and to get an insight in both centre policies as well as personal beliefs of transplant professionals.An online survey was sent to 1128 ESOT-members. Questions were included about several extended donor criteria; overweight/obesity, older age, vascular multiplicity, minors as donors and comorbidities; hypertension, impaired fasting glucose, kidney stones, malignancies and renal cysts. Comparisons were made between transplant centres of three regions in Europe and between Europe and other countries worldwide.331 questionnaires were completed by professionals from 55 countries. Significant differences exist between regions in Europe in acceptance of donors with several extended criteria. Median refusal rate for potential live donors is 15%. Furthermore, differences are seen regarding pre-operative work-up, both in specialists who perform screening as in preoperative imaging.Remarkably, 23.4% of transplant professionals sometimes deviate from their centre policy, resulting in more or less comparable personal beliefs regarding extended criteria. Variety is seen, proving the need for a standardized approach in selection, preferably evidence based.

  11. Expanding the Game Design Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Majgaard, Gunver

    2016-01-01

    . It encapsulates the entire development process from the first ideas to the final game with emphasis on game design thinking. Our model of expanded game design space consists of four separate – yet interconnected – layers in the process of game development. The first layer addresses the importance of framing...... as a guideline for evaluating game design thinking and for measuring solutions made in the development process. To strengthen our model of expanded design space, we will present examples from our game design courses.......This article considers game design research in educational settings. Its focus is on how undergraduate students – particularly engineering students – learn computer game design. From observations conducted during our game design courses we have developed a model of expanded game design space...

  12. Psychiatric approach to the living kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Correia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kidney transplantation is considered the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. Living donor transplantation has increased because of the shortage, the needs of cadaver donors.Based on existing literature the authors address ethical issues and major psychiatric aspects involved in the evaluation of living donor kidney transplant, and the interference of this procedure on quality of life for donors, and their contraindications. The authors further describe the evaluation procedures used in the Hospital S. João, as well as data related to the 32 patients evaluated in the Department of Psychiatry since 2004.

  13. Donor Human Milk for the High-Risk Infant: Preparation, Safety, and Usage Options in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The use of donor human milk is increasing for high-risk infants, primarily for infants born weighing milk may be considered in situations in which the supply of maternal milk is insufficient. The use of pasteurized donor milk is safe when appropriate measures are used to screen donors and collect, store, and pasteurize the milk and then distribute it through established human milk banks. The use of nonpasteurized donor milk and other forms of direct, Internet-based, or informal human milk sharing does not involve this level of safety and is not recommended. It is important that health care providers counsel families considering milk sharing about the risks of bacterial or viral contamination of nonpasteurized human milk and about the possibilities of exposure to medications, drugs, or herbs in human milk. Currently, the use of pasteurized donor milk is limited by its availability and affordability. The development of public policy to improve and expand access to pasteurized donor milk, including policies that support improved governmental and private financial support for donor milk banks and the use of donor milk, is important. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Flow boiling in expanding microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, Tamanna

    2017-01-01

    This Brief presents an up to date summary of details of the flow boiling heat transfer, pressure drop and instability characteristics; two phase flow patterns of expanding microchannels. Results obtained from the different expanding microscale geometries are presented for comparison and addition to that, comparison with literatures is also performed. Finally, parametric studies are performed and presented in the brief. The findings from this study could help in understanding the complex microscale flow boiling behavior and aid in the design and implementation of reliable compact heat sinks for practical applications.

  15. Dual Criteria Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    2014-01-01

    The most popular models of decision making use a single criterion to evaluate projects or lotteries. However, decision makers may actually consider multiple criteria when evaluating projects. We consider a dual criteria model from psychology. This model integrates the familiar tradeoffs between...

  16. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  17. Green Supplier Selection Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Izabela Ewa; Banaeian, Narges; Golinska, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    Green supplier selection (GSS) criteria arise from an organization inclination to respond to any existing trends in environmental issues related to business management and processes, so GSS is integrating environmental thinking into conventional supplier selection. This research is designed...... to determine prevalent general and environmental supplier selection criteria and develop a framework which can help decision makers to determine and prioritize suitable green supplier selection criteria (general and environmental). In this research we considered several parameters (evaluation objectives......) to establish suitable criteria for GSS such as their production type, requirements, policy and objectives instead of applying common criteria. At first a comprehensive and deep review on prevalent and green supplier selection literatures performed. Then several evaluation objectives defined to assess the green...

  18. Expanding nail or expanding femur? An adverse event with the expandable intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Soham; Riley, Nicholas D; Sivaji, Chellappan K

    2010-01-01

    The expandable intramedullary nail is self-locking and has the advantage of reducing operating time and exposure to ionizing radiation. The nail is recommended for simple diaphyseal fractures involving the middle third of long bones, where the nail can bypass the fracture site by at least 5 cm. We encountered a unique complication with the expandable nail in a simple transverse shaft fracture at the junction of the middle and distal third of the left femur in an otherwise healthy 57-year-old man. The fracture was reduced and a 12-mm expandable nail was inserted. Following full expansion, intraoperative radiographs were obtained prior to closure. After six postoperative weeks, it was noted that the nail expanded the femoral canal, converting a simple fracture to a distally progressing comminuted fracture with a butterfly fragment. A review of the intraoperative radiographs showed slight widening of the medullary canal at the level of the fracture. As the alignment was satisfactory and callus was present, no further surgical intervention was considered. The patient was advised not to bear weight and was provided with a locked knee brace in extension to wear for six weeks. Radiographs at 12 weeks demonstrated good progress of healing with adequate callus and the patient was permitted to bear weight as tolerated and commence knee flexion. The fracture united satisfactorily at four months. This adverse experience emphasizes that caution should be exercised when expanding the nail, with close observation of the medullary canal diameter during the later stages of expansion.

  19. LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF DECEASED DONOR LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gautier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study was to evaluate patient and graft survival after liver transplantation (LT and to determine if primary disease diagnosis, early graft dysfunction or other factors affect it. Furthermore, we analyzed the reasonsof short-term and long-term deaths or retransplantations.Materials and methods. 192 LTs from donors with brain death were performed from December 2004 until June 2014. Recipient age varied from 5 to 71 years. Most frequent diagnosis was liver cirrhosis (mainly due to hepatitis C, then hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, liver graft dysfunction, etc.Results and discussion. 1-year patient survival is 89.5%, graft survival is 87.7%, 3-year –87% and 84.6%, respectively, and 5-year – 83.5% and 83.0%, respectively. Early mortality (in fi rst 30 days after transplantation was 8%, long-term mortality – 5.9%. Primary non-function graft (PNF was the reason of 66.7% early deaths. In the long term, infections and oncology were the reasons of death with the same frequency – 36.4%. Early graft dysfunction including primary non-function signifi cantly decreases short term survival (p = 0.0002. Nevertheless, in the majority of cases graft function improves and doesn’t affect survival. Donor factors play role in outcomes: early dysfunction is higher (40.6% in extended criteria donor group than in standard donor group (р = 0.0431. PNF has the same trend – 8.5% and 0.0%, respectively, but without signifi cance (р =0.0835. 5-year survival is remarkably lower in HCC group 40.8% (p = 0.003 than in other groups.Conclusion: survival after liver transplantation in our Center is comparable with the results of the world’s centers.

  20. Intentional and successful use of a marginal donor heart with surgically-corrected interventricular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Guillaume; Pozzi, Matteo; D'Alessandro, Cosimo; Leprince, Pascal

    2010-10-01

    We describe a case of heart transplantation (HTX) performed using a heart from a 20-year-old donor who underwent surgical closure of a ventricular septal defect during childhood. Our 26-year-old patient was successfully discharged to a rehabilitation centre on day 20 post-transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an HTX performed with a 'redo' donor heart with previous surgical correction of a congenital heart defect. The widespread use of HTX as a therapeutic option is currently limited by the increase in number of patients listed annually for this procedure. The concomitant lack of organ donors has led to the concept of 'marginal donor' to broaden the classic standard criteria of donor suitability, but these extended criteria do not consider the possibility of using hearts that have undergone surgical correction of simple congenital heart defects. There has been a considerable increase in the grown-up congenital heart disease population over the past 20 years. We discuss the feasibility of using these hearts for transplantation and consider the limitations and precautions of such practice.

  1. BLOODR: blood donor and requester mobile application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Vamsi Krishna; El-Ocla, Hosam

    2017-01-01

    With rapid increase in the usage of social networks sites across the world, there is also a steady increase in blood donation requests as being noticed in the number of posts on these sites such as Facebook and twitter seeking blood donors. Finding blood donor is a challenging issue in almost every country. There are some blood donor finder applications in the market such as Blood app by Red Cross and Blood Donor Finder application by Neologix. However, more reliable applications that meet the needs of users are prompted. Several software technologies including languages and framework are used to develop our blood-donor web application known as BLOODR application. These technologies comprise Ruby programming language (simply known as Ruby) along with JavaScript and PostgreSQL for database are used. Ruby on Rails (simply known as Rails) is an open source Web framework that makes it possible to quickly and easily create data-based web applications. We show screenshots for the BLOODR application for different types of users including requester, donor, and administrator. Various features of the application are described and their needs of use are analyzed. If a patient needs a blood at a clinic, blood donors in vicinity can be contacted through using a clinic management service provided in this application. Registered donors will get notification for the blood requests only if their blood group is compatible with the requested blood type and in the same city/region. Then matching blood donors can go to the requesting clinic and donate. BLOODR application provides a reliable platform to connect local blood donors with patients. BLOODR creates a communication channel through authenticated clinics whenever a patient needs blood donation. It is a useful tool to find compatible blood donors who can receive blood request posts in their local area. Clinics can use this web application to maintain the blood donation activity. Future improvement of the BLOODR is explained.

  2. Travel behavior and deferral of Dutch blood donors : Consequences for donor availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout-Krikke, Ryanne W.; Oei, Welling; Habets, Karin; Pasker-De Jong, Pieternel C M

    2015-01-01

    Background Donors returning from areas with outbreaks of infectious diseases may donate infectious blood back home. Geographic donor deferral is an effective measure to ensure the blood safety, but donor deferral may pose a threat for the blood supply especially after holiday seasons. Insight into

  3. EFFECT OF INCORPORATING EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... Abstract. Incorporating expanded polystyrene granules in concrete matrix can produce lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete of various densities. Workability which is an important property of concrete, affects the rate of placement and the degree of compaction of concrete. Inadequate compaction.

  4. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  5. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-02-28

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  6. Expanding Access to Pro-Poor Energy Services in Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eleri, Ewah Otu; Ugwu, Okechukwu; Onuvae, Precious

    2012-10-15

    Nigeria experiences a remarkable paradox -- the abundance of energy resources and widespread energy poverty. Only about 40% of the population has access to the country’s grid electricity. About 72% of the population depends on traditional fuelwood for cooking. Despite this, government financing of energy services that benefits majority of Nigeria’s population has been grossly inadequate. Private sector investments and donor support have not fared better. This paper examines the current level of energy poverty in Nigeria. It analyses the level of government, private sector and donor funding for energy services that benefit the poor. It further reviews international best practices in expanding access for pro poor energy services. The paper finds a significant decline in political interest for expanding electricity services to rural areas. Even though ambitious policy reforms have commenced, agreed programmes are not implemented effectively. Not only are investments in rural electrification in decline, there is no history of annual budgeting for cooking energy programmes. The paper recommends a number of action points for expanding access to energy services that benefit the poor. These include the development and launching of a new national rural electrification strategy; establishment of a national cooking energy programme; and the development of clear policy incentives to support private sector investment in energy services for the poor. It calls on the Nigerian Central Bank of Nigeria to set aside 10% of the existing power intervention fund for pro poor energy financing; and the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission to establish a clear framework for the utilization of the Consumer Assistance Fund. Other recommendations include the use of a proportion of the Ecological Fund to finance cooking energy; establishment of a donor’s platform on pro poor energy; and the mobilization of civil society in providing community-level energy services.

  7. Backyard Telescopes Watch an Expanding Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-01-01

    What can you do with a team of people armed with backyard telescopes and a decade of patience? Test how binary star systems evolve under Einsteins general theory of relativity!Unusual VariablesCataclysmic variables irregularly brightening binary stars consisting of an accreting white dwarf and a donor star are a favorite target among amateur astronomers: theyre detectable even with small telescopes, and theres a lot we can learn about stellar astrophysics by observing them, if were patient.Diagram of a cataclysmic variable. In an AM CVn, the donor is most likely a white dwarf as well, or a low-mass helium star. [Philip D. Hall]Among the large family of cataclysmic variables is one unusual type: the extremely short-period AM Canum Venaticorum (AM CVn) stars. These rare variables (only 40 are known) are unique in having spectra dominated by helium, suggesting that they contain little or no hydrogen. Because of this, scientists have speculated that the donor stars in these systems are either white dwarfs themselves or very low-mass helium stars.Why study AM CVn stars? Because their unusual configuration allows us to predict the behavior of their orbital evolution. According to the general theory of relativity, the two components of an AM CVn will spiral closer and closer as the system loses angular momentum to gravitational-wave emission. Eventually they will get so close that the low-mass companion star overflows its Roche lobe, beginning mass transfer to the white dwarf. At this point, the orbital evolution will reverse and the binary orbit will expand, increasing its period.CBA member Enrique de Miguel, lead author on the study, with his backyard telescope in Huelva, Spain. [Enrique de Miguel]Backyard Astronomy Hard at WorkMeasuring the evolution of an AM CVns orbital period is the best way to confirm this model, but this is no simple task! To observe this evolution, we first need a system with a period that can be very precisely measured best achieved with an

  8. Care With The Potential Organ Donor In The Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Patrícia Barreto de Carvalho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organ transplants have expanded throughout the country, being extremely significant for the population. Objective: To know the reality of organ harvesting and describe the care with the potential organ donor in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU and compare it with the pertinent literature. Method: It is a research of exploratory and descriptive nature, with a qualitative approach. The data were analyzed through the content analysis idealized by Bardin. Results: The findings indicate that the resolution of care and procedures with the potential donor is essential to the success of transplants in our country. Conclusions: Several difficulties have been encountered, as the lack of human and material resources generating impasses in the specific care of the potential organ donor and the lack of provision of continuing education. Keywords: Organ donation; Intensive Care Unit; Nursing.

  9. FORUM Paediatric living donor liver transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the definitive treatment for children with end-stage liver disease (ESLD). The greatest limitation for LT is scarcity of deceased donor organs. This is particularly critical for smaller children (weighing <10 kg). Living donor liver transplantation. (LDLT) has emerged over the last 2 decades as a viable ...

  10. Factors Influencing Donor Partnership Effectiveness | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... This paper, published in the peer-reviewed journal of philanthropy The Foundation Review, discusses the development and use of this new tool as well as various aspects of internal and inter-institutional communication as it pertains to donor collaboration. Download the PDF : Factors Influencing Donor ...

  11. Normothermic machine perfusion for donor liver preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolboom, H.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, liver transplantation is the only treatment for end-stage liver failure. Unfortunately, a sever shortage of donor organs causes significant mortality amongst patients awaiting transplantation. The donor organ shortage could be alleviated by using organs that are normally not accepted for

  12. Fire protection design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  13. [Start of an adult living donor liver transplantation program in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentha, G; Morel, P; Majno, P; Giostra, E; Rubbia, L; Bednarkiewicz, M; Van Gessel, E; Klopfenstein, C E; Romand, J; Hadengue, A

    2000-08-26

    resolved popliteal sensory palsy). Living-donor right liver transplantation is a potentially valuable solution to the increasing shortage of donor organs. The procedure can be performed safely provided stringent criteria for donor selection, for donor-recipient coupling (> 1% graft to body weight ratio) and for centre selection (experience in liver surgery, reduced and split liver transplantation) are applied.

  14. Tele-recruitment for Donor Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Tiwari, A

    2014-03-01

    Blood transfusion services are the integral part of health care system and these services have safe blood transfusion as the major goal. Voluntary blood donation is the key to safe blood and this safety is further enhanced when the voluntary blood donors become repeat/regular donors. Retention of donors is therefore a very crucial strategy to ensure enhanced blood safety. Tele-recruitment is an effective medium of recruiting and more importantly retaining donors via means of telephone/Short Message Service. This study was carried out at a standalone blood bank during the period from January to December 2011 with objectives of donor retention, relationship management with the support of personnel with good communication skills, Donor data base, Integrated software and communication facility. For Initial 4 months there was no tele-recruiter, then for 2 months two tele-recruiter and for next 6 months three tele-recruiter were dedicated. Only impact of tele-recruitment on in-house donation was taken into consideration. 2,091 donors were recruited through tele-recruitment in this eight-month period. This was 63 % of in-house donations and 13 % of total donations. In other words out of every five in-house donations, three donations were from people contacted through tele-recruitment. Repeat voluntary blood donation is the safest donation. Tele-recruitment does this by converting 'first-time' donors into repeat/regular donors. Simple intervention like reminder calls on telephone can be highly effective tool to retain donors. Tele-recruitment helped the blood center establish relationships with individual donors, and, maybe, even the society at large. Tele-recruitment is a very low-cost model which can be easily replicated in all kind of blood banks, be it standalone, or a hospital based. Even the blood centers which are largely dependent on replacement donors can possibly have good results and convert replacement donors into repeat/regular voluntary blood donors.

  15. Potential organ donor audit in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, M

    2010-11-01

    As increasing demand for organs is a challenge for transplant services worldwide it is essential to audit the process of organ donation. To address this, a national audit of potential organ donors was undertaken across hospitals with Intensive Care Units (N = 36). Questionnaires were returned on all patients (n = 2073) who died in these units from 1\\/9\\/07-31\\/8\\/08; 200 (10%) of these patients were considered for Brain Stem Testing (BST), 158 patients (79%) were diagnosed Brain Stem Dead (BSD) and 138 patients (87%) became potential donors. Consent for donation was given by 92 (69%) next of kin and 90 potential donors (65%) became organ donors. There was no evidence of a large number of potential organ donors being missed. Recommendations included completion of BSTs on all appropriate patients, development of support on BST, referral of all BSD patients to the Organ Procurement Service; enhanced co-ordination within hospitals and sustained information\\/education campaigns.

  16. Care With The Potential Organ Donor In The Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Francisca Patrícia Barreto de Carvalho; Kênnia Stephanie Morais Oliveira; Glauber Weder dos Santos Silva; Geórgia Nóbrega Melo; Thiago Enggle de Araújo Alves; Ana Cristina Arrais; Ilana Deyse Rocha Leite; Amélia Carolina Lopes Fernandes; Lucidio Clebeson Oliveira; Francisco Rafael Ribeiro Soares

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Organ transplants have expanded throughout the country, being extremely significant for the population. Objective: To know the reality of organ harvesting and describe the care with the potential organ donor in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and compare it with the pertinent literature. Method: It is a research of exploratory and descriptive nature, with a qualitative approach. The data were analyzed through the content analysis idealized by Bardin. Results: The fin...

  17. Non-therapeutic (elective) ventilation of potential organ donors: the ethical basis for changing the law.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, A B

    1996-01-01

    Non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors would increase the supply of kidneys for transplantation. There are no major ethical objections to it. The means of permitting it are forbidden by laws with an ethical basis. A law permitting it would need an ethical basis. Introducing a third legal method of diagnosing death would be unethical. Expanding the power of the advance directive to permit procedures involving minimal harm would be ethical but not helpful. Extending the power of ...

  18. Multimodal freight investment criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Literature was reviewed on multi-modal investment criteria for freight projects, examining measures and techniques for quantifying project benefits and costs, as well as ways to describe the economic importance of freight transportation. : A limited ...

  19. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  20. Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA develops water quality criteria based on the latest scientific knowledge to protect human health and aquatic life. This information serves as guidance to states and tribes in adopting water quality standards.

  1. Integrated Criteria Document Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Slooff W; Cleven RFMJ; Janus JA; van der Poel P; van Beelen P; Boumans LJM; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Krajnc EI; de Leeuw FAAM; Matthijsen AJCM; van de Meent D; van der Meulen A; Mohn GR; Wijland GC

    1990-01-01

    Betreft de engelse versie van rapport 758701001
    Bij dit rapport behoort een appendix onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria Document Chromium: Effects" Auteurs: Janus JA; Krajnc EI
    (appendix: see 710401002A)

  2. Donor Conception and "Passing," or; Why Australian Parents of Donor-Conceived Children Want Donors Who Look Like Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Karen-Anne

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the processes through which Australian recipients select unknown donors for use in assisted reproductive technologies and speculates on how those processes may affect the future life of the donor-conceived person. I will suggest that trust is an integral part of the exchange between donors, recipients, and gamete agencies in donor conception and heavily informs concepts of relatedness, race, ethnicity, kinship, class, and visibility. The decision to be transparent (or not) about a child's genetic parentage affects recipient parents' choices of donor, about who is allowed to "know" children's genetic backgrounds, and how important it is to be able to "pass" as an unassisted conception. In this way, recipients must trust the process, institutions, and individuals involved in their treatment, as well as place trust in the future they imagine for their child. The current market for donor gametes reproduces normative conceptions of the nuclear family, kinship, and relatedness by facilitating "matching" donors to recipients by phenotype and cultural affinities. Recipient parents who choose not to prioritize "matching," and actively disclose the process of children's conceptions, may embark on a project of queering heteronormative family structures and place great trust in both their own children and changing social attitudes to reduce stigma and generate acceptance for non-traditional families.

  3. Higher Bilirubin Levels of Healthy Living Liver Donors Are Associated With Lower Posttransplant Hepatocellular Carcinoma Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangbin; Yang, Ju Dong; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Kim, Jong Man; Shin, Jun Chul; Son, Hee Jeong; Gwak, Mi Sook; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Gaab Soo

    2016-09-01

    Serum bilirubin level, which may reflect the host defense against increased oxidative stress, is inversely associated with the risk of cancer development. In liver transplantation, the intrinsic bilirubin metabolism of donor liver is subsequently translated into recipient. Thus, we hypothesized that liver transplantation conducted with living donors with higher serum bilirubin reduces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence. Two hundred fifty recipients who underwent liver transplantation for treating HCC within the Milan criteria were included in the study. The association between donor preoperative total bilirubin concentration and the risk of HCC recurrence was analyzed using the Fine and Gray regression model with posttransplant death as a competing risk event with adjustment for tumor biology including α-fetoprotein, histological differentiation, and microvascular invasion. All donors were confirmed to have no underlying hepatobiliary diseases or hematological disorders. Donor preoperative total bilirubin concentration was 0.7 mg/dL in median and ranged from 0.2 to 2.7 mg/dL. Thirty-five (14.0%) recipients developed HCC recurrence. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that donor preoperative total bilirubin concentration was inversely associated with the recurrence risk (hazard ratio, 0.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.72; P = 0.013). The highest (≥1.0 mg/dL) versus lowest (≤0.6 mg/dL) tertile of donor preoperative total bilirubin showed a significant reduction of the recurrence risk (hazard ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.70; P = 0.006). Hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence risk decreases in relation to the increase in total serum bilirubin level of healthy living donors without underlying hepatobiliary or hematological disorders. Further validation of bilirubin as a potent anticancer substance against HCC is warranted.

  4. Higher organ donation consent rates by relatives of potential uncontrolled donors versus potential controlled donors after death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, J.; Mook, W.N. van; Willems, M.E.; Heurn, L.W. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Refusal to consent to organ donation is an important cause of the persisting gap between the number of potential organ donors and effectuated donors. In the Netherlands, organ donors include both uncontrolled donors: donors who die unexpectedly after cardiac death (DCD), after failed

  5. Expanding the Game Design Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Majgaard, Gunver

    2016-01-01

    layer establishes correspondence between formal elements of computer games and the structure of problem-based creativity. It addresses how game design challenges should be formulated and how creative solutions can be measured. The fourth and final layer demonstrates how clear framing can act......This article considers game design research in educational settings. Its focus is on how undergraduate students – particularly engineering students – learn computer game design. From observations conducted during our game design courses we have developed a model of expanded game design space....... It encapsulates the entire development process from the first ideas to the final game with emphasis on game design thinking. Our model of expanded game design space consists of four separate – yet interconnected – layers in the process of game development. The first layer addresses the importance of framing...

  6. Swedish sperm donors are driven by altruism, but shortage of sperm donors leads to reproductive travelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerhovd, Erling; Faurskov, Anders; Werner, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Swedish legislation requires that sperm donors are identifiable to offspring. In Denmark sperm donors remain anonymous. The aim of this study was to examine sperm donation in Sweden by identifying socio-demographic backgrounds, motivations and attitudes among donors and to describe options and plans of sperm recipients. Furthermore, the willingness of Swedish health care providers to assist in treatment abroad, where sperm from an anonymous donor were to be used, was assessed. The extent of travelling to Denmark for reproductive purposes was also examined. Thirty Swedish sperm donors completed a questionnaire and were interviewed about their backgrounds, motivations and attitudes. Thirty couples where the infertility workup had shown azoospermia were interviewed about their options for achieving parenthood. The willingness to assist in fertility treatment abroad and the extent of reproductive cross border travelling were assessed by interviewing health care providers and by contacting Danish clinics. Almost all donors were Caucasian. The main motivation for sperm donors was to help others. Owing to shortage of sperm donors many Caucasian recipients intended to have treatment abroad. For most non-Caucasian recipients sperm from a donor of appropriate ethnicity were not available in Sweden. Whether the sperm donor was anonymous or identifiable was not of major importance to most sperm recipients. Health care providers expressed unanimous willingness to assist in treatment with sperm from an anonymous donor. Our inquiry indicated that more than 250 Swedish sperm recipients travel to Denmark annually. Identifiable sperm donors are driven by altruistic motives, but shortage of sperm donors leads to reproductive travelling. Recruitment strategies to increase the number of sperm donors in Sweden are therefore warranted.

  7. Assessment of donor heart viability during ex vivo heart perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher W; Ambrose, Emma; Müller, Alison; Li, Yun; Le, Hoa; Hiebert, Brett; Arora, Rakesh; Lee, Trevor W; Dixon, Ian; Tian, Ganghong; Nagendran, Jayan; Hryshko, Larry; Freed, Darren

    2015-10-01

    Ex vivo heart perfusion (EVHP) may facilitate resuscitation of discarded donor hearts and expand the donor pool; however, a reliable means of demonstrating organ viability prior to transplantation is required. Therefore, we sought to identify metabolic and functional parameters that predict myocardial performance during EVHP. To evaluate the parameters over a broad spectrum of organ function, we obtained hearts from 9 normal pigs and 37 donation after circulatory death pigs and perfused them ex vivo. Functional parameters obtained from a left ventricular conductance catheter, oxygen consumption, coronary vascular resistance, and lactate concentration were measured, and linear regression analyses were performed to identify which parameters best correlated with myocardial performance (cardiac index: mL·min(-1)·g(-1)). Functional parameters exhibited excellent correlation with myocardial performance and demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for identifying hearts at risk of poor post-transplant function (ejection fraction: R(2) = 0.80, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.85; stroke work: R(2) = 0.76, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.77; minimum dP/dt: R(2) = 0.74, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.54; tau: R(2) = 0.51, sensitivity = 1.00, specificity = 0.92), whereas metabolic parameters were limited in their ability to predict myocardial performance (oxygen consumption: R(2) = 0.28; coronary vascular resistance: R(2) = 0.20; lactate concentration: R(2) = 0.02). We concluded that evaluation of functional parameters provides the best assessment of myocardial performance during EVHP, which highlights the need for an EVHP device capable of assessing the donor heart in a physiologic working mode.

  8. The role of the altruistic unbalanced chain in exchange living donor renal transplantation: single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, B K; Kwon, O J; Kang, C M

    2012-01-01

    The exchange donor program in renal transplantation is an efficient solution for recipients with a blood type or crossmatch-incompatible donor. However, this program has some difficulties to define unacceptable human leukocyte antigen matches, deteriorating clinical potential recipient condition, and withdrawal of donor consent. We analyzed the outcomes of exchange donor renal transplantation through the altruistic unbalanced chain. Among 152 cases of exchange donor renal transplantation from 1991 to 2010 in our hospital, we performed 58 procedures through altruistic unbalanced chains. We compared their outcomes with the direct and balanced chain group. We analyzed retrospectively whether this program expanded the donor pool, seeking better immunologic, size, and age matching. The graft survival and acute rejection rates did not differ significantly in the two groups. Of 152 cases, 58 (38.2%) renal transplantations were performed through an unbalanced chain. Seventeen waiting list recipients were transplanted through an altruistic unbalanced chain. In blood type O recipients (n = 32), the causes of registration in the exchange program were ABO incompatibility (93.3%), and positive crossmatch (6.7%). Nine altruistic blood type O donors and 9 (28.1%) type O recipients underwent transplantations through this chain. We suggest the altruistic unbalanced chain may expand the donor pool with advantages for difficult-to-match pairs. The disadvantages of type O recipients may be overcome through the use of an unbalanced chain. The altruistic unbalanced exchange transplantation program can help easy-to-match subjects, shortening the waiting periods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Strategies for customized neck reconstruction based on the pre-expanded superficial cervical artery flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haizhou; Zhou, Yiwen; Du, Zijing; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Xie, Feng; Xie, Yun; Herrler, Tanja; Li, Qingfeng; Zan, Tao

    2015-08-01

    It is still highly challenging to restore the esthetic neck contour for postburn deformities. In many patients with burns, the back skin remains intact, which is a useful donor site for extensive contracture release. As the main technique, the refinement of the pre-expanded superficial cervical artery (SCA) flaps may improve its application in diverse neck contractures. This study reviewed the cases of three types of neck contractures that were reconstructed with pre-expanded SCA flaps: (1) for unilateral neck contractures, the flaps were harvested as pedicled perforator flaps including a small amount of muscle; (2) for lateral and anterior neck contractures, vascular augmentation with circumflex scapular vessels was used to increase the flap size; (3) for contractures of the entire neck, maximal flap release with pedicle dissection toward the origin of the superficial cervical vessels allowed for reaching contralateral defects. From March 2010 to September 2012, pre-expanded SCA flaps were recommended in 15 patients with severe neck contracture. Tip necrosis occurred in one patient. The donor sites were closed primarily in all cases. One patient had donor-site wound dehiscence that healed within 2 weeks by conservative management. All patients had restored neck extension to a near-normal position without the sense of restricted neck flexion or rotation. Pre-expanded SCA flaps are practical and flexible for the reconstruction of diverse scar contractures ranging from unilateral to total neck lesions. Considering the reconstructive efficiency and the reduced donor-site morbidity, this flap may be an ideal option for the reconstruction of severe neck scar contractures. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Plastic compressed collagen as a novel carrier for expanded human corneal endothelial cells for transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah J Levis

    Full Text Available Current treatments for reversible blindness caused by corneal endothelial cell failure involve replacing the failed endothelium with donor tissue using a one donor-one recipient strategy. Due to the increasing pressure of a worldwide donor cornea shortage there has been considerable interest in developing alternative strategies to treat endothelial disorders using expanded cell replacement therapy. Protocols have been developed which allow successful expansion of endothelial cells in vitro but this approach requires a supporting material that would allow easy transfer of cells to the recipient. We describe the first use of plastic compressed collagen as a highly effective, novel carrier for human corneal endothelial cells. A human corneal endothelial cell line and primary human corneal endothelial cells retained their characteristic cobblestone morphology and expression of tight junction protein ZO-1 and pump protein Na+/K+ ATPase α1 after culture on collagen constructs for up to 14 days. Additionally, ultrastructural analysis suggested a well-integrated endothelial layer with tightly opposed cells and apical microvilli. Plastic compressed collagen is a superior biomaterial in terms of its speed and ease of production and its ability to be manipulated in a clinically relevant manner without breakage. This method provides expanded endothelial cells with a substrate that could be suitable for transplantation allowing one donor cornea to potentially treat multiple patients.

  11. Plastic compressed collagen as a novel carrier for expanded human corneal endothelial cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, Hannah J; Peh, Gary S L; Toh, Kah-Peng; Poh, Rebekah; Shortt, Alex J; Drake, Rosemary A L; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Daniels, Julie T

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments for reversible blindness caused by corneal endothelial cell failure involve replacing the failed endothelium with donor tissue using a one donor-one recipient strategy. Due to the increasing pressure of a worldwide donor cornea shortage there has been considerable interest in developing alternative strategies to treat endothelial disorders using expanded cell replacement therapy. Protocols have been developed which allow successful expansion of endothelial cells in vitro but this approach requires a supporting material that would allow easy transfer of cells to the recipient. We describe the first use of plastic compressed collagen as a highly effective, novel carrier for human corneal endothelial cells. A human corneal endothelial cell line and primary human corneal endothelial cells retained their characteristic cobblestone morphology and expression of tight junction protein ZO-1 and pump protein Na+/K+ ATPase α1 after culture on collagen constructs for up to 14 days. Additionally, ultrastructural analysis suggested a well-integrated endothelial layer with tightly opposed cells and apical microvilli. Plastic compressed collagen is a superior biomaterial in terms of its speed and ease of production and its ability to be manipulated in a clinically relevant manner without breakage. This method provides expanded endothelial cells with a substrate that could be suitable for transplantation allowing one donor cornea to potentially treat multiple patients.

  12. Second-opinion stress tele-echocardiography for the Adonhers (Aged donor heart rescue by stress echo) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Daniele; Cini, Davide; Arpesella, Giorgio; Gherardi, Sonia; Calamai, Italo; Barletta, Giuseppe; Valente, Serafina; Pasanisi, Emilio; Sansoni, Stefania; Ricci, Caterina; Serra, Walter; Picano, Eugenio; Bombardini, Tonino

    2010-06-01

    To resolve the current shortage of donor hearts, we established the Adonhers protocol. An upward shift of the donor age cut-off limit (from the present 55 to 65 years) is acceptable if a stress echo screening on the candidate donor heart is normal. This study aimed to verify feasibility of a "second opinion" of digitally transferred images of stress echo results to minimize technical variability in selection of aged donor hearts for heart transplant. The informatics infrastructure was created for a core lab reading with a second opinion from the Pisa stress echo lab. To test the system, simulation standard stress echo cineloops were sent digitally from 5 peripheral labs to the central core lab.Starting January 2009, real marginal donor stress echos were sent via internet to the central core echo lab, Pisa, for a second opinion before heart transplant. In the simulation protocol, 30 dipyridamole stress echocardiograms were sent from the five peripheral echo labs to the central core lab in Pisa. Both the echo images and reports were correctly uploaded in the web system and sent to the core echo lab; the second opinion evaluation was obtained in all cases (100% feasibility). In the transplant protocol, eight donor cases were sent to the Pisa core lab for the second opinion protocol, and six of them were transplanted in marginal recipients. Second-Opinion Stress Tele-Echocardiography can effectively be performed in a network aimed to safely expand the heart donor pool for heart transplant.

  13. RETROPERITONEOSCOPIC DONOR NEPHRECTOMY: EXPERIENCE WITH TEN OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We modified the method of retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrectomy and evaluated results of first 10 pro- cedures. We performed four left- and six right-sided donor nephrectomy. There were no conversions to open or hand-assisted surgery. All organs have been successfully transplanted. Retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrec- tomy is safe and feasible. The method has three main advantages over conventional laparoscopic nephrectomy: the absence of contact with bowel, spleen, liver and other intra-abdominal structures, more comfortable access to the renal artery, absence of intraperitoneal pressure elevation. 

  14. Donor policy rules and aid effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars

    2008-01-01

    policy choices, aid disbursements may lead to faster transitional growth, stagnation or cyclical growth. Moreover, the analysis also suggests that donor policies may be part of the reason why foreign aid is not found to be uniformly effective in raising long-run productivity across recipients......The present paper examines the macroeconomic impact of aid, by introducing endogenous aid allocations into a neoclassical growth framework. On this basis it is shown that donor policies can have important implications for the trajectory of recipients' GDP per capita. Depending on specific donor...

  15. [Lung transplantation with uncontrolled non-heart-beating donors. Transplantation. Donor prognostic factor and immediate evolution post transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Diego A; Del Río, Francisco; Fuentes, Manuel E; Naranjo, Sara; Moradiellos, Javier; Gómez, David; Rubio, Juan José; Calvo, Elpidio; Varela, Andrés

    2011-08-01

    Uncontrolled donation after cardiac death (DACD) has become an alternative to lung transplantation with encephalic-death donation. The main objective of this study is to describe the incidence of clinically relevant events in the period of thirty days after lung transplant with uncontrolled DACD and the influence of factors depending on the donor and donation process as well. Historical cohort study of 33 lung transplant receivers at Hospital Puerta de Hierro and Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla with 32 DACD from Hospital Clínico San Carlos from 2002 to 2008. We studied surgical and medical complications, primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, pneumonia and mortality. We made an evaluation of the donor characteristics and donation procedure times (minutes). Median age of recipients was 50.5 years (interquartile range, 38.5-58). There were 28 males and 5 females. Cumulative incidence of events in the first month was: pneumonia 10 (31.3%); primary graft dysfunction 15 (46.9%); rejection 12 (37.5%); mortality 4 (12.1%); medical complications 25 (78.1%); and surgical complications 18 (56.3%). Median time of cardiac arrest was higher in those who presented pneumonia (15 vs. 7.5; p = 0.027). Median time of cold ischemia was higher in those who presented surgical complications and mortality (436 vs. 343.5; p = 0.04; 505 vs. 410; p = 0.033, respectively), and median of total ischemia times were longer in the recipients who died (828 vs. 695; p = 0.036). Uncontrolled DACD are a valid alternative for expanding the donor pool in order to mitigate the current shortage of lungs that are valid for transplantation. The incidence of complications is comparable with published data in the literature. Copyright © 2010 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Human decellularized bone scaffolds from aged donors show improved osteoinductive capacity compared to young donor bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Smith

    Full Text Available To improve the safe use of allograft bone, decellularization techniques may be utilized to produce acellular scaffolds. Such scaffolds should retain their innate biological and biomechanical capacity and support mesenchymal stem cell (MSC osteogenic differentiation. However, as allograft bone is derived from a wide age-range, this study aimed to determine whether donor age impacts on the ability an osteoinductive, acellular scaffold produced from human bone to promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSC. BM-MSCs from young and old donors were seeded on acellular bone cubes from young and old donors undergoing osteoarthritis related hip surgery. All combinations resulted in increased osteogenic gene expression, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP enzyme activity, however BM-MSCs cultured on old donor bone displayed the largest increases. BM-MSCs cultured in old donor bone conditioned media also displayed higher osteogenic gene expression and ALP activity than those exposed to young donor bone conditioned media. ELISA and Luminex analysis of conditioned media demonstrated similar levels of bioactive factors between age groups; however, IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP1 concentration was significantly higher in young donor samples. Additionally, structural analysis of old donor bone indicated an increased porosity compared to young donor bone. These results demonstrate the ability of a decellularized scaffold produced from young and old donors to support osteogenic differentiation of cells from young and old donors. Significantly, the older donor bone produced greater osteogenic differentiation which may be related to reduced IGFBP1 bioavailability and increased porosity, potentially explaining the excellent clinical results seen with the use of allograft from aged donors.

  17. When Operating on Dead People Saves Lives: Benefits of Surgical Organ Donor Intensivists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kristin; Talley, Cynthia; Yarrison, Rebecca B; Bernard, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for many patients suffering from end-stage organ failure. Organs have been successfully recovered after a variety of aggressive interventions. We propose that decompressive laparotomy, when clinically indicated, should be considered in the aggressive resuscitation of potential organ donors. A thorough literature review examining aggressive interventions on potential organ donors was conducted after experience with a unique case at this institution. Articles were reviewed for the types of interventions performed as well as the time frame in relation to organ donation. In our case, several ethical issues were raised when considering decompressive laparotomy in a patient pronounced dead by neurologic criteria. We propose that having a surgical intensivist involved in the management of potential donors will further increase the salvage rate, as more invasive resuscitation options are possible.

  18. When Operating on Dead People Saves Lives: Benefits of Surgical Organ Donor Intensivists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid organ transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for many patients suffering from end-stage organ failure. Organs have been successfully recovered after a variety of aggressive interventions. We propose that decompressive laparotomy, when clinically indicated, should be considered in the aggressive resuscitation of potential organ donors. A thorough literature review examining aggressive interventions on potential organ donors was conducted after experience with a unique case at this institution. Articles were reviewed for the types of interventions performed as well as the time frame in relation to organ donation. In our case, several ethical issues were raised when considering decompressive laparotomy in a patient pronounced dead by neurologic criteria. We propose that having a surgical intensivist involved in the management of potential donors will further increase the salvage rate, as more invasive resuscitation options are possible.

  19. Sero-prevalence of brucellosis among blood donors in Ahvaz, Southwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhussein Shakurnia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify sero-prevalence of brucellosis among blood donors in Ahvaz city, Southwest Iran. Methods: A total number of 1 450 serum samples from blood donation were collected and were screened for the presence of brucella antibody. Rose Bengal Plate Test, Standard Agglutination Test (SAT, and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME agglutination were tested in the sample. SAT dilution ≥1/80 and 2ME agglutination ≥1/40 were considered positive. Results: Sero-prevalence of brucellosis among the blood donors was 0.70%, 0.34%, and 0.20% by Rose Bengal Plate Test, SAT, and 2ME respectively. Conclusions: Considering the 1/80 titer of SAT as the criteria of contamination with brucella, routine screening of sero-prevalence of brucella in blood donors is not recommended in this area.

  20. Robustness - acceptance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzuto, Enrico; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Kroon, Inger B.

    2010-01-01

    This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen in conjunc......This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen...

  1. Efficacy of different bone volume expanders for augmenting lumbar fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2008-01-01

    A wide variety of bone volume expanders are being used in performing posterolateral lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented lumbar fusions. This article presents a review of their efficacy based on fusion rates, complications, and outcomes. Lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented fusions frequently use laminar autografts and different bone graft expanders. This review presents the utility of multiple forms/ratios of DBMs containing allografts. It also discusses the efficacy of artificial bone graft substitutes, including HA and B-TCP. Dynamic x-ray and/or CT examinations were used to document fusion in most series. Outcomes were variously assessed using Odom's criteria or different outcome questionnaires (Oswestry Questionnaire, SF-36, Dallas Pain Questionnaire, and/or Low Back Pain Rating Scale). Performing noninstrumented and instrumented lumbar posterolateral fusions resulted in comparable fusion rates in many series. Similar outcomes were also documented based on Odom's criteria or the multiple patient-based questionnaires. However, in some studies, the addition of spinal instrumentation increased the reoperation rate, operative time, blood loss, and cost. Various forms of DBMs, applied in different ratios to autografts, effectively supplemented spinal fusions in animal models and patient series. beta-Tricalcium phosphate, which is used to augment autograft fusions addressing idiopathic scoliosis or lumbar disease, also proved to be effective. Different types of bone volume expanders, including various forms of allograft-based DBMs, and artificial bone graft substitutes (HA and B-TCP) effectively promote posterolateral lumbar noninstrumented and instrumented fusions when added to autografts.

  2. Donor acceptor complexes of noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mück, Leonie Anna; Timoshkin, Alexey Y; von Hopffgarten, Moritz; Frenking, Gernot

    2009-03-25

    Donor-acceptor (DA) complexes of noble gases (Ng) of the general type A noble gas, a lone pair of the donor molecule and a vacant orbital of the acceptor molecule. Detailed bonding analysis of the model compounds F(3)Al-Ng-NH(3) reveals that Ng-ammonia interaction is repulsive due to Pauli repulsion. Bonding interaction between Ng and N is mostly electrostatic. In contrast, strong orbital interactions are responsible for the attractive interactions between Ng and AlF(3). Due to the repulsive interactions with the donor molecule and a sizable reorganization energy of the acceptor molecule, optimization attempts of the A noble gases. These are the first examples of the thermodynamically stable Ar and Kr compounds. Application of the push-pull cryptand ligands featuring multiple (two and three) donor-acceptor induced chemical bonds is expected to yield stable complexes with virtually any electron-rich element in the periodic table.

  3. RESULTS OF THE SPECIAL BLOOD DONOR DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    Responding to the HUG (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève) hospitals’ urgent appeal for blood donations during this summer season, the CERN medical staff organised a day of blood donations for the Swiss bloodbank CTS on 30 July. They were supported by NOVAE (Restaurant No. 1), who provided donors with a free snack. This specially arranged campaign was a success, as the 135 volunteers included 66 first-time donors, and a total of 99 standard bags of blood were collected. (Swiss hospitals need 1300 bags every day!) The CTS and CERN’s medical staff wish to thank the donors and all others who helped make the event a success. Upcoming blood donor days at CERN: 12 November 2008 and 10 March 2009.

  4. RESULTS OF THE SPECIAL BLOOD DONOR DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    Responding to the HUG (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève) hospitals’ urgent appeal for blood donations during this summer season, the CERN medical staff organised a day of blood donations for the Swiss bloodbank CTS on 30 July. They were supported by NOVAE (Restaurant No. 1), who provided donors with a free snack. This specially arranged campaign was a success, as the 135 volunteers included 66 first-time donors, and a total of 99 standard bags of blood was collected. (Swiss hospitals need 1300 bags every day!) The CTS and CERN’s medical staff want to thank the donors and all others who helped make the event a success. Upcoming blood donor days at CERN: 12 November 2008 and 10 March 2009.

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  6. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... 2:30. credihealth 146 views 2:30 Pain Control: Support for ... Jeff, peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 29,377 ...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  8. Thermodynamic and Spectrophotometric Studies of Electron Donor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ). The stoichiometry of the complex was 2:1 ... and for assay of active pharmaceutical ingredient. (API) content to ensure efficacy and safety of the ..... alternative assay technique for cephalexin by charge transfer interaction of the donor: ...

  9. The dead donor rule: a defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Samuel C M

    2013-08-01

    Miller, Truog, and Brock have recently argued that the "dead donor rule," the requirement that donors be determined to be dead before vital organs are procured for transplantation, cannot withstand ethical scrutiny. In their view, the dead donor rule is inconsistent with existing life-saving practices of organ transplantation, lacks a cogent ethical rationale, and is not necessary for maintenance of public trust in organ transplantation. In this paper, the second of these claims will be evaluated. (The first and third are not addressed.) The claim that the dead donor rule lacks a cogent ethical rationale will be shown to be an expression of the contemporary rejection of the moral significance of the traditional distinction between killing and allowing to die. The moral significance of this traditional distinction, and the associated norm that doctors should not kill their patients, will be defended, and this critique of it shown to be unsuccessful.

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  11. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  12. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  13. Psychiatric history in living kidney donor candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Katsuji; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Ishigooka, Jun

    2012-04-01

    To critically discuss recent studies of living kidney donor candidates with a past or current psychiatric history and to offer guidance for the psychosocial evaluation of such donors. A global consensus has been developed that active, significant mental illness and substance abuse are absolute contraindications to organ donation due to diminished ability to make a well informed, rational decision about donation or to maintain health status after donation. However, to date, there has been little information published on the suitability for donation and the long-term psychosocial and medical outcomes after donation in donors with mental health issues, especially relatively milder psychiatric disorders, or past significant psychiatric history. To resolve the ethical dilemma of whether living donor candidates with mental health issues should be allowed to donate as is their right or be considered a vulnerable group in need of protection, we need more information. Information should include careful evaluation, possible intervention and follow-up to optimize donation.

  14. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her blood stem cell donation experience at the National ... 31,594 views 10:58 AML Survivor meets her German stem cell donor for the first time ...

  15. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have ... 11 12 videos Play all exercise cassie shipman Leukemia Survivor Meets Bone Marrow Donor - Duration: 4:47. ...

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on the use of BMT and PBSCT, see http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/fa... If you are ... registry of volunteers willing to be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... My Personal Experience in Donating Bone Marrow/Stem cells. Be a Donor, Fight Leukemia- Bradford Pine - Duration: 2:59. Bradford Pine 36,968 views ... Loading... Loading... About Press Copyright Creators ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  19. Alginate dressing as a donor site haemostat.

    OpenAIRE

    Groves, A. R.; Lawrence, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An alginate fibre dressing has been used to reduce blood loss from skin graft donor sites. Significant haemostasis has been achieved in the immediate post surgery phase and no adverse reactions observed.

  20. Analysis of donor heterogeneity as a factor affecting the clinical outcome of oocyte donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sarah E; Faddy, Malcolm; Levett, Stephen; Sharma, Vinay; Gosden, Roger

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated factors that may affect the clinical outcome of oocyte donation on the basis of data from a clinical programme involving 243 treatment cycles analysed retrospectively. In each cohort, oocytes were distributed randomly to one, two or three recipients, which enabled the outcomes in terms of pregnancy and live birth rates to be compared among donors. The results were compared with respect to age of the donor and recipient, number of oocytes collected, fertilization and cleavage rates, qualitative embryo criteria (morphological grade) and other clinical criteria. Most variables had no significant effect on either outcome, although the live birth rate varied inversely with recipient age. Unsurprisingly, the pregnancy rate was correlated positively with the number of embryos transferred. Most of the variation in pregnancy and live birth rates (85-90%) could not be accounted for by any specific donation characteristic, indicating that interdonor heterogeneity was the result of idiopathic factors. The factor most predictive of a recipient's cycle outcome was a history of previous success of the donor, which accounted for approximately 30% of the variation in live birth rates. Pregnancy success rates varied widely among oocyte donors, as has been found among sperm donors. This observation highlights the need to identify markers that predict developmental competence and help to identify the genetic and environmental bases of differential fertility. In conclusion, the quality of oocytes varied widely among women presumed to be fertile by clinical criteria, and the causative factors set a major limitation on the prospects of improving the outcome of egg donation.

  1. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy increases the supply of living donor kidneys: a center-specific microeconomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, P C; Johnson, L B

    2000-05-27

    A tenet of microeconomics is that new technology will shift the supply curve to the right. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) is a new technique for removal of living donor kidneys. Centers performing this procedure have noted an increased number of patients presenting for donor evaluation. This has not been previously studied. The records of all LDN performed from May 1998 to February 1999 were reviewed. The following variables were examined: sex, age, related vs. unrelated donation, estimated blood loss, i.v. analgesia, length of stay, and time out of work. Donors undergoing traditional open donor nephrectomy during January 1997 to May 1998 served as the control group. A composite cost index was constructed. LDN significantly decreased length of stay, pain, and time out of work; the supply function shifted to the right. Telephone interviews revealed that 47% donated solely because of the LDN procedure. LDN increases the supply of living donor kidneys.

  2. Donor-Derived Myeloid Sarcoma in Two Kidney Transplant Recipients from a Single Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amudha Palanisamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the rare occurrence of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant patients who received organs from a single deceased donor. There was no evidence of preexisting hematologic malignancy in the donor at the time of organ recovery. Both recipients developed leukemic involvement that appeared to be limited to the transplanted organ. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and molecular genotyping analyses confirmed that the malignant cells were of donor origin in each patient. Allograft nephrectomy and immediate withdrawal of immunosuppression were performed in both cases; systemic chemotherapy was subsequently administered to one patient. Both recipients were in remission at least one year following the diagnosis of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma. These cases suggest that restoration of the immune system after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy and allograft nephrectomy may be sufficient to control HLA-mismatched donor-derived myeloid sarcoma without systemic involvement.

  3. Nitric oxide donors for treating preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckitt, Kirsten; Thornton, Steve; O'Donovan, Oliver P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-05-08

    A number of tocolytics have been advocated for the treatment of threatened preterm labour in order to delay birth. The rationale is that a delay in birth may be associated with improved neonatal morbidity or mortality. Nitric oxide donors, such as nitroglycerin, have been used to relax the uterus. This review addresses their efficacy, adverse effects and influence on neonatal outcome. To determine whether nitric oxide donors administered in threatened preterm labour are associated with a delay in birth, adverse effects or improved neonatal outcome. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (1 December 2013). Randomised controlled trials of nitric oxide donors administered for tocolysis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Twelve trials, including a total of 1227 women at risk of preterm labour, contributed data to this updated review. The methodological quality of trials was mixed; trials comparing nitric oxide donors with other types of tocolytics were not blinded and this may have had an impact on findings.Three studies compared nitric oxide donors (glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)) with placebo. There was no significant evidence that nitric oxide donors prolonged pregnancy beyond 48 hours (average risk ratio (RR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74 to 1.90, two studies, 186 women), and although for most adverse effects there was no significant difference between groups, women in the active treatment group in one study were at higher risk of experiencing a headache. For infant outcomes there was no significant evidence that nitric oxide donors reduced the risk of neonatal death or serious morbidity (stillbirth RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.01 to 8.59, one study, 153 infants; neonatal death RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.06 to 2.89, two studies, 186 infants). One study, using a composite outcome, reported a reduced risk of serious adverse outcomes for infants in the GTN group which approached statistical significance (RR

  4. Iron status of regular voluntary blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahida Vilsu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our blood bank is a regional blood transfusion centre, which accepts blood only from voluntary donors. Aim: The aim is to study iron status of regular voluntary donors who donated their blood at least twice in a year. Materials and Methods: Prior to blood donation, blood samples of 220 male and 30 female voluntary donors were collected. Control included 100 each male and female healthy individuals in the 18- to 60-year age group, who never donated blood and did not have any chronic infection. In the study and control groups, about 10% subjects consumed non-vegetarian diet. After investigation, 85 males and 56 females having haemoglobin (Hb levels above 12.5 g/dl were selected as controls. Donors were divided into ≤10, 11-20, 21-50 and> 50 blood donation categories. Majority of the donors in> 50 donation category donated blood four times in a year, whereas the remaining donors donated two to three times per year. Haematological parameters were measured on fully automatic haematology analyzer, serum iron and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC by biochemical methods, ferritin using ELISA kits and transferrin using immunoturbidometry kits. Iron/TIBC ratio x 100 gave percentage of transferrin saturation value. Statistical Analysis: Statistical evaluation was done by mean, standard deviation, pair t -test, χ2 and anova ( F -test. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the iron profile of vegetarian and non-vegetarian subjects or controls and the donors donating < 20 times. Significant increase or decrease was observed in mean values of various haematological and iron parameters in donors who donated blood for> 20 times ( P < 0.001, compared to controls. Anaemia, iron deficiency and depletion of iron stores were more prevalent in female donors ( P < 0.05 compared to males and especially in those male donors who donated their blood for more than 20 times. Conclusion: Regular voluntary blood

  5. Blood donation mobile applications: are donors ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shan; Chang, Shelley; Uyeno, Kasie; Almquist, Gay; Wang, Shirong

    2016-03-01

    The rapid rise of mobile communication technologies has the potential to dramatically change and improve blood donor recruitment and retention efforts. E-mail invitations were sent to blood donors in a large metropolitan area to participate in a Web-based survey designed to gauge their readiness and interest level for a blood donation mobile application ("app"). A total of 982 ethnically diverse respondents of various age groups and prior donation experiences were surveyed. Among the respondents, 87.3% had ready access to smart phones. E-mail was chosen by 62.1% as the currently preferred method when contacted by the blood center, followed by texting (10.1%). App features desired by most respondents were the abilities to request appointments 24/7 (76.8%) and to receive appointment confirmations quickly (81.3%). Many were concerned about receiving too many alerts or messages (64.1%) or insufficient protection for personal information (53.5%). Overall, 67.7% of respondents indicated that they were likely to use a blood donation mobile app. Likelihood was not significantly different by sex or ethnicity, and the impact of education level was limited. Donors who currently made donation appointments via telephone or a website were equally likely to use such an app. However, donors older than 45 years were less likely than younger donors (p = 0.001), and donors with more than five lifetime donations were more likely than less frequent donors to use such an app (p = 0.02). In a metropolitan area, donors are very receptive to using a mobile app to manage their donations. © 2015 AABB.

  6. Impact of the Cornea Donor Study (CDS) on Acceptance of Corneas from Older Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Alan; Montoya, Monty M.; Beck, Roy; Cowden, John W.; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Kollman, Craig; Malling, Jackie; Mannis, Mark J.; Tennant, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate retrospectively whether findings from the Cornea Donor Study (CDS) led to changes in the transplantation of corneas from older donors. Methods United States eye banks provided complete data on donor age and placement (domestic or international) for 86,273 corneas from 1998 to 2009. The data were analyzed by 3 time periods: preceding CDS (1998–1999), during CDS (2000–2007) and after publication of CDS 5 year results (2008–2009), and separately for corneas placed within vs. outside the United States. Results For corneal tissues transplanted in the United States, the percentage of donors ≥66 years old increased from 19% before CDS to 21% during CDS and 25% after CDS (pcorneas distributed outside the United States with the percentage of donors ≥66 years old decreasing from 56% to 42% to 34%, respectively. Donor age trends over time varied by eye bank. Conclusions There was a modest overall increase in the donor age of corneas transplanted in the United States from 1998 to 2009, but the retrospective nature of the study limits our ability to attribute this change to the CDS. The modest increases in the donor age of corneas transplanted is a positive finding, but wider acceptance of older corneal donor tissue should be encouraged based on the five-year evidence generated by the CDS. PMID:22262218

  7. Impact of the cornea donor study on acceptance of corneas from older donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Alan; Montoya, Monty M; Beck, Roy; Cowden, John W; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L; Kollman, Craig; Malling, Jackie; Mannis, Mark J; Tennant, Bradley

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate retrospectively whether the findings from the Cornea Donor Study (CDS) led to changes in the transplantation of corneas from older donors. Eye banks in United States provided complete data on donor age and placement (domestic or international) for 86,273 corneas from 1998 to 2009. The data were analyzed by 3 periods, preceding CDS (1998-1999), during CDS (2000-2007), and after publication of CDS 5-year results (2008-2009), and separately for corneas placed within versus outside the United States. For corneal tissues transplanted in the United States, the percentage of donors who were 66 years or older increased from 19% before CDS to 21% during CDS and 25% after CDS (Pcorneas distributed outside the United States, with the percentage of donors 66 years and older decreasing from 56% to 42% to 34%, respectively. Donor age trends over time varied by eye bank. There was a modest overall increase in the donor age of corneas transplanted in the United States from 1998 to 2009, but the retrospective nature of the study limits our ability to attribute this change to the CDS. The modest increases in the donor age of corneas transplanted is a positive finding, but wider acceptance of older corneal donor tissue should be encouraged based on the 5-year evidence generated by the CDS.

  8. Pre-banking microbial contamination of donor conjunctiva and storage medium for penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Takenori; Ono, Koichi; Matsuba, Tsuyoshi; Shiang, Tina; Di Zazzo, Antonio; Nakatani, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Akira

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the incidence of positive donor tissue cultures before transfer to preservation medium (Optisol™-GS) for penetrating keratoplasty, to verify the efficacy of antibiotics contained in Optisol™-GS by examining the drug susceptibility and to assess the relationship between the results of our microbial assessments as well as donor factors and the incidence of contamination. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study using Juntendo Eye Bank records for all corneal transplantations. Two hundred donor conjunctiva harvestings and storage medium (EP-II®) cultures were performed between July 2008 and June 2011. We analyzed the associations between donor factors (age, gender, history of cataract surgery, death-to-preservation interval, cause of death) and contamination rates using multivariate analysis by the generalized estimating equation model. We obtained positive bacterial cultures from 154 of the 200 eyes (77.0%). The isolated bacteria were indigenous, such as coagulase-negative Staphylococci, Corynebacterium sp., and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There was significant resistance to levofloxacin (18 eyes, 9.0%) and gentamicin (12 eyes, 6.0%), and no vancomycin-resistant bacteria were detected. The donor factors did not correlate with the prevalence of bacterial contamination in our criteria. Pre-banking microbial assessment allows for microbial detection, bacterial susceptibility and resistance testing. This is useful for developing preservation mediums containing effective spectrum antibiotic agents for high quality control of corneal banking.

  9. Does Lung Donation by Heart Donors Have an Impact on Survival in Heart Transplant Recipients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y; Friedmann, P; Bello, R; Goldstein, D; D'Alessandro, D

    2017-02-01

    Lung procurement is increasing during multiorgan recovery and substantially alters the explant process. This study evaluated whether lung donation by a heart donor affects survival in heart transplant recipients. Retrospective analysis of United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) adult heart transplantation data from 1998 to 2012 was performed. Lung donors (LDs) were defined as those having at least one lung procured and transplanted. Non-LDs had neither lung transplanted. Heart transplant recipients who had previous transplants, who had heterotopic transplants, who were waitlisted for other organs or who were temporarily delisted were excluded from the analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed. Of 23 590 heart transplant recipients meeting criteria during the study period, 8638 (36.6%) transplants were from LDs. Donors in the LD group had less history of cigarette use (15.5% vs. 29.5%, p < 0.001). On univariate analysis, LDs were associated with improved patient survival (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, LDs were not significantly associated with patient survival (adjusted hazard ratio 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.94-1.03). Analysis of the UNOS registry suggested that donor pulmonary status and lung procurement had no detrimental effect on survival in heart transplant recipients, supporting the present practice of using donor lungs whenever possible. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  10. Obesity increases the risk of end-stage renal disease among living kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Jayme E; Reed, Rhiannon D; Massie, Allan; MacLennan, Paul A; Sawinski, Deirdre; Kumar, Vineeta; Mehta, Shikha; Mannon, Roslyn B; Gaston, Robert; Lewis, Cora E; Segev, Dorry L

    2017-03-01

    Determining candidacy for live kidney donation among obese individuals remains challenging. Among healthy non-donors, body mass index (BMI) above 30 is associated with a 16% increase in risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the impact on the ESRD risk attributable to donation and living with only one kidney remains unknown. Here we studied the risk of ESRD associated with obesity at the time of donation among 119 769 live kidney donors in the United States. Maximum follow-up was 20 years. Obese (BMI above 30) live kidney donors were more likely male, African American, and had higher blood pressure. Estimated risk of ESRD 20 years after donation was 93.9 per 10 000 for obese; significantly greater than the 39.7 per 10 000 for non-obese live kidney donors. Adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, blood pressure, baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, and relationship to recipient, obese live kidney donors had a significant 86% increased risk of ESRD compared to their non-obese counterparts (adjusted hazard ratio 1.86; 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.30). For each unit increase in BMI above 27 kg/m2 there was an associated significant 7% increase in ESRD risk (1.07, 1.02-1.12). The impact of obesity on ESRD risk was similar for male and female donors, African American and Caucasian donors, and across the baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate spectrum. These findings may help to inform selection criteria and discussions with persons considering living kidney donation. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HIV prevalence among blood donors in a blood bank in Curitiba (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Andrade Neto

    Full Text Available There still is no cure for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Its etiologic agent is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and transmission occurs through sexual relationships, contacts with blood, and vertically (mother to child. In this study, we sought to determine the prevalence of HIV among blood donors at a blood bank in Curitiba. We studied 213,666 blood donations made from March 1, 1992, to April 25, 1999. Each potential blood donor first answered a questionnaire, submitted to a clinical examination, and filled out a self-exclusion card. Blood was collected and analyzed only from the candidates approved by the first two criteria. Two tests were used to detect HIV: ELISA for screening, and Western-Blot for confirmation. The results were analyzed statistically by determining the 95% confidence interval. Of the total number of donors, 156,942 were men, and 56,724 were women. There were 319 cases of HIV infection (244 men, 75 women. There were no significant differences between genders, or among the different age groups, or between first-donation and repeated-donation donors. There was a significant predominance of HIV infection among single individuals compared to married, widowed, and other individuals. The same occurred among married and divorced individuals compared to widowed subjects. The prevalence of HIV among blood donors was 0.149% (0.155% among men and 0.132% among women. The frequency of HIV was statistically identical among new blood donors and repeat donors. A large number of HIV-infected married women was also observed.

  12. HIV prevalence among blood donors in a blood bank in Curitiba (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Neto José Luiz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There still is no cure for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Its etiologic agent is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and transmission occurs through sexual relationships, contacts with blood, and vertically (mother to child. In this study, we sought to determine the prevalence of HIV among blood donors at a blood bank in Curitiba. We studied 213,666 blood donations made from March 1, 1992, to April 25, 1999. Each potential blood donor first answered a questionnaire, submitted to a clinical examination, and filled out a self-exclusion card. Blood was collected and analyzed only from the candidates approved by the first two criteria. Two tests were used to detect HIV: ELISA for screening, and Western-Blot for confirmation. The results were analyzed statistically by determining the 95% confidence interval. Of the total number of donors, 156,942 were men, and 56,724 were women. There were 319 cases of HIV infection (244 men, 75 women. There were no significant differences between genders, or among the different age groups, or between first-donation and repeated-donation donors. There was a significant predominance of HIV infection among single individuals compared to married, widowed, and other individuals. The same occurred among married and divorced individuals compared to widowed subjects. The prevalence of HIV among blood donors was 0.149% (0.155% among men and 0.132% among women. The frequency of HIV was statistically identical among new blood donors and repeat donors. A large number of HIV-infected married women was also observed.

  13. Retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrectomy: Review of the first 50 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Changing from an open to a laparoscopic live renal donor programme poses challenges and may affect donor and graft outcomes. Objectives. To evaluate donor safety and graft outcomes for the first 50 retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrectomies performed at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.

  14. Prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in Owerri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in the Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, Imo State, was carried out between December, 2003 and April, 2004. A total of 500 blood samples were collected from blood donors consisting of 262 commercial donors and 238 relation-donors, using ...

  15. Sperm donor anonymity and compensation: an experiment with American sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Glenn; Coan, Travis; Ottey, Michelle; Boyd, Christina

    2016-12-01

    Most sperm donation that occurs in the USA proceeds through anonymous donation. While some clinics make the identity of the sperm donor available to a donor-conceived child at age 18 as part of 'open identification' or 'identity release programs,' no US law requires clinics to do so, and the majority of individuals do not use these programs. By contrast, in many parts of the world, there have been significant legislative initiatives requiring that sperm donor identities be made available to children after a certain age (typically when the child turns 18). One major concern with prohibiting anonymous sperm donation has been that the number of willing sperm donors will decrease leading to shortages, as have been experienced in some of the countries that have prohibited sperm donor anonymity. One possible solution, suggested by prior work, would be to pay current anonymous sperm donors more per donation to continue to donate when their anonymity is removed. Using a unique sample of current anonymous and open identity sperm donors from a large sperm bank in the USA, we test that approach. As far as we know, this is the first attempt to examine what would happen if the USA adopted a prohibition on anonymous sperm donation that used the most ecologically valid population, current sperm donors. We find that 29% of current anonymous sperm donors in the sample would refuse to donate if the law changed such that they were required to put their names in a registry available to donor-conceived children at age 18. When we look at the remaining sperm donors who would be willing to participate, we find that they would demand an additional $60 per donation (using our preferred specification). We also discuss the ramifications for the industry.

  16. The willed body donor interview project: medical student and donor expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Michael; Holman, Alexis; Mueller, Dean A; Gruppen, Larry D; Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The Anatomical Donations Program at the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) has begun a multiphase project wherein interviews of donors will be recorded and later shown to medical students who participate in the anatomical dissection course. The first phase of this project included surveys of both current UMMS medical students and donors concerning their perceptions of such a program. A five-question survey administered via Qualtrics software was electronically mailed to all current medical students at UMMS, and a survey was mailed to registered and potential donors requesting information from the UMMS on anatomical donations. A total of 224 medical student responses (response rate 33%) and 54 donor responses (response rate 27%) were received. Seventy-four percent of students and 81% of donors reported they would participate in this program if it existed. Students and donors supported the implementation of this program for varying reasons, though many felt strongly they would not want to participate in a donor interview program. These qualitative results support those of previous studies that show a majority of students desire a closer personal relationship with the donor, and these are the first results to be reported on donor perceptions of a donor interview program. Although many students and donors are in favor of instituting this program, others feel strongly that such an experience could be traumatic. The causes of these differing reactions need to be further explored, and the opinions of those who object to this study will be respected by maintaining voluntary participation in future phases of this study. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  17. OCT Expanded Clinical Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Baalen, Mary; Tafreshi, Ali; Patel, Nimesh; Young, Millennia; Mason, Sara; Otto, Christian; Samuels, Brian; Koslovsky, Matthew; Schaefer, Caroline; Taiym, Wafa; hide

    2017-01-01

    Vision changes identified in long duration space fliers has led to a more comprehensive clinical monitoring protocol. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was recently implemented on board the International Space Station in 2013. NASA is collaborating with Heidelberg Engineering to expand our current OCT data analysis capability by implementing a volumetric approach. Volumetric maps will be created by combining the circle scan, the disc block scan, and the radial scan. This assessment may provide additional information about the optic nerve and further characterize changes related microgravity exposure. We will discuss challenges with collection and analysis of OCT data, present the results of this reanalysis and outline the potential benefits and limitations of the additional data.

  18. Preventive Ethics Through Expanding Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anita; MacDonald, Lisa Mei-Hwa; Unger, David

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare institutions have been making increasing efforts to standardize consultation methodology and to accredit both bioethics training programs and the consultants accordingly. The focus has traditionally been on the ethics consultation as the relevant unit of ethics intervention. Outcome measures are studied in relation to consultations, and the hidden assumption is that consultations are the preferred or best way to address day-to-day ethical dilemmas. Reflecting on the data from an internal quality improvement survey and the literature, we argue that having general ethics education as a key function of ethics services may be more important in meeting the contemporaneous needs of acute care settings. An expanded and varied ethics education, with attention to the time constraints of healthcare workers' schedules, was a key recommendation brought forward by survey respondents. Promoting ethical reflection and creating a culture of ethics may serve to prevent ethical dilemmas or mitigate their effects.

  19. Expanding Human Cognition and Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spohrer, Jim [IBM, North Castle, NY (United States); Pierce, Brian M. [Raytheon Co., Waltham, MA (United States); Murray, Cherry A. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Golledge, Reginald G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Horn, Robert E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Turkle, Sherry [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Yonas, Gerold [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Glicken Turnley, Jessica [Galisteo Consulting Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pollack, Jordan [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States); Burger, Rudy [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Robinett, Warren; Wilson, Larry Todd [Inst. of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Piscataway, NJ (United States); Bainbridge, W. S.; Canton, J.; Kuekes, P.; Loomis, J.; Penz, P.

    2013-01-01

    To be able to chart the most profitable future directions for societal transformation and corresponding scientific research, five multidisciplinary themes focused on major goals have been identified to fulfill the overall motivating vision of convergence described in the previous pages. The first, “Expanding Human Cognition and Communication,” is devoted to technological breakthroughs that have the potential to enhance individuals’ mental and interaction abilities. Throughout the twentieth century, a number of purely psychological techniques were offered for strengthening human character and personality, but evaluation research has generally failed to confirm the alleged benefits of these methods (Druckman and Bjork 1992; 1994). Today, there is good reason to believe that a combination of methods, drawing upon varied branches of converging science and technology, would be more effective than attempts that rely upon mental training alone.

  20. Expanding the Trilinos developer community.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen

    2010-10-01

    The Trilinos Project started approximately nine years ago as a small effort to enable research, development and ongoing support of small, related solver software efforts. The 'Tri' in Trilinos was intended to indicate the eventual three packages we planned to develop. In 2007 the project expanded its scope to include any package that was an enabling technology for technical computing. Presently the Trilinos repository contains over 55 packages covering a broad spectrum of reusable tools for constructing full-featured scalable scientific and engineering applications. Trilinos usage is now worldwide, and many applications have an explicit dependence on Trilinos for essential capabilities. Users come from other US laboratories, universities, industry and international research groups. Awareness and use of Trilinos is growing rapidly outside of Sandia. Members of the external research community are becoming more familiar with Trilinos, its design and collaborative nature. As a result, the Trilinos project is receiving an increasing number of requests from external community members who want to contribute to Trilinos as developers. To-date we have worked with external developers in an ad hoc fashion. Going forward, we want to develop a set of policies, procedures, tools and infrastructure to simplify interactions with external developers. As we go forward with multi-laboratory efforts such as CASL and X-Stack, and international projects such as IESP, we will need a more streamlined and explicit process for making external developers 'first-class citizens' in the Trilinos development community. This document is intended to frame the discussion for expanding the Trilinos community to all strategically important external members, while at the same time preserving Sandia's primary leadership role in the project.

  1. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...... the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions....

  2. Diagnostic criteria of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Rémi W

    2007-03-01

    In the past two decades there has been a tremendous effort among clinicians and searchers to improve the diagnostic criteria of the dementias on the basis of the differential neurological and neuropsychological profiles. This was an obligatory requirement for clinical trials and the development of treatments. Over the years it became rapidly evident that the cohorts of patients in studies had some degree of heterogeneity, making it difficult to interpret the results of some studies, particularly in the vascular dementias and the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) group. For example, many sub-types of the vascular group were included in clinical trials, such as the cortical strokes, the lacunar states and the diffuse white matter disease cases, and some of the patients might have had also mixed pathology. In addition, the standard DSM IV criteria for dementia no longer represent our present knowledge of the clinical profile of some of the dementias such as vascular dementia (VaD) and fronto-temporal dementia where the memory impairment is not necessarily the first requirement. To improve the validity of clinical trials and eventually help developing more appropriate treatments, we revised the present diagnostic criteria and made recommendations for some changes in the context of the 2nd Canadian Conference on the Development of Antidementia Therapies, held in 2004 and reviewed in the light of the recent literature as of early 2006. It is expected that in the near future, these dementia criteria for clinical trials will have to be revised again in order to include specific subtypes of the dementias as well as biomarkers, structural and functional imaging.

  3. Feasibility and safety of setting up a donor breastmilk bank in a neonatal prem unit in a resource limited setting: An observational, longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Nadia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beneficial effects of human milk on decreasing rates of paediatric infections such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC and sepsis have been clearly demonstrated. Donor breastmilk has been encouraged as the milk of choice when a mother's own breastmilk is not available. The objectives of this study were to assess feasibility of providing donor breastmilk to infants in a resource limited Neonatal Prem Unit (NPU. In addition we sought to determine whether donor breastmilk could be safely pasteurized and administered to infants without any adverse events. Methods Low birth weight infants Results 191 infants met the inclusion criteria of whom 96 received their mother's own breastmilk. Of the 95 infants who were potentially eligible to receive donor milk, only 40 did in fact receive donor milk. There was no evidence of bacterial contamination in the samples analyzed, and no evidence of adverse events from feeding with donor breastmilk. Conclusion It is feasible to supply donor breastmilk to infants in an NPU in a resource limited setting, however staff needs to be sensitized to the importance of donor breastmilk to improve uptake rates. Secondly we showed that it is possible to supply donor breastmilk according to established guidelines with no adverse events therefore making it possible to prevent NEC and other side effects often associated with formula feeding of premature infants.

  4. The blood donor identity survey: a multidimensional measure of blood donor motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Christopher R; Kowalsky, Jennifer M; France, Janis L; Himawan, Lina K; Kessler, Debra A; Shaz, Beth H

    2014-08-01

    Evidence indicates that donor identity is an important predictor of donation behavior; however, prior studies have relied on diverse, unidimensional measures with limited psychometric support. The goals of this study were to examine the application of self-determination theory to blood donor motivations and to develop and validate a related multidimensional measure of donor identity. Items were developed and administered electronically to a sample of New York Blood Center (NYBC) donors (n=582) and then to a sample of Ohio University students (n=1005). Following initial confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the NYBC sample to identify key items related to self-determination theory's six motivational factors, a revised survey was administered to the university sample to reexamine model fit and to assess survey reliability and validity. Consistent with self-determination theory, for both samples CFAs indicated that the best fit to the data was provided by a six-motivational-factor model, including amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, integrated regulation, and intrinsic regulation. The Blood Donor Identity Survey provides a psychometrically sound, multidimensional measure of donor motivations (ranging from unmotivated to donate to increasing levels of autonomous motivation to donate) that is suitable for nondonors as well as donors with varying levels of experience. Future research is needed to examine longitudinal changes in donor identity and its relationship to actual donation behavior. © 2014 AABB.

  5. Donor-transmitted, donor-derived, and de novo cancer after liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jeremy R; Lynch, Stephen V

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is the third most common cause of death (after cardiovascular disease and infection) for patients who have a functioning kidney allograft. Kidney and liver transplant recipients have similar cancer risks because of immunosuppression but different risks because of differences in primary diseases that cause renal and hepatic failure and the inherent behavior of cancers in the liver. There are 4 types of cancer that may develop in liver allograft recipients: (1) recurrent cancer, (2) donor-transmitted cancer, (3) donor-derived cancer, and (4) de novo cancer. Identification of potential donor cancer transmission may occur at postmortem examination of a deceased donor or when a probable donor-transmitted cancer is identified in another recipient. Donor-transmitted cancer after liver transplant is rare in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Aging of the donor pool may increase the risk of subclinical cancer in donors. Liver transplant recipients have a greater risk of de novo cancer than the general population, and risk factors for de novo cancer in liver transplant recipients include primary sclerosing cholangitis, alcoholic liver disease, smoking, and increased age. Liver transplant recipients may benefit from cancer screening because they have a high risk, are clearly identifiable, and are under continuous medical supervision.

  6. DETERMINATION OF A MAXIMUM NUMBER OF ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATIONS BY DONOR CHILDREN PER SPERM DONOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, A; Oosterwijk, JC; RIGTERSARIS, CAE

    Objective: To determine a safe maximum number of artificial insemination (donor insemination [DI]) children per anonymous sperm donor. Design: Multiparameter calculation model of contribution of DI to inbreeding. Setting: Data of the collaborative DI centers and demographic population data of The

  7. Outcomes of liver transplant with donors over 70 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mils, Kristel; Lladó, Laura; Fabregat, Juan; Baliellas, Carme; Ramos, Emilio; Secanella, Lluís; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria

    2015-10-01

    Organ shortage has forced transplant teams to progressively expand the acceptance of marginal donors. We performed a comparative analysis of the post-transplant evolution depending on donor age (group I: less than 70 years old (n=474) vs. group II: 70 or more years old [n=105]) over a 10 year period (2002-2011). Donors over 70 years old were similar to donors less than 70 years old in terms of ICU stay, gender, weight, laboratory results, and use of vasoactive drugs. However, the younger donor group presented with cardiac arrest more often (GI: 14 vs. GII: 3%, P=.005). There were no differences in initial poor function (GI: 6% vs. GII: 7,7%; P=.71), ICU stay (GI: 2.7±2 vs. GII: 3.3±3.8, P=.46), hospital stay (GI: 13.5±10 vs. GII: 15.5±11, P=.1), or hospital mortality (GI: 5.3 vs. GII: 5.8%, P=.66) between receptors of more or less than 70 year old grafts. After a median follow up of 32 months, no differences were found in the incidence of biliary tract complications (GI: 17 vs. GII: 20%, P=.4) or vascular complications (GI: 11 vs. GII: 9%, P=.69). The actuarial 5 year survival was similar for both study groups (GI: 70 vs. GII: 76%, P=.54). In our experience, the use of grafts from donors older than 70 years, when other risk factors are avoided (cold ischemia, steatosis, sodium levels), does not worsen the results of liver transplantation on the short or long term. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. STOPP/START criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people: version 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Denis; O'Sullivan, David; Byrne, Stephen; O'Connor, Marie Noelle; Ryan, Cristin; Gallagher, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Screening tool of older people's prescriptions (STOPP) and screening tool to alert to right treatment (START) criteria were first published in 2008. Due to an expanding therapeutics evidence base, updating of the criteria was required. We reviewed the 2008 STOPP/START criteria to add new evidence-based criteria and remove any obsolete criteria. A thorough literature review was performed to reassess the evidence base of the 2008 criteria and the proposed new criteria. Nineteen experts from 13 European countries reviewed a new draft of STOPP & START criteria including proposed new criteria. These experts were also asked to propose additional criteria they considered important to include in the revised STOPP & START criteria and to highlight any criteria from the 2008 list they considered less important or lacking an evidence base. The revised list of criteria was then validated using the Delphi consensus methodology. The expert panel agreed a final list of 114 criteria after two Delphi validation rounds, i.e. 80 STOPP criteria and 34 START criteria. This represents an overall 31% increase in STOPP/START criteria compared with version 1. Several new STOPP categories were created in version 2, namely antiplatelet/anticoagulant drugs, drugs affecting, or affected by, renal function and drugs that increase anticholinergic burden; new START categories include urogenital system drugs, analgesics and vaccines. STOPP/START version 2 criteria have been expanded and updated for the purpose of minimizing inappropriate prescribing in older people. These criteria are based on an up-to-date literature review and consensus validation among a European panel of experts. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  9. Oocyte cryopreservation for donor egg banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Ana; Remohí, José; Chang, Ching-Chien; Nagy, Zsolt Peter

    2011-09-01

    Oocyte donation is an efficient alternative to using own oocytes in IVF treatment for different indications. Unfortunately, 'traditional' (fresh) egg donations are challenged with inefficiency, difficulties of synchronization, very long waiting periods and lack of quarantine measures. Given the recent improvements in the efficiency of oocyte cryopreservation, it is reasonable to examine if egg donation through oocyte cryopreservation has merits. The objective of the current manuscript is to review existing literature on this topic and to report on the most recent outcomes from two established donor cryobank centres. Reports on egg donation using slow freezing are scarce and though results are encouraging, outcomes are not yet comparable to a fresh egg donation treatment. Vitrification on the other hand appears to provide high survival rates (90%) of donor oocytes and comparable fertilization, embryo development, implantation and pregnancy rates to traditional (fresh) egg donation. Besides the excellent outcomes, the ease of use for both donors and recipients, higher efficiency, lower cost and avoiding the problem of synchronization are all features associated with the benefit of a donor egg cryobank and makes it likely that this approach becomes the future standard of care. Oocyte donation is one of the last resorts in IVF treatment for couples challenged with infertility problems. However, traditional (fresh) egg donation, as it is performed today, is not very efficient, as typically all eggs from one donor are given to only one recipient, it is arduous as it requires an excellent synchronization between the donor and recipient and there are months or years of waiting time. Because of the development of an efficient oocyte cryopreservation technique, it is now possible to cryo-store donor (as well as non-donor) eggs, maintaining their viability and allowing their use whenever there is demand. Therefore, creating a donor oocyte cryobank would carry many advantages

  10. 78 FR 66366 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests To Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products for Infection With... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests to Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and... ``Guidance for Industry: Eligibility Determination for Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and...

  11. [Is syphilis test necessary in blood donors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-López, María Rebeca F; Arenas-Esqueda, Alfonso; Ambriz-Fernández, Raúl

    2009-01-01

    A syphilis test is performed in blood donors because the national transfusion law makes it mandatory, nevertheless the blood has not been found as an important vehicle of transmission for Treponema pallidum infection. Our objective was to know the prevalence of syphilis in blood donors. we reviewed tests from blood donors of the "Banco Central de Sangre del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI" in two periods, the first from July 2001 to April 2003, and the second from March 2005 to June 2006. Both groups went through screening tests, such as VDRL or USR. and a second test for confirmation, FTA-ABS for the first group and TPHA for the second group. in the first group 111 030 blood donors were included. In this group the positive results from VDRL or USR tests were 471 (0.42 %). One hundred and ninety six were confirmed (0.17 %) with FTA-ABS. In the second group results from 80 578 blood donors were included; the positive results from VDRL or USR tests were 279 (0.34 %). In this group, only 0.08 % were confirmed for a syphilis infection.

  12. Microbial Biofilms and Breast Tissue Expanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Karau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously developed and validated a vortexing-sonication technique for detection of biofilm bacteria on the surface of explanted prosthetic joints. Herein, we evaluated this technique for diagnosis of infected breast tissue expanders and used it to assess colonization of breast tissue expanders. From April 2008 to December 2011, we studied 328 breast tissue expanders at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Of seven clinically infected breast tissue expanders, six (85.7% had positive cultures, one of which grew Propionibacterium species. Fifty-two of 321 breast tissue expanders (16.2%, 95% CI, 12.3–20.7% without clinical evidence of infection also had positive cultures, 45 growing Propionibacterium species and ten coagulase-negative staphylococci. While vortexing-sonication can detect clinically infected breast tissue expanders, 16 percent of breast tissue expanders appear to be asymptomatically colonized with normal skin flora, most commonly, Propionibacterium species.

  13. Blood donation and blood donor mortality after adjustment for a healthy donor effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that blood donors experience lower mortality than the general population. While this may suggest a beneficial effect of blood donation, it may also reflect the selection of healthy persons into the donor population. To overcome this bias, we...... and Transfusion database (SCANDAT), we assessed the association between annual number of donations in 5-year windows and donor mortality by means of Poisson regression analysis. The analyses included adjustment for demographic characteristics and for an internal healthy donor effect, estimated among elderly...... donation (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.8%-20.4%). After additional adjustment for the internal healthy donor effect, each additional annual donation was associated with a 7.5% decreased mortality risk 7.5% (95% CI, 5.7%-9.4%). CONCLUSION: We observed an inverse relationship between donation frequency...

  14. Reconstruction of Complex Facial Defects Using Cervical Expanded Flap Prefabricated by Temporoparietal Fascia Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Qinghua; Jiang, Haiyue; Liu, Ge; Huang, Wanlu; Dong, Weiwei

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of complex facial defects using cervical expanded flap prefabricated by temporoparietal fascia flap. Complex facial defects are required to restore not only function but also aesthetic appearance, so it is vital challenge for plastic surgeons. Skin grafts and traditional flap transfer cannot meet the reconstructive requirements of color and texture with recipient. The purpose of this sturdy is to create an expanded prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap to repair complex facial defects. Two patients suffered severe burns on the face underwent complex facial resurfacing with prefabricated cervical flap. The vasculature of prefabricated flap, including the superficial temporal vessel and surrounding fascia, was used as the vascular carrier. The temporoparietal fascia flap was sutured underneath the cervical subcutaneous tissue, and expansion was begun in postoperative 1 week. After 4 to 6 months of expansion, the expander was removed, facial scars were excised, and cervical prefabricated flap was elevated and transferred to repair the complex facial defects. Two complex facial defects were repaired successfully by prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap, and prefabricated flaps survived completely. On account of donor site's skin was thinner and expanded too fast, 1 expanded skin flap was rupture during expansion, but necrosis was not occurred after the 2nd operation. Venous congestion was observed in 1 patient, but after dressing, flap necrosis was not happened. Donor site was closed primarily. Postoperative follow-up 6 months, the color, texture of prefabricated flap was well-matched with facial skin. This method of expanded prefabricated flap may provide a reliable solution to the complex facial resurfacing.

  15. Blood Donor Deferrals by Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace, James M.; Berman, Jules J.; Brown, Lawrence A.; Moore, G. William

    1990-01-01

    Blood collection facilities have recently witnessed a substantial increase in the number of different tests used to detect infectious disease in donor populations. These facilities are also experiencing an increasingly stringent regulatory effort on the part of the Food and Drug Administration to determine the validity of the software used to handle this information. This report describes a precedence-based inference program (PRELOG) and a modular expert system used to determine a donor's suitability for continued donations (donor deferrals), and whether the donated unit can be released for transfusion. PRELOG accepts ternary logic input, in which test results are allowed to be positive, negative, or undetermined; and allows one to assign precedence values to the logic rules. These features enable programs to be written in a shorter, more error-resistant manner. A comparison between PRELOG and PROLOG is included, and the utility of this approach in producing and validating blood bank software is discussed.

  16. Motivations, outcomes, and characteristics of unspecified (nondirected altruistic) kidney donors in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Hannah; Chilcot, Joseph; Burnapp, Lisa; Gibbs, Paul; Santhouse, Alastair; Norton, Sam; Weinman, John; Mamode, Nizam

    2014-12-15

    Unspecified (nondirected altruistic) kidney donation is becoming increasingly common in the United Kingdom. Questions regarding motivation and characteristics of these donors persist, alongside concerns about regret and long-term psychosocial outcomes. The aims of this study were to compare psychosocial and physical outcomes in unspecified kidney donors (UKDs) versus specified kidney donors (SKDs). We performed a cross-sectional study, in which a detailed assessment of psychosocial outcomes was made using validated questionnaires. Additional questions specific to donation were also asked, including questions regarding motivation, regret, and anonymity. One hundred ninety responses were received from 296 participants studied (110 UKDs [74.3%] vs. 80 SKDs [54.1%], P0.05). Unspecified kidney donors were more engaged in other altruistic behaviours (P<0.001). There was no difference in physical outcomes, although UKDs recovered quicker (P<0.001). Regret was low (3.7% UKDs vs. 7.5% SKDs; P=0.078). This study has demonstrated that UKDs have comparable physical and psychosocial outcomes to SKDs. These favorable outcomes may be, in part, because of the rigorous evaluation process which currently includes a mental health assessment. We conclude that the program can continue to expand safely across the United Kingdom.

  17. Techniques used for the screening of hemoglobin levels in blood donors: current insights and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary R

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rajendra Chaudhary,1 Anju Dubey,2 Atul Sonker3 1Department of Transfusion Medicine, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Transfusion Medicine, T.S. Misra Medical College and Hospital, 3Department of Transfusion Medicine, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India Abstract: Blood donor hemoglobin (Hb estimation is an important donation test that is performed prior to blood donation. It serves the dual purpose of protecting the donors’ health against anemia and ensuring good quality of blood components, which has an implication on recipients’ health. Diverse cutoff criteria have been defined world over depending on population characteristics; however, no testing methodology and sample requirement have been specified for Hb screening. Besides the technique, there are several physiological and methodological factors that affect accuracy and reliability of Hb estimation. These include the anatomical source of blood sample, posture of the donor, timing of sample and several other biological factors. Qualitative copper sulfate gravimetric method has been the archaic time-tested method that is still used in resource-constrained settings. Portable hemoglobinometers are modern quantitative devices that have been further modified to reagent-free cuvettes. Furthermore, noninvasive spectrophotometry was introduced, mitigating pain to blood donor and eliminating risk of infection. Notwithstanding a tremendous evolution in terms of ease of operation, accuracy, mobility, rapidity and cost, a component of inherent variability persists, which may partly be attributed to pre-analytical variables. Hence, blood centers should pay due attention to validation of test methodology, competency of operating staff and regular proficiency testing of the outputs. In this article, we have reviewed various regulatory guidelines, described the variables that affect the measurements and compared the validated

  18. Compensatory Hypertrophy After Living Donor Nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K W; Wu, M W F; Chen, Z; Tai, B C; Goh, Y S B; Lata, R; Vathsala, A; Tiong, H Y

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that kidney volume enhances the estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in kidney donors. This study aimed to describe the phenomenon of compensatory hypertrophy after donor nephrectomy as measured on computerized tomographic (CT) scans. An institutional Domain Specific Review Board (DSRB)-approved study involved approaching kidney donors to have a follow up CT scan from 6 months to 1 year after surgery; 29 patients participated; 55% were female. Clinical chart review was performed, and the patient's remaining kidney volume was measured before and after surgery based on CT scans. eGFR was determined with the use of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Mean parenchymal volume of the remaining kidney for this population (mean age, 44.3 ± 8.5 y) was 204.7 ± 82.5 cc before surgery and 250.5 ± 113.3 cc after donor nephrectomy. Compensatory hypertrophy occurred in 79.3% of patients (n = 23). Mean increase in remaining kidney volume was 22.4 ± 23.2% after donor nephrectomy in healthy individuals. Over a median follow-up of 52.9 ± 19.8 months, mean eGFR was 68.9 ± 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), with 24.1% of patients (n = 7) in chronic kidney disease grade 3. Absolute and relative change in kidney volume was not associated with sex, race, surgical approach, or background of hypertension (P = NS). There was a trend of decreased hypertrophy with increasing age (P = .5; Spearman correlation, -0.12). In healthy kidney donors, compensatory hypertrophy of the remaining kidney occurs in 79.3% of the patients, with an average increment of about 22.4%. Older patients may have a blunted compensatory hypertrophy response after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Discovery of Uniformly Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Saul Perlmutter and the Brian Schmidt – Adam Riess teams reported that their Friedmann-model GR-based analysis of their supernovae magnitude-redshift data re- vealed a new phenomenon of “dark energy” which, it is claimed, forms 73% of the energy / matter density of the present-epoch universe, and which is linked to the further claim of an accelerating expansion of the universe. In 2011 Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess received the Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating ex- pansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae”. Here it is shown that (i a generic model-independent analysis of this data reveals a uniformly expanding universe, (ii their analysis actually used Newtonian gravity, and finally (iii the data, as well as the CMB fluctuation data, does not require “dark energy” nor “dark matter”, but instead reveals the phenomenon of a dynamical space, which is absent from the Friedmann model.

  20. Expanding cosmic horizons of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Nalin C.; Narlikar, J. V.; Wickramasinghe, J. T.; Wainwright, Milton

    2003-02-01

    The conceptual boundaries of life are rapidly expanding far beyond the confines of our planet to encompass an ever-widening region of the universe. Complex organic molecules in interstellar dust and comets appear most plausibly to be biologically derived, or at least closely related spectroscopically and structurally to such material. A de novo origin of life from non-living material is reckoned to have so minuscule a probability that its occurrence once in the universe can be considered miracle enough. The widespread distribution of similar material (e.g with the characteristics of the diffuse infrared bands and 2175 absorption features) throughout the galaxy and in external galaxies adds weight to the theory of panspermia, where it is supposed that the components of life at a generic level are readily transferred from one place to another. Spectroscopic evidence consistent with life extends to redshifts z=0.5, and from elemental abundance studies alone (e.g, of C, O and metals) in distant galaxies the possibility of cosmic life extends to redshifts as high as z=3.

  1. Web site Evaluation Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdgan binesh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing evolution of the Internet and the growing number of the resources accessible through this medium, has turned the issue of resource evaluation of the internet-based information into a controversial and cogent issue. By nature, the internet milieu is uncontrollable. It concomitantly contains both verifiable and unverifiable information. Thus it behooves the internet users to develop resource evaluation and critical thinking skills in order to discern appropriate quality resources. Through review and comparison of the available checklists, the present paper endeavors to offer criteria for website evaluation

  2. Elderly donors double kidney transplantation (DKT)

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez-Chacón, Pedro; Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM. Lima, Perú; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú; Vidalón, Armando; Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM. Lima, Perú; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú; Medina, Mario; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú; Camacho, Miguel; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú; Somocurcio, José; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To use both kidneys of an elderly donor in the same receptor and remark the importance of kidney histology as selector method. Materials and Methods: We evaluate the selection and surveillance of 11 patients who received double kidney of cadaver elderly donors. The ten donors’ mean serum creatinine was 1,3 mg/dL, and the mean age was 63 years old (range 56 to 73 years), the receptor’s mean age 53 years. Both kidneys were examined by frozen wedge biopsy. Quantification of damaged ti...

  3. Predictors of hemoglobin in Danish blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotzé, Sebastian R; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that blood donors are at increased risk of iron deficiency and subsequent development of iron deficiency anemia. We aimed to investigate the effect of factors influencing hemoglobin (Hb) levels. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Initiated in 2010, the Danish Blood Donor Study...... for the prediction of Hb. RESULTS: The strongest predictors of Hb and risk of low Hb were low ferritin (iron supplementation (yes/no). No dietary factors were found to be consistently significant in multivariable models predicting Hb levels, risk of having low Hb, or risk of a decrease...

  4. Combining the IADPSG criteria with the WHO diagnostic criteria for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, yet there are no universally accepted ... and World Health Organization's (WHO) diagnostic criteria are commonly used criteria, although clinical outcome data .... GDM, hypertensive disorder, maternal age, maternal obesity,.

  5. Nitric Oxide Donor-Based Cancer Therapy: Advances and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhangjian; Fu, Junjie; Zhang, Yihua

    2017-09-28

    The increasing understanding of the role of nitric oxide (NO) in cancer biology has generated significant progress in the use of NO donor-based therapy to fight cancer. These advances strongly suggest the potential adoption of NO donor-based therapy in clinical practice, and this has been supported by several clinical studies in the past decade. In this review, we first highlight several types of important NO donors, including recently developed NO donors bearing a dinitroazetidine skeleton, represented by RRx-001, with potential utility in cancer therapy. Special emphasis is then given to the combination of NO donor(s) with other therapies to achieve synergy and to the hybridization of NO donor(s) with an anticancer drug/agent/fragment to enhance the activity or specificity or to reduce toxicity. In addition, we briefly describe inducible NO synthase gene therapy and nanotechnology, which have recently entered the field of NO donor therapy.

  6. Decision Making in Kidney Paired Donation Programs with Altruistic Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijiang; Song, Peter X-K; Leichtman, Alan B; Rees, Michael A; Kalbfleisch, John D

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, kidney paired donation (KPD) has been extended to include living non-directed or altruistic donors, in which an altruistic donor donates to the candidate of an incompatible donor-candidate pair with the understanding that the donor in that pair will further donate to the candidate of a second pair, and so on; such a process continues and thus forms an altruistic donor-initiated chain. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy to sequentially allocate the altruistic donor (or bridge donor) so as to maximize the expected utility; analogous to the way a computer plays chess, the idea is to evaluate different allocations for each altruistic donor (or bridge donor) by looking several moves ahead in a derived look-ahead search tree. Simulation studies are provided to illustrate and evaluate our proposed method.

  7. Decision Making in Kidney Paired Donation Programs with Altruistic Donors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijiang; Song, Peter X.-K.; Leichtman, Alan B.; Rees, Michael A.; Kalbfleisch, John D.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, kidney paired donation (KPD) has been extended to include living non-directed or altruistic donors, in which an altruistic donor donates to the candidate of an incompatible donor-candidate pair with the understanding that the donor in that pair will further donate to the candidate of a second pair, and so on; such a process continues and thus forms an altruistic donor-initiated chain. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy to sequentially allocate the altruistic donor (or bridge donor) so as to maximize the expected utility; analogous to the way a computer plays chess, the idea is to evaluate different allocations for each altruistic donor (or bridge donor) by looking several moves ahead in a derived look-ahead search tree. Simulation studies are provided to illustrate and evaluate our proposed method. PMID:25309603

  8. Tissue banking: relationship with blood donor and organ donor card status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Kenneth D; Fitzpatrick, Patricia E; Sheehan, John D

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationships among altruistic health acts may serve to aid therapeutic research advances. In this paper, we report on the links between two such behaviours-donating blood and carrying an organ donor card-and willingness to donate urological tissue to a tissue bank. Reasons for the differential willingness to do so are examined in this paper. A systematic sample of 259 new and returning attendees at a tertiary urology referral clinic in Ireland completed a self-report questionnaire in an outpatient setting. In addition to demographic details, details of known diagnosis of malignancy and family history of cancer; attitudes to tissue donation for research purposes were gauged using a 5-point Likert scale. Both blood donors and organ donor card carriers were more likely to be willing to donate tissue for research purposes. Blood donors were more likely want to know their overall results in comparison to nonblood donors and want their samples to be used for nonprofit research. Our hypothesis that being a blood donor would be a better predictor to donate urological tissue than being an organ donor card carrier borne out by the trends reported above.

  9. Peer-to-peer milk donors' and recipients' experiences and perceptions of donor milk banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Karleen D

    2013-07-01

    To explore the intersection of peer-to-peer milk sharing and donor milk banks. A descriptive survey design containing closed and open-ended questions was used to examine women's perceptions of peer-to-peer milk sharing and milk banking. Closed-ended questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics and conventional qualitative content analysis was used to analyze open-ended responses. Participants were recruited via the Facebook sites of two online milk-sharing networks (Human Milk 4 Human Babies and Eats on Feet). Ninety-eight milk donors and 41 milk recipients who had donated or received breast milk in an arrangement that was facilitated via the Internet. One half of donor recipients could not donate to a milk bank because there were no banks local to them or they did not qualify as donors. Other respondents did not donate to a milk bank because they viewed the process as difficult, had philosophical objections to milk banking, or had a philosophical attraction to peer sharing. Most donor respondents felt it was important to know the circumstances of their milk recipients. No recipient respondents had obtained milk from a milk bank; it was recognized that they would not qualify for banked milk or that banked milk was cost prohibitive. Peer-to-peer milk donors and recipients may differ from milk bank donors and recipients in significant ways. Cooperation between milk banks and peer sharing networks could benefit both groups. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  10. Generalized Safety and Efficacy of Simplified Intravenous Thrombolysis Treatment (SMART) Criteria in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sigrid B; Barazangi, Nobl; Chen, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) exclusion criteria may substantially limit the use of thrombolysis. Preliminary data have shown that the SMART (Simplified Management of Acute stroke using Revised Treatment) criteria greatly expand patient...... eligibility by reducing thrombolysis exclusions, but they have not been assessed on a large scale. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of general adoption of SMART thrombolysis criteria to a large regional stroke network. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who received IV thrombolysis...... application of SMART criteria is safe and effective. Widespread application of these criteria could substantially increase the proportion of patients who might qualify for treatment....

  11. Sero - Prevalence of Viral Transfusion-transmissible Infections amongst voluntary Blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashida Elrashid Mohamed Ali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the Sero-prevalence of viral transfusion-transmissible Infectious diseases among blood donors, namely immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and C transmissible infections (TTIs like HBV, HCV. HIV (Human immune viruses.. sero-prevalence of viral transmissible infections. The donated blood for specific antibodies for infections agents. Can largely reduce the risk of TTIs, virus among blood donors. The study was carried out in the blood bank at Khartoum Teaching Hospital, centre, Sudan. Screening of blood samples for hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV Antibodies were done using (ELISA enzyme link immunoassay. The study included (1184 voluntary Blood donors, all were males. The overall prevalence of viral transfusion transmissible Infections were (11.84%. The sero-prevalence for antibody against HIV (6 and hepatitis C Virus was positive in 8 (0.06 and (0.08% donors respectively while HBsAg was detected in 98 (9.8% donors.  situation that need for strict criteria for selection of blood donors and also methods of laboratory assays. Services are high in Sudan due to the endemicity of infections like malaria, nutritional problem and obstetrical emergencies associated with blood loss. Little is known about the level of these infections in Sudan so; this study was conducted to investigate the sero-prevalence of transfusion transmissible viral infectious diseases in particular human B and hepatitis Immunodeficiency, hepatitis C viruses. The mode of transmission for HIV, HBV and HCV is the same and includes unsafe Sexual sharp materials Contact, using contaminated with body fluid, mother to Child and transfusion of blood and blood Products.

  12. Expanding the knowledge translation metaphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretsen, Eivind; Sandset, Tony Joakim; Ødemark, John

    2017-03-13

    Knowledge translation (KT) is a buzzword in modern medical science. However, there has been little theoretical reflection on translation as a process of meaning production in KT. In this paper, we argue that KT will benefit from the incorporation of a more theoretical notion of translation as an entangled material, textual and cultural process. We discuss and challenge fundamental assumptions in KT, drawing on theories of translation from the human sciences. We show that the current construal of KT as separate from and secondary to the original scientific message is close to the now deeply compromised literary view of translation as the simple act of copying the original. Inspired by recent theories of translation, we claim that KT can be more adequately understood in terms of a 'double supplement' - on the one hand, KT offers new approaches to the communication of scientific knowledge to different groups in the healthcare system with the aim of supplementing a lack of knowledge among clinicians (and patients). On the other, it demonstrates that a textual and cultural supplement, namely a concern with target audiences (clinicians and patients), is inevitable in the creation of an 'autonomous' science. Hence, the division between science and its translation is unproductive and impossible to maintain. We discuss some possible implications of our suggested shift in concept by drawing on pharmaceutical interventions for the prevention of HIV as a case. We argue that such interventions are based on a supplementary and paradoxical relation to the target audiences, both presupposing and denying their existence. More sophisticated theories of translation can lay the foundation for an expanded model of KT that incorporates a more adequate and reflective description of the interdependency of scientific, cultural, textual and material practices.

  13. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Cecilia Padilla Rodriguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner is present at a high level. This study sought to apply this theorem to the corporate sector, and to expand it to include other indicators of course effectiveness: satisfaction, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations. A large Mexican organisation participated in this research, with 146 learners, 30 teachers and 3 academic assistants. Three versions of an online course were designed, each emphasising a different type of interaction. Data were collected through surveys, exams, observations, activity logs, think aloud protocols and sales records. All course versions yielded high levels of effectiveness, in terms of satisfaction, learning and return on expectations. Yet, course design did not dictate the types of interactions in which students engaged within the courses. Findings suggest that the interaction equivalency theorem can be reformulated as follows: In corporate settings, an online course can be effective in terms of satisfaction, learning, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations, as long as (a at least one of three types of interaction (learner-content, learner-teacher or learner-learner features prominently in the design of the course, and (b course delivery is consistent with the chosen type of interaction. Focusing on only one type of interaction carries a high risk of confusion, disengagement or missed learning opportunities, which can be managed by incorporating other forms of interactions.

  14. Compliance with donor age recommendations in oocyte donor recruitment advertisements in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta, Hillary B; Berry, Roberta M; Levine, Aaron D

    2013-04-01

    IVF using donated oocytes offers benefits to many infertile patients, yet the technique also raises a number of ethical concerns, including worries about potential physical and psychological risks to oocyte donors. In the USA, oversight of oocyte donation consists of a combination of federal and state regulations and self-regulatory guidelines promulgated by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. This study assesses compliance with one of these self-regulatory guidelines - specifically, ASRM's preferred minimum age for donors of 21. To assess compliance, 539 oocyte donor recruitment advertisements from two recruitment channels (Craigslist and college newspapers) were collected and evaluated. Of these, 61% in the Craigslist dataset and 43% in the college newspaper dataset listed minimum ages between 18 and 20, which is inconsistent with ASRM's preferred minimum age recommendation of 21. Advertisements placed by oocyte donor recruitment agencies were more likely than advertisements placed by clinics to specify minimum ages between 18 and 20. These results indicate that ASRM should evaluate and consider revising its donor age guidelines. IVF using donated human eggs can help many patients who have difficulty having children. However, the technique also raises ethical concerns, including concerns about potential physical and psychological harms to egg donors. In the USA, oversight of egg donation relies on a combination of federal and state regulation and professional self-regulation. Governmental regulations address only limited aspects of egg donation, such as the potential spread of infectious diseases and the reporting of success rates, leaving voluntary guidelines developed by an association of medical professionals to address most issues, including ethical concerns raised by the practice. One of these voluntary guidelines recommends that egg donors should be at least 21 years of age. In this article, we analysed 539 egg donor recruitment advertisements

  15. PERFORMANCE CRITERIA SLITTING-PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Starkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Criteria of efficiency the slitting process. For example double-line rolling of rebar No. 20 identified such criteria separation efficiency in non-dividing device as the size of the crossbar.

  16. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M., E-mail: msingh@sandia.gov; Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87175 (United States); Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  17. Donor vigilance: what are we doing about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; Marijt-van der Kreek, Tanneke; de Kort, Wim L A M

    2012-05-01

    Donor vigilance is the systematic monitoring of adverse reactions and incidents in blood donor care with a view to improving quality and safety for blood donors. Standard international definitions are available for surveillance purposes. In recent years advances have been made in determining risk factors for vasovagal and other adverse reactions to blood donation as well as in evaluating preventive measures. Blood establishments should record all adverse reactions in blood donors. Besides its use for individual donor care, this information can be reviewed within and between organisations to guide policy decisions and research for improving donor care. Copyright © 2011 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Benzyne arylation of oxathiane glycosyl donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Fascione

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The arylation of bicyclic oxathiane glycosyl donors has been achieved using benzyne generated in situ from 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT and lead tetraacetate. Following sulfur arylation, glycosylation of acetate ions proceeded with high levels of stereoselectivity to afford α-glycosyl acetates in a ‘one-pot’ reaction, even in the presence of alternative acceptor alcohols.

  19. prevalence of cytomegalovirus antibodies in blood donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... 86 (Supplement) December 2009. PREVALENCE OF CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ANTIBODIES IN BLOOD DONORS AT THE NATIONAL BLOOD. TRANSFUSION CENTRE, NAIROBI. D. G. Njeru, MBChB, MMed (Path), Dip. Forensic Med (SA), Registrar, Department of Human Pathology, W. O. Mwanda,. MBChB ...

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 29,949 ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... DOUBLE STEMCELL (Hindi) 09039139777 - Duration: 4:26. Pharma Science 116,753 views 4:26 Stem Cell Basics - ...

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 38,921 views 49:19 Myelodysplastic Syndrome | Dr. ...

  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have ... 3:35. hemaquebec1998 8,944 views 3:35 Leukemia Survivor Meets Bone Marrow Donor - Duration: 4:47. ...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 7,934 views 32:25 Stem Cell Basics - How Blood is Made. - Duration: 10:58. Vernon Louw ... 19. Children's Health 40,015 views 49:19 How to become a potential blood stem cell donor ...

  5. [The blood donors' haemovigilance in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounnoughene, N; Sandid, I; Carlier, M; Joussemet, M; Ferry, N

    2013-05-01

    This work aim to present the descriptive analysis of serious adverse reactions in donors (dSAR's), which were notified in 2010 and 2011 in the French national haemovigilance database "e-FIT" (Internet secured haemovigilance reporting system). Some data, which are necessary for this analysis, also come from the regional haemovigilance coordinators' reports (RHC). The other parts of haemovigilance in the context of donation, without donors adverse reactions, such as post-donation information (PDI), adverse events occurred in the blood collection steps of the transfusion chain and epidemiology are not subject to this work analysis. This work shows that the quality of the data gradually improved since the setting up of the notification system of dSAR's. These data are particularly rich in learning lessons, but are still improving. It allows us to confirm that donor's safety, blood components quality, while preserving the blood components self-sufficiency in France, remains a priority. For these reasons, it is important to continue this haemovigilance awareness and to implement necessary actions that would be required for the protection of the donor's health and comfort during donation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Evaluation of homocysteine in blood bank donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Rosa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the use of plasma homocysteine levelsin blood bank donors as a risk marker for the development ofcardiovascular diseases in healthy individuals. Methods: Thirtynineblood donors were evaluated and a correlation was establishedbetween the plasma homocysteine levels and the different ageand gender groups. Results: The values of homocysteine levelswere found to be within the normal range, as expected for a healthypopulation. Only three male donors, aged between 40 and 60years, presented hyperhomocysteinemia within the risk rangefor developing cardiovascular disease. Comparing females andmales with regard to homocysteine levels, the values presentedstatistically significant differences, however of little relevance.Variance analysis did not show significant differences betweenthe considered age groups, regardless of gender, but there was aclear increase in homocysteine concentration in males betweenthe 5th and 6th decades of life. Conclusions: It was not possible tosuggest the use of plasma homocysteine levels as an early markerfor the development of cardiovascular diseases in healthy bloodbank donors, but one can speculate about a critical homocysteinelevel to be defined as a cutoff point, above which there wouldbe an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

  7. BLOOD DONOR HAEMATOLOGY PARAMETERS IN TWO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2005-03-03

    Mar 3, 2005 ... blood transfusion states that a donor's blood pressure, .... Differences between Nairobi and Kisumu obtained with independent samples t-test. ns, not significant (p>0.05). Table 2. Statistical analysis and comparisons of leukocyte and platelet parameters for 1394 donated units from two regional blood banks ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... A 60 Minutes investigation - Duration: 16:11. CBS News 361,590 views 16:11 Pain Control: Support ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former NCI employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her ...

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ... YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign in to add this ...

  11. Research Award: Donor Partnership Division | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Deadline: September 7, 2016 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. ... the production of information related to donor partnerships, participating in partnership development, monitoring and evaluation, communication and learning activities, and preparing internal and external reports.

  12. Organ Donor Recognition: Practical and Ethical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.J. de Groot (Yorick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe brain dead patient is the ideal multiorgan donor. Conditions that can lead to the state of brain death are limited. A subarachnoid haemorrhage, intracerebral haemorrhage or traumatic brain injury precede in 83% of the cases the state of brain death. Because of better prevention and

  13. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her German stem cell donor for the first time in Germany. #priceless - Duration: 1:04. Jacque Brohawn ... Bone Marrow Transplant Patient Information: Chapter 3 - What Are Stem Cells - Duration: 3:58. HenryFordTV 20,159 ...

  14. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... video will automatically play next. Up next Stem cell donation: Step by step - Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 8,779 views 3:35 My Friend the Stem Cell Donor - Duration: 4:41. Annabelle Monks 6,482 ...

  15. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  16. Reimbursing live organ donors for incurred non-medical expenses: a global perspective on policies and programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickand, M; Cuerden, M S; Klarenbach, S W; Ojo, A O; Parikh, C R; Boudville, N; Garg, A X

    2009-12-01

    Methods to reimburse living organ donors for the non-medical expenses they incur have been implemented in some jurisdictions and are being considered in others. A global understanding of existing legislation and programs would help decision makers implement and optimize policies and programs. We searched for and collected data from countries that practice living organ donation. We examined legislation and programs that facilitate reimbursement, focusing on policy mechanisms, eligibility criteria, program duration and types of expenses reimbursed. Of 40 countries, reimbursement is expressly legal in 16, unclear in 18, unspecified in 6 and expressly prohibited in 1. Donor reimbursement programs exist in 21 countries; 6 have been enacted in the last 5 years. Lost income is reimbursed in 17 countries, while travel, accommodation, meal and childcare costs are reimbursed in 12 to 19 countries. Ten countries have comprehensive programs, where all major cost categories are reimbursed to some extent. Out-of-country donors are reimbursed in 10 jurisdictions. Reimbursement is conditional on donor income in 7 countries, and recipient income in 2 countries. Many nations have programs that help living donors with their financial costs. These programs differ in operation and scope. Donors in other regions of the world are without support.

  17. Transfusion Transmissible Infections Among Walk-In Blood Donors at Kisumu Regional Blood Transfusion Centre, Kisumu County, Kenya, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamamba, Dominic; Onyango, Dickens; Oyugi, Elvis; Kanyina, Evalyne; Obonyo, Mark; Githuku, Jane; Ransom, James

    2017-11-08

    Transfusion transmissible infections (TTIs) are threats to blood safety. This study investigated TTIs among volunteer blood donors at the Kisumu Regional Blood Transfusion Centre (KRBTC) in Kenya. We performed a retrospective record review of blood donor registers at KRBTC, 2015. Walk-in donors accepted for donation were analyzed to determine prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and syphilis. Descriptive and associative statistics were calculated using Microsoft Excel and Open-Epi software. The records of a total of 3690 walk-in donors were reviewed, and 2046 were included in the analysis. Mean age was 30 ± 9.6 years, 76% male, 51% married, and 80% were Kisumu residents. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis was 2.4%, 3.1%, 2.3%, and 1%, respectively. HBV was the most common TTI among the volunteers. KRBTC should be proactive and address issues of donor self-exclusion, strict adherence to donor selection criteria, and vaccination.

  18. On harm thresholds and living organ donation: must the living donor benefit, on balance, from his donation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nicola Jane

    2017-05-19

    For the majority of scholars concerned with the ethics of living organ donation, inflicting moderate harms on competent volunteers in order to save the lives or increase the life chances of others is held to be justifiable provided certain conditions are met. These conditions tend to include one, or more commonly, some combination of the following: (1) The living donor provides valid consent to donation. (2) Living donation produces an overall positive balance of harm-benefit for donors and recipients which cannot be obtained in a less harmful manner. (3) Donation is not liable to cause significant and long-term morbidity to, or the death of, the donor. This paper critically examines the suggestion that these criteria are not sufficient to offer a general account of justified living organ donation in the context of competent volunteers and that key to justified living organ donation is that donors receive sufficient benefits from their donation that these outweigh the harms they suffer. However, although this view-termed here 'The Donor Benefit Standard'-directs welcome attention to the many and complex motives which may underlie living organ donation, this paper ultimately concludes that given the threats this position poses to individual autonomy and the lives of those in need of organ transplants 'The Donor Benefit Standard' should ultimately be rejected.

  19. Successful unintentional ABO-incompatible renal transplantation: Blood group A1B donor into an A2B recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Pomper, Gregory J

    2014-05-01

    To report a successful unintentional transplantation of a deceased donor kidney from an "incompatible" A1B donor into a recipient who was blood group A2B with unsuspected preformed anti-A1 antibodies. The donor and recipient were both typed for ABO antigens. The recipient was tested for ABO and non-ABO antibodies. The recipient was typed for HLA class I and class II antigens, including HLA antibody screen. The T-and B-flow cytometry crossmatch test was performed using standard protocol. The donor-recipient pair was a complete six-antigen human leukocyte antigen mismatch, but final T- and B-flow cytometry cross-match tests were compatible. The recipient was a 65-year-old woman with a medical history of end-stage renal disease secondary to diabetic nephropathy who underwent kidney transplantation from a 46-year-old brain-dead standard criteria donor. The recipient's RBCs were negative with A1 lectin, and the recipient was thus typed as an A2 subgroup. Anti-A1 could be demonstrated in the recipient's plasma. The donor's RBCs were positive with A1 lectin, thereby conferring an A1 blood type. It is safe to transplant across the A1/A2 blood group barrier provided that the preformed antibodies are not reactive at 37°C and with anti-human globulin.

  20. User perspectives on relevance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    implications for relevance feedback in information retrieval systems, suggesting that systems accept and utilize multiple positive and negative relevance criteria from users. Systems designers may want to focus on supporting content criteria followed by full text criteria as these may provide the greatest cost...

  1. Sample quality criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Charles A; Wagner, Claas

    2015-01-01

    The concept of Sample Quality Criteria (SQC) is the initial step in the scientific approach to representative sampling. It includes the establishment of sampling objectives, Decision Unit (DU), and confidence. Once fully defined, these criteria serve as input, in addition to material properties, to the Theory of Sampling for developing a representative sampling protocol. The first component of the SQC establishes these questions: What is the analyte(s) of concern? What is the concentration level of interest of the analyte(s)? How will inference(s) be made from the analytical data to the DU? The second component of the SQC establishes the DU, i.e., the scale at which decisions are to be made. On a large scale, a DU could be a ship or rail car; examples for small-scale DUs are individual beans, seeds, or kernels. A well-defined DU is critical because it defines the spatial and temporal boundaries of sample collection. SQC are not limited to a single DU; they can also include multiple DUs. The third SQC component, the confidence, establishes the desired probability that a correct inference (decision) can be made. The confidence level should typically correlate to the potential consequences of an incorrect decision (e.g., health or economic). The magnitude of combined errors in the sampling, sample processing and analytical protocols determines the likelihood of an incorrect decision. Thus, controlling error to a greater extent increases the probability of a correct decision. The required confidence level directly affects the sampling effort and QC measures.

  2. Intensification of donor interviewing procedures: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhenen, D J; Molijn, M H; Gorgels, J; van der Linden, J M; Ko, L K

    1996-02-01

    To determine the feasibility and acceptability for the blood donor of an intensified blood donor interviewing procedure on high-risk factors for infectious diseases. To answer the question whether an intensified blood donor interviewing procedure would lead to an unacceptable loss of blood donors. Feasibility study. Red Cross Bloodbank Rotterdam. DONORS: Study group of 240 first-time donors. Intensified donor interviewing techniques by direct questioning and workload assessment. Intensified interviewing was welcomed by 88-91% of first-time donors and rejected by 2-5%. On the question whether the intensified interviewing procedure should be the standard approach of the blood bank the answer was positive in 76-82% of first-time donors and negative in 11-14%. No blood donors indicated that this would be a reason to withdraw from blood donation. The workload for the blood bank physician increased by approximately 30%. The approach of intensified donor interviewing techniques in first-time donors is acceptable both to the donors and the blood bank workload.

  3. Seropositive abdominal and thoracic donor organs are largely underutilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R M; Pietroski, R E; Hagan, M; Eisenbrey, A B; Fontana, R J

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology and utilization of anti-hepatitis B core protein(+) and anti-hepatitis C virus(+) organ donor referrals in a large organ procurement organization. Between 1995 and 2006, 3,134 deceased organ donor referrals were tested for anti-HBc and anti-HCV using commercial assays. The prevalence of anti-HCV(+) organ donor referrals significantly increased from 3.4% in 1994-1996 to 8.1% in 2003-2005 (P < .001), whereas the prevalence of anti-HBc(+) organ donor referrals remained unchanged at 3%-4% (P = .20). The 112 anti-HBc(+) (3.5%) and 173 anti-HCV(+) (5.5%) organ donor referrals were significantly older and more likely to be noncaucasian than seronegative organ donor referrals (P < .02). The procurement and utilization rates of seropositive thoracic and abdominal donor organs were significantly lower compared with seronegative organ donors (P < .0001). However, liver utilization rates significantly increased from anti-HBc(+) donors over time (21% vs 46%; P = .026), whereas utilization of anti-HCV(+) liver donors remained unchanged over time (5% vs 18%; P = .303). In summary, the proportion of anti-HCV(+) organ donor referrals has significantly increased and the proportion of anti-HBc(+) organ donor referrals has remained stable. Both thoracic and abdominal organs from seropositive donors are largely underutilized. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recruitment of Live Donors by Candidates for Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Peter P.; Shea, Judy A.; Berns, Jeffrey S.; Simon, Maureen K.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Bloom, Roy D.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about efforts that renal transplant candidates make to recruit live donors. It was hypothesized that preference for live donor kidney transplantation and greater knowledge about live donor transplantation are associated with candidates’ initiating conversations about donation with potential donors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A cross-sectional study of renal transplant candidates was performed at initial transplant evaluation. Candidates completed a questionnaire that specified whether they had initiated conversations about donation with any potential donors. The questionnaire also measured preference for live donor transplantation, knowledge about transplantation, concern about donor harm, willingness to ask for help in coping with kidney disease, and social support. Results: Ninety-six candidates participated. Forty-nine (51%) reported initiating a conversation with at least one potential donor. In multivariable logistic regression, domains associated with initiating a conversation included: preference for live donor transplantation, willingness to ask for help, and female gender. Older age was associated with a lower odds of initiating a conversation. Knowledge, concern about donor harm, social support, and ethnicity were not associated with initiating a conversation with a donor. Conclusions: Attempts at donor recruitment by kidney transplant candidates are common. These findings suggest that interventions that influence preferences about transplantation and willingness to ask others for help are logical targets to enhance access to live donor transplantation. PMID:18385392

  5. A donor cornea with metastatic cells from a cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Marino; Mistò, Raffaela; Limongelli, Anna; Valente, Maria G; Cuttin, Maria S; D'Amato Tóthová, Jana

    2013-12-01

    To describe the case of a donor cornea that showed hematogenous metastatic spread of cutaneous melanoma to the sclerocorneal limbus. Corneal tissue obtained from a donor with cutaneous malignant melanoma was evaluated for endothelial cell density, corneal transparency, and epithelial morphology. Subsequently, hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical characterization using S100, HMB45, Melan-A, and CD34 antibodies were performed on the corneal sections. The corneal tissue was transparent with high endothelial cell density; it was graded as being suitable for transplantation according to the current eye bank criteria. However, the aggressiveness of the donor's cancer and the diffuse melanosis of the sclera led to the suspicion of malignant melanoma metastasis to the cornea. Histochemical analysis of the corneoscleral rim showed small aggregates rich in pigmented cells that were localized in cleft-like structures in the sclera, at the sclerocorneal interface and in the peripheral avascular portion of the cornea. The aggregates were positive for the melanocytic tumor markers S100, HMB45, and Melan-A; the rims of the clefts expressed the panvascular CD34 antigen, which was suggestive of neovascularization. Corneal tissue from a donor with malignant cutaneous melanoma displayed neoplastic lesions of melanocytic origin that had spread from a primitive melanoma through hematogenous routes to the sclerocorneal limbus. On the basis of this finding, we believe that having a metastatic cutaneous malignant melanoma could in some cases be reviewed as an exclusionary criterion for undergoing cornea transplantation.

  6. Reconstruction of a Damaged Lower Polar Artery for Kidney Transplantation Using Tubularised Donor Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Vicéns-Morton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Live donors, extended donor criteria, and the maximum usage of organs with anatomical variants are some of the mechanisms used to increase the number of organs available. Case. We present the case of a kidney transplant, in which the organ had an iatrogenic injury to a lower pole arterial branch during retrieval. The donor was a 35-year-old male (DCD, Maastricht III. The right kidney was accepted; it had three veins in a single cava patch and three renal arteries, the main artery with aorta patch that is 8 cm long. A small lower pole artery was sectioned during retrieval surgery at approximately 1 cm from its origin as well as a third small mid-lower pole artery. The lower pole damaged artery was reconstructed using tubularised aorta patch to a total length of 5 cm. No additional donor vessels had been sent. After construction of the tubulised aorta, E-E anastomosis to the damaged polar artery was done with interrupted 7-0 Prolene sutures. Conclusion. While the waiting list for a kidney continues to rise and we continue to have organ shortness, vascular retrieval injury should not be an absolute contraindication for transplant.

  7. Extending normothermic regional perfusion to the thorax in donors after circulatory death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Steven S L; Oniscu, Gabriel C

    2017-06-01

    Despite a significant increase in the utilization of donors after circulatory death (DCD), the number of organs recovered and their function are largely inferior to those from donors after brain death. This review summarizes recent advances in in-situ normothermic regional perfusion of DCD organs prior to procurement. The combination of warm and cold ischemia in DCD donation are detrimental to organ function. As a consequence, the acceptance criteria are far more restrictive and many organs are discarded.The application of extracorporeal circulation technology to DCD organ retrieval in the form of abdominal normothermic regional perfusion (NRP) made a significant impact on organ procurement. DCD heart transplantation has been made possible by technological developments of ex-situ preservation. Extending NRP to include cardio-thoracic organs is a recent development enabling conversion from a DCD to a donor after brain death-type procurement.NRP offers the opportunity for a dynamic assessment of function and may lead to expansion of acceptance criteria as well as allowing for early interventions to modulate organ function. Thoraco-abdominal NRP may become the new gold standard for DCD organ retrieval. Further research and education are required to streamline logistics, define organ function markers and increase acceptance and utilization.

  8. Predonation psychosocial evaluation of living kidney and liver donor candidates: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerinckx, Nathalie; Timmerman, Lotte; Van Gogh, Johan; van Busschbach, Jan; Ismail, Sohal Y; Massey, Emma K; Dobbels, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating a person's suitability for living organ donation is crucial, consisting not only of a medical but also of a thorough psychosocial screening. We performed a systematic literature review of guidelines, consensus statements, and protocols on the content and process of psychosocial screening of living kidney and liver donor candidates. We searched PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO until June 22, 2011, following the PRISMA guidelines, complemented by scrutinizing guidelines databases and references of identified publications. Thirty-four publications were identified, including seven guidelines, six consensus statements, and 21 protocols or programs. Guidelines and consensus statements were inconsistent and lacked concreteness for both their content and process, possibly explaining the observed variability in center-specific evaluation protocols and programs. Overall, recommended screening criteria are not evidence-based and an operational definition of the concept "psychosocial" is missing, causing heterogeneity in terminology. Variation also exists on methods used to psychosocially evaluate potential donors. The scientific basis of predonation psychosocial evaluation needs to be strengthened. There is a need for high-quality prospective psychosocial outcome studies in living donors, a uniform terminology to label psychosocial screening criteria, and validated instruments to identify risk factors. © 2013 Steunstichting ESOT. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Crystal structures of deprotonated nucleobases from an expanded DNA alphabet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Mariko F; Kim, Hyo Joong; Takahashi, Daisuke; Abboud, Khalil A; Benner, Steven A

    2016-12-01

    Reported here is the crystal structure of a heterocycle that implements a donor-donor-acceptor hydrogen-bonding pattern, as found in the Z component [6-amino-5-nitropyridin-2(1H)-one] of an artificially expanded genetic information system (AEGIS). AEGIS is a new form of DNA from synthetic biology that has six replicable nucleotides, rather than the four found in natural DNA. Remarkably, Z crystallizes from water as a 1:1 complex of its neutral and deprotonated forms, and forms a `skinny' pyrimidine-pyrimidine pair in this structure. The pair resembles the known intercalated cytosine pair. The formation of the same pair in two different salts, namely poly[[aqua(μ6-2-amino-6-oxo-3-nitro-1,6-dihydropyridin-1-ido)sodium]-6-amino-5-nitropyridin-2(1H)-one-water (1/1/1)], denoted Z-Sod, {[Na(C5H4N3O3)(H2O)]·C5H5N3O3·H2O}n, and ammonium 2-amino-6-oxo-3-nitro-1,6-dihydropyridin-1-ide-6-amino-5-nitropyridin-2(1H)-one-water (1/1/1), denoted Z-Am, NH4+·C5H4N3O3-·C5H5N3O3·H2O, under two different crystallization conditions suggests that the pair is especially stable. Implications of this structure for the use of this heterocycle in artificial DNA are discussed.

  10. ِAnalysis of donor motivations in living donor liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham eAbdeldayem

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The introduction of the living donor liver transplantation (LDLT in Egypt as in elsewhere, has raised important psychological conflicts and ethical questions. The objective of this study was to get better understanding of the potential donors’ motives towards LDLT.Methods:This study was conducted on consecutive 193 living –liver donors who underwent partial hepatectomy as donors for LDLT during the period between April 2003 and January 2013, at the National Liver Institute Menoufeyia University, Egypt. Potential donors were thoroughly evaluated preoperatively through a screening questionnaire and interviews as regard their demographic data, relationship to the potential recipient and motives towards proceeding to surgery. They were assured that the information shared between them and the transplant centre is confidential. Results.The donors’ mean age was 25.53± 6.39 years with a range of 18-45 years. Males represented 64.7 % and females were 35.3%. The most common donors (32.1%, n_62, were sons and daughters to their parents (sons: n_43, daughters: n_19 while parents to their offsprings represent 15% (mothers: n_21, fathers: n_8. Brothers and sisters represent 16.5 % (brothers: n_22, sisters: n_10. Nephews & nieces giving their uncles or aunts were 14%. The number of wives donating to their husbands was 11 (5.7%. Interestingly, there was no single husband who donated his wife. Among the remaining donors, there were 11 cousins & one uncle. Unrelated donors were 20 (10.4%. Several factors seemed to contribute to motivation for donation: the seriousness of the potential recipient condition, the relationship and personal history of the donor to the potential recipient, the religious beliefs, the trust in the health care system, and family dynamics and obligations.Conclusions. Absolute absence of coercion on the living-liver donor’s motives may not be realistic because of the serious condition of the potential recipient. It is

  11. Non-therapeutic (elective) ventilation of potential organ donors: the ethical basis for changing the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A B

    1996-04-01

    Non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors would increase the supply of kidneys for transplantation. There are no major ethical objections to it. The means of permitting it are forbidden by laws with an ethical basis. A law permitting it would need an ethical basis. Introducing a third legal method of diagnosing death would be unethical. Expanding the power of the advance directive to permit procedures involving minimal harm would be ethical but not helpful. Extending the power of proxies to permit specific non-therapeutic procedures which caused or risked minimal harm to incompetent patients is the best way forward.

  12. Contribution of the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS to research on blood transfusion safety in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Loureiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS program was established in the United States in 1989 with the purpose of increasing blood transfusion safety in the context of the HIV/AIDS and human T-lymphotropic virus epidemics. REDS and its successor, REDS-II were at first conducted in the US, then expanded in 2006 to include international partnerships with Brazil and China. In 2011, a third wave of REDS renamed the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III was launched. This seven-year research program focuses on both blood banking and transfusion medicine research in the United States of America, Brazil, China, and South Africa. The main goal of the international programs is to reduce and prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other known and emerging infectious agents through transfusion, and to address research questions aimed at understanding global issues related to the availability of safe blood. This article describes the contribution of REDS-II to transfusion safety in Brazil. Articles published from 2010 to 2013 are summarized, including database analyses to characterize blood donors, deferral rates, and prevalence, incidence and residual risk of the main blood-borne infections. Specific studies were developed to understand donor motivation, the impact of the deferral questions, risk factors and molecular surveillance among HIV-positive donors, and the natural history of Chagas disease. The purpose of this review is to disseminate the acquired knowledge and briefly summarize the findings of the REDS-II studies conducted in Brazil as well as to introduce the scope of the REDS-III program that is now in progress and will continue through 2018.

  13. How to reverse first time donors to become regular donors? A questionnaire survey in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerus, P; Kullaste, R; Pungas, K; Aavik, T; Lang, K

    2017-11-01

    Donating blood in Estonia is non-remunerated and voluntary. Estonian Blood Service system has four independent regional blood centres that are responsible for blood collection, processing, screening and distribution of blood components to hospitals for clinical use. This research was carried out as a questionnaire survey. A questionnaire was developed to study lapsing first time donors' (FTD) blood donation experience, intention and willingness to donate again. A thousand five hundred and forty-six questionnaires were posted to donors who had one successful donation in 2010 and who had not returned to second donation till the year 2012. For data analysis routine statistical methods were used. To evaluate the most appropriate number of classes, based on previous experience and future expectations, latent class analysis was used. There were 453 respondents (29.3%). For the majority of aspects of blood donation experience the emotions were positive. Results of the study suggested that blood collection agencies should intervene to bolster donors' attitudes, perceived control, and identity as a donor during this crucial post-first donation period. First blood donation seems to have been a positive experience. Reasons leading to stopping blood donation should be studied further. Establishing a donor registry for Estonia would be essential to keep track of donors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Decision criteria in PSA applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, J.E.; Pulkkinen, U.; Rosqvist, T.; Simola, K. [VTT Automation (Finland)

    2001-11-01

    Along with the adoption of risk informed decision making principles, the need for formal probabilistic decision rule or criteria has been risen. However, there are many practical and theoretical problems in the application of probabilistic criteria. One has to think what is the proper way to apply probabilistic rules together with deterministic ones and how the criteria are weighted with respect to each other. In this report, we approach the above questions from the decision theoretic point of view. We give a short review of the most well known probabilistic criteria, and discuss examples of their use. We present a decision analytic framework for evaluating the criteria, and we analyse how the different criteria behave under incompleteness or uncertainty of the PSA model. As the conclusion of our analysis we give recommendations on the application of the criteria in different decision situations. (au)

  15. Computer Algorithms in the Search for Unrelated Stem Cell Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Steiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a medical procedure in the field of hematology and oncology, most often performed for patients with certain cancers of the blood or bone marrow. A lot of patients have no suitable HLA-matched donor within their family, so physicians must activate a “donor search process” by interacting with national and international donor registries who will search their databases for adult unrelated donors or cord blood units (CBU. Information and communication technologies play a key role in the donor search process in donor registries both nationally and internationaly. One of the major challenges for donor registry computer systems is the development of a reliable search algorithm. This work discusses the top-down design of such algorithms and current practice. Based on our experience with systems used by several stem cell donor registries, we highlight typical pitfalls in the implementation of an algorithm and underlying data structure.

  16. TRANSLOCATION OF BACTERIA AND ENDOTOXIN IN ORGAN DONORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; Rosman, C; Kooi, K; Wubbels, GH; Bleichrodt, RP

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To determine if bacterial translocation and endotoxin absorption occur in organ donors with an anatomically intact gastrointestinal tract. Design: Case series. Setting: Intensive care units in general and university hospitals. Patients: Twenty-one (multiple) organ donors. Intervention:

  17. Living Kinship Trouble: Danish Sperm Donors' Narratives of Relatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Danish sperm donors face a particular kind of kinship trouble: they find themselves in a cultural and organizational context that offers different and contrary ways of how to make connections to donor-conceived individuals meaningful. Whereas Danish sperm banks and Danish law want sperm donors to regard these connections as contractual issues, the dominant kinship narrative in Denmark asks sperm donors to also consider them as family and kinship relations. Based on interviews with Danish sperm donors and participant observation at Danish sperm banks, I argue that Danish sperm donors make sense of connections to donor-conceived individuals as a particular kind of relatedness that cannot be reduced to either contractual or kinship relations. Making sense of these connections, sperm donors negotiate their social significance and thereby participate in opening a space which offers avenues for new kinds of sociality.

  18. Anaesthesia and peri-operative care for laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.R.A.M. Mertens Zur Borg (Ingrid)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA successful renal transplant for patients with kidney failure reduces mortality rate when compared to patients who continue dialysis. Organ donation from living donors has significant better results over organ donation from deceased donors. Traditionally the surgical

  19. Easy come, easy go. Retention of blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, A

    2015-08-01

    Retention of blood donors has benefits over recruitment of new blood donors. Retention is defined as preventing donors from lapsing and eventually becoming inactive. This review paper discusses literature on the importance of efforts to retain donors, specifically new donors, since lapsing is most common before the fifth donation. Studies have found that intention to donate, attitudes towards blood donation and self-efficacy (does one feel capable of donating blood) are predictors of blood donation. Feelings of 'warm glow' predict donation behaviour better than altruism. The existing literature further suggests that first time donors can be retained by paying extra attention to adverse events (vasovagal reactions and fatigue). These events could be reduced by drinking water and muscle tension exercises. Feelings of anxiety (in regular donors) and stress can further prevent donors from returning. Planning donations amongst busy lives can help retention, and suggestions are given on which interventions might be helpful. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  20. Formula milk versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, M A; Henderson, G; Anthony, M Y; McGuire, W

    2007-10-17

    When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, the alternative sources of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula milk. Feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with formula milk might increase nutrient input and growth rates. However, since feeding with formula milk may be associated with a higher incidence of feeding intolerance and necrotising enterocolitis, this may adversely affect growth and development. To determine the effect of formula milk compared with donor human breast milk on growth and development in preterm or low birth weight infants. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2007), MEDLINE (1966 - May 2007), EMBASE (1980 - May 2007), CINAHL (1982 - May 2007), conference proceedings, and previous reviews. Randomised controlled trials comparing feeding with formula milk versus donor breast milk in preterm or low birth weight infants. Data were extracted using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by two reviewer authors, and synthesis of data using relative risk, risk difference and weighted mean difference. Eight trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Only one trial used nutrient-fortified donor breast milk. Enteral feeding with formula milk compared with donor breast milk resulted in higher rates of growth in the short term. There was no evidence of an effect on long-term growth rates or neurodevelopmental outcomes. Meta-analysis of data from five trials demonstrated a statistically significantly higher incidence of necrotising enterocolitis in the formula fed group: typical relative risk 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.2, 5.1); typical risk difference: 0.03 (95% confidence interval 0.01, 0.06; number needed to harm: 33 (95

  1. Blood donor to inactive donor transition in the Basel region between 1996 and 2011: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volken, T; Buser, A; Holbro, A; Bart, T; Infanti, L

    2015-08-01

    For the prevention of blood shortages, it is essential for blood banks to design and implement donor recruitment and donor retention strategies that take into account the determinants of donor return. We studied the behaviour of first-time blood donors in the region of Basel, Switzerland, between 1996 and 2011 and described factors associated with transition from active to inactive donor in two successive first-time donor cohorts (1996-2002, 2003-2008). The risk of becoming an inactive donor was associated with being younger and female, not being a 0-negative donor and living in an urban area. Over time, hazards of becoming an inactive donor were converging for individuals living in non-urban and urban areas as were those of younger and older donors. After their first donation, 73.6% and 67.5% of males in the 1996-2002 and 2003-2008 cohorts, respectively, donated at least once in the following 24 months. The proportion of returning female donors was 71.8% and 65.4%, respectively. The increased volatility of first-time blood donors suggests that marketing actions and strategies aimed at increasing return rates should be reinforced, especially for younger and female blood donors. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  2. Kidney Exchange with Good Samaritan Donors: A Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Tayfun Sönmez; M. Utku Ünver

    2006-01-01

    We analyze mechanisms to kidney exchange with good samaritan donors where exchange is feasible not only among donor-patient pairs but also among such pairs and non-directed alturistic donors. We show that you request my donor-I get your turn mechanism (Abdulkadiroglu and Sonmez [1999]) is the only mechanism that is Pareto efficient, individually rational, strategy-proof, weakly neutral and consistent.

  3. FHR Generic Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, G.F.; Holcomb, D.E.; Cetiner, S.M.

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC)–based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

  4. FHR Generic Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC) - based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

  5. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christopher J; Angevine, Peter D; Aulino, Joseph M; Berger, Kevin L; Choudhri, Asim F; Fries, Ian Blair; Holly, Langston T; Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karaqulle; Kessler, Marcus M; Kirsch, Claudia F; Luttrull, Michael D; Mechtler, Laszlo L; O'Toole, John E; Sharma, Aseem; Shetty, Vilaas S; West, O Clark; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Bykowski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with myelopathic symptoms may have a number of causative intradural and extradural etiologies, including disc degenerative diseases, spinal masses, infectious or inflammatory processes, vascular compromise, and vertebral fracture. Patients may present acutely or insidiously and may progress toward long-term paralysis if not treated promptly and effectively. Noncontrast CT is the most appropriate first examination in acute trauma cases to diagnose vertebral fracture as the cause of acute myelopathy. In most nontraumatic cases, MRI is the modality of choice to evaluate the location, severity, and causative etiology of spinal cord myelopathy, and predicts which patients may benefit from surgery. Myelopathy from spinal stenosis and spinal osteoarthritis is best confirmed without MRI intravenous contrast. Many other myelopathic conditions are more easily visualized after contrast administration. Imaging performed should be limited to the appropriate spinal levels, based on history, physical examination, and clinical judgment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals, and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ACR appropriateness criteria jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Tasneem; Couto, Corey A; Rosen, Max P; Baker, Mark E; Blake, Michael A; Cash, Brooks D; Fidler, Jeff L; Greene, Frederick L; Hindman, Nicole M; Katz, Douglas S; Kaur, Harmeet; Miller, Frank H; Qayyum, Aliya; Small, William C; Sudakoff, Gary S; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yarmish, Gail M; Yee, Judy

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental consideration in the workup of a jaundiced patient is the pretest probability of mechanical obstruction. Ultrasound is the first-line modality to exclude biliary tract obstruction. When mechanical obstruction is present, additional imaging with CT or MRI can clarify etiology, define level of obstruction, stage disease, and guide intervention. When mechanical obstruction is absent, additional imaging can evaluate liver parenchyma for fat and iron deposition and help direct biopsy in cases where underlying parenchymal disease or mass is found. Imaging techniques are reviewed for the following clinical scenarios: (1) the patient with painful jaundice, (2) the patient with painless jaundice, and (3) the patient with a nonmechanical cause for jaundice. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Criteria for performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Weiss

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Using a cognitive task (mental calculation and a perceptual-motor task (stylized golf putting, we examined differential proficiency using the CWS index and several other quantitative measures of performance. The CWS index (Weiss and Shanteau, 2003 is a coherence criterion that looks only at internal properties of the data without incorporating an external standard. In Experiment 1, college students (n = 20 carried out 2- and 3-digit addition and multiplication problems under time pressure. In Experiment 2, experienced golfers (n = 12, also college students, putted toward a target from nine different locations. Within each experiment, we analyzed the same responses using different methods. For the arithmetic tasks, accuracy information (mean absolute deviation from the correct answer, MAD using a coherence criterion was available; for golf, accuracy information using a correspondence criterion (mean deviation from the target, also MAD was available. We ranked the performances of the participants according to each measure, then compared the orders using Spearman's rextsubscript{s}. For mental calculation, the CWS order correlated moderately (rextsubscript{s} =.46 with that of MAD. However, a different coherence criterion, degree of model fit, did not correlate with either CWS or accuracy. For putting, the ranking generated by CWS correlated .68 with that generated by MAD. Consensual answers were also available for both experiments, and the rankings they generated correlated highly with those of MAD. The coherence vs. correspondence distinction did not map well onto criteria for performance evaluation.

  8. 21 CFR 640.73 - Reporting of fatal donor reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of fatal donor reactions. 640.73 Section 640.73 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... donor reactions. If a donor has a fatal reaction which, in any way, may be associated with...

  9. 21 CFR 640.66 - Immunization of donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunization of donors. 640.66 Section 640.66 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.66 Immunization of donors. If specific immunization of a donor is to be performed, the selection and scheduling of the injection of the...

  10. Exploring the Mental Health of Living Kidney Donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Timmerman (Lotte)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Living donor kidney transplantation is the best option for extending and improving the lives of patients with end-stage renal disease. The benefits for the donor are less straightforward: a donor is a healthy person who undergoes a surgery in the first place for the

  11. Prediction models for hemoglobin deferral in whole blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Each year, a relevant proportion of the invited blood donors is eventually deferred from donation because of low hemoglobin (Hb) levels. Deferrals are meant to protect donors from developing iron deficiency anemia after a blood donation, however, they may increase the risk of donor lapse, even

  12. Donors and archives a guidebook for successful programs

    CERN Document Server

    Purcell, Aaron D

    2015-01-01

    Donors and Archives: A Guidebook for Successful Programs highlights the importance of development and fundraising for archives, while focusing on the donor and potential donor. Their interest, their support, their enthusiasm, and their stuff are vital to the success of archival programs.

  13. Population representation among anatomical donors and the implication for medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Amanda J; Smith, Whitney; Giannaris, Eustathia Lela; Orvek, Elizabeth; Lazar, Peter; Carney, Jan K; Gilroy, Anne M; Rosen, Max P

    2018-03-01

    Dissection provides a unique opportunity to integrate anatomical and clinical education. Commonly, cadavers are randomly assigned to courses, which may result in skewed representation of patient populations. The primary aim of this study was to determine if the anatomical donors studied by students at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) accurately represent the disease burden of the local patient population. This cross-sectional study compared the University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center patient claims data and body donation data from the UMMS Anatomical Gift Program (AGP). This study examined age, race, sex, and morbidities within a 10-year timeframe in 401,258 patients and 859 anatomical donors who met inclusion criteria. An independent t test was conducted to compare the mean ages of the two populations. Chi square analysis was conducted on race, sex, and 10 morbidity categories. A Fischer's exact test was conducted for two morbidity categories with n Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evidence-based regulation of labour migration in OECD countries: setting quotas, selection criteria, and shortage lists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonathan Chaloff

    2014-01-01

      The growing complexity of selection criteria for discretionary labour migration in OECD countries has been accompanied by an expanded demand for labour market analysis and consultation with stakeholder...

  15. South Korea as an emerging donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, Hong-Min; Munyi, Elijah Nyaga; Lee, Heejin

    2010-01-01

    like the objective of ODA, positioning of Korea's ODA as an emerging donor and the nature of aid to North Korea. We also argue that a shift of ODA policy is required to promote reform, based on a thorough reflection on the role of ODA in the alleviation of poverty and promoting sustainable development......South Korea's official development assistance (ODA) has been increasing rapidly and will continue to do so. Korea is one of the few countries which have successfully transitioned from a recipient to a donor. It became a member of DAC (development assistance committee), OECD in November 2009. Korea......'s ODA policy, along with its growth in quantity, is at a crossroads for the enhancement of its quality. Discussions and debates are going on regarding the reforms in Korea's ODA activities, and this paper examines key issues raised. It first reviews the past and present of Korea's ODA, and identifies...

  16. Diet and Asthma: Vitamins and Methyl Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Blatter, Josh; Brehm, John M.; Forno, Erick; Litonjua, Augusto A; Celedón, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dietary changes may partly explain the high burden of asthma in industrialized nations. Experimental studies have motivated a significant number of observational studies of the relation between vitamins (A, C, D, and E) or nutrients acting as methyl donors (folate, vitamin B12, and choline) and asthma. Because observational studies are susceptible to several sources of bias, well-conducted randomized controlled trials (RCTs) remain the “gold standard” to determine whether a vitamin or nutrient has an effect on asthma. Evidence from observational studies and/or relatively few RCTs most strongly justify ongoing and future RCTs of: 1) vitamin D to prevent or treat asthma, 2) choline supplementation as adjuvant treatment for asthma, and 3) vitamin E to prevent the detrimental effects of air pollution in subjects with asthma. At this time, there is insufficient evidence to recommend supplementation with any vitamin or nutrient acting as a methyl donor to prevent or treat asthma. PMID:24461761

  17. Second-opinion stress tele-echocardiography for the Adonhers (Aged donor heart rescue by stress echo project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Walter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To resolve the current shortage of donor hearts, we established the Adonhers protocol. An upward shift of the donor age cut-off limit (from the present 55 to 65 years is acceptable if a stress echo screening on the candidate donor heart is normal. This study aimed to verify feasibility of a "second opinion" of digitally transferred images of stress echo results to minimize technical variability in selection of aged donor hearts for heart transplant. Methods The informatics infrastructure was created for a core lab reading with a second opinion from the Pisa stress echo lab. To test the system, simulation standard stress echo cineloops were sent digitally from 5 peripheral labs to the central core lab. Starting January 2009, real marginal donor stress echos were sent via internet to the central core echo lab, Pisa, for a second opinion before heart transplant. Results In the simulation protocol, 30 dipyridamole stress echocardiograms were sent from the five peripheral echo labs to the central core lab in Pisa. Both the echo images and reports were correctly uploaded in the web system and sent to the core echo lab; the second opinion evaluation was obtained in all cases (100% feasibility. In the transplant protocol, eight donor cases were sent to the Pisa core lab for the second opinion protocol, and six of them were transplanted in marginal recipients. Conclusions Second-Opinion Stress Tele-Echocardiography can effectively be performed in a network aimed to safely expand the heart donor pool for heart transplant.

  18. Hemochromatosis Patients as Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara E Power

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate hemochromatosis patients' suitability as blood donors as well as their perceptions and experience with the current public donation system. Participants were gathered from a list of current hemochromatosis patients (n=120 and members of the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society (n=1000. Of the 1120 surveys mailed out to these groups, 801 surveys were returned completed. The sample respondents had a mean age of 57.44 years (SD=12.73; range 19 to 87 years, and 57% were men. It was found that 20% (160 of the respondents have donated blood since their diagnosis; however, only 12% of the respondents indicated that they use voluntary blood donation as a means of maintaining their iron levels. Forty per cent of the respondents indicated that they had been refused from voluntary donation. Despite the fact that in May 2001 the Canadian Blood Services, in collaboration with the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society, began a promotion campaign to encourage hemochromatosis patients to become voluntary blood donors, the present study found that 15% of the respondents reported having been refused from the voluntary blood donation service due to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. With respect to quality of life, it was found that individuals who donate blood were generally healthier with respect to physical functioning and bodily pain, however, these findings may indicate that hemochromatosis patients who are healthier are better able to donate at public blood banks, rather than that voluntary blood donation has an effect on the donors' physical functioning over phlebotomy clinic users. These study findings suggest that although there may be other medical factors limiting individuals from donating, hemochromatosis patients are interested in being voluntary blood donors and this potential resource is currently under-used.

  19. [Ethics and kidney transplants with living donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamzer Bruneel, Marie-France

    2016-12-01

    The ethical debate surrounding transplant practices questions our societies. International recommendations set out numerous precautions which must be taken to ensure that donors act with their free will. While in most countries, including France, organ donation is a voluntary and non-commercial act, a black market exists in the world resulting in the trafficking of organs and tragic transplant tourism. Copyright © 2016. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. External validation of the Donor Risk Index and the Eurotransplant Donor Risk Index on the French liver transplantation registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Audrey; Féray, Cyrille; Audureau, Etienne; Écochard, René; Jacquelinet, Christian; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Duvoux, Christophe; Daurès, Jean-Pierre; Landais, Paul

    2017-08-01

    A major limitation to liver transplantation is organ shortage leading to the use of non-optimal liver grafts. The Donor Risk Index has been validated and recommended to select donors/organs. The Eurotransplant Donor Risk Index was derived from the Donor Risk Index. The objective of our study was to perform an external validation of both Donor Risk Index and Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index against the French liver transplantation Cristal registry according to recommendations of the Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis. Liver transplantations performed in France between 2009 and 2013 were used to perform the validation study for the Donor Risk Index and the Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index respectively. We applied on the French data the models used to construct the Donor Risk Index and the Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index respectively. Neither the Donor Risk Index nor the Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index were validated against this dataset. Discrimination and calibration of these scores were not preserved according to our data. Important donor and candidates differences between our dataset and the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network or the Eurotransplant datasets may explain why the Donor Risk Index and the Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index appeared unadapted to the French transplant registry. Neither of these risk indexes were suitable to optimize the French liver allocation system. Thus, our next step will be to propose a general adaptive model for a Donor Risk Index. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Higher organ donation consent rates by relatives of potential uncontrolled donors versus potential controlled donors after death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Jentina; van Mook, Walther N K A; Willems, Monique E C; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2012-11-01

    Refusal to consent to organ donation is an important cause of the persisting gap between the number of potential organ donors and effectuated donors. In the Netherlands, organ donors include both uncontrolled donors: donors who die unexpectedly after cardiac death (DCD), after failed resuscitation and donors in whom death can be expected and donors after brain death, and controlled DCD donors: those who die after the withdrawal of treatment. Different donor type implies a different setting in which relatives are requested to consent to organ donation. It is unknown whether the setting influences the eventual decision for donation or not. Therefore, we compared the consent rate in potential donors who died unexpectedly (UD group) and in whom death was expected. A total of 523 potential organ donors between 2003 and 2011 in the 715-bed Maastricht University Medical Centre, the Netherlands were included. Both the patients' registration in the national donor register (DR) and the relatives' refusal rate in the two groups were retrospectively assessed using data from the donation application database. There were 109 unexpected and 414 expected potential donors The potential donors in the UD group were younger (mean age 52 versus 55 years, P = 0.032) and more often male (68 versus 52%, P = 0.003). There were no significant differences in registration in the DR between the groups. The relatives' consent rate in non-registered potential donors, or those who mandated the relatives for that decision, was higher in the UD group (53 versus 29%, P organ donation. The relatives of potential donors who died unexpectedly consented more often to donation than those in whom death was expected.

  2. Cardiovascular and demographic characteristics in whole blood and plasma donors: results from the Donor InSight study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsma, Femke; Veldhuizen, Ingrid; de Vegt, Femmie; Doggen, Carine; de Kort, Wim

    2011-02-01

    Within blood establishments little comparative information is available about donors versus the general population. In this study, a description of the donor pool was made in terms of demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors. The general Dutch population was used as a reference group. The Donor InSight study provided information on donors. Extensive information has been gathered by a self-administered questionnaire addressing various topics, like demographics, lifestyle, and health. Aggregated donor responses were compared with general population summary data. The study population consisted of 15,076 donors. The median age was 46.3 years and 47.3% were men. Donors were more likely to be highly educated (34.6%), married (71.7%), and of Dutch origin (97.4%), when compared to the general population. Donors were less often smokers (donors, 17.1%; general population, 31.8%), more often moderate drinkers (donors, 82.8%; general population, 74.7%), and physically more active (donors, 2.0 hr/week; general population, 1.0 hr/week). Male donors were more often moderately overweight (47.7%) than men from the general population (39.9%). In donors, 0.9% reported to have Type 2 diabetes versus 1.9% in the general population. In donors, 3.4% reported high cholesterol versus 4.6% in the general population. The study provided important knowledge about demographic distributions and cardiovascular risk factors within donors. A proper understanding of demographic characteristics of donors will help us to focus recruitment and retention strategies. The reported beneficial cardiovascular profile suggests a need for further research on the role of blood donation in cardiovascular risk reduction. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Donor safety in living donor liver transplantation: The Korean organ transplantation registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Geun; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Chu, Chong Woo; Kim, Bong-Wan; Choi, Dong Lak; You, Young Kyoung; Kim, Dong-Sik; Nah, Yang Won; Kang, Koo Jeong; Choi, In Soek; Yu, Hee Chul; Hong, Geun; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Myoung Soo

    2017-08-01

    Major concerns about donor safety cause controversy and limit the use of living donor liver transplantation to overcome organ shortages. The Korean Organ Transplantation Registry established a nationwide organ transplantation registration system in 2014. We reviewed the prospectively collected data of all 832 living liver donors who underwent procedures between April 2014 and December 2015. We allocated the donors to a left lobe group (n = 59) and a right lobe group (n = 773) and analyzed the relations between graft types and remaining liver volumes and complications (graded using the Clavien 5-tier grading system). The median follow-up was 19 months (range, 10-31 months). During the study period, 553 men and 279 women donated livers, and there were no deaths after living liver donation. The overall, biliary, and major complication (grade ≥ III) rates were 9.3%, 1.7%, and 1.9%, respectively. The graft types and remaining liver volume were associated with significantly different overall, biliary, and major complication rates. Of the 16 patients with major complications, 9 (56.3%) involved biliary complications (2 biliary strictures [12.5%] and 7 bile leakages [43.8%]). Among the 832 donors, the mean aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, and total bilirubin levels were 23.9 ± 8.1 IU/L, 20.9 ± 11.3 IU/L, and 0.8 ± 0.4 mg/dL, respectively, 6 months after liver donation. In conclusion, biliary complications were the most common types of major morbidity in living liver donors. Donor hepatectomy can be performed successfully with minimal and easily controlled complications. Our study shows that prospective, nationwide cohort data provide an important means of investigating the safety in living liver donation. Liver Transplantation 23 999-1006 2017 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. The effect of World Blood Donor Day on digital information seeking and donor recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Floris J; Kreuger, Aukje L; Arbous, M Sesmu; Laeijendecker, Daphne; van Kraaij, Marian G J

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of World Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is to raise awareness for the importance of blood donation. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of WBDD on digital information seeking and donor recruitment. Google Trends data were used to quantify seeking behavior on "blood donation" and "blood donor." Differences in relative search volume (RSV) between the 3 weeks surrounding WBDD and the rest of the year were calculated. Second, mean differences in RSV were compared to assess the additional effect of hosting using translated search terms. Third, we compared the period around WBDD with the control period regarding page views of the Sanquin website and Facebook likes and number of newly registered donors in 2016. The mean RSV for "blood donation" in the period of interest was 78.6, compared to 72.1 in the control period (difference, 6.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.2-11.8). For "blood donor" this was 78.9 compared to 65.9 (difference, 12.9; 95% CI, 8.1-17.8). We found no additional effect of hosting. In the period of interest, the website of Sanquin was visited 6862 times a day and 4293 times in the control period (difference, 2569; 95% CI, 1687-3451). In June 2016, 54.6% (95% CI, 53.0-56.2) more new donors were registered compared to the control period. An international campaign like WBDD raises the awareness of blood donation and is effective in convincing people to register as blood donors. © 2017 AABB.

  5. Anonymity versus privacy in the dictator game: revealing donor decisions to recipients does not substantially impact donor behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Winking

    Full Text Available Anonymity is often offered in economic experiments in order to eliminate observer effects and induce behavior that would be exhibited under private circumstances. However, anonymity differs from privacy in that interactants are only unaware of each others' identities, while having full knowledge of each others' actions. Such situations are rare outside the laboratory and anonymity might not meet the requirements of some participants to psychologically engage as if their actions were private. In order to explore the impact of a lack of privacy on prosocial behaviors, I expand on a study reported in Dana et al. (2006 in which recipients were left unaware of the Dictator Game and given donations as "bonuses" to their show-up fees for other tasks. In the current study, I explore whether differences between a private Dictator Game (sensu Dana et al. (2006 and a standard anonymous one are due to a desire by dictators to avoid shame or to pursue prestige. Participants of a Dictator Game were randomly assigned to one of four categories-one in which the recipient knew of (1 any donation by an anonymous donor (including zero donations, (2 nothing at all, (3 only zero donations, and (4 and only non-zero donations. The results suggest that a lack of privacy increases the shame that selfish-acting participants experience, but that removing such a cost has only minimal effects on actual behavior.

  6. Factors predicting the usefulness of deceased donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H P; Yang, J D; Yu, H C; Cho, B H; Kwon, K S; Park, S K; Lee, S

    2013-10-01

    Preoperative management for deceased donation is important. Deceased donation can failed for several reasons. We analyzed the clinical data of deceased donation after consent for cadaveric donation to evaluate the reasons of failure of organ procurement. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 112 deceased donors in a single institution between January 1998 and September 2012. There were no organs from cardiac death donors. Of 112 deceased donors, 51 (45.5%) were traumatic brain deaths and 33 (29.5%), nontraumatic brain hemorrhages. The overall mean age was 37.2 (±16.6) years with 35 (30.7%) of female gender. There were 15 (13.3%) donation failures for all organs. Significant factors for failure were histories of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (odds ratio [OR], 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.58; P = .005), cardiac arrest (OR, 0.03; 95% CI, 0.006-0.14; P donation was associated with cardiac arrest while awaiting organ procurement and the presence of an history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation or presence of acute renal failure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparison of skin expansion and contraction between one expander and two expanders: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gan-lin; Zhang, Jin-ming; Ji, Chen-yang; Meng, Hong; Huang, Jian-hua; Luo, He-yuan; Zhang, Hua-sheng; Liu, Xiao-tao; Hong, Xiao-fang

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the difference between the skin expansion and contraction rates for an expanded flap with one versus two expanders. The study cohort comprised 24 cases of two overlapping expanders and 15 cases of a single implanted expander involving 22 patients. The method of "wet-cloth sampling" was applied to measure the expanded flap area and the initial unexpanded area and to calculate the skin expansion rate. Two points 5 cm apart in the center of the expanded flap were selected before the second surgical stage. After removal of the expander, the distance between the two fixed points was measured and recorded. The contraction rate of the expanded flap then was calculated. During the same period of expansion in the two groups (p = 0.06, >0.01), the skin expansion rate was 3.5 ± 0.9 % in the group with two overlapping expanders and 2.6 ± 0.6 % in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.002, 0.05). We fitted a linear regression model that was Y = 0.533 − 0.003X, where Y was the contraction rate of the expanded flap and X was the period of expansion. The contraction rate of the expanded flap was negatively correlated with the period of expansion. Compared with the traditional method of implanting a single expander, the new method of overlapping two expanders in a single cavity increased the skin expansion rate. The instantly expanded flap contraction rate did not differ significantly between the two groups, so the amount of expanded skin area absolutely increased. The clinical application of the new method is worth promoting. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  8. Multi-Criteria Recommender Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomavicius, Gediminas; Manouselis, Nikos; Kwon, Youngok

    This chapter aims to provide an overview of the class of multi-criteria recommender systems. First, it defines the recommendation problem as a multicriteria decision making (MCDM) problem, and reviews MCDM methods and techniques that can support the implementation of multi-criteria recommenders. Then, it focuses on the category of multi-criteria rating recommenders - techniques that provide recommendations by modelling a user's utility for an item as a vector of ratings along several criteria. A review of current algorithms that use multi-criteria ratings for calculating predictions and generating recommendations is provided. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion on open issues and future challenges for the class of multi-criteria rating recommenders.

  9. Higher refusal rates for organ donation among older potential donors in the Netherlands: impact of the donor register and relatives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiden, H.A. van; Jansen, N.E.; Haase-Kromwijk, B.J.; Hoitsma, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of donor organs is considerably reduced by relatives refusing donation after death. There is no previous large-scale evaluation of the influence of the Donor Register (DR) consultation and the potential donor's age on this refusal in The Netherlands. METHODS: This study

  10. Revised diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, O H; Nash, T E; White, A C; Rajshekhar, V; Wilkins, P P; Singh, G; Vasquez, C M; Salgado, P; Gilman, R H; Garcia, H H

    2017-01-15

    A unified set of criteria for neurocysticercosis (NCC) has helped to standardize its diagnosis in different settings. Cysticercosis experts were convened to update current diagnostic criteria for NCC according to two principles: neuroimaging studies are essential for diagnosis, and all other information provides indirect evidence favoring the diagnosis. Recent diagnostic advances were incorporated to this revised set. This revised set is structured in absolute, neuroimaging and clinical/exposure criteria. Absolute criteria include: histological confirmation of parasites, evidence of subretinal cysts, and demonstration of the scolex within a cyst. Neuroimaging criteria are categorized as major (cystic lesions without scolex, enhancing lesions, multilobulated cysts, and calcifications), confirmative (resolution of cysts after cysticidal drug therapy, spontaneous resolution of single enhancing lesions, and migrating ventricular cysts on sequential neuroimaging studies) and minor (hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal enhancement). Clinical/exposure criteria include: detection of anticysticercal antibodies or cysticercal antigens by well-standardized tests, systemic cysticercosis, evidence of a household Taenia carrier, suggestive clinical manifestations, and residency in endemic areas. Besides patients having absolute criteria, definitive diagnosis can be made in those having two major neuroimaging criteria (or one major plus one confirmative criteria) plus exposure. For patients presenting with one major and one minor neuroimaging criteria plus exposure, definitive diagnosis of NCC requires the exclusion of confounding pathologies. Probable diagnosis is reserved for individuals presenting with one neuroimaging criteria plus strong evidence of exposure. This revised set of diagnostic criteria provides simpler definitions and may facilitate its more uniform and widespread applicability in different scenarios. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  11. Outcome of transplanted donor corneas with more than 6 h of death-to-preservation time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashik Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In tropical countries, physicians are skeptic in using corneas with death-to-preservation time (DTPT >6 h, concerns being endothelial cell viability and microbial contamination on prolonged DTPT. The objective of the study was to investigate these concerns by analyzing the outcomes of corneal transplants performed using donor corneas with DTPT >6 h. Materials and Methods: The study was a retrospective case series of 65 transplants performed in 2013 with donor corneas that had DTPT >6 h (range, 6.1–9.8 h. The information on donor cornea tissues and the recipient details were collected from the eye bank and the medical records department of our tertiary eye care center. The main outcome measures were slit lamp assessment of the donor corneas, primary graft failure, graft survival, and postoperative adverse reactions, especially infections, if any. Results: Median DTPT was 7 h. Forty-four (67.7% corneas were evaluated as optical grade and 21 (32.3% were deemed as therapeutic grade; 36 (55.4% were used for optical indications. There was no relationship between DTPT and the tissue grading of corneas or endothelial cell density. Of the 23 keratoplasties for purely optical indications with a minimum follow-up of 3 months, 15 (65.2% remained clear whereas 7 (30.4% failed (mean follow-up 15.1 ± 6.7 months. The causes of failure were primary graft failure (n = 1 and secondary graft failure (n = 6. Conclusion: The donor corneas with DTPT 6 h to 10 h can be utilized for optical indications provided that they meet the criteria of tissue acceptance for optical use.

  12. Outcome of transplanted donor corneas with more than 6 h of death-to-preservation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ashik; Chaurasia, Sunita; Garg, Prashant

    2016-09-01

    In tropical countries, physicians are skeptic in using corneas with death-to-preservation time (DTPT) >6 h, concerns being endothelial cell viability and microbial contamination on prolonged DTPT. The objective of the study was to investigate these concerns by analyzing the outcomes of corneal transplants performed using donor corneas with DTPT >6 h. The study was a retrospective case series of 65 transplants performed in 2013 with donor corneas that had DTPT >6 h (range, 6.1-9.8 h). The information on donor cornea tissues and the recipient details were collected from the eye bank and the medical records department of our tertiary eye care center. The main outcome measures were slit lamp assessment of the donor corneas, primary graft failure, graft survival, and postoperative adverse reactions, especially infections, if any. Median DTPT was 7 h. Forty-four (67.7%) corneas were evaluated as optical grade and 21 (32.3%) were deemed as therapeutic grade; 36 (55.4%) were used for optical indications. There was no relationship between DTPT and the tissue grading of corneas or endothelial cell density. Of the 23 keratoplasties for purely optical indications with a minimum follow-up of 3 months, 15 (65.2%) remained clear whereas 7 (30.4%) failed (mean follow-up 15.1 ± 6.7 months). The causes of failure were primary graft failure (n = 1) and secondary graft failure (n = 6). The donor corneas with DTPT 6 h to 10 h can be utilized for optical indications provided that they meet the criteria of tissue acceptance for optical use.

  13. The donor advocacy team: a risk management program for living organ, tissue, and cell transplant donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Susumu; Soyama, Akihiko; Nagai, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kurihara, Shintaro; Hidaka, Masaaki; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Hara, Takanobu; Fujita, Fumihiko; Kanetaka, Kengo; Takatsuki, Mistuhisa

    2017-08-01

    Although the incidence of living donor death is low in Japan, statistics show one living liver donor death in more than 7000 living liver transplants. Thus, medical transplant personnel must recognize that the death of a living organ or tissue transplant donor can occur and develop an appropriate risk management program. We describe how Nagasaki University Hospital established and implemented a Donor Advocacy Team (DAT) program: a risk management program for initiation in the event of serious, persistent, or fatal impairment of an organ, tissue, or cell transplantation from a living donor. The purposes of the DAT program are as follows: 1. To disclose official information without delay. 2. To provide physical and psychological care to the patient experiencing impairment and their family. 3. To provide psychological care to the medical staff in charge of the transplant. 4. To standardize the responses of the diagnosis and treatment department staff and other hospital staff. 5. To minimize the damage that the whole medical transplantation system may suffer and leverage the occurrence for improvement. To address (1) and (5), actions, such as reporting and responses to the government, mass media, transplant-related societies, and organ transplant networks, have been established to ensure implementation.

  14. Computer applications in the search for unrelated stem cell donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Carlheinz R

    2002-08-01

    The majority of patients which are eligible for a blood stem cell transplantation from an allogeneic donor do not have a suitable related donor so that an efficient unrelated donor search is a prerequisite for this treatment. Currently, there are over 7 million volunteer donors in the files of 50 registries in the world and in most countries the majority of transplants are performed from a foreign donor. Evidently, computer and communication technology must play a crucial role in the complex donor search process on the national and international level. This article describes the structural elements of the donor search process and discusses major systematic and technical issues to be addressed in the development and evolution of the supporting telematic systems. The theoretical considerations are complemented by a concise overview over the current state of the art which is given by describing the scope, relevance, interconnection and technical background of three major national and international computer appliances: The German Marrow Donor Information System (GERMIS) and the European Marrow Donor Information System (EMDIS) are interoperable business-to-business e-commerce systems and Bone Marrow Donors World Wide (BMDW) is the basic international donor information desk on the web.

  15. Is the population of Crotalus durissus (Serpentes, Viperidae) expanding in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Marcelo Ribeiro; Menezes, Frederico Alcântara

    2013-12-05

    Crotalus durissus are found from Mexico to northern Argentina in a highly disjunct distribution. According to some studies, this species is prone to occupy areas disturbed by human activities and floods comprise a plausible method of dispersal as inferred for some North American rattlesnakes. Based on the literature, it seems plausible that Crotalus durissus expanded their natural distribution in Brazil due to floods, but only in a few municipalities in Rio de Janeiro State. Data entries of Butantan Institute, in São Paulo, Brazil, from 1998 to 2012 show a declining tendency of snakes brought by donors. In addition, research shows no evidence of Crotalus durissus being an expanding species in the Brazilian territory.

  16. Is the population of Crotalus durissus (Serpentes, Viperidae) expanding in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Crotalus durissus are found from Mexico to northern Argentina in a highly disjunct distribution. According to some studies, this species is prone to occupy areas disturbed by human activities and floods comprise a plausible method of dispersal as inferred for some North American rattlesnakes. Based on the literature, it seems plausible that Crotalus durissus expanded their natural distribution in Brazil due to floods, but only in a few municipalities in Rio de Janeiro State. Data entries of Butantan Institute, in São Paulo, Brazil, from 1998 to 2012 show a declining tendency of snakes brought by donors. In addition, research shows no evidence of Crotalus durissus being an expanding species in the Brazilian territory. PMID:24314146

  17. Analysis of a rotating spool expander for Organic Rankine Cycle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Abhinav

    Increasing interest in recovering or utilizing low-grade heat for power generation has prompted a search for ways in which the power conversion process may be enhanced. Amongst the conversion systems, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) has generated an enormous amount of interest amongst researchers and system designers. Nevertheless, component level technologies need to be developed and match the range of potential applications. In particular, technical challenges associated with scaling expansion machines (turbines) from utility scale to commercial scale have prevented widespread adoption of the technology. In this regard, this work focuses on a novel rotating spool expansion machine at the heart of an Organic Rankine Cycle. A comprehensive, deterministic simulation model of the rotating spool expander is developed. The comprehensive model includes a detailed geometry model of the spool expander and the suction valve mechanism. Sub-models for mass flow, leakage, heat transfer and friction within the expander are also developed. Apart from providing the ability to characterize the expander in a particular system, the model provides a valuable tool to study the impact of various design variables on the performance of the machine. The investigative approach also involved an experimental program to assess the performance of a working prototype. In general, the experimental data showed that the expander performance was sub-par, largely due to the mismatch of prevailing operating conditions and the expander design criteria. Operating challenges during the shakedown tests and subsequent sub-optimal design changes also detracted from performance. Nevertheless, the results of the experimental program were sufficient for a proof-of-concept assessment of the expander and for model validation over a wide range of operating conditions. The results of the validated model reveal several interesting details concerning the expander design and performance. For example, the match

  18. Expanding Scope of Practice for Ontario Optometrists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emily Bray; Ivy Bourgault

    2017-01-01

    In 2011, The Optometry Act, 1991 was amended to include The Designated Drugs and Standards of Practice Regulation which expanded the scope of practice for Ontario optometrists to include prescribing...

  19. Efficacy of Nickel-Titanium Palatal Expanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Paul

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : To conclude, a Ni-Ti expander brings about expansion by a combination of orthodontic and orthopedic effects by an increase in maxillary intermolar, maxillary intercanine and mandibular intercanine widths as also the opening of the midpalatal suture.

  20. Descemet’s Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty Outcomes Compared with Penetrating Keratoplasty from the Cornea Donor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Marianne O.; Gorovoy, Mark; Benetz, Beth A.; Price, Francis W.; Menegay, Harry J.; Debanne, Sara M.; Lass, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess outcomes 1 year after Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in comparison with penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) from the Specular Microscopy Ancillary Study (SMAS) of the Cornea Donor Study. Design Multicenter, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial. Participants A total of 173 subjects undergoing DSAEK for a moderate risk condition (principally Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic/aphakic corneal edema) compared with 410 subjects undergoing PKP from the SMAS who had clear grafts with at least 1 postoperative specular image within a 15-month follow-up period. Methods The DSAEK procedures were performed by 2 experienced surgeons per their individual techniques, using the same donor and similar recipient criteria as for the PKP procedures in the SMAS performed by 68 surgeons at 45 sites, with donors provided from 31 eye banks. Graft success and complications for the DSAEK group were assessed and compared with the SMAS group. Endothelial cell density (ECD) was determined from baseline donor, 6-month (range, 5–7 months), and 12-month (range, 9–15 months) postoperative central endothelial images by the same reading center used in the SMAS. Main Outcome Measures Endothelial cell density and graft survival at 1 year. Results Although the DSAEK recipient group criteria were similar to the PKP group, Fuchs’ dystrophy was more prevalent in the DSAEK group (85% vs. 64%) and pseudophakic corneal edema was less prevalent (13% vs. 32%, Ptransplantation, overall graft success was comparable for DSAEK and PKP procedures and endothelial cell loss was higher with DSAEK. PMID:20031230

  1. Reduced reactivation from dormancy but maintained lineage choice of human mesenchymal stem cells with donor age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Dexheimer

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are promising for cell-based regeneration therapies but up to date it is still controversial whether their function is maintained throughout ageing. Aim of this study was to address whether frequency, activation in vitro, replicative function, and in vitro lineage choice of MSC is maintained throughout ageing to answer the question whether MSC-based regeneration strategies should be restricted to younger individuals. MSC from bone marrow aspirates of 28 donors (5-80 years were characterized regarding colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F numbers, single cell cloning efficiency (SSCE, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation capacity in vitro. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mineralization, Oil Red O content, proteoglycan- and collagen type II deposition were quantified. While CFU-F frequency was maintained, SSCE and early proliferation rate decreased significantly with advanced donor age. MSC with higher proliferation rate before start of induction showed stronger osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. MSC with high osteogenic capacity underwent better chondrogenesis and showed a trend to better adipogenesis. Lineage choice was, however, unaltered with age. CONCLUSION: Ageing influenced activation from dormancy and replicative function of MSC in a way that it may be more demanding to mobilize MSC to fast cell growth at advanced age. Since fast proliferation came along with high multilineage capacity, the proliferation status of expanded MSC rather than donor age may provide an argument to restrict MSC-based therapies to certain individuals.

  2. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Maria; McGuire, William

    2014-04-22

    When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, alternative sources of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula. Donor breast milk may retain some of the non-nutritive benefits of maternal breast milk for preterm or low birth weight infants. However, feeding with artificial formula may ensure more consistent delivery of optimal levels of nutrients. Uncertainty exists about the balance of risks and benefits of feeding formula versus donor breast milk for preterm or low birth weight infants. To determine the effect of feeding with formula compared with donor breast milk on growth and development in preterm or low birth weight infants. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2014, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2014), EMBASE (1980 to March 2014), CINAHL (1982 to March 2014), conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing feeding with formula versus donor breast milk in preterm or low birth weight infants. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by two review authors. Nine trials, in which 1070 infants participated, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Four trials compared standard term formula versus donor breast milk and five compared nutrient-enriched preterm formula versus donor breast milk. Only the two most recent trials used nutrient-fortified donor breast milk. The trials contain various methodological quality weaknesses, specifically uncertainty about adequate allocation concealment methods in three trials and lack of blinding in most of the trials.Formula-fed infants had higher in hospital rates of increase in weight [mean difference (MD): 2.58 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.98 to 3.71) g/kg/day], length [MD 1.93 (95% CI 1.23 to 2.62) mm/week] and head circumference [MD 1.59 (95% CI 0.95 to 2.24) mm

  3. AIEE Active Donor-Acceptor-Donor-Based Hexaphenylbenzene Probe for Recognition of Aliphatic and Aromatic Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Subhamay; Deol, Harnimarta; Bhalla, Vandana; Kumar, Manoj

    2017-10-30

    In the present investigation, an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and aggregation induced emission enhancement (AIEE) active donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) system 5 having fumaronitrile as the acceptor and hexaphenylbenzene (HPB) as the donor moieties joined through rotatable phenyl rings has been designed and synthesized that is highly emissive in the solid state and exhibits stimuli-responsive reversible piezochromic behavior upon grinding and heating. Because of its AIEE characteristics, HPB derivative 5 undergoes aggregation to form fluorescent aggregates in mixed aqueous media that exhibit ratiometric fluorescence response toward aliphatic amines (primary/secondary/tertiary) and turn-off response toward aromatic amines and hence differentiates between them. Further, the solution-coated portable paper strips of derivative 5 showed pronounced and sensitive response toward aromatic and aliphatic amines with a detection limit in the range of picogram and nanogram level, respectively.

  4. Microwave assisted synthesis of bithiophene based donor-acceptor-donor oligomers and their optoelectronic performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathula, Chinna; Buruga, Kezia; Lee, Sang Kyu; Khazi, Imtiyaz Ahmed M.; Kang, Youngjong

    2017-07-01

    In this article we present the synthesis of two novel bithiophene based symmetrical π conjugated oligomers with donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) structures by microwave assisted PdCl2(dppf) catalyzed Suzuki coupling reaction. These molecules contain electron rich bithiophene as a donor, dithienothiadiazole[3,4-c]pyridine and phthalic anhydride units as acceptors. The shorter reaction time, excellent yields and easy product isolation are the advantages of this method. The photophysical prerequisites for electronic application such as strong and broad optical absorption, thermal stability, and compatible energy levels were determined for synthesized oligomers. Optical band gap for the oligomers is found to be 1.72-1.90 eV. The results demonstrated the novel oligomers to be promising candidates in organic optoelectronic applications.

  5. Diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Hijdra, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    The term vascular dementia implies the presence of a clinical syndrome (dementia) caused by, or at least assumed to be caused by, a specific disorder (cerebrovascular disease). In this review, the various sets of criteria used to define vascular dementia are outlined. The various sets of criteria

  6. AFRICAN PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: YORUBA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This analysis presents personality assessment criteria often used by the Yoruba as psychological tools to position an individual on the social responsibility scale and also to determine the norm compliant level of the Yoruba person. The study focused on four core criteria upon which such assessment is anchored, namely, ...

  7. Mathematics Teachers' Criteria of Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Alattin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine mathematics teachers' decisions about dimensions of the geometric figures, criteria of dimension and consistency of decision-criteria. The research is a qualitative research and the model applied in the study is descriptive method on the basis of general scanning model. 15 mathematics teachers attended the…

  8. New criteria to identify spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Arne; Krishna, M.

    In this paper we give some new criteria for identifying the components of a probability measure, in its Lebesgue decomposition. This enables us to give new criteria to identify spectral types of self adjoint operators on Hilbert spaces, especially those of interest....

  9. New criteria to identify spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Arne; Krishna, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we give some new criteria for identifying the components of a probability measure, in its Lebesgue decomposition. This enables us to give new criteria to identify spectral types of self-adjoint operators on Hilbert spaces, especially those of interest....

  10. Use of a liver from donor after cardiac death: is it appropriate for the sick or the stable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbeld, Jeroen; van Hoek, Bart; Ringers, Jan

    2011-04-01

    Liver transplantation following donation after cardiac death (DCD) continues to be a subject for heated debate. Opinion is divided in the literature as to who benefits the most from receiving a liver from a DCD donor. This review will focus on some important questions regarding the outcome of transplantation and the selection and matching of donor and recipient. Liver transplantation with an organ from a donor after cardiac death is becoming an accepted way to treat patients on the waiting list with end-stage liver disease. However, there are still some major issues to address such as ischemic-type biliary lesions, retransplantation rates, criteria for donor and patient selection and whether conversion of donation after brain death to DCD exists. Accepting a DCD liver has the potential for reduced recipient quality of life after transplant. Death on the waiting list must be balanced against the inherent risks of a DCD liver. Success of liver transplantation is mostly measured as graft and patient survival. DCD liver transplantation is a potential tool to decrease mortality on the waiting list. Careful selection and matching of donor organ and recipient can lead to good outcomes. However, ischemic-type biliary lesions after DCD liver transplantation remain an important obstacle to overcome and have a serious impact on quality of life after transplantation.

  11. Why search for a sperm donor online? The experiences of women searching for and contacting sperm donors on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadva, Vasanti; Freeman, Tabitha; Tranfield, Erika; Golombok, Susan

    2017-04-28

    Whilst studies have examined the experiences of women who use clinic donors, to date there has been limited research investigating women's motivations and experiences of searching for a sperm donor online. A total of 429 women looking for a sperm donor on Pride Angel (a website that facilitates contact between donors and recipients) completed an online survey. Fifty-eight percent (249) saw advantages of obtaining donated sperm online with the most common advantage reported as being able to connect with and meet the donor (n = 50 (24%)). A third (n = 157 (37%)) of the participants gave disadvantages, the most common reported was encountering 'dishonest donors' (n = 63 (40%)). Most recipients (n = 181 (61%)) wanted the donor to be 'just a donor' (i.e. to provide sperm and have no further contact). Whilst it was important for recipients to know the identity of the donor, some did not see this as important for the child and thus the level of information that parents have about the donor, and that which the child has, can differ. Finding a donor online blurs the distinction between categories of 'anonymous', 'known' and 'identity release' donations. Whilst the survey had a large sample size, the representativeness of the sample is not known.

  12. "Brain Death" and dead donor rule. Discussion and proposals on the thesis of Truog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The introduction in 1968 by the "ad hoc" Harvard committee of the concept of "Brain Death" gave birth to the worldwide diffusion of organ transplantation. Recently "Total Brain Failure" has been proposed as preferred term, instead of "Brain Death", by the President's Council on Bioethics. The concepts of "brain death" and of "dead donor rule" remain the ethical and moral support of organ transplantation. However both criteria has been questioned , either separately or all together , by many authors and particularly by Dr. Robert D. Truog.

  13. Loss of volunteer blood donors because of unconfirmed enzyme immunoassay screening results. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, H E; Korelitz, J J; Busch, M P; Williams, A E; Kleinman, S H; Gilcher, R O; Nourjah, P

    1997-02-01

    Blood donors who test repeatably reactive on enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and are not confirmed as positive are a continuing problem for blood banks. Units are discarded and donors are deferred, in spite of multiple studies indicating that such donors are very rarely infected with the transmissible agents. Few data are available, however, with which to evaluate whether the discarded units are more likely to come from particular demographic subgroups. The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study database of over 2 million allogeneic whole-blood donations collected in the years 1991 through 1993 was utilized. The prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate test results within demographic subgroups was computed for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and human T-lymphotropic virus (anti-HIV, anti-HCV, anti-HTLV, respectively) and hepatitis B surface antigen (false-positive only) as the proportion of donations that were repeatably reactive on EIA but negative or indeterminate on the confirmatory or supplemental test. Several demographic groups with increased prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate anti-HIV results were the same females, younger age groups, blacks, and first-time donors. Likewise, many of the demographic subgroups with increased prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate anti-HCV results were similar: older age groups, non-whites, lower education levels, first-time donors, donors making directed donations, and donors who had received transfusions. For anti-HTLV, by contrast, the oldest group had the highest prevalence of false-positive results but the lowest prevalence of indeterminate results: blacks had the lowest prevalence of false positive results but the highest prevalence of indeterminate results. If units that test repeatably reactive on EIA but that are not confirmed as positive are almost always from individuals not infected with the virus in question, then these results indicate that there may be sex-, race

  14. Failure Criteria for Reinforced Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathkjen, Arne

    Failure of materials is often characterized as ductile yielding, brittle fracture, creep rupture, etc., and different criteria given in terms of different parameters have been used to describe different types of failure. Only criteria expressing failure in terms of stress are considered in what...... place until the matrix, the continuous component of the composite, fails. When an isotropic matrix is reinforced as described above, the result is an anisotropic composite material. Even if the material is anisotropic, it usually exhibits a rather high degree of symmetry and such symmetries place...... certain restrictions on the form of the failure criteria for anisotropic materials. In section 2, some failure criteria for homogenous materials are reviewed. Both isotropic and anisotropic materials are described, and in particular the constraints imposed on the criteria from the symmetries orthotropy...

  15. Donor Safety and Recipient Liver Function After Right-Lobe Liver Transplantation From Living Donors With Gilbert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W H; Hwang, S; Song, G W; Jung, D H; Kim, K H; Park, G C; Ha, T Y; Ahn, C S; Moon, D B; Yoon, Y I; Shin, M H; Kim, W J; Kim, S H; Lee, S G

    2015-12-01

    Donor safety is the most important aspect in living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Gilbert syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition that is a common cause of isolated unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, and its prevalence is not negligibly low in the general population. This study intended to assess donor safety and recipient liver function after LDLT with the use of right liver grafts from living donors with Gilbert syndrome. Among 2,140 right liver transplantations performed from January 2002 to December 20113 at our institution, we identified 12 living donors (0.6%) who showed a preoperative serum total bilirubin level of ≥2 mg/dL. These donors were clinically diagnosed with Gilbert syndrome. The clinical outcomes of these donors and their recipients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean donor age was 24.6 ± 7.1 years, and 11 donors were male. All subjects met the preoperative evaluation conditions for right liver donation except for the level of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The mean serum total bilirubin level of the donors was 2.23 ± 0.20 mg/dL before and 1.79 ± 0.61 mg/dL 1 year after right liver donation. The preoperative donor direct bilirubin level was 0.43 ± 0.19 mg/dL. The preoperative indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes was 8.2 ± 2.8%. All donors and recipients recovered uneventfully and were alive at the time of writing. The recipient serum total bilirubin level was 1.29 ± 0.47 mg/dL 1 year after LDLT. We suggest that LDLT with living donors with Gilbert syndrome can be safely performed, but that a meticulous preoperative evaluation is vital to maximize donor safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Properties of Excitons Bound to Ionized Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben; Suffczynski, M.; Gorzkowski, W.

    1971-01-01

    Binding energies, interparticle distances, oscillator strengths, and exchange corrections are calculated for the three-particle complex corresponding to an exciton bound to an ionized donor. The results are given as functions of the mass ratio of the electron and hole. Binding of the complex...... is obtained for mass ratios up to 0.426. The interparticle distances are up to 50 times larger than the corresponding exciton radius. The oscillator strengths are about 104 times greater than those of free excitons, while the exchange corrections for the complex are comparable to those of free excitions...

  17. Communicating identifiability risks to biobank donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, T. J.; Gjerris, Mickey; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2018-01-01

    can track individuals across multiple databases. This article focuses on the communication of identifiability risks in the process of obtaining consent for donation and research. Most ethical discussions of identifiability risks have focused on the severity of the risk and how it might be mitigated......, and what precisely is at stake in pervasive data sharing. However, there has been little discussion of whether and how to communicate the risk to potential donors. We review the ethical arguments behind favoring different types of risk communication in the consent process, and outline how identifiability...... concerns can be incorporated into either a detailed or a simplified method of communicating risks during the consent process....

  18. Structures of Thermal Double Donors in Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Pesola, M.; Joo Lee, Young; von Boehm, J.; Kaukonen, M.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate total-energy calculations are used to study the structures and formation energies of oxygen chains as models for thermal double donors (TDD's) in Si. We find that the first three TDD's (TDD0–TDD2) consist of one four-member ring, with one or two adjacent interstitial O atoms. These metastable TDD's form bistable negative-U systems with the corresponding stable, electrically inactive staggered structures. The TDD3-TDD7 structures are found to consist of four-member rings with adjacent...

  19. A comparison of donor and control group quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Makmor; Abdul Talib Abdul Mutalib, Muzalwana; Mohd Satar, Nurulhuda; Abdullah, Nawi; Chong, Chin-Sieng; Ng, Kok-Peng; Lim, Soo-Kun

    2014-03-03

    Informed consent of prospective donors should include information about the quality of life (QoL) of existing donors, especially those within the relevant country. This study aimed to provide information on Malaysian organ donors' QoL relative to a control group. Using a shorter version of the SF-36, QoL of 80 donors from the University of Malaya Medical Center (UMMC), Malaysia was surveyed and compared to QoL of 80 selected healthy individuals. ANOVA and General Linear Model (GLM) procedure were each applied for the QoL comparison, which was based on gender and age. Donors recorded a better QoL relative to the control group. Comparison across gender revealed that differences are more obvious for males than females. Donor/control comparison across age groups reveals that donors aged 56 and above reported significantly better QoL in most domains relative to other age groups. Information on donor QoL should be made available to the public to present a comprehensive picture of the consequences of organ donation. Nonetheless, we also argue that, despite the merits of organ donation, caution is required before concluding that donors have better QoL because the present research outcomes may reflect a self-selection bias in which respondents only included donors engaging in regular follow-ups.

  20. Liver transplantation in children using organs from young paediatric donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herden, Uta; Ganschow, Rainer; Briem-Richter, Andrea; Helmke, Knut; Nashan, Bjoern; Fischer, Lutz

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, most paediatric liver transplant recipients receive a split or other technical variant graft from adult deceased or live donors, because of a lack of available age- and size matched paediatric donors. Few data are available, especially for liver grafts obtained from very young children (transplantations between 1989 and 2009. Recipients were divided into five groups (1-5) depending on donor age (transplantations from deceased donors were performed; 1- and 5-year graft survival rates were 75%, 80%, 78%, 81%, 74% and 75%, 64%, 70%, 67%, 46%, and 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 88%, 91%, 90%, 89%, 78% and 88%, 84%, 84%, 83%, 63% for groups 1-5, respectively, without significant difference. Eight children received organs from donors younger than 1 year and 45 children received organs from donors between 1 and 6 years of age. Overall, vascular complications occurred in 13.2% of patients receiving organs from donors younger than 6 years. Analysis of our data revealed that the usage of liver grafts from donors younger than 6 years is a safe procedure. The outcome was comparable with grafts from older donors with excellent graft and patient survival, even for donors younger than 1 year. © 2011 The Authors. Transplant International © 2011 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  1. The proportion and trend of human immunodeficiency virus infections associated with men who have sex with men from Chinese voluntary blood donors: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinxin; Xu, Junjie; Reilly, Kathleen Heather; Li, Yongze; Zhang, Christiana Meng; Jiang, Yongjun; Geng, Wenqing; Wang, Lunan; Shang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive cases associated with men who have sex with men (MSM) have rapidly increased over the past years. The objective of this study is to comprehensively evaluate the proportions, changing trends, and geographical distribution of MSM-associated HIV cases from Chinese voluntary blood donors by systematically reviewing the available literature. Major English and Chinese research databases were searched for studies reporting study locations, study years, the number of HIV infections among blood donors, and the number of HIV-positive donations associated with MSM in China. The proportion estimates were calculated; subgroup analyses and test for time trend were performed using software of comprehensive meta-analysis. Thirty-four studies met eligibility criteria. The pooled proportion of HIV-positive donations associated with MSM from 2001 to 2012 was 36.5% (95% confidence interval, 29.6%-44.1%). The epidemic was found to be more severe in northeast and north China compared to south China (59.6%; 55.0% vs. 3.8%, respectively). The proportion showed a significantly increasing trend over the study period (10.3% in 2001-2005; 38.6% in 2006-2009; and 47.6% in 2010-2012; trend test chi-square = 16.42, p public education and improving knowledge of blood safety are needed to prevent this at-risk population from seeking HIV testing through blood donation. It is also imperative to expand the scope of postdonation nucleic acid testing to shorten the window period to improve blood supply safety in China. © 2014 AABB.

  2. Brain-Dead Donors on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchard, Régis; Durand, Louise; Legeai, Camille; Cohen, Johana; Guerrini, Patrice; Bastien, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    To describe donors after brain death with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and to analyze the outcome of organs transplanted from these donors. Retrospective analysis of the national information system run by the French Biomedicine Agency (CRISTAL database). National registry data of all donors after brain death in France and their organ recipients between 2007 and 2013. Donors after brain death and their organ recipients. None. During the study period, there were 22,270 brain-dead patients diagnosed in France, of whom 161 with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Among these patients, 64 donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and 10,805 donors without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation had at least one organ retrieved. Donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were significantly younger and had more severe intensive care medical conditions (hemodynamic, biological, renal, and liver insults) than donors without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. One hundred nine kidneys, 37 livers, seven hearts, and one lung were successfully transplanted from donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. We found no significant difference in 1-year kidney graft survival (p = 0.24) and function between recipients from donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (92.7% [85.9-96.3%]) and matching recipients from donors without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (95.4% [93.0-97.0%]). We also found no significant difference in 1-year liver recipient survival (p = 0.91): 86.5% (70.5-94.1) from donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation versus 80.7% (79.8-81.6) from donors without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Brain-dead patients with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation have more severe medical conditions than those without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. However, kidney graft survival and function were no different than usual. Brain-dead patients with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are suitable for organ procurement.

  3. Short-term impact of an educational program promoting live donor kidney transplantation in dialysis centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradel, Françoise G; Suwannaprom, Puckwipa; Mullins, C Daniel; Sadler, John; Bartlett, Stephen T

    2008-12-01

    Given the shortage of kidneys available for transplantation, a community-based intervention trial was implemented to assess the impact of an educational program on patients' access to live donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). To compare the short-term impact of a basic intervention and an enhanced intervention on patients' readiness to pursue LDKT. DEGISN: Baseline data and data from 1 week after interventions were analyzed. 214 transplant-eligible hemodialysis patients attending 14 dialysis facilities in Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. In the basic intervention, 107 patients watched a 10-minute videotape on the experience of recipients and live donors of a kidney. In the enhanced intervention, 107 patients watched the same videotape and had a discussion with a health educator on the risks and benefits of LDKT, who could be a donor, and how to address the barriers they were encountering when seeking a live kidney donor. Patient reported whether they were considering LDKT, had talked with family or friends about LDKT, and had asked someone for a kidney. Over half of transplant-eligible patients were not pursuing LDKT at baseline (64% in the basic intervention group, 61% in the enhanced intervention group). One week after the intervention, the odds of considering LDKT were higher among African Americans (odds ratio [OR], 2.28; confidence interval [CI], 1.22-4.25), younger patients (OR, 0.94; CI, 0.91-0.97), and patients who spent less time on dialysis (OR, 0.90; CI, 0.83-0.97). The odds of asking for a kidney were higher among African Americans (OR, 4.94; CI, 2.54-9.60) and patients who perceived they were in poor to fair health (OR, 3.30; CI, 1.12-9.67). Although both interventions helped patients consider LDKT and ask for a kidney, more time and expanded educational content might be needed to facilitate patients' discussion about LDKT with their loved ones.

  4. Recovery of donor hearts after circulatory death with normothermic extracorporeal machine perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolboom, Herman; Makhro, Asya; Rosser, Barbara A; Wilhelm, Markus J; Bogdanova, Anna; Falk, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    A severe donor organ shortage leads to the death of a substantial number of patients who are listed for transplantation. The use of hearts from donors after circulatory death could significantly expand the donor organ pool, but due to concerns about their viability, these are currently not used for transplantation. We propose short-term ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion (MP) to improve the viability of these ischaemic donor hearts. Hearts from male Lewis rats were subjected to 25 min of global in situ warm ischaemia (WI) (37°C), explanted, reconditioned for 60 min with normothermic (37°C) MP with diluted autologous blood and then stored for 4 h at 0-4°C in Custodiol cold preservation solution. Fresh and ischaemic hearts stored for 4 h in Custodiol were used as controls. Graft function was assessed in a blood-perfused Langendorff circuit. During reconditioning, both the electrical activity and contractility of the ischaemic hearts recovered rapidly. Throughout the Langendorff reperfusion, the reconditioned ischaemic hearts had a higher average heart rate and better contractility compared with untreated ischaemic controls. Moreover, the reconditioned ischaemic hearts had higher tissue adenosine triphosphate levels and a trend towards improved tissue redox state. Perfusate levels of troponin T, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were not significantly lower than those of untreated ischaemic controls. The micro- and macroscopic appearance of the reconditioned ischaemic hearts were improved compared with ischaemic controls, but in both groups myocardial damage and oedema were evident. Our results indicate that functional recovery from global WI is possible during short-term ex vivo reperfusion, allowing subsequent cold storage without compromising organ viability. We expect that once refined and validated, this approach may enable safe transplantation of hearts obtained from donation after circulatory death. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford

  5. Tuning Optoelectronic Properties of Organic Semiconductors Via Donor-Acceptor Cocrystals and Interfacial Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen

    Organic donor-acceptor (D-A) interaction has attracted intensive research interest because of the promising applications in electronic devices and renewable energy. Depending on the interaction process, the optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductors may change dramatically. To improve their performance and expand the applications, we have investigated the structure-property relationship in D-A cocrystals and nanofibril composites. These materials provide unique D-A interface structures, thus allowing tunable charge transfer across the interface, which can be modified and controlled by exquisite molecule design and supramolecular assembly. In Chapter 2, we studied the fabrication, conductivity, and chemiresistive sensor performance of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) - 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) charge transfer cocrystal microfibers. Compared to TCNQ and TTF, TTF-TCNQ cocrystal has much higher conductivity under ambient conditions, due to the high yield of charge separation, which also induces high polarization at the interface, resulting in different binding intensity towards alkyl and aromatic amines. Based on this investment, we developed a TTF-TCNQ chemiresistive sensor to efficiently discriminate alkyl and aromatic amine vapors. In Chapter 3, we further designed a new series of D-A cocrystals, and studied the coassembly and optical properties. The cocrystal is composed of coronene and perylene diimide at 1:1 molar ratio and belongs to the triclinic system, as confirmed by X-ray analysis. The donor and acceptor molecules perform an alternate pi-pi stacking along the (100) direction, leading to the strong one-dimensional growth tendency of macroscopic cocrystal. Additionally, due to the charge transfer interaction, the cocrystal shows a new and largely red-shifted photoluminescence band, compared to the crystals of the components. In Chapter 4, we alternatively developed a series of donor-acceptor nanofibril composites, in which the donor and

  6. Variation in semen parameters derived from computer-aided semen analysis, within donors and between donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijchman, JG; De Wolf, BTHM; Graaff, R; Arts, EGJM

    2001-01-01

    The development of computer-aided semen analysis (CASA) has made it possible to study sperm motility characteristics objectively and longitudinally. In this 2-year study of 8 sperm donors, we used CASA to measure 7 semen parameters (concentration, percentage of motile spermatozoa, curvilinear

  7. Similar liver transplantation survival with selected cardiac death donors and brain death donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbeld, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Farid, W.; Ringers, J.; Porte, R. J.; Metselaar, H. J.; Baranski, A. G.; Kazemier, G.; van den Bere, A. P.; van Hoek, B.

    Background: The outcome of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with controlled graft donation after cardiac death (DCD) is usually inferior to that with graft donation after brain death (DBD). This study compared outcomes from OLT with DBD versus controlled DCD donors with predefined restrictive

  8. GNS-12 Packaging design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, E.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-24

    The purpose of this Packaging Design Criteria (PDC) is to provide criteria for the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP)(Onsite). The SARP provides the evaluation to demonstrate that the onsite transportation safety criteria are met for the transport and storage of the 324 Building vitrified encapsulated material in the GNS-12 cask. In this application, the approved PDC provides a formal set of standards for the payload requirements, and guidance for the current cask transport configuration and a revised storage seal and primary lid modification design.

  9. Principles and Criteria for Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beghin, D.; Cervetto, D.; Hansen, Peter Friis

    1997-01-01

    The mandate of ISSC Committee IV.1 on principles and Criteria for Design is to report on the following:The ongoing concern for quantification of general economic and safety criteria for marine structures and for the development of appropriate principles for rational life cycle design using...... such criteria. Reassessment of existing structures shall also be addressed. Special attention shall be given to issues affecting code formulation and development, with accounting of all uncertainties affecting actual structural behaviour.The emphasis is on ships, with offshore structures teated primarily...

  10. Syntheses of donor-acceptor-functionalized dihydroazulenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk; Jevric, Martyn; Bond, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) photo/thermoswitch has been of interest for use in molecular electronics and advanced materials. The switching between the two isomers has previously been found to depend strongly on the presence of donor and acceptor groups. The fine-tuning of opt......The dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) photo/thermoswitch has been of interest for use in molecular electronics and advanced materials. The switching between the two isomers has previously been found to depend strongly on the presence of donor and acceptor groups. The fine......-tuning of optical and switching properties relies on ready access to new derivatives via efficient synthetic protocols. The central DHA core is conveniently prepared in a four-step synthesis starting from acetophenone and tropylium substrates. Here, the outcome of this reaction as a function of the nature...... of the substituent group on the phenyl unit of acetophenone is investigated in detail. A wide variety of functional groups (nitro, cyano, halo, alkyl, amido, and thioether) was tolerated, and the route provided access to a large selection of substituted DHA derivatives (position 2 of DHA). These compounds were...

  11. Expanding marine protected areas to include degraded coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, A; Nelson, P A; Edgar, G J; Shashar, N; Reed, D C; Belmaker, J; Krause, G; Beck, M W; Brokovich, E; France, R; Gaines, S D

    2016-12-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are a commonly applied solution to coral reef degradation, yet coral reefs continue to decline worldwide. We argue that expanding the range of MPAs to include degraded reefs (DR-MPA) could help reverse this trend. This approach requires new ecological criteria for MPA design, siting, and management. Rather than focusing solely on preserving healthy reefs, our approach focuses on the potential for biodiversity recovery and renewal of ecosystem services. The new criteria would help identify sites with the highest potential for recovery and the greatest resistance to future threats (e.g., increased temperature and acidification) and sites that contribute to MPA connectivity. The DR-MPA approach is a compliment rather than a substitute for traditional MPA design approaches. We believe that the DR-MPA approach can enhance the natural, or restoration-assisted, recovery of DRs and their ecosystem services; increase total reef area available for protection; promote more resilient and better-connected MPA networks; and improve conditions for human communities dependent on MPA ecosystem services. © 2016 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. Blood donors' helping behavior is driven by warm glow: more evidence for the blood donor benevolence hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Eamonn; Taylor, Michael; Keatley, David; Flynn, Niall; Lawrence, Claire

    2012-10-01

    The benevolence hypothesis (both donor and recipient gain) suggests that blood donors, compared to non-blood donors have a general altruistic motivational preference based on warm glow (i.e., "I donate because it makes me feel good"). With objective behavioral economics tests of altruism and warm-glow giving, this paper offers the first direct experimental test of this hypothesis. The prediction that blood donors will be motivated in general by warm glow was compared to predictions from other theoretical models: strong reciprocity and empathy. Four experiments and one prospective study examined blood donors' and nondonors' motivations for general charitable giving and blood donation. Variants of the dictator game (DG; a charity DG [CDG] and a warm-glow version of a CDG) were used to provide objective measures of altruism. Blood donors gave less than nondonors on the CDG, but gave more on the warm-glow version. Blood donors' actual donations (in the CDGs and blood donation) were associated with feelings of warm glow. There was no evidence that blood donors were motivated by strong reciprocity or empathic concerns. This paper offers objective behavioral evidence that blood donors' charitable giving and blood donation, compared to non-blood donors, is more strongly motivated by warm glow. This provides additional support for the benevolence hypothesis of blood donation. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. Peritoneal Recurrence of Initially Controlled Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariman Sadykov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the presence of end-stage liver disease increases the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Liver transplantation (LT for patients within the Milan criteria has become a standard treatment for HCC in most developed centers worldwide. However, a major cause of death in cirrhotic patients with HCC after transplantation is tumor recurrence, including peritoneal recurrences, which develops rarely but presents a significant problem with regard to their management. Our experience includes two cases with HCC within the Milan criteria of peritoneal recurrences after living donor LT. Both patients had interventions for HCC in their medical history before LT, and we propose that these might have been a possible cause of the HCC peritoneal recurrence.

  14. Retrospective review of serological testing of potential human milk donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ronald S; Xiong, Sean C; Sakamoto, Pauline

    2010-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of positive serology among potential donors to a human milk bank. Retrospective review of our experience with donor serological testing at our milk bank over a 6-year interval. Not-for-profit, regional human milk bank. Volunteer, unpaid potential donors of human milk. Serological testing for syphilis, HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2). Results of serological screening tests performed on potential donors. Of 1091 potential donors, 3.3% were positive on screening serology, including 6 syphilis, 17 hepatitis B, 3 hepatitis C, 6 HTLV and 4 HIV. There is a significant incidence of positive serology among women interested in donating human milk. This implies that there may be significant risk associated with peer-to-peer distribution of human milk from unscreened donors.

  15. How to kill gamete donation: retrospective legislation and donor anonymity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Guido

    2012-10-01

    Victoria (Australia) is considering retrospective legislation on the abolition of gamete donor anonymity. Retrospective legislation evokes many negative emotions mainly because it is considered unfair. It also makes it impossible for citizens to organize their life with reasonable certainty of the consequences. Introduction of this law for donor anonymity is defended by the right of the child to know its genetic origins. Against this law, people appeal to the right to privacy and confidentiality of the donor. This paper analyses the arguments for and against a retrospective law on donor anonymity by looking at the conditions that should be respected when two principles (the donor's right to privacy and the child's right to genetic information) have to be balanced. It is concluded that the justification for introducing retrospective law is lacking: the conditions are not fulfilled. Moreover, retroactive laws in the context of gamete donation may jeopardize the whole practice by destroying the trust of candidate donors and recipients in the government.

  16. Improving Photoconductance of Fluorinated Donors with Fluorinated Acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, Logan E.; Larson, Bryon; Oosterhout, Stefan; Owczarczyk, Zbyslaw; Olson, Dana C.; Kopidakis, Nikos; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Braunecker, Wade A.

    2016-11-21

    This work investigates the influence of fluorination of both donor and acceptor materials on the generation of free charge carriers in small molecule donor/fullerene acceptor BHJ OPV active layers. A fluorinated and non-fluorinated small molecule analogue were synthesized and their optoelectronic properties characterized. The intrinsic photoconductance of blends of these small molecule donors was investigated using time-resolved microwave conductivity. Blends of the two donor molecules with a traditional non-fluorinated fullerene (PC70BM) as well as a fluorinated fullerene (C60(CF3)2-1) were investigated using 5% and 50% fullerene loading. We demonstrate for the first time that photoconductance in a 50:50 donor:acceptor BHJ blend using a fluorinated fullerene can actually be improved relative to a traditional non-fluorinated fullerene by fluorinating the donor molecule as well.

  17. Mini-donor nephrectomy: A viable and effective alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Guleria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Live kidney donation is an excellent way of increasing the donor pool. The introduction of the laparoscopic donor nephrectomy has resulted in an increase in live organ donation in the western hemisphere. There is no data on its impact on organ donation in India. However attractive as it may seem, the procedure is associated with a definite learning curve and does compromise donor safety. The procedure is also expensive in terms of the equipment required. The mini-donor nephrectomy is an excellent alternative, has no learning curve and is ideally suited for donors in India who have a low BMI. The procedure is also relatively inexpensive. We are in need of a donor registry rather than reports from single institutions to fully evaluate the risks and benefits of both procedures.

  18. Improving the waiting list by using 75-year-old donors for recipients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascales Campos, P A; Romero, P R; Gonzalez, R; Zambudio, A R; Martinez Frutos, I M; de la Peña, J; Bueno, F S; Robles Campos, R; Miras, M; Pons Miñano, J A; Sanmartin Monzo, A; Domingo, J; Bixquert Montagud, V; Parrilla Paricio, P

    2010-03-01

    The best treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with liver cirrhosis is liver transplantation and the best results are obtained when the tumors fulfill the Milan criteria. However, although the number of transplants is increasing, the organ deficit is growing, which lengthens time on the waiting list, increasing the risk of tumor progression of and exclusion from the list. The use of elderly donors is a valid option for patients on the transplant waiting list with HCC, reducing time on the waiting list. We report our experience with patients transplanted for HCC associated with hepatic cirrhosis using livers from donors >75 years of age. Our preliminary results supported the use of elderly suboptimal donors making it possible to give priority to these patients. All patients in the series achieved good graft function after a follow-up of 2 years with a 100% disease-free survival rate. More extensive long-term studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    otherwise considered transplantable, but failed to meet the usual criteria due to possible contusions or because they were from donors with sepsis or unable to pass the oxygenation test. RESULTS: In the study period, seven of 33 Danish lung transplantations were made possible due to EVLP. One patient died...... of non-EVLP-related causes, but all other recipients were alive with normal graft function at the end of our registration period. All lungs showed an improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio from a median 23.1 kPa (8.8-38.9) within the donor to 58.8 kPa (34.9-76.5) (FiO2 = 1.0) after EVLP, which corresponds to a 155......% improved oxygenation. The median time to extubation, time in intensive care unit and the admission period were 1, 7 and 39 days, respectively. CONCLUSION: In the first year after the introduction of EVLP in Denmark, seven pairs of donor lungs that previously would have been rejected have been transplanted...

  20. First Danish experience with ex vivo lung perfusion of donor lungs before transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ian Sune Iversen; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Christian Holdfold

    2014-01-01

    % improved oxygenation. The median time to extubation, time in intensive care unit and the admission period were 1, 7 and 39 days, respectively. CONCLUSION: In the first year after the introduction of EVLP in Denmark, seven pairs of donor lungs that previously would have been rejected have been transplanted...... otherwise considered transplantable, but failed to meet the usual criteria due to possible contusions or because they were from donors with sepsis or unable to pass the oxygenation test. RESULTS: In the study period, seven of 33 Danish lung transplantations were made possible due to EVLP. One patient died...... of non-EVLP-related causes, but all other recipients were alive with normal graft function at the end of our registration period. All lungs showed an improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio from a median 23.1 kPa (8.8-38.9) within the donor to 58.8 kPa (34.9-76.5) (FiO2 = 1.0) after EVLP, which corresponds to a 155...