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Sample records for expanded clay aggregate

  1. Fire Resistance of Concrete Constructions with Expanded Clay Aggregate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes briefly a series of full-scale tests made as documentation for extending the field of application of the reduced cross section method from the structural codes to constructions based on expanded clay aggregate. As a special result the tests verify that slabs with a short ancho...

  2. Lightweight self-compacting concrete with light expanded clay aggregate (LECA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiza Khaled

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight concretes have been successfully applied in building constructions for many years due to their favorable material properties, particularly their low specific weight in connection with a high strength, a high capability of thermal insulation and a high durability. The development leading to lightweight self-compacting concrete (LWSCC represents an important advanced step within the recent years. This concrete combines the favorable properties of a lightweight concrete with those of a self-compacting concrete. Research work is aimed on development of (LWSCC with the use of light aggregates “Light expanded clay aggregate (LECA”. In this research, first by specific gravity factor method, twenty different mix designs of (LWSCC were cast and tested to find out the values of slump flow, J-ring , V-funnel and 28 day compressive strength. Based on the results obtained, the best mix design was selected for further investigation. This paper also focuses on studying the effect of changing the reinforcement ratio on reinforced two way slabs when the dimensions were kept constant.

  3. The use of lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) as sorbent for PAHs removal from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah; Christy, Alfred A.; Barth, Tanja; Francis, George William

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of contact time on sorption PAH by LECA. ► Effect of mass of sorbent (LECA) on sorption of PAH. ► Sorption Isotherms for PAH-LECA interaction. - Abstract: Lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) has been explored as a sorbent for the removal of PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) from water. The efficacy of LECA as a sorbent for PAHs was assessed using contact time, mass of sorbent and sorption isotherms in a series of batch experiments. Maximum (optimum) sorption was reached at 21 h after which the amount of PAHs sorbed remained almost constant. Batch experiments were conducted by shaking a 100 ml solution mixture of individual PAHs (containing 0.02 mg/L) with LECA. The maximum sorption was 70.70, 70.82 and 72.12%, respectively for phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene when a mass of 0.2 g of sorbent was used. There was an increase in sorption as a result of an increase in mass of sorbent until a maximum was reached at a mass of 4.0 g LECA with 92.61, 93.91 and 94.15% sorption of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene respectively. Sorption data were fitted to the linearised forms of the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models to determine the water-LECA partitioning coefficient. Physical sorption caused by the aromatic nature of the compounds was the main mechanism that governed the removal process while the hydrophobicity of the PAHs also influenced the sorption capacity. LECA can be used as an alternative method for aqueous PAHs removal.

  4. Documentation for Calculations of Standard Fire Resistance of Slabs and Walls of Concrete with Expanded Clay Aggregate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    A number of full-scale tests are made in order to document calculation methods for fire-exposed slabs and walls derived during a previous project on fire exposed light-weight aggregate concrete constructions. The calculation methods are derived, and thus have a logical connection with the calcula......A number of full-scale tests are made in order to document calculation methods for fire-exposed slabs and walls derived during a previous project on fire exposed light-weight aggregate concrete constructions. The calculation methods are derived, and thus have a logical connection...... with the calculation methods used for other load cases. In addition the methods are shown to be valid for heavy concrete constructions by cooperation with tests for beams and columns, and a few slabs and walls. The two test series phase 1 and 2 of this report can therefore be seen as a necessary supplement to show...... that the methods are applicable for slabs and walls of light weight aggregate concrete. It is shown that the temperatures for standard fire exposed cross sections can be calculated, that the ultimate moment capacity can be calculated for slabs, and that the anchorage capacity and the shear tension capacity can...

  5. Silt-clay aggregates on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greeley, R.

    1979-01-01

    Viking observations suggest abundant silt and clay particles on Mars. It is proposed that some of these particles agglomerate to form sand size aggregates that are redeposited as sandlike features such as drifts and dunes. Although the binding for the aggregates could include salt cementation or other mechanisms, electrostatic bonding is considered to be a primary force holding the aggregates together. Various laboratory experiments conducted since the 19th century, and as reported here for simulated Martian conditions, show that both the magnitude and sign of electrical charges on windblown particles are functions of particle velocity, shape and composition, atmospheric pressure, atmospheric composition, and other factors. Electrical charges have been measured for saltating particles in the wind tunnel and in the field, on the surfaces of sand dunes, and within dust clouds on earth. Similar, and perhaps even greater, charges are proposed to occur on Mars, which could form aggregates of silt and clay size particles. Electrification is proposed to occur within Martian dust clouds, generating silt-clay aggregates which would settle to the surface where they may be deposited in the form of sandlike structures. By analog, silt-clay dunes are known in many parts of the earth where silt-clay aggregated were transported by saltation and deposited as 'sand.' In these structures the binding forces were later destroyed, and the particles reassumed the physical properties of silt and clay, but the sandlike bedding structure within the 'dunes' was preserved. The bedding observed in drifts at the Viking landing site is suggested to result from a similar process involving silt-clay aggregates on Mars

  6. Electric alignment of plate shaped clay aggregates in oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castberg, Rene; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the rotation of plate shaped aggregates of clay mineral particles immersed in silicone oil. The rotation is induced by an external electric field. The rotation time is measured as a function of the following parameters: electric field strength, the plate geometry (length and width) and the dielectric properties of the plates. We find that the plates always align with their longest axis parallel to the direction of the electric field (E), independently of the arrangement of individual clay -2 mineral particles within the plate. The rotation time is found to scale as E and is proportional to the viscosity (μ), which coincides well with a model that describes orientation of dipoles in electric fields. As the length of the plate is increased we quantify a difference between the longitudinal and transverse polarisability. Finally, we show that moist plates align faster. We attribute this to the change of the dielectric properties of the plate due to the presence of water.

  7. Clay based superior aggregate for making light construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumarnadi, Eko Tri; Sudaryanto; Zulkarnain, Iskandar

    2002-01-01

    Aggregate is defined as material consisting of solid minerals with grain size ranging from sand to gravel. This material is usually used for filling components of concrete. Clay based aggregate has special properties that can be useful for making light construction in wet environment. Concrete build using the aggregate is not impermeable, but it can adsorb water in significant amount, so that is very useful to be used as paving block for walker zone (trotoir) and zone surrounding swimming pool. Laboratory test results show that the aggregate has grain size in zone 1 type with specific gravity between 1360 - 1840 kg/cm 3. Its abrasive factor about 35.32 % in average and it can be used as building material for light construction. Concrete with mixing ratio cement/aggregate of 1 to 6 with slump condition 3 to 6 cm and curing time of 28 days indicates compressive strength of 10 N/cm 3. Qualitative cost analysis reflected that the paving block production cost is relatively low and it will be more profitable if they are product from failed pentile having fail between 10 to 30 %

  8. Viscosity and transient electric birefringence study of clay colloidal aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakk, Audun; Fossum, Jon O; da Silva, Geraldo J; Adland, Hans M; Mikkelsen, Arne; Elgsaeter, Arnljot

    2002-02-01

    We study a synthetic clay suspension of laponite at different particle and NaCl concentrations by measuring stationary shear viscosity and transient electrically induced birefringence (TEB). On one hand the viscosity data are consistent with the particles being spheres and the particles being associated with large amount bound water. On the other hand the viscosity data are also consistent with the particles being asymmetric, consistent with single laponite platelets associated with a very few monolayers of water. We analyze the TEB data by employing two different models of aggregate size (effective hydrodynamic radius) distribution: (1) bidisperse model and (2) log-normal distributed model. Both models fit, in the same manner, fairly well to the experimental TEB data and they indicate that the suspension consists of polydisperse particles. The models also appear to confirm that the aggregates increase in size vs increasing ionic strength. The smallest particles at low salt concentrations seem to be monomers and oligomers.

  9. The molecular aggregation of pyronin Y in natural bentonite clay suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meral, Kadem; Yilmaz, Nuray; Kaya, Mehmet; Tabak, Ahmet; Onganer, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    The molecular aggregation and spectroscopic properties of Pyronin Y (PyY) in the suspension containing natural bentonite clay were studied using molecular absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. Interaction between the clay particles and the cationic dye compounds in aqueous solution resulted in significant changes in spectral properties of PyY compared to its molecular behavior in deionized water at the same concentration. These changes were due to the formation of dimer and aggregate of PyY in the clay suspension as well as the presence of the dye monomer. The H-type aggregates of PyY in the clay suspension were identified by the observation of a blue-shifted absorption band of the dye compared to that of its monomer. In spite of diluted dye concentrations, the H-aggregate of PyY in the clay suspension was formed. The intensive aggregation in the clay suspension attributed to the localized high dye concentration on the negatively charged clay surfaces. Adsorption sites of PyY on the clay particles were discussed by deconvulated absorption and excitation spectra. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies revealed that the fluorescence intensity of PyY in the clay suspension is decreased by H-aggregates drastically. Moreover, the presence of H-aggregates in the clay suspension resulted in the decrease of fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield of PyY compared to those in deionized water. - Highlights: → Molecular behavior of PyY adsorbed on clay surface was followed spectroscopically. → H-aggregates of PyY in the clay suspension were formed at very low dye concentrations. → The intensive H-aggregate structure drastically reduced the fluorescence intensity of PyY. → The fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield of PyY in the clay suspension was discussed.

  10. The use of expanded clay dust in paint manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverguzova, S. V.; Sapronova, Zh A.; Starostina, Yu L.; Belovodskiy, E. A.

    2018-01-01

    Production increase of useful products is accompanied by the formation and the accumulation of the vast amounts of industrial wastes, the bulk of which is not involved in the recycling processes. An example of such wastes is dust bag filters of ceramsite production. At the large enterprises, the volume of its formation can reach 7-8 tons of dust per day, which is 10-15% of feedstock mass. The studies on the use of ceramsite production dust as filler pigment in the composition of organic mixed primer of red-brown color are carried out in this work. For comparison, red iron oxide pigment (Pg FGM) was used. The results showed that, primer with the use of expanded clay dust is characterized by the short drying time and meets all regulatory requirements.

  11. Mechanical properties of recycled concrete with demolished waste concrete aggregate and clay brick aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocan; Lou, Cong; Du, Geng; Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Zhiwu; Li, Liqin

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the effect of the replacement of natural coarse aggregate (NCA) with either recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) or recycled clay brick aggregate (RBA) on the compressive strengths of the hardened concrete. Two grades (C25 and C50) of concrete were investigated, which were achieved by using different water-to-cement ratios. In each grade concrete five different replacement rates, 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% were considered. In order to improve the performance of the recycled aggregates in the concrete mixes, the RCA and RBA were carefully sieved by using the optimal degradation. In this way the largest reduction in the 28-day compressive strength was found to be only 7.2% and 9.6% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RCA, and 11% and 13% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RBA. In general, the concrete with RCA has better performance than the concrete with RBA. The comparison of the present experimental results with those reported in literature for hardened concrete with either RCA or RBA demonstrates the effectiveness in improving the compressive strength by using the optimal gradation of recycled aggregates.

  12. Electric alignment of plate shaped clay aggregates in oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Christian Castberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the rotation of plate shaped aggregates of clay mineral particles immersed in silicone oil. The rotation is induced by an external electric field. The rotation time is measured as a function of the following parameters: electric field strength, the plate geometry (length and width and the dielectric properties of the plates. We find that the plates always align with their longest axis parallel to the direction of the electric field (E, independently of the arrangement of individual clay−2 mineral particles within the plate. The rotation time is found to scale as E and is proportional to the viscosity (μ, which coincides well with a model that describes orientation of dipoles in electric fields. As the length of the plate is increased we quantify a difference between the longitudinal and transverse polarisability. Finally, we show that moist plates align faster. We attribute this to the change of the dielectric properties of the plate due to the presence of water.

  13. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinan Hu

    Full Text Available Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+ at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability.

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  15. Flocculation - Formation and structure of aggregates composed of polyelectrolyte chains and clay colloidal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Sakhawoth , Yasine

    2017-01-01

    Flocculation is a key process in numerous environmental and industrial technologies such as purification of waste-water or paper making. It is necessary to understand the formation and structure of the aggregates to control and optimize such a process. Most of the studies on flocculation involve spherical particles, but there is a clear need to understand the flocculation of anisotropic particles such as clay colloids, which are platelets. I studied the flocculation of montmorillonite clay su...

  16. The Dependence of the Physical Mechanical Properties of Expanded-Clay Lightweight Concrete on the Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Vaičienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Binder material is the most expensive raw component of concrete; thus, scientists are looking for cheaper substitute materials. This paper shows that when manufacturing, a part of the binder material of expanded-clay lightweight concrete can be replaced with active filler. The conducted studies show that technogenic – catalyst waste could act as similar filler. The study also includes the dependence of the physical and mechanical properties of expanded-clay lightweight concrete on the concrete mixture and the chemical composition of the samples obtained. Different formation and composition mixtures of expanded-clay lightweight concrete were chosen to determine the properties of physical-mechanical properties such as density, water absorption and compressive strength.Article in Lithuanian

  17. Role of clay minerals in the formation of atmospheric aggregates of Saharan dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadros, Javier; Diaz-Hernandez, José L.; Sanchez-Navas, Antonio; Garcia-Casco, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Saharan dust can travel long distances in different directions across the Atlantic and Europe, sometimes in episodes of high dust concentration. In recent years it has been discovered that Saharan dust aerosols can aggregate into large, approximately spherical particles of up to 100 μm generated within raindrops that then evaporate, so that the aggregate deposition takes place most times in dry conditions. These aerosol aggregates are an interesting phenomenon resulting from the interaction of mineral aerosols and atmospheric conditions. They have been termed "iberulites" due to their discovery and description from aerosol deposits in the Iberian Peninsula. Here, these aggregates are further investigated, in particular the role of the clay minerals in the aggregation process of aerosol particles. Iberulites, and common aerosol particles for reference, were studied from the following periods or single dust events and locations: June 1998 in Tenerife, Canary Islands; June 2001 to August 2002, Granada, Spain; 13-20 August 2012, Granada; and 1-6 June 2014, Granada. Their mineralogy, chemistry and texture were analysed using X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, SEM and TEM. The mineral composition and structure of the iberulites consists of quartz, carbonate and feldspar grains surrounded by a matrix of clay minerals (illite, smectite and kaolinite) that also surrounds the entire aggregate. Minor phases, also distributed homogenously within the iberulites, are sulfates and Fe oxides. Clays are apparently more abundant in the iberulites than in the total aerosol deposit, suggesting that iberulite formation concentrates clays. Details of the structure and composition of iberulites differ from descriptions of previous samples, which indicates dependence on dust sources and atmospheric conditions, possibly including anthropic activity. Iberulites are formed by coalescence of aerosol mineral particles captured by precursor water droplets. The concentration of

  18. Effects of Wastes from the Brewing Industry in Lightweight Aggregates Manufactured with Clay for Green Roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, Romina D.; Martínez García, Carmen; Cotes Palomino, Teresa; Martínez Arellano, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of sieved wastes generated from the brewing industry on lightweight aggregates manufactured with clay. Sludge from a wastewater treatment plant, bagasse and diatomaceous earth were used to obtain the samples. These wastes are usually dumped in landfills, but the current increase in restrictions on dumping and interest in improving the environment make our proposal for gaining value from these wastes a significant contribution. Laboratory tests show that the new aggregate has low bulk density and increased water absorption and porosity. The thermographic camera results provide evidence that new aggregates have significant insulating properties and are suitable for use on green roofs. PMID:28772892

  19. Effects of Wastes from the Brewing Industry in Lightweight Aggregates Manufactured with Clay for Green Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina D. Farías

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of sieved wastes generated from the brewing industry on lightweight aggregates manufactured with clay. Sludge from a wastewater treatment plant, bagasse and diatomaceous earth were used to obtain the samples. These wastes are usually dumped in landfills, but the current increase in restrictions on dumping and interest in improving the environment make our proposal for gaining value from these wastes a significant contribution. Laboratory tests show that the new aggregate has low bulk density and increased water absorption and porosity. The thermographic camera results provide evidence that new aggregates have significant insulating properties and are suitable for use on green roofs.

  20. Agricultural residues and expanded clay in Oncidium baueri Lindl. orchid cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Marchezi Mora

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For orchid cultivation in containers is essential to select the right substrate, since this will influence the quality of the final product, it serve as a support for the root system of the plants. This study aimed to evaluate different agricultural residues and expanded clay in Oncidium baueri Lindl. orchid cultivation. The plants were subjected to treatments: pinus husk + carbonized rice husk, pinus husk + coffee husk, pinus husk + fibered coconut, pecan nut husk, expanded clay, fibered coconut, coffee husk, carbonized rice husk, pinus husk. After eleven months of the experiment, the following variables were evaluated: plant height; largest pseudo-bulb diameter; number of buds; shoot fresh dry matter; the longest root length; number of roots; root fresh matter; root dry matter; and electric conductivity; pH and water retention capacity of the substrates. Except the expanded clay, the other substrates showed satisfactory results in one or more traits. Standing out among these substrates pinus husk + coffee husk and pine bark + fibered coconut, which favored the most vegetative and root characteristic of the orchid. The mixture of pinus husk + coffee husk and pinus husk + fibered coconut, provided the best results in vegetative and root growth of the orchid Oncidium baueri and the expanded clay did not show favorable results in the cultivation of this species.

  1. Reuse of wastewater sludge with marine clay as a new resource of construction aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, J H; Show, K Y; Lee, D J; Hong, S Y

    2004-01-01

    The disposal of sludge from wastewater treatment presents highly complex problems to any municipality. Most of the sludge disposal methods have varying degrees of environmental impact. Hence, it is necessary to explore potential areas of reuse in order to alleviate sludge disposal problems and to conserve natural resources. Industrial sludge and marine clay are two forms of high-volume wastes. Using these wastes as a resource of raw materials to produce construction aggregates would enable large-scale sludge reuse. The aggregates were produced at various sludge-clay combinations containing 0, 20, 50, 80 and 100% clay contents, respectively. The pelletized aggregates displayed lower particle densities ranged between 1.48 and 2.25 g/cm3, compared to the density of granite at 2.56 g/cm3. Good 28-day concrete compressive strength of 38.5 N/mm2 achieved by the 100% sludge aggregate was comparable to the value of 38.0 N/mm2 achieved of the granite control specimens. The leachate contamination levels from the aggregates after 150 days were found acceptable when used in concrete, indicating insignificant environmental contamination. The heat flow study showed increases in heat flow at the temperatures of 480 degrees C and between 660 degrees C and 900 degrees C, indicating a need for the extension of heating time around these temperatures.

  2. Changes in the Expandability, Layer charge, and CEC of Smectitic Clay due to a Illitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Owan; Cho, Won Jin

    2007-01-01

    In a high-level waste(HLW) repository, the major fucntions of the smectitic clay for use as a buffer material are to inhibit the penetration of groundwater and to retard the release of radionuclides from the radioactive wastes to the surrounding environment. However, when the smectite clay is exposed to an elevated temperature due to radioactive decay heat and geochemical conditions for a long time, its physicochemical and mineralogical properties may be degradated and thus lose its barrier functions. It has been known in literature that the degradation of these properties of the smectitic clay occurs by a illitization in which the smectite transforms into illite. Therefore, an understanding of the illitization is essential to evaluate the long-term barrier performance of smectitic clay for the buffer of a HLW repository. This paper will carry out hydrothermal reaction tests with domestic smectitic clay which will be favorably considered for the buffer material of a Korean HLW repository, and investigate changes in the expandibility, layer charge and cation exchange capacity(CEC) of the smectitic clay due to a illitization

  3. Potential assessment of Sergipe and Alagoas clays in aggregates production for use in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, H.A.; Santos, C.P.; Oliveira, R.M.P.B.; Jesus, E. de; Macedo, Z.S.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to characterize technologically three clays employed by ceramic industries in Sergipe state, Brazil. Its potential use for the production of calcined synthetic aggregate to substitute gravel in concrete production was evaluated. The characterization of the clays included particle size and plasticity analysis, X-ray diffraction, differential and thermogravimetric analyses, dilatometry, X-ray fluorescence, organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, specific area, and scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic bodies were uniaxially pressed under 30 MPa, into rectangular and cylindrical shapes. Ceramic bodies of individual clays and also ceramic formulations were fired and subsequently characterized to determine their water absorption, apparent density, compressive strength, and grain morphology. It was observed that, after firing at 1120 deg C, two formulations presented strength, water absorption and specific mass comparable to those of gravel used in concrete. (author)

  4. Infiltration of water in disturbed soil columns as affected by clay dispersion and aggregate slaking

    OpenAIRE

    Amezketa, E.; Aragües, R.; Gazol, R.

    2004-01-01

    Soil crusting negatively affects the productivity and sustainability of irrigated agriculture, reducing water infiltration and plant emergence, and enhancing surface runoff and erosion. Clay dispersion and slaking of the aggregates at the soil surface are the main processes responsible for crusting. The infiltration rates (IR) of ten arid-zone soils in disturbed soil columns were measured and their relative susceptibilities to dispersion and slaking were determined. It was also examined wheth...

  5. Influence of low temperatures on aggregate disruption of heavy clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kozlovsky Dufková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy clay soils that are normally resistant to wind erosion, from study site Ostrožská Nová Ves si­tua­ted in the foothills of the Bílé Karpaty Mountains, Czech Republic, were a subject of laboratory analyses. The analyses should found out the influence of overwinter processes on disruption of soil aggregates and thus reason of vulnerability to soil loss by wind. Two overwinter processes were observed – freezing and thawing, and freeze-drying of the soil. Both processes have indicated the increasing of erodible fraction in dependence of water content of analysed soils. Exposed frozen clay soils that freeze-dries during the winter in the foothills of Bílé Karpaty, leaves soils highly erodible in late winter and early spring.

  6. Flexural Behaviour Of Reinforced Concrete Beams Containing Expanded Glass As Lightweight Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatib Jamal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The flexural properties of reinforced concrete beams containing expanded glass as a partial fine aggregate (sand replacement are investigated. Four concrete mixes were employed to conduct this study. The fine aggregate was replaced with 0%, 25%, 50% and 100% (by volume expanded glass. The results suggest that the incorporation of 50% expanded glass increased the workability of the concrete. The compressive strength was decreasing linearly with the increasing amount of expanded glass. The ductility of the concrete beam significantly improved with the incorporation of the expanded glass. However, the load-carrying capacity of the beam and load at which the first crack occurs was reduced. It was concluded that the inclusion of expanded glass in structural concrete applications is feasible.

  7. The exploitation of sludge from aggregate plants in the manufacture of porous fired clay bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamorro-Trenado, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggregates (gravel and sand are, after water, the Earth’s second most used natural resource, representing about 50% of all consumed mineral resources. Aggregate production generates a large quantity of waste from the aggregate washing process. This waste is made up of suspended solids – sludge – which has a great environmental impact. It is deposited in huge troughs because of the impossibility of discharging it directly into rivers. Many plants have incorporated decanters and filter presses to separate the solid from the liquid fraction. This paper evaluates the possibility of exploiting the solid fraction (i.e. sludge in the manufacture of fired clay bricks. The added value of these bricks is, on the one hand, the exploitation of sludge as a currently useless waste product, and on the other, the use of this sludge to enhance the physical and mechanical properties of conventional fired clay bricks.Los áridos son la segunda materia prima más consumida en la Tierra después del agua, representando alrededor del 50% de todos los recursos minerales consumidos. El proceso de elaboración de estos áridos genera una gran cantidad de residuos procedentes de su lavado. Se trata de partículas sólidas en suspensión – lodos – de gran impacto ambiental, que se depositan en grandes charcas ante la imposibilidad de verterlos directamente al rio. Muchas empresas han incorporado decantadores y filtros de prensa para separar la fracción solida de la líquida. El presente trabajo evalúa la posibilidad de utilizar la fracción sólida, es decir el barro, para la fabricación de piezas cerámicas. El valor añadido de estas piezas es por un lado el aprovechamiento del barro como producto residual, que en estos momentos es desechable, y por otro, conseguir que este barro mejore las propiedades físico-mecánicas de la cerámica convencional.

  8. Study of the behavior of aggregate of calcined clay for use in permeable pavements for the city of Manaus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.S.; Vilela, P.A.T.; Araujo, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Research on the production of ceramic aggregates and their use in paving in the country began in the 80’s in the search for an alternative material that could replace the pebble or crushed stone, studied the clay, considered an abundant mineral resource by virtue of being the predominant soil in this region and which were made synthetic calcinated clay aggregates (ASAC), for their application in permeable paving concrete motivated by the lack of permeable areas. The study consists of the characterization of materials for manufacture of concrete slabs permeable and the assessment of the effects of synthetic aggregate on its properties in fresh and hardened state. The ceramic bodies were subjected to tests of X-ray diffraction, determination of chemical composition and plasticity. The results indicate that the use of synthetic clusters is a viable alternative for the production of porous concrete. (author)

  9. An Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties in Clay Brick Masonry by Partial Replacement of Fine Aggregate with Clay Brick Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumavat, Hemraj Ramdas

    2016-09-01

    The compressive stress-strain behavior and mechanical properties of clay brick masonry and its constituents clay bricks and mortar, have been studied by several laboratory tests. Using linear regression analysis, a analytical model has been proposed for obtaining the stress-strain curves for masonry that can be used in the analysis and design procedures. The model requires only the compressive strengths of bricks and mortar as input data, which can be easily obtained experimentally. Development of analytical model from the obtained experimental results of Young's modulus and compressive strength. Simple relationships have been identified for obtaining the modulus of elasticity of bricks, mortar, and masonry from their corresponding compressive strengths. It was observed that the proposed analytical model clearly demonstrates a reasonably good prediction of the stress-strain curves when compared with the experimental curves.

  10. Clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides and soil organic carbon distribution within soil aggregates in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Fernández-Ugalde, Oihane; Virto, Iñigo; Arias-González, Ander

    2017-04-01

    Soil mineralogy is of primary importance for key environmental services provided by soils like carbon sequestration. However, current knowledge on the effects of clay mineralogy on soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization is based on limited and conflicting data. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides and SOC distribution within soil aggregates in mature Pinus radiata D.Don forest plantations. Nine forest stands located in the same geographical area of the Basque Country (North of Spain) were selected. These stands were planted on different parent material (3 on each of the following: sandstone, basalt and trachyte). There were no significant differences in climate and forest management among them. Moreover, soils under these plantations presented similar content of clay particles. We determined bulk SOC storage, clay mineralogy, the content of Fe-Si-Al-oxides and oxyhydroxides and the distribution of organic C in different soil aggregate sizes at different soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-20 cm). The relationship between SOC and abiotic factors was investigated using a factor analysis (PCA) followed by stepwise regression analysis. Soils developed on sandstone showed significantly lower concentration of SOC (29 g C kg-1) than soils developed on basalts (97 g C kg-1) and trachytes (119 g C kg-1). The soils on sandstone presented a mixed clay mineralogy dominated by illite, with lesser amounts of hydroxivermiculite, hydrobiotite and kaolinite, and a total absence of interstratified chlorite/vermiculite. In contrast, the major crystalline clay mineral identified in the soils developed on volcanic rocks was interstratified chlorite/vermiculite. Nevertheless, no major differences were observed between basaltic and trachytic soils in the clay mineralogy. The selective extraction of Fe showed that the oxalate extractable iron was significantly lower in soils on sandstone (3.7%) than on basalts (11.2%) and

  11. Compressive and flexural strength of expanded perlite aggregate mortar subjected to high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifeli, Muhamad Faqrul Hisham bin Mohd; Saman@Hj Mohamed, Hamidah binti Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Work on thermal resistant of outer structures of buildings is one of the solution to reduce death, damages and properties loss in fire cases. Structures protected with thermal resistant materials can delay or avoid failure and collapse during fire. Hence, establishment of skin cladding with advance materials to protect the structure of buildings is a necessary action. Expanded perlite is a good insulation material which can be used as aggregate replacement in mortar. This study is to study on mortar mechanical properties of flexural and compressive strength subjected to elevated temperatures using expanded perlite aggregate (EPA). This study involved experimental work which was developing mortar with sand replacement by volume of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of EPA and cured for 56 days. The mortars then exposed to 200°C, 400 °C, 700 °C and 1000 °C. Flexural and compressive strength of the mortar were tested. The tests showed that there were increased of flexural and compressive strength at 200°C, and constantly decreased when subjected to 400°C, 700°C and 1000 °C. There were also variation of strengths at different percentages of EPA replacement. Highest compressive strength and flexural strength recorded were both at 200 °C with 65.52 MPa and 21.34 MPa respectively. The study conclude that by using EPA as aggregate replacement was ineffective below elevated temperatures but increased the performance of the mortar at elevated temperatures.

  12. Matéria-prima da formação Corumbataí na região do pólo cerâmico de Santa Gertrudes, SP, com características naturais para fabricação de argila expandida Sedimentary rocks from Corumbataí formation (Paraná basin, Brazil with natural characteristics to produce expanded clay lightweight aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. T. Moreno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se um material da base da Formação Corumbataí, proveniente de uma mineração de argila, que apresenta restrições de uso em cerâmica devido à sua dureza e, principalmente, ao alto conteúdo de matéria orgânica. Verificou-se que o material apresenta características naturais ótimas para a fabricação de argila expandida diretamente a partir de fragmentos de rocha, mostrando comportamento piroplástico com expansão significativa se submetido à queima rápida. A caracterização da matéria-prima e do produto foi realizada mediante análise de carbono orgânico, difração de raios X, microscopia ótica e testes de queima. Foram determinadas as condições de queima para obter argila expandida utilizando forno de queima rápida e forno a rolos, ambos de laboratório, obtendo corpos com densidade variável (que podem chegar a valores menores que 0,5 g.cm-3 até o limite de expansão. Esta densidade é obtida devido à formação de poros fechados e uma película externa vítrea, que proporcionam uma resistência mecânica alta aos fragmentos expandidos.This paper refers to the study of the material of the base of the Corumbataí formation (Parana Basin, Brazil of a clay mine, which presents limits for its use in ceramic tiles in dry grinding process due to its hardness and, especially, the high content of organic matter in relation to the clay overlaid. The characterization of the raw material and the product was accomplished by organic carbon analysis, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and test-firing. Firing conditions were determined to get expanded clay, using fast firing static kiln and a continuous roller kiln, both from laboratory equipment, getting samples with variable density up to the limit of expansion, with density that can reach values lower than 0.5 g.cm-3 because of the formation of closed pores and an external vitreous foil which provide a high mechanical resistance to the particles.

  13. Lightweight expanded clay aggregates (LECA), a new up-scaleable matrix for production of microfungal metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    In order to compare the effects of different growth matrices on secondary metabolite production we compared 16 Penicillium species known to produce several families of bioactive compounds. The isolates were grown in rich complex media formulated as semisolid (agar), liquid (still), shake culture,...... for production of sporulation-associated metabolites, such as cyclopenins and viridicatins, for quick up-scaling from agar based media, and as an alternative for production of metabolites that are not induced under submerse conditions....

  14. Natural and controlled expansion of expanded clays for the production of lightweight aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann-Venevere, P.

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available Not availableLa modificación de una materia prima hace posible definir las propiedades del producto a manufacturar a partir de ella (fig. 1. La calidad de los áridos ligeros de diversos tipos, hechos con diferentes materias primas, puede juzgarse únicamente por su idoneidad como un constituyente del hormigón ligero. Por consiguiente, es esencial valorar la influencia del árido sobre ciertas características bien definidas del hormigón ligero.

  15. Texture-contrast profile development across the prairie-forest ecotone in northern Minnesota, USA, and its relation to soil aggregation and clay dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmerchak, C. S.; Mason, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Along the prairie-forest ecotone, Alfisols with distinct clay-enriched B horizons are found under forest, established only within the past 4 ka, including outlying patches of prairie groves surrounded by prairie. Grassland soils only 5-10 km away from the vegetation boundary show much weaker texture-contrast. In order for clay to be dispersed it must first be released from aggregates upper horizons, which occurs when exposed top soil undergoes wetting and mechanical stress. The relationship between physiochemical soil characteristics and soil aggregation/clay dispersion is of particular interest in explaining texture-contrast development under forest. Soil samples were collected along a transect in northern Minnesota on gentle slopes in similar glacial sediment. Aggregate stability experiments show Mollisol A and B horizons have the most stable aggregates, while Alfisol E horizons have the weakest aggregates and disintegrate rapidly. This demonstrates the strong influence of OM and exchange chemistry on aggregation. Analysis of other physiochemical soil characteristics such as base saturation and pH follow a gradual decreasing eastward trend across the study sites, and do not abruptly change at the prairie-forest boundary like soil morphology does. Linear models show the strongest relationship between rapid aggregate disintegration and ECEC, although they only explain 47-50% of the variance. Higher surface charge enhances aggregation by allowing for greater potential of cation bridging between OM and clay particles. ECEC also represents multiple soil characteristics such as OC, clay, mineralogy, and carbonate presence, suggesting the relationship between aggregation stability and soil characteristics is not simple. Given the parent material consists of calcareous glacial sediment, abundant Ca2+ and Mg2+ from carbonates weathering also contributes to enhanced aggregation in upper horizons. Differences in the rates of bioturbation, most likely also contribute

  16. Effect of the addition of expanded vermiculite in the technological properties of ceramic materials of clay base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, R.R.F.; Peixoto, R.S. Dutra; Macedo, D.A.; Nascimento, R.M.; Oliveira, G.V.M.; Universidade Federal da Paraiba

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of adding expanded vermiculite ceramic block made from two different types of clay and analysis of the properties for three compositions at different sintering temperatures. Samples pressed at 40 MPa were sintered between 800 and 1100 ° C. The technological properties were determined according to the sintering temperature. The evaluation of the crystalline phases and microstructure was carried out by X-ray diffraction results indicated that with the addition of expanded vermiculite in the specimens there was an increase in porosity of the blocks together with the water absorption, therefore a reduction in apparent density, as well as the breakdown voltage of the three-point bending. This study demonstrates the possibility of formulating ceramic blocs order to improve the insulating properties of these materials. (author)

  17. Anaerobic fluidized bed reactor with expanded clay as support for hydrogen production through dark fermentation of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante de Amorim, Eduardo Lucena [Department of Hydraulic and Sanitation, University of Sao Paulo. Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense, 400 Centro, CEP 13566-590 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Barros, Aruana Rocha; Rissato Zamariolli Damianovic, Marcia Helena; Silva, Edson Luiz [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luis, km 235, CEP 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    This study evaluated hydrogen production in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFBR) fed with glucose-based synthetic wastewater. Particles of expanded clay (2.8-3.35 mm) were used as a support material for biomass immobilization. The reactor was operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT) ranging from 8 to 1 h. The hydrogen yield production increased from 1.41 to 2.49 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose as HRT decreased from 8 to 2 h. However, when HRT was 1 h, there was a slight decrease to 2.41 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose. The biogas produced was composed of H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, and the H{sub 2} content increased from 8% to 35% as HRT decreased. The major soluble metabolites during H{sub 2} fermentation were acetic acid (HAc) and butyric acid (HBu), accounting for 36.1-53.3% and 37.7-44.9% of total soluble metabolites, respectively. Overall, the results demonstrate the potential of using expanded clay as support material for hydrogen production in AFBRs. (author)

  18. Incorporation of Biochar Carbon into Stable Soil Aggregates: The Role of Clay Mineralogy and Other Soil Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charlene N.KELLY; Joseph BENJAMIN; Francisco C.CALDER(O)N; Maysoon M.MIKHA; David W.RUTHERFORD; Colleen E.ROSTAD

    2017-01-01

    Aggregation and structure plav key roles in water-holding capacity and stability of soils.In this study,the incorporation of carbon (C) from switchgrass biochar into stable aggregate size fractions was assessed in an Aridisol (from Colorado,USA) dominated by 2:1 clays and an Alfisol (from Virginia,USA) containing weathered mixed 1∶1 and 2∶1 mineralogy,to evaluate the effect of biochar addition on soil characteristics.The biochar was applied at 4 levels,0,25,50,and 100 g kg-1,to the soils grown with wheat in a growth chamber experiment.The changes in soil strength and water-holding capacity using water release curves were measured.In the Colorado soil,the proportion of soil occurring in large aggregates decreased,with concomitant increases in small size fractions.No changes in aggregate size fractions occurred in the Virginia soil.In the Colorado soil,C content increased from 3.3 to 16.8 g kg-1,whereas in the < 53 μm fraction C content increased from 5.7 to 22.6 g kg-1 with 100 g kg-1 biochar addition.In the Virginia soil,C content within aggregate size fractions increased for each size fraction,except the > 2 000 μm fraction.The greatest increase (from 6.2 to 22.0 g kg-1) occurred in the 53-250 μm fraction.The results indicated that C was incorporated into larger aggregates in the Virginia soil,but remained largely unassociated to soil particles in the Colorado soil.Biochar addition had no significant effect on water-holding capacity or strength measurements.Adding biochar to more weathered soils with high native soil organic content may result in greater stabilization of incorporated C and result in less loss because of erosion and transport,compared with the soils dominated by 2∶1 clays and low native soil organic content.

  19. Seismic Performance of Composite Shear Walls Constructed Using Recycled Aggregate Concrete and Different Expandable Polystyrene Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The seismic performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC composite shear walls with different expandable polystyrene (EPS configurations was investigated. Six concrete shear walls were designed and tested under cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of fine RAC in designing earthquake-resistant structures. Three of the six specimens were used to construct mid-rise walls with a shear-span ratio of 1.5, and the other three specimens were used to construct low-rise walls with a shear-span ratio of 0.8. The mid-rise and low-rise shear walls consisted of an ordinary recycled concrete shear wall, a composite wall with fine aggregate concrete (FAC protective layer (EPS modules as the external insulation layer, and a composite wall with sandwiched EPS modules as the insulation layer. Several parameters obtained from the experimental results were compared and analyzed, including the load-bearing capacity, stiffness, ductility, energy dissipation, and failure characteristics of the specimens. The calculation formula of load-bearing capacity was obtained by considering the effect of FAC on composite shear walls as the protective layer. The damage process of the specimen was simulated using the ABAQUS Software, and the results agreed quite well with those obtained from the experiments. The results show that the seismic resistance behavior of the EPS module composite for shear walls performed better than ordinary recycled concrete for shear walls. Shear walls with sandwiched EPS modules had a better seismic performance than those with EPS modules lying outside. Although the FAC protective layer slightly improved the seismic performance of the structure, it undoubtedly slowed down the speed of crack formation and the stiffness degradation of the walls.

  20. The 11S Proteasomal Activator REGγ Impacts Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Aggregation and Motor Neuron Viability through Distinct Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M. Yersak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by expression of a polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded androgen receptor (AR. The inefficient nuclear proteasomal degradation of the mutant AR results in the formation of nuclear inclusions containing amino-terminal fragments of the mutant AR. PA28γ (also referred to as REGγ is a nuclear 11S-proteasomal activator with limited proteasome activation capabilities compared to its cytoplasmic 11S (PA28α, PA28β counterparts. To clarify the role of REGγ in polyQ-expanded AR metabolism, we carried out genetic and biochemical studies in cell models of SBMA. Overexpression of REGγ in a PC12 cell model of SBMA increased polyQ-expanded AR aggregation and contributed to polyQ-expanded AR toxicity in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT. These effects of REGγ were independent of its association with the proteasome and may be due, in part, to the decreased binding of polyQ-expanded AR by the E3 ubiquitin-ligase MDM2. Unlike its effects in PC12 cells, REGγ overexpression rescued transgenic SBMA motor neurons from DHT-induced toxicity in a proteasome binding-dependent manner, suggesting that the degradation of a specific 11S proteasome substrate or substrates promotes motor neuron viability. One potential substrate that we found to play a role in mutant AR toxicity is the splicing factor SC35. These studies reveal that, depending on the cellular context, two biological roles for REGγ impact cell viability in the face of polyQ-expanded AR; a proteasome binding-independent mechanism directly promotes mutant AR aggregation while a proteasome binding-dependent mechanism promotes cell viability. The balance between these functions likely determines REGγ effects on polyQ-expanded AR-expressing cells.

  1. Raw material of the Corumbatai formation at the region of ceramic pole of Santa Gertrudes - Sao Paulo, Brazil, with natural characteristics for fabrication of expanded clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, M.M.T.; Zanardo, A.; Rocha, R.R.; Roveri, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper refers to the study of the bases material of the Corumbatai Formation (Parana Basin) from a clay mine, which presents limits for its use in ceramic tiles in dry grinding process due to its hardness and, especially, the high content of organic matter in relation to the clay overlaid. The characterization of the raw material and the product was accomplished by organic carbon analysis, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and test-firing. Firing conditions were determined to get expanded clay, using fast firing static kiln and a continuous roller kiln, both from laboratory equipment, getting samples with variable density up to the limit of expansion, with density that can reach values lower than 0,5g.cm -3 because of the formation of closed pores and an external vitreous foil which provide a high mechanical resistance to the particles. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the Effects of Crushed and Expanded Waste Glass Aggregates on the Material Properties of Lightweight Concrete Using Image-Based Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang-Yeop; Abd Elrahman, Mohamed; Sikora, Pawel; Rucinska, Teresa; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Stephan, Dietmar

    2017-11-25

    Recently, the recycling of waste glass has become a worldwide issue in the reduction of waste and energy consumption. Waste glass can be utilized in construction materials, and understanding its effects on material properties is crucial in developing advanced materials. In this study, recycled crushed and expanded glasses are used as lightweight aggregates for concrete, and their relation to the material characteristics and properties is investigated using several approaches. Lightweight concrete specimens containing only crushed and expanded waste glass as fine aggregates are produced, and their pore and structural characteristics are examined using image-based methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray computed tomography (CT), and automated image analysis (RapidAir). The thermal properties of the materials are measured using both Hot Disk and ISOMET devices to enhance measurement accuracy. Mechanical properties are also evaluated, and the correlation between material characteristics and properties is evaluated. As a control group, a concrete specimen with natural fine sand is prepared, and its characteristics are compared with those of the specimens containing crushed and expanded waste glass aggregates. The obtained results support the usability of crushed and expanded waste glass aggregates as alternative lightweight aggregates.

  3. Evaluation of the Effects of Crushed and Expanded Waste Glass Aggregates on the Material Properties of Lightweight Concrete Using Image-Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yeop Chung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the recycling of waste glass has become a worldwide issue in the reduction of waste and energy consumption. Waste glass can be utilized in construction materials, and understanding its effects on material properties is crucial in developing advanced materials. In this study, recycled crushed and expanded glasses are used as lightweight aggregates for concrete, and their relation to the material characteristics and properties is investigated using several approaches. Lightweight concrete specimens containing only crushed and expanded waste glass as fine aggregates are produced, and their pore and structural characteristics are examined using image-based methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray computed tomography (CT, and automated image analysis (RapidAir. The thermal properties of the materials are measured using both Hot Disk and ISOMET devices to enhance measurement accuracy. Mechanical properties are also evaluated, and the correlation between material characteristics and properties is evaluated. As a control group, a concrete specimen with natural fine sand is prepared, and its characteristics are compared with those of the specimens containing crushed and expanded waste glass aggregates. The obtained results support the usability of crushed and expanded waste glass aggregates as alternative lightweight aggregates.

  4. Stability and aggregation of nanoscale titanium dioxide particle (nTiO2): Effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhong; Cheng, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Fate and transport of engineered nanoscale titanium dioxide (nTiO 2 ) have received much attention during the past decade. The aggregation and stability of nTiO 2 in water with complicated components, however, have not been fully examined. The objective of this paper is to determine the individual and synergistic effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids on nTiO 2 stability and aggregation, and elucidate the related mechanisms. We conducted systematic laboratory experiments to determine nTiO 2 stability and aggregation in NaCl and MgCl 2 solutions, both in the absence and presence of humic acid and illite colloids. Results showed that Mg 2+ , in comparison to Na + , could make the zeta potential of nTiO 2 more positive, and shift the point of zero charge of nTiO 2 (pH pzc,TiO2 ) towards higher pH. We also found that nTiO 2 are destabilized by illite colloids at pH < pH pzc,TiO2 through formation of illite-nTiO 2 hetero-aggregates, but are not interfered by illite colloids at higher pH. HA was found to make nTiO 2 stable via electrostatic and steric effects, both in the absence and presence of illite colloids. Calculated interaction energy based on DLVO theory revealed that instability of the nTiO 2 suspensions is mainly caused by primary minima, and that secondary minima normally do not destabilize the suspension, even though they are found to promote aggregation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Limestone calcined clay cement as a low-carbon solution to meet expanding cement demand in emerging economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudiesky Cancio Díaz

    Full Text Available This paper aims at assessing the return on investment and carbon mitigation potentials of five investment alternatives for the Cuban cement industry in a long-term horizon appraisal (15 years. Anticipated growing demand for cement, constrained supply and an urgent need for optimisation of limited capital while preserving the environment, are background facts leading to the present study. This research explores the beneficial contribution of a new available technology, LC3 cement, resulting from the combination of clinker, calcined clay and limestone, with a capacity of replacing up to 50% of clinker in cement. Global Warming Potential (GWP is calculated with Life Cycle Assessment method and the economic investment's payback is assessed through Return on Capital Employed (ROCE approach. Main outcomes show that projected demand could be satisfied either by adding new cement plants—at a high environmental impact and unprofitable performance— or by introducing LC3 strategy. The latter choice allows boosting both the return on investment and the production capacity while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG emissions up to 20–23% compared to business-as-usual practice. Overall profitability for the industry is estimated to overcome BAU scenario by 8–10% points by 2025, if LC3 were adopted. Increasing the production of conventional blended cements instead brings only marginal economic benefits without supporting the needed increase in production capacity. The conducted study also shows that, in spite of the extra capital cost required for the calcination of kaolinite clay, LC3 drops production costs in the range of 15–25% compared to conventional solutions. Keywords: Cement, Alternative, ROCE, CO2, LCA, Investment

  6. Study of the behavior of aggregate of calcined clay for use in permeable pavements for the city of Manaus; Estudo do comportamento de agregado sintetico de argila calcinada para uso em pavimentos permeaveis para a cidade de Manaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.S.; Vilela, P.A.T.; Araujo, V.S., E-mail: oliveirasmichelle@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Amazonas (UEAM), AM (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Research on the production of ceramic aggregates and their use in paving in the country began in the 80’s in the search for an alternative material that could replace the pebble or crushed stone, studied the clay, considered an abundant mineral resource by virtue of being the predominant soil in this region and which were made synthetic calcinated clay aggregates (ASAC), for their application in permeable paving concrete motivated by the lack of permeable areas. The study consists of the characterization of materials for manufacture of concrete slabs permeable and the assessment of the effects of synthetic aggregate on its properties in fresh and hardened state. The ceramic bodies were subjected to tests of X-ray diffraction, determination of chemical composition and plasticity. The results indicate that the use of synthetic clusters is a viable alternative for the production of porous concrete. (author)

  7. The use of spent glauconite in lightweight aggregate production

    OpenAIRE

    Franus, Wojciech; Franus, Małgorzata; Latosińska, Jolanta; Wójcik, Rafał

    2011-01-01

    The presented work has shown an application of spent glauconite bed after purification of wastewater for production of lightweight expanded clay aggregates. Sewage, from which it was removed Zn ions, came from technological line (zincworks) of Communication Equipment Factory „PZL” Świdnik. Spent glauconite bed was used as an additive in lightweight aggregate production which was obtained using plastic method by sintering, at temperature 1140 ºC and 1200 ºC, of spent glauconite amouts 10, 15, ...

  8. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  9. Potential assessment of Sergipe and Alagoas clays in aggregates production for use in concrete; Avaliacao do potencial de argilas de Sergipe e Alagoas na producao de agregados para uso em concreto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, H.A.; Santos, C.P.; Oliveira, R.M.P.B.; Jesus, E. de; Macedo, Z.S., E-mail: herbetalves148@gmail.com, E-mail: cochiran@hotmail.com, E-mail: rosaneboliveira@gmail.com, E-mail: edilsonjs@ufs.br, E-mail: zelia.macedo@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    This study aims to characterize technologically three clays employed by ceramic industries in Sergipe state, Brazil. Its potential use for the production of calcined synthetic aggregate to substitute gravel in concrete production was evaluated. The characterization of the clays included particle size and plasticity analysis, X-ray diffraction, differential and thermogravimetric analyses, dilatometry, X-ray fluorescence, organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, specific area, and scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic bodies were uniaxially pressed under 30 MPa, into rectangular and cylindrical shapes. Ceramic bodies of individual clays and also ceramic formulations were fired and subsequently characterized to determine their water absorption, apparent density, compressive strength, and grain morphology. It was observed that, after firing at 1120 deg C, two formulations presented strength, water absorption and specific mass comparable to those of gravel used in concrete. (author)

  10. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  11. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  12. Clay colloid formation and release from MX-80 buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1999-12-01

    Flowing groundwater can tear off clay colloids from buffer clay that has penetrated into fractures and transport them and bring sorbed radionuclides up to the biosphere. The colloids are 2-50 μm particle aggregates that are liberated from expanded, softened buffer if the water flow rate in the fractures exceeds a few centimeters per second. Except for the first few months or years after application of the buffer in the deposition holes the flow rate will not be as high as that. The aperture of the fractures will not hinder transport of colloids but most of the fractures contain clastic fillings, usually chlorite, that attract and immobilize them. This condition and the flow rate criterion combine to reduce the chance of radionuclide-bearing clay colloids to reach the biosphere to practically zero except for certain cases that need to be considered

  13. Effect of the addition of expanded vermiculite in the technological properties of ceramic materials of clay base; Efeito da adicao de vermiculita expandida nas propriedades tecnologicas de materiais Ceramicos de base argilosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lins, R.R.F.; Peixoto, R.S. Dutra; Macedo, D.A.; Nascimento, R.M.; Oliveira, G.V.M., E-mail: rivaldoeng.m@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses the effects of adding expanded vermiculite ceramic block made from two different types of clay and analysis of the properties for three compositions at different sintering temperatures. Samples pressed at 40 MPa were sintered between 800 and 1100 ° C. The technological properties were determined according to the sintering temperature. The evaluation of the crystalline phases and microstructure was carried out by X-ray diffraction results indicated that with the addition of expanded vermiculite in the specimens there was an increase in porosity of the blocks together with the water absorption, therefore a reduction in apparent density, as well as the breakdown voltage of the three-point bending. This study demonstrates the possibility of formulating ceramic blocs order to improve the insulating properties of these materials. (author)

  14. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  15. A Study of Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites Consisting of Unmodified Clay and Organo Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized from DGEBA resin and montmorillonite clay with an in-situ polymerization. One type of untreated clay and two types of organo clay were used to produce the nanocompsoites. The aims of this study were to examine the nanocomposite structure using different tools and to compare the results between the unmodified clay and modified clays as nanofillers. Although diffractogram in reflection mode did not show any apparent peak of both types of materials, the transmitted XRD (X-Ray Difraction graphs, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope images revealed that the modified clay-epoxy and unmodified clay-epoxy provides different results. Interestingly, the micrographs showed that some of the modified clay layers possessed non-exfoliated layers in the modified clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Clay aggregates and a hackle pattern were found from E-SEM images for both types of nanocomposite materials. It is shown that different tools should be used to determine the nanocomposite structure.

  16. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  17. Raw material of the Corumbatai formation at the region of ceramic pole of Santa Gertrudes - Sao Paulo, Brazil, with natural characteristics for fabrication of expanded clay; Materia-prima da formacao Corumbatai na regiao do polo ceramico de Santa Gertrudes - Sao Paulo, com caracteristicas naturais para fabricacao de argila expandida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, M.M.T.; Zanardo, A.; Rocha, R.R.; Roveri, C.D., E-mail: mmoreno@rc.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Petrologia e Metalogenia

    2009-07-01

    This paper refers to the study of the bases material of the Corumbatai Formation (Parana Basin) from a clay mine, which presents limits for its use in ceramic tiles in dry grinding process due to its hardness and, especially, the high content of organic matter in relation to the clay overlaid. The characterization of the raw material and the product was accomplished by organic carbon analysis, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and test-firing. Firing conditions were determined to get expanded clay, using fast firing static kiln and a continuous roller kiln, both from laboratory equipment, getting samples with variable density up to the limit of expansion, with density that can reach values lower than 0,5g.cm{sup -3} because of the formation of closed pores and an external vitreous foil which provide a high mechanical resistance to the particles. (author)

  18. clay nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work deals with the synthesis of specialty elastomer [fluoroelastomer and poly (styrene--ethylene-co-butylene--styrene (SEBS)]–clay nanocomposites and their structure–property relationship as elucidated from morphology studies by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray ...

  19. Use of clay from kangerlussuaq in the Greenlandic construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Villumsen, Arne; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Clay material from Kangerlussuaq in West Greenland was characterised and its possible use for the production of bricks, expanded clay products and inert filler material was investigated. It was generally found that it was possible to use the clay in all of the above mentioned materials, although,...

  20. Marine Synechococcus Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuer, S.; Deng, W.; Cruz, B. N.; Monks, L.

    2016-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to play an important role in the oceanic biological carbon pump, especially in oligotrophic regions. But as single cells are too small to sink, their carbon export has to be mediated by aggregate formation and possible consumption by zooplankton producing sinking fecal pellets. Here we report results on the aggregation of the ubiquitous marine pico-cyanobacterium Synechococcus as a model organism. We first investigated the mechanism behind such aggregation by studying the potential role of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) and the effects of nutrient (nitrogen or phosphorus) limitation on the TEP production and aggregate formation of these pico-cyanobacteria. We further studied the aggregation and subsequent settling in roller tanks and investigated the effects of the clays kaolinite and bentonite in a series of concentrations. Our results show that despite of the lowered growth rates, Synechococcus in nutrient limited cultures had larger cell-normalized TEP production, formed a greater volume of aggregates, and resulted in higher settling velocities compared to results from replete cultures. In addition, we found that despite their small size and lack of natural ballasting minerals, Synechococcus cells could still form aggregates and sink at measureable velocities in seawater. Clay minerals increased the number and reduced the size of aggregates, and their ballasting effects increased the sinking velocity and carbon export potential of aggregates. In comparison with the Synechococcus, we will also present results of the aggregation of the pico-cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus in roller tanks. These results contribute to our understanding in the physiology of marine Synechococcus as well as their role in the ecology and biogeochemistry in oligotrophic oceans.

  1. The influence of aggregates type on W/C ratio on the strength and other properties of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaiskiene, J.; Skripkiunas, G.; Vaiciene, M.; Karpova, E.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of different types of aggregates and W/C ratio on concrete properties is analysed. In order to achieve this aim, lightweight (with expanded clay aggregate) and normal concrete (with gravel aggregate) mixtures are prepared with different W/C ratios. Different W/C ratios are selected by reducing the amount of cement when the amount of water is constant. The following properties of concrete have been determined: density, compressive strength and water absorption. Additionally, the statistical data analysis is performed and influence of aggregate type and W/C ratio on concrete properties is determined. The empirical equations indicating dependence between concrete strength and W/C and strength of aggregate are obtained for normal concrete and light-weight concrete.

  2. The influence of clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Getahun, Gizachew Tarekegn; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Schjønning, Per

    2016-01-01

    × SOC according to Dexter et al. (2008). NCC was a better predictor of dispersible clay than total clay and SOC at all depths in natural aggregates, while tensile strength and derived parameters were generally better explained by the total amount of clay in remoulded aggregates. Remoulded aggregates had...

  3. Reuse of industrial sludge as construction aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, J H; Show, K Y; Hong, S Y

    2001-01-01

    Industrial wastewater sludge and dredged marine clay are high volume wastes that needed enormous space at landfill disposal sites. Due to the limitation of land space, there is an urgent need for alternative disposal methods for these two wastes. This study investigates the possibility of using the industrial sludge in combination with marine clay as construction aggregates. Different proportions of sludge and clay were made into round and angular aggregates. It was found that certain mix proportions could provide aggregates of adequate strength, comparable to that of conventional aggregates. Concrete samples cast from the sludge-clay aggregates yield compressive strengths in the range of 31.0 to 39.0 N/mm2. The results showed that the round aggregates of 100% sludge and the crush aggregates of sludge with up to 20% clay produced concrete of compressive strengths which are superior to that of 38.0 N/mm2 for conventional aggregate. The study indicates that the conversion of high volume wastes into construction materials is a potential option for waste management.

  4. Utilization of crushed clay brick in cellular concrete production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Aliabdo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research program is to study the effect of using crushed clay brick as an alternative aggregate in aerated concrete. Two series of mixtures were designed to investigate the physico-mechanical properties and micro-structural analysis of autoclave aerated concrete and foamed concrete, respectively. In each series, natural sand was replaced with crushed clay brick aggregate. In both series results showed a significant reduction in unit weight, thermal conductivity and sound attenuation coefficient while porosity has increased. Improvement on compressive strength of autoclave aerated concrete was observed at a percentage of 25% and 50% replacement, while in foamed concrete compressive strength gradually decreased by increasing crushed clay brick aggregate content. A comparatively uniform distribution of pore in case of foamed concrete with natural sand was observed by scanning electron microscope, while the pores were connected mostly and irregularly for mixes containing a percentage higher than 25% clay brick aggregate.

  5. Development of photopolymerizable clay nanocomposites utilizing reactive dispersants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Adom, Kwame

    Nanocomposites hold tremendous promise for expanding the utility of polymeric materials. However, accessing particulate sizes in the nanoscale domain continues to be a scientific challenge, especially in highly cross-linked photopolymerizable systems. In this study, photopolymerizable nanocomposites utilizing clay nanoparticles and reactive dispersants have been developed. The influence of particle size, dispersant-clay interactions, and surfactant concentration on photopolymerization behavior and nanoparticle dispersion has been elucidated. Clay particles serve as templates upon which surfactants aggregate during photopolymerization. This results in higher photopolymerization rates with addition of increasing concentrations of polymerizable surfactants. Furthermore, polymerizable surfactants induce faster photopolymerization rates compared to non-polymerizable analogues in systems that have ionically-bound dispersants on the particle surface. Utilizing reactive organoclays induces significant changes to the photopolymerization behavior depending on the choice of reactive functionality employed. Faster acrylate photopolymerization rates occur in photopolymer systems containing thiol-modified clays, while much slower rates occur for nonpolymerizable organoclay systems. In addition, chemical compatibility between monomer and clay dispersant (based on chemical similarity or polarity) allows enhancement of exfoliation in photopolymerizable formulations. With polymerizable dispersants, exfoliation is readily achieved in various multifunctional acrylate systems. The degree of exfoliation depends on the position of the reactive group relative to the surfactant's cationic site and the type of functionality. Thiolated organoclays exfoliate during polymerization, while methacrylated clays show substantially less dependence on polymerization behavior. Interestingly, changes in the physical properties of the resulting nanocomposite are independent of the degree of exfoliation

  6. EFFECT OF INCORPORATING EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... Incorporating expanded polystyrene granules in concrete matrix can produce lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete of ... structure. [1] reported that the standard workability tests are not suitable for the polystyrene aggregate concrete since they are sensitive to the unit weight of concrete. [2] made ...

  7. The influence of clay particles on the hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahmy, M.I.

    1961-01-01

    The relation between hydraulic conductivity and size of the sand particles and clay content was investigated in artificial mixtures of sand and clay and in natural soils, in four different ways in the laboratory and field.

    In the artificial mixtures coarse aggregates of illitic clay hardly

  8. ELABORACIÓN Y EVALUACIÓN DE PLACAS PREFABRICADAS DE CONCRETO ALIGERADO CON ARCILLA EXPANDIDA PARA USO COMO COBERTURAS DE ESTRUCTURAS PECUARIAS DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF PREFABRICATED CONCRETE ROOF SLABS MADE WITH LIGHTWEIGHT EXPANDED CLAY ARID APPLIED TO COVERING FACILITIES FOR ANIMAL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilda de Fátima Ferreira Tinôco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue evaluar el uso de la arcilla expandida en concretos livianos, dosificada y elaborada de manera que fuera viable el moldeo de placas con una geometría apropiada, capaz de atender las demandas de confort térmico y de las técnicas para estructuras pecuarias. Modelos de galpones de aves fueron construidos en escala 1:12, de acuerdo con Jentzsch (2002 y localizados en dirección este-oeste. Los techos fueron construidos con tres materiales diferentes: placas prefabricadas de concreto aligerado con arcilla expandida (LWC, tejas en fibrocemento (Fcim y tejas cerámicas (Cer. Los parámetros evaluados al interior de los modelos reducidos fueron: humedad relativa (HR, índice de temperatura de globo negro y humedad (ITGU y carga térmica radiante (CTR, durante el verano y el invierno. Los resultados mostraron que los parámetros HR, ITGU y CTR fueron estadísticamente diferentes para cada sistema evaluado. El mejor comportamiento se presentó con el modelo de placas prefabricadas de concreto aligerado con arcillas expandidas (LWC.This research aimed to evaluate the use of the expanded clay on the light concrete, dosed and executed in order to make possible to mold the roof tiles with appropriate geometry, according to the comfort and technique demands of the animals constructions. Models of poultry livestock facilities were build in scale of 1:12, Jentzsch (2002, and were positioned on the East-West direction. The roofs were made of three different materials each one: roofing tiles of light concrete using expanded clay (LWC, roofing tiles of asbestos-cement (Fcim and ceramic roofing tiles (Cer. The parameters evaluated inside of the reduced models were: relative humidity (RH, and black globe temperature and humidity index (BGHI and thermal load of radiation (TLR, during the summer and winter. The results showed that the parameters RH, BGHI and TLR were statistically different among the systems. The best performance happened on the

  9. Disruption of soil aggregates by varied amounts of ultrasonic energy in fractionation of organic matter of a clay latosol : carbon, nitrogen and 13C distribution in particle-size fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roscoe, R.; Buurman, P.; Velthorst, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasonic energy has been widely used to disrupt soil aggregates before fractionating soil physically when studying soil organic matter (SOM). Nevertheless, there is no consensus about the optimum energy desirable to disrupt the soil. We therefore aimed (i) to quantify the effect of varied

  10. Production of lightweight aggregates from washing aggregate sludge and fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Corrochano, Beatriz; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto; Rodas, Magdalena

    2010-05-01

    manufactured with 75%:25% and 50%:50% proportions of washing aggregate sludge:fly ash, heated at different temperatures and dwell times, were expanded LWAs (BI > 0). They showed the lowest loose bulk density, the lowest dry and apparent particle density, the lowest water absorption and the highest compressive strength. The possible applications of sintered pellets, taking into consideration compressive strength and water absorption values, could be similar to those of Arlita G3 (insulation, geotechnical applications, gardening and/or horticulture) and/or Arlita F3 (prefabricated lightweight structures and insulation lightweight concretes), two varieties of the most widely marketed LWAs in Spain. References - Benbow, J., September 1987. Mineral in fire protection construction support market. Industrial Minerals, 61-73. - Bethanis, S., Cheeseman, C.R., Sollars, C.J., 2004. Effect of sintering temperature on the properties and leaching of incinerator bottom ash. Waste Management and Research 22 (4), 255-264. - De' Gennaro, R., Cappelletti, P., Cerri, G., De' Gennaro, M., Dondi, M., Langella, A., 2004. Zeolitic tuffs as raw materials for lightweight aggregates. Applied Clay Science 25 (1-2), 71-81. - Fakhfakh, E., Hajjaji, W., Medhioub, M., Rocha, F., López-Galindo, A., Setti, M.,Kooli, F., Zargouni, F., Jamoussi, F., 2007. Effects of sand addition on production of lightweight aggregates from Tunisian smectite-rich clayey rocks. Applied Clay Science 35, 228-237. - UNE-EN-13055-1, 2003. Lightweight aggregates - lightweight aggregates for concrete, mortar and grout. - Yasuda, Y., 1991. Sewage-sludge utilization in Tokyo. Water Science and Technology 23 (10-12), 1743-1752.

  11. Colloid Release from Soil Aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  12. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool......-Saxon and continental traditions, this special issue provides examples of the use of researcher subjectivity, informed by psychoanalytic thinking, in expanding research understanding....

  13. Water storage change estimation from in situ shrinkage measurements of clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, te B.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the applicability of clay soil elevation change measurements to estimate soil water storage changes, using a simplified approach. We measured moisture contents in aggregates by EC-5 sensors, and in multiple aggregate and inter-aggregate spaces (bulk soil) by

  14. Contracción de agregados de Argiudoles de la Pampa Ondulada diferenciados en su mineralogía de arcillas Shrinkage of soil aggregates from rolling Pampa Argiudolls differentiated by their clay mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Guillermo Castiglioni

    2005-07-01

    propiedades que mejor se relacionaron con la tasa de contracción residual, mientras que la presencia de carbono orgánico disminuyó sensiblemente su valor.Swelling and shrinking affect soil physical and chemical behavior. Mc Garry & Malafant improved a model with three shrinkage areas, through which it is possible to estimate parameters with physical significance to compare different soils. The objective of the present work was to determine which soil properties and characteristics of Rolling Pampa Argiudolls with different clay mineralogy, affect the model parameters of Mc Garry & Malafant. Clods of distinct horizons of three non-disturbed soils were used to set the specific volume change / gravimetric water content relationship. Estimated parameters of the three straight lines model, were correlated with soils properties and characteristics. Whereas the distinct behavior in the volume change of argilic horizons with contrasting mineralogy was mainly at low soil water contents, the influence of clay percentage was best appreciated with normal shrinkage slope and at high soil water contents. Independently of clay mineralogy, the air entry point in the argilic horizons was registered at soil moisture seldom registered in the field. In the BC and C horizons, the joined consideration of clay and CEC gave a better correlation with the residual shrinkage slope, than the values obtained pondering those parameters individually. In the A and BA horizons the CEC was the better predictive parameter of the residual shrinkage slope. Analyzing the A, BA, BC and C horizons together, equivalent moisture and particle density were the best soil properties for predicting the residual contraction rate, whereas organic carbon decreased this value significantly.

  15. Graph Aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endriss, U.; Grandi, U.

    Graph aggregation is the process of computing a single output graph that constitutes a good compromise between several input graphs, each provided by a different source. One needs to perform graph aggregation in a wide variety of situations, e.g., when applying a voting rule (graphs as preference

  16. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  17. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  18. Rydberg aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüster, S.; Rost, J.-M.

    2018-02-01

    We review Rydberg aggregates, assemblies of a few Rydberg atoms exhibiting energy transport through collective eigenstates, considering isolated atoms or assemblies embedded within clouds of cold ground-state atoms. We classify Rydberg aggregates, and provide an overview of their possible applications as quantum simulators for phenomena from chemical or biological physics. Our main focus is on flexible Rydberg aggregates, in which atomic motion is an essential feature. In these, simultaneous control over Rydberg-Rydberg interactions, external trapping and electronic energies, allows Born-Oppenheimer surfaces for the motion of the entire aggregate to be tailored as desired. This is illustrated with theory proposals towards the demonstration of joint motion and excitation transport, conical intersections and non-adiabatic effects. Additional flexibility for quantum simulations is enabled by the use of dressed dipole-dipole interactions or the embedding of the aggregate in a cold gas or Bose-Einstein condensate environment. Finally we provide some guidance regarding the parameter regimes that are most suitable for the realization of either static or flexible Rydberg aggregates based on Li or Rb atoms. The current status of experimental progress towards enabling Rydberg aggregates is also reviewed.

  19. Recent advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li Zhi; Zhou, Chun Hui; Wang, Jing; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua; Wang, Hao

    2015-12-28

    Clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels have been proven to have exceptional composition, properties, and applications, and consequently have attracted a significant amount of research effort over the past few years. The objective of this paper is to summarize and evaluate scientific advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels in terms of their specific preparation, formation mechanisms, properties, and applications, and to identify the prevailing challenges and future directions in the field. The state-of-the-art of existing technologies and insights into the exfoliation of layered clay minerals, in particular montmorillonite and LAPONITE®, are discussed first. The formation and structural characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogels made from in situ free radical polymerization, supramolecular assembly, and freezing-thawing cycles are then examined. Studies indicate that additional hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, coordination bonds, hydrophobic interaction, and even covalent bonds could occur between the clay mineral nanoplatelets and polymer chains, thereby leading to the formation of unique three-dimensional networks. Accordingly, the hydrogels exhibit exceptional optical and mechanical properties, swelling-deswelling behavior, and stimuli-responsiveness, reflecting the remarkable effects of clay minerals. With the pivotal roles of clay minerals in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels, the nanocomposite hydrogels possess great potential as superabsorbents, drug vehicles, tissue scaffolds, wound dressing, and biosensors. Future studies should lay emphasis on the formation mechanisms with in-depth insights into interfacial interactions, the tactical functionalization of clay minerals and polymers for desired properties, and expanding of their applications.

  20. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A.

    2002-01-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  1. Heteroaggregation of Silver Nanoparticles with Clay Minerals in Aqueous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Burrow, E.; Hwang, Y.; Lenhart, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being used in industrial processes and consumer products that exploit their beneficial properties and improve our daily lives. Nevertheless, they also attract attention when released into natural environment due to their potential for causing adverse effects. The fate and transport of nanoparticles in aqueous systems have been the focus of intense study. However, their interactions with other natural particles have received only limited attention. Clay minerals are ubiquitous in most aquatic systems and their variably charged surfaces can act as deposition sites that can alter the fate and transport of nanoparticles in natural aqueous environments. In this study, we investigated the homoaggregation of silver nanoparticles with different coating layers and their heteroaggregation behavior with clay minerals (illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite) in neutral pH solutions. Silver nanoparticles with a nominal diameter of 80 nm were synthesized with three different surface coating layers: uncoated, citrate-coated and Tween-coated. Illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), and montmorillonite (SWy-2) were purchased from the Clay Mineral Society (Indiana) and pretreated to obtain monocationic (Na-clay) and dicationic (Ca-clay) suspensions before the experiments. The change in hydrodynamic diameter as a function of time was monitored using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements in order to evaluate early stage aggregation as a function of electrolyte concentration in both the homo- and heteroaggregation scenarios. A shift in the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values to lower electrolyte concentrations was observed in binary systems, compared to single silver nanoparticle and clay systems. The results also suggest more rapid aggregation in binary system during the early aggregation stage when compared to the single-particle systems. The behavior of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles was similar to that of the bare particles, while the

  2. Expandable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, J C; Carrasco, H

    1996-05-01

    Expandable metallic stents are effective in selected patients with malignant or benign airway stenoses. When used for malignant lesions, the primary purpose of the stent is to improve the quality of life; stents are usually chosen for palliation of symptoms in recognition of the low likelihood of success for other therapy. For patients with benign stenoses, the stents provide a permanent source of structural support to alleviate the narrowed segment. The advantages of the expandable metallic stents are as follows: (1) they can be inserted through an endotracheal tube or under local anesthesia with relative simplicity under fluoroscopic guidance; (2) they do not impair the drainage of sputum because ciliary movement is not interrupted; (3) over a period of a few weeks, the meshwork is gradually covered with mucosa as the stent becomes incorporated into the airway wall; (4) ventilation usually is not impaired if the metallic mesh stent covers another nonstenosed bronchus, because the interstices of the stent are nonobstructive; and (5) they are dynamic and continue to expand over time, particularly if concurrent treatment achieves an effect on the lesion that caused stenosis. Disadvantages of the expandable stent include (1) they often are only temporarily effective for tracheobronchial stenosis due to intraluminal tumor or granulation tissue, both of which can grow between the wires; (2) they are considered permanent stents because removal is difficult; and (3) they can be poorly positioned during placement or can become displaced by progressive migration after placement, and they cannot be repositioned. A relative contraindication to insertion is an inflammatory process or infection that can predispose to granulation formation, particularly at the points of maximal contact pressure of the stent to the airway mucosa. In the presence of inflammation, it may be better to use a silicone prosthesis until the inflammatory process subsides and fibrosis occurs. Granulation

  3. Expander Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Expander Codes - The Sipser–Spielman Construction. Priti Shankar. General Article Volume 10 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  4. Clay minerals behaviour in thin sandy clay-rich lacustrine turbidites (Lake Hazar, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ouahabi, Meriam; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurelia; Lamair, Laura; Hage, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    particles are dispersed, and the suspension is stabilized supported by our SEM observations. In alkaline water, kaolinite reveals a lower degree of consolidation. While, alkaline water has no measurable effect on illite and chlorite surface properties due to the absence of modifications in charge. Illite and chlorite form with other clasts clusters or aggregate structures in suspension when the particle interactions are dominated by attractive energies were formed. The aggregate structure plays a major part in the flow behavior of clay suspensions. Flocs will immobilize the suspending medium, and give rise to increasing viscosity and yield strength of the suspension. S. Hage, A. Hubert-Ferrari, L. Lamair, U. Avşar, M. El Ouahabi, M. Van Daele, F. Boulvain, M.A. Bahri, A. Seret, Al. Plenevaux. Flow dynamics at the origin of thin sandy clay-rich lacustrine turbidites: Examples from Lake Hazar, Turkey, submitted to Sedimentology, in revision.

  5. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    This research studies Latvia originated Devon (Tūja, Skaņkalne), quaternary (Ceplīši), Jurassic, (Strēļi) and Triassic (Vadakste) deposit clays as well as Lithuania originated Triassic (Akmene) deposit clays. Thixotropic properties of clay were researched by measuring relative viscosity of clay in water suspensions. Relative viscosity is measured with a hopper method. It was detected that, when concentration of suspension is increased, clay suspension’s viscosity also increases. It happens un...

  6. Concrete-Opalinus clay interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenni, A.; Maeder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste foresee cementitious materials as structural elements, backfill or waste matrix. Therefore, studies of interactions between cement and all other materials involved are important. Interactions are mostly driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical alterations in the barrier system, which in turn influence properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention in case of clay materials. Existing laboratory and in-situ studies using clay-stone revealed significant alteration in both cement and clay-stone. Phase dissolution, precipitation, and carbonation, were found to cause an overall porosity increase in the cement with a possible decrease close to the interface, and clogging in the clay-stone [2]. Most of the work was done on cement pastes rather than concretes to avoid analytical complications caused by aggregates, and the scale of investigation was chosen in the range of centimetres rather than micrometers. The Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) aims at replicating some of the processes at interfaces to be expected.For this purpose, two vertical cylindrical boreholes (384 mm diameter, up to 10 m length) in Opalinus Clay (OPA) were filled with layers of three different concretes and bentonite. The concrete formulations are based on common aggregate content and grain size distributions, combined with three different cements: Portland cement (OPC), ESDRED cement especially designed for repository applications (40% of cement substituted with silica fume), and low alkali cement (LAC, containing slag and nano-silica).In this study, we present a characterisation of the three concrete-OPA interfaces after two years of alteration and deduce possible mechanisms. Backscattered electron (BE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrum (EDX) element mapping

  7. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SOIL MICROBIAL BIOMASS, AGGREGATE STABILITY AND AGGREGATE ASSOCIATED-C: A MECHANISTIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Guidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the identification of C pools involved in soil aggregation, a physically-based aggregate fractionation was proposed, and  additional pretreatments were used in the measurement of the 1-2 mm aggregate stability in order to elucidate the relevance of the role of soil microorganisms with respect to the different aggregate breakdown mechanisms. The study was carried out on three clay loam Regosols, developed on calcareous shales, known history of organic cultivation.Our results showed that the soil C pool controlling the process of stabilisation of aggregates was related to the microbial community. We identified the resistance to fast wetting as the major mechanism of aggregate stability driven by microorganims. The plausible hypothesis is that organic farming promotes fungi growth, improving water repellency of soil aggregates by fungal hydrophobic substances. By contrast, we failed in the identification of C pools controlling the formation of aggregates, probably because of the disturbance of mechanical tillage which contributes to the breakdown of soil aggregates.The physically-based aggregate fractionation proposed in this study resulted useful in the  mechanistically understanding of the role of microorganisms in soil aggregation and it might be suggested for studying the impact of management on C pools, aggregates properties and their relationships in agricultural soils.

  8. Heteroaggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with natural clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labille, Jérôme; Harns, Carrie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Brant, Jonathan

    2015-06-02

    To better understand and predict the fate of engineered nanoparticles in the water column, we assessed the heteroaggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles with a smectite clay as analogues for natural colloids. Heteroaggregation was evaluated as a function of water salinity (10(-3) and 10(-1) M NaCl), pH (5 and 8), and selected nanoparticle concentration (0-4 mg/L). Time-resolved laser diffraction was used, coupled to an aggregation model, to identify the key mechanisms and variables that drive the heteroaggregation of the nanoparticles with colloids. Our data show that, at a relevant concentration, nanoparticle behavior is mainly driven by heteroaggregation with colloids, while homoaggregation remains negligible. The affinity of TiO2 nanoparticles for clay is driven by electrostatic interactions. Opposite surface charges and/or high ionic strength favored the formation of primary heteroaggregates via the attachment of nanoparticles to the clay. The initial shape and dispersion state of the clay as well as the nanoparticle/clay concentration ratio also affected the nature of the heteroaggregation mechanism. With dispersed clay platelets (10(-3) M NaCl), secondary heteroaggregation driven by bridging nanoparticles occurred at a nanoparticle/clay number ratio of greater than 0.5. In 10(-1) M NaCl, the clay was preaggregated into larger and more spherical units. This favored secondary heteroaggregation at lower nanoparticle concentration that correlated to the nanoparticle/clay surface area ratio. In this latter case, a nanoparticle to clay sticking efficiency could be determined.

  9. Geopolymerization of lightweight aggregate waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrincha, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymerization is a viable way to process and re-use alumino-silicate industrial waste while producing highstrength, high chemical inertia materials that can effectively immobilize other industrial by-products, and even hazardous waste. In this study industrial waste from different stages of the manufacture of lightweight expanded clay aggregate was characterized for its possible transformation, via alkali activation, to geopolymers. The ultimate aim was to assess the possibility of using such geopolymers to develop thermal and acoustic insulation panels. The containment of hazardous materials is another important application for these new materials. Geopolymers were prepared for this study with different particles size distributions and activator concentrations. Their mechanical properties, composition and microstructure were characterized and a material with promising insulating properties was produced. A preliminary analysis was conducted of the salt formation observed in these geopolymers, the chief drawback to their use.La geopolimerización es una manera viable para procesar y agregar valor a los residuos industriales de alumino-silicato dando lugar a materiales con elevadas resistencias mecánmicas, alta inercia química y que permiten encapsular otros residuos, incluso peligrosos. Los residuos industriales que proceden de diversos tipos de arcillas para la fabricación de áridos ligeros se han caracterizado para la producción de geopolímeros mediante el proceso de ataque alcalino. Su incorporación en una matriz geopolimérica permite la posibilidad de desarrollo de paneles de aislamiento (térmico y acústico. Además, la inmovilización de materiales peligrosos es un logro adicional importante. Los geopolímeros se han producido con fórmulas diferentes y se han caracterizado sus propiedades mecánicas, composición y microestructura, para dar lugar a una composición interesante con propiedades aislantes. Se ha llevado a cabo

  10. On the effect of hot water vapor on MX-80 clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, Roland

    2000-10-01

    Earlier experiments with smectite clay exposed to hot water vapor have indicated that the expandability may be largely lost. If such conditions prevail in a HLW repository the buffer clay may deteriorate and lose its isolating potential. The present study aimed at checking this by hydrothermal treatment at 90 to 110 deg C of rather dense MX-80 clay with subsequent oedometer testing for determining the hydration rate, swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity, which are all expected to be quite different from those of untreated clay if the expandability is actually reduced. The results show that the swelling pressure of MX-80 clay is not noticeably altered by exposing it to vapor with a temperature of up to 110 deg C for one month while the hydraulic conductivity is increased by about 10% due to some permanent microstructural alteration. The overall change in physical properties of MX-80 clay under the prevailing laboratory conditions is not very significant

  11. On the effect of hot water vapor on MX-80 clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2000-10-01

    Earlier experiments with smectite clay exposed to hot water vapor have indicated that the expandability may be largely lost. If such conditions prevail in a HLW repository the buffer clay may deteriorate and lose its isolating potential. The present study aimed at checking this by hydrothermal treatment at 90 to 110 deg C of rather dense MX-80 clay with subsequent oedometer testing for determining the hydration rate, swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity, which are all expected to be quite different from those of untreated clay if the expandability is actually reduced. The results show that the swelling pressure of MX-80 clay is not noticeably altered by exposing it to vapor with a temperature of up to 110 deg C for one month while the hydraulic conductivity is increased by about 10% due to some permanent microstructural alteration. The overall change in physical properties of MX-80 clay under the prevailing laboratory conditions is not very significant.

  12. Partition expanders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavinsky, Dmitry; Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2017), s. 378-395 ISSN 1432-4350 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : expanders * pseudorandomness * communication complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00224-016-9738-5

  13. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brick is one of the most used and versatile building materials in use today. Bricks can be defined as modular units connected by mortar in the formation of a building system or product. Commonly the word brick is used to refer to clay bricks, which...

  14. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  15. Physical Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Stepanova, V; Ločs, J; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of clays mostly depends on its mineral and chemical composition, particle size and pH value. The mutual influence of these parameters is complex. Illite is the most abundant clay mineral in Latvia and usually used in building materials and pottery. The viscosity and plasticity of Latvian clays from several deposits were investigated and correlated with mineral composition, particle size and pH value. Fractionated and crude clay samples were used. The p...

  16. Microbial Ecology of Soil Aggregation in Agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, K. S.; Bell, S.; Tfailly, M.; Thompson, A.; Callister, S.

    2017-12-01

    Crop selection and soil texture influence the physicochemical attributes of the soil, which structures microbial communities and influences soil C cycling storage. At the molecular scale, microbial metabolites and necromass alter the soil environment, which creates feedbacks that influence ecosystem functions, including soil C accumulation. By integrating lab to field studies we aim to identify the molecules, organisms and metabolic pathways that control carbon cycling and stabilization in bioenergy soils. We investigated the relative influence of plants, microbes, and minerals on soil aggregate ecology at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research experiment. Sites in WI and MI, USA have been in corn and switchgrass cropping systems for a decade. By comparing soil aggregate ecology across sites and cropping systems we are able to test the relative importance of plant, microbe, mineral influences on soil aggregate dynamics. Soil microbial communities (16S) differ in diversity and phylogeny among sites and cropping systems. FT-ICR MS revealed differences in the molecular composition of water-soluble fraction of soil organic matter for cropping systems and soil origin for both relative abundance of assigned formulas and biogeochemical classes of compounds. We found the degree of aggregation, measured by mean weighted diameter of aggregate fractions, is influenced by plant-soil interactions. Similarly, the proportion of soil aggregate fractions varied by both soil and plant factors. Differences in aggregation were reflected in differences in bacterial, but not fungal community composition across aggregate fractions, within each soil. Scanning electron microscopy revealed stark differences in mineral-organic interactions that influence the microbial niche and the accessibility of substrates within the soil. The clay soils show greater surface heterogeneity, enabling interactions with organic fraction of the soil. This is consistent with molecular data that reveal differences

  17. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  18. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  19. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  20. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eLongo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS, have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals.

  1. Flocculation of Clay Colloids Induced by Model Polyelectrolytes: Effects of Relative Charge Density and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhawoth, Yasine; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre; Malikova, Natalie

    2017-10-06

    Flocculation and its tuning are of utmost importance in the optimization of several industrial protocols in areas such as purification of waste water and civil engineering. Herein, we studied the polyelectrolyte-induced flocculation of clay colloids on a model system consisting of purified clay colloids of well-defined size fractions and ionene polyelectrolytes presenting regular and tunable chain charge density. To characterize ionene-induced clay flocculation, we turned to the combination of light absorbance (turbidity) and ζ-potential measurements, as well as adsorption isotherms. Our model system allowed us to identify the exact ratio of positive and negative charges in clay-ionene mixtures, the (c+/c-) ratio. For all samples studied, the onset of efficient flocculation occurred consistently at c+/c- ratios significantly below 1, which indicated the formation of highly ionene-deficient aggregates. At the same time, the ζ-potential measurements indicated an apparent zero charge on such aggregates. Thus, the ζ-potential values could not provide the stoichiometry inside the clay-ionene aggregates. The early onset of flocculation in clay-ionene mixtures is reminiscent of the behavior of multivalent salts and contrasts that of monovalent salts, for which a large excess amount of ions is necessary to achieve flocculation. Clear differences in the flocculation behavior are visible as a function of the ionene charge density, which governs the conformation of the ionene chains on the clay surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Preparation of PEO/Clay Nanocomposites Using Organoclay Produced via Micellar Adsorption of CTAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, Ahmet; Ejder-Korucu, Mehtap; Doğar, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation of polyethylene oxide (PEO)/clay nanocomposites using organoclay produced via micellar adsorption of cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and their characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, and the investigation of certain mechanical properties of the composites. The results show that the basal distance between the layers increased with the increasing CTAB/clay ratio as parallel with the zeta potential values of particles. By considering the aggregation number of CTAB micelles and interlayer distances of organo-clay, it could be suggested that the predominant micelle geometry at lower CTAB/clay ratios is an ellipsoidal oblate, whereas, at higher CTAB/clay ratios, sphere-ellipsoid transition occurs. The increasing tendency of the exfoliation degree with an increase in clay content may be attributed to easier diffusion of PEO chains to interlayer regions. FT-IR spectra show that the intensity of Si-O stretching vibrations of the organoclays (1050 cm−1) increased, especially in the ratios of 1.0 g/g clay and 1.5 g/g clay with the increasing CTAB content. It was observed that the mechanical properties of the composites are dependent on both the CTAB/clay ratios and clay content of the composites. PMID:23365515

  3. Nafion–clay nanocomposite membranes: Morphology and properties

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera Alonso, Rafael; Estevez, Luis; Lian, Huiqin; Kelarakis, Antonios; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2009-01-01

    A series of Nafion-clay nanocomposite membranes were synthesized and characterized. To minimize any adverse effects on ionic conductivity the clay nanoparticles were H+ exchanged prior to mixing with Nafion. Well-dispersed, mechanically robust, free-standing nanocomposite membranes were prepared by casting from a water suspension at 180 °C under pressure. SAXS profiles reveal a preferential orientation of Nafion aggregates parallel to the membrane surface, or normal plane. This preferred orientation is induced by the platy nature of the clay nanoparticles, which tend to align parallel to the surface of the membrane. The nanocomposite membranes show dramatically reduced methanol permeability, while maintaining high levels of proton conductivity. The hybrid films are much stiffer and can withstand much higher temperatures compared to pure Nafion. The superior thermomechanical, electrochemical and barrier properties of the nanocomposite membranes are of significant interest for direct methanol fuel cell applications. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nafion–clay nanocomposite membranes: Morphology and properties

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera Alonso, Rafael

    2009-05-01

    A series of Nafion-clay nanocomposite membranes were synthesized and characterized. To minimize any adverse effects on ionic conductivity the clay nanoparticles were H+ exchanged prior to mixing with Nafion. Well-dispersed, mechanically robust, free-standing nanocomposite membranes were prepared by casting from a water suspension at 180 °C under pressure. SAXS profiles reveal a preferential orientation of Nafion aggregates parallel to the membrane surface, or normal plane. This preferred orientation is induced by the platy nature of the clay nanoparticles, which tend to align parallel to the surface of the membrane. The nanocomposite membranes show dramatically reduced methanol permeability, while maintaining high levels of proton conductivity. The hybrid films are much stiffer and can withstand much higher temperatures compared to pure Nafion. The superior thermomechanical, electrochemical and barrier properties of the nanocomposite membranes are of significant interest for direct methanol fuel cell applications. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fish DNA-modified clays: Towards highly flame retardant polymer nanocomposite with improved interfacial and mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihi, Omid; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Khayyam, Hamid; Naebe, Minoo

    2016-12-01

    Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) has been recently found to be an efficient renewable and environmentally-friendly flame retardant. In this work, for the first time, we have used waste DNA from fishing industry to modify clay structure in order to increase the clay interactions with epoxy resin and take benefit of its additional thermal property effect on thermo-physical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites. Intercalation of DNA within the clay layers was accomplished in a one-step approach confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, and XRD analyses, indicating that d-space of clay layers was expanded from ~1.2 nm for pristine clay to ~1.9 nm for clay modified with DNA (d-clay). Compared to epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt of Nanomer I.28E organoclay (m-clay), it was found that at 2.5%wt d-clay loading, significant enhancements of ~14%, ~6% and ~26% in tensile strength, tensile modulus, and fracture toughness of epoxy nanocomposite can be achieved, respectively. Effect of DNA as clay modifier on thermal performance of epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt d-clay was evaluated using TGA and cone calorimetry analysis, revealing significant decreases of ~4000 kJ/m2 and ~78 kW/m2 in total heat release and peak of heat release rate, respectively, in comparison to that containing 2.5%wt of m-clay.

  6. Comparative study of organovermiculites using natural and expanded vermiculite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, L.S.; Hudson, A.B.; Francisco, K.S.; Romualdo, R.M.; Gelmires, A.N.; Lisiane, N.L.S.

    2012-01-01

    Organovermiculites were obtained using vermiculite clay in its natural state and expanded in order to use these new materials in the adsorption of organic contaminants from water. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were performed to obtain confirmation of these organovermiculites. Foster swelling and sorption tests were used to test the compatibility between the treated clay and organic solvents. The organophilization process has provided an increase in basal distance of vermiculite and it was observed an expressive increase in distance between the clay layers. The organovermiculite showed adsorption capacity by organic solvents tested, the best results were observed for diesel oil. (author)

  7. Comparaison performantielle à court et à long termes de mortiers légers à base de déchets de mousse de polyuréthane rigide et de billes de polystyrène expansé Comparison of short and long-term performances of lightweight aggregate mortars made with polyurethane foam waste and expanded polystyrene beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounanga P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cet article s’intègre dans une étude menée sur la valorisation de déchets de mousse de polyuréthane rigide (PUR pour l’élaboration de matériaux cimentaires légers. Dans ce but, des mortiers ont été fabriqués en remplaçant partiellement le sable par des particules fines de mousse PUR. Les taux de remplacement volumique considérés sont de 25 et 50%. Afin de comparer les bénéfices apportés par l’utilisation de mousse PUR par rapport à des granulats légers commerciaux, des mortiers légers à base de billes de polystyrène expansé (PSE de diamètre compris entre 1,5 et 2,5 mm, ont également été fabriqués. L’ouvrabilité, la cinétique d’hydratation au jeune âge et les propriétés mécaniques (résistance à la compression et module d’Young dynamique, thermiques (conductivité thermique et capacité calorifique, le retrait de séchage et la perméabilité au gaz ont été mesurés sur les différents mortiers mis en oeuvre. Une analyse comparative de ces propriétés est alors proposée. This article is part of a study on the valorization of rigid polyurethane foam (PUR waste for the development of lightweight cementitious materials. Mortars were made with volume replacement rates of sand with plastic lightweight aggregates equal to 25 and 50%. To compare the benefits of the use of PUR foam in comparison with commercial lightweight aggregates, two types of aggregates were considered: PUR foam particles and expanded polystyrene beads. The workability, early-age hydration rate, mechanical properties (compressive strength and dynamic Young’s modulus, thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat, drying shrinkage and gas permeability were measured on the different mortars investigated. A comparative analysis of these properties was then proposed, which showed that it was possible to produce lightweight aggregate mortars for structural use using PUR foam waste and that PUR foam particles had a

  8. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  9. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Girkontas; Tadas Tamošiūnas; Andrius Savickas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a) clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m); b) tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide); c) cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height). According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bear...

  10. Experimental Study on Environment Friendly Tap Hole Clay for Blast Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva kumar, R.; Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    Blast furnace (BF) is the best possible route of iron production available. Blast furnace is a high pressure vessel where iron ore is melted and liquid iron is produced. The liquid iron is tapped through the hole in Blast Furnace called tap hole. The tapped liquid metal flowing through the tap hole is plugged using a clay called tap hole clay. Tap hole clay (THC) is a unshaped refractory used to plug the tap hole. The tap hole clay extruded through the tap hole using a gun. The tap hole clay is designed to expand and plug the tap hole. The tap hole filled with clay is drilled using drill bit and the hole made through the tap hole to tap the liquid metal accumulated inside the furnace. The number of plugging and drilling varies depending on the volume of the furnace. The tap hole clay need to have certain properties to avoid problems during plugging and drilling. In the present paper tap hole clay properties in industrial use was tested and studied. The problems were identified related to tap hole clay manufacturing. Experiments were conducted in lab scale to solve the identified problems. The present composition was modified with experimental results. The properties of the modified tap hole clay were found suitable and useful for blast furnace operation with lab scale experimental results.

  11. Creep in buffer clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Adey, R.

    1999-12-01

    The study involved characterization of the microstructural arrangement and molecular forcefields in the buffer clay for getting a basis for selecting suitable creep models. It is concluded that the number of particles and wide range of the particle bond spectrum require that stochastical mechanics and thermodynamics will be considered and they are basic to the creep model proposed for predicting creep settlement of the canisters. The influence of the stress level on creep strain of MX-80 clay is not well known but for the buffer creep is approximately proportional to stress. Theoretical considerations suggest a moderate impact for temperatures up to 90 deg C and this is supported by model experiments. It is believed that the assumption of strain being proportional to temperature is conservative. The general performance of the stochastic model can be illustrated in principle by use of visco-elastic rheological models implying a time-related increase in viscosity. The shear-induced creep settlement under constant volume conditions calculated by using the proposed creep model is on the order of 1 mm in ten thousand years and up to a couple of millimeters in one million years. It is much smaller than the consolidation settlement, which is believed to be on the order of 10 mm. The general conclusion is that creep settlement of the canisters is very small and of no significance to the integrity of the buffer itself or of the canisters

  12. Chlordecone retention in the fractal structure of volcanic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Macarie, Hervé; Jannoyer, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Allophanic soils are highly polluted but less contaminant for cultivated vegetables. ► SAXS and TEM show the fractal structure of allophane aggregates at the nanoscale. ► Allophane aggregates play the role of a labyrinth which fixes and traps chlordecone. ► Allophane physical properties contribute to chlordecone retention in andosols. - Abstract: Chlordecone (CHLD), a soil and foodstuff pollutant, as well as an environmentally persistent organochlorine insecticide, was used intensively in banana fields. The chlordecone uptake of three crops was measured for two types of polluted soils: allophanic and non-allophanic. The uptake is lower for allophanic soils even if their chlordecone content is higher than with non-allophanic soils. The fractal structure of the allophane aggregates was characterized at the nanoscale by small angle X-rays scattering, pore size distribution and transmission electron microscopy. We showed that clay microstructures should be an important physico-chemical factor governing the fate of chlordecone in the environment. Allophanic clays result in two counterintuitive findings: higher contaminant trappings yet lower contaminant availability. We propose that this specific, tortuous structure, along with its associated low accessibility, partly explains the low availability of chlordecone confined in allophanic soils. Capsule The fractal and tortuous microstructure of allophane clay favours the chlordecone retention in soils and disfavours the crop uptake.

  13. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, A.; Grobet, P.; Keung, M.; Leeman, H.; Schoonheydt, R.; Toufar, H.

    1995-01-01

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  14. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, A; Grobet, P; Keung, M; Leeman, H; Schoonheydt, R; Toufar, H [eds.

    1995-08-20

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY `95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately.

  15. Nafion–clay hybrids with a network structure

    KAUST Repository

    Burgaz, Engin; Lian, Huiqin; Alonso, Rafael Herrera; Estevez, Luis; Kelarakis, Antonios; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2009-01-01

    Nafion-clay hybrid membranes with a unique microstructure were synthesized using a fundamentally new approach. The new approach is based on depletion aggregation of suspended particles - a well-known phenomenon in colloids. For certain concentrations of clay and polymer, addition of Nafion solution to clay suspensions in water leads to a gel. Using Cryo-TEM we show that the clay particles in the hybrid gels form a network structure with an average cell size in the order of 500 nm. The hybrid gels are subsequently cast to produce hybrid Nafion-clay membranes. Compared to pure Nafion the swelling of the hybrid membranes in water and methanol is dramatically reduced while their selectivity (ratio of conductivity over permeability) increases. The small decrease of ionic conductivity for the hybrid membranes is more than compensated by the large decrease in methanol permeability. Lastly the hybrid membranes are much stiffer and can withstand higher temperatures compared to pure Nafion. Both of these characteristics are highly desirable for use in fuel cell applications, since a) they will allow the use of a thinner membrane circumventing problems associated with the membrane resistance and b) enable high temperature applications. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nafion–clay hybrids with a network structure

    KAUST Repository

    Burgaz, Engin

    2009-05-01

    Nafion-clay hybrid membranes with a unique microstructure were synthesized using a fundamentally new approach. The new approach is based on depletion aggregation of suspended particles - a well-known phenomenon in colloids. For certain concentrations of clay and polymer, addition of Nafion solution to clay suspensions in water leads to a gel. Using Cryo-TEM we show that the clay particles in the hybrid gels form a network structure with an average cell size in the order of 500 nm. The hybrid gels are subsequently cast to produce hybrid Nafion-clay membranes. Compared to pure Nafion the swelling of the hybrid membranes in water and methanol is dramatically reduced while their selectivity (ratio of conductivity over permeability) increases. The small decrease of ionic conductivity for the hybrid membranes is more than compensated by the large decrease in methanol permeability. Lastly the hybrid membranes are much stiffer and can withstand higher temperatures compared to pure Nafion. Both of these characteristics are highly desirable for use in fuel cell applications, since a) they will allow the use of a thinner membrane circumventing problems associated with the membrane resistance and b) enable high temperature applications. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clay preference and particle transport behavior of Formosan subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae): a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai; Henderson, Gregg

    2014-12-01

    Although preference and utilization of clay have been studied in many higher termites, little attention has been paid to lower termites, especially subterranean termites. The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, can modify its habitat by using clay to fill tree cavities. Here, the biological significance of clay on C. formosanus was investigated. Choice tests showed that significantly more termites aggregated in chambers where clay blocks were provided, regardless of colony group, observation period, or nutritional condition (fed or starved). No-choice tests showed that clay had no observable effect on survivorship, live or dry biomass, water content, and tunneling activity after 33-35 d. However, clay appeared to significantly decrease filter paper consumption (dry weight loss). Active particle (sand, paper, and clay) transport behavior was observed in both choice and no-choice tests. When present, clay was preferentially spread on the substrate, attached to the smooth surfaces of the containers, and used to line sand tunnels. Mechanisms and potential application of clay attraction are discussed. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Utilization of crushed clay brick in concrete industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Aliabdo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive experimental program regarding the use of recycled aggregates produced from demolition of brick buildings is presented. The brick wastes were crushed, sorted and classified into coarse and fine aggregates as well as powder (CBP. The first phase of the research focuses on the effect of incorporating recycled aggregates on physico-mechanical properties of paste, mortar and concrete. Non-traditional tests including X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA and micro-structural analysis (MSA were performed. The second phase of the program explores the effect of using recycled aggregates on properties of concrete masonry units. A total of 44 mixtures were utilized throughout the program. Results show cement paste when modified with 25% CBP achieves smaller pore size and lower weight loss under high temperature than reference paste. Furthermore, the use of recycled aggregates reduces the overall unit weight of concrete masonry units. Actually, modified concrete masonry units incorporating recycled aggregates achieve lower unit weight, higher thermal resistance and absorption rate than reference units. Although considerable strength reduction is noticeable by substitution, compressive strength levels meet the Egyptian specifications limitations. Critical replacement ratios are suggested to produce load bearing-concrete masonry units. Based on experimental evidences, it can be stated that the use of recycled aggregate and dust made of clay bricks is promising in many applications where the thermal resistance, cost and environmental aspects are imperative.

  19. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  20. New magnetic organic-inorganic composites based on hydrotalcite-like anionic clays for drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carja, Gabriela; Chiriac, Horia; Lupu, Nicoleta

    2007-01-01

    The structural 'memory effect' of anionic clays was used to obtain layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with tailored magnetic properties, by loading iron oxides and/or spinel structures on iron partially substituted hydrotalcite-like materials. The obtained magnetic layered structures were further used as precursors for new hybrid nanostructures, such as aspirin-hydrotalcite-like anionic clays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis shows that small iron oxide or spinel nanoparticles coexist with the fibrous drug particles on the surface of partially aggregated typical clay-like particles. The specific saturation magnetization of the loaded LDHs can be increased up to 70 emu/g by using specific post-synthesis treatments

  1. Encapsulation of Clay Platelets inside Latex Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, D.J.; Ming, W.; Herk, van A.M.; Fernando, R.H.; Sung, Li-Piin

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent attempts in encapsulating clay platelets inside latex particles by emulsion polymerization. Face modification of clay platelets by cationic exchange has been shown to be insufficient for clay encapsulation, leading to armored latex particles. Successful encapsulation of

  2. Technical Note: Effect of Incorporating Expanded Polystyrene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incorporating expanded polystyrene granules in concrete matrix can produce lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete of various densities. Workability which is an important property of concrete, aects the rate of placement and the degree of compaction of concrete. Inadequate compaction leads to reduction in both ...

  3. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Illite Containing Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Niedra, Santa; Dušenkova, Inga; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    Thixotropic properties of Latvian Devonian and Quaternary clays were studied. Dynamic viscosity of the water clay suspensions were measured with a rotating viscometer. Influence of concentration, pH and modifiers on the thixotropic clay properties was analyzed. It was found that Latvian clays have thixotropic properties. Stability of clay suspensions is described with the thixotropy hysteresis loop. Increasing the speed of the viscometer rotation, dynamic viscosity of the clay suspension decr...

  4. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Vecstaudža, J; Stepanova, V; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  5. The use of spent glauconite in lightweight aggregate production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franus, Wojciech

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The presented work has shown an application of spent glauconite bed after purification of wastewater for production of lightweight expanded clay aggregates. Sewage, from which it was removed Zn ions, came from technological line (zincworks of Communication Equipment Factory „PZL” Świdnik. Spent glauconite bed was used as an additive in lightweight aggregate production which was obtained using plastic method by sintering, at temperature 1140 ºC and 1200 ºC, of spent glauconite amouts 10, 15, 20 and 25% wt. with clays from open-cast mine „Budy Mszczonowskie”. The presence of the mineral improves sinter texture, increases porosity and contributes to formation of glassy layer on the surface of the aggregates. Tests of zinc elution from lightweight of aggregate samples has shown very low mobility of zinc ions. Content of zinc in water extracts obtained from lightweight of aggregate is definitely lower than zinc concentration permitted for sewage discharge to water or soil, means that spent material is not offensive for the environment as it can be used as a high quality building product.

    El trabajo presentado ha demostrado una aplicación de agotado depósito de glauconita después de la purificación de aguas residuales para la producción de áridos ligeros de arcilla expandida. Las aguas residuales, de la que fueron eliminados los iones Zn, vinieron de la línea tecnológica del equipo de comunicación de la fábrica “PZL” Świdnik. Agotado depósito de glauconita se utiliza como aditivo en la producción de áridos ligeros que se obtuvo utilizando el método de plástico de la sinterización, a temperatura C. 1140 º y 1200 º C, de spent glauconita amouts10, 15, 20 y 25% en peso. con arcillas de la mina a cielo abierto “Budy Mszczonowskie”. La presencia de este mineral mejora la textura de sinterización, aumenta la porosidad y contribuye a la formación de la capa vítrea en la superficie de los agregados. Pruebas de

  6. Thermal volume changes in clays and clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Sulem, J.; Mohajerani, M.; Tang, A.M.; Monfared, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The disposal of high activity exothermic radioactive waste at great depth in clay host rocks will induce a temperature elevation that has been investigated in various underground research laboratories in Belgium, France and Switzerland through in-situ tests. Thermal effects are better known in clays (in particular Boom clay) than in clay-stone (e.g. Opalinus clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone). In terms of volume changes, Figure 1 confirms the findings of Hueckel and Baldi (1990) that volume changes depend on the over-consolidation ratio (OCR) of the clay. In drained conditions, normally consolidated clays exhibit plastic contraction when heated, whereas over-consolidated clay exhibit elastic dilation. The nature of thermal volume changes in heated clays obviously has a significant effect on thermally induced pore pressures, when drainage is not instantaneous like what occurs in-situ. Compared to clays, the thermal volume change behaviour of clay-stones is less well known than that of clays. clay-stone are a priori suspected to behave like over-consolidated clays. In this paper, a comparison of recent results obtained in the laboratory on the drained thermal volume changes of clay-stones is presented and discussed. It is difficult to run drained mechanical tests in clay-stones like the Opalinus clay and the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone because of their quite low permeability (10 -12 - 10 -13 m/s). This also holds true for thermal tests. Due to the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficient between minerals and water, it is necessary to adopt very slow heating rate (0.5 - 1 C/h) to avoid any thermal pressurization. To do so, a new hollow cylinder apparatus (100 mm external diameter, 60 mm internal diameter) with lateral drainages reducing the drainage length to half the sample thickness (10 mm) has been developed (Monfared et al. 2011). The results of a drained cyclic thermal test carried out on

  7. Transmission X-ray Microscopy—A New Tool in Clay Mineral Floccules Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray L. Frost

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective flocculation and dewatering of mineral processing streams containing clays are microstructure dependent in clay-water systems. Initial clay flocculation is crucial in the design and for the development of a new methodology of gas exploitation. Microstructural engineering of clay aggregates using covalent cations and Keggin macromolecules have been monitored using the new state of the art Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM with 60 nm tomography resolution installed in a Taiwanese synchrotron. The 3-D reconstructions from TXM images show complex aggregation structures in montmorillonite aqueous suspensions after treatment with Na+, Ca2+ and Al13 Keggin macromolecules. Na-montmorillonite displays elongated, parallel, well-orientated and closed-void cellular networks, 0.5–3 µm in diameter. After treatment by covalent cations, the coagulated structure displays much smaller, randomly orientated and openly connected cells, 300–600 nm in diameter. The average distances measured between montmorillonite sheets was around 450 nm, which is less than half of the cell dimension measured in Na-montmorillonite. The most dramatic structural changes were observed after treatment by Al13 Keggin; aggregates then became arranged in compacted domains of a 300 nm average diameter composed of thick face-to-face oriented sheets, which forms porous aggregates with larger intra-aggregate open and connected voids.

  8. Flocculation of colloidal clay by bacterial polysaccharides: effect of macromolecule charge and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labille, J; Thomas, F; Milas, M; Vanhaverbeke, C

    2005-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of montmorillonite flocculation by bacterial polysaccharides was investigated, with special emphasis on the effect of carboxylic charges in the macromolecules on the mechanisms of interaction with the clay surface. An indirect way to quantify the energy of interaction was used, by comparing the flocculation ability of variously acidic polysaccharides. Data on tensile strength of aggregates in diluted suspension were collected by timed size measurements in the domain 0.1-600 microm, using laser diffraction. The flow behavior of settled aggregates was studied by rheology measurements. Flocculation of colloidal clay suspension by polysaccharides requires cancelling of the electrostatic repulsions by salts, which allows approach of clay surfaces close enough to be bridged by adsorbing macromolecules. The amount of acidic charges of the polysaccharides, and especially their location in the molecular structure, governs the bridging mechanism and the resulting tensile strength of the aggregates. The exposure of carboxylate groups located on side chains strongly promotes flocculation. In turn, charges located on the backbone of the polysaccharide are less accessible to interaction, and the flocculation ability of such polysaccharides is lowered. Measurements at different pH indicate that adsorption of acidic polysaccharides occurs via electrostatic interactions on the amphoteric edge surface of clay platelets, whereas neutral polysaccharides rather adsorb via weak interactions. Increased tensile strength in diluted aggregates due to strong surface interactions results in proportionally increased viscosity of the concentrated aggregates.

  9. ALKALI-ACTIVATED CEMENT MORTARS CONTAINING RECYCLED CLAY-BASED CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Puertas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of clay-based waste as an aggregate for concrete production is an amply studied procedure. Nonetheless, research on the use of this recycled aggregate to prepare alkaline cement mortars and concretes has yet to be forthcoming. The present study aimed to determine: the behaviour of this waste as a pozzolan in OPC systems, the mechanical strength in OPC, alkali-activated slag (AAS and fly ash (AAFA mortars and the effect of partial replacement of the slag and ash themselves with ground fractions of the waste. The pozzolanic behaviour of clay-based waste was confirmed. Replacing up to 20 % of siliceous aggregate with waste aggregate in OPC mortars induced a decline in 7 day strength (around 23 wt. %. The behaviour of waste aggregate in AAMs mortars, in turn, was observed to depend on the nature of the aluminosilicate and the replacement ratio used. When 20 % of siliceous aggregate was replaced by waste aggregate in AAS mortars, the 7 day strength values remained the same (40 MPa. In AAFA mortars, waste was found to effectively replace both the fly ash and the aggregate. The highest strength for AAFA mortars was observed when they were prepared with both a 50 % replacement ratio for the ash and a 20 % ratio for the aggregate.

  10. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    glacial time are characterised by the absence of this mussel. These deposits are named Aalborg Clay and Aalborg Sand. In the city of Aalborg, a fill layer superposes Aalborg Clay. This layer is at some places found to be 6m thick. This fill layer does not provide sufficient bearing capacity, which has...... resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...

  11. Information retrieval for children based on the aggregated search paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte Torres, Sergio

    This report presents research to develop information services for children by expanding and adapting current Information retrieval technologies according to the search characteristics and needs of children. Concretely, we will employ the aggregated search paradigm as theoretical framework. The

  12. Geochemical of clay formations : study of Spanish clay REFERENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrero, M. J.; Pena, J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay rocks are investigated in different international research programs in order to assess its feasibility for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. This is because different sepcific aspects: they have low hydraulic conductivity (10''-11-10''-15 m/s), a high sorption capacity, self-sealing capacity of facults and discontinuities and mechanical resistance. Several research programs on clay formations are aimed to study the chemistry of the groundwater and the water-rock reactions that control it: e. g. Boom Clay (Mol, Belgium), Oxford Clay /Harwell, United Kingdom), Toarcian Clay (Tournemire, France), Palfris formation (Wellenberg, Switzerland), Opalinus Clay (Bure, France). Based on these studies, considerable progress in the development of techniques for hydrologic, geochemical and hydrogeochemical characterization of mudstones has been accomplished (e. g. Beaufais et al. 1994, De Windt el al. 1998. Thury and Bossart 1999, Sacchi and Michelot 2000) with important advances in the knowledge of geochemical process in these materials (e. g. Reeder et al. 1993, Baeyens and Brandbury 1994, Beaucaire et al. 2000, Pearson et al., 2003).Furtermore, geochemical modeling is commonly used to simulate the evolution of water chemistry and to understand quantitatively the processes controlling the groundwater chemistry (e. g. Pearson et al. 1998, Tempel and Harrison 2000, Arcos et al., 2001). The work presented here is part of a research program funded by Enresa in the context of its R and D program. It is focused on the characterization of a clay formation (reference Argillaceous Formation, RAF) located within the Duero Basin (north-centralSpain). The characterisation of th ephysical properties,, fluid composition, mineralogy, water-rock reaction processes, geochemical modelling and sorption properties of the clays from the mentioned wells is the main purpose of this work. (Author)

  13. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine-grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  14. The use of lightweight aggregate saturated with PCM as a temperature stabilizing material for road surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryms, Michał; Lewandowski, Witold M.; Klugmann-Radziemska, Ewa; Denda, Hubert; Wcisło, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the possibility of adding lightweight building aggregates to increase the stability – mechanical as well as thermal – of constructions and road objects. This stability can be achieved through saturating the porous granules of aggregate with a phase-change material (PCM) that allows the accumulation of solar heat. Intense solar radiation, especially during the summer, can cause the asphalt on road surfaces, bridges and parking lots to melt, thus protecting the structure from further overheating. The absence of asphalt layers results in thermal stress and strain conditions causes accelerated wear of road surface. Lightweight aggregate, previously used to reduce the weight of the structures, while maintaining the bearing capacity similar to that offered by conventional concrete structures, thereby gains a new functionality, as a temperature stabilizing material. The paper contains a review of several phase-change materials as well as a study justifying the choice of ceresin, a product of crude oil distillation, as a suitable material for such applications. Information about the aggregate and its possible applications, and a proposed method of saturating the aggregate with ceresin has also been collected and presented. With the help of quantitative research conducted through the use of differential scanning calorimetry, the characteristic of thermodynamic parameters of pure ceresin and expanded clay aggregate (Pollytag) saturated with ceresin was determined. Simulation tests conducted under real conditions on two asphalt surfaces (0.32 × 0.22 × 0.15 m), one of which contained the PCM while the other did not, have shown that even a small addition of ceresin (3% mass relative to the weight of the ground) causes a reduction in surface temperature of about 5 K within the tested temperature range of 318.15–338.15 K. - Highlights: • Road surface overheating on summer days may reach up to 344 K. • Solution against overheating through

  15. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  16. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S.; Klein, Susanne; Leach, Edward; Pizzey, Claire; Richardson, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods.

  17. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijneveldt, Jeroen S van; Klein, Susanne; Leach, Edward; Pizzey, Claire; Richardson, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods

  18. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction is increa...

  19. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  20. A Novel Method to Quantify Soil Aggregate Stability by Measuring Aggregate Bond Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efrat, Rachel; Rawlins, Barry G.; Quinton, John N.; Watts, Chris W.; Whitmore, Andy P.

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a key indicator of soil quality because it controls physical, biological and chemical functions important in cultivated soils. Micro-aggregates are responsible for the long term sequestration of carbon in soil, therefore determine soils role in the carbon cycle. It is thus vital that techniques to measure aggregate stability are accurate, consistent and reliable, in order to appropriately manage and monitor soil quality, and to develop our understanding and estimates of soil as a carbon store to appropriately incorporate in carbon cycle models. Practices used to assess the stability of aggregates vary in sample preparation, operational technique and unit of results. They use proxies and lack quantification. Conflicting results are therefore drawn between projects that do not provide methodological or resultant comparability. Typical modern stability tests suspend aggregates in water and monitor fragmentation upon exposure to an un-quantified amount of ultrasonic energy, utilising a laser granulometer to measure the change in mean weight diameter. In this project a novel approach has been developed based on that of Zhu et al., (2009), to accurately quantify the stability of aggregates by specifically measuring their bond energies. The bond energies are measured operating a combination of calorimetry and a high powered ultrasonic probe, with computable output function. Temperature change during sonication is monitored by an array of probes which enables calculation of the energy spent heating the system (Ph). Our novel technique suspends aggregates in heavy liquid lithium heteropolytungstate, as opposed to water, to avoid exposing aggregates to an immeasurable disruptive energy source, due to cavitation, collisions and clay swelling. Mean weight diameter is measured by a laser granulometer to monitor aggregate breakdown after successive periods of calculated ultrasonic energy input (Pi), until complete dispersion is achieved and bond

  1. Microbial properties of soil aggregates created by earthworms and other factors: spherical and prismatic soil aggregates from unreclaimed post-mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frouz, J.; Kristufek, V.; Liveckova, M.; van Loo, D.; Jacobs, P.; Van Hoorebeke, L. [Charles University of Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Environmental Studies

    2011-01-15

    Soil aggregates between 2 and 5 mm from 35- and 45-year-old unreclaimed post-mining sites near Sokolov (Czech Republic) were divided into two groups: spherical and prismatic. X-ray tomography indicated that prismatic aggregates consisted of fragments of claystone bonded together by amorphous clay and roots while spherical aggregates consisted of a clay matrix and organic fragments of various sizes. Prismatic aggregates were presumed to be formed by plant roots and physical processes during weathering of Tertiary mudstone, while earthworms were presumed to contribute to the formation of spherical aggregates. The effects of drying and rewetting and glucose addition on microbial respiration, microbial biomass, and counts of bacteria in these aggregates were determined. Spherical aggregates contained a greater percentage of C and N and a higher C-to-N ratio than prismatic ones. The C content of the particulate organic matter was also higher in the spherical than in the prismatic aggregates. Although spherical aggregates had a higher microbial respiration and biomass, the growth of microbial biomass in spherical aggregates was negatively correlated with initial microbial biomass, indicating competition between bacteria. Specific respiration was negatively correlated with microbial biomass. Direct counts of bacteria were higher in spherical than in prismatic aggregates. Bacterial numbers were more stable in the center than in the surface layers of the aggregates. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that bacteria often occurred as individual cells in prismatic aggregates but as small clusters of cells in spherical aggregates. Ratios of colony forming units (cultivatable bacteria) to direct counts were higher in spherical than in prismatic aggregates. Spherical aggregates also contained faster growing bacteria.

  2. SBR Brazilian organophilic/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Thiago R.; Valenzuela-Diaz, Francisco R.; Morales, Ana Rita; Paiva, Lucilene B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is the obtaining of SBR composites using a Brazilian raw bentonite and the same bentonite treated with an organic salt. The clays were characterized by XRD. The clay addition in the composites was 10 pcr. The composites were characterized by XRD and had measured theirs tension strength (TS). The composite with Brazilian treated clay showed TS 233% higher than a composite with no clay, 133% higher than a composite with Cloisite 30B organophilic clay and 17% lower than a composite with Cloisite 20 A organophilic clay. XRD and TS data evidence that the composite with Brazilian treated clay is an intercalated nanocomposite. (author)

  3. Soil aggregation under different management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Mascioli Rebello Portella

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the soil aggregation reflects the interaction of chemical, physical and biological soil factors, the aim of this study was evaluate alterations in aggregation, in an Oxisol under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT, since over 20 years, using as reference a native forest soil in natural state. After analysis of the soil profile (cultural profile in areas under forest management, samples were collected from the layers 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm, with six repetitions. These samples were analyzed for the aggregate stability index (ASI, mean weighted diameter (MWD, mean geometric diameter (MGD in the classes > 8, 8-4, 4-2, 2-1, 1-0.5, 0.5-0.25, and < 0.25 mm, and for physical properties (soil texture, water dispersible clay (WDC, flocculation index (FI and bulk density (Bd and chemical properties (total organic carbon - COT, total nitrogen - N, exchangeable calcium - Ca2+, and pH. The results indicated that more intense soil preparation (M < NT < PC resulted in a decrease in soil stability, confirmed by all stability indicators analyzed: MWD, MGD, ASI, aggregate class distribution, WDC and FI, indicating the validity of these indicators in aggregation analyses of the studied soil.

  4. Hydrothermal behaviour of sedimentary saponitic clays from Madrid Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas Rodriguez, J.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrothermal behavior of sedimentary saponitic clays from Madrid Basin has been investigated to assess their potential use as a buffer material in high level radioactive waste repositories. This paper deals with a review of several aspects that has been studied: the adsorption and irreversible fixation of K'+, the alteration in absence of potassium and the effects of heat and steam on textural properties of the smectitic clay. Experiments have covered temperatures up to 175 degree centigree with an excess of liquid water except on the last subject. Chemical and XRD analyses of final clay products and solutions indicates minor alteration of the saponite in the hydrothermal experiments either in the presence or absence of potassium. No illitization or chloritization processes seems to affect the smectite. Sepiolite was found to be largely dissolved at 175 degree centigree, a process that inhibited recrystallization or formation of illite observed when illite was present in significant amounts in starting materials. Accessory minerals (illite and sepiolite) accompanying as traces the saponitic material underwent and intense degradation at 175 degree centigree in absence of potassium. On the other hand, clay steamed at 200 degree centigree showed significant textural changes forming highly stable silt size aggregates which hindered the swelling abilities of the saponitic material, a fact that was previously observed in montmorillonites. (Author) 25 refs

  5. Atomistic Structure of Mineral Nano-aggregates from Simulated Compaction and Dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Greathouse, Jeffery A; Wang, Yifeng; Criscenti, Louise J

    2017-11-10

    The porosity of clay aggregates is an important property governing chemical reactions and fluid flow in low-permeability geologic formations and clay-based engineered barrier systems. Pore spaces in clays include interlayer and interparticle pores. Under compaction and dewatering, the size and geometry of such pore spaces may vary significantly (sub-nanometer to microns) depending on ambient physical and chemical conditions. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation method to construct a complex and realistic clay-like nanoparticle aggregate with interparticle pores and grain boundaries. The model structure is then used to investigate the effect of dewatering and water content on micro-porosity of the aggregates. The results suggest that slow dewatering would create more compact aggregates compared to fast dewatering. Furthermore, the amount of water present in the aggregates strongly affects the particle-particle interactions and hence the aggregate structure. Detailed analyses of particle-particle and water-particle interactions provide a molecular-scale view of porosity and texture development of the aggregates. The simulation method developed here may also aid in modeling the synthesis of nanostructured materials through self-assembly of nanoparticles.

  6. Information Aggregation in Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation contributes to the analysis of information aggregation procedures within organizations. Facing uncertainty about the consequences of a collective decision, information has to be aggregated before making a choice. Two main questions are addressed. Firstly, how well is an organization suited for the aggregation of decision-relevant information? Secondly, how should an organization be designed in order to aggregate information efficiently? The main part deals with information a...

  7. Thermal Behaviour of clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassoni, E.

    1985-01-01

    The programme carried out by ENEA to model the thermal-hydraulic-mechanical behaviour of the clay formations and to measure, in situ and in laboratory, the thermal properties of these rocks, is presented. An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The conclusions are as follows: - the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; - the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm -1 . 0 C -1 - the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is negligible. A laboratory automated method has been designed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in clay samples. A review of experimental data concerning thermomechanical effects in rocks as well as results of thermal experiments performed at ISMES on clays are presented. Negative thermal dilation has been found both in the elastic and plastic range under constant stress. Thermoplastic deformation appears ten times greater than the thermoelastic one. A mathematical model is proposed in order to simulate the above and other effects that encompass thermal-elastic-plastic-pore water pressure response of clays at high temperature and effective pressure with undrained and transient drainage conditions. Implementation of the two versions into a finite element computer code is described

  8. Chemical modification of clay from the state of vermiculite Paraiba for use in nanocomposites of thermoset matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, W.A.; Alves, T.S.; Barbosa, R.

    2011-01-01

    Vermiculite is a hydrated aluminosilicate of magnesium, iron and aluminum flake shape, formed by stacking cells 2:1 and feature high cation exchange capacity. In the present study was performed the treatment of an expanded vermiculite clay from Paraiba state with surfactant agent, in order to make it organophilic and allow its use in thermoset matrix nanocomposites. The natural clay and organophilizated one were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), by Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR) and swelling of Foster's swelling. The results indicated a change in the chemical composition of clay, related to the presence of characteristic groups of the salt in the clay and an increase of up to 124% in the basal interlayer distance. The chemical modification of the clay was efficient, indicating the possibility to apply the clay in polymeric nanocomposites. (author)

  9. Towards General Temporal Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boehlen, Michael H.; Gamper, Johann; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2008-01-01

    associated with the management of temporal data. Indeed, temporal aggregation is complex and among the most difficult, and thus interesting, temporal functionality to support. This paper presents a general framework for temporal aggregation that accommodates existing kinds of aggregation, and it identifies...

  10. Study of Adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, M. L.; Escolano, O.; Rodriguez, V.; Diaz, F. J.; Perez, R.; Garcia, S.; Garcia Frutos, F. J.

    2003-01-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay minerals also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represents ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs

  11. Clay dispersibility and soil friability – testing the soil clay-to-carbon saturation concept

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L.W.; Munkholm, L.J.; Moldrup, P.; Christensen, B.T.; Olesen, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled three years in a field varying in clay content (~100 to ~220 g kg-1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay ...

  12. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...... capacity was found to be 18.3 meq/100 g at pH 6 and 8.6 meq/100 g at pH 7. A competitive Langmuir sorption isotherm where sorption is dependant on both pH and fluoride concentration is employed to characterise the experimental sorption and desorption data. The sorption and desorption isotherms revealed...

  13. Magnetic orientation of nontronite clay in aqueous dispersions and its effect on water diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Christoffer; Nordstierna, Lars; Nordin, Matias; Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Nydén, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion rate of water in dilute clay dispersions depends on particle concentration, size, shape, aggregation and water-particle interactions. As nontronite clay particles magnetically align parallel to the magnetic field, directional self-diffusion anisotropy can be created within such dispersion. Here we study water diffusion in exfoliated nontronite clay dispersions by diffusion NMR and time-dependant 1H-NMR-imaging profiles. The dispersion clay concentration was varied between 0.3 and 0.7 vol%. After magnetic alignment of the clay particles in these dispersions a maximum difference of 20% was measured between the parallel and perpendicular self-diffusion coefficients in the dispersion with 0.7 vol% clay. A method was developed to measure water diffusion within the dispersion in the absence of a magnetic field (random clay orientation) as this is not possible with standard diffusion NMR. However, no significant difference in self-diffusion coefficient between random and aligned dispersions could be observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Testing the effect of a microbial-based soil amendment on aggregate stability and erodibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malozo, Mponda; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    to the rainfall-runoff experiment where the microbial-based product had a clear effect on soil erodibility. In relation to measurement of aggregate stability as well as clay dispersion, the picture was less clear. Especially for the sandy Tanzania soil with a low content of organic matter, a clear effect was seen...... aggregate stability and erodibility. Two commercial products, gypsum and a microbial-based solution were used for the experiment and were tested on two Danish sandy loamy soils as well on a sandy soil from Tanzania. The carrier of the microbial-based product, a glycerol solution, was tested as well....... In the laboratory, soils were treated with the soil amendments in a two-step procedure at controlled water contents following aerobic incubation in closed containers. Water-aggregate stability and clay dispersion were measured on soil aggregates less than 8 mm in diameter. Aggregate stability was measured...

  15. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  16. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ A. DE FREITAS PACHECO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  17. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  18. Stools - pale or clay-colored

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003129.htm Stools - pale or clay-colored To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stools that are pale, clay, or putty-colored may be due to problems ...

  19. Phosphonium modified clay/polyimide nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, Hatice; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Kahraman, Memet Vezir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, octyltriphenylphosphonium bromide [OTPP-Br] was prepared from the reaction of triphenylphosphine and 1 -bromooctane. The modification of clay was done by ion exchange reaction using OTPP-Br in water medium. Poly(amic acid) was prepared from the reaction of 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-Oxydianiline (ODA). Polyimide(PI)/clay hybrids were prepared by blending of poly(amic acid) and organically modified clay as a type of layered clays. The morphology of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structures of polyimide and Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  20. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  1. Additive to clay drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voytenko, V.S.; Nekrasova, V.B.; Nikitinskiy, E.L.; Ponomarev, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to improve the lubricating and strengthening properties of clay drilling muds. This goal is achieved because the lubricating and strengthening additive used is waste from the pulp and paper industry at the stage of reprocessing crude sulfate soap into phytosterol.

  2. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  3. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  4. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cept, though not new, has received enormous attention in recent times. The desire to make ... which they are divided into four main groups such as, illite, smectite .... acid or driving out NH3 by heating the NH4 + ion treated clay. It is clear from ...

  5. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain...

  6. generalized constitutive model for stabilized quick clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QUICK CLAY. PANCRAS MUGISHAGWE BUJULU AND GUSTAV GRIMSTAD. ABSTRACT. An experimentally-based two yield surface constitutive model for cemented quick clay has been ... Clay Model, the Koiter Rule and two Mapping Rules. .... models, where a mobilization formulation is used, this is independent of q.

  7. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  8. Influence of granitic aggregates from Northeast Brazil on the alkali-aggregate reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes Neto, David de Paiva; Santana, Rodrigo Soares de; Barreto, Ledjane Silva, E-mail: pvgomes@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias dos Materiais e Engenharia; Conceicao, Herbert; Lisboa, Vinicios Anselmo Carvalho [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia

    2014-08-15

    The alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in concrete structures is a problem that has concerned engineers and researchers for decades. This reaction occurs when silicates in the aggregates react with the alkalis, forming an expanded gel that can cause cracks in the concrete and reduce its lifespan. The aim of this study was to characterize three coarse granitic aggregates employed in concrete production in northeastern Brazil, correlating petrographic analysis with the kinetics of silica dissolution and the evolution of expansions in mortar bars, assisted by SEM/EDS, XRD, and EDX. The presence of grains showing recrystallization into individual microcrystalline quartz subgrains was associated with faster dissolution of silica and greater expansion in mortar bars. Aggregates showing substantial deformation, such as stretched grains of quartz with strong undulatory extinction, experienced slower dissolution, with reaction and expansion occurring over longer periods that could not be detected using accelerated tests with mortar bars. (author)

  9. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clay based polymeric composites: Preparation and quality characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloisi, G.G.; Elisei, F.; Nocchetti, M.; Camino, G.; Frache, A.; Costantino, U.; Latterini, L.

    2010-01-01

    Commercial clays Cloisites Na + , 30B and 20A were labelled with the fluorescent dye Rhodamine B and used as fillers of polypropylene in order to prepare composites to be studied with confocal fluorescence microscopy. The dye uptake by clays was monitored by X-ray powder diffraction and spectroscopic analyses and clear evidences of intercalated dye in the organically modified montmorillonites Clo30B and Clo20A were obtained. Clay-Rhodamine B hybrids were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission spectroscopy to explore the effect of dye arrangement on the optical properties. The obtained information was used to rationalize fluorescence behaviour of composites. Confocal fluorescence imaging gave rise to bright fluorescent images of Cloisite aggregated labelled with the dye allowing to easily and directly visualize the 3-D dispersion of the labelled fillers in the polymer matrix in a non-invasive manner. The images were analyzed in terms of size distribution of the fluorescence grains to quantify the dispersion degree. The data indicate that Clo20A is able to homogeneously distribute in the polymer matrix forming a composite material.

  11. Role of clay constituents in stone decay processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniale, F.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Stone alterability/durability is depending upon a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors among which "clay minerals" constituents, either diffused throughout the stone framework or as coating-filling of void spaces, can play an important role. Swelling-shrinking and aggregation-disaggregation phenomena occurring by interaction of argillaceous particles with water and other fluids can cause destructuration of the stone resulting in a variety of pathologies. Also salt crystallization which is depending on fluid transfer, moisture evaporation and ion concentration in the circulating solutions, can be influenced by clay mineral reactivity. Furthermore, saline solutions can drastically change the clay minerals behaviour, resulting in enhanced "osmotic" swelling and variations in clay aggregation geometry; these phenomena resulting in significant stone damage. Case histories concerning several lithotypes used for monumental buildings and artistic manufacts are reported for showing the role of different clay mineral types in determining trend and intensity of decay processes.

    Varios factores, tanto intrínsecos como extrínsecos, pueden condicionar la alterabilidad/durabilidad de materiales pétreos. Entre ellos, la presencia de minerales arcillosos, bien como constituyentes difusos o recubriendo-rellenando huecos, puede jugar un papel importante. El resultado de la interacción de las partículas arcillosas y el agua (u otros fluidos da lugar a patologías que son consecuencia de una serie de daños internos producidos por las continuas variaciones plásticas, asociadas a parámetros físicos y cristaloquímicos de este tipo de minerales. Entre los que podemos citar la desestructuración de la piedra (bien por agregación-desagregación de las partículas arcillosas o por procesos de hinchamiento-contracción que está asociado, por ejemplo, con la cristalización de sales, producida por la transferencia de fluidos a su través, o a

  12. Technetium migration in natural clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebke, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  13. Radiocesium distribution in aggregate-size fractions of cropland and forest soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koarashi, Jun; Nishimura, Syusaku; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Nagao, Seiya

    2018-08-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident caused serious radiocesium ( 137 Cs) contamination in soils in a range of terrestrial ecosystems. It is well documented that the interaction of 137 Cs with soil constituents, particularly clay minerals, in surface soil layers exerts strong control on the behavior of this radionuclide in the environment; however, there is little understanding of how soil aggregation-the binding of soil particles together into aggregates-can affect the mobility and bioavailability of 137 Cs in soils. To explore this, soil samples were collected at seven sites under different land-use conditions in Fukushima and were separated into four aggregate-size fractions: clay-sized (fractions were then analyzed for 137 Cs content and extractability and mineral composition. In forest soils, aggregate formation was significant, and 69%-83% of 137 Cs was associated with macroaggregates and sand-sized aggregates. In contrast, there was less aggregation in agricultural field soils, and approximately 80% of 137 Cs was in the clay- and silt-sized fractions. Across all sites, the 137 Cs extractability was higher in the sand-sized aggregate fractions than in the clay-sized fractions. Mineralogical analysis showed that, in most soils, clay minerals (vermiculite and kaolinite) were present even in the larger-sized aggregate fractions. These results demonstrate that larger-sized aggregates are a significant reservoir of potentially mobile and bioavailable 137 Cs in organic-rich (forest and orchard) soils. Our study suggests that soil aggregation reduces the mobility of particle-associated 137 Cs through erosion and resuspension and also enhances the bioavailability of 137 Cs in soils. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay

  15. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...

  16. Preparation and characterization of bentonite organo clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Almeida Neto, A.F.; Silva, M.G.C.

    2009-01-01

    Bentonite clays organically modified have great potential use for environmental remediation, especially in the separation of organic compounds from the water. The aim of this work was the preparation of organophilic clays from 'Verde-Lodo' bentonite clay with the quaternary ammonium salts cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The materials obtained were characterized by XRD, thermogravimetric analyses, Helium picnometry, SEM and energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The results show consistently successful synthesis of the organoclay through the increase in the basal spacing, as well as salt elimination picks and presence of carbon and chlorine in the modified clays; they are inexistent elements in the natural clay. (author)

  17. Aggregates from mineral wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baic Ireneusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem concerning the growing demand for natural aggregates and the need to limit costs, including transportation from remote deposits, cause the increase in growth of interest in aggregates from mineral wastes as well as in technologies of their production and recovery. The paper presents the issue related to the group of aggregates other than natural. A common name is proposed for such material: “alternative aggregates”. The name seems to be fully justified due to adequacy of this term because of this raw materials origin and role, in comparison to the meaning of natural aggregates based on gravel and sand as well as crushed stones. The paper presents characteristics of the market and basic application of aggregates produced from mineral wastes, generated in the mining, power and metallurgical industries as well as material from demolished objects.

  18. Zeolites and clays behavior in presence of radioactive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera Garcia, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    Natural aluminosilicates have found application as selective ion exchangers for radioactive cations, present in liquid wastes arising from nuclear facilities. Among severals cations and complex mixtures of them, Co is a common constituent of liquid radioactive wastes. Two types of zeolites (Y zeolite, and natural mexican erionite), and two types of clays (natural bentonite, and Al-expanded bentonite (Al-B) were used. Previous to the experiments, the zeolites and the natural bentonite were stabilized to their respective Na + form using 5N NaCl solution. 2Na + → 60 Co 2+ ion exchange kinetics in zeolites and clays was followed by gamma spectrometry using a NaCl-Co(NO 3 ) 2 isonormal solution (0.1N) labeled with 60 Co-Co(NO 3 ) 2 (100 μ Ci). Before and after experiments, the structural changes in the cristallinity of aluminosilicates were determined by X-ray diffraction. XRD analyzes show that the cristallinity of the aluminosilicates was not affected by ion exchange. After Co exchange the cell parameters were determined in all samples. The efficiency of zeolites, natual clays and expanded clays to remove cobalt ions from solutions depends on the ion echange capacity of the material. Results for long contacts time, 18 days, show that Co is more effectively removed by Y zeolite ( 4.07 wt %), followed by erionite (3.09 wt %), then bentonite ( 2.36 wt %) and finally expanded bentonite ( 0.70 wt %). In Y zeolite an unusual fast soportion uptake of 4.51 % wt Co was observed followed by a desorption process to 4.07 %. This effect is due to the different hydration degree of zeolites during the contact time between the zeolite and the 60 Co solution. In erionite the exchange is lower than in Y-zeolite, frist because the Si/Al ratio is higher for erionite than for Y-zeolite and second because K ions in erionite cannot be exchanged during the stabilization of erionite in 5N NaCl solution. The low exchange in expanded bentonite was expected because its cation exchange

  19. Clarification of olive mill and winery wastewater by means of clay-polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytwo, Giora; Lavi, Roy; Rytwo, Yuval; Monchase, Hila; Dultz, Stefan; König, Tom N

    2013-01-01

    Highly polluted effluents from olive mills and wineries, among others, are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants due to the large amounts of organic and suspended matter. Efficiency of all management practices for such effluents depends on an effective pretreatment that lowers the amount of suspended solids. Such pretreatments are usually based on three separate stages, taking a total of 2 to 6h: coagulation-neutralizing the colloids, flocculation-aggregating the colloids into larger particles, and separation via filtration or decanting. Previous studies have presented the concept of coagoflocculation based on the use of clay-polymer nanocomposites. This process adds a higher density clay particle to the flocs, accelerating the process to between 15 and 60 min. This study examined suitable nanocomposites based on different clays and polymers. The charge of the compounds increased proportionally to the polymer-to-clay ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that in sepiolite-based nanocomposites there is no change in the structure of the mineral, whereas in smectite-based nanocomposites, the polymer intercalates between the clay layers and increases the spacing depending on the polymer-to-clay ratio. Efficiency of the coagoflocculation process was studied with a dispersion analyzer. Sequential addition of olive mill or winery effluents with a boosting dose of nanocomposites may yield a very efficient and rapid clarification pretreatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies on silica sol-clay particle interactions by small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moini, A.; Pinnavaia, T.J.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing; Thiyagarajan, P.; White, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    SANS data were collected on a series of hydrolyzed silica and silica-clay complexes prepared from a 40 A silica sol and aqueous suspensions of Na + montmorillonite. The hydrolyzed silica product showed a peak centered at Q=0.0856 A -1 corresponding to a distance of 73 A between the sol particles. For such an evaporated gel in which the particles are in close contact, this distance is expected to be very close to the particle diameter indicating partial aggregation of the original spheres. A similar feature was observed in the SANS data for silica-clay products indicating the presence of some unintercalated silica. The intensity of this scattering was found to be dependent on the silica:clay ratio and the reaction time. The SANS data in the region from Q=0.006 to 0.025 A -1 were characteristic of clay scattering and exhibited a power-law behavior. The change in the slope of this curve upon reaction of the clay with the silica sol was interpreted in terms of a separation of clay platelets caused by a binding interaction with the sol particles. (orig.)

  1. Thermomechanical behaviour of boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, N.; Delage, P.; Cui, Y.J.

    2000-01-01

    Special attention has been recently paid on temperature effects on the behaviour of deep saturated clays, in relation with nuclear deep waste storage. However, few experimental data are presently available, and existing constitutive models need to be completed. This note is aimed at completing, both experimentally and theoretically, the understanding of the effects of the over-consolidation ration on the thermal volume changes of Boom clay (Belgium). The experimental data obtained here are in a good agreement with existing data. As a complement to existing data, they are used to develop a new elastoplastic model. The adoption of a second coupled plastic mechanism provides good simulations on a complex thermo-mechanical path. (authors)

  2. Application of aluminum slag incorporated in lightweigh aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Elisa Akiko Nakano

    2006-01-01

    The use of industrial waste materials as additives in the manufacture of ceramic product has been attracting a growing interest in the last few years and is becoming common practice. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the possibility of incorporation of aluminum slag into clay materials. Expansive clays are obtained from a pyro plastic expansion, and are usually employed like lightweight aggregate in structural concrete as ornamental garden products. The characterization of the aluminum slag and clay materials was carried out by Xray fluorescence spectrometry, Xray diffraction, granulometry, differential thermal analysis, thermal gravimetry (DTA and TG) and scanning electron microscopy. The studied compositions contained 5, 10, 15 and 20 weight % of aluminum slag into clay mass. The linear expansion, mass variation, apparent specific mass and water absorption of all compositions were determined. Leaching and solubilization experiments were also performed. The main results show the viability of using up to 5 wt% aluminum slag for producing expansive clays with characteristics within the accepted standards. (author)

  3. Study of the chemo-hydro-mechanical behavior of stiff clays in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Xuan Phu

    2013-01-01

    The present research aims to understand the chemo-hydro-mechanical behavior of stiff clays through two geological formations, the Boom Clay and the Ypresian clays which are considered as possible host formations for the radioactive wastes disposal in Belgium. The volume change behavior was studied in both intact and reconstituted states, and under different conditions: under K0 and isotropic loading, under loading/unloading loops. The results show that the volume change behavior is governed by the competition between the physico-chemical effect and the mechanical effect, characterized by a threshold stress which corresponds to the swelling stress in terms of structure changes. A constitutive law was developed to capture this aspect. The permeability was determined, compared with the results in literature and correlated with the parameters as void ratio. The permeability variation with depth shows the important role of macro-pores in fluids' transfer. The volume change behavior and permeability of intact Boom Clay and Ypresian clays are also influenced by pore water chemical composition changes which modify the diffuse double layer and give rise to the aggregation of clay particles. The elastic parameters, yield curve and failure envelope of Boom Clay and Ypresian clays were identified. A conceptual elasto-plastic model was developed, accounting for the swelling effects and the competition between the physico-chemical effect and the mechanical effect. (author)

  4. Hyperspectral analysis of clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaki Rama Suresh, G.; Sreenivas, K.; Sivasamy, R.

    2014-11-01

    A study was carried out by collecting soil samples from parts of Gwalior and Shivpuri district, Madhya Pradesh in order to assess the dominant clay mineral of these soils using hyperspectral data, as 0.4 to 2.5 μm spectral range provides abundant and unique information about many important earth-surface minerals. Understanding the spectral response along with the soil chemical properties can provide important clues for retrieval of mineralogical soil properties. The soil samples were collected based on stratified random sampling approach and dominant clay minerals were identified through XRD analysis. The absorption feature parameters like depth, width, area and asymmetry of the absorption peaks were derived from spectral profile of soil samples through DISPEC tool. The derived absorption feature parameters were used as inputs for modelling the dominant soil clay mineral present in the unknown samples using Random forest approach which resulted in kappa accuracy of 0.795. Besides, an attempt was made to classify the Hyperion data using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm with an overall accuracy of 68.43 %. Results showed that kaolinite was the dominant mineral present in the soils followed by montmorillonite in the study area.

  5. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  6. p-Nitrophenol, phenol and aniline sorption by organo-clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, C.H.; Fan Chihhao; Chiang, P.N.; Wang, M.K.; Lin, K.C.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to make use of organo-clays (i.e., Cloisite-10A, Cloisite-15A, Cloisite-30B and Cloisite-93A), to remove p-nitrophenol, phenol and aniline of organic pollutants. The organo-clays were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Sorption isotherm, kinetic and pH effect of p-nitrophenol, phenol and aniline sorbed by four organo-clays were evaluated. The d-spacings (0 0 1) of the XRD peak of Cloisite-10A, Cloisite-15A, Cloisite-30B and Cloisite-93A are 1.98, 2.76, 1.93 and 2.64 nm, respectively. The d(0 0 1)-spacings of XRD indicated that these p-nitropheno, phenol and aniline could penetrate into the interlayer of clays and expand the d(0 0 1)-spacings. The linear sorption isotherm of constant partition was employed to describe the sorption isotherms of phenols sorbed by organo-clays through hydrophobic-hydrophobic chemical reactions. The parabolic diffusion and power-function of kinetic models were employed to describe properly the kinetic experiments. The rate limiting step of the p-nitrophenol sorption reactions on organo-clays were diffusion-controlled processes (i.e., 15A, 30B, 93A) and chemical-controlled process for 10A organo-clays. The pre-exponential factor of the p-nitrophenol sorbed by four organo-clays showed the trend as follows: 10A > 30B > 93A > 15A. The efficiency of these organo-clays in removing phenol compounds in water treatments merit further study

  7. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eJuenemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington’s disease is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion bodies composed of aggregated N-terminal huntingtin fragments and other sequestered proteins. Fluorescence microscopy and filter trap assay are conventional methods to study protein aggregates, but cannot be used to analyze the presence and levels of post-translational modifications of aggregated huntingtin such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of proteins can be a signal for degradation and intracellular localization, but also affects protein activity and protein-protein interactions. The function of ubiquitination relies on its mono- and polymeric isoforms attached to protein substrates. Studying the ubiquitination pattern of aggregated huntingtin fragments offers an important possibility to understand huntingtin degradation and aggregation processes within the cell. For the identification of aggregated huntingtin and its ubiquitinated species, solubilization of the cellular aggregates is mandatory. Here we describe methods to identify post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of aggregated mutant huntingtin. This approach is specifically described for use with mammalian cell culture and is suitable to study other disease-related proteins prone to aggregate.

  8. Fundamental investigations of clay/polymer nanocomposites and applications in co-extruded microlayered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Jeremy John

    particle lengths and aspect ratios, which was attributed to the growth of skewed aggregates during concentration. The melt induced clay concentration and increased clay particle dimensions caused significant decreases in the permeability of the nanocomposite microlayers and reduced the overall permeability of the multilayered films. Morphology and transport behavior of these microlayered films were compared to a series of bulk nanocomposites using a second LLDPE-g-MA containing M 2(HT)2 with varying clay content.

  9. Investigation on the cohesive silt/clay-particle sediment via the coupled CFD-DEM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Sun, H.; Sun, R.

    2017-12-01

    Sedimentation of silt/clay particles happens ubiquitously in nature and engineering field. There have been abundant studies focusing on the settling velocity of the cohesive particles, while studies on the sediment deposited from silt/clay irregular particles, including the vertical concentration profile of sediment and the various forces among the deposited particles are still lacking. This paper aims to investigate the above topics by employing the CFD-DEM (Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method) simulations. In this work, we simulate the settling of the mono- and poly- dispersed silt/clay particles and mainly study the characteristics of the deposited cohesive sediment. We use the bonded particles to simulate the irregular silt/clay aggregates at the initial state and utilize the van der Waals force for all micro-particles to consider the cohesive force among silt/clay particles. The interparticle collision force and the fluid-particle interaction forces are also considered in our numerical model. The value of the mean structural density of cohesive sediment obtained from simulations is in good agreement with the previous research, and it is obviously smaller than no-cohesive sediment because of the existence of the silt/clay flocs. Moreover, the solid concentration of sediment increases with the growth of the depth. It is because the silt/clay flocs are more easily to break up due to the gradually increased submerged gravity of the deposited particles along the depth. We also obtain the noncontacted cohesive force and contact force profiles during the sedimentation and the self-weight consolidation process. The study of the concentration profile and the forces among silt/clay sediment will help to give an accurate initial condition for calculating the speed of the reconsolidation process by employing the artificial loads, which is necessary for practical designs of the land reclamation projects.

  10. Speciation of uranium in surface-modified, hydrothermally treated, (UO2)2+-exchanged smectite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaquinta, D.M.; Soderholm, L.; Yuchs, S.E.; Wasserman, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    A successful solution to the problem of disposal and permanent storage of water soluble radioactive species must address two issues: exclusion of the radionuclides from the environment and the prevention of leaching from the storage media into the environment. Immobilization of radionuclides in clay minerals has been studied. In addition to the use of clays as potential waste forms, information about the interactions of radionuclides with clays and how such interactions affect their speciations is crucial for successful modeling of actinide-migration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to determine the uranium speciation in exchanged and surface-modified clays. The XAS data from uranyl-loaded bentonite clay are compared with those obtained after the particle surfaces have been coated with alkylsilanes. These silane films, which render the surface of the clay hydrophobic, are added in order to minimize the ability of external water to exchange with the water in the clay interlayer, thereby decreasing the release rate of the exchanged-uranium species. Mild hydrothermal conditions are used in an effort to mimic potential geologic conditions that may occur during long-term radioactive waste storage. The XAS spectra indicate that the uranyl monomer species remain unchanged in most samples, except in those samples that were both coated with an alkylsilane and hydrothermally treated. When the clay was coated with an organic film, formed by the acidic deposition of octadecyltrimethoxysilane, hydrothermal treatment results in the formation of aggregated uranium species in which the uranium is reduced from U VI to U IV

  11. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource (AcTOR) is EPA's online aggregator of all the public sources of chemical toxicity data. ACToR aggregates data...

  12. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  13. Rapid and extensive debromination of decabromodiphenyl ether by smectite clay-templated subnanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Gu, Cheng; Boyd, Stephen A; Liu, Cun; Sun, Cheng; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2012-08-21

    Subnanoscale zerovalent iron (ZVI) synthesized using smectite clay as a template was utilized to investigate reduction of decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE). The results revealed that DBDE was rapidly debrominated by the prepared smectite-templated ZVI with a reaction rate 10 times greater than that by conventionally prepared nanoscale ZVI. This enhanced reduction is plausibly attributed to the smaller-sized smectite-templated ZVI clusters (∼0.5 nm) vs that of the conventional nanoscale ZVI (∼40 nm). The degradation of DBDE occurred in a stepwise debromination manner. Pentabromodiphenyl ethers were the terminal products in an alkaline suspension (pH 9.6) of smectite-templated ZVI, whereas di-, tri-, and tetrabromodiphenyl ethers formed at the neutral pH. The presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a cosolvent at large volume fractions (e.g., >70%) in water reduced the debromination rates due to enhanced aggregation of clay particles and/or diminished adsorption of DBDE to smectite surfaces. Modification of clay surfaces with tetramethylammonium (TMA) attenuated the colsovent effect on the aggregation of clay particles, resulting in enhanced debromination rates. Smectite clay provides an ideal template to form subnanoscale ZVI, which demonstrated superior debromination reactivity with DBDE compared with other known forms of ZVIs. The ability to modify the nature of smectite clay surface by cation exchange reaction utilizing organic cations can be harnessed to create surface properties compatible with various contaminated sites.

  14. Recycled aggregates concrete: aggregate and mix properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Fonteboa, B.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This study of structural concrete made with recycled concrete aggregate focuses on two issues: 1. The characterization of such aggregate on the Spanish market. This involved conducting standard tests to determine density, water absorption, grading, shape, flakiness and hardness. The results obtained show that, despite the considerable differences with respect to density and water absorption between these and natural aggregates, on the whole recycled aggregate is apt for use in concrete production. 2. Testing to determine the values of basic concrete properties: mix design parameters were established for structural concrete in non-aggressive environments. These parameters were used to produce conventional concrete, and then adjusted to manufacture recycled concrete aggregate (RCA concrete, in which 50% of the coarse aggregate was replaced by the recycled material. Tests were conducted to determine the physical (density of the fresh and hardened material, water absorption and mechanical (compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity properties. The results showed that, from the standpoint of its physical and mechanical properties, concrete in which RCA accounted for 50% of the coarse aggregate compared favourably to conventional concrete.

    Se aborda el estudio de hormigones estructurales fabricados con áridos reciclados procedentes de hormigón, incidiéndose en dos aspectos: 1. Caracterización de tales áridos, procedentes del mercado español. Para ello se llevan a cabo ensayos de densidad, absorción, granulometría, coeficiente de forma, índice de lajas y dureza. Los resultados obtenidos han puesto de manifiesto que, a pesar de que existen diferencias notables (sobre todo en cuanto a densidad y absorción con los áridos naturales, las características de los áridos hacen posible la fabricación de hormigones. 2. Ensayos sobre propiedades básicas de los hormigones: se establecen parámetros de dosificaci

  15. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  16. New magnetic organic-inorganic composites based on hydrotalcite-like anionic clays for drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carja, Gabriela [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Industrial Chemistry, Technical University of Iasi, 71 Mangeron Boulevard, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Chiriac, Horia [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, 47 Mangeron Boulevard, 700050 Iasi (Romania)]. E-mail: hchiriac@phys-iasi.ro; Lupu, Nicoleta [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, 47 Mangeron Boulevard, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

    2007-04-15

    The structural 'memory effect' of anionic clays was used to obtain layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with tailored magnetic properties, by loading iron oxides and/or spinel structures on iron partially substituted hydrotalcite-like materials. The obtained magnetic layered structures were further used as precursors for new hybrid nanostructures, such as aspirin-hydrotalcite-like anionic clays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis shows that small iron oxide or spinel nanoparticles coexist with the fibrous drug particles on the surface of partially aggregated typical clay-like particles. The specific saturation magnetization of the loaded LDHs can be increased up to 70 emu/g by using specific post-synthesis treatments.

  17. Elaboration, morphology and properties of starch/polyester nano-biocomposites based on sepiolite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivato, J B; Marini, J; Pollet, E; Yamashita, F; Grossmann, M V E; Avérous, L

    2015-03-15

    The incorporation of nano-sized sepiolite clays into thermoplastic starch/poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (TPS/PBAT) blends has been investigated with the goal of improving the matrix properties. TPS/PBAT nano-biocomposites were elaborated with two different proportions of the polymeric phases. The influence of the sepiolite nanoclays on the mechanical, thermal and structural properties of the corresponding blends was evaluated. SEM images confirmed the good dispersion of the sepiolite clay, with a low occurrence of small aggregates in the polymeric matrix. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction showed no significant alteration of the crystalline structures of PBAT and starch induced by the sepiolite clay. The addition of sepiolite slightly affected the thermal degradation of the nano-biocomposites; however, the mechanical tests revealed an increase in some mechanical properties, demonstrating that sepiolite is a promising nanofiller for TPS-based materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. From clay bricks to deep underground storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    This booklet issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at the use of clay strata for the storage of radioactive wastes in deep-lying repositories. First of all, a geological foray is made concerning the history of the use of clay and its multifarious uses. The characteristics of clay and its composition are examined and its formation in the geological past is explained. In particular Opalinus clay is looked at and the structures to be found are discussed. The clay's various properties and industrial uses are examined and its sealing properties are examined. Also, Bentonite clay is mentioned and work done by Nagra and co-researchers is noted

  19. Organophilization and characterization of commercial bentonite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, B.B. da; Lima, J.C.C.; Alves, A.M.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Bentonite clay is a plastic changes resulting from volcanic ash, consisting mostly of montmorillonite. The state of Paraiba is a major source of bentonite clay from Brazil, where the main oil fields are located in Boa Vista and represents the largest national production of raw and beneficiated bentonite. Aimed at the commercial value of this type of clay and its high applicability in the polls, this article aims to make a comparison between two kinds of clay, a national (Brasgel) and other imported (Cloisite) from organophilization of two commercial bentonite, ionic surfactant with Praepagem WB, and characterize them by XRD, FTIR and TG / DTG. We observe that despite getting inferior properties, the clay presents national values very similar to those presented by imported clay. (author)

  20. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  1. Fracture behavior of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Wang, Ke; Kotaki, Masaya; Hu, Charmaine; He, Chaobin

    2006-12-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/clay nanocomposites have been prepared via a reactive compounding approach with an epoxy based masterbatch. Compared with PP and common PP/organoclay nanocomposites, the PP/clay nanocomposites based on epoxy/clay masterbatch have higher impact strength. The phenomenon can be attributed to the epoxy phase dispersed uniformly in the PP matrix, which may act as impact energy absorber and helps to form a large damage zone, thus a higher impact strength value is achieved.

  2. Multifaceted role of clay minerals in pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, Inderpreet Singh; Kaur, Satvinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Khurana, Rajneet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The desirable physical and physiochemical properties of clay minerals have led them to play a substantial role in pharmaceutical formulations. Clay minerals like kaolin, smectite and palygorskite-sepiolite are among the world's most valuable industrial minerals and of considerable importance. The elemental features of clay minerals which caused them to be used in pharmaceutical formulations are high specific area, sorption capacity, favorable rheological properties, chemical inertness, swelli...

  3. Lightweight concrete masonry units based on processed granulate of corn cob as aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino, J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A research work was performed in order to assess the potential application of processed granulate of corn cob (PCC as an alternative lightweight aggregate for the manufacturing process of lightweight concrete masonry units (CMU. Therefore, CMU-PCC were prepared in a factory using a typical lightweight concrete mixture for non-structural purposes. Additionally, lightweight concrete masonry units based on a currently applied lightweight aggregate such as expanded clay (CMU-EC were also manufactured. An experimental work allowed achieving a set of results that suggest that the proposed building product presents interesting material properties within the masonry wall context. Therefore, this unit is promising for both interior and exterior applications. This conclusion is even more relevant considering that corn cob is an agricultural waste product.En este trabajo de investigación se evaluó la posible aplicación de granulado procesado de la mazorca de maiz como un árido ligero alternativo en el proceso de fabricación de unidades de mampostería de hormigón ligero. Con esta finalidad, se prepararon en una fábrica diversas unidades de mampostería no estructural con granulado procesado de la mazorca de maiz. Además, se fabricaran unidades de mampostería estándar de peso ligero basado en agregados de arcilla expandida. Este trabajo experimental permitió lograr un conjunto de resultados que sugieren que el producto de construcción propuesto presenta interesantes propiedades materiales en el contexto de la pared de mampostería. Por lo tanto, esta solución es prometedora tanto para aplicaciones interiores y exteriores. Esta conclusión es aún más relevante teniendo en cuenta que la mazorca de maíz es un producto de desecho agrícola.

  4. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  5. Nanocomposites based on epoxy resin and montmorillonite: effect of clay percent and dispersion state on thermomechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaioncz, Soraia; Soares, Bluma G.

    2009-01-01

    Nanocomposites of epoxy resin modified with PMMA and montmorillonite organophilic were synthesized with clay content equal to 0.1, 1, 2.5, 5 and 7 (wt %). Dispersion state and the nano structure of materials has been investigated using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The nanocomposites containing 0.1 (wt %) of clay showed an exfoliated morphology, while the nanocomposites with higher clay content (1 to 7 wt %) show that the dispersion state is less uniform and that large aggregates coexist with tactoids stacks of two or three platelets. The nano structure of materials was correlated with its thermomechanical properties obtained by DMTA. The results showed an increase in Tg of the materials to clay content of up to 5 wt % and an increase in the storage modulus for the epoxy matrix. (author)

  6. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Organic waste treatment with organically modified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pancoski, S.E.; Alther, G.

    1989-01-01

    The use of organically modified clays in hazardous waste management applications offers a significant new and untapped potential. These clays may be used in the stabilization of organic wastes and organically contaminated soils, for waste water treatment, for oil spill control, for liner systems beneath fuel oil storage tanks, and as a component within liner systems of hazardous waste storage treatment and disposal facilities. Organically modified clays (organophilic clays) may be employed in each of these systems to adsorb organic waste constituents, enhancing the performance of the applications

  8. Engineering a fibrocartilage spectrum through modulation of aggregate redifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan K; Masters, Taylor E; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-01-01

    Expanded costochondral cells provide a clinically relevant cell source for engineering both fibrous and hyaline articular cartilage. Expanding chondrocytes in a monolayer results in a shift toward a proliferative, fibroblastic phenotype. Three-dimensional aggregate culture may, however, be used to recover chondrogenic matrix production. This study sought to engineer a spectrum of fibrous to hyaline neocartilage from a single cell source by varying the duration of three-dimensional culture following expansion. In third passage porcine costochondral cells, the effects of aggregate culture duration were assessed after 0, 8, 11, 14, and 21 days of aggregate culture and after 4 subsequent weeks of neocartilage formation. Varying the duration of aggregate redifferentiation generated a spectrum of fibrous to hyaline neocartilage. Within 8 days of aggregation, proliferation ceased, and collagen and glycosaminoglycan production increased, compared with monolayer cells. In self-assembled neocartilage, type II-to-I collagen ratio increased with increasing aggregate duration, yet glycosaminoglycan content varied minimally. Notably, 14 days of aggregate redifferentiation increased collagen content by 25%, tensile modulus by over 110%, and compressive moduli by over 50%, compared with tissue formed in the absence of redifferentiation. A spectrum of fibrous to hyaline cartilage was generated using a single, clinically relevant cell source, improving the translational potential of engineered cartilage.

  9. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed

  10. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  11. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  12. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  13. Fly ash aggregates. Vliegaskunstgrind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-03-01

    A study has been carried out into artificial aggregates made from fly ash, 'fly ash aggregates'. Attention has been drawn to the production of fly ash aggregates in the Netherlands as a way to obviate the need of disposal of fly ash. Typical process steps for the manufacturing of fly ash aggregates are the agglomeration and the bonding of fly ash particles. Agglomeration techniques are subdivided into agitation and compaction, bonding methods into sintering, hydrothermal and 'cold' bonding. In sintering no bonding agent is used. The fly ash particles are more or less welded together. Sintering in general is performed at a temperature higher than 900 deg C. In hydrothermal processes lime reacts with fly ash to a crystalline hydrate at temperatures between 100 and 250 deg C at saturated steam pressure. As a lime source not only lime as such, but also portland cement can be used. Cold bonding processes rely on reaction of fly ash with lime or cement at temperatures between 0 and 100 deg C. The pozzolanic properties of fly ash are used. Where cement is applied, this bonding agent itself contributes also to the strength development of the artificial aggregate. Besides the use of lime and cement, several processes are known which make use of lime containing wastes such as spray dry absorption desulfurization residues or fluid bed coal combustion residues. (In Dutch)

  14. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI (aq) ) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. - Highlights: • Iodide sorption experiments were completed with a diverse array of clay minerals. • Iodide uptake trended with CEC and swamping electrolyte identity and concentration. • Results can be explained by considering the formation of ion pairs in clay interlayers

  15. Calcined clay lightweight ceramics made with wood sawdust and sodium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santis, Bruno Carlos de; Rossignolo, Joao Adriano, E-mail: desantis.bruno@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil); Morelli, Marcio Raymundo [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-11-15

    This paper aims to study the influence of including wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the production process of calcined clay lightweight ceramics. In the production process first, a sample used by a company that produces ceramic products in Brazil was collected. The sample was analysed by techniques of liquidity (LL) and plasticity (LP) limits, particle size analysis, specific mass, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). From the clay, specimens of pure clay and mixtures with wood sawdust (10%, 20% and 30% by mass) and sodium silicate were produced and fired at a temperature of 900 deg C. These specimens were submitted to tests of water absorption, porosity, specific mass and compressive strength. Results of this research indicate that the incorporation of wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the ceramic paste specimens can be useful to make calcined clay lightweight ceramics with special characteristics (low values of water absorption and specific mass and high values of compressive strength), which could be used to produce calcined clay lightweight aggregates to be used in structural concrete. (author)

  16. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...... aggregation response and ISS. Higher TRAP values were associated with death due to cerebral injuries (P 

  17. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  18. Clay as Thermoluminescence Dosemeter in diagnostic Radiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the investigation of the basic thermoluminescence properties of clay at x-rays in the diagnostic radiology range, including dose monitoring in abdominal radiography. Clay sourced from Calabar, Nigeria, was tested for thermoluminescence response after irradiation at diagnostic radiology doses, including ...

  19. Climatic control on clay mineral formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type,climate,topography and exposure age affect weathering environments.In the present study,an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering pro ...

  20. clay nanocomposite by solution intercalation technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymer–clay nanocomposites of commercial polystyrene (PS) and clay laponite were prepared via solution intercalation technique. Laponite was modified suitably with the well known cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide by ion-exchange reaction to render laponite miscible with hydrophobic PS.

  1. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange ...

  2. Investigations of salt mortar containing saliferous clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Saliferous clay mortar might be considered for combining individual salt bricks into a dense and tight long-term seal. A specific laboratory program was started to test mortars consisting of halite powder and grey saliferous clay of the Stassfurt from the Bleicherode salt mine. Clay fractions between 0 and 45% were used. The interest focused upon obtaining good workabilities of the mixtures as well as upon the permeability and compression strength of the dried mortar samples. Test results: 1) Without loss of quality the mortar can be mixed using fresh water. Apprx. 18 to 20 weight-% of the solids must be added as mixing water. 2) The porosity and the permeability of the mortar samples increases distinctly when equally coarse-grained salt power is used for mixing. 3) The mean grain size and the grain size distribution of the saliferous clay and the salt powder should be very similar to form a useful mortar. 4) The permeability of the mortar samples decreases with increasing clay fraction from 2 10 -12 m 2 to 2 10 -14 m 2 . The investigated samples, however, were large and dried at 100degC. 5) The uniaxial compressive strength of the clay mortar equals, at an average, only 4 MPa and decreases clearly with increasing clay fraction. Moist mortar samples did not show any measurable compressive strength. 6) Moistened saliferous clay mortar may show little temporary swelling. (orig./HP)

  3. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-06-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  4. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  5. Geomechanics of clays for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.

    1989-01-01

    Clay formations have been studied for many years in the European Community as potential disposal media for radioactive waste. This document brings together results of on-going research about the geomechanical behaviour of natural clay bodies, at normal and elevated temperatures. The work is carried out within the third Community R and D programme on Management and storage of radioactive waste

  6. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaldoun, A.; Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Wegdam, G.; de Leeuw, B.; Méheust, Y.; Fossum, J.O.; Bonn, D.

    2009-01-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay

  7. Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 57 58 59 60 For Peer Review 1 Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications N. M. Musyoka1*, J. Ren1, H. W. Langmi1, D. E. C. Rogers1, B. C. North1, M. Mathe1 and D. Bessarabov2... clear (filtered) extract of cloisite clay, SNC for zeolite from unfiltered cloisite clay extract and SBC for zeolite from unfiltered South African bentonite clay extract. Furfuryl alcohol (Sigma Aldrich, C5H6O2, 98%) and Ethylene gas were used...

  8. Iron-clay interactions under a thermal gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodin-Caumon, Marie-Camille; Mosser-Ruck, Regine; Randi, Aurelien; Cathelineau, Michel; Michau, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    . temperature 80 deg. C or 150 deg. C). At the end of experiments, the tubes were quenched and cut into 5 sections. The particles collected in each of the five sections of the gold tube and in the two platinum capsules were characterized by SEM, TEM-EDS and XRD. The argillite is mainly composed of clay minerals (illite, inter-stratified illite/smectite, and a few amount of chlorite and kaolinite) with calcite, dolomite, quartz, pyrite, muscovite and feldspars. After reaction, the clay particles are Fe-enriched and some of the accessory minerals are dissolved (or oxidized) depending on experimental conditions. Iron is oxidized into magnetite and sometimes siderite. Among the accessory minerals, quartz, dolomite, pyrite and feldspars are the most reactive. Oxidized pyrite is observed on SEM micro-photographies. Dolomite, feldspars and quartz are probably dissolved. The dissolution of quartz indicates that the medium becomes alkaline. Calcite is less affected, probably because it is more stable under alkaline conditions. The morphology of the clay reaction products depends on the Fe content. The initial illite morphology (voile) evolves toward flakes, platelets and hairy aggregates with increasing Fe content. At 300 deg. C, Fe-rich clay minerals are Fe/Mg-chlorite with platelet morphology. At 150 deg. C, Fe-rich clay particles are Fe-serpentine products with hairy aggregate morphology. Flakes have a lowest Fe-content and are less crystallized. It could be an intermediate reaction product. In newly formed clay minerals, Fe replaces Al in octahedral sheets, and is also present in tetrahedral sheets in place of Si and Al in the most transformed products. Al from octahedral sheets replaces Si in tetrahedral sheets. The becoming of Si and Al escaped from tetrahedral sheets is not solved. Mg escapes from octahedral sheets toward the hot point when iron was initially placed at the cold point. It enriches the octahedral sheets of the newly formed clay minerals above 200 deg. C. Finally

  9. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  10. Development of ODOT guidelines for the use of geogrids in aggregate bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    A primary objective of the current study was to help ODOT expand its selection of approved : geogrid products for base reinforcement applications by producing measured data on selected : geogrids and a dense-graded base aggregate commonly used in ODO...

  11. Purification of bentonite clays from the district of Cubati, PB, for other uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.R.; Araujo, J.P.; Silva, I.A.; Cardoso, M.A.; Silva, C.D.; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The state of Paraiba is responsible for the increased production of crude bentonite in the country, coming from one of the largest mines of Brazil, located in Boa Vista, PB. Recently, in the regions of Cubati and Pedra Lavrada, PB, found new deposits of bentonite that could expand the state reserves. The paper aims at the characterization and development of clay purified using the techniques of screening and hydrocycloning, from bentonite clay recently discovered in the city of Cubati, PB, for various uses. The sample characterization was performed through techniques: granulometric analysis by laser diffraction, X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence and thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that the samples are typical of bentonite clay, and that the purification process using only the hydrocycloning shows better results. (author)

  12. The effective stress concept in saturated sand-clay buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, J.; Oswell, J.M.; Gray, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed on mixtures of sand and bentonite, to investigate whether the behavior of the mixture can be expressed in terms of effective stresses, defined as the tensor difference between externally applied total stresses and pore water pressures measured outside the cell. Within acceptable bounds of experimental error, the tests show that effective stress can be used to describe consolidation and shear behaviour. However, because part of the effective stress in the clay is derived from net interparticle repulsive (unit) forces seated in diffuse double layers around aggregations of bentonite particles, the applicability of the concept has at this stage been restricted to conditions of constant volume (or possibly constant straining rate), constant chemistry, and constant temperature

  13. 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues linked to Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete. The main subjects are geology of clays, hydration and performance of blended systems with calcined clays, alkali activated binders, economic and environmental impacts of the use of calcined clays in cement based materials. Topics addressed in this book include the influence of processing on reactivity of calcined clays, influence of clay mineralogy on reactivity, geology of clay deposits, Portland-calcined clay systems, hydration, durability, performance, Portland-calcined clay-limestone systems, hydration, durability, performance, calcined clay-alkali systems, life cycle analysis, economics and environmental impact of use of calcined clays in cement and concrete, and field applications. This book compiles the different contributions of the 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete, which took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, June, 23-25, 2015.The papers present the latest  res...

  14. Single clay sheets inside electrospun polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaohui

    2005-03-01

    Nanofibers were prepared from polymer solution with clay sheets by electrospinning. Plasma etching, as a well controlled process, was used to supply electrically excited gas molecules from a glow discharge. To reveal the structure and arrangement of clay layers in the polymer matrix, plasma etching was used to remove the polymer by controlled gasification to expose the clay sheets due to the difference in reactivity. The shape, flexibility, and orientation of clay sheets were studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Additional quantitative information on size distribution and degree of exfoliation of clay sheets were obtained by analyzing electron micrograph of sample after plasma etching. Samples in various forms including fiber, film and bulk, were thinned by plasma etching. Morphology and dispersion of inorganic fillers were studied by electron microscopy.

  15. Treatment for cracked and permeable Houston clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Leung, M.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, the treatability of a field clay (obtained from Houston, Texas) and a clay-sand mixture to reduce their hydraulic conductivity was evaluated. Remolded field clay and clay-sand mixture with and without methanol contamination were treated to reduce their hydraulic conductivity by permeating very dilute grout solutions. The concentration of sodium silicate in the grout solution was 8%, while the solid content in the cement grout was 0.3%. The hydraulic conductivity of permeable Houston clay (hydraulic conductivity >10 -5 cm/sec) could be reduced to less than 10 -7 cm/sec (U.S. EPA limit for soil barriers) by permeating with a selected combination of grout solutions

  16. Some Tests on Heather Field Moraine Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Jacobsen, Moust

    This report deals with oedometer tests on three samples of moraine clay from the Heather Field in the English part of the North Sea. The tests have been carried out in the very unelastic apparatus used in Denmark and with special test procedures differing from the ones used elsewhere. In Denmark...... Moraine Clay covers a large part of the surface, and it has therefore been investigated extensively in the field and in the laboratories during the last 25 years. It is to day - from a geotechnical point of view - the best known clay in Denmark. It could therefore be of some interest to compare...... the English North Sea moraine clays with the corresponding Danish Moraine Clays. The Danish test procedures are explained in details and some comments are given in the hope that they may not be banalities all of them....

  17. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundie, P.; McLeod, N.

    1997-01-01

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation

  18. Aggregate and soil organic carbon dynamics in South Chilean Andisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Huygens

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC to climate and land use change warrants further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between aggregate and SOC dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses of a south Chilean Andisol: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR, a grassland (GRASS and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS. Total carbon content of the 0-10cm soil layer was higher for GRASS (6.7 kg C m-2 than for PINUS (4.3 kg C m-2, while TC content of SGFOR (5.8 kg C m-2 was not significantly different from either one. High extractable oxalate and pyrophosphate Al concentrations (varying from 20.3-24.4 g kg-1, and 3.9-11.1 g kg-1, respectively were found in all sites. In this study, SOC and aggregate dynamics were studied using size and density fractionation experiments of the SOC, δ13C and total carbon analysis of the different SOC fractions, and C mineralization experiments. The results showed that electrostatic sorption between and among amorphous Al components and clay minerals is mainly responsible for the formation of metal-humus-clay complexes and the stabilization of soil aggregates. The process of ligand exchange between SOC and Al would be of minor importance resulting in the absence of aggregate hierarchy in this soil type. Whole soil C mineralization rate constants were highest for SGFOR and PINUS, followed by GRASS (respectively 0.495, 0.266 and 0.196 g CO2-Cm-2d-1 for the top soil layer. In contrast, incubation experiments of isolated macro organic matter fractions gave opposite results, showing that the recalcitrance of the SOC decreased in another order: PINUS>SGFOR>GRASS. We deduced that electrostatic sorption processes and physical protection of SOC in soil aggregates were the main processes determining SOC stabilization. As a result, high aggregate carbon concentrations, varying from 148 till 48 g kg-1, were encountered for all land use

  19. The Use of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites in Wastewater Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytwo, Giora

    2012-01-01

    Some agricultural effluents are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants: their pretreatment is necessary to avoid clogging of the filtering devices by colloidal matter. The colloidal stability of the effluents is mainly due to mutual repulsive forces that keep charged particles in suspension. Pretreatment processes are based on two separate stages: (a) neutralization of the charges (“coagulation”) and (b) bridging between several small particles to form larger aggregates that sink, leaving clarified effluent (“flocculation”). The consequent destabilization of the colloidal suspension lowers total suspended solids (TSSs), turbidity, and other environmental quality parameters, making the treatments that follow more efficient. Clay-based materials have been widely used for effluent pretreatment and pollutant removal. This study presents the use of nanocomposites, comprised of an anchoring particle and a polymer, as “coagoflocculants” for the efficient and rapid reduction of TSS and turbidity in wastewater with a high organic load. The use of such particles combines the advantages of coagulant and flocculant by neutralizing the charge of the suspended particles while bridging between them and anchoring them to a denser particle (the clay mineral), enhancing their precipitation. Very rapid and efficient pretreatment is achieved in one single treatment step. PMID:22454607

  20. ALKALI AGGREGATE REACTIONS IN CONCRETE: A REVIEW OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    coarse aggregate, water and chemical admixtures to improve its various .... slowly from certai~ alkali-bearing rock components within the ... retaining walls. ... expand in pores and microcracks of the cementious matrix. ... allY'a' pressure on the surrounding concrete ... effect is reduced structural integrity and shortened.

  1. Erosion of dust aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seizinger, A.; Krijt, S.; Kley, W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple

  2. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  3. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  4. SUPPRESSION OF HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSES BY 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-p-DIOXIN INTERCALATED IN SMECTITE CLAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Stephen A.; Johnston, Cliff T.; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Teppen, Brian J.; Li, Hui; Khan, Bushra; Crawford, Robert B.; Kovalova, Natalia; Kim, Seong-Su; Shao, Hua; Gu, Cheng; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.

    2018-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a highly toxic environmental contaminant found in soils and sediments. Because of its exceptionally low water solubility, this compound exists predominantly in the sorbed state in natural environments. Clay minerals, especially expandable smectite clays, are one of the major component geosorbents in soils and sediments that can function as an effective adsorbent for environmental dioxins, including TCDD. In this study, TCDD was intercalated in the smectite clay saponite by an incipient wetness method. The primary goal of this study was to intercalate TCDD in natural K-saponite clay and evaluate its immunotoxic effects in vivo. The relative bioavailability of TCDD was evaluated by comparing the metabolic activity of TCDD administered in the adsorbed state as an intercalate in saponite and freely dissolved in corn oil. This comparison revealed nearly identical TCDD-induced suppression of humoral immunity, a well-established and sensitive sequela, in a mammalian (mouse) model. This result suggests that TCDD adsorbed by clays is likely to be available for biouptake and biodistribution in mammals, consistent with previous observations of TCDD in livestock exposed to dioxin-contaminated ball clays that were used as feed additives. Adsorption of TCDD by clay minerals does not appear to mitigate risk associated with TCDD exposure substantially. PMID:21994089

  5. Suppression of humoral immune responses by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin intercalated in smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Stephen A; Johnston, Cliff T; Pinnavaia, Thomas J; Kaminski, Norbert E; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui; Khan, Bushra; Crawford, Robert B; Kovalova, Natalia; Kim, Seong-Su; Shao, Hua; Gu, Cheng; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2011-12-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a highly toxic environmental contaminant found in soils and sediments. Because of its exceptionally low water solubility, this compound exists predominantly in the sorbed state in natural environments. Clay minerals, especially expandable smectite clays, are one of the major component geosorbents in soils and sediments that can function as an effective adsorbent for environmental dioxins, including TCDD. In this study, TCDD was intercalated in the smectite clay saponite by an incipient wetness method. The primary goal of this study was to intercalate TCDD in natural K-saponite clay and evaluate its immunotoxic effects in vivo. The relative bioavailability of TCDD was evaluated by comparing the metabolic activity of TCDD administered in the adsorbed state as an intercalate in saponite and freely dissolved in corn oil. This comparison revealed nearly identical TCDD-induced suppression of humoral immunity, a well-established and sensitive sequela, in a mammalian (mouse) model. This result suggests that TCDD adsorbed by clays is likely to be available for biouptake and biodistribution in mammals, consistent with previous observations of TCDD in livestock exposed to dioxin-contaminated ball clays that were used as feed additives. Adsorption of TCDD by clay minerals does not appear to mitigate risk associated with TCDD exposure substantially. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  6. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  7. Sustainable aggregates production : green applications for aggregate by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Increased emphasis in the construction industry on sustainability and recycling requires production of : aggregate gradations with lower dust (cleaner aggregates) and smaller maximum sizeshence, increased : amount of quarry by-products (QBs). QBs ...

  8. Biochar Effects on Soil Aggregate Properties Under No-Till Maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Naveed, Muhammad; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2014-01-01

    of biochar particles had higher TS and SRE probably because of bonding effects. Based on the improved soil aggregate properties, we suggest that biochar can be effective for increasing and sustaining overall soil quality, for example, related to minimizing the soil erosion potential.......Soil aggregates are useful indicators of soil structure and stability, and the impact on physical and mechanical aggregate properties is critical for the sustainable use of organic amendments in agricultural soil. In this work, we evaluated the short-term soil quality effects of applying biochar (0......–10 kg m−2), in combination with swine manure (2.1 and 4.2 kg m−2), to a no-till maize (Zea mays L.) cropping system on a sandy loam soil in Denmark. Topsoil (0–20 cm) aggregates were analyzed for clay dispersibility, aggregate stability, tensile strength (TS), and specific rupture energy (SRE) using end...

  9. EFFECTS OF LIGHTWEIGHT MULLITE-SILICA RICH GLASS COMPOSITE AGGREGATES ON PROPERTIES OF CASTABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mullite-silica rich glass (MSRG composite is a material which is more efficient than chamotte for refractory utilization of clay. The effects of lightweight MSRG composite aggregate on the properties of refractory castables were studied by XRD, SEM and EDS, etc. Comparing with a common lightweight chamotte aggregate, it was found that the hot modulus of rupture, refractoriness under load and thermal shock resistance of the castable with lightweight MSRG aggregate were higher than those of the castable with a common lightweight chamotte aggregate because MSRG did not contain silica crystalline phases and contained a liquid phase with very high viscosity at high temperature. The castables with lightweight chamotte aggregate have higher thermal expansion because of existence of cristobalite and quartz, and have lower thermal conductivity because of higher porosity.

  10. Compressibility characteristics of Sabak Bernam Marine Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lat, D. C.; Ali, N.; Jais, I. B. M.; Baharom, B.; Yunus, N. Z. M.; Salleh, S. M.; Azmi, N. A. C.

    2018-04-01

    This study is carried out to determine the geotechnical properties and compressibility characteristics of marine clay collected at Sabak Bernam. The compressibility characteristics of this soil are determined from 1-D consolidation test and verified by existing correlations by other researchers. No literature has been found on the compressibility characteristics of Sabak Bernam Marine Clay. It is important to carry out this study since this type of marine clay covers large coastal area of west coast Malaysia. This type of marine clay was found on the main road connecting Klang to Perak and the road keeps experiencing undulation and uneven settlement which jeopardise the safety of the road users. The soil is indicated in the Generalised Soil Map of Peninsular Malaysia as a CLAY with alluvial soil on recent marine and riverine alluvium. Based on the British Standard Soil Classification and Plasticity Chart, the soil is classified as a CLAY with very high plasticity (CV). Results from laboratory test on physical properties and compressibility parameters show that Sabak Bernam Marine Clay (SBMC) is highly compressible, has low permeability and poor drainage characteristics. The compressibility parameters obtained for SBMC is in a good agreement with other researchers in the same field.

  11. Sorption of radionuclides by tertiary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Czurda, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sorption capacity of different clay types for some metals (Co, Cs, Sr and Zn), occurring as common radionuclides in radioactive waste deposits, had been analysed by a static (batch technique) and a dynamic method (percolation tests, in which the driving force is a hydraulic gradient). Sorption capacity generally increased with an increasing pH of solution. A decrease of sorption capacity had been observed in the order Zn > Cs ≥ Co > Sr for the batch and Cs > Zn > Sr > Co for the percolation tests. Clay marls showed a distinctly higher sorption respectively retention capacity as pure clays. Sorption capacity depends on solution parameters like type and concentration of radionuclide, pH, salt concentration, etc., and on rock parameters like mineral content (e.g. swelling clay minerals and carbonates), organic material, rock pH, micro fabric, etc. A third parameter of great influence is the contact time between clay and solution. The adsorption isotherms reflect two different adsorption mechanisms: a very rapid adsorption (a few minutes) on the external surfaces of clay minerals and a slow adsorption process (weeks and longer), due to the diffusion of metal ions into the interlayer space of clay minerals. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  12. Concrete produced with recycled aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. L. Tenório

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of the mechanical and durable properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC for using in concrete. The porosity of recycled coarse aggregates is known to influence the fresh and hardened concrete properties and these properties are related to the specific mass of the recycled coarse aggregates, which directly influences the mechanical properties of the concrete. The recycled aggregates were obtained from construction and demolition wastes (CDW, which were divided into recycled sand (fine and coarse aggregates. Besides this, a recycled coarse aggregate of a specific mass with a greater density was obtained by mixing the recycled aggregates of the CDW with the recycled aggregates of concrete wastes (CW. The concrete was produced in laboratory by combining three water-cement ratios, the ratios were used in agreement with NBR 6118 for structural concretes, with each recycled coarse aggregates and recycled sand or river sand, and the reference concrete was produced with natural aggregates. It was observed that recycled aggregates can be used in concrete with properties for structural concrete. In general, the use of recycled coarse aggregate in combination with recycled sand did not provide good results; but when the less porous was used, or the recycled coarse aggregate of a specific mass with a greater density, the properties of the concrete showed better results. Some RAC reached bigger strengths than the reference concrete.

  13. Deformation and Fabric in Compacted Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensrich, C. M.; Pineda, J.; Luzin, V.; Suwal, L.; Kisi, E. H.; Allameh-Haery, H.

    2018-05-01

    Hydromechanical anisotropy of clay soils in response to deformation or deposition history is related to the micromechanics of platelike clay particles and their orientations. In this article, we examine the relationship between microstructure, deformation, and moisture content in kaolin clay using a technique based on neutron scattering. This technique allows for the direct characterization of microstructure within representative samples using traditional measures such as orientation density and soil fabric tensor. From this information, evidence for a simple relationship between components of the deviatoric strain tensor and the deviatoric fabric tensor emerge. This relationship may provide a physical basis for future anisotropic constitutive models based on the micromechanics of these materials.

  14. Synthetic mullite fabrication from smectite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, L.N. de; Kiminami, R.H.G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The technological importance of mullite is mostly due to its refractory properties. Mullite in native form is very rare, and therefore it may be necessary to produced it by synthetic means. Brazil has a large reserve of smectite clays. In this work the process to produce synthetic mullite from these clays by treatment with aluminum sulphate was studied. X-ray analyses has shown the presence of mullite crystals in treated smectite clays of several colours, sinterized at 1100 0 C. By sintering at 1300 0 C, pure mullite was obtained in some colours. (author) [pt

  15. Discrete analysis of clay layer tensile strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T.N.H.; Ple, O.; Villard, P.; Gourc, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method is used to investigate the tensile behaviour and cracks mechanisms of a clay material submitted to bending loading. It is the case of compacted clay liners in landfill cap cover application. Such as the soil tested in this study is plastic clay, the distinct elements model was calibrated with previous data results by taking into account cohesive properties. Various contact and cohesion laws are tested to show that the numerical model is able to reproduce the failure mechanism. Numerical results are extending to simulate a landfill cap cover and comparing to experimental large scale field bending tests achieved in a real site of storage. (authors)

  16. Comparative study of organovermiculites using natural and expanded vermiculite; Estudo comparativo de organovermiculitas utilizando vermiculita natural e expandida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea, L.S.; Hudson, A.B.; Francisco, K.S.; Romualdo, R.M.; Gelmires, A.N.; Lisiane, N.L.S., E-mail: dea_lopes@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    Organovermiculites were obtained using vermiculite clay in its natural state and expanded in order to use these new materials in the adsorption of organic contaminants from water. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were performed to obtain confirmation of these organovermiculites. Foster swelling and sorption tests were used to test the compatibility between the treated clay and organic solvents. The organophilization process has provided an increase in basal distance of vermiculite and it was observed an expressive increase in distance between the clay layers. The organovermiculite showed adsorption capacity by organic solvents tested, the best results were observed for diesel oil. (author)

  17. Aggregation Algorithms in Heterogeneous Tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus Felix FURTUNA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous tables are most used in the problem of aggregation. A solution for this problem is to standardize these tables of figures. In this paper, we proposed some methods of aggregation based on the hierarchical algorithms.

  18. Familial Aggregation of Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrin, Denise C; Morin, Charles M; Rochefort, Amélie; Ivers, Hans; Dauvilliers, Yves A; Savard, Josée; LeBlanc, Mélanie; Merette, Chantal

    2017-02-01

    There is little information about familial aggregation of insomnia; however, this type of information is important to (1) improve our understanding of insomnia risk factors and (2) to design more effective treatment and prevention programs. This study aimed to investigate evidence of familial aggregation of insomnia among first-degree relatives of probands with and without insomnia. Cases (n = 134) and controls (n = 145) enrolled in a larger epidemiological study were solicited to invite their first-degree relatives and spouses to complete a standardized sleep/insomnia survey. In total, 371 first-degree relatives (Mage = 51.9 years, SD = 18.0; 34.3% male) and 138 spouses (Mage = 55.5 years, SD = 12.2; 68.1% male) completed the survey assessing the nature, severity, and frequency of sleep disturbances. The dependent variable was insomnia in first-degree relatives and spouses. Familial aggregation was claimed if the risk of insomnia was significantly higher in the exposed (relatives of cases) compared to the unexposed cohort (relatives of controls). The risk of insomnia was also compared between spouses in the exposed (spouses of cases) and unexposed cohort (spouses of controls). The risk of insomnia in exposed and unexposed biological relatives was 18.6% and 10.4%, respectively, yielding a relative risk (RR) of 1.80 (p = .04) after controlling for age and sex. The risk of insomnia in exposed and unexposed spouses was 9.1% and 4.2%, respectively; however, corresponding RR of 2.13 (p = .28) did not differ significantly. Results demonstrate evidence of strong familial aggregation of insomnia. Additional research is warranted to further clarify and disentangle the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors in insomnia. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Clay, Water, and Salt: Controls on the Permeability of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, Ian C; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2017-09-19

    The ability to predict the permeability of fine-grained soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks is a fundamental challenge in the geosciences with potentially transformative implications in subsurface hydrology. In particular, fine-grained sedimentary rocks (shale, mudstone) constitute about two-thirds of the sedimentary rock mass and play important roles in three energy technologies: petroleum geology, geologic carbon sequestration, and radioactive waste management. The problem is a challenging one that requires understanding the properties of complex natural porous media on several length scales. One inherent length scale, referred to hereafter as the mesoscale, is associated with the assemblages of large grains of quartz, feldspar, and carbonates over distances of tens of micrometers. Its importance is highlighted by the existence of a threshold in the core scale mechanical properties and regional scale energy uses of shale formations at a clay content X clay ≈ 1/3, as predicted by an ideal packing model where a fine-grained clay matrix fills the gaps between the larger grains. A second important length scale, referred to hereafter as the nanoscale, is associated with the aggregation and swelling of clay particles (in particular, smectite clay minerals) over distances of tens of nanometers. Mesoscale phenomena that influence permeability are primarily mechanical and include, for example, the ability of contacts between large grains to prevent the compaction of the clay matrix. Nanoscale phenomena that influence permeability tend to be chemomechanical in nature, because they involve strong impacts of aqueous chemistry on clay swelling. The second length scale remains much less well characterized than the first, because of the inherent challenges associated with the study of strongly coupled nanoscale phenomena. Advanced models of the nanoscale properties of fine-grained media rely predominantly on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, a mean field

  20. Clay nanoparticles for regenerative medicine and biomaterial design: A review of clay bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Mohamed; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dawson, Jonathan I

    2018-03-01

    Clay nanoparticles, composites and hydrogels are emerging as a new class of biomaterial with exciting potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Clay particles have been extensively explored in polymeric nanocomposites for self-assembly and enhanced mechanical properties as well as for their potential as drug delivery modifiers. In recent years, a cluster of studies have explored cellular interactions with clay nanoparticles alone or in combination with polymeric matrices. These pioneering studies have suggested new and unforeseen utility for certain clays as bioactive additives able to enhance cellular functions including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, most notably for osteogenesis. This review examines the recent literature describing the potential effects of clay-based nanomaterials on cell function and examines the potential role of key clay physicochemical properties in influencing such interactions and their exciting possibilities for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffusion through statically compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.L.; Shebl, M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental work on the effect of compaction on contaminant flow through clay liners. The experimental program included evaluation of soil properties, compaction, permeability and solute diffusion. A permeameter was built of non reactive materials to test samples compacted at different water contents and compactive efforts. The flow of a permeating solute, LiCl, was monitored. Effluent samples were collected for solute concentration measurements. The concentrations were measured by performing atomic adsorption tests. The analyzed results showed different diffusion characteristics when compaction conditions changed. At each compactive effort, permeability decreased as molding water content increased. Consequently, transit time (measured at relative concentration 50%) increased and diffusivity decreased. As compactive effort increased for soils compacted dry of optimum, permeability and diffusion decreased. On the other hand, as compactive effort increased for soils compacted wet of optimum, permeability and diffusivity increased. Tortuosity factor was indirectly measured from the diffusion and retardation rate. Tortuosity factor also decreased as placement water content was increased from dry of optimum to wet of optimum. Then decreases were more pronounced for low compactive effort tests. 27 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Fracture in Kaolinite clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Arratia, Paulo E.

    2017-11-01

    Clay minerals are involved in many natural (landslides, river channels) and industrial processes (ceramics, cosmetics, oil recovery). They are plate shaped charged colloids and exhibit different flow properties than simpler colloids when suspended in a liquid such as thixotropy and shear-banding. kaolinite platelets are non-swelling, meaning that the stacks formed by the platelets do not have water layers, and thus the suspension does not have a sol-gel transition. However, it has been shown that kaolinite suspensions possesses a non-zero yield stress even at low concentrations, indicating that the particles arrange themselves in a structure through attractive interactions. Here, we experimentally investigate the sedimentation of kaolinite suspensions in a Hele-Shaw cell. The sedimentation of these dilute suspensions can display solid behavior like fracture, revealed in cross-polarized light, which is linked to the failure of the weakly-bonded structure (typical yield stress 10-2 Pa). By changing the interaction potential of the particles (by sonication or introducing salts), we show through these sedimentation experiments, how the fracture pattern can be avoided. Research was sponsored by the Army Research Laboratory and was accomplished under Grant Number 569074.

  3. Clay-free drilling mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmadeyev, R G; Panov, V B; Simonenkov, O I

    1982-01-01

    A clay-free drilling mud is proposed which contains humate-containing substance, alkali electrolyte, gel-former, inhibitor and water. In order to reduce viscosity of the static shear stress and water output under conditions of polyvalent aggression, it additionally contains organic stabilizer with the following ratio of components, % by mass: humate-containing substance 4.0-8.0; alkali electrolyte 0.2-1.5; gel-former 1.0-3.0; organic stabilizer 0.1-1.0; inhibitor 1.0-40.0; water--the rest. The solution is also distinguished by the fact that the gel-former used is magnesium chloride or magnesium sulfate, or calcium chloride or aluminum sulfate, or iron chloride (III) or iron sulfate (II) or waste of chlorides of titanium production with average chemical composition, % by mass: Ti 1.5-7.0; Fe 5.0-15.0; Al 1.5-10.0; Na 5.0-16.0; Mg 0.5-3.0; Cl 30.0-60.0; Ca 0.2-2.0; Cr 0.2-2.0; Cu 0.2-1.5.

  4. Radionuclides sorption in clay soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraky, G.; Lewis, C.; Hamlat, S.; Nollmann, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of clay soils is examined through a parametric study of the distribution coefficient (Kd) for the radionuclides of interest, Cs and Sr. This work is a preliminary stage of the migration studies of these nuclides in a porous medium (ground of Ezeiza, Argentina) and the evaluation of radiologic impact of the removal of low and intermediate activity wastes in shallow trenches. The determination of Kd is performed by a static technique or batch. The phases are separated by centrifugation at 20000 g during 1 hour. The activity of supernatant solution of Cs-137 and Sr-85 is measured in a detecting system of I Na(Tl) well-type. Two types of parameters were changed: a) those related to the determination method: phase separation (centrifugation vs. centrifugation plus filtration); equilibrium period, ratio solid/liquid; b) those related to the geochemical system: pH of contact solution, carrier concentration, competitive ions, ionic strength, desorption. It was observed that the modification of parameters in the Kd-measurement does not change the order of magnitude of results. (Author)

  5. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  6. Expanding Your Horizon 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaltenhauser, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Expanding your horizons is a bi-annual “Science Day” for girls aged 11 to 14, held at the University of Geneva on 14 November. The girls had the opportunity to take part in hands-on workshops held by local professional women in the field of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. For the fourth time, CERN was part of this event, offering three workshops as well as a booth at the Discovery Fair, including Higgnite, an interactive visualization of the Higgs Field.

  7. Crushed aggregate-betonite mixtures as backfill material for the Finnish repositories of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holopainen, P.; Pirhonen, V.; Snellman, M.

    1984-03-01

    Backfill materials consisting of three components: crushed rock aggregate, finely ground rock aggregate and bentonite (3 to 2 per cent of weight) were studied. The production and installation procedures of the material were evaluated. Laboratory tests were made to determine the hydraulic conductivity and swelling potential of the materials. Chemical tests were made on the different materials and groundwaters. Mineralogical changes of the clay fraction were estimated. (author)

  8. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Adsorption and Desorption of Cesium in Clay Minerals: Effects of Natural Organic Matter and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Ilgen, Anastasia; Mills, Melissa; Lee, Moo; Seol, Jeung Gun; Cho, Nam Chan; Kang, Hyungyu

    2017-04-01

    Cesium (Cs) released into the environment (e.g., Fukushima accident) poses significant environmental concerns and remediation challenges. A majority of Cs in the environment have remained within the surface soils due to the strong adsorption affinity of Cs towards clay minerals. Different clay minerals have different bonding sites, resulting in various adsorption mechanisms at nanometer scale. For example, the illite commonly has a basal spacing of 1.0 nm, but becomes wider to 1.4 nm once other cations exchange with K in the interlayer site. Cs adsorbs into these expanded wedged zone strongly, which can control its mobility in the environment. In addition, natural organic matter (NOM) in the surface soils can interact with clay minerals, which can modify the mechanisms of Cs adsorption on the clay minerals by blocking specific adsorption sites and/or providing Cs adsorption sites on NOM surface. In this work, three representative clay minerals (illite, vermiculite, montmorillonite) and humic acid (HA) are used to systematically investigate the adsorption and desorption behavior of Cs. We performed batch adsorption experiments over a range of Cs concentrations on three clay minerals with and without HA, followed by sequential desorption batch testing. We tested desorption efficiency as a function of initial adsorbed Cs concentration, HA content, sodium concentration, and pH. The sequential extraction results are compared to the structural changes in clay minerals, measured using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) - energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Hence, this work aims to identify the mechanisms of Cs fixation at the nanometer (or atomic-) scale as a function of the clay mineral properties (e.g. expandability, permanent surface charge) and varying organic matter content at different pH values and to enhance our atomic-scale mechanistic understanding of

  10. Clarification of olive mill and winery wastewater by means of clay-polymer nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rytwo, Giora, E-mail: rytwo@telhai.ac.il [Tel Hai College, Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Upper Galilee 12210 (Israel); Environmental Physical Chemistry Laboratory, MIGAL, Galilee Technological Center, Kiryat Shmona (Israel); Lavi, Roy; Rytwo, Yuval; Monchase, Hila [Environmental Physical Chemistry Laboratory, MIGAL, Galilee Technological Center, Kiryat Shmona (Israel); Dultz, Stefan [Institute of Soil Science, Leibniz University Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str. 2, D-30419 Hannover (Germany); Koenig, Tom N. [Environmental Physical Chemistry Laboratory, MIGAL, Galilee Technological Center, Kiryat Shmona (Israel)

    2013-01-01

    Highly polluted effluents from olive mills and wineries, among others, are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants due to the large amounts of organic and suspended matter. Efficiency of all management practices for such effluents depends on an effective pretreatment that lowers the amount of suspended solids. Such pretreatments are usually based on three separate stages, taking a total of 2 to 6 h: coagulation-neutralizing the colloids, flocculation-aggregating the colloids into larger particles, and separation via filtration or decanting. Previous studies have presented the concept of coagoflocculation based on the use of clay-polymer nanocomposites. This process adds a higher density clay particle to the flocs, accelerating the process to between 15 and 60 min. This study examined suitable nanocomposites based on different clays and polymers. The charge of the compounds increased proportionally to the polymer-to-clay ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that in sepiolite-based nanocomposites there is no change in the structure of the mineral, whereas in smectite-based nanocomposites, the polymer intercalates between the clay layers and increases the spacing depending on the polymer-to-clay ratio. Efficiency of the coagoflocculation process was studied with a dispersion analyzer. Sequential addition of olive mill or winery effluents with a boosting dose of nanocomposites may yield a very efficient and rapid clarification pretreatment. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocomposites yielded clarification of olive mill (OMW) and winery effluents (WW). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In smectite based nanocomposites intercalation of the polymer was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In sepiolite based nanocomposites no changes in the spacing were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Colloidal neutralization is the main clarification process in WW but not in OMW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several cycles of

  11. Thermally modified bentonite clay for copper removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Kleinübing, S.J.; Silva, M.G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Bentonite clay coming from Pernambuco was thermally modified in order to increase its affinity and capacity in the copper removal in porous bed. The application of this procedure is justified by the low cost of clay, their abundance and affinity for various metal ions. Thermally treatment modifies the clay adsorption properties enables its use in porous bed system, with the increase in surface area and mechanical strength. The material was characterized by x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and N_2 physisorption. Then tests were carried out for adsorption of copper in various experimental conditions and evaluated the mass transfer zone, useful and total adsorbed removal amounts and total copper removal percentage. The results showed that the clay treated at higher temperature showed higher copper removal. (author)

  12. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay. GEOCHEMICAL AND .... tries, as filling material in the pulp and paper, toothpaste and paint industries as well ..... tions very vital to human health and other ac- tivities of man.

  13. Study of radionuclide migration in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonioli, F.; Bocola, W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the studies on the migration of Cs, Sr and I in clay formations, which are presently considered for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. The distribution and diffusion coefficients were evaluated by means of experimental techniques and computer procedures, which are presented in this report. The natural clays tested in the laboratory experiments were sampled from the most representative italian basins and from the zone of Mol (Belgium). In addition tests were performed on monomineral clays artificially remade in edometer. The experimental results are in accordance with data found in the literature and show the existence of a good correlation between the observed migration properties and the granulometric and mineralogic characteristics of the natural clays

  14. pillared and un-pillared bentonite clays

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BARTH EKWUEME

    2011-07-29

    Jul 29, 2011 ... A pseudo-second order kinetic model was used to characterize the metal ion transport ... may endanger human health through consumption of sea food and ... widely reported. The pillared clays are two – dimensional zeolite.

  15. experimental characterization of clay soils behavior stabilized

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Rehab Bekkouche, G. Boukhatem

    2016-09-01

    Sep 1, 2016 ... California Bearing Ratio (CBR) ... the globe. Clay soils have the curious property of seeing their consistency changes according ... The use of building materials had been popularly applied to soil stabilization, such as cement.

  16. Aspects of clay/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, D.W.; Dixon, D.A.; Onofrei, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste management, both clay-based materials and concrete are proposed for use as barriers, seals or supporting structures. The main concern when clays and concrete are in proximity is the generation of a high-pH environment by concrete since clay minerals are relatively unstable at high pH. Here we examine the OH - -generating capacity of two high-performance concretes when in contact with several solutions. We also investigate various aspects of claylconcrete interactions. They are: (1) the alkalimetric titration of clay suspensions, (2) the effect of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite) on the swelling and hydraulic properties of compacted bentonite, and (3) the influence of cement grout on a backfill clay retrieved from the 900-d Buffer/Container Experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory of AECL. The results indicate that although high-performance concretes establish significantly lower poresolution pH (9 to 10) than does ordinary portland cement, the pH is still somewhat higher than that of clay/groundwater systems of about pH 8. Hence, even if high-performance concrete is used in a disposal vault, the potential still exists for clay minerals to alter over long periods of time if in contact with this concrete. The data show, however, that clays have a substantial buffering capacity, and clay-based barriers can thus neutralize much of the OH - potentially released from concrete in a vault. Moreover, even after reacting for 120 d at 85 o C with up to 5 wt.% Ca(OH) 2 , compacted bentonite (dry density = 1.2 Mg/m 3 ) retains much of its swelling capacity and has a permeability low enough (hydraulic conductivity ≤ 10 -11 m/s) to ensure that molecular diffusion will be the main transport mechanism through compacted clay-based barriers. Furthermore, according to X-ray diffractometry, the clay mineral component of backfill was not altered by contact with a cement grout for 900 d in the Buffer/Container Experiment

  17. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...... sandstones....

  18. Pedological ~cterization, Clay Mine:at~ and .~cation of,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    namely, very deep, well drained, dark reddish brown to dark brown, sandy clay loams and sandy clays on the steep convex slopes; very deep, well drained, dark brown to dark red, sandy clay loams and; sandy clays on the linear slopes; and very ...

  19. Utilization of Nkpuma-Akpatakpa clay in ceramics: characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nkpuma – Akpatakpa clay was analysed for its ceramics suitability. Chemical, mechanical and spectral characterization of the clay was carried out to obtain more information from this clay found in commercial quantity at Ebonyi State Nigeria. The XRD analysis showed that the principal minerals in the clay are quartz, ...

  20. Preparation and properties of recycled HDPE/clay hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong Lei; Qinglin Wu; Craig M. Clemons

    2007-01-01

    Hybrids based on recycled high density polyethylene (RHDPE) and organic clay were made by melt compounding. The influence of blending method, compatibilizers, and clay content on clay intercalation and exfoliation, RHDPE crystallization behavior, and the mechanical properties of RHDPE/clay hybrids were investigated. Both maleated polyethylene (MAPE) and titanate could...

  1. The Composition and Physical Properties of Some Clays of Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and quartz as the main subsidiary non-clay mineral. The high plasticity index of the clays corresponds to the more transported clays of the tertiary- to –recent environment. The percentage of linear shrinkage varied from 11-16% with the lowest shrinkage (11%), having the coarsest features. Silica (SiO2) content of the clays ...

  2. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  3. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. "Small" market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed.

  4. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicting the water-drop energy required to breakdown dry soil aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.; Bazzoffi, P.

    1995-04-01

    The raindrop energy required to breakdown dry soil aggregates is an index of structural stability which has been found very useful in modelling soil erosion process and in evaluating the suitability of tillage implements for different soils. The aim of this research was to develop and validate a model for predicting the specific water-drop energy required to breakdown aggregates (D) as influenced by soil properties. Air-dry aggregates (2-4 mm in diameter), collected from 15 surface (0-20 cm) soils in north central Italy were used for this study. The actual and natural log-transformed D values were regressed on the soil properties. Clay content, wilting point moisture content (WP) and percent water-stable aggregates (WSA) > 2.0 mm were good predictors of D. Empirical models developed from either clay content or WP predicted D in 70% of the test soils whereas the model developed from WSA > 2.0 mm predicted D in 90% of the test soils. The correlation coefficients (r) between measured and predicted D were 0.961, 0.963 and 0.997 respectively, for models developed from clay, WP and WSA > 2.0 mm. The validity of these models need to be tested on other soils with a wider variation in properties than those used to developed the models. (author). 42 refs, 5 tabs

  6. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) project is a NASA-industry partnership with Bigelow Aerospace (BA) that has developing the first human-rated expandable...

  7. Tissue expander infections in children: look beyond the expander pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A C; Davison, S P; Manders, E K

    1999-11-01

    Infection of the expander pocket is the most common complication encountered with soft-tissue expansion. It is usually due to direct inoculation with skin flora either at the time of expander insertion or from extrusion of the device. The authors report two cases of infection of tissue expanders in which the children had concomitant infected sites distant from the prosthesis. Etiological bacteria of common pediatric infections like otitis media and pharyngitis were cultured from the infected expander pocket, raising suspicion that translocation of the organism to the expander had occurred. Aggressive antibiotic treatment, removal of the prosthesis, and flap advancement is advocated.

  8. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  9. The S/T-Rich Motif in the DNAJB6 Chaperone Delays Polyglutamine Aggregation and the Onset of Disease in a Mouse Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Mansson, Cecilia; de Mattos, Eduardo P.; Bergink, Steven; van der Zwaag, Marianne; van Waarde-Verhagen, M A W H; Kloosterhuis, Niels J.; Melki, Ronald; van Cruchten, Remco T. P.; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Arosio, Paolo; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Bates, Gillian P.; van Deursen, Jan M.; Linse, Sara; van de Sluis, Bart; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2016-01-01

    Expanded CAG repeats lead to debilitating neurodegenerative disorders characterized by aggregation of proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts. The mechanism of aggregation involves primary and secondary nucleation steps. We show how a noncanonical member of the DNAJ-chaperone family,

  10. Experimental study of the effect of high porewater salinity on the physical properties of a natural smectitic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, Roland

    2001-03-01

    Natural smectitic clays for backfilling tunnels and shafts in deep repositories may be an alternative to mixtures of bentonite and ballast. Very salt groundwater is known to raise the hydraulic conductivity and reduce the expandability of clay materials in general and of bentonite/ballast mixtures in particular and the present study aimed at determining the impact of salt water on the major physical properties of natural smectitic clays, represented by the German Friedland Ton. The investigation showed that the compactability of the investigated clay is not significantly affected by the water content in contrast to bentonite/ballast fills, and that the conductivity and expandability are acceptable even at salt contents of up to 20 % if the bulk density at saturation is slightly higher than 2000 kg/m 3 . For salt contents up to 3. 5 % the corresponding density is around 1900 kg/m 3 . In general, the investigated clay offers better physical properties than mixtures of bentonite/ballast mixtures with up to 30 % bentonite content

  11. Experimental study of the effect of high porewater salinity on the physical properties of a natural smectitic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    Natural smectitic clays for backfilling tunnels and shafts in deep repositories may be an alternative to mixtures of bentonite and ballast. Very salt groundwater is known to raise the hydraulic conductivity and reduce the expandability of clay materials in general and of bentonite/ballast mixtures in particular and the present study aimed at determining the impact of salt water on the major physical properties of natural smectitic clays, represented by the German Friedland Ton. The investigation showed that the compactability of the investigated clay is not significantly affected by the water content in contrast to bentonite/ballast fills, and that the conductivity and expandability are acceptable even at salt contents of up to 20 % if the bulk density at saturation is slightly higher than 2000 kg/m{sup 3} . For salt contents up to 3. 5 % the corresponding density is around 1900 kg/m{sup 3}. In general, the investigated clay offers better physical properties than mixtures of bentonite/ballast mixtures with up to 30 % bentonite content.

  12. Characterization of clay used for red ceramic fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, P.S.; Morais, A.S.C.; Caldas, T.C.C.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize a clay used in the red ceramics fabrication, from Campos dos Goytacazes north of the State of Rio de Janeiro. The clay was submitted for physical, chemical and mineralogical tests. The results showed that the clay has a high content of clay minerals with kaolinitic predominance, high loss on ignition and low flux oxides. It is recommended that this clay is mixed with non-plastic materials. (author)

  13. Mechanism of smectic arrangement of montmorillonite and bentonite clay platelets incorporated in gels of poly(acrylamide) induced by the interaction with cationic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodoubtsev, S G; Lavrentyeva, E K; Khokhlov, A R; Allegra, G; Famulari, A; Meille, S V

    2006-01-03

    Structure transitions, induced by the interaction with the cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride in nanocomposite gels of poly(acrylamide) with incorporated suspensions of the two closely related layered clays bentonite and montmorillonite, were studied. Unexpectedly, different behaviors were revealed. X-ray diffraction measurements confirm that, due to the interaction with the surfactant, initially disordered bentonite platelets arrange into highly ordered structures incorporating alternating clay platelets and surfactant bilayers. The formation of these smectic structures also in the cross-linked polymer gels, upon addition of the surfactant, is explained by the existence of preformed, poorly ordered aggregates of the clay platelets in the suspensions before the gel formation. In the case of montmorillonite, smectic ordering of the disordered platelets in the presence of the surfactant is observed only after drying the suspensions and the clay-gel composites. Rheology studies of aqueous suspensions of the two clays, in the absence of both surfactant and gel, evidence a much higher viscosity for bentonite than for montmorillonite, suggesting smaller clay-aggregate size in the latter case. Qualitatively consistent results are obtained from optical micrographs.

  14. The expanding EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zank, Wolfgang

    In this paper I try to explore whether the EU can go on expanding and thereby become culturally ever more diversified, and at the same retain its stability. The answer is, in principle, affirmative. Europe has always been much diversified, and therefore it is not possible to define a European...... identity in terms of particular cultural traditions. However, in spite of their diversity, the EU-member countries are united by their adherence to the principles of democracy, rule by law and human rights. Countries which do not share this basic consensus would not be accepted as members, nor is it likely...... that they would apply for it. An essential part is the willingness of member states to accept a reduction of national sovereignty on some important policy fields. The EU project is basically about lifting the principles of democracy and rule by law on the international level, most and foremost among the member...

  15. Expanding hollow metal rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Harold B [Evans, GA; Imrich, Kenneth J [Grovetown, GA

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  16. Effects of modified Clay on the morphology and thermal stability of PMMA/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Yen; Lin, Mei-Ju; Chuang, Yi-Chen; Chou, Po-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The potential to improve the mechanical, thermal, and optical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/clay nanocomposites prepared with clay containing an organic modifier was investigated. Pristine sodium montmorillonite clay was modified using cocoamphodipropionate, which absorbs UVB in the 280–320 nm range, via ion exchange to enhance the compatibility between the clay platelets and the methyl methacrylate polymer matrix. PMMA/clay nanocomposites were synthesized via in situ free-radical polymerization. Three types of clay with various cation-exchange capacities (CEC) were used as inorganic layered materials in these organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposites: CL42, CL120, and CL88 with CEC values of 116, 168, and 200 meq/100 g of clay, respectively. We characterized the effects of the organoclay dispersion on UV resistance, effectiveness as an O 2 gas barrier, thermal stability, and mechanical properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposites. Gas permeability analysis demonstrated the excellent gas barrier properties of the nanocomposites, consistent with the intercalated or exfoliated morphologies observed. The optical properties were assessed using UV–Visible spectroscopy, which revealed that these materials have good optical clarity, UV resistance, and scratch resistance. The effect of the dispersion capability of organoclay on the thermal properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposites was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry; these analyses revealed excellent thermal stability of some of the modified clay nanocomposites. - Highlights: ► We control the dispersion morphology by protonation of K2 into the clay. ► The CL120 and CL88, with the higher CEC, are more random intercalated by K2. ► We report these materials have good optical clarity, and UV resistance

  17. Incorporation of nano-clay saponite layers in the organo-clay hybrid films using anionic amphiphile stearic acid by Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Syed Arshad, E-mail: sa_h153@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar-799022 (India); Chakraborty, S.; Bhattacharjee, D. [Department of Physics, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar-799022 (India); Schoonheydt, R.A. [Centres for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, K.U. Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 23, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-06-01

    In general cationic amphiphiles are used to prepare organo-clay hybrid film in Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) technique. In this present communication we demonstrated a unique technique to prepare the organo–clay hybrid films using an anionic amphiphile. The T–O–T type clay saponite was incorporated onto a floating stearic acid monolayer via a divalent cation Mg{sup 2+}. Salt MgCl{sub 2} was mixed along with the clay dispersion in the LB trough and amphiphile solution was spread onto the subphase in order to make the organo-clay hybrid films. It was observed that salt (MgCl{sub 2}) concentration on the subphase affects the organization of nano-dimensional clay platelet (saponite) in organo-clay hybrid films at air–water interface as well as in LB films. Noticeable changes in area per molecule and shape of the isotherms were observed and measured at subphases with different salt concentrations. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies reveal that only an in-plane (996 cm{sup −1}) vibration of ν (Si-O) band occurred when the salt concentration was 10 mM. However, both in-plane (996 cm{sup −1}) and out-of-plane (1063 cm{sup −1}) vibrations of the ν (Si-O) band of saponite occurred when the subphase salt concentration was 100 mM. Also the out-of-plane vibration of ν (OH) of saponite was prominent at higher salt concentration. This is because at lower salt concentration clay sheets remain flat on the surface whereas; at higher MgCl{sub 2} concentration they aggregated and form stacks of saponite layers. Also they may be slightly tilted with a very small tilt angle at higher salt concentration making a favorable condition for both in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations of ν (Si-O) in the hybrid films. Observed decrease in starting area per molecule in the pressure area isotherm measured at higher salt concentration also supports the tilting of clay layers at air–clay dispersion interface. Attentuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared

  18. The expanding plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, M.C.M. van den.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis concerns the fundamental aspects of an argon plasma expanding from a cascaded arc. This type of plasma is not only used for fundamental research but also for technologically orientated research on plasma deposition and plasma sources. The important characteristics of the plasma are a strong supersonic expansion in which the neutral particle and ion densities decrease three orders of magnitude, followed by a stationary shock front. After the shock front the plasma expands further subsonically. A part of this thesis is devoted to the discussion of a newly constructed combined Thomson-Rayleigh scattering set up. With this set up the electron density, the electron temperature and the neutral particle density are measured locally in the plasma for different conditions. In the analysis of the measured spectra weak coherent effects and the measured apparatus profile are included. The inaccuracies are small, ranging from 1 to 4 percent for the electron density and 2 to 6 percent for the electron temperature, depending on the plasma conditions. The inaccuracy of the neutral particle density determination is larger and ranges from 10 to 50 percent. The detection limits for the electron and neutral particle density are 7.10 17 m -3 and 1.10 20 m -3 respectively. A side path in this thesis is the derivation of the Saha equation for a two-temperature plasma. The reason for this derivation was the dispute in the literature about the correct form of this equation. In this thesis it is shown, from the correct extension of the second law of thermodynamics and from the non-equilibrium formalism of Zubarev, That in the limit of m e /m h ->0 the generalized Saha equation depends on the electron temperature only. (author). 221 refs.; 54 figs.; 13 tabs

  19. Characterization of expandable clay minerals in Lake Baikal sediments by thermal dehydration and cation exchange

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grygar, Tomáš; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David; Hrušková, Michaela; Novotná, Kateřina; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Pruner, Petr; Oberhansli, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2005), s. 389-400 ISSN 0009-8604 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3032401 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) EVK2-2000-00057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : cation exchange capacity * Lake Baikal * Lake Sediments Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.364, year: 2005

  20. Evaluation of aggregate stability of Haplic Stagnosols using dynamic light scattering, phase analysis light scattering and color coordinates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Artemyeva, Z.; Žigová, Anna; Kirillova, N.; Šťastný, Martin; Holubík, O.; Podrázský, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 13 (2017), s. 1838-1851 ISSN 0365-0340 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : land use * aggregate stability * organo-clay complexes * dynamic light scattering * phase analysis light scattering * color coordinates Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science OBOR OECD: Soil science Impact factor: 2.137, year: 2016

  1. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-01-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 μM/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na + and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with 14 C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 μM, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet

  2. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of −3.0 ± 0.4 nN and −330 ± 43 aJ (10−18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions. PMID:26585552

  3. Investigating the swelling pressure of compacted crushed-Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C. S.; Tang, A. M.; Cui, Y. J.; Delage, P.; Schroeder, C.; De Laure, E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the swelling pressure of heavily compacted crushed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone at a dry unit mass ρ d =2.0 Mg/m 3 using four different methods: constant-volume, swell-reload, zero-swell and adjusted constant-volume method. Results show that the swelling pressure varies in the range of 1-5 MPa and depends significantly on the test method. From the constant-volume tests, it is observed that the swelling behavior during wetting is a function of the suction and depends on both the hydration paths and wetting conditions (e.g. vapor-wetting or liquid-wetting). The swelling pressure decreases significantly with saturation time. To identify the microstructure changes of specimens before and after wetting, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests were performed. It is observed that, after wetting, the large inter-aggregate pores observed in the as-compacted specimen are no longer apparent; the whole pattern is characterized by a general swell of hydrated clay particles, rendering the soil more homogenous. Results from MIP indicated that wetting caused a significant reduction of the entrance diameter of the dominant inter-aggregate pores from 2.1 to 0.5μm whereas intra-aggregate pores were not significantly influenced. (authors)

  4. Research on Judgment Aggregation Based on Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Preference aggregation and judgment aggregation are two basic research models of group decision making. And preference aggregation has been deeply studied in social choice theory. However, researches of social choice theory gradually focus on judgment aggregation which appears recently. Judgment aggregation focuses on how to aggregate many consistent logical formulas into one, from the perspective of logic. We try to start with judgment aggregation model based on logic and then explore different solutions to problem of judgment aggregation.

  5. Influence of Polymer-Clay Interfacial Interactions on the Ignition Time of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Indraneel S; Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2017-08-11

    Metal ions present on smectite clay (montmorillonite) platelets have preferential reactivity towards peroxy/alkoxy groups during polyamide 6 (PA6) thermal decomposition. This changes the decomposition pathway and negatively affects the ignition response of PA6. To restrict these interfacial interactions, high-temperature-resistant polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI) and polyimide (PI) were used to coat clay layers. PEI was deposited on clay by solution-precipitation, whereas PI was deposited through a solution-imidization-precipitation technique before melt blending with PA6. The absence of polymer-clay interfacial interactions has resulted in a similar time-to-ignition of PA6/PEI-clay (133 s) and PA6/PI-clay (139 s) composites as neat PA6 (140 s). On the contrary, PA6 with conventional ammonium-based surfactant modified clay has showed a huge drop in time-to-ignition (81 s), as expected. The experimental evidences provided herein reveal the role of the catalytic activity of clay during the early stages of polymer decomposition.

  6. Mechanical interaction between swelling compacted clay and fractured rock, and the leaching of clay colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grindrod, P.; Peletier, M.A.; Takase, H.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a saturated clay buffer layer and a fractured crystalline rock engineered disturbed zone. Once saturated, the clay extrudes into the available rock fractures, behaving as a compressible non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss the modelling implications of published

  7. Study of adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals; Estudio de Adsorcion de Fenentreno en Diferentes Tipos de Arcillas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, M L; Escolano, O; Rodriguez, V; Diaz, F J; Perez, R; Garcia, S; Garcia Frutos, F J

    2003-07-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay mineral also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represent ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs.

  8. Clay mineral facies and lateritization in basalts of the southeastern Parana Basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.T.G. de; Formoso, M.L.L.; Trescases, J.J.; Meunier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Seventeen samples from two lateritic profiles, each with five facies, were studied. These profiles occur on the old planation surface of the plateau basalts of the southern part of ParanáBasin, Brazil. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, Mössbauer spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra were used to obtain information about the nature and chemical composition of each weathering facies. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and analyses of clay minerals were performed to detect microcrystalline environmental changes. Both profiles have two major parts: a loose red-clay latosol separated from an underlying mottled clay and an alterite facies; a stone line may or may not be present between the latosol and the underlying units. In both profiles the latosol consists principally of kaolinite, hematite and goethite. Two alterite facies, shaped by differential weathering, are also present in the lower profile: a halloysite–nontronite clayey matrix with a well developed fissure system occurs in the argillaceous alterite and a network of Al–goethite aggregates is typical of the highly porous cortex of the boulder alterite that is found in the stone line and below it. Gibbsite has crystallized in the large pores of porphyritic boulder alterite but is absent in the small pores of the subaphyric boulder alterite. Clay minerals observed in fissures include halloysite associated with goethite and manganese oxides. The basalt has hydrothermal green-clays (mixed layers and trioctahedral smectites) that formed between primary plagioclase, pyroxene and Ti–magnetite crystals while fresh corestones of the boulder alterite have cryptocrystalline iron-rich material. The study of these profiles shows one principal evolutionary trend for clay minerals. This trend is from smectite and mixed layers that form green clays in altered bedrock at the base of the profile to an intermediate association of nontronite and halloysite in the argillaceous

  9. Hydrogen isotope ratios of clay minerals constituting clay veins found in granitic rocks in Hiroshima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Ryuji; Kakitani, Satoru; Kuroda, Yoshimatsu; Matsuo, Sadao; Suzuoki, Tetsuro.

    1980-01-01

    The deuterium content of the constitutional and interlayer water extracted from the clay minerals (illite, montmorillonite, interstratified illite-montmorillonite mineral, kaolinite, halloysite) constituting the clay veins found in the granitic rocks in Hiroshima Prefecture was measured. The clay minerals were heated at 270 deg C to extract the interlayer water, then heated to 1,400 or 1,500 deg C to extract the constitutional water. The deuterium content of the local surface water collected from sampling points was measured. In the clay veins formed along perpendicular joints, the constituent clay minerals change from lower to upper part: illite → montmorillonite → kaolinite → halloysite. The deuterium content values of the constitutional water for illite and montmorillonite were estimated to be -67 to -69% and -86 to -89%, respectively. The deuterium content values of the constitutional water for halloysite range from -68 to -80% and for kaolinite from -63 to -67%. (J.P.N.)

  10. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  11. The Artful Universe Expanded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, B A

    2005-01-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  12. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  13. Characterization of wet aggregate stability of soils by ¹H-NMR relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, C; Meyer, M; Schaumann, G E

    2015-09-01

    For the assessment of soil structural stability against hydraulic stress, wet sieving or constant head permeability tests are typically used but rather limited in their intrinsic information value. The multiple applications of several tests is the only possibility to assess important processes and mechanisms during soil aggregate breakdown, e.g. the influences of soil fragment release or differential swelling on the porous systems of soils or soil aggregate columns. Consequently, the development of new techniques for a faster and more detailed wet aggregate stability assessment is required. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry ((1)H-NMR relaxometry) might provide these requirements because it has already been successfully applied on soils. We evaluated the potential of (1)H-NMR relaxometry for the assessment of wet aggregate stability of soils, with more detailed information on occurring mechanisms at the same time. Therefore, we conducted single wet sieving and constant head permeability tests on untreated and 1% polyacrylic acid-treated soil aggregates of different textures and organic matter contents, subsequently measured by (1)H-NMR relaxometry after percolation. The stability of the soil aggregates were mainly depending on their organic matter contents and the type of aggregate stabilization, whereby additional effects of clay swelling on the measured wet aggregate stability were identified by the transverse relaxation time (T2) distributions. Regression analyses showed that only the percentage of water stable aggregates could be determined accurately from percolated soil aggregate columns by (1)H-NMR relaxometry measurements. (1)H-NMR relaxometry seems a promising technique for wet aggregate stability measurements but should be further developed for nonpercolated aggregate columns and real soil samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  15. Accurate control testing for clay liner permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R J

    1991-08-01

    Two series of centrifuge tests were carried out to evaluate the use of centrifuge modelling as a method of accurate control testing of clay liner permeability. The first series used a large 3 m radius geotechnical centrifuge and the second series a small 0.5 m radius machine built specifically for research on clay liners. Two permeability cells were fabricated in order to provide direct data comparisons between the two methods of permeability testing. In both cases, the centrifuge method proved to be effective and efficient, and was found to be free of both the technical difficulties and leakage risks normally associated with laboratory permeability testing of fine grained soils. Two materials were tested, a consolidated kaolin clay having an average permeability coefficient of 1.2{times}10{sup -9} m/s and a compacted illite clay having a permeability coefficient of 2.0{times}10{sup -11} m/s. Four additional tests were carried out to demonstrate that the 0.5 m radius centrifuge could be used for linear performance modelling to evaluate factors such as volumetric water content, compaction method and density, leachate compatibility and other construction effects on liner leakage. The main advantages of centrifuge testing of clay liners are rapid and accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties and realistic stress modelling for performance evaluations. 8 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Radionuclide sorption studies on abyssal red clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.

    1979-01-01

    The radionuclide sorption properties of a widely distributed abyssal red clay are being experimentally investigated using batch equilibration techniques. This paper summarizes sorption equilibrium data obtained when 0.68 N NaCl solutions containing either Tc, U, Pu, Am or Cm were contacted with samples of the red clay and also summarizes some initial results from experiments designed to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for various nuclides. Under mildly oxidizing conditions, the sorption equilibrium distribution coefficients for technetium were essentially zero. At solution-phase nuclide concentrations on the order of 10 -6 M and less and at solution pH values of about 6.9, the distribution coefficients for plutonium were about 3 x 10 3 m1/gm and for uranium, americium, and curium were about 10 5 ml/gm or greater. However, at solution pH values of about 2.7, the distribution coefficients for each of the nuclides were greatly diminished. Initial experiments conducted in order to determine the relative selectivity of the clay for cesium, barium, and cerium, indicated that the silicate phases in the clay were selective for cesium over barium and cerium. These experiments also indicated that the hydrous oxide phases were selective for cerium over barium and for barium over cesium

  17. Se of polymers to control clay swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slobod, R L; Beiswanger, J P.G.

    1968-01-01

    The injection of water to displace oil is one of the main methods used to increase oil recovery. High injection rates are generally desired, and in some cases the flood will not be economic unless high rates are maintained. The presence of clays which swell in the presence of water offers a complication to the problem of maintaining adequate injectivity. In the course of this study it was observed that certain polymers, when present in dilute concentrations in the water, had the ability to reduce the response of these clays to fresh water. Two polymers, one an anionic and the other nonionic, were found to be very effective in controlling the clays present in Berea cores. Successful control of clay swelling was obtained by use of solutions containing as little as 1.0 ppM of polymer, but at this low concentration appreciable volumes of treating solution were required. These results suggest that some minimum amount of polymer must be adsorbed to prevent clay swelling. In Berea sandstone this minimum amount appeared to be of the order of 0.03 mg per cc of pore space. A series of tests made using 10.0 ppM polymer showed that the polymer could be made through the porous system in which 0.066 per mg of polymer was adsorbed per cc of pore space.

  18. Sintering study in vertical fixed bed reactor for synthetic aggregate production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaresma, D.S.; Neves, A.S.S.; Melo, A.O.; Pereira, L.F.S.; Bezerra, P.T.S.; Macedo, E.N.; Souza, J.A.S.

    2017-01-01

    The synthetic aggregates are being employed in civil construction for the reduction of mineral extraction activities. Within this context, the recycling of industrial waste is the basis of the majority of processes to reduce the exploitation of mineral resources. In this work the sintering in a vertical fixed bed reactor for synthetic aggregate production using 20% pellets and 80% charcoal was studied. The pellets were prepared from a mixture containing clay, charcoal and fly ash. Two experiments varying the speed of air sucking were carried out. The material produced was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, measures of their ceramic properties, and particle size analysis. The results showed that the solid-state reactions, during the sintering process, were efficient and the produced material was classified as coarse lightweight aggregate. The process is interesting for the sintering of aggregates, and can be controlled by composition, particle size, temperature gradient and gaseous flow. (author)

  19. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Reynolds

    Full Text Available Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  20. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  1. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease. (paper)

  2. Information Aggregation and Investment Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Hellwig; Aleh Tsyvinski; Elias Albagli

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies an environment in which information aggregation interacts with investment decisions. The first contribution of the paper is to develop a tractable model of such interactions. The second contribution is to solve the model in closed form and derive a series of implications that result from the interplay between information aggregation and the value of market information for the firms' decision problem. We show that the model generates an information aggregation wedge between ...

  3. The history of aggregate development in the denver, Co area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    At the start of the 20th century Denver's population was 203,795. Most streets were unpaved. Buildings were constructed of wood frame or masonry. Transport was by horse-drawn-wagon or rail. Statewide, aggregate consumption was less than 0.25 metric tons per person per year. One hundred years later Denver had a population of 2,365,345. Today Denver is a major metropolitan area at the crossroads of two interstates, home to a new international airport, and in the process of expanding its light rail transit system. The skyline is punctuated with skyscrapers. The urban center is surrounded with edge cities. These changes required huge amounts of aggregate. Statewide, aggregate consumption increased 50 fold to over 13 metric tons per person per year. Denver has a large potential supply of aggregate, but sand and gravel quality decreases downstream from the mountain front and potential sources of crushed stone occur in areas prized for their scenic beauty. These issues, along with urban encroachment and citizen opposition, have complicated aggregate development and have paved a new path for future aggregate development including sustainable resource management and reclamation techniques.

  4. Sociocultural dimensions of supply and demand for natural aggregate; examples from the Mid-Atlantic region, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Brown, William M.

    2002-01-01

    The United States uses large quantities of natural aggregate to build and maintain a continuously expanding infrastructure. In recent years, per capita demand for aggregate in the United States has grown to about 9.7 metric tons (10.7 tons) per person per year. Over the next 25 years, the aggregate industry expects to mine quantities equivalent to all aggregate mined in the United States over the past 100 years. The issues surrounding supply and demand for aggregate in the mid-Atlantic states of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia illustrate competing requirements for industrial minerals and many simultaneous social and environmental objectives.

  5. Behavior of clay exposed to heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heremans, R.; Buyens, M.; Manfroy, P.

    1978-01-01

    In the frame of his R and D programme on geological burial of solidified radioactive waste, the C.E.N./S.C.K. undertook experimental and theoretical work on the behavior of the Boom clay against heat. The work is performed under contract with the Commission of European Communities. In a first phase a series of chemical and physical properties were determined on clay samples taken at various depths during the core boring performed on the C.E.N./S.C.K. site in 1975. In a second phase, a simulated high level waste heat source was developed and tested in view of representative heat transfer experiments into the geological formation. In parallel to the experimental work, computarized theoretical studies were undertaken aiming an evaluation of heat effect of a vitrified high level waste repository on an underground structure in clay

  6. Interaction of polymer with discotic clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvray, L.; Lal, J.

    1999-01-01

    Normally synthetic well defined monodisperse discotic laponite clays are known to form a gel phase at mass concentrations as low as a few percent in distilled water. Hydrosoluble polymer polyethylene oxide was added to this intriguing clay system, it was observed that it either prevents gelation or slows it down extremely depending on the polymer weight, concentration or the laponite concentration. Small Angle Neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study these systems because only by isotopic labeling can the structure of the adsorbed polymer layers be determined. The contrast variation technique is specifically used to determine separately the different partial structure factors of the clay and polymer. In this way the signal of the adsorbed chains is separated from the signal of the free chains in the dilute regime. Attempts have also been made to characterize the structure in the concentrated regime of laponite with polymer

  7. Aggregates morphometry in a Latosol (Oxisol under different soil management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Eloize Carducci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in soil physical properties are inherent in land use, mainly in superficial layers. Structural alterations can directly influence distribution, stability and especially morphometry of soil aggregates, which hence will affect pore system and the dynamic process of water and air in soil. Among the methods used to measure these changes, morphometry is a complementary tool to the classic methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate structural quality of a Latosol (Oxisol, under different management systems, using morphometric techniques. Treatments consisted of soil under no-tillage (NT; pasture (P, in which both had been cultivated for ten years, and an area under native vegetation (NV – Savannah like vegetation. Aggregates were sampled at depths of 0-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m, retained on sieves with 9.52 – 4.76 mm, 4.76 – 1.0mm, 1.0 – 0.5mm diameter ranges. Aggregate morphometry was assessed by 2D images from scanner via QUANTPORO software. The analyzed variables were: area, perimeter, aspect, roughness, Ferret diameter and compactness. Moreover, disturbed samples were collected at the same depths to determine particle size, aggregate stability in water, water-dispersible clay, clay flocculation index and organic matter content. It was observed that different soil management systems have modified soil aggregate morphology as well as physical attributes; and management effects’ magnitude increased from NT to P.

  8. Aggregate Stability in Soil with Humic and Histic Horizons in a Toposequence under Araucaria Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hanke

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aggregate stability is one of the most important factors in soil conservation and maintenance of soil environmental functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the aggregate stability mechanisms related to chemical composition of organic matter in soil profiles with humic and histic horizons in a toposequence under Araucaria moist forest in southern Brazil. The soils sampled were classified as Humic Hapludox (highest position, Fluvaquentic Humaquepts (lowest slope position, and Typic Haplosaprists (floodplain. The C and N contents were determined in bulk soil samples. The chemical composition of soil organic matter was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy. Aggregate stability was determined by applying increasing levels of ultrasound energy. Carbon content increased from the top of the slope to the alluvial plain. Higher ultrasonic energy values for clay dispersion were observed in the C-rich soils in the lower landscape positions, indicating that organic compounds play an important role in the structural stabilization of these profiles. Both aliphatic and carbohydrate-like structures were pertinent to aggregate stability. In the Oxisol, organo-mineral interaction between carbohydrates and the clay mineral surface was the most important mechanism affecting aggregation. In soils with a higher C content (Humaquepts and Haplosaprists, stabilization is predominantly conferred by the aliphatic groups, which is probably due to the structural protection offered by these hydrophobic organic groups.

  9. An Outline of Data Aggregation Security in Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Boubiche

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Data aggregation processes aim to reduce the amount of exchanged data in wireless sensor networks and consequently minimize the packet overhead and optimize energy efficiency. Securing the data aggregation process is a real challenge since the aggregation nodes must access the relayed data to apply the aggregation functions. The data aggregation security problem has been widely addressed in classical homogeneous wireless sensor networks, however, most of the proposed security protocols cannot guarantee a high level of security since the sensor node resources are limited. Heterogeneous wireless sensor networks have recently emerged as a new wireless sensor network category which expands the sensor nodes’ resources and capabilities. These new kinds of WSNs have opened new research opportunities where security represents a most attractive area. Indeed, robust and high security level algorithms can be used to secure the data aggregation at the heterogeneous aggregation nodes which is impossible in classical homogeneous WSNs. Contrary to the homogeneous sensor networks, the data aggregation security problem is still not sufficiently covered and the proposed data aggregation security protocols are numberless. To address this recent research area, this paper describes the data aggregation security problem in heterogeneous wireless sensor networks and surveys a few proposed security protocols. A classification and evaluation of the existing protocols is also introduced based on the adopted data aggregation security approach.

  10. An Outline of Data Aggregation Security in Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubiche, Sabrina; Boubiche, Djallel Eddine; Bilami, Azzedine; Toral-Cruz, Homero

    2016-04-12

    Data aggregation processes aim to reduce the amount of exchanged data in wireless sensor networks and consequently minimize the packet overhead and optimize energy efficiency. Securing the data aggregation process is a real challenge since the aggregation nodes must access the relayed data to apply the aggregation functions. The data aggregation security problem has been widely addressed in classical homogeneous wireless sensor networks, however, most of the proposed security protocols cannot guarantee a high level of security since the sensor node resources are limited. Heterogeneous wireless sensor networks have recently emerged as a new wireless sensor network category which expands the sensor nodes' resources and capabilities. These new kinds of WSNs have opened new research opportunities where security represents a most attractive area. Indeed, robust and high security level algorithms can be used to secure the data aggregation at the heterogeneous aggregation nodes which is impossible in classical homogeneous WSNs. Contrary to the homogeneous sensor networks, the data aggregation security problem is still not sufficiently covered and the proposed data aggregation security protocols are numberless. To address this recent research area, this paper describes the data aggregation security problem in heterogeneous wireless sensor networks and surveys a few proposed security protocols. A classification and evaluation of the existing protocols is also introduced based on the adopted data aggregation security approach.

  11. An Outline of Data Aggregation Security in Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubiche, Sabrina; Boubiche, Djallel Eddine; Bilami, Azzedine; Toral-Cruz, Homero

    2016-01-01

    Data aggregation processes aim to reduce the amount of exchanged data in wireless sensor networks and consequently minimize the packet overhead and optimize energy efficiency. Securing the data aggregation process is a real challenge since the aggregation nodes must access the relayed data to apply the aggregation functions. The data aggregation security problem has been widely addressed in classical homogeneous wireless sensor networks, however, most of the proposed security protocols cannot guarantee a high level of security since the sensor node resources are limited. Heterogeneous wireless sensor networks have recently emerged as a new wireless sensor network category which expands the sensor nodes’ resources and capabilities. These new kinds of WSNs have opened new research opportunities where security represents a most attractive area. Indeed, robust and high security level algorithms can be used to secure the data aggregation at the heterogeneous aggregation nodes which is impossible in classical homogeneous WSNs. Contrary to the homogeneous sensor networks, the data aggregation security problem is still not sufficiently covered and the proposed data aggregation security protocols are numberless. To address this recent research area, this paper describes the data aggregation security problem in heterogeneous wireless sensor networks and surveys a few proposed security protocols. A classification and evaluation of the existing protocols is also introduced based on the adopted data aggregation security approach. PMID:27077866

  12. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  13. Preparation of organophilic clays and polypropylene nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Martha Fogliato S.; Nascimento, Vinicius G. do; Lenz, Denise M.; Schenato, Flavia

    2011-01-01

    Polypropylene/montmorillonite nano composites were prepared by the melt intercalation technique. The clay was organically modified with different quaternary ammonium salts to obtain the organo clay. The modified clays with the quaternary ammonium salts were introduced in a polypropylene matrix with 3 wt. % of clay. The interlayer distance (d001) of the clay particles were obtained by X- ray diffraction and the thermal stability of the systems were investigated by thermogravimetry. The organo clay presence in the polymer matrix increased the degradation temperature in relation to the pure polymer. (author)

  14. Removal of Phenol in Aqueous Solution Using Kaolin Mineral Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Kaolin clay were tested for phenol removal as toxic liquid waste from aqueous waste water. Several experimental conditions such as weight and particle size of clay were investigated to study batch kinetic techniques, also the ph and concentration of the phenol solution were carried out. The stability of the Langmuir adsorption model of the equilibrium data were studied for phenol sorbent clay system. Infrared spectra, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis techniques were used to characterize the behavior of kaolin clay and kaolin clay saturated with phenol. The results obtained showed that kaolin clay could be used successfully as an efficient sorbent material to remove phenol from aqueous solution

  15. Moessbauer firing study of Peruvian clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, R.; Wagner, U.; Wagner, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    In connection with work on ancient ceramics Moessbauer studies of the firing behaviour of six Peruvian clays have been performed in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. For two clays, one of them is poor, the other one is rich in oxides, the change of the Moessbauer parameters on firing between 100 and 1350 0 C was measured in detail, both with and without preceding reduction. The minerals present at characteristic temperatures are determined by X-ray diffraction and an attempt is made to discuss the physical and chemical processes occurring in the different temperature ranges. (author)

  16. Synthetic clay excels in 90Sr removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarneni, Sridhar; Kodama, Tatsuya; Paulus, William J.; Carlson, C.

    2000-01-01

    Tests with actual ground water from Hanford site, and fundamental studies of 2Na + →Sr 2+ exchange equilibria revealed that a synthetic clay is extremely selective for 90 Sr with a high capacity for uptake. Comparative studies with existing Sr selective ion exchangers clearly revealed that the present synthetic clay exhibited the best performance for 90 Sr removal from actual ground water collected from three different locations at Hanford. This novel Sr ion sieve is expected to be useful for the decontamination of the environment after accidental release and contamination with 90 Sr. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society

  17. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  18. Effects of Different Types of Clays and Maleic Anhydride Modified Polystyrene on Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehrabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer/clay nanocomposites are considered as a new subject of research in Iran and the world. Addition of a minimum amount of clay (2-5wt% can improve the mechanical properties, enhance barrier properties and reduce flammability dramatically. Polystyrene (PS exhibits high strength, high modulus and excellent dimensional stability, but it has poor ductility, elongation, and flexural modulus. By incorporating clay into polystyrene these properties can be improved. In this study preparation of polystyrene/clay nanocomposite, effects of different types of clays (Cloisite 10A andNanomer I.30TC and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene on mechanical properties of the prepared polystyrene/clay nanocomposites were evaluated. Samples were prepared by a twin screw extruder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were employed to evaluate the extent of intercalation and exfoliation of silicate layers in the nanocomposites. Mechanical tests show that by addition of clay and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene the flexural modulus (~30% and elongation-at-break (~40% of prepared nanocomposites have been improved. XRD and TEM results show that nanocomposite have an intercalated structure with ability to change to further exfoliation structure.

  19. Clay intercalation and influence on crystallinity of EVA-based clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, D.S.; Prasad, R.; Gupta, R.K.; Bhattacharya, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    Various polymer clay nanocomposites (PCNs) were prepared from ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) with 9, 18 and 28% vinyl acetate (VA) content filled with different wt.% (2.5, 5 and 7.5) of a Montmorillonite-based organo-modified clay (Cloisite[reg] C15A and C30B). The PCNs were prepared using melt blending techniques. Morphological information regarding intercalation and exfoliation were determined by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). WAXS and TEM confirmed that increasing the VA content was necessary to achieve greater clay-polymer interaction as seen from the comparatively higher intercalation of clay platelets with 28% VA. The effect of addition of clay on the development and the modification of crystalline morphology in EVA matrix was also studied using WAXS and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). Results are presented showing that the addition of clay platelets does not increase the matrix crystallinity but the morphology was significantly modified such that there was an increase in the 'rigid' amorphous phase. Mechanical properties were also evaluated against the respective morphological information for each specimen and there are indications that the level of clay-polymer interaction plays a significant role in such morphological modification, and in such a way that affects the final PCN mechanical properties which has wide and significant applications in the packaging industries

  20. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  1. Multiscale Micromechanical Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites and the Effective Clay Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Nuo; Boyce, Mary C.; Parks, David M.; Manovitch, Oleg; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Lee, Hojun; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-03-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced mechanical properties at low weight fractions (Wp) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly dependent on particular features of the second-phase ¡°particles¡+/-; in particular, the particle volume fraction (fp), the particle aspect ratio (L/t), and the ratio of particle mechanical properties to those of the matrix. However, these important aspects of as-processed nanoclay composites have yet to be consistently and accurately defined. A multiscale modeling strategy was developed to account for the hierarchical morphology of the nanocomposite: at a lengthscale of thousands of microns, the structure is one of high aspect ratio particles within a matrix; at the lengthscale of microns, the clay particle structure is either (a) exfoliated clay sheets of nanometer level thickness or (b) stacks of parallel clay sheets separated from one another by interlayer galleries of nanometer level height. Here, quantitative structural parameters extracted from XRD patterns and TEM micrographs are used to determine geometric features of the as-processed clay ¡°particles¡+/-, including L/t and the ratio of fp to Wp. These geometric features, together with estimates of silicate lamina stiffness obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, provide a basis for modeling effective mechanical properties of the clay particle. The structure-based predictions of the macroscopic elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of clay weight fraction are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The adopted methodology offers promise for study of related properties in polymer/clay nanocomposites.

  2. Interaction of clay and concrete plugs - Plugging of 5 m deep hole KA1621G01 at Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Drawrite AB, Lund (Sweden); Luleaa Technical Univ., Luleaa (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    along the contact between the plug and the borehole wall as well as interleaved within the bottom of the concrete fill. Chemical alteration of the cement mineral phases at the clay-concrete contact released some quantities of Ca and K that had partly replaced Na in the interlayer of the clay. Precipitation of gypsum and halite had occurred as well as chemical modifications of the clay. The cement has clearly been altered in contact with the clay plug and has lost part of the material strength. Neocrystallization of a fibrous Ca-Si phase had occurred along with the formation of some amorphous components. Dissolution in the saline water is the probable mechanism. The major practical consequence of the chemical interaction of contacting clay and concrete is that the clay becomes slightly less expandable and slightly more conductive within a few centimetres distance from the contact and that the concrete loses some of its strength in 3 years. The adhesion between concrete and rock appeared to be low and concrete plug segments could easily be extruded from the discs by hand.

  3. Interaction of clay and concrete plugs - Plugging of 5 m deep hole KA1621G01 at Aespoe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, Roland; Ramqvist, Gunnar

    2011-11-01

    along the contact between the plug and the borehole wall as well as interleaved within the bottom of the concrete fill. Chemical alteration of the cement mineral phases at the clay-concrete contact released some quantities of Ca and K that had partly replaced Na in the interlayer of the clay. Precipitation of gypsum and halite had occurred as well as chemical modifications of the clay. The cement has clearly been altered in contact with the clay plug and has lost part of the material strength. Neocrystallization of a fibrous Ca-Si phase had occurred along with the formation of some amorphous components. Dissolution in the saline water is the probable mechanism. The major practical consequence of the chemical interaction of contacting clay and concrete is that the clay becomes slightly less expandable and slightly more conductive within a few centimetres distance from the contact and that the concrete loses some of its strength in 3 years. The adhesion between concrete and rock appeared to be low and concrete plug segments could easily be extruded from the discs by hand

  4. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-size particles, 21% silt and 27% clay. Analysis of the clay-sized particles and the bulk materials shows: specific gravity of 2.07 and 2.66, liquid limit of 91.0% and 33.0%, plastic limit of 27.5% and 14.3%, plasticity index of 63.5% and 18.7% and a linear shrinkage of 7.9% and 5.4%, for both clay-sized particles and bulk clay respectively. The activity value of the clay material (0.64 suggests the presence of Kaolinite and Ilite; and these were confirmed with X-Ray diffraction on the bulk sample and clay-sized particles. X-Ray diffraction patterns shows distinctive peaks which highlight the dominance of Kaolinite (with 8 peaks in the pottery clay sample for both clay-sized particles and bulk material; while traces of other clay minerals like Illite and Halloysite and rock minerals like Mica, Feldspar and Chrysotile were also found. These results suggest that the clay possesses high viability in the manufacturing of ceramics, refractory bricks, paper, fertilizer and paint. The clay material can be used as a subgrade in road construction, since it possesses low swelling characteristics.

  5. Preparation of nanocomposites polyurethane water bone with clay montmorillonite sodica and organophilic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Claudia P.; Delpech, Marcia C.; Coutinho, Fernanda M.B.; Mello, Ivana L.

    2009-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on water bone polyurethane (NWPU's) were synthesized based on poli(propylene glycol), dimethylolpropionic acid (DMPA), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and hydrazine (HYD), as chain extender. Two kinds of clays were employed: hydrophilic and organophilic. The nanocomposites were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and the mechanical properties were evaluated. The FTIR results showed the presence of specific groups of clay and the XRD suggested that occurred their intercalation/exfoliation through polyurethane matrix. The mechanical resistance of the systems showed significant increase when compared to water dispersions synthesized without clay. (author)

  6. Crystallite size distribution of clay minerals from selected Serbian clay deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The BWA (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique for the measurement of the mean crystallite thickness and thickness distributions of phyllosilicates was applied to a set of kaolin and bentonite minerals. Six samples of kaolinitic clays, one sample of halloysite, and five bentonite samples from selected Serbian deposits were analyzed. These clays are of sedimentary volcano-sedimentary (diagenetic, and hydrothermal origin. Two different types of shape of thickness distribution were found - lognormal, typical for bentonite and halloysite, and polymodal, typical for kaolinite. The mean crystallite thickness (T BWA seams to be influenced by the genetic type of the clay sample.

  7. Feasibility of using overburden clays for sealing purposes and laboratory testing of the clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, J. (Vyzkumny Ustav pro Hnede Uhli, Most (Czechoslovakia))

    1992-03-01

    Studies properties of overburden clay from North Bohemian surface coal mines for use as sealants of industrial and household waste that will be dumped at Czechoslovak surface mine sites. Basic requirements of sealing layers are optimum compressibility and impermeability by suitable compacting. Laboratory soil mechanical tests of different clay samples were carried out using the Proctor standard tests (PCS) and the Norwegian Geonor A/S - m 45 instrument. Laboratory tests were used to select the best available clay types with optimum density and moisture content. Experimental results of laboratory tests are provided.

  8. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    129 Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 Angstrom to 8.0 Angstrom after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 Angstrom to 8.4 Angstrom

  9. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  10. Collective Rationality in Graph Aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endriss, U.; Grandi, U.; Schaub, T.; Friedrich, G.; O'Sullivan, B.

    2014-01-01

    Suppose a number of agents each provide us with a directed graph over a common set of vertices. Graph aggregation is the problem of computing a single “collective” graph that best represents the information inherent in this profile of individual graphs. We consider this aggregation problem from the

  11. Emulsions treatment of oil / water using clay vermiculite hydrofobized; Tratamento de emulsoes oleo/agua utilizando a argila vermiculita hidrofobizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, V.C.; Batista, T.S.; Ramos, I.B.M.; Alves, J.J.N.; Sousa, B.V., E-mail: valdetecampossilva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the oil removal capacity in synthetic emulsions using clay vermiculite expanded and hydrophobized. Removing and oil adsorption capacity were evaluated from the finite bath assays using the factorial design 2², and the model definition that describes the process by adsorption isotherm. The diffraction patterns confirm that the process of expansion and hydrophobic at 700 ° C increases the spacing between clay layers of vermiculite, as well as the infrared spectrum presents characteristic band of the hydrophobing process. From the isotherms it found that the correlation coefficients showed that the Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir sigmoidal Hill Sigmoidal well describe the adsorption behavior of vermiculite clay. However, the experimental data were best fitted to the Hill sigmoid model.(author)

  12. Study of the application of non-plastic clays from Pocos de Caldas - part 1: chemical-mineralogic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roveri, C.D.; Mariano, N.A.; Faustino, L.M.; Aielo, G.F.; Pinto, L.P.A.; Maestrelli, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Pocos de Caldas is an important 'hidrotermomineral' center of Brazil, where can be found non-plastic clays deposits with no significant records about its characterization; this fact difficult the studies of industrial application. These nonplastic clays, not used, have been stored in sheds or open, which creates a high cost to the industry, and become an environmental liability. In the present work, the chemical-mineralogical study of six samples of non-plastic clays was realized, to expand the horizons of researches about such materials. This preliminary study showed that, overall, the samples are composed of refractory minerals such as kaolinite and gibbsite, with less significant amounts of other phases such as quartz, illite and vermiculite. The chemical analysis permitted the grouping of raw materials into two groups according to their refractories proprieties, guiding to the subsequent characterization. (author)

  13. Orthogonal flexible Rydberg aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, K.; Wüster, S.; Rost, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the link between atomic motion and exciton transport in flexible Rydberg aggregates, assemblies of highly excited light alkali-metal atoms, for which motion due to dipole-dipole interaction becomes relevant. In two one-dimensional atom chains crossing at a right angle adiabatic exciton transport is affected by a conical intersection of excitonic energy surfaces, which induces controllable nonadiabatic effects. A joint exciton-motion pulse that is initially governed by a single energy surface is coherently split into two modes after crossing the intersection. The modes induce strongly different atomic motion, leading to clear signatures of nonadiabatic effects in atomic density profiles. We have shown how this scenario can be exploited as an exciton switch, controlling direction and coherence properties of the joint pulse on the second of the chains [K. Leonhardt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 223001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.223001]. In this article we discuss the underlying complex dynamics in detail, characterize the switch, and derive our isotropic interaction model from a realistic anisotropic one with the addition of a magnetic bias field.

  14. Is montmorillonite-rich clay of MX-80 type the ideal buffer for isolation of HLW?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1999-12-01

    Four commercial clays, saponite, mixed-layer smectite-mica, kaolinite, and palygorskite, have been examined as possible alternatives to MX-80 buffer. General estimates based on the microstructural constitution and hydration potential as well as actual laboratory testing show that except for normally graded kaolinite, they would all serve acceptably in a repository. MX-80 is, however, superior with respect to hydraulic conductivity and retardation of diffusive transport of relevant cations and, like saponite and palygorskite, it has a high swelling pressure, that may in fact be too high. The mixed-layer clay is less but sufficiently expandable and is concluded to have better thermal and rheological properties as well as gas release capacity. It is hence the number one competitor to MX-80

  15. Is montmorillonite-rich clay of MX-80 type the ideal buffer for isolation of HLW?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    Four commercial clays, saponite, mixed-layer smectite-mica, kaolinite, and palygorskite, have been examined as possible alternatives to MX-80 buffer. General estimates based on the microstructural constitution and hydration potential as well as actual laboratory testing show that except for normally graded kaolinite, they would all serve acceptably in a repository. MX-80 is, however, superior with respect to hydraulic conductivity and retardation of diffusive transport of relevant cations and, like saponite and palygorskite, it has a high swelling pressure, that may in fact be too high. The mixed-layer clay is less but sufficiently expandable and is concluded to have better thermal and rheological properties as well as gas release capacity. It is hence the number one competitor to MX-80.

  16. The Expanding Universe: Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, Don [Fermilab; Nord, Brian [Fermilab

    2014-09-01

    In 1998, observations of distant supernovae led physicists that not only was the universe expanding, but the expansion was speeding up. In this article, we describe the evidence for an expanding universe and describe what physicists and cosmologists have learned in the intervening years. The target audience for this article is high school physics teachers and college physics professors at teaching institutions.

  17. The expanding universe: an introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Pössel, Markus

    2017-01-01

    An introduction to the physics and mathematics of the expanding universe, using no more than high-school level / undergraduate mathematics. Covered are the basics of scale factor expansion, the dynamics of the expanding universe, various distance concepts and the generalized redshift-luminosity relation, among other topics.

  18. Quantitative approach on SEM images of microstructure of clay soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施斌; 李生林; M.Tolkachev

    1995-01-01

    The working principles of Videolab Image Processing System (VIPS), the examining methods of orientation of microstructural units of clay soils and analysing results on SEM images of some typical microstructures of clay soils using the VIPS are introduced.

  19. Hydration Phase Diagram of Clay Particles from Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorio, Tulio; Brochard, Laurent; Vandamme, Matthieu

    2017-11-07

    Adsorption plays a fundamental role in the behavior of clays. Because of the confinement between solid clay layers on the nanoscale, adsorbed water is structured in layers, which can occupy a specific volume. The transition between these states is intimately related to key features of clay thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior. In this article, we consider the hydration states of clays as phases and the transition between these states as phase changes. The thermodynamic formulation supporting this idea is presented. Then, the results from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of sodium montmorillonite are used to derive hydration phase diagrams. The stability analysis presented here explains the coexistence of different hydration states at clay particle scale and improves our understanding of the irreversibilities of clay thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior. Our results provide insights into the mechanics of the elementary constituents of clays, which is crucial for a better understanding of the macroscopic behavior of clay-rich rocks and soils.

  20. Radionuclide transport in clay during climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenborg, A.F.B.; Orlic, B.; Thimus, J.F.; De Lange, G.; De Cock, S.; De Leeuwe, C.S.; Veling, E.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch national research programme into the feasibility of retrievable storage of radioactive waste (CORA Programme Phase I; CORA: Comité Opslag Radioactief Afval = Committee on Radioactive Waste Disposal) examined the suitability of Tertiary clay deposits for such storage. Long-term isolation –

  1. Radionuclide transport in clay during climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenborg, A.F.B.; Orlic, B.; Thimus, J.F.; Lange, G.de; Cock, S. de; Leeuw, C.S. de; Veling, E.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch national research programme into the feasibility of retrievable storage of radioactive waste (CORA Programme Phase I; CORA: Comité Opslag Radioactief Afval = Committee on Radioactive Waste Disposal) examined the suitability of Tertiary clay deposts for such storage. Long-term isolation -

  2. On the thermal behaviour of Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Cui Yu Jun; Sultan, N.

    2004-01-01

    When temperature is increased, the various phenomena that occur in a saturated natural potential host clay for nuclear waste disposal (Boom clay from SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium) were experimentally investigated in a temperature controlled high stress triaxial cell. Firstly, the pore pressure build-up due to the difference in thermal dilation of both water and minerals was investigated through thermal consolidation tests. Interesting information was obtained about the dissipation of thermally induced pore pressure in Boom clay, based on the standard Terzaghi consolidation theory. Secondly, the volume change behaviour in drained conditions (i.e. under a very slow temperature increase) confirmed that the clay overconsolidation ratio (OCR) controlled the nature of the volume changes. Whereas overconsolidated soils use to dilate as any material when temperature is elevated, normally consolidated soils present a decrease in volume, which is less common. The principles of a coupled thermo-elasto-plastic model that was specifically developed to model this particular behaviour are finally presented. Obviously, it appears necessary to account in detail for these thermal phenomena in order to properly understand the response of the geological barrier in the near field once nuclear waste has been stored. (orig.)

  3. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Sedano, A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  4. Calm, Cool, and Comfortable in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The author's fourth-grade students had just finished a drawing unit that focused on the human figure. Projects included charcoal gesture drawings and chalk manikin drawings in chiaroscuro. She wanted to integrate a new medium for students to continue their study of the human figure. Since students are always excited to work with clay, making clay…

  5. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  6. Diffusion in Clay Layers and Groundwater Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a collaborative SERDP-funded study, researchers from the Air Force Institute of Technology, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the University of Michigan developed a numerical model that simulates the enhanced transport of CAHs into and out of low permeability clay ...

  7. Clay Shirky, Internet e il collegio invisibile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Come Internet sta cambiando il nostro modo di pensare? Fra le 172 risposte presentate da Edge, Clay Shirky ne propone una particolarmente interessante per i ricercatori di professione. Internet, scrive Shirky, ha aumentato straordinariamente la capacità espressiva dell’umanità. Ma che una risorsa divenga abbondante, da scarsa che era, è una sfortuna, almeno per chi su [...

  8. Mineralogical and Geochemical Characterization of Clay and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    which include soil horizons, continental and marine sediments, geothermal fields, volcanic ... water, air, or steam and the type of clay however is controlled by the composition of pre-existing ... the lake basin is characterized by biannual nature of precipitation with a mean annual ...... isotope record from LakeAshenge.

  9. Clay Corner: Recreating Chinese Bronze Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Harriet

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson where students make faux Chinese bronze vessels through slab or coil clay construction after they learn about the history, function, and design of these vessels. Utilizes a variety of glaze finishes in order to give the vessels an aged look. Gives detailed guidelines for creating the vessels. (CMK)

  10. Transport of Organic Solutes in Clay Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research is a pilot investigation for the SERDP (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, DoD) founded project, Impact of Clay-DNAPL Interactions on Transport and Storage of Chlorinated Solvents in Low Permeability Zones, from 2010-2012. The report tries to s...

  11. Thermal stability of PMMA–clay hybrids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Thermal stability of PMMA–clay hybrids. TANUSHREE CHOUDHURY* and NIRENDRA M MISRA. Department of Applied Chemistry, Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad 826 004, India. MS received 9 December 2008. Abstract. Materials with small particle size are being extensively used in composites and hybrid ...

  12. Laboratory study of the Flandres clay swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaddaj, Said

    1992-01-01

    The first chapter contains a survey about the swelling of soils, and about the experimental methods used to characterize this phenomenon. A classification of soils in function of their swelling potential is proposed. The second chapter deals with the properties of Flandres clay. Chemical and mineralogical compositions, mechanical properties and free swell index are given. The third chapter contains a presentation of the study of the swelling potential of Flandres clay using the oedometer. Four methods are described and used (free-swell, different pressures, pre-swell and direct-swell). A numerical simulation of free-swell tests is also given. The fourth chapter includes a presentation of the study of the swelling behaviour of Flandres clay using a triaxial cell. Three methods are used: free-swell, pre-swell and different-pressures. The last chapter contains a parametric study of the swelling behaviour of Flandres clay. The influence of some parameters such as sample thickness, initial water content, vertical load and load history is presented. (author) [fr

  13. Geotechnical studies of Jaitapur marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.

    characterisEd. by high water content and high Atterberg limits. Undrained shear strength varied from 1.8 to 6 KPa. These were moderately sensitive clays. Carbonate content which varied from 3 to 27%, was found to influence engineering properties of the soil...

  14. Production of smectite organophylic clays from three commercial sodium bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela Diaz, Francisco R.; Souza Santos, Persio de

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory cationic exchange procedures using Brazilian's commercial quaternary ammonium salt and three samples of commercial sodium bentonites (two Brazilian's and one from Wyoming (US) are described. Swelling values in some liquid organic media are shown for the organophilic clays and for a Brazilian's commercial organophilic clay. Organophilic clays with larger swelling values than the commercial organophilic clay in kerosene, Varsol, toluene and soya bean oil were obtained. (author)

  15. Repository tunnel construction in deep clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, B.G.; Mair, R.J.; Taylor, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    One of the objects of the Hades project at Mol, Belgium has been to evaluate the feasibility of construction of a deep repository in the Boom clay formation at depth of approximately 225 metres. The main objective of the present project was to analyse and interpret the detailed geotechnical measurements made around the Hades trial shaft and tunnel excavations and evaluate the safety of radioactive waste disposal in a repository facility in deep clay formations. Plasticity calculations and finite element analyses were used which gave results consistent with the in-situ measurements. It was shown that effective stress analysis could successfully predict the observed field behaviour. Correct modelling of the small-strain stiffness of the Boom clay was essential if reasonable predictions of the pore pressure response due to construction are to be made. The calculations undertaken indicated that, even in the long term, the pressures on the test drift tunnel lining are likely to be significantly lower than the overburden pressure. Larger long-term tunnel lining pressures are predicted for impermeable linings. A series of laboratory stress path tests was undertaken to determine the strength and stiffness characteristics of the Boom clay. The tests were conducted at appropriate effective stress levels on high-quality samples retrieved during construction of the test drift. The apparatus developed for the testing is described and the results discussed. The development of a self boring retracting pressure-meter is described. This novel in-situ testing device was specifically designed to determine from direct measurements the convergence/confinement curve relevant to tunnelling in clay formations. 44 refs., 60 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Faults in clays their detection and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, G.; Carabelli, E.; Chiantore, V.; Colombo, P.F.; Gruszka, A.; Pensieri, R.; Superbo, S.; Gera, F.

    1991-01-01

    The 'Faults in clays project', a cooperative research effort between Ismes and Enea of Italy and BGS and Exeter University of the UK, has been aimed at assessing and improving the resolution capability of some high resolution geophysical techniques for the detection of discontinuities in clay formations. All Ismes activities have been carried out in Italy: they consisted in the search of one or more sites - faulted clay formations - suitable for the execution of geophysical and geotechnical investigations, in the execution of such tests and in additional geological surveys and laboratory (geotechnical and geochemical) testing. The selected sites were two quarries in plio-pleistocenic clay formations in central Italy where faults had been observed. The greatest part of the research work has been carried out in the Orte site where also two 90 m boreholes have been drilled and cored. Geophysical work at Orte consisted of vertical electrical soundings (VESs) and horizontal electrical lines (HELs), four high resolution seismic reflection lines, and in-hole and cross-hole logs. Laboratory activities were geotechnical characterization and permeability tests, and measurements of disequilibrium in the uranium decay series. At Narni, where Exeter University sampled soil gases for geochemical analyses, the geophysical work consisted in a geo-electrical survey (five VESs and two HELs), and in two high resolution reflection seismic lines. Additional investigations included a structural geology survey. The main conclusion of the research is that current geophysical techniques do not have a resolution capacity sufficient to detect the existence and determine the characteristics of faults in deep homogeneous clay formations

  17. Water-clay interactions. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaucher, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Clay minerals contribute to the chemical composition of soil and sediment groundwaters via surface and dissolution/precipitation reactions. The understanding of those processes is still today fragmentary. In this context, our experimental purpose is to identify the contribution of each reaction in the chemical composition of water in a water/clay System. Kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite are the reference clays. After a fine mineralogical study, the exchange equilibria between K + and H + are characterised. Different exchange sites are identified and the exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients are quantified. Then, mixtures of the three clays are equilibrated with acidic and basic (I≤10 -2 M) solutions at 25 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C, during 320 days. The System evolution is observed by chemical analysis of the solutions and mineralogical analysis by TEM. We show that montmorillonite is unstable compared to the kaolinite/amorphous silica assemblage for solutions of pH<7. Aqueous silica is probably controlled by the kinetics of dissolution of the montmorillonite in moderate pH media. In more acidic solutions, amorphous silica precipitates. Al is under control of 'kaolinite' neo-formations. The use of the selectivity coefficients in a numerical simulation shows that K + concentration depends on exchange reactions. The pH has a more complicated evolution, which is not completely understood. This evolution depends on both exchange equilibria and organic acid occurrence. In this type of experiments, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium equations between smectite and kaolinite are inexact. The problem of the thermodynamic nature of clays remains and is not resolved by these solubility experiments. (author) [fr

  18. Migration of leachate solution through clay soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Warith, M M

    1987-01-01

    The problem of domestic solid wastes buried in landfill sites is viewed from the aspect of leachate contamination and migration in the substrate, and the efficiency of natural clay barriers as an expedient economic lining material is assessed. Various chemical constituents of the landfill leachate of an actual waste containment site at Lachenaie (35 km east of Montreal) were determined from samples collected from specially designed basins. Data for companion tests on laboratory columns are also presented. Chemical analysis on samples from the basins and leachates from the columns measured changes in the concentration of: (a) cations (Na, K, Ca, and Mg), (b) anions (Cl, HCO/sub 3/, and CO/sub 3/) (c) total organic carbon (TOC), and (d) heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Pb, and Cu). The physical parameters measured included: (a) pH, and (b) specific conductivity. Predictions, using a dispersion-convection model for concentration profile development for either adsorbed or retained contaminants, were compared with the experimentally determined profiles (both in leaching columns and landfill laboratory model). Another set of experiments was also conducted to evaluate the effect of some organic fluids on the geotechnical properties of different clay soils (natural clay and two reference clay soils: illite and kaolinite). The results from this study have demonstrated that the natural clay soil can be used to adequately contain the different contaminant species usually present in the leachate solutions. Furthermore, the data suggested that under favorable soil conditions, landfill leachates containing low levels of trace metals will not pose a substantial contamination threat to the subsurface environment, provided that a proper thickness of barrier is used.

  19. Proteins with Intrinsically Disordered Domains Are Preferentially Recruited to Polyglutamine Aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie P Wear

    Full Text Available Intracellular protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregates formed by polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded proteins, such as Huntingtin, adopt amyloid-like structures that are resistant to denaturation. We used a novel purification strategy to isolate aggregates formed by human Huntingtin N-terminal fragments with expanded polyQ tracts from both yeast and mammalian (PC-12 cells. Using mass spectrometry we identified the protein species that are trapped within these polyQ aggregates. We found that proteins with very long intrinsically-disordered (ID domains (≥ 100 amino acids and RNA-binding proteins were disproportionately recruited into aggregates. The removal of the ID domains from selected proteins was sufficient to eliminate their recruitment into polyQ aggregates. We also observed that several neurodegenerative disease-linked proteins were reproducibly trapped within the polyQ aggregates purified from mammalian cells. Many of these proteins have large ID domains and are found in neuronal inclusions in their respective diseases. Our study indicates that neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins are particularly vulnerable to recruitment into polyQ aggregates via their ID domains. Also, the high frequency of ID domains in RNA-binding proteins may explain why RNA-binding proteins are frequently found in pathological inclusions in various neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Change effects in the land use about the mineral clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cespedes Payret, C.; Gutierrez, O; Panario, D.; Pineiro, G

    2012-01-01

    The Pampas land changes during the Quaternary, left their mark on the mineralogy of soil clays. This work is oriented to compare the mineralogical composition of the clays and the value of potassium in an eucalyptus forestation. These results show that the mineralogical illite alteration is the cause of its destruction. This clay is the main reservoir of potassium for the agricultural soils

  1. Geological Investigations on Boulder-Clay of E. Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzel, van P.; Overweel, C.J.; Veenstra, H.J.

    1959-01-01

    In this article the results of a study on boulder-clay in the neighbourhood of Winschoten (N.E. Netherlands) are communicated (Chapter I). The underlying sediments of the boulder-clay in this area consist of fine preglacial sands and black clay. In the nuclei of the many drumlins a strongly

  2. Traditional mining and mineralogy of geophagic clays from Limpopo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geophagic clays consumed were whitish, yellowish, khaki and black; mined from hills and mountains, river beds, valleys, excavation sites and termitaria. Geophagic individuals from Free State preferred whitish geophagic clays; and sometimes khaki. Yellowish clays were preferred mostly by geophagic individuals from ...

  3. Polymer-clay nanocomposites obtained by solution polymerization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Clay minerals can be found all over the world.1 Clay minerals have ... salts or covalent bonding with silanes at the OH edges of the clay. ..... Marras S I, Tsimpliaraki A, Zuburtikudis I and ... Mansoori Y, Roojaei K, Zamanloo M R and Imanzadeh.

  4. Strength and Deformation Properties of Tertiary Clay at Moesgaard Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    The tertiary clay at Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus in the eastern part of Jutland in Denmark is a highly plastic, glacially disturbed nappe of Viborg Clay. The clay is characterised as a swelling soil, which could lead to damaging of the building due to additional heave of the soil. To take...

  5. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  6. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trieves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  7. Enrichment and activation of smectite-poor clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarcevica, Inese; Kostjukovs, Juris; Actint, Andris, E-mail: inese.sarcevicha@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Latvia, Kr. Valdemara street 48, Riga (Latvia)

    2011-06-23

    A new method of smectite clay enrichment has been developed. The method is based on dispersing clay in a phosphate solution and sequential coagulation. The product of enrichment is characterized with X-ray powder diffraction, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetry. Sorption of methylene blue and hexadecylpyridinium bromide on raw and purified clays was studied.

  8. Evaluation of kaolinite clays of Moa for the production of cement based clinker-calcined clay-limestone (LC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Almenares-Reyes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clay materials from two outcrops of the Moa region were analyzed to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious material in the production of ternary cements based on limestone-calcined clay. The clays were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (ATG. These methods revealed high aluminum in clays, moderate kaolinite content, a disordered structure and the presence of impurities. The solubility of aluminum and silicon in alkali and the compressive strength of LC3 systems is proportional to their content in clay, being higher for the one with higher kaolinite content and greater structural disorder (outcrop D1, although the clay of both outcrops may constitute supplementary cementitious materials in the production of ternary cements based clinker-calcined clay-limestone. The suitable thermal activation range for both clays is between 650 ° C and 850 ° C.

  9. Kinetics of aggregation with choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2016-12-01

    We generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters. We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tails of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. We also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.

  10. Study of selection and purification of Brazilian bentonite clay by elutriation: a XRF, SEM and Rietveld analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, J.L.; Zanini, A.E.; Souza, M.E. de; Nascimento, M.L.F., E-mail: jeff_eq@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: mlfn@ufba.br [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA/PROTEC/PEI), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2016-01-15

    Clays obtained from nature have a lot of impurities. Therefore, for best using of these materials, it is necessary its selection and purification. Thus, the aim of this work is to separate and to purify the smectite fractions using water as a solvent at a low flux mixed with a bentonite clay extracted from a mine in Vitoria da Conquista - Bahia / Brazil. For this a separation method of fractions of expandable clays based on the Stokes' Law was applied - this process is called elutriation, in order to ensure and to expand possible industrial applications of this material. The samples were characterized by analysis of X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The Rietveld method enabled the quantification of main phase minerals: montmorillonite, kaolinite, nontronite and quartz, reaching 85% in mass of montmorillonite phase at the end of the process. Results showed that the method used was efficient to remove almost all quartz, carbonates and organic matter from the sample. It was also observed a monomodal grain size distribution of elutriated materials with thinner grains, around (18.1 ± 1.8) μm at the end of the process. It has been concluded that the method developed and applied showed promising characters to be applied to elutriate kilograms of clays and could be used in industrial scale. (author)

  11. Study of selection and purification of Brazilian bentonite clay by elutriation: a XRF, SEM and Rietveld analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Alves

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clays obtained from nature have a lot of impurities. Therefore, for best using of these materials, it is necessary its selection and purification. Thus, the aim of this work is to separate and to purify the smectite fractions using water as a solvent at a low flux mixed with a bentonite clay extracted from a mine in Vitória da Conquista - Bahia / Brazil. For this a separation method of fractions of expandable clays based on the Stokes' Law was applied - this process is called elutriation, in order to ensure and to expand possible industrial applications of this material. The samples were characterized by analysis of X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The Rietveld method enabled the quantification of main phase minerals: montmorillonite, kaolinite, nontronite and quartz, reaching 85% in mass of montmorillonite phase at the end of the process. Results showed that the method used was efficient to remove almost all quartz, carbonates and organic matter from the sample. It was also observed a monomodal grain size distribution of elutriated materials with thinner grains, around (18.1 ± 1.8 μm at the end of the process. It has been concluded that the method developed and applied showed promising characters to be applied to elutriate kilograms of clays and could be used in industrial scale.

  12. Study of selection and purification of Brazilian bentonite clay by elutriation: a XRF, SEM and Rietveld analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, J.L.; Zanini, A.E.; Souza, M.E. de; Nascimento, M.L.F.

    2016-01-01

    Clays obtained from nature have a lot of impurities. Therefore, for best using of these materials, it is necessary its selection and purification. Thus, the aim of this work is to separate and to purify the smectite fractions using water as a solvent at a low flux mixed with a bentonite clay extracted from a mine in Vitoria da Conquista - Bahia / Brazil. For this a separation method of fractions of expandable clays based on the Stokes' Law was applied - this process is called elutriation, in order to ensure and to expand possible industrial applications of this material. The samples were characterized by analysis of X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The Rietveld method enabled the quantification of main phase minerals: montmorillonite, kaolinite, nontronite and quartz, reaching 85% in mass of montmorillonite phase at the end of the process. Results showed that the method used was efficient to remove almost all quartz, carbonates and organic matter from the sample. It was also observed a monomodal grain size distribution of elutriated materials with thinner grains, around (18.1 ± 1.8) μm at the end of the process. It has been concluded that the method developed and applied showed promising characters to be applied to elutriate kilograms of clays and could be used in industrial scale. (author)

  13. The role of clay minerals in the preservation of organic matter in sediments of Qinghai Lake, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bingsong; Dong, Hailiang; Jiang, Hongchen; Lv, Guo; Eberl, Dennis D.; Li, Shanying; Kim, Jinwook

    2009-01-01

    The role of saline lake sediments in preserving organic matter has long been recognized. In order to further understand the preservation mechanisms, the role of clay minerals was studied. Three sediment cores, 25, 57, and 500 cm long, were collected from Qinghai Lake, NW China, and dissected into multiple subsamples. Multiple techniques were employed, including density fractionation, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), total organic carbon (TOC) and carbon compound analyses, and surface area determination. The sediments were oxic near the water-sediment interface, but became anoxic at depth. The clay mineral content was as much as 36.8%, consisting mostly of illite, chlorite, and halloysite. The TEM observations revealed that organic matter occurred primarily as organic matter-clay mineral aggregates. The TOC and clay mineral abundances are greatest in the mid-density fraction, with a positive correlation between the TOC and mineral surface area. The TOC of the bulk sediments ranges from 1 to 3% with the non-hydrocarbon fraction being predominant, followed by bitumen, saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbons, and chloroform-soluble bitumen. The bimodal distribution of carbon compounds of the saturated hydrocarbon fraction suggests that organic matter in the sediments was derived from two sources: terrestrial plants and microorganisms/algae. Depthrelated systematic changes in the distribution patterns of the carbon compounds suggest that the oxidizing conditions and microbial abundance near the water-sediment interface promote degradation of labile organic matter, probably in adsorbed form. The reducing conditions and small microbial biomass deeper in the sediments favor preservation of organic matter, because of the less labile nature of organic matter, probably occurring within clay mineral-organic matter aggregates that are inaccessible to microorganisms. These results have important implications for our

  14. Clay mineralogy in different geomorphic surfaces in sugarcane areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L.; Marques, J., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    conditions of each surface. The rate goethite/(goethite+hematite) decreases the surface I to III this result is the variation of the source material that has an increase of clay which is characteristic of sandstone rock (Adamantine Formation) in the surface III. The rate kaolinite/(kaolinite+gibbsite) also shows a decrease of the surface I to the surface III. The spatial distribution pattern of mineralogy influenced the pattern of physical and chemical properties. On the surface III (with higher iron and gibbsite) had the best physical condition (lower density, higher porosity and aggregates) and greater phosphorus sorption. In this sense, the identification and mapping of the GSs, allowed a better understanding of cause and effect of the distribution of soils in the area, and the recognition of areas of controlled variability of soil attributes. These areas can be considered specific areas of management, useful for planning and management practices in the culture of sugarcane. Besides, suggesting criteria for the recognition of map units that would be equivalent to the future series of soils of the Brazilian System of Soil Classification.

  15. Nickel aggregates produced by radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marignier, J.L.; Belloni, J.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel aggregates with subcolloidal size and stable in water have been synthesized by inhibiting the corrosion by the medium. The protective effect of the surfactant is discussed in relation with the characteristics of various types of polyvinyl alcohol studied. The reactivity of aggregates towards oxidizing compounds, nitro blue tetrazolium, methylene blue, silver ions, oxygen, methylviologen, enables an estimation of the redox potential of nickel aggregates (E = - 04 ± 0.05 V). It has been applied to quantitative analysis of the particles in presence of nickel ions. 55 refs [fr

  16. Aggregating and Disaggregating Flexibility Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Valsomatzis, Emmanouil; Hose, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In many scientific and commercial domains we encounter flexibility objects, i.e., objects with explicit flexibilities in a time and an amount dimension (e.g., energy or product amount). Applications of flexibility objects require novel and efficient techniques capable of handling large amounts...... and aiming at energy balancing during aggregation. In more detail, this paper considers the complete life cycle of flex-objects: aggregation, disaggregation, associated requirements, efficient incremental computation, and balance aggregation techniques. Extensive experiments based on real-world data from...

  17. Intensity and duration of chemical weathering: An example from soil clays of the southeastern Koolau Mountains, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Mark J.; Ellen, Stephen D.; McKittrick, Mary Anne

    1993-01-01

    Orographic precipitation on the southern flank of the southeastern Koolau Mountains produces a pronounced precipitation gradient. The corresponding gradient in the intensity of the chemical weathering environment provides an opportunity to address the effects of varying chemical weathering intensity on the composition of clay-size weathering products in soils developed on basalt. In addition, little-modified remnants of the constructional surface of the Koolau Volcano, isolated by stream dissection, remain as facets on the southern ends of the parallel ridges of the study area. By comparing clay mineralogy of soils developed on these older geomorphic surfaces with those developed on the younger sharp-crested ridges and steep side slopes, the effects of weathering duration on clay mineralogy can also be addressed.Soil clays in this part of the Koolau Mountains are mineralogically complex; principal phases include smectite, kaolinite, and halloysite, but pure end member phases are uncommon. Rather, most phases contain some amount of mixed layering. Smectite may contain small (Volcano are markedly more leached than those from younger landscapes in the same precipitation regime. Although smectite may be present, kaolinite is the dominant phase, and accumulations of Fe and Ti occur in the uppermost soil levels. Enrichment of Zr and Ti in these soils, as compared to concentrations in the original basaltic parent material, indicates that as much as 75% of the parent material has been lost. Thus weathering duration may affect soil clay composition in the same way as weathering intensity.Because smectite and halloysite are expandable clay minerals, their presence in soils may decrease slope stability and influence the nature of slope processes. Soil avalanches occur on steep slopes throughout the study area, whereas slow-moving landslides appear to be restricted to gentler slopes in drier parts of the study area where smectite is abundant. The clay mineralogy of soils thus

  18. Alkali aggregate reactivity in concrete structures in western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, D.R.; Empey, D.

    1989-01-01

    In several regions of Canada, particularly parts of Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime Provinces, research, testing and evaluation of aged concrete structures in the field has shown that alkali aggregate reactivity can give rise to pronounced concrete deterioration, particularly in hydraulic structures subjected to saturation or alternate wetting and drying such as locks, dams, canals, etc. Concrete deterioration is mainly caused by alkali-silica reactions and alkali-carbonate reactions, but a third type of deterioration involves slow/late expanding alkali-silicate/silica reactivity. The alkalies NaOH and KOH in the concrete pore solutions are mainly responsible for attack on expansive rocks and minerals in concrete. Methods for evaluating alkali-aggregate reaction potential in aggregates, and field and laboratory methods for detecting deterioration are discussed. Examples of alkali-aggregate reactions in structures is western Canada are detailed, including a water reservoir at Canadian Forces Base Chilliwack in British Columbia, the Oldman River diversion and flume, the Lundbreck Falls Bridge, and the St Mary's Reservoir spillway, all in southern Alberta. Mitigative measures include avoidance of use of suspect aggregates, but if this cannot be avoided it is recommended to keep the total alkalies in the concrete as low as possible and minimize opportunities for saturation of concrete by moisture. 16 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  19. Aggregation of montmorillonite and organic matter in aqueous media containing artificial seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jinwook

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dispersion-aggregation behaviors of suspended colloids in rivers and estuaries are affected by the compositions of suspended materials (i.e., clay minerals vs. organic macromolecules and salinity. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the dispersion and aggregation mechanisms of suspended particles under simulated river and estuarine conditions. The average hydrodynamic diameters of suspended particles (representing degree of aggregation and zeta potential (representing the electrokinetic properties of suspended colloids and aggregates were determined for systems containing suspended montmorillonite, humic acid, and/or chitin at the circumneutral pH over a range of salinity (0 – 7.2 psu. Results The montmorillonite-only system increased the degree of aggregation with salinity increase, as would be expected for suspended colloids whose dispersion-aggregation behavior is largely controlled by the surface electrostatic properties and van der Waals forces. When montmorillonite is combined with humic acid or chitin, the aggregation of montmorillonite was effectively inhibited. The surface interaction energy model calculations reveal that the steric repulsion, rather than the increase in electronegativity, is the primary cause for the inhibition of aggregation by the addition of humic acid or chitin. Conclusion These results help explain the range of dispersion-aggregation behaviors observed in natural river and estuarine systems. It is postulated that the composition of suspended particles, specifically the availability of steric polymers such as those contained in humic acid, determine whether the river suspension is rapidly aggregated and settled or remains dispersed in suspension when it encounters increasingly saline environments of estuaries and oceans.

  20. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  1. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  2. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  3. Pure and impure clays and their firing products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murad, E.; Wagner, U.

    1989-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is highly suited for the study of clays whose industrial uses depend on the iron content. Reactions that take place during clay firing can be readily monitored by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Following dehydroxylation of clay minerals, the quadrupole splitting of octahedrally coordinated iron (III) increases abruptly, but reverts to lower values upon the formation of new, better ordered phases at higher temperatures. It is also shown that iron oxides may account for a considerably higher proportion of the total iron content of many clays than is commonly recognized, and their existence must be taken into consideration for a correct interpretation of the Moessbauer spectra of clays. (orig.)

  4. Performance Study of the Natural Rubber Composite with Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyo Nyo Myint; Tin Tin Aye; Kyaw Myo Naing; Nyunt Wynn

    2008-03-01

    The preparation, characterization and some applications of natural rubber clay composite have been studied. This study investigated the possibility of natural rubber latex to replace some part of natural clays. In formulation of rubber clay composite from natural rubber latex and various clay minerals, three main steps were involved (i) preparation of latex cream (ii) prevulcanization of latex cream (iii) mixing vulcanized latex compound, with other ingredients. In each step, several parameters have been carefully investigated to optimize the performance of natural rubber clay composite production. The composite products were of better quality and can be considered to be more cost effective.

  5. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACTOR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACTOR) is a database on environmental chemicals that is searchable by chemical name and other identifiers, and by...

  6. Laser characterization of fine aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This report describes the results of a research effort to establish the feasibility of using a laser monitoring system to provide real-time data to characterize aggregate properties in a laboratory or field environment. This was accomplished by using...

  7. Aggregate Supply and Potential Output

    OpenAIRE

    Razin, Assaf

    2004-01-01

    The New-Keynesian aggregate supply derives from micro-foundations an inflation-dynamics model very much like the tradition in the monetary literature. Inflation is primarily affected by: (i) economic slack; (ii) expectations; (iii) supply shocks; and (iv) inflation persistence. This paper extends the New Keynesian aggregate supply relationship to include also fluctuations in potential output, as an additional determinant of the relationship. Implications for monetary rules and to the estimati...

  8. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R.; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-01-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling. PMID:21845150

  9. Proceedings of the NEA Clay Club Workshop on Clay characterisation from nanoscopic to microscopic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A wide spectrum of argillaceous media are being considered in Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) member countries as potential host rocks for the final, safe disposal of radioactive waste, and/or as major constituent of repository systems in which wastes will be emplaced. In this context, the NEA established the Working Group on the 'Characterisation, the Understanding and the Performance of Argillaceous Rocks as Repository Host Formations' in 1990, informally known as the 'Clay Club'. The Clay Club examines various argillaceous rocks that are being considered for the underground disposal of radioactive waste, ranging from soft clays to indurated shales. Very generally speaking, these clay rocks are composed of fine-grained minerals showing pore sizes from < 2 nm (micropores) up to > 50 nm (macro-pores). The water flow, solute transport and mechanical properties are largely determined by this microstructure, the spatial arrangement of the minerals and the chemical pore water composition. Examples include anion accessible ('geochemical') porosity and macroscopic membrane effects (chemical osmosis, hyper-filtration), geomechanical properties and the characteristics of two-phase flow properties (relevant for gas transport). At the current level of knowledge, there is a strong need to improve the nanoscale description of the phenomena observed at a more macroscopic scale. However, based on the scale of individual clay-minerals and pore sizes, for most of the imaging techniques this resolution is a clear challenge. The workshop, hosted by the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in the Akademiehotel Karlsruhe (Germany) from 6 to 8 September 2011, was intended to give, inter alia, a discussion platform on: - The current state-of-the-art of different spectro-microscopic methods - New developments addressing the above mentioned knowledge gaps in clays. - The perception of the interplay between geometry

  10. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Moran

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  11. Mars - CO2 adsorption and capillary condensation on clays: Significance for volatile storage and atmospheric history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, F. P.; Cannon, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    Results on the adsorbate-adsorbent system CO2-nontronite are reported at 230, 196, and 158 deg K, covering the range of subsurface regolith temperature on Mars. A three-part regolith-atmosphere-cap model reveals that cold nontronite, and expanding clays in general, are far better but far more complex CO2 adsorbers than cold pulverized basalt. In addition, the layered terrain, and possibly the adjacent debris mantle, contains about 2% or more by mass of atmosphere-exchangeable CO2 and the total regolith inventory of available adsorbed CO2 is estimated to be 400 g/ sq cm.

  12. New generation expandable sand screens

    OpenAIRE

    Syltøy, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering This thesis aims to give a general insight into sand control and various sorts of sand control measures and applications of sand control tools. Special focus will be given to expandable sand screens – a technology which came about in the late 1990’s through the use of flexible, expandable tubulars as base pipe in sand screens. More specifically Darcy’s Hydraulic Endurance Screens, a compliant sand screen system using hydraulic activation, and the fu...

  13. Neutrinos in an expanding Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigmans, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Universe contains several billion neutrinos for each nucleon. In this paper, we follow the history of these relic neutrinos as the Universe expanded. At present, their typical velocity is a few hundred km/s and, therefore, their spectra are affected by gravitational forces. This may have led to a phenomenon that could explain two of todays great mysteries: The large-scale structure of the Universe and the increasing rate at which it expands. (paper)

  14. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both [ 3 H]NaBH 4 reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated

  15. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  16. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. © 2013.

  17. Sorption of Pu onto some kinds of clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Haihong; Si Gaohua; Liu Wei; Yu Jing

    2010-01-01

    There are rich clay mines holding in one area, so it's necessary to know about these clays' sorption capacity to Pu, for building radioactive waste repository in the area. Distribution coefficients of Pu onto different clays were acquired in static method, with the result about 104. The size of clay is different, but the result of Kds is near. In addition, it's estimated how far Pu moves in the most rapid speed in the clay based on these Kids', disregarding the influence of Pu-colloid. In a word, as a kind of backfilling material clays in the area can effectively prevent Pu from moving to environment, and when designing the backfilling layer, it's not necessary to catch clays through NO.200 sieve, if only considering the influence of Kd. (authors)

  18. Feasibility of classification of clay minerals by using PAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Y; Yoshida, Y; Akiyama, Y; Nishijima, S

    2015-01-01

    After the nuclear power plant disaster, the evaluation of radioactive Cs kept in soil, especially in clay minerals and the elucidation of its movement are urgent subjects to promote decontamination. It is known that the extractable level of Cs depends on the sort of clay minerals. We tried to find the characteristics of clay minerals belonging to phillosilicate group using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and the relationship between the results of PAS and the amounts of substantially extracted Cs from the clay minerals. The results showed that each clay mineral was found to be distinguishable from other clay minerals by PAS and the extraction rate of Cs was different among those clay minerals, however the direct correlation between the results of PAS and the extraction rates of Cs was not found. (paper)

  19. Rheological characterization of nanocomposites Nylon 6/bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.R.G.; Fernandes, P.C.; Oliveira, S.V.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are a class of materials that have been widely used in various applications. Among them, has been emphasizing the preparation of polymer films with barrier properties for applications in polymer membranes. In this work, nanocomposites of nylon 6/bentonite clay were obtained from a Homogenizer, in the ratios of 1, 3 and 5 wt% clay. The Brasgel PA bentonite clay was treated organically with Praepagen HY salt, to make it organophilic. By X-ray diffraction (XRD), it was showed that the efficiency of the incorporation of salt in the clay. The rheological curves showed that for the AST clay the torque did not change when compared with the pure nylon 6, while for the clay ACT, the torque increased gradually with the percentage of clay. (author)

  20. Static and dynamic filtrations of different clay, electrolytes, polymer systems; Filtrations statiques et dynamiques de differents systemes argile, electrolytes, polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y

    1996-04-16

    Filtration properties of model drilling fluids composed of water, clays, electrolytes and water soluble polymers have been studied in static and dynamic conditions on paper filters and rock slices. Filtration experiments combined with cake observations by cryo-S.E.M. and T.E.M., show the influence of the size shape of clay particles as well as their associating mode in suspension, on the texture of the cake, its permeability, and relaxation properties. These parameters depend on the nature of the electrolyte. The polymer reduces the cake permeability by enhancing the dispersion of the clay within the suspension, but mainly by plugging the porous network due its auto aggregation properties. The cake construction in dynamic conditions, is related to the state of aggregation of the initial suspension, its poly-dispersity, its sensitivity to shear rates, and also, to the permeability of the cake built at the beginning of the filtration. In all cases, the rate of thickening of the cake is slower and larger filtrate volumes are obtained compared to the static conditions. Shear rate has two effects: first, to dissociate the weak aggregates in suspension, second, to impose a size selection of the particles in the case of a poly-dispersed suspension. At high shear rates, a cake of constant thin thickness is quickly obtained. The thickness of this limiting cake depends on the fraction of small particles present in suspension, or that can be formed by dissociation of weak aggregates under shear rate. The permeability of this limiting cake formed in dynamic conditions is, as in static conditions, controlled by the size and the shape of the particles that form the cake or by the presence of a build loss reducer water soluble polymer. Filtrations carried out on Fontainebleau sandstones allow to visualize the internal cake and to precise the risks of formation damage by the drilling fluid. (author) 127 refs.

  1. Organically modified clay removes oil from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alther, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    When bentonite or other clays and zeolites are modified with quaternary amines, they become organophilic. Such modified bentonites are used to remove mechanically emulsified oil and grease, and other sparingly soluble organics. If the organoclay is granulated, it is placed into a liquid phase carbon filter vessel to remove FOG's and chlorinated hydrocarbons. In this application the clay is mixed with anthrazite to prevent early plugging of the filter by oil or grease droplets. In batch systems a powered organoclay is employed. Types of oil found in water can include fats, lubricants, cutting fluids, heavy hydrocarbons such as tars, grease, crude oil, diesel oils; and light hydrocarbons such as kerosene, jet fuel, and gasoline

  2. Clay-based geothermal drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guven, N.; Carney, L.L.; Lee, L.J.; Bernhard, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The rheological properties of fluids based on fibrous clays such as sepiolite and attapulgite have been systematically examined under conditions similar to those of geothermal wells, i.e. at elevated temperatures and pressures in environments with concentrated brines. Attapulgite- and sepiolite-based fluids have been autoclaved at temperatures in the range from 70 to 800/sup 0/F with the addition of chlorides and hydroxides of Na, K, Ca, and Mg. The rheological properties (apparent and plastic viscosity, fluid loss, gel strength, yield point, and cake thickness) of the autoclaved fluids have been studied and correlated with the chemical and physical changes that occur in the clay minerals during the autoclaving process.

  3. Organoclays obtaining starting up of clays sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.M. da; Mota, M.F.; Oliveira, G.C. de; Rodrigues, M.G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Clays have several applications in many areas of fields of technology, however, modification of these materials using organic compounds can be performed to obtain further hydrophobic materials, for applications in the adsorption of organic pollutants. This study aimed to analyze the effects of modifying two clays using sodium quaternary ammonium surfactants through ion exchange reaction process, in obtaining organoclays. The samples with sodium and organoclays were characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Infrared Spectroscopy in the region (IV), Gravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA / TG) and organic adsorption tests. The results show that the process of obtaining organoclay is efficient, and materials have the potential for future applications in removing organic contaminants. (author)

  4. Rheological properties of sodium smectite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, L.; Hoekmark, H.; Karnland, O.

    1988-12-01

    The rheological properties of Na-smectite Mx-80 have been investigated by various laboratory tests. The investigations include determination of the hydraulic conductivity, the undrained stress-strain-strength properties, the creep properties, the compression and swelling properties in drained and undrained conditions and the undrained thermomechanical properties. Measurements have been made at different densities, clay/sand mixtures and pore water compositions. The influence of temperature, rate of strain and testing technique has also been considered. The investigation has led to a supply of basic data for the material models which will be used at performance calculations. The results have also increased the general understanding of the function of smectitic clay as buffer material. The microstructural behaviour has been considered at the validation of the different test results and the validity of the effective stress theory has been discussed. Comparisons with the properties of Ca-smectite have also been made. (orig.)

  5. Chemical buffering capacity of clay rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaucaire, C.; Pearson, F.J.; Gautschi, A.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term performance of a nuclear waste repository is strongly dependent on the chemical properties of the host rock. The host rock establishes the chemical environment that determines such important performance attributes as radionuclide solubilities from the waste and the transport rates from the repository to the accessible environment. Clay-rich rocks are especially favourable host rocks because they provide a strong buffering capacity to resist chemical changes prompted either internally, by reactions of the waste itself and emplacement materials, or externally, by changes in the hydrologic systems surrounding the host rock. This paper will focus on three aspects of the stability of clay-rich host rocks: their ability to provide pCO 2 and redox buffering, and to resist chemical changes imposed by changes in regional hydrology and hydro-chemistry. (authors)

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopy of iron in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raclavsky, K.; Sitek, J.; Lipka, J.

    1975-01-01

    Selected pure clay minerals predominantly of Czechoslovak origin were studied, such as montmorillonite, nontronite, beidellite, glauconite, seladonite, illite, vermiculite, saponite, palygorskite, goethite. Moessbauer measurements were performed at room temperature with a 57 Co in Pd source. The spectra were fitted by the least square method. The parameters of the measured Moessbauer spectra are given. The values of isomer shifts, quadrupole splittings and line widths were obtained with an error of +- 0.03 mm/sec. (Z.S.)

  7. Octyl Phenol Synthesis Using Natural Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casuscelli

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of clay minerals, HB, NB and Al-PILC have been studied in the alkylation reactions of 2-octanol with phenol at 180°C, under conditions of alcohol/phenol = 1 (mole ratio and W/FAo °= 64,27 ghmol-1. The selectivity of Al-PILC was 77,12% for octyl phenol and 16,5% for dioctyl phenol.

  8. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundl, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  9. Anaerobic nitrogen turnover by sinking diatom aggregates at varying ambient oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo

    2016-01-01

    nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient oxygen levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular......In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host...

  10. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  11. Influence of clay organic modifier on morphology and performance of poly(ε-caprolactone/clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Marija S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two series of poly(e-caprolactone nanocomposites with different organo-modified clays (1 to 8 wt% were prepared by the solution casting method. Organoclays with polar (Cloisite®C30B and nonpolar (Cloisite®C15A organic modifier and with different miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone matrix, were chosen. Exfoliated and/or intercalated nanocomposite’s structures were obtained by using high dilution and an ultrasonic treatment for the composite preparation. The effect of the surface modification and clay content on the morphology, mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites was studied. Scanning electron microscopy excluded the formation of microcomposite. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the tendency toward exfoliated structure is higher for the Cloisite®C30B, which had better miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone matrix. Differences in spherulites’ sizes and morphology between two series of the nanocomposites were observed by the optical microscopy performed on as-casted films. Enthalpies of fusion and degrees of crystallinity were higher for nanocomposites than for neat poly(e-caprolactone and increase with the clay loading in both series, as a consequence of the clay nucleating effect. Decreased thermal stability of nanocomposites was ascribed to thermal instability of organic modifiers of the clays. The Halpin-Tsai model was used to compare the theoretically predicted values of the Young’s modulus with experimentally obtained ones in tensile tests.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172062

  12. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Alekseeva, Tatiana; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie; Forano, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. - The biodegradation rate of atrazine was greatly modulated by adsorption of the pesticide and also bacterial cells on clay particles.

  13. Evaluation of the bleaching flux in clays containing hematite and different clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, E.M.; Lusa, T.; Silva, T.M.; Medeiros, B.B.; Santos, G.R. dos; Morelli, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the addition of a synthetic flux in a clay mineral constituted by illite phase in the presence of iron oxide with the hematite, promotes color change of the firing products, making the reddish color firing into whiteness. This flow is constituted of a vitreous phase of the silicates family obtained by fusion/solidification of oxides and carbonates. Thus, the objective of this work was that of studying the interaction of the iron element in the final color mechanism of the different types of mineral crystal phase of the clays. In order to study the phenomenon, we obtained different compositions between the select clays and the synthetic flow, and characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and visual analysis. The results showed that the action of the synthetic flow as a modifying agent for color depends on the mineral crystal phase of the clays. The color firing modification does not occur in the clays content high levels of kaolinite mineral phase. (author)

  14. Schemes for aggregating preferential tariffs in agriculture,export volume effects and African LDCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Wusheng

    Trade-weighted aggregated tariffs (TWPT) are often used in analyzing the issues of erosion of non-reciprocal preferences. This paper argues that commonly used TWPTs under-estimate the true protection on imports originated from preference-receiving countries, including LDCs. When used in numerical...... simulations of preference erosion and expansion scenarios, the TWPTs tend to incorrectly downplay preference erosion effect of MFN tariff cuts, and understate the export promotion effect of expanding preferences. In light of these claims, an alternative aggregation scheme is developed to calculate aggregated...... preferential tariffs imposed by a number of developed countries on African LDCs. These are shown to be higher than the TWPTs aggregated from the same disaggregated tariff data set. Numerical simulations conducted with the two sets of aggregated tariffs confirm the two claims and suggest that TWPTs may lead...

  15. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A., E-mail: ferelenakq@gmail.co [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Inst. de Investigaciones para la Industria Quimica; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Profa. Eloisa Mano

    2009-07-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  16. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A.; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  17. Effect of porosity on physical properties of lightweight cement composite with foamed glass aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurpińska Marzena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of physical properties of lightweight cement composite. We investigate the possibility of replacing traditional aggregate with Granulated Ash Aggregate (GAA and above all with Granulated Expanded Glass Aggregate (GEGA. For this purpose, 15 specimens of different percentage share of each aggregate in total aggregate volume were tested: 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% or 100% of foam glass aggregate (GEGA partially replaced by ash aggregate (GAA content in the cement composite. The water-cement ratio was constant and equal to w/c=0.5. Three grain sizes were analyzed: 2mm, 4mm (both GEGA and 8mm (GAA. Numerical simulations of concrete specimen behavior under static loading were conducted with the implementation of elastic plastic model of each component. The study shows a significant impact of grain type and size on physical properties of lightweight concrete. Due to lower density of foamed glass aggregate, specimens shows various apparent density and porosity, which affect concrete properties. Compressive strength of concrete decreases with the increase in foam glass aggregate content; however specimens show different workability and in consequence porosity of lightweight concrete.

  18. Effects of Pedogenic Fe Oxides on Soil Aggregate-Associated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefaw Berhe, A.; Jin, L.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon sequestration is intimately related to the soil structure, mainly soil aggregate dynamics. Carbon storage in soil aggregates has been recognized as an important carbon stabilization mechanism in soils. Organic matter and pedogenic Fe oxides are major binding agents that facilitate soil aggregate formation and stability. However, few studies have investigated how different forms of pedogenic Fe oxides can affect soil carbon distribution in different aggregate-size fractions. We investigated sequentially extracted pedogenic Fe oxides (in the order of organically complexed Fe extracted with sodium pyrophosphate, poorly-crystalline Fe oxides extracted with hydroxylamine hydrochloride, and crystalline Fe oxides extracted with dithionite hydrochloride) and determined the amount and nature of C in macroaggregates (2-0.25mm), microaggregates (0.25-0.053mm), and two silt and clay fractions (0.053-0.02mm, and soil from Sierra Nevada mountain in California. We also determined how pedogenic Fe oxides affect soil carbon distribution along soil depth gradients. Findings of our study revealed that the proportion of organic matter complexed Fe decreased, but the proportion of crystalline Fe increased with increasing soil depths. Poorly crystalline Fe oxides (e.g. ferrihydrite) was identified as a major Fe oxide in surface soil, whereas crystalline Fe oxides (e.g. goethite) were found in deeper soil layers. These results suggest that high concentration of organic matter in surface soil suppressed Fe crystallization. Calcium cation was closely related to the pyrophosphate extractable Fe and C, which indicates that calcium may be a major cation that contribute to the organic matter complexed Fe and C pool. Increasing concentrations of extractable Fe and C with decreasing aggregate size fractions also suggests that Fe oxides play an important role in formation and stability of silt and clay fractions, and leading to further stabilization of carbon in soil. Our findings provide

  19. Strengthening and stress relaxation of Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, Otto

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text follows: In the framework of the EU-project NF-PRO (e.g. RTDC-5, Synthesis Report, D-No 5.2.3), special emphasis was put on the investigation and modelling of near-field processes in a candidate host rock: http://project.nf-pro.org/workspaces/rtdc5/deliverables/d5_2_3_rtdc_5_synthesis_report_final_version. The coupled TMHC-processes under consideration mainly concern the interaction between the host rock in and near to the EDZ and the waste products in its immediate vicinity. With respect to long-term safety analyses, there is no doubt that a sound process understanding is required. However, safe disposal also requires a suitable multi-barrier-system. This has to consist of technical and geo-technical barriers (e.g. container and backfill) but also of a strong geological barrier. Comparing the self-sealing capacity of the candidate host rocks, i.e. salt, clay and crystalline rock formations, where underground rooms will be inevitably backfilled only in part for technical reasons, in a salt formation convergence by viscous deformation provokes the re-establishing of a tight system, whereas in a crystalline rock formation long-term isolation has to be guaranteed solely by the technical and geotechnical components. This work is concentrated on the question, whether convergence and reduction of open space by long-term creep will take place also in a clay-stone formation, where laboratory investigation on Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory was performed for this purpose. Several results from the work on the long-term deformation behaviour of clay-stone exist already. Nevertheless, to the author's knowledge the sound proof of a time-dependent and non-dilatant viscous deformation in the undisturbed far-field of clay-stone is still missing. Results from the rock laboratory at the Mt. Terri site yield hints for an anisotropic state of in-situ stresses, which may continue to exist in the

  20. Preparation of Al/Fe-Pillared Clays: Effect of the Starting Mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Helir-Joseph; Blanco, Carolina; Gil, Antonio; Vicente, Miguel-Ángel; Galeano, Luis-Alejandro

    2017-11-28

    Four natural clays were modified with mixed polyoxocations of Al/Fe for evaluating the effect of the physicochemical properties of the starting materials (chemical composition, abundance of expandable clay phases, cationic exchange capacity and textural properties) on final physicochemical and catalytic properties of Al/Fe-PILCs. The aluminosilicate denoted C2 exhibited the highest potential as starting material in the preparation of Al/Fe-PILC catalysts, mainly due to its starting cationic exchange capacity (192 meq/100 g) and the dioctahedral nature of the smectite phase. These characteristics favored the intercalation of the mixed (Al 13- x /Fe x ) 7+ Keggin-type polyoxocations, stabilizing a basal spacing of 17.4 Å and high increase of the BET surface (194 m²/g), mainly represented in microporous content. According to H₂-TPR analyses, catalytic performance of the incorporated Fe in the Catalytic Wet Peroxide Oxidation (CWPO) reaction strongly depends on the level of location in mixed Al/Fe pillars. Altogether, such physicochemical characteristics promoted high performance in CWPO catalytic degradation of methyl orange in aqueous medium at very mild reaction temperatures (25.0 ± 1.0 °C) and pressure (76 kPa), achieving TOC removal of 52% and 70% of azo-dye decolourization in only 75 min of reaction under very low concentration of clay catalyst (0.05 g/L).

  1. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Absorption characteristics of Kupravas deposit clays modified by phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruplis, A.; Mezinskis, G.; Chaghuri, M.

    1998-01-01

    Literature data suggested that clays may be used as sorbents for waste water treatment. The surface and sorption properties of minerals changes due to the influence of acid rains. The process of recession of clay properties has been modeled in laboratory by treatment of clays with mineral acids at higher temperature that in natural conditions. The present paper is devoted to the study of influence of phosphoric acid on the sorption properties of Kupravas deposit clays. Natural clay samples and samples treated with phosphoric acid were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction an differential thermal analysis (DTA) methods These methods were used also to identify the sample of Lebanese clays. X-ray diffraction analysis data show that the samples of clays from the deposit of Kuprava contain illite and kaolinite while sample of Lebanese clay contains quartz, calcite, and montmorillonite. DTA results show characteristic features of Kuprava clays described in reference with DTA of Lebanese clay clearly demonstrate the presence of large quantity of calcite

  3. Comparing uranyl sorption complexes on soil and reference clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Berg, J.M.; Conradson, S.D.; Morris, D.E.; McKinley, J.P.; Zachara, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Clay minerals and other components in natural soils may play a key role in limiting the mobility of uranium in the environment through the formation of sorption complexes. Reference clays are frequently used as models to study sorption processes because they have well-known chemical and physical properties, but they may differ chemically and morphologically from clays derived from natural soils. Therefore, inferences based on reference clay data have been questioned. The authors have used luminescence and x-ray absorption spectroscopies to characterize the sorption complexes of aqueous uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) species on two soil smectites from the Kenoma and Ringold formations, and compared these results to those obtained on reference smectite clays. The pH dependence of uptake suggests that the ratio of sorption on amphoteric edge sites is greater for the soil smectites than for reference clays such as Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-1). The luminescence spectra for uranyl sorbed to the soil clays are very similar to those for uranyl sorbed principally to the edge sites of SWy-1. This observation supports the solution data suggesting that adsorption to amphoteric sites is a more important mechanism for soil clays. However, the spectral data indicate that the sorption complexes on natural and reference clays are quite similar. Furthermore, as with the reference clays, the authors have found that the chemistry of the solution plays a greater role in defining the sorption complex than does the clay matrix. Thus, if differences in surface properties are adequately taken into account, the reference clays may serve as useful analogs for soil clays in investigations of metal-ion sorption

  4. Aggregated recommendation through random forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng-Ru; Min, Fan; He, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Aggregated recommendation refers to the process of suggesting one kind of items to a group of users. Compared to user-oriented or item-oriented approaches, it is more general and, therefore, more appropriate for cold-start recommendation. In this paper, we propose a random forest approach to create aggregated recommender systems. The approach is used to predict the rating of a group of users to a kind of items. In the preprocessing stage, we merge user, item, and rating information to construct an aggregated decision table, where rating information serves as the decision attribute. We also model the data conversion process corresponding to the new user, new item, and both new problems. In the training stage, a forest is built for the aggregated training set, where each leaf is assigned a distribution of discrete rating. In the testing stage, we present four predicting approaches to compute evaluation values based on the distribution of each tree. Experiments results on the well-known MovieLens dataset show that the aggregated approach maintains an acceptable level of accuracy.

  5. The development of structure in the expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, J.; White, S. D.

    1978-01-01

    A model for clustering in an expanding universe is developed based on an application of the coagulation equation to the collision and aggregation of bound condensations. While the growth rate of clustering is determined by the rate at which density fluctuations reach the nonlinear regime and therefore depends on the initial fluctuation spectrum, the mass spectrum rapidly approaches a self-similar limiting form. This form is determined by the tidal processes which lead to the merging of condensations, and is not dependent on initial conditions.

  6. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  7. A Functional Reference Architecture for Aggregators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondy, Daniel Esteban Morales; Heussen, Kai; Gehrke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Aggregators are considered to be a key enabling technology for harvesting power system services from distributed energy resources (DER). As a precondition for more widespread use of aggregators in power systems, methods for comparing and validating aggregator designs must be established. This paper...... proposes a functional reference architecture for aggregators to address this requirement....

  8. Valorisation of different types of boron-containing wastes for the production of lightweight aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavas, T.; Christogerou, A.; Pontikes, Y.; Angelopoulos, G.N.

    2011-01-01

    Four boron-containing wastes (BW), named as Sieve (SBW), Dewatering (DBW), Thickener (TBW) and Mixture (MBW) waste, from Kirka Boron plant in west Turkey were investigated for the formation of artificial lightweight aggregates (LWA). The characterisation involved chemical, mineralogical and thermal analyses as well as testing of their bloating behaviour by means of heating microscopy. It was found that SBW and DBW present bloating behaviour whereas TBW and MBW do not. Following the above results two mixtures M1 and M2 were prepared with (in wt.%): 20 clay mixture, 40 SBW, 40 DBW and 20 clay mixture, 35 SBW, 35 DBW, 10 quartz sand, respectively. Two different firing modes were applied: (a) from room temperature till 760 deg. C and (b) abrupt heating at 760 deg. C. The obtained bulk density for M1 and M2 pellets is 1.2 g/cm 3 and 0.9 g/cm 3 , respectively. The analysis of microstructure with electron microscopy revealed a glassy phase matrix and an extended formation of both interconnected and isolated, closed pores. The results indicate that SBW and DBW boron-containing wastes combined with a clay mixture and quartz sand can be valorised for the manufacturing of lightweight aggregates.

  9. An exact approach for aggregated formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette; Spoorendonk, Simon; Røpke, Stefan

    Aggregating formulations is a powerful approach for problems to take on tractable forms. Aggregation may lead to loss of information, i.e. the aggregated formulation may be an approximation of the original problem. In branch-and-bound context, aggregation can also complicate branching, e.g. when...... optimality cannot be guaranteed by branching on aggregated variables. We present a generic exact solution method to remedy the drawbacks of aggregation. It combines the original and aggregated formulations and applies Benders' decomposition. We apply the method to the Split Delivery Vehicle Routing Problem....

  10. Flow boiling in expanding microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, Tamanna

    2017-01-01

    This Brief presents an up to date summary of details of the flow boiling heat transfer, pressure drop and instability characteristics; two phase flow patterns of expanding microchannels. Results obtained from the different expanding microscale geometries are presented for comparison and addition to that, comparison with literatures is also performed. Finally, parametric studies are performed and presented in the brief. The findings from this study could help in understanding the complex microscale flow boiling behavior and aid in the design and implementation of reliable compact heat sinks for practical applications.

  11. Balancing energy flexibilities through aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsomatzis, Emmanouil; Hose, Katja; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2014-01-01

    One of the main goals of recent developments in the Smart Grid area is to increase the use of renewable energy sources. These sources are characterized by energy fluctuations that might lead to energy imbalances and congestions in the electricity grid. Exploiting inherent flexibilities, which exist...... in both energy production and consumption, is the key to solving these problems. Flexibilities can be expressed as flex-offers, which due to their high number need to be aggregated to reduce the complexity of energy scheduling. In this paper, we discuss balance aggregation techniques that already during...... aggregation aim at balancing flexibilities in production and consumption to reduce the probability of congestions and reduce the complexity of scheduling. We present results of our extensive experiments....

  12. Turbulent breakage of ductile aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioli, Cristian; Soldati, Alfredo

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we study breakage rate statistics of small colloidal aggregates in nonhomogeneous anisotropic turbulence. We use pseudospectral direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow and Lagrangian tracking to follow the motion of the aggregates, modeled as sub-Kolmogorov massless particles. We focus specifically on the effects produced by ductile rupture: This rupture is initially activated when fluctuating hydrodynamic stresses exceed a critical value, σ>σ(cr), and is brought to completion when the energy absorbed by the aggregate meets the critical breakage value. We show that ductile rupture breakage rates are significantly reduced with respect to the case of instantaneous brittle rupture (i.e., breakage occurs as soon as σ>σ(cr)). These discrepancies are due to the different energy values at play as well as to the statistical features of energy distribution in the anisotropic turbulence case examined.

  13. Fe(0)-clays interactions at 90°C under anoxic conditions: a comparative study between clay fraction of Callovo-Oxfordian and other purified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Villieras, F.; Barres, O.; Galmiche, M.; Ghanbaja, J.; Kohler, A.; Michau, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste it is of prime importance to understand the interactions between the saturated clay formation and steel containers. This can be achieved through an in-depth analysis of iron-clay interactions. Previous studies on the subject investigated the influence of solid/liquid ratio, iron/clay ratio, temperature and reaction time. The aim of the present study is to explain Callovo-Oxfordian-Fe(0) interactions by determining the role of each mineral phases present in the Callovo-Oxfordian (clay minerals, quartz, carbonates and pyrite) on the mechanisms of interaction between metal iron and clay particles. In that context, it is especially important to understand in detail the influence of clay nature and to obtain some insight about the relationships between interaction mechanisms at the molecular scale and crystallographic properties (particle size, TO or TOT layers, amount of edge faces...). The influence of the combination of different clays and the addition of other minerals must also be studied. In a first step, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Andra's underground research laboratory was purified to extract the clay fraction (illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and chlorite). Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) for durations of one, three or nine months in the presence of metallic iron powder. Experiments without iron were used as control. The iron/clay ratio was fixed at 1/3 with a solid/liquid ratio of 1/20. The above mentioned experiments were also carried out in parallel on other purified clays: two smectites (Georgia bentonite and SWy2 from the Clay Minerals Society), one illite (illite du Puy) and one kaolinite (KGa2, from the Clay Minerals society). At the end of the experiments, solid and liquid phases were

  14. SHAPE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONCRETE AGGREGATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As a composite material, the performance of concrete materials can be expected to depend on the properties of the interfaces between its two major components, aggregate and cement paste. The microstructure at the interfacial transition zone (ITZ is assumed to be different from the bulk material. In general, properties of conventional concrete have been found favoured by optimum packing density of the aggregate. Particle size is a common denominator in such studies. Size segregation in the ITZ among the binder particles in the fresh state, observed in simulation studies by concurrent algorithm-based SPACE system, additionally governs density as well as physical bonding capacity inside these shell-like zones around aggregate particles. These characteristics have been demonstrated qualitatively pertaining also after maturation of the concrete. Such properties of the ITZs have direct impact on composite properties. Despite experimental approaches revealed effects of aggregate grain shape on different features of material structure (among which density, and as a consequence on mechanical properties, it is still an underrated factor in laboratory studies, probably due to the general feeling that a suitable methodology for shape characterization is not available. A scientific argument hindering progress is the interconnected nature of size and shape. Presently, a practical problem preventing shape effects to be emphasized is the limitation of most computer simulation systems in concrete technology to spherical particles. New developments at Delft University of Technology will make it possible in the near future to generate jammed states, or other high-density fresh particle mixtures of non-spherical particles, which thereupon can be subjected to hydration algorithms. This paper will sketch the outlines of a methodological approach for shape assessment of loose (non-embedded aggregate grains, and demonstrate its use for two types of aggregate, allowing

  15. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  16. Consequential secondary structure alterations and aggregation during prolonged casein glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Supriya; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) of casein is a process used not just to ameliorate the quality of dairy products but also to increase the shelf life of canned foods, including baby milk supplements. Incubation of κ-casein with reducing sugars for 15 days at physiological temperature showed the formation of a molten globule state at day 9 and 12 during fructation and glucation respectively. This state exhibits substantial secondary structure and maximum ANS binding. Later on, glycation resulted in the formation of aggregates at day 12 in presence of fructose and day 15 in presence of glucose. Aggregates possess extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and FTIR. These aggregates showed altered tryptophan environment, decrease ANS binding relative to molten globule state and increase in Thioflavin T fluorescence. Aggregates were also accompanied by the accumulation of AGEs, indicative of structural damage to the protein and formation of potentially harmful species at the physiological level. Fructose was more reactive than glucose and thus caused early and significant changes in the protein. From our studies, we conclude that controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction in the food industry is essential to counter its negative effects and expand its safety spectrum.

  17. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharpenseel, H. W. [Institut fuer Bodenkunde der Universitaet Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Kerpen, W. [Arbeitsgruppe, Institut fuer Landwirtschaft der KFA Juelich, Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1967-11-15

    {sup 55}Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the B{sub t}-development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of {sup 55}Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for {sup 55}Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  18. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpenseel, H.W.; Kerpen, W.

    1967-01-01

    55 Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the B t -development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of 55 Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for 55 Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  19. Clay facial masks: physicochemical stability at different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zague, Vivian; de Almeida Silva, Diego; Baby, André Rolim; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles

    2007-01-01

    Clay facial masks--formulations that contain a high percentage of solids dispersed in a liquid vehicle--have become of special interest due to specific properties presented by clays, such as particle size, cooling index, high adsorption capacity, and plasticity. Although most of the physicochemical properties of clay dispersions have been studied, specific aspects concerning the physicochemical stability of clay mask products remain unclear. This work aimed at investigating the accelerated physicochemical stability of clay mask formulations stored at different temperatures. Formulations were subjected to centrifuge testing and to thermal treatment for 15 days, during which temperature was varied from -5.0 degrees to 45.0 degrees C. The apparent viscosity and visual aspect (homogeneity) of all formulations were affected by temperature variation, whereas color, odor, and pH value remained unaltered. These results, besides the estimation of physicochemical stability under aging, can be useful in determining the best storage conditions for clay-based formulations.

  20. Tensile mechanical response of polyethylene – clay nanocomposites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on the microstructural and the mechanical characteristics of high density polyethylene (HDPE-clay nanocomposites, with particular attention to the creep behaviour. The samples were prepared through melt compounding, using two high-density polyethylenes with different melt flow rate (MFR, two different organo-modified clays, and changing the relative amount of a polyethylene grafted with maleic anhydride (PEgMA compatibilizer. The intercalation process is more effective as the matrix melt viscosity decreases (higher MFR, while the clay interlamellar spacing increases as the compatibilizer amount increases. The relative stiffness of the nanocomposites increases with the addition of clay, with a limited enhancement of the relative yield stress. The better intercalation obtained by the addition of the compatibilizer is not accompanied by a concurrent improvement of the tensile mechanical properties. The creep resistance is enhanced by the introduction of clay, with an appreciable dependence on both the polyethylene and the clay type.

  1. Characterization of organophilic attapulgite clay from state of Piaui

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.C. dos Santos; Alves, T.S.; Barbosa, R.

    2011-01-01

    The attapulgite is mineral clay typically fibrous. It owns a superficial area around 125 to 210 m²/g, cationics transfer capacity from 20 to 30 mill equivalents per 100g of clay, high capacity of sorption, considerable decolourizer capacity, chemical inertia and maintenance of thixotropics properties in the presence of electrolytes. The objective of this work was to perform the chemical modification of attapulgite original from state of Piaui - Brazil, for applications in polymeric nanocomposites. The chemical composition of clay without modification was determined by X-Ray Diffraction. The natural clay and organophilizated one were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), by Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR), and Foster's swelling. The obtained results indicated the presence of characteristics groups of the salt in the clay, alteration in its chemical composition, evidencing that the chemical modification in the clay was efficient, could the same be applied in preparation of polymeric nanocomposites. (author)

  2. Influence of processing variables on the mechanical behavior of HDPE/clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Barbosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites were processed using the technique of melt intercalation, starting from a concentrated polar compatibilizer/organoclay (PE-g-MA/organoclay prepared in an internal mixer. The concentrate was incorporated into the matrix of HDPE by two methods: I counter-rotating twin-screw extruder and II co-rotating twin-screw extruder, using two screw profiles (ROS and 2KB90. After extrusion, the specimens of the extruded composites were injection molded. The X-ray diffraction (XRD technique was used to analyze the degree of expansion of the prepared clays. To analyze the degree of exfoliation of obtained nanocomposites, XRD and TEM (transmission electron microscopy were used. The influence of processing variables on mechanical properties was studied through the behavior of the modulus and tensile strength of nanocomposite systems. By XRD and TEM, it was seen that the clay was well dispersed in the matrix and the presence of intercalated and partially exfoliated hybrid structure for nanocomposites was observed when the systems were prepared in counter-rotating twin-screw extruder. A similar behavior was observed in the use of screws (2KB90 or ROS of the nanocomposites, with a reduction in modulus and tensile strength. Although the mixing process by extruding be the most common industrial practice, and also it is the preferred strategy for the preparation of polymer nanocomposites, much of the literature was directed to the study of chemical modification of clay, type and level of compatibilizer, in order to maximize the compatibility between clay and the polymeric matrix. On the other hand, studies about the role of the processing and configurations of screws are relatively scarce. The main motivation of this work was to expand and to contribute to spread a better understanding of the effects of processing to obtain polymer nanocomposites.

  3. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  4. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Fachgebiet Theoretische Chemie

    2016-11-01

    This first systematic survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, is currently being extended to neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals, like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we examine if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally to support the interpretation of pertinent experiments. A further facet of these studies is to account also for the dynamic nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamic simulations.

  5. Electrochemical remediation of copper contaminated clay soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, V.A.; Babakina, O.A.; Mitojan, R.A. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The study objective focused on electrochemical remediation copper polluted soils in the presence of adjuvant substances and conditions that are more effective for the treatment. Some of these substances were studied in different researches. Moreover, authors obtained a result of extraction copper rate higher than 90%. In this connection the following problems were set: - Influence organic and inorganic substances on copper mobility in soil under the DC current. - Moisture effect on copper migration in clay. - Electrochemical remediation soils different mineralogical composition. - A washing conditions contribution to electrochemical remediation of soil from copper. - Accuracy rating experimental dates. (orig.)

  6. Clay Ceramic Filter for Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zereffa Enyew Amare

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic water filters were prepared from different proportions of kaolin and soft wood and sintered at 900 °C, 950 °C, and 1000 °C. The flow rate, conductivity, pH of filtered water and removal efficiency (microbial, water hardness agent’s, nitrite and turbidity were analysed. The ceramic filter with 15 % saw dust, 80 % clay and 5 % grog that was fired at temperature of 950 °C or 1000 °C showed the best removal efficiency. Statistical ANOVA tests showed a significant difference between ceramic filters with various compositions in their removal efficiencies.

  7. Reagent for treating clay drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachenko, P V; Leshchinskiy, P A; Shnaper, B I; Zinchuk, I F; Zlobin, V P

    1982-01-01

    A reagent is proposed for treating clay drilling muds. It contains lignite, caustic soda and modifying agent. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to reduce the cost of the reagent with simultaneous decrease in the viscosity and static shear stress of the drilling mud, it additionally contains iron sulfate, and the modifying agent contained is wastes of carbonic acid production with the following ratio of components (parts by weight): lignite 10.0-15.0, caustic soda 2.0-3.0, wastes of carbonic acid production 0.5-0.75; iron sulfate 1.0-2.0.

  8. Analysis of cement-treated clay behavior by micromechanical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Dong-Mei; Yin , Zhenyu; Hicher , Pierre Yves; Huang , Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Experimental results show the significant influence of cement content on the mechanical properties of cement-treated clays. Cementation is produced by mixing a certain amount of cement with the saturated clay. The purpose of this paper is to model the cementation effect on the mechanical behavior of cement-treated clay. A micromechanical stress-strain model is developed considering explicitly the cementation at inter-cluster contacts. The inter-cluster bonding and debo...

  9. Production of polyol carbonates and their intercalation into Smectite clays

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen, Uzma

    2017-01-01

    In hyper-saline conditions, clays in geosynthetic clay liners contract and fail to form a hydraulic barrier due to removal of water from the interlayer spaces of smectite, which is the swelling mineral component of bentonites used in geosynthetic clay liners. Five-membered cyclic carbonates such as propylene carbonate have been reported to form stable intercalated complexes with hydrated Na-smectite, which maintain swollen states at 1M). Glycerol carbonate was selected as an alternative c...

  10. Expanded-bed chromatography in primary protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspach, F B; Curbelo, D; Hartmann, R; Garke, G; Deckwer, W D

    1999-12-31

    Chromatography in stable expanded beds enables proteins to be recovered directly from cultivations of microorganisms or cells and preparations of disrupted cells, without the need for prior removal of suspended solids. The general performance of an expanded bed is comparable to a packed bed owing to reduced mixing of the adsorbent particles in the column. However, optimal operating conditions are more restricted than in a packed bed due to the dependence of bed expansion on the size and density of the adsorbent particles as well as the viscosity and density of the feedstock. The feedstock composition may become the most limiting restriction owing to interactions of adsorbent particles with cell surfaces, DNA and other substances, leading to their aggregation and consequently to bed instabilities and channeling. Despite these difficulties, expanded-bed chromatography has found widespread applications in the large scale purification of proteins from mammalian cell and microbial feedstocks in industrial bioprocessing. The basics and implementation of expanded-bed chromatography, its advantages as well as problems encountered in the use of this technique for the direct extraction of proteins from unclarified feedstocks are addressed.

  11. Stability of expanded plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the stabilization of the expanded plasma focus formed by 4.5 kJ plasma focus device of Mather type by magnetic field is presented. The experimental results of the induced axial magnetic field and electric probe measurements of the expanded plasma focus show that, the plasma consists of three plasmoids, electron temperature measurements off the plasmoids at a point close to the muzzle are 26 eV, 30 eV and 27 eV respectively and the electron densities are 6.6 x 10 14 , 6.1 x 10 14 / cm 3 respectively. The presence of external axial magnetic field (B 2 = 1.6 kg) at the mid distance between the breech and the muzzle has a less effect on the stability of expanded focus and it causes a restriction for the plasma motion. the electron temperature of the three plasmoids are found to increase in that case by 23%, 18.5% respectively. When this axial magnetic field is applied at the muzzle end, it leads to a more stable expanded plasma focus which consists mainly of one plasmoid with electron temperature of 39 eV and density of 3.4 x 10 14 / cm 3 . 5 figs

  12. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  13. Expanding the Universe of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Definitions of "education" and "rural" are debunked and expanded. The three major tasks of rural education are educating people to understand their own needs, the unavoidable changes that will transform rural Australia within their lifetimes, and the range of technologies that can enhance their well-being. Presents a strategy…

  14. Experimental study of water sorption and clays swelling by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and digital image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes-Hernandez, G.

    2002-10-01

    This work deals with the study of water sorption and clays swelling (MX80 bentonite and Paris basin argilites). A new approach by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) coupled to digital image analysis is proposed to estimate the swelling with time and the relative humidity. The ESEM is a new generation tool, not much used in the clays domain, which allows to study hydrated materials in different conditions of relative humidity. In this work, it is shown that qualitative and quantitative information about clays swelling at the aggregate scale can be obtained. The study of the kinetics allows to identify three swelling steps which are described by a first order kinetic model. The study of water sorption by raw bentonite and the exchange of different cation (Na + , Li + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ ) has permitted to analyze the cation influence on the swelling potential. The adsorption kinetics, described by a second order model, depends directly on the relative humidity, on the mass of the sample and on the compensating cation. The study of the texture of the compacted MX80 bentonite in dry and humid conditions has permitted to observe the morphological evolution of the porous network (macro-porosity) during the hydration/dehydration. From different analytical approaches, a diminution of the macro-pores and/or meso-pores size and the opening of inter-aggregate pores is observed when the apparent density increases. The study of the influence of the instantaneous water condensation/evaporation on the argilites shows that the sensitiveness to water increases when the proportion of clay increases. In particular, it is characterized by a cracking partially reversible or irreversible after several condensation/evaporation cycles. (J.S.)

  15. Microstructures and physical properties of "backfill" clays: comparison of residua and sedimentary montmorillonite clays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přikryl, R.; Ryndová, T.; Boháč, J.; Weishauptová, Zuzana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 23, 1-4 (2003), s. 149-156 ISSN 0169-1317 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2046101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : bentonite * montmorillonite-rich clay * hydrophysical properties Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.287, year: 2003

  16. Diffusion, sorption and stability of radionuclide-organic complexes in clays and clay-organic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staunton, S.; Rees, L.V.C.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence on various parameters of the diffusion coefficient of neptunium (V) in clay systems has been studied. The effect of the clay mineralogy, the charge compensating cation in the clay, the ionic strength of a background perchlorate solution and the presence of three organic ligands have been investigated. The diffusion coefficients were compared to those predicted if diffusion occurred only in the liquid phase and adsorption was reversible; agreement was fairly good. An approximation to the diffusion coefficient can thus be obtained from readily measured experimental parameters. There is no evidence of surface phase diffusion. The most significant factor in determining the diffusion coefficient is the magnitude of the distribution ratio, itself highly dependent on the nature of the clay. Neither EDTA nor citrate modified the diffusion coefficient. Although the presence of 1 or 100 mg dm -3 of Aldrich humic acid had little effect on the distribution ratio of neptunium, it caused a lowering of the measured diffusion coefficient. This is interpreted in terms of the limiting liquid phase diffusion coefficient and the true liquid phase impedance factor of neptunium-humic acid complexes. 21 figs; 3 tabs; 20 refs

  17. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  18. Water diffusion in clays with added organic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda-Pinon, J; Mendoza-Lopez, M L; Manzano-RamIrez, A; Perez-Robles, J F; Vega-Duran, J T

    2007-01-01

    Tensoactive agents may decrease water absorption in clay products like adobes. They modify the characteristics of the surface of clay particles. Characterization of water diffusion through the pores of modified clays is important to apply appropriate surface modifiers and to improve their performance. We established a simple model for water diffusion in test samples of defined dimensions to estimate real physical parameters and their effect on water absorption. Adsorption mechanisms are examined based on experimental results. The fitting of the experimental data to the model provides a deep understanding of water adsorption in chemically modified clays. A better agreement between the model and the experimental data is achieved for complex molecules

  19. Development of polymer nanocomposites with regional bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Edcleide M.; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Paz, Rene A. da; Medeiros, Keila M. de; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Barbosa, Josiane D.V.; Barbosa, Renata

    2011-01-01

    nanocomposites with regional bentonite clay were prepared by melt intercalation technique. The clays were studied without modification and modified with four quaternary ammonium salts. It was evidenced by X-ray diffraction that salts were incorporated into the clay structure thus confirming its organophilization. The nanocomposites were evaluated by means of thermal mechanic and flammability tests where presented properties significantly improved their pure polymers. The process of biodegradation of obtained bio nanocomposites was accelerated by the presence of clay. The produced membranes from nanocomposites have potential in the oil-water separation. (author)

  20. The use of clays as sorbents and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    The paper attempts to show the structural, physical and chemical properties of clay minerals relate to their laboratory, industrial and environmental uses as sorbents and catalysts. A brief review of the formulae and structures of clays and their relationship to their chemical and physical properties follows. Clay minerals are also useful in environmental protection as they can adsorb crude oils from spills and they are used, sometimes mixed into concrete, as containment barriers for radionuclides caesium 137 and strontium 90. Clay soils can also act as natural barriers to the migration of radionuclides in the environment

  1. Rheology of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-Clay Nanocomposite Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Jack; Xu, Di; Bhatnagar, Divya; Gersappe, Dilip; Sokolov, Jonathan; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2015-03-01

    The stiffness of PNIPA Gels has been reported could be significant improved by gelation with clay fillers. Here we conducted systematic rheology study of synthesized PNIPA-Clay Composites at different clay concentration, in a range from fluid to strong gel, where G'' dominant changed to G' dominant. Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to analyze the structure of composites and corresponding mechanical changes with increased clays. Where we found viscoelastic behavior become significant only 1.5 times above percolation threshold. The yield stress extrapolated from our rheology results shows good fitting to modified Mooney's theory of suspension viscosity.

  2. Influence of chemical treatment of clay to obtain polypropylene nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Jeferson L.S.; Marques, Maria F.V.

    2009-01-01

    Commercial clay was chemically treated to prepare a Ziegler-Natta catalyst containing MgCl 2 and clay for the synthesis of polypropylene nanocomposites by in situ polymerization. The performance of this catalyst and materials obtained in propylene polymerization was compared with a reference catalyst (without clay) and with another, whose composition presents the same clay but without prior chemical treatment. Techniques like differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and melt flow index (MFI) measurements were performed. There was a marked reduction in catalytic activity of clay catalysts in comparison with the reference one, and a slight reduction in melting temperature of the polymers produced from first ones. The melt flow index of polymers obtained with treated clay were notably higher than those synthesized with the untreated clay, so the treated clay caused treated the production of PP's with lower molar mass. The clays showed an increase of spacing and irregular stacking of the lamellas, especially if chemically treated. (author)

  3. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  4. Clay shale as host rock. A geomechanical contribution about Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempp, Christof; Menezes, Flora; Sachwitz, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The Opalinuston is a prominent rock representing the type of organic clay shales or clay stones within the sequence of Triassic and Jurassic marine sediments in Southern Germany. The rock forms a homogenous unit some ten meters thick. The degree of consolidation of this type of pelitic rock depends mainly on the former load conditions, but is also dependent on the long-term weathering and even on the present exposition. The geomechanical parameters such as shear strength, tensional strength and permeability vary with the state of consolidation and become important when the use is discussed of such rocks for radioactive waste disposal. A tunneling project at the northern escarpment of the Swabian Alb (Southwest Germany) within the Opalinus clay offered the rare opportunity to obtain fresh unweathered rock samples in greater amounts compared to fresh drilling cores from which geomechanical investigations are usually undertaken. Consequently, the results of geomechanical laboratory testings are presented in order to compare here the results of multistep triaxial compression tests, of hydraulic fracturing laboratory tests and of some other tests for rock characterization with the corresponding results of Opalinus clay sites in Switzerland that were investigated by the Swiss Nagra Company for host rock characterization. After a discussion of the relevant state of fresh Opalinus clay, especially of suction pressure conditions and saturation state, the results of triaxial shear tests are presented. Increasing shear deformation at increasing pressure and unchanged water saturation do not result in a significant strength reduction of the Opalinus clay. The rock shows increasing cohesion and stiffness, if multiple loading has repeatedly reached the failure point. Thus there is no increased permeability with continued shearing. Only at the beginning of the shearing process is a temporarily increased permeability to be expected due to dilatation processes. An increased

  5. [Impact of land use type on stability and organic carbon of soil aggregates in Jinyun Mountain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Lin; Jiang, Chang-Sheng; Hao, Qing-Ju

    2014-12-01

    Soil aggregates have the important effect on soil fertility, soil quality and the sustainable utilization of soil, and they are the mass bases of water and fertilizer retention ability of soil and the supply or release of soil nutrients. In this paper, in order to study the impact of land use type on stability and organic carbon of soil aggregates in Jinyun Mountain, we separated four land use types of soil, which are woodland, abandoned land, orchard and sloping farmland by wet sieving method, then we got the proportion of large macroaggregates (> 2 mm), small macroaggregates (0.25-2 mm), microaggregates (53 μm-0.25 mm) and silt + clay (soil depth of 0-60 cm and calculated the total content of organic carbon of all aggregates fraction in each soil. The results showed that reclamation of woodland will lead to fragmentation of macroaggregates and deterioration of soil structure, and the proportion of macroaggrgates (> 0.25 mm) were 44.62% and 32.28% respectively in the soils of orchard and sloping farmland, which reduced 38.58% (P soil fraction from silt + clay to large macroaggregates and small macroaggregates, so it will improve the soil structure. MWD (mean weight diameter) and GMD (geometric mean diameter) are important indicators of evaluating the stability of soil aggregates. We found the MWD and GWD in soil depth of 0-60 cm in orchards and sloping farmland were significantly lower than those in woodland (P soil aggregates, and they will be separated more easily by water. However, after changing the sloping farmland to abandoned land will enhance the stability of soil aggregates, and improve the ability of soil to resist external damage. The organic carbon content in each soil aggregate of four land use types decreased with the increase of soil depth. In soil depth of 0-60 cm, the storage of organic carbon of large macroaggregates in each soil are in orders of woodland (14.98 Mg x hm(-2)) > abandoned land (8.71 Mg x hm(-2)) > orchard (5.82 Mg x hm(-2

  6. Shape characterization of concrete aggregate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeven, P.; Hu, J.

    2006-01-01

    As a composite material, the performance of concrete materials can be expected to depend on the properties of the interfaces between its two major components, aggregate and cement paste. The microstructure at the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is assumed to be different from the bulk material. In

  7. Aggregate modeling of manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefeber, A.A.J.; Armbruster, H.D.; Kempf, K.G.; Keskinocak, P.; Uzsoy, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter we will present three approaches to model manufacturing systems in an aggregate way leading to fast and effective (i.e., scalable) simulations that allow the development of simulation tools for rapid exploration of different production scenarios in a factory as well as in a whole

  8. The Aggregate Dutch Historical Censuses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashkpour, Ashkan; Meroño-Peñuela, Albert; Mandemakers, Kees

    2015-01-01

    Historical censuses have an enormous potential for research. In order to fully use this potential, harmonization of these censuses is essential. During the last decades, enormous efforts have been undertaken in digitizing the published aggregated outcomes of the Dutch historical censuses

  9. The Aggregate Dutch Historical Censuses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ashkpour (Ashkan); A. Meronõ-Peñuela (Albert); C.A. Mandemakers (Kees)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractHistorical censuses have an enormous potential for research. In order to fully use this potential, harmonization of these censuses is essential. During the last decades, enormous efforts have been undertaken in digitizing the published aggregated outcomes of the Dutch historical censuses

  10. Aggregate modeling of manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefeber, A.A.J.; Armbruster, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    In this report we will present three approaches to model manufacturing systems in an aggregate way leading to fast and effective (i.e., scalable) simulations that allow the development of simulation tools for rapid exploration of different production scenarios in a factory as well as in a whole

  11. Diversity, intent, and aggregated search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    Diversity, intent and aggregated search are three core retrieval concepts that receive significant attention. In search result diversification one typically considers the relevance of a document in light of other retrieved documents. The goal is to identify the probable "aspects" of an ambiguous

  12. Changes in carbon stability and microbial activity in size fractions of micro-aggregates in a rice soil chronosequence under long term rice cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Genxing; Liu, Yalong; Wang, Ping; Li, Lianqinfg; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Bian, Rongjun; Ding, Yuanjun; Ma, Chong

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown soil carbon sequestration through physical protection of relative labile carbon intra micro-aggregates with formation of large sized macro-aggregates under good management of soil and agricultural systems. While carbon stabilization had been increasingly concerned as ecosystem properties, the mechanisms underspin bioactivity of soil carbon with increased carbon stability has been still poorly understood. In this study, topsoil samples were collected from rice soils derived from salt marsh under different length of rice cultivation up to 700 years from eastern China. Particle size fractions (PSF) of soil aggregates were separated using a low energy dispersion protocol. Carbon fractions in the PSFs were analyzed either with FTIR spectroscopy. Soil microbial community of bacterial, fungal and archaeal were analyzed with molecular fingerprinting using specific gene primers. Soil respiration and carbon gain from amended maize as well as enzyme activities were measured using lab incubation protocols. While the PSFs were dominated by the fine sand (200-20μm) and silt fraction (20-2μm), the mass proportion both of sand (2000-200μm) and clay (soil aggregates (also referred to aggregate stability). Soil organic carbon was found most enriched in coarse sand fraction (40-60g/kg), followed by the clay fraction (20-24.5g/kg), but depleted in the silt fraction (~10g/kg). Phenolic and aromatic carbon as recalcitrant pool were high (33-40% of total SOC) in both coarse sand and clay fractions than in both fine sand and silt fractions (20-29% of total SOC). However, the ratio of LOC/total SOC showed a weak decreasing trend with decreasing size of the aggregate fractions. Total gene content in the size fractions followed a similar trend to that of SOC. Bacterial and archaeal gene abundance was concentrated in both sand and clay fractions but that of fungi in sand fraction, and sharply decreased with the decreasing size of aggregate fraction. Gene abundance

  13. Bacterial density and community structure associated with aggregate size fractions of soil-feeding termite mounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, S; Nazaret, S; Chotte, J L; Brauman, A

    2004-08-01

    The building and foraging activities of termites are known to modify soil characteristics such as the heterogeneity. In tropical savannas the impact of the activity of soil-feeding termites ( Cubitermes niokoloensis) has been shown to affect the properties of the soil at the aggregate level by creating new soil microenvironments (aggregate size fractions) [13]. These changes were investigated in greater depth by looking at the microbial density (AODC) and the genetic structure (automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis: ARISA) of the communities in the different aggregate size fractions (i.e., coarse sand, fine sand, coarse silt, fine silt, and dispersible clays) separated from compartments (internal and external wall) of three Cubitermes niokoloensis mounds. The bacterial density of the mounds was significantly higher (1.5 to 3 times) than that of the surrounding soil. Within the aggregate size fractions, the termite building activity resulted in a significant increase in bacterial density within the coarser fractions (>20 mum). Multivariate analysis of the ARISA profiles revealed that the bacterial genetic structures of unfractionated soil and soil aggregate size fractions of the three mounds was noticeably different from the savanna soil used as a reference. Moreover, the microbial community associated with the different microenvironments in the three termite mounds revealed three distinct clusters formed by the aggregate size fractions of each mound. Except for the 2-20 mum fraction, these results suggest that the mound microbial genetic structure is more dependent upon microbial pool affiliation (the termite mound) than on the soil location (aggregate size fraction). The causes of the specificity of the microbial community structure of termite mound aggregate size fractions are discussed.

  14. Adsorption and desorption of Cu2+ on paddy soil aggregates pretreated with different levels of phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Wu, Wenchen; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Changxun

    2017-05-01

    Interactions between anions and cations are important for understanding the behaviors of chemical pollutants and their potential risks in the environment. Here we prepared soil aggregates of a yellow paddy soil from the Taihu Lake region, and investigated the effects of phosphate (P) pretreatment on adsorption-desorption of Cu 2+ of soil aggregates, free iron oxyhydrates-removed soil aggregates, goethite, and kaolinite with batch adsorption method. The results showed that Cu 2+ adsorption was reduced on the aggregates pretreated with low concentrations of P, and promoted with high concentrations of P, showing a V-shaped change. Compared with the untreated aggregates, the adsorption capacity of Cu 2+ was reduced when P application rates were lower than 260, 220, 130 and 110mg/kg for coarse, clay, silt and fine sand fractions, respectively. On the contrary, the adsorption capacity of Cu 2+ was higher on P-pretreated soil aggregates than on the control ones when P application rates were greater than those values. However, the desorption of Cu 2+ was enhanced at low levels of P, but suppressed at high levels of P, displaying an inverted V-shaped change over P adsorption. The Cu 2+ adsorption by the aggregate particles with and without P pretreatments was well described by the Freundlich equation. Similar results were obtained on P-pretreated goethite. However, such P effects on Cu 2+ adsorption-desorption were not observed on kaolinite and free iron oxyhydrates-removed soil aggregates. The present results indicate that goethite is one of the main soil substances responsible for the P-induced promotion and inhibition of Cu 2+ adsorption. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Studies on recycled aggregates-based concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshvir, Major; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2006-06-01

    Reduced extraction of raw materials, reduced transportation cost, improved profits, reduced environmental impact and fast-depleting reserves of conventional natural aggregates has necessitated the use of recycling, in order to be able to conserve conventional natural aggregate. In this study various physical and mechanical properties of recycled concrete aggregates were examined. Recycled concrete aggregates are different from natural aggregates and concrete made from them has specific properties. The percentages of recycled concrete aggregates were varied and it was observed that properties such as compressive strength showed a decrease of up to 10% as the percentage of recycled concrete aggregates increased. Water absorption of recycled aggregates was found to be greater than natural aggregates, and this needs to be compensated during mix design.

  16. Reuse potential of low-calcium bottom ash as aggregate through pelletization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, S; Ramamurthy, K

    2010-01-01

    Coal combustion residues which include fly ash, bottom ash and boiler slag is one of the major pollutants as these residues require large land area for their disposal. Among these residues, utilization of bottom ash in the construction industry is very low. This paper explains the use of bottom ash through pelletization. Raw bottom ash could not be pelletized as such due to its coarseness. Though pulverized bottom ash could be pelletized, the pelletization efficiency was low, and the aggregates were too weak to withstand the handling stresses. To improve the pelletization efficiency, different clay and cementitious binders were used with bottom ash. The influence of different factors and their interaction effects were studied on the duration of pelletization process and the pelletization efficiency through fractional factorial design. Addition of binders facilitated conversion of low-calcium bottom ash into aggregates. To achieve maximum pelletization efficiency, the binder content and moisture requirements vary with type of binder. Addition of Ca(OH)(2) improved the (i) pelletization efficiency, (ii) reduced the duration of pelletization process from an average of 14-7 min, and (iii) reduced the binder dosage for a given pelletization efficiency. For aggregate with clay binders and cementitious binder, Ca(OH)(2) and binder dosage have significant effect in reducing the duration of pelletization process. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Behavior of clay materials under ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this PhD thesis is to study and understand, by proposing reaction mechanisms, the behavior under irradiation of various clay materials. The systems of interest were first synthetic talc, which is the prototype of a non-swelling material. Under irradiation by accelerated electrons, the production of dihydrogen in this system, due solely to surface hydroxyl groups, is of the same order of magnitude as the one obtained in liquid water. This yield is divided by 30 in the case of natural talc from Luzenac, thus highlighting the importance of the impurities as scavengers of the precursors of dihydrogen. Synthetic smectites, which are swelling materials, were then studied. The results evidence the radiolysis of water confined in the interlayer space, leading to H 2 yields which may be two to three times higher than those measured in water. Moreover, they are similar for montmorillonite and saponite, evidencing that the charge location plays only a minor role. Finally, the study of double layered hydroxides or anionic clays shows that, in this case, the nature of the anion in the inter lamellar space controls the reactivity. Parallel to these measurements, electron paramagnetic spectroscopy experiments have enabled proposing reaction mechanisms. Finally, all these results are of interest in the context of the disposal of radioactive waste. (author) [fr

  18. Halloysite Clay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Joshua; Yendluri, Raghuvara; Lvov, Yuri

    2016-02-08

    Halloysite clay is an aluminosilicate nanotube formed by rolling flat sheets of kaolinite clay. They have a 15 nm lumen, 50-70 nm external diameter, length of 0.5-1 μm, and different inside/outside chemistry. Due to these nanoscale properties, they are used for loading, storage, and controlled release of active chemical agents, including anticorrosions, biocides, and drugs. We studied the immobilization in halloysite of laccase, glucose oxidase, and lipase. Overall, negatively charged proteins taken above their isoelectric points were mostly loaded into the positively charged tube's lumen. Typical tube loading with proteins was 6-7 wt % from which one-third was released in 5-10 h and the other two-thirds remained, providing enhanced biocatalysis in nanoconfined conditions. Immobilized lipase showed enhanced stability at acidic pH, and the optimum pH shifted to more alkaline pH. Immobilized laccase was more stable with respect to time, and immobilized glucose oxidase showed retention of enzymatic activity up to 70 °C, whereas the native sample was inactive.

  19. Halloysite nanotubule clay for efficient water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yafei; Abdullayev, Elshad; Vasiliev, Alexandre; Lvov, Yuri

    2013-09-15

    Halloysite clay has chemical structure similar to kaolinite but it is rolled in tubes with diameter of 50 nm and length of ca. 1000 nm. Halloysite exhibits higher adsorption capacity for both cationic and anionic dyes because it has negative SiO2 outermost and positive Al2O3 inner lumen surface; therefore, these clay nanotubes have efficient bivalent adsorbancy. An adsorption study using cationic Rhodamine 6G and anionic Chrome azurol S has shown approximately two times better dye removal for halloysite as compared to kaolin. Halloysite filters have been effectively regenerated up to 50 times by burning the adsorbed dyes. Overall removal efficiency of anionic Chrome azurol S exceeded 99.9% for 5th regeneration cycle of halloysite. Chrome azurol S adsorption capacity decreases with the increase of ionic strength, temperature and pH. For cationic Rhodamine 6G, higher ionic strength, temperature and initial solution concentration were favorable to enhanced adsorption with optimal pH 8. The equilibrium adsorption data were described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Geotechnical and mineralological Konyaalti (Antalya, Turkey) clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acar, Mustafa Hilami; Uzer, A.U.; Altunsoy, M.

    2008-01-01

    Geotechnical and mineralogical characteristics of blue-green clays of the Harbour District existing inside the boundaries of Antalya Konyaalti Municipality were investigated with comprehensive field and laboratory tests. Today, building construction in this district is carried out without any prior qualified geotechnical investigations taking place. Undisturbed and disturbed soil specimens were taken from 12 drilled boreholes at 1.5 m intervals and down 30 m deep. Shelby tubes samples were retrieved and SPT were carried out in order to determine soil profile and geotechnical properties. After comparing the laboratory and field test results, it was observed that they were in agreement. Strength and compressibility characteristics of the soil were defined with the correlations using laboratory and field test results. Since the region has been formed of lagoon-sedimented clays, rock analysis was done on two specimens achieved from various depths along the soil profile. XRD analyses on eleven specimens were also conducted. Unconfined compressive strength (qu), undrained cohesion (Cu) and compression index (Cc) varies between 40 kN/m2, 7.0 kN/m2 and 90 kN/m2, 0.095 and 0.38, respectively. (author)