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Sample records for exotic nuclear structure

  1. Exotic nuclear matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenske H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments of nuclear structure theory for exotic nuclei are addressed. The inclusion of hyperons and nucleon resonances is discussed. Nuclear multipole response functions, hyperon interactions in infinite matter and in neutron stars and theoretical aspects of excitations of nucleon resonances in nuclei are discussed.

  2. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole moments for nuclear structure research on exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Neyens, G

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues in current nuclear physics research is to investigate the properties of so-called 'exotic nuclei' and of 'exotic nuclear structures'. Exotic nuclei are nuclei with a proton-to-neutron ratio that is very different from the proton-to-neutron ratio in stable nuclei (a technical term related to this ratio is the 'isospin'). We define exotic nuclear structures as excitation modes of nuclei that have a very different structure than the structure (or shape) of the nuclear ground state. By putting the nucleons in a nucleus to extreme conditions of isospin and excitation energy one can investigate details of one of the four basic forces in nature: the strong force which binds the nucleons together to form a bound nucleus. While the basic properties of the strong nucleon-nucleon interaction are known from investigating the properties of nuclei near the 'valley of stability', recent developments in the study of exotic nuclei have demonstrated that specific properties of the strong interaction, such...

  3. Dynamical self-consistent description of exotic structures in nuclear matter at subnuclear densities

    CERN Document Server

    de la Mota, Virginia; Figerou, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of exotic structures in nuclear matter at subnuclear densities within the framework of the dywan model. This approach, developed ab initio for the description of nuclear collisions, is a microscopic dynamical approach in which the numerical treatment makes use of wavelet representation techniques. Before tackling the effects of multi-particle correlations on the overall dynamics, we focused the present work on the study of cold matter within a pure mean field description. Starting from inhomogeneous initial conditions provided by an arrangement of nuclei located on an initial crystalline lattice, the exotic structures result from the dynamical self-consistent evolution. The nuclear system can freely self-organize, it can modify or even break the lattice structure and the initial symmetries of matter distribution. This approach goes beyond the Wigner-Seitz approximation and no assumption of final shapes of matter is made. In this framework, different effects, as the sensitivity of...

  4. Nuclear structure for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goegelein, Peter

    2007-07-01

    In this work the Skyrme Hartree-Fock and Relativistic Hartree--Fock approaches have been considered to describe the structure of nuclear systems ranging from finite nuclei, structures in the crust of neutron stars to homogeneous matter. Effects of pairing correlations and finite temperature are also taken into account. The numerical procedure in the cubic box is described for the Skyrme Hartree-Fock as well as the relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. And finally, results for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  5. Exotic nuclear excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Pancholi, S C

    2011-01-01

    By providing the reader with a foundational background in high spin nuclear structure physics and exploring exciting current discoveries in the field, this book presents new phenomena in a clear and compelling way. The quest for achieving the highest spin states has resulted in some remarkable successes which this monograph will address in comprehensive detail. The text covers an array of pertinent subject matter, including the rotational alignment and bandcrossings, magnetic rotation, triaxial strong deformation and wobbling motion and chirality in nuclei. Dr. Pancholi offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. The prerequisites for a proper appreciation are courses in nuclear physics and nuclear models and measurement techniques of observables like gamma-ray energies, intensities, multi-fold coincidences, angular correlations or distributions, linear polarization, internal conversion coefficients, short lifetime (pico-second range) of excited states etc. and instrum...

  6. Exotic States of Nuclear Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Umberto; Baldo, Marcello; Burgio, Fiorella; Schulze, Hans-Josef

    2008-02-01

    pt. A. Theory of nuclear matter EOS and symmetry energy. Constraining the nuclear equation of state from astrophysics and heavy ion reactions / C. Fuchs. In-medium hadronic interactions and the nuclear equation of state / F. Sammarruca. EOS and single-particle properties of isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter within the Brueckner theory / W. Zuo, U. Lombardo & H.-J. Schulze. Thermodynamics of correlated nuclear matter / A. Polls ... [et al.]. The validity of the LOCV formalism and neutron star properties / H. R. Moshfegh ... [et al.]. Ferromagnetic instabilities of neutron matter: microscopic versus phenomenological approaches / I. Vidaã. Sigma meson and nuclear matter saturation / A. B. Santra & U. Lombardo. Ramifications of the nuclear symmetry energy for neutron stars, nuclei and heavy-ion collisions / A. W. Steiner, B.-A. Li & M. Prakash. The symmetry energy in nuclei and nuclear matter / A. E. L. Dieperink. Probing the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities / M. Di Toro et al. Investigation of low-density symmetry energy via nucleon and fragment observables / H. H. Wolter et al. Instability against cluster formation in nuclear and compact-star matter / C. Ducoin ... [et al.]. Microscopic optical potentials of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering / Z.-Y. Ma, J. Rong & Y.-Q. Ma -- pt. B. The neutron star crust: structure, formation and dynamics. Neutron star crust beyond the Wigner-Seitz approximation / N. Chamel. The inner crust of a neutron star within the Wigner-Seitz method with pairing: from drip point to the bottom / E. E. Saperstein, M. Baldo & S. V. Tolokonnikov. Nuclear superfluidity and thermal properties of neutron stars / N. Sandulescu. Collective excitations: from exotic nuclei to the crust of neutron stars / E. Khan, M. Grasso & J. Margueron. Monte Carlo simulation of the nuclear medium: fermi gases, nuclei and the role of Pauli potentials / M. A. Pérez-García. Low-density instabilities in relativistic hadronic models / C. Provid

  7. ANASEN: The array for nuclear astrophysics and structure with exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshchiy, E.; Blackmon, J. C.; Rogachev, G. V.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Baby, L.; Barber, P.; Bardayan, D. W.; Belarge, J.; Caussyn, D.; Johnson, E. D.; Kemper, K.; Kuchera, A. N.; Linhardt, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Matoš, M.; Rasco, B. S.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2017-10-01

    An active target detector array, ANASEN, has been developed for nuclear reaction studies with rare isotope beams at low energies. It aims at measurements of the excitation functions for proton and α- particle elastic and inelastic scattering and direct measurements of (α, p) reactions with exotic nuclei in inverse kinematics. ANASEN is composed of three types of charged particle detectors. The length of the active area is 340 mm and the total covered area is 1300 cm2 (almost 3 π steradian solid angle coverage) providing high efficiency for experiments with low intensity radioactive beams. A mix of 78 conventional electronics channels (for Proportional Counter and CsI-detectors) and 480 dedicated high-density ASICs electronics channels for the silicon detector are used for readout.

  8. Shell Structure of Exotic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw University; Michel, N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL); Rotureau, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical predictions and experimental discoveries for neutron-rich, short-lived nuclei far from stability indicate that the familiar concept of nucleonic shell structure should be considered as less robust than previously thought. The notion of single-particle motion in exotic nuclei is reviewed with a particular focus on three aspects: (i) variations of nuclear mean field with neutron excess due to tensor interactions; (ii) importance of many-body correlations; and (iii) influence of open channels on properties of weakly bound and unbound nuclear states.

  9. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure; Les noyaux exotiques: un autre regard sur la structure nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw Univ., Institute of Theoretical Physics (Poland); Blumenfeld, Y.; Flocard, H.; Garcia Borge, M.J.; Nowacki, F.; Rombouts, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Marques, F.M.; Lacroix, D.; Dessagne, P.; Gaeggeler, H

    2002-07-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements.

  10. Nuclear Structure Studies of Exotic Nuclei with Radioactive Ion Beams A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winger, Jeff Allen [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Beta-decay spectroscopy provides important information on nuclear structure and properties needed to understand topics as widely varied as fundamental nuclear astrophysics to applied nuclear reactor design. However, there are significant limitations of our knowledge due to an inability to experimentally measure everything. Therefore, it is often necessary to rely on theoretical calculations which need to be vetted with experimental results. The focus of this report will be results from experimental research performed by the Principal Investigator (PI) and his research group at Mississippi State University in which the group played the lead role in proposing, implementing, performing and analyzing the experiment. This research was carried out at both the National Superconduction Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The primary emphasis of the research was the use of \\bdec spectroscopy as a tool to understand the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei which could then be applied to improve theory and to increase the overall knowledge of nuclear structure.

  11. Mass measurements of exotic ions in the heavy mass region for nuclear structure studies at ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgmann, Christopher

    2012-11-07

    The mass is a unique fingerprint of each nucleus as it reflects the sum of all interactions within it. Comparing experimental mass values with theoretical calculations provides an important benchmark of how well the role of these interactions is already understood. By investigating differences of experimental binding energies, such as two-neutron separation energies (S{sub 2n}), valuable indications for nuclear-structure studies are provided. The present thesis contributes to these studies providing new high-precision mass measurements especially in the heavy-mass region. Here, nuclear theory is heavily challenged due to the large number of nucleons. The data have been obtained at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP located at the radioactive-ion-beam facility Isolde at CERN. For the determination of the masses, the time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance technique has been applied. While the new mass data for {sup 122-124}Ag continue existing trends in the S{sub 2n} energies, the new mass values for {sup 207,208}Fr render them more precisely. In the case of the mass values for {sup 184,186,190,193-195}Tl a new interesting odd-even effect has been revealed. The comparison of the measured mass values with theoretical models furthermore demonstrates significant problems in reproducing the strength of the pairing correctly. This is of special interest for the discussion about shape coexistence in the region around the doubly-magic {sup 208}Pb.

  12. Mass measurements of exotic Ions in the heavy mass region for nuclear structure studies at ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Borgmann, Christopher

    The mass is a unique fingerprint of each nucleus as it reflects the sum of all interactions within it. Comparing experimental mass values with theoretical calculations provides an important benchmark of how well the role of these interactions is already understood. By investigating differences of experimental binding energies, such as two-neutron separation energies (S$_{2n}$), valuable indications for nuclear-structure studies are provided. The present thesis contributes to these studies providing new high-precision mass measurements especially in the heavy-mass region. Here, nuclear theory is heavily challenged due to the large number of nucleons. The data have been obtained at the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP located at the radioactive-ion-beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. For the determination of the masses, the time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance technique has been applied. While the new mass data for $^{122−124}$Ag continue existing trends in the S$_{2n}$ energies, the new mass values for $...

  13. Nuclear Structure Effects in the Exotic Decay of $^{225}$Ac via $^{14}$C Emission

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS323 \\\\ \\\\ We propose to build at Isolde a high intensity $^{225}$Ac source by $\\beta$-decay of $^{225}$(Ra+Fr) beam, to be used at the superconducting spectrometer SOLENO of IPN-Orsay in order to study a possible fine structure in the spectrum of $^{14}$C ions spontaneously emitted by $^{225}$Ac.

  14. Exotic cluster structures on

    CERN Document Server

    Gekhtman, M; Vainshtein, A

    2017-01-01

    This is the second paper in the series of papers dedicated to the study of natural cluster structures in the rings of regular functions on simple complex Lie groups and Poisson-Lie structures compatible with these cluster structures. According to our main conjecture, each class in the Belavin-Drinfeld classification of Poisson-Lie structures on \\mathcal{G} corresponds to a cluster structure in \\mathcal{O}(\\mathcal{G}). The authors have shown before that this conjecture holds for any \\mathcal{G} in the case of the standard Poisson-Lie structure and for all Belavin-Drinfeld classes in SL_n, n<5. In this paper the authors establish it for the Cremmer-Gervais Poisson-Lie structure on SL_n, which is the least similar to the standard one.

  15. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, G.; Togo, V.

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: (i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. (ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ˜1,000 m2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4 × 10-16 cm-2 s-1 sr-1for 4 ×10-5SLIM experiment at the high altitude Chacaltaya lab (5,230 m a.s.l.), using 427 m2 of CR39 detectors exposed for 4.22 years, gave an upper limit for IMMs of ˜1.3 × 10-15 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The experiments yielded interesting upper limits also on the fluxes of the other mentioned exotic particles. (iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  16. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ~1000 m^2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4x10^-16 cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for 4x10^-5 exotic particles. iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  17. Spes: Exotic Beams for Nuclear Physics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Corradetti, Stefano; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesu; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-02-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported.

  18. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienholtz, F; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-06-20

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes (40)Ca and (48)Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of (51)Ca and (52)Ca have been validated by direct measurements, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes (53)Ca and (54)Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our theoretical calculations. These results increase our understanding of neutron-rich matter and pin down the subtle components of nuclear forces that are at the forefront of theoretical developments constrained by quantum chromodynamics.

  19. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wienholtz, F; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-01-01

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes $^{40}$Ca and $^{48}$Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of $^{51}$Ca and $^{52}$Ca have been validated by direct measurements$^4$, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes $^{53}$Ca and $^{54}$Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our t...

  20. Exotic nuclear studies around and below A = 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara Singh, B. S.; Wadsworth, R.; Brock, T. S. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Boutachkov, P.; Grawe, H.; Go, M.; Pietri, S.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Caceres, L.; Engert, T.; Farinon, F.; Gerl, J.; Goel, N.; Gottardo, A.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Merchant, E.; Nociforo, C.; Prochazka, A.; Schaffner, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2011-11-30

    A RISING experiment with an aim to study exotic Cd nuclei was carried out at GSI-FRS facility. Some preliminary results from this experiment are presented here. In particular, the {beta} decay of {sup 96}Cd to {sup 96}Ag revealed the existence of a high spin isomer predicted a few decades ago. In this context, the structures of both these nuclei are discussed. Shell model calculations using the Gross-Frenkel interaction are used to interpret the results.

  1. Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Angela

    2003-04-01

    An account of recent studies in the field of theoretical nuclear structure is reported. These studies concern essentially research activities performed under the Italian project "Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi". Special attention is addressed to results obtained during the last two years as regards the development of new many-body techniques as well as the interpretation of new experimental aspects of nuclear structure.

  2. Structure of the subsaturated nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Niita, Koji; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    1998-07-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics is applied to study the ground state and excited state properties of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities. The structure of nuclear matter at subsaturation density shows some exotic shapes with variation of the density. However, the structure in our result is rather irregular compared to those of previous works due to the existence of local minimum configurations. (author)

  3. Charge exchange reactions as tests for structures of exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Karataglidis, S

    2010-01-01

    Charge exchange reactions serve as alternative tests of the structures of exotic nuclei. Of particular relevance is the (p, n) reaction, which is related to the Gamow-Teller matrix element. The (p, n) reaction is also related to (p, p′) in the case of transitions to the isobaric analogue state (IAS). There are few measurements of (p, n) reactions using exotic beams. We revisit the case of 6He(p, n)6Li and discuss apparent discrepancies with other available data.

  4. Structure of exotic nuclei and superheavy elements in meson field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Khin Nyan

    2008-07-15

    In this work the nuclear structure of exotic nuclei and superheavy nuclei is studied in a relativistic framework. In the relativistic mean-field (RMF) approximation, the nucleons interact with each other through the exchange of various effective mesons (scalar, vector, isovector-vector). Ground state properties of exotic nuclei and superheavy nuclei are studied in the RMF theory with the three different parameter sets (ChiM,NL3,NL-Z2). Axial deformation of nuclei within two drip lines are performed with the parameter set (ChiM). The position of drip lines are investigated with three different parameter sets (ChiM,NL3,NL-Z2) and compared with the experimental drip line nuclei. In addition, the structure of hypernuclei are studied and for a certain isotope, hyperon halo nucleus is predicted. (orig.)

  5. Calibrations of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors and search for exotic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, V.

    2003-09-01

    We present the final results of the search for exotic massive particles in the cosmic radiation performed with the MACRO underground experiment. Magnetic monopoles and nuclearites flux upper limits obtained with the CR39 nuclear track subdetector, the scintillation and streamer tube subdetectors are given. Searches at high altitude with the SLIM experiment are in progress.

  6. Calibrations of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors and search for exotic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kumar, A; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Matteuzzi, D; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R; 10.1016/S0920-5632(03)02249-7

    2003-01-01

    We present the final results of the search for exotic massive particles in the cosmic radiation performed with the MACRO underground experiment. Magnetic monopoles and nuclearites flux upper limits obtained with the CR39 nuclear track subdetector, the scintillation and streamer tube subdetectors are given. Searches at high altitude with the SLIM experiment are in progress.

  7. Structural risk and limits on agency among exotic dancers: HIV risk practices in the exotic dance club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footer, Katherine H A; Lim, Sahnah; Brantley, Meredith R; Sherman, Susan G

    2017-07-19

    This paper provides longitudinal examination of women's health and sexual risk trajectories in US exotic dance clubs, which represent an important commercial setting for the economic mainstreaming of sexual services and an important target for public health programmes. Between July 2014 and May 2015, two semi-structured interviews (at baseline and at three months) were conducted with 24 female exotic dancers who had recently started working in in Baltimore City, USA. Results from a constant comparative analysis point to the interrelationship between the structures of the club setting, including the social context, and women's agentic practices concerning their sexual health. Study findings highlight the centrality of the interrelationship between individual- and structural-level experiences in influencing dancers' risk behavior. Findings point to the need for interventions to empower women both individually and collectively so as to provide the foundation for longer-term structural change.

  8. Nuclear structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Irvine, J M

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear Structure Theory provides a guide to nuclear structure theory. The book is comprised of 23 chapters that are organized into four parts; each part covers an aspect of nuclear structure theory. In the first part, the text discusses the experimentally observed phenomena, which nuclear structure theories need to look into and detail the information that supports those theories. The second part of the book deals with the phenomenological nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from phase shift analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Part III talks about the phenomenological parameters used to de

  9. Antiprotons for Nuclear Structure Research

    CERN Document Server

    Lenske, H

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of antiprotons with nuclei is investigated in a model using the free space pN T-matrix and nuclear densities from HFB calculations. Elastic scattering and annihilation reactions are used as probes for nuclear sizes of exotic nuclei. The annihilation cross sections are related to the nuclear root-mean-square radii by a scaling law. By detecting a pion ejected from the annihilation zone in coincidence with the final A-1 system the the annihilation process can be localized spatially and used to to extract specific information on the nuclear wave function.

  10. Nuclear structure database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.; Browne, E.

    1980-06-01

    A nuclear structure database has been created from the Table of Isotopes level-scheme file. This database contains evaluated data (through 1977) on level and deexcitation properties for all known isotopes from radioactive decay and nuclear reaction studies. The data are organized in simple array formats to enable rapid searches for specific level or decay information. Examples of the use of this database to study the properties of first excited J/sup ..pi../ = 2/sup +/ states in even-even nuclei and Weisskopf enhancements of delayed ..gamma..-ray transitions are shown. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Exotic species and the structure of a plant-galling network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Santos de Araujo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gall-inducing insects are highly specialized herbivores and is expected that networks composed by gall-inducing insects and their host plants are also very specialized. However, presence of exotic species might reduce the interaction number for native species, which would lead to changes in the specialization of plant-galling networks. In this study, we use network metrics to describe, for the first time, the structure of a network of gall-inducing insects associated to ornamental host plants. We found that the plant-galling network has a low-connected structure and is more modular than expected by chance. Native insect herbivores were significantly more frequent on native host plant species, while exotic herbivores occurred mostly on exotic host plant species. On the other hand, the number of interactions between insect herbivores and native or exotic plant species did not vary. Our findings show that plant-galling networks are very specialized and structured independently of exotic species presence.

  12. Nuclear structure of weakly bound radioactive nuclei through elastic and and inelastic scattering on proton. Impacts of the couplings induced by these exotic nuclei on direct reactions; Structure de noyaux radioactifs faiblement lies par diffusions elastiques et inelastiques sur proton. Effets des couplages induits par ces noyaux exotiques sur les reactions directes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapoux, V

    2005-09-15

    Information on the structure, spectroscopy and target interaction potentials of exotic nuclei can be inferred by interpreting measured data from direct reactions on proton such as elastic or inelastic scattering of proton (p,p') or one-nucleon transfer reaction (p,d). A series of experimental results has been obtained at the GANIL facilities on the setting composed of the MUST telescope array used for the detection of light charged-particles and of CATS beam detectors. This setting aims at measuring reactions on light proton or deuteron targets through reverse kinematics. Particularly, results on C{sup 10}, C{sup 11} and on direct reactions with the He{sup 8} beam of Spiral are presented. The first chapter is dedicated to the description of the most important theories concerning the nucleus. The experimental tools used to probe the nucleus are reported in the second chapter. The third and fourth chapters present the framework that has allowed us to analyse results from (p,p') and (p,d) reactions on weakly bound exotic nuclei. The last chapter is dedicated to the description of future experimental programs. (A.C.)

  13. Investigations of Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, Demetrios [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Reviol, W. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The proposal addresses studies of nuclear structure at low-energies and development of instrumentation for that purpose. The structure studies deal with features of neutron-rich nuclei with unexplored shapes (football- or pear-shaped nuclei). The regions of interest are: neutron rich nuclei like 132-138Sn, or 48-54Ca, and the Zr, Mo, and Ru isotopes. The tools used can be grouped as follows: either Gammasphere or Gretina multi-gamma detector arrays and auxiliary detectors (Microball, Neutron Shell, and the newly completed Phoswich Wall).The neutron-rich nuclei are accessed by radioactive-beam binary reactions or by 252Cf spontaneous fission. The experiments with heavy radioactive beams aim at exciting the beam nuclei by pick-up or transfer a neutron or a proton from a light target like 13C, 9Be, 11B or 14N .For these binary-reaction studies the Phoswich Wall detector system is essential. It is based on four multi-anode photomultiplier tubes on which CsI and thin fast-timing plastic scintillators are attached. Their signals are digitized with a high density microchip system.

  14. Nuclear structure of $^{231}$Ac

    CERN Document Server

    Boutami, R; Mach, H; Kurcewicz, W; Fraile, L M; Gulda, K; Aas, A J; García-Raffi, L M; Løvhøiden, G; Martínez, T; Rubio, B; Taín, J L; Tengblad, O

    2008-01-01

    The low-energy structure of 231Ac has been investigated by means of gamma ray spectroscopy following the beta-decay of 231Ra. Multipolarities of 28 transitions have been established by measuring conversion electrons with a mini-orange electron spectrometer. The decay scheme of 231Ra --> 231Ac has been constructed for the first time. The Advanced Time Delayed beta-gamma-gamma(t) method has been used to measure the half-lives of five levels. The moderately fast B(E1) transition rates derived suggest that the octupole effects, albeit weak, are still present in this exotic nucleus.

  15. Particle acceleration and exotic light emission in structured plasma wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Twisted Laguerre Gaussian lasers, with orbital angular momentum (OAM), are characterised by twisted wavefronts and doughnut intensity profiles. These lasers provide a transformative set of research directions in a growing range of fields, particularly at intensities below damage thresholds. Here, we explore how the interaction between ultra-intense twisted light and matter could enhance plasma accelerators and light sources. We support our findings with theory and massively parallel three-dimensional particle-in-cell Osiris simulations. Providing a solution to a long-lasting challenge in plasma acceleration, we show that twisted light can excite a nonlinear doughnut blowout suitable for electron and positron focusing and acceleration. This is a new type of wakefield that contrasts with the nonlinear spherical blowout, characterised by positron defocusing forces. Despite being driven by an OAM laser, doughnut plasma waves contain no OAM. This picture changes dramatically, when the laser driver contain multiple OAM levels characterised by distinct frequencies. The corresponding beating pattern results in a spiralling laser intensity profile, known as a light spring, which can excite a twisted plasma wave with OAM. The twisted wakefields accelerate particles both longitudinally and azimuthally. This feature can be exploited towards the generation of relativistic bunches with similar longitudinal and transverse momenta, which changes radiation emission processes. Structured lasers have been produced in the laboratory, using conventional spiral phase plates and plasma based holograms. Here, we demonstrate how to create and amplify ultra-intense OAM lasers in the plasma, through stimulated Raman backscattering. Work supported by FCT (Portugal) Grant No. SFRH/IF/01635/2015.

  16. Host specificity and population structure of two exotic helminths, Camallanus cotti (Nematoda) and Bothriocephalus acheilognathi (Cestoda), parasitizing exotic fishes in Waianu Stream, O'ahu, Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Amanda G; Font, William F

    2003-06-01

    Introduction of exotic fishes into Hawai'ian streams has resulted in the simultaneous introduction of exotic parasites. Camallanus corti (Nematoda) and Bothricephalus acheilognathi (Cestoda) are the most prevalent and abundant fish helminths in Hawai'ian streams. The population structure and host specificity of C. cotti and B. acheilognathi in exotic poeciliids were examined during May and June 1995 in Waianu Stream, O'ahu, Hawai'i. Prevalence and mean abundance of C. cotti were significantly different among Poecilia reticulata (65.2%, 1.05), Poecilia mexicana (49.0%, 0.87), and Xiphophorus helleri (32.3%, 0.44). Prevalence of B. acheilognathi was significantly higher in P. mexicana (6.1%) than in P. reticulata (2.1%) and X. helleri (1.6%). However, tapeworm differences in mean abundance were not significant among P. mexicana (0.08), P. reticulata (0.04), or X. helleri (0.03). Nematode and tapeworm prevalence and mean abundance were not significantly different with regard to fish sex. Camallanus cotti prevalence and mean abundance increased as P. mexicana body size increased (r2 = 0.84 and r2 = 0.72, respectively), whereas B. acheilognathi displayed no significant trend with respect to poeciliid body size.

  17. Symmetries in nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Allaart, K; Dieperink, A

    1983-01-01

    The 1982 summer school on nuclear physics, organized by the Nuclear Physics Division of the Netherlands' Physical Society, was the fifth in a series that started in 1963. The number of students attending has always been about one hundred, coming from about thirty countries. The theme of this year's school was symmetry in nuclear physics. This book covers the material presented by the enthusi­ astic speakers, who were invited to lecture on this subject. We think they have succeeded in presenting us with clear and thorough introductory talks at graduate or higher level. The time schedule of the school and the location allowed the participants to make many informal contacts during many social activities, ranging from billiards to surf board sailing. We hope and expect that the combination of a relaxed atmosphere during part of the time and hard work during most of the time, has furthered the interest in, and understanding of, nuclear physics. The organization of the summer school was made possible by substantia...

  18. One-nucleon transfer reactions induced by secondary beam of {sup 11}Be: study of the nuclear structure of the exotic nuclei {sup 11}Be and {sup 10}Li; Reactions de transfert d'un nucleon induites par un faisceau secondaire de {sup 11}Be: etude de la structure des noyaux exotiques {sup 11}Be et {sup 10}Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pita, S

    2000-09-01

    The structure of the neutron rich light nuclei {sup 11}Be and {sup 10}Li has been investigated by means of one nucleon transfer reactions. The experiments have been carried out at GANIL in inverse kinematics using {sup 11}Be secondary beams. The {sup 11}Be(p,d){sup 10}Be reaction bas been studied at 35.3 MeV/u. The {sup 10}Be ejectiles were analyzed by the spectrometer SPEG, and coincident deuterons were detected in the position sensitive silicon detector CHARISSA. Transfer cross sections to 0{sup +}{sub 1} and 2{sup +}{sub 1}, states in {sup 10}Be were measured up to {theta}{sub CM} = 16 deg. and compared to DWBA and CRC predictions. The effects of neutron-cure couplings on reaction form factors have been studied by solving coupled equations in the framework of a vibrational model. It is shown that the rate of core excitation {sup 10}Be{sub 2+} in the {sup 11}Be{sub gs} wave function is overestimated by a standard analysis with form factors given by the usual Separation Energy prescription. The former model predicts a rate of core excitation of 16% and leads to theoretical cross sections which are in good agreement with the experimental data. The aim of the {sup 11}Be(d,{sup 3}He){sup 10}Li experiment, realized at 37 MeV/u, was to measure the distribution of the 2s neutron strength in the unbound nucleus {sup 10}Li. The energy spectrum was deduced from the {sup 3}He energy and angle measured by the silicon strip detector array MUST. An asymmetric peak is clearly observed near the threshold, with a maximum at -S{sub n} = 130 keV. This constitutes a direct proof of the inversion of 2s and 1p{sub 1/2} shells in {sup 10}Li, which was until now a controversial question in spite of many experimental efforts. On the other band the analysis of the {sup 11}Be(d,t){sup 10}Be reaction studied in the same experiment confirms the results obtained in the {sup 11}Be(p,d){sup 10}Be reaction concerning the {sup 11}Be{sub gs} structure. This work shows the interest and feasibility

  19. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  20. Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Jagdish K.

    2004-10-01

    The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is a leading resource for the experimental nuclear data. It is maintained and distributed by the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The file is mainly contributed to by an international network of evaluators under the auspice of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The ENSDF is updated, generally by mass number, i.e., evaluating together all isobars for a given mass number. If, however, experimental activity in an isobaric chain is limited to a particular nuclide then only that nuclide is updated. The evaluations are published in the journal Nuclear Data Sheets, a publication of Elsevier. This presentation will briefly review this and other databases and dissemination services of the US and international network, and reflect on how the network resources can help scientists in both the basic as well as the applied fields.

  1. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today�s nuclear science is the �journey to the limits� of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  2. Nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Sergio; Pascoalino, Bruno dos Santos; Nardelli, Sheila C

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nucleus in living organisms characterizes the Eukaryote domain. The nucleus compartmentalizes the genetic material surrounded by a double membrane called nuclear envelope. The nucleus has been observed since the advent of the light microscope, and sub-compartments such as nucleoli, diverse nuclear bodies and condensed chromosomes have been later recognized, being part of highly organized and dynamic structure. The significance and function of such organization has increased with the understanding of transcription, replication, DNA repair, recombination processes. It is now recognized as consequence of adding complexity and regulation in more complex eukaryotic cells. Here we provide a description of the actual stage of knowledge of the nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi. As an early divergent eukaryote, it presents unique and/or reduced events of DNA replication, transcription and repair as well as RNA processing and transport to the cytosol. Nevertheless, it shows peculiar structure changes accordingly to the cell cycle and stage of differentiation. T. cruzi proliferates only as epimastigote and amastigote stages, and when these forms differentiate in trypomastigote forms, their cell cycle is arrested. This arrested stage is capable of invading mammalian cells and of surviving harsh conditions, such as the gut of the insect vector and mammalian macrophages. Transcription and replication decrease during transformation in trypomastigotes implicating large alterations in the nuclear structure. Recent evidences also suggest that T. cruzi nucleus respond to oxidative and nutritional stresses. Due to the phylogenetic proximity with other well-known trypanosomes, such as Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, they are expected to have similar nuclear organization, although differences are noticed due to distinct life cycles, cellular organizations and the specific adaptations for surviving in different host environments. Therefore, the general

  3. Heavy exotic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+1 binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb-(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  4. Variations of the fine-structure constant α in exotic singularity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Denkiewicz, Tomasz; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Vielzeuf, P. E.

    2014-06-01

    Various classes of exotic singularity models have been studied as possible mimic models for the observed recent acceleration of the Universe. Here we further study one of these classes and, under the assumption that they are phenomenological toy models for the behavior of an underlying scalar field that also couples to the electromagnetic sector of the theory, obtain the corresponding behavior of the fine-structure constant α for particular choices of model parameters that have been previously shown to be in reasonable agreement with cosmological observations. We then compare this predicted behavior with available measurements of α, thus constraining this putative coupling to electromagnetism. We find that values of the coupling that would provide a good fit to spectroscopic measurements of α are in more than three-sigma tension with local atomic clock bounds. Future measurements by ESPRESSO and ELT-HIRES will provide a definitive test of these models.

  5. Nuclear structure with coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Apolodor Aristotel

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the essential features of a large variety of nuclear structure properties, both collective and microscopic in nature. Most of results are given in an analytical form thus giving deep insight into the relevant phenomena. Using coherent states as variational states, which allows a description in the classical phase space, or provides the generating function for a boson basis, is an efficient tool to account, in a realistic fashion, for many complex properties. A detailed comparison with all existing nuclear structure models provides readers with a proper framework and, at the same time, demonstrates the prospects for new developments. The topics addressed are very much of current concern in the field. The book will appeal to practicing researchers and, due to its self-contained account, can also be successfully read and used by new graduate students.

  6. Exotic species, Micropterus salmoides, as a key bioindicator influencing the reservoir health and fish community structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ho Han

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to analyze the difference in fish fauna, ecological indicator characteristics, biological status of other fish populations, and fish community structures between two groups of reservoir ecosystems along with the invasion of an introduced species, Micropterus salmoides. Six reservoirs were selected and divided into two groups: reservoirs noninvaded and invaded by M. salmoides were RNIv and RIv, respectively. A total of 11,519 individuals of 28 species were sampled in RNIv, whereas 1925 individuals of 19 species were sampled in RIv. Korean endemic fish population dominates in RNIv, exotic fish species, especially M. salmoides, dominate in RIv. Sensitive species dominate in RNIv, whereas tolerant species and carnivore species dominate in RIv. The analysis of total length size distribution showed some difference, particularly in species size group between RNIv and RIv. Also, the analysis of total fish biomass showed a significant difference in accordance with M. salmoides inhabitation. According to the fish community analysis results, as M. salmoides proportion increased, species richness and diversity decreased. Overall data suggest that the dominant distribution of M. salmoides may influence simplification of the fish fauna, species composition, as well as community structure, and affect the length distribution and biomass of other fish population negatively.

  7. Novel features of nuclear forces and shell evolution in exotic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    大塚 孝治; 鈴木 俊夫; 本間 道雄; 宇都野 穣; 角田 直文; 月山 幸志郎; Hjorth-Jensen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Novel simple properties of the monopole component of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction are presented, leading to the so-called monopole-based universal interaction. Shell structures are shown to change as functions of $N$ and $Z$ consistently with experiments. Some key cases of this shell evolution are discussed, clarifying the effects of central and tensor forces. The validity of the present tensor force is examined in terms of the low-momentum interaction V$_{low k}$ and the Q$_{box...

  8. Nuclear Structure Data Evaluation and the US Nuclear Data Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Richard G.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Nuclear Data Program and the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data network of the International Atomic Energy Agency work in collaboration to provide recommended nuclear structure and decay data for use in basic and applied research. Data are evaluted for nuclear levels and for various types of radiation. In addition, an extensive bibliographic database of nuclear structure, reaction, and decay data references is maintained. The databases maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory include the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data Library (XUNDL), and the Nuclear Sciences References (NSR). These data are all available via the Internet and some are available in hard-copy. Although the data in the ENSDF database for a particular nucleus has often not been updated in the last few fears, XUNDL provides compiled experimental data from papers with a delay of only about one month. Also, the NSR bibliographic database is current for the many journals that are monitored regularly.

  9. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  10. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  11. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1990-09-30

    This paper discusses the following topics: antiproton nucleus interactions; strangeness production in heavy ion collisions; search for a J{sup PC} exotic hybrid meson; the SMC experiment; pion production in {rvec n}p scattering; spin transfer measurements for {rvec n}p elastic scattering; pion production in {rvec n}{rvec p} scattering; radiative muon capture (RMC) on hydrogen; radiative decays of low-lying hyperons; photoproduction of jets in nuclei; cylindrical multiplicity detector; MWPC detectors and electronics; lead glass array; cylindrical wire chamber; beam calorimeter; shower counter; and muon veto hodoscope.

  12. Nuclear Structure Data for the Present Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2005-05-01

    The US Nuclear Data Program maintains and provides easy and free access to several comprehensive databases that assist scientists to sift through and assess the vast quantity of published nuclear structure and decay data. These databases are an invaluable asset for nuclear-science experimentalists and theorists alike, and the recommended values provided for nuclear properties such as decay modes, level energies and lifetimes, and radiation properties can also be of great importance to specialists in other fields such as medicine, geophysics, and reactor design. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) contains experimental nuclear structure data for all known nuclides, evaluated by the US nuclear data program evaluators in collaboration with a number of international data groups; the Nuclear Science Reference (NSR) database provides complementary bibliographic information; the Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data Listing (XUNDL) exists to enable rapid access to experimental nuclear-structure data compiled from the most recent publications (primarily in high-spin physics). This paper presents an overview of the nuclear structure and decay data available through these databases, with emphasis on recent and forthcoming additions to and presentations of the available material.

  13. Nuclear structure of {sup 231}Ac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutami, R. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Borge, M.J.G. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: borge@iem.cfmac.csic.es; Mach, H. [Department of Radiation Sciences, ISV, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Kurcewicz, W. [Department of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pl-00 681 Warsaw (Poland); Fraile, L.M. [Departamento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gulda, K. [Department of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pl-00 681 Warsaw (Poland); Aas, A.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Garcia-Raffi, L.M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. 22805, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Lovhoiden, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Martinez, T.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. 22805, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    The low-energy structure of {sup 231}Ac has been investigated by means of {gamma} ray spectroscopy following the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 231}Ra. Multipolarities of 28 transitions have been established by measuring conversion electrons with a MINI-ORANGE electron spectrometer. The decay scheme of {sup 231}Ra {yields}{sup 231}Ac has been constructed for the first time. The Advanced Time Delayed {beta}{gamma}{gamma}(t) method has been used to measure the half-lives of five levels. The moderately fast B(E1) transition rates derived suggest that the octupole effects, albeit weak, are still present in this exotic nucleus.

  14. Nuclear Structure of 186Re

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-24

    known nuclides plotted with their proton number Z versus neutron number N . The black squares in the central valley of the chart represent the stable...can also occur when the nucleus is stretched or compressed along a direction perpendicular to the axis of nuclear symmetry , resulting in axial...equipotential surfaces in deformed nuclei, with the axis of nuclear symmetry identified as the z axis. The spherical shape has = 0, while the oblate

  15. Nuclear structure studies at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy, carried out at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics in the recent past, using heavy-ion projectiles from the pelletron accelerator centres in the country and multi-detector arrays have yielded significant data on the structure of a large number of nuclei spanning different mass ...

  16. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  17. Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00003703

    2016-01-01

    A selection of results for searches for exotic physics at the LHC are presented. These include a search for massive resonances, dark matter with a high energy jet in association with large missing transverse momentum, long-lived neutral particles, and narrow dijet resonances. The results are based on 20/fb of LHC proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV taken with the CMS detector.

  18. Black Holes and Exotic Spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Hoff da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exotic spin structures are non-trivial liftings, of the orthogonal bundle to the spin bundle, on orientable manifolds that admit spin structures according to the celebrated Geroch theorem. Exotic spin structures play a role of paramount importance in different areas of physics, from quantum field theory, in particular at Planck length scales, to gravity, and in cosmological scales. Here, we introduce an in-depth panorama in this field, providing black hole physics as the fount of spacetime exoticness. Black holes are then studied as the generators of a non-trivial topology that also can correspond to some inequivalent spin structure. Moreover, we investigate exotic spinor fields in this context and the way exotic spinor fields branch new physics. We also calculate the tunneling probability of exotic fermions across a Kerr-Sen black hole, showing that the exotic term does affect the tunneling probability, altering the black hole evaporation rate. Finally we show that it complies with the Hawking temperature universal law.

  19. EMC effect and nuclear structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atashbar Tehrani, S. [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Boushehr, Iran and Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O.Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Atashbar@ipm.ir; Mirjalili, A. [Physics Department, Yazd University, Yazd, Iran and Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O.Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Mirjalili@ipm.ir; Khorramian, Ali N. [Physics Department, Semnan University, Semnan, Iran and Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O.Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Alinaghi.Khorramian@cern.ch

    2007-02-15

    We analyze experimental data of nuclear structure function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup D} for obtaining optimum parton distribution functions (PDFs) in nuclei. Then, uncertainties of the nuclear PDFs are estimated by the Hessian method. Parametrization of nuclear parton distribution is investigated in the leading order of {alpha}{sub s}. The parton distribution are provided at Q{sup 2}=1GeV{sup 2} with a number of parameters, which are determined by a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of the data on nuclear structure function. From the analysis, we propose parton distributions at Q{sup 2}=1GeV{sup 2} for nuclei from deuteron to heavy ones with a mass number A{approx}208.

  20. Theoretical nuclear structure. Progress report for 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the fields of radioactive ion beam physics, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and the interface between nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The authors report substantial progress in all these areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 25 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 25 invited presentations at conferences and workshops.

  1. Spin and exotic Galilean symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duval, C.; Horvathy, P.A

    2002-11-07

    A slightly modified and regularized version of the non-relativistic limit of the relativistic anyon model considered by Jackiw and Nair yields particles associated with the twofold central extension of the Galilei group, with independent spin and exotic structure.

  2. Structural vulnerabilities to HIV/STI risk among female exotic dancers in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Meredith L; German, Danielle; Serio-Chapman, Chris; Sherman, Susan G

    2015-01-01

    Female exotic dancers (FEDs) are an important, yet understudied group of women who may engage in drug- and sex-related HIV/STI risk behaviors through their work. The study objective was to identify co-occurring indicators of vulnerability (e.g., housing, income, incarceration) associated with HIV/STI risk behavior among FEDs in Baltimore, Maryland. Surveys administered during July 2008-February 2009 captured socio-demographic characteristics, drug use, and sexual practices among dancers (N = 101) aged ≥18 years. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between vulnerability and risk behavior. Dancers with a high vulnerability score (i.e., 2 or more indicators) were more likely to report sex exchange (AOR: 10.7, 95% CIs: 2.9, 39.9) and multiple sex partnerships (AOR: 6.4, 95% CIs: 2.3, 18.3), controlling for demographics and drug use, compared to their less vulnerable counterparts. Findings point to primacy of macro-level factors that need to be addressed in HIV/STI prevention efforts targeting this and other high-risk populations.

  3. Nuclear Structure Research at Richmond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beausang, Cornelius W. [Univ. of Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The goals for the final year were; (1) to continue ongoing efforts to develop and enhance GRETINA and work towards GRETA; (2) to investigate the structure of non-yrast states in shape transitional Sm and Gd nuclei; (3) to investigate the structure of selected light Cd nuclei; (4) to exploit the surrogate reaction technique to extract (n,f) cross sections for actinide nuclei, particularly the first measurement of the 236Pu and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections.

  4. Euroschool on Exotic Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Pfützner, Marek; The Euroschool on Exotic Beams, vol. IV

    2014-01-01

    This is the forth volume in a series of Lecture Notes based on the highly successful Euro Summer School on Exotic Beams. The aim of these notes is to provide a thorough introduction to radioactive ion-beam physics at the level of graduate students and young postdocs starting out in the field. Each volume covers a range of topics from nuclear theory to experiment and applications. Vol I has been published as LNP 651, Vol II has been published as LNP 700, and Vol. III has been published as LNP 764.

  5. Mean field approach to nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-01

    Several examples of mean-field calculations, relevant to the recent and planned low-spin experimental works, are presented. The perspectives for future studies (mainly related to spectroscopy of exotic nuclei) are reviewd.

  6. Nuclear structure at particle drip lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Warsaw Univ. (Poland); Hamamoto, I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden); Nazarewicz, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Warsaw Univ. (Poland)]|[Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sheikh, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India)

    1993-12-31

    Several examples of mean-field calculations, relevant to the recent and planned low-spin experimental works, are presented. The perspectives for future studies (mainly related to spectroscopy of exotic nuclei) are reviewed.

  7. QCD Structure of Nuclear Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos [Florida Intl Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    2011-05-25

    This dissertation investigated selected processes involving baryons and nuclei in hard scattering reactions. Through these processes, this work explored the constituent structure of baryons and the mechanisms through which the interactions between these constituents ultimately control the selected reactions. First, hard nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering was studied considering the quark exchange (QE) between the nucleons to be the dominant mechanism of interaction in the constituent picture. It was found that an angular asymmetry exhibited by proton-neutron (pn) elastic scattering data is explained within this framework if a quark-diquark picture dominates the nucleon's structure instead of a more traditional SU(6) model. The latter yields an asymmetry around 90 deg center of mass scattering with a sign opposite to what is experimentally observed. The second process is the hard breakup by a photon of a nucleon-nucleon system in light nuclei. Proton-proton (pp) and pn breakup in 3He, and double Δ-isobars production in deuteron breakup were analyzed in the hard rescattering model (HRM), which in conjunction with the QE mechanism provides a QCD description of the reaction. Cross sections for both channels in 3He photodisintegration were computed without the need of a fitting parameter. The results presented here for pp breakup show excellent agreement with recent experimental data. In double Δ-isobars production in deuteron breakup, HRM angular distributions for the two double Δ channels were compared to the pn channel and to each other. An important prediction from this study is that the Δ++ Δ- channel consistently dominates Δ+Δ0, which is in contrast with models that unlike the HRM consider a double Δ system in the initial state of the interaction. For such models both channels should have the same strength.

  8. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumano S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrinooscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function b1 is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact suggests that a new hadronic phenomenon should exist in the tensor-polarized deuteron at high energies, and it will be experimentally investigated at JLab from the end of 2010’s.

  9. Nuclear structure of Ra at high spin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, nuclear structure at high spin and excitation energies (∼ 6 MeV) would require a coupling of excited 1p–1h with 208Pb core. The coupling between single- particle orbitals and collective vibrations of core complicates the simple shell model picture. With increasing neutron number, Ra isotopes show an abrupt ...

  10. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Richard G.

    1998-10-01

    Earlier this year, the U. S. Nuclear Data Program was reorganized; it now consists of a Coordinating Committee and three working groups. The Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group consists of the persons at several U. S. laboratories and McMaster University who prepare the evaluated experimental structure and decay data that make up the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), which is maintain at the National Nuclear Data Center. This Working Group is responsible for coordinating the work of the evaluators and approving improvements in the ENSDF format and data evaluation methodology. In this period of decreasing manpower, the Working Group helps set priorities for future work. While working to maintain the quality and currency of ENSDF, there is a need to be responsive to research ares of high current interest, such as data for astrophysics and high-spin levels. In support of astrophysics, the status of the decay data for atoms of interest is being determined and modifications of the ENSDF format will allow inclusion of data for the decay of ionized atoms. A compilation of published and unpublished data for high-spin levels is being created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by D. Radford. The ENSDF evaluators may be able to make use of this compilation to improve the currency of ENSDF in this research area. For the case of super-deformed bands, a special publication of these data already exists and it is up-dated annually.

  11. New Directions in Nuclear Structure Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, D. F.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Dunford, C.; Tuli, J.

    2003-04-01

    Since the 1970's, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Lab has maintained and disseminated a variety of widely-used databases containing evaluated nuclear structure and decay data, as well as indexed bibliographic information. These include ENSDF, NuDat, NSR, and the Nuclear Wallet Cards. Over the last few years, the NNDC has been involved in an effort to migrate existing databases to a more modern, relational format. The end result of this migration will be more flexible access and more efficient administration of the data. Ongoing tasks include the development of object-oriented interfaces and XML formats for data exchange. In this talk, several of the new databases and interfaces will be discussed.

  12. Investigation of Nuclear Partonic Structure. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Henry J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Engelage, J. M.

    2016-08-30

    Our research program had two primary goals during the period of this grant, to search for new and rare particles produced in high-energy nuclear collisions and to understand the internal structure of nuclear matter. We have developed electronics to pursue these goals at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment and the AnDY experiment. Our results include discovery of the anti-hyper-triton, anti- 3Λ-barH, which opened a new branch on the chart of the nuclides, and the anti-alpha, anti- 4He, the heaviest form of anti-matter yet seen, as well as uncovering hints of gluon saturation in cold nuclear matter and observation of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions that will be used to probe orbital motion inside protons.

  13. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Primary structures for nuclear power plants are designed to resist expected earthquakes of the site. Two intensities are referred to as Operating Basis Earthquake and Design Basis Earthquake. These structures are required to accommodate these seismic loadings without loss of their functional integrity. Thus, no plastic yield is allowed. The application of NASTRAN in analyzing some of these seismic induced structural dynamic problems is described. NASTRAN, with some modifications, can be used to analyze most structures that are subjected to seismic loads. A brief review of the formulation of seismic-induced structural dynamics is also presented. Two typical structural problems were selected to illustrate the application of the various methods of seismic structural analysis by the NASTRAN system.

  14. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluation: Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, F. G.; Browne, E.; Ouellet, C.; Pritychenko, B.; Reich, C.; Sonzogni, A.; Tandel, S.; Tuli, J. K.; Cameron, J.; Chen, A.; Singh, B.; Kelley, J.; Kwan, E.; Baglin, C.; Basunia, M. S.; Firestone, R. B.; Nica, N.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Smith, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    Reliable nuclear structure data represent the fundamental building blocks of nuclear structure physics and astrophysics research, and are also of vital importance in a large number of applications. Members of the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program, in collaboration with scientists from Japan and other countries within the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network (under the auspices of IAEA), are involved in compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclei. The network's principal effort is devoted to the timely revision of information in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) library, which is the only comprehensive nuclear structure and decay data database that is updated continuously. This presentation will briefly review recent achievements of the network, present on-going activities, and reflect on ideas for future projects and challenges in the field of nuclear structure and decay data evaluation.

  15. Colloidal synthesis of an exotic phase of silicon: the BC8 structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Kazem, Nasrin; Carter, Danielle; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2014-01-29

    Creating allotropes and polymorphs of nanoparticles (NPs) has gained tremendous momentum in recent times. Group 14 (C, Si, Ge) has a number of allotropes; some with significant applications. Here we report the synthesis of Si NPs crystallizing in the BC8 structure via a colloidal route for the first time. The BC8 structure is a metastable structure of Si that can be accessed from the β-Sn form through the release of high pressure. These Si BC8 structured NPs were synthesized via reduction of SiI4 with n-butyllithium, capped with octanol and precipitated from solution. The transmission electron microscopy lattice fringes as well as the selected area electron diffraction pattern of the precipitate are consistent with the BC8 structure. The LeBail whole profile fitting of powder X-ray diffraction data also confirms the structure as the BC8 phase. The Raman spectrum provides further evidence to support the BC8 structure. With proper tuning of the band gap these NPs could be potential candidates for solar cells.

  16. 15th National Conference on Nuclear Structure in China

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Shan-Gui; Nuclear Structure in China 2014; NSC2014

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a collection of the contributions to the 15th National Conference on Nuclear Structure in China (NSC2014), held on October 25-28, 2014 in Guilin, China and hosted by Guangxi Normal University. It provides an important updated resource in the nuclear physics literature for researchers and graduate students studying nuclear structure and related topics. Recent progress made in the study of nuclear spectroscopy of high-spin states, nuclear mass and half-life, nuclear astrophysics, super-heavy nuclei, unstable nuclei, density functional theory, neutron star and symmetry energy, nuclear matter, and nuclear shell model are covered.

  17. Experiences of structural vulnerability among exotic dancers in Baltimore, Maryland: Co-occurring social and economic antecedents of HIV/STI risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Meredith L; Footer, Katherine H A; Lim, Sahnah; Kerrigan, Deanna; Sherman, Susan G

    2017-12-01

    Women who grow up in economic scarcity often face limited opportunities for upward mobility, as a result of challenges securing stable housing, quality education, and steady employment. Chronic instability may limit the capacity of women to protect themselves against HIV/STI-related harm when engaging in sexual activity or drug use. Characterizing the structural contexts that facilitate HIV/STI risk among women are critical to effective design and implementation of drug and sexual harm reduction interventions. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were completed with 25 female exotic dancers working in Baltimore City and County exotic dance clubs July 2014-May 2015. Using thematic analysis, interviews were examined to understand the nature of structural vulnerability experienced by dancers during their early lives through the initial months of exotic dancing, including an examination of the roles of drug use and social relationships in engagement of sexual risk behavior. Dancers depicted early experiences of social and economic disadvantage, which accumulated through early adulthood. Substance use emerged as an important subject for the majority of women, operating cyclically as both precursor to and product of accumulating social and economic hardship. Dancers revealed social strategies that buffered the effects of structural vulnerability and minimized exposure to workplace-related drug and sexual harms. This study provides insight on an understudied group of at-risk women with a unique demographic profile. Findings illustrate how the effects of structural vulnerability, substance abuse, social strategies, and opportunities for economic gain through sexual services in the workplace converge to produce varying levels of HIV/STI risk among exotic dancers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Electromagnetic studies of nucleon and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.; Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    Important objectives of the group are the study of subatomic structure through experimental measurements and the interpretation of the data through modeling. The common theme that unifies the studies of strong interactions and hadronic systems is the effort to determine the electromagnetic response as completely as possible. The general approach is coincidence detection of exclusive final states and determination of the dependence on the spin variables using polarized beams and targets and outgoing nucleon polarimetry. Direct reaction and giant resonance studies of electron quasi-elastic scattering on {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O are reported, as well as work on nuclear structure models and instrumentation development.

  19. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluation: Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, F. G.; Tuli, J. K.

    2003-10-01

    The expression ``Nuclear Structure and Decay Data'' refers to complex nuclear level schemes and tables of numerical values, which quantify fundamental properties of nuclear structure, such as level energies, quantum numbers and state lifetimes, as well as various decay modes and associated radiation. These data are not only at the core of basic nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics research, but they are also relevant for many applied technologies, including nuclear energy production, reactor design and safety, medical diagnostic and radiotherapy, health physics, environmental research and monitoring, safeguards, material analysis, etc. The mission of the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group of the US DOE funded Nuclear Data Program is to evaluate, compile, maintain, and disseminate nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclei (more than 2900!). The network's principal effort is devoted to the timely revision of information in the ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) database. However, in recent years, special attention has been given to topical evaluations of properties of particular interest to the nuclear structure community, such as log ft values, α- and proton decay properties, super-deformed and magnetic dipole collective structures, nuclear moments, and nuclear isomers (under development). This presentation will briefly review recent achievements of the network, present on-going activities, and reflect on ideas for future projects and challenges in the field of nuclear structure and decay data evaluation.

  20. Nuclear structure effects in the exotic decay of $^{225}$Ac via $^{14}$C emission

    CERN Document Server

    Bonetti, R; Guglielmetti, A; Matheoud, R; Migliorino, C; Pasinetti, A L; Ravn, H L

    1993-01-01

    By using a $^{225}$Ac source produced at the electromagnetic separator Isolde we collected on our track-recording glass detectors 305 $^{14}$C events from the radioactive decays of $^{225}$Ac and its daughter $^{221}$Fr and obtained, for $^{225}$Ac, a branching ratio B($^{14}$C/$\\alpha$)=(6.0 $\\pm$ 1.3) x 10$^{-12}$. Our result suggests that such a decay from an odd proton nucleus is dominated by transition to the ground or to the first excited state of daughter nucleus.

  1. Structural Biology of Nuclear Auxin Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Dhurvas Chandrasekaran; Calderón Villalobos, Luz Irina; Abel, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Auxin coordinates plant development largely via hierarchical control of gene expression. During the past decades, the study of early auxin genes paired with the power of Arabidopsis genetics have unraveled key nuclear components and molecular interactions that perceive the hormone and activate primary response genes. Recent research in the realm of structural biology allowed unprecedented insight into: (i) the recognition of auxin-responsive DNA elements by auxin transcription factors; (ii) the inactivation of those auxin response factors by early auxin-inducible repressors; and (iii) the activation of target genes by auxin-triggered repressor degradation. The biophysical studies reviewed here provide an impetus for elucidating the molecular determinants of the intricate interactions between core components of the nuclear auxin response module. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    shell model. Then, as usual, the program of the meeting consisted of general talks and more specialized contributions, which covered five main topics: i) From nuclear forces to nuclear structure; ii) Exploring nuclear structure toward the drip line; iii) Role of the shell model in the study of exotic nuclei; iv) Nuclear structure aspects outside the shell model; and v) Special topics. The main conclusions were drawn in two keynote talks given by Amand Faessler and Franco Iachello. The Conference had about 90 participants from some 20 countries [please see the list of participants]. This is well in line with the tradition of these meetings, as is the fact that more than 50% of the present participants attended one or more of the previous Seminars. We received 58 manuscripts out of the 73 invited papers and contributions presented at the Seminar. All of these have been peer reviewed and are collected in this volume. We would like to thank all the colleagues who have acted as referees to assess the suitability of the various articles for publication in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are confident that the high quality of both invited and contributed papers contained in these Proceedings will be appreciated by the nuclear physics community. We gratefully acknowledge the members of the Advisory Committee for their valuable cooperation in preparing the scientific program as well as the financial support of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, the University of Naples Federico II, and the Dipartimento di Fisica who helped make the Seminar possible. Angela Gargano Luigi Coraggio Nunzio Itaco Editors

  3. Nuclear structure studies of neutron-rich heavy nuclei by mass measurements of francium and radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbusch, Marco [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: ISOLTRAP-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The mass is a unique property of an atomic nucleus reflecting its binding energy and thus the sum of all interactions at work. Precise measurements of nuclear masses especially of short-lived exotic nuclides provide important input for nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, tests of the Standard Model, and weak interaction studies. The Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN has been set up for precision mass measurements and continuously improved for accessing more exotic nuclides. The mass uncertainty is typically δm / m=10{sup -8} and the accessible half-life has been reduced to about 50 ms. In this contribution, the results of a measurement campaign of neutron-rich francium and radium isotopes will be presented, i.e. the masses of the isotopic chain of {sup 224-233}Fr and {sup 233,234}Ra, one of the most neutron-rich ensemble obtainable at ISOL facilities. The mass {sup 234}Ra denotes the heaviest mass ever measured with ISOLTRAP. Experimental data in the neutron-rich, heavy mass region is of great interest for studies of structural evolution far from stability, especially because the knowledge from nuclear mass models is scarce. The impact of the new data on the physics in this mass region as well as recent technical developments of ISOLTRAP are discussed.

  4. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-12-01

    Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

  5. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraggio L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  6. Introducion to Nuclear Physics course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    Atomic nuclei are made of nucleons, protons and neutrons, composed by quarks strongly interacting via gluons. How such complex objects as particles and nuclei are built? remains a fundamental question. A new "frontier" of subatomic physics is the exploration of exotic nuclei, elements and isotopes not stable enough to have survived on Earth. Exotic nuclei populated vast unknown regions of the nuclear chart where many unexpected structures have recently been discovered. Exotic nuclei synthesized in laboratory allow large variation of the neutron and proton chemical composition of nuclear systems needed to uncover the true nature of the subatomic structures and to understand the origin of elements in the Universe. This lecture will be an introduction to the open questions and key issues on the properties and structure of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter.

  7. Nuclear matrix – structure, function and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Wasąg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear matrix (NM, or nuclear skeleton, is the non-chromatin, ribonucleoproteinaceous framework that is resistant to high ionic strength buffers, nonionic detergents, and nucleolytic enzymes. The NM fulfills a structural role in eukaryotic cells and is responsible for maintaining the shape of the nucleus and the spatial organization of chromatin. Moreover, the NM participates in several cellular processes, such as DNA replication/repair, gene expression, RNA transport, cell signaling and differentiation, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and carcinogenesis. Short nucleotide sequences called scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MAR anchor the chromatin loops to the NM proteins (NMP. The NMP composition is dynamic and depends on the cell type and differentiation stage or metabolic activity. Alterations in the NMP composition affect anchoring of the S/MARs and thus alter gene expression.This review aims to systematize information about the skeletal structure of the nucleus, with particular emphasis on the organization of the NM and its role in selected cellular processes. We also discuss several diseases that are caused by aberrant NM structure or dysfunction of individual NM elements.

  8. Stocked exotic predators and their interaction with native galaxiids (Pisces: Galaxiidae) shape the food web structure in Tasmanian lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Nicolas; Amsinck, Susanne Lildal; Barmuta, Leon

    2015-01-01

    maximum body size, but not of cladocerans. The zooplankton community food web was wider in lakes with lower pelagic contribution to the fish diet. Our results suggest a negative effect by exotic predators on the niche width of galaxiids, but weak cascading effects on phytoplankton biomass, and a negative...... effect of introduced trout on the conservation status of Tasmanian lake ecosystems....

  9. Development of structural steels for nuclear application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Byun, T. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Park, D. K.; Oh, J. M.; Cho, H. D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H. D.; Kang, S. S.; Kim, J. W.; Ahn, S. B.

    1997-08-01

    To established the bases of nuclear structural material technologies, this study was focused on the localization and improvement of nuclear structural steels, the production of material property data, and technology developments for integrity evaluation. The important test and analysis technologies for material integrity assessment were developed, and the materials properties of the pressure vessel steels were evaluated systematically on the basis of those technologies, they are microstructural characteristics, tensile and indentation deformation properties, impact properties, and static and dynamic fracture toughness, fatigue and corrosion fatigue etc. Irradiation tests in the research reactors were prepared or completed to obtain the mechanical properties of irradiated materials. The improvement of low alloy steel was also attempted through the comparative study on the manufacturing processes, computer assisted alloy and process design, and application of the inter critical heat treatment. On the other hand, type 304 stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and tested successfully. High strength type 316LN stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and the microstructural characteristics, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties at high temperatures, low cycle fatigue property etc. were tested and analyzed in the view point of the effect of nitrogen. Type 347 stainless steels with high corrosion resistance and toughness for pipings and tubes and low-activated Cr-Mn steels were also developed and their basic properties were evaluated. Finally, the martensitic stainless steels for turbine blade were developed and tests. (author). 242 refs., 100 tabs., 304 figs.

  10. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier, E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia [TRIUMF (Canada); Barnea, Nir [The Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  11. Collinear Laser Spectroscopy on exotic Ca isotopes towards new magic numbers N=32 and N=34

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084516

    For more than a century physicists have been trying to understand the striking particularities of the atomic nucleus. Although several questions remain open for stable nuclei, our current interest for exploring the properties of exotic species has revealed new and unexpected aspects of nuclear structure. The study of nuclei at extreme conditions is not only relevant for nuclear physics, it can also provide answers to questions related to astrophysical processes such as the origin of elements in the universe and the limits of existence for nuclear matter. Besides the complexity of the nuclear many-body problem, nuclear structure properties exhibit regular patterns at the so called “magic” numbers of nucleons. The understanding of these apparently simple structures has motivated the development of some of the most elegant models of nuclear physics. Up to now, most of these models have been successfully applied to describe the properties of nuclei in specific regions of the nuclear chart. Even though some mo...

  12. Exotic Non-relativistic String

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Longhi, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    We construct a classical non-relativistic string model in 3+1 dimensions. The model contains a spurion tensor field that is responsible for the non-commutative structure of the model. Under double dimensional reduction the model reduces to the exotic non-relativistic particle in 2+1 dimensions.

  13. Exotic smoothness and quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, T, E-mail: torsten.asselmeyer-maluga@dlr.d [German Aerospace Center, Berlin, Germany and Loyola University, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Since the first work on exotic smoothness in physics, it was folklore to assume a direct influence of exotic smoothness to quantum gravity. Thus, the negative result of Duston (2009 arXiv:0911.4068) was a surprise. A closer look into the semi-classical approach uncovered the implicit assumption of a close connection between geometry and smoothness structure. But both structures, geometry and smoothness, are independent of each other. In this paper we calculate the 'smoothness structure' part of the path integral in quantum gravity assuming that the 'sum over geometries' is already given. For that purpose we use the knot surgery of Fintushel and Stern applied to the class E(n) of elliptic surfaces. We mainly focus our attention to the K3 surfaces E(2). Then we assume that every exotic smoothness structure of the K3 surface can be generated by knot or link surgery in the manner of Fintushel and Stern. The results are applied to the calculation of expectation values. Here we discuss the two observables, volume and Wilson loop, for the construction of an exotic 4-manifold using the knot 5{sub 2} and the Whitehead link Wh. By using Mostow rigidity, we obtain a topological contribution to the expectation value of the volume. Furthermore, we obtain a justification of area quantization.

  14. Exotic charmonium spectroscopy with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ronchese, P

    2015-01-01

    The latest results of CMS in the area of exotic quarkonium decays will be presented: observation of a peaking structure in $J/\\psi\\Phi$ mass spectrum in the decay $B^\\pm \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Phi K^\\pm$, search for new bottomonium states in $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})\\pi^+\\pi^-$ mass spectrum, measurement of prompt $J/\\psi$ pair production.

  15. The TRIUMF nuclear structure program and TIGRESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, P E; Andreyev, A; E.Austin, R A; Ball, G C; Bandyopadhyay, D; Becker, J A; Boston, A; Boston, H; Charkrawarthy, R S; Churchman, R; Cline, D; Cooper, R J; Cross, D; Dashdorj, D; Demand, G A; Dimmock, M R; Drake, T; Finlay, P; Gagnon, K; Gallant, A T; Green, K L; Grint, A N; Grinyer, G F; Hackman, G; Harkness, L J; Hayes, A B; Kanungo, R; Kulp, W D; Leach, K G; Lee, G; Leslie, J R; Maharaj, R; Martin, J P; Mattoon, C; Mills, W J; Morton, A C; Nelson, L; Newman, O; Nolan, P J; Padilla-Rodal, E; Pearson, C J; Phillips, A A; Porter-Peden, M; Ressler, J J; Ruiz, C; Sarazin, F; Schumaker, M A; Scraggs, D P; Strange, M T; Subramanian, M; Svensson, C E; Waddington, J C; Wan, J; Whitebeck, A; Williams, S J; Wood, J L; Wong, J C; Wu, C Y; Zganjar, E F

    2006-08-30

    The Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility located at the TRIUMF laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, is one of the world's most advanced ISOL-type radioactive ion beam facilities. An extensive {gamma}-ray spectroscopy program at ISAC is centered around two major research facilities: (1) the 8{pi} {gamma}-ray spectrometer for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments with the low-energy beams from ISAC-I, and (2) the next-generation TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) for in-beam experiments with the accelerated radioactive ion beams. An overview of these facilities and recent results from the diverse program of nuclear structure and fundamental interaction studies they support is presented.

  16. Exotic nuclei explored at in-flight separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Sakurai, H.; Watanabe, H.

    2017-11-01

    In-flight separators have played a significant role in the physics of exotic nuclei. In the last decade, in particular, this field has expanded rapidly with the advent of the new-generation (3rd-generation) in-flight-separator facility, the RI-beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN that was commissioned in 2007. In addition, new experimental methods, techniques and state-of-the-art detectors at in-flight separators have developed rapidly, which has contributed considerably to this progress. One can now reach very far from the stable nuclei towards the drip lines, and even beyond in some cases. Hundreds of new isotopes have been identified, and new exotic isomers have been observed. β decays and relevant γ decays, including isomeric states, have clarified many new aspects of nuclear structures. A variety of direct reactions, making the best use of in-flight rare isotope (RI) beams at intermediate/high energies, have been applied for a wide range of rare isotopes. New experimental results using these methods have shown that one needs a new framework to understand structures and dynamics of exotic nuclei, such as new or lost magic numbers, novel neutron halo/skin structures and relevant reactions/excitations. A wide range of reactions associated with nucleo-synthesis in the Universe and the equation of state (EoS) of neutron-rich nuclear matter have also been studied through experiments using rare isotopes available at in-flight separators. This review article focuses its attention on how recent experimental techniques have been developed and applied to exotic nuclei at in-flight separators. We also make remarks on prospects for the near future: in the era when the 3rd-generation RI-beam facilities based on in-flight separators are being completed world-wide.

  17. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  18. Nuclear Cartography: Patterns in Binding Energies and Subatomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. C.; Shelley, M.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear masses and binding energies are some of the first nuclear properties met in high school physics, and can be used to introduce radioactive decays, fusion, and fission. With relatively little extension, they can also illustrate fundamental concepts in nuclear physics, such as shell structure and pairing, and to discuss how the elements…

  19. Establishment and Analysis of Nuclear Structure Data DB for Nuclear Safety Regulation Technique Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ouk; Yoo, Jae Kwon; Gil, Choong; Cho, Young Sik; Kim, Hyung Il; Kim, Jong Woon; Kwon, Duk Hee; Lee, Jong Hwa

    2013-10-15

    The contents of the project consisting of four research fields carried out are: Ο Installation of DB with nuclear structure/decay datasets - Setup a computer system for production of nuclear structure/decay data in ENSDF format - Production of nuclear structure/decay data in ENSDF format({sup 211}, {sup 215}Po, {sup 136}Cs) and setup a data converting system from ENSDF format to ENDF-6 format. Ο Computer simulation of nuclear decay and burnup using the ENSDF DB - Calculation of decay heats of the several radioactive nuclides with Geant4 - Burnup calculation with full decay chain using Monte Carlo method Ο Comparison and analysis of nuclear structure/decay and fission product yields data. - Acquisitions and Analyses of decay and fission yields data in ENDF-6 format - Research for theoretical evaluation method of fission product yields data. Ο Analysis of SCALE(ORIGEN-s, -ARP) libraries - Analysis of ORIGEN library structure of nuclear decay/yields data. - Methodological studies to improve nuclear decay/yield ORIGEN libraries by use of nuclear structure/yield data in ENDF-6 format. The results of this project will be a basis to establish the nuclear decay and fission yield data DB in Korea. Additionally, new decay and yield data can be immediately served for the users to utilize those data for nuclear research and/or development.

  20. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, Filip G.; International Nuclear Structure; Decay Data Network

    2006-03-01

    The nuclear structure databases provide physicists around the world with a useful collection of reliable and well documented datasets. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) database, produced by the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network (NSDD) under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), contains evaluated experimental information for all known nuclei. The bibliographical database Nuclear Science References (NSR) provides references to published data in the field of Nuclear Physics. The Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL) provides a method for rapid access to formatted (compiled) data from recently published articles. Detailed information regarding these databases, as well as other products and services, can be found at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and IAEA web portals.

  1. The Influence of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Structure in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, K. E.

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear reactions play an important role for the energy production and the nucleosynthesis in stars. New facilities, able to accelerate radioactive nuclei or high-intensity stable beams have allowed us to measure in the laboratory reactions involving short-lived nuclei or processes with very small cross sections, which are crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis. I will discuss some of the recent experiments studying fusion and transfer reactions with radioactive beams which play a critical role in various quiescent and explosive stellar environments.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can counterbalance the negative influence of the exotic tree species Eucalyptus camaldulensis on the structure and functioning of soil microbial communities in a sahelian soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisa, Marija; Sanon, Arsene; Thioulouse, Jean; Assigbetse, Komi; Sylla, Samba; Spichiger, Rodolphe; Dieng, Lamine; Berthelin, Jacques; Prin, Yves; Galiana, Antoine; Lepage, Michel; Duponnois, Robin

    2007-10-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that bacterial communities would differentiate under Eucalyptus camaldulensis and that an enhancement of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) density would minimize this exotic plant species effect. Treatments consisted of control plants, preplanting fertilizer application and AM inoculation. After 4 months of culture in autoclaved soil, E. camaldulensis seedlings were either harvested for growth measurement or transferred into containers filled with the same soil but not sterilized. Other containers were kept without E. camaldulensis seedlings. After 12 months, effects of fertilizer amendment and AM inoculation were measured on the growth of Eucalyptus seedlings and on soil microbial communities. The results clearly show that this plant species significantly modified the soil bacterial community. Both community structure (assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles) and function (assessed by substrate-induced respiration responses including soil catabolic evenness) were significantly affected. Such changes in the bacterial structure and function were accompanied by disturbances in the composition of the herbaceous plant species layer. These results highlight the role of AM symbiosis in the processes involved in soil bio-functioning and plant coexistence and in afforestation programmes with exotic tree species that target preservation of native plant diversity.

  3. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... Keywords. Hyperpure germanium; multiplicity detector, charged particle detector; nuclear structure; -ray spectroscopy; empirical shell model. Abstract. A multidetector gamma array (GDA), for studying nuclear structure was built with ancillary devices namely gamma multiplicity filter and charged particle ...

  4. Nuclear Structure References (NSR) file. [Mostly information for input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewbank, W.B.

    1978-08-01

    The use of the Nuclear Structure References file by the Nuclear Data Project at ORNL is described. Much of the report concerns format information of interest only to those preparing input to the system or otherwise needing detailed knowledge of its internal structure. 17 figures. (RWR)

  5. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  6. Nuclear cartography: patterns in binding energies and subatomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. C.; Shelley, M.

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear masses and binding energies are some of the first nuclear properties met in high school physics, and can be used to introduce radioactive decays, fusion, and fission. With relatively little extension, they can also illustrate fundamental concepts in nuclear physics, such as shell structure and pairing, and to discuss how the elements around us were formed in stars. One way of visualising these nuclear properties is through the nuclide chart, which maps all nuclides as a function of their proton and neutron numbers. Here we use the nuclide chart to illustrate various aspects of nuclear physics, and present 3D visualisations of it produced as part of the binding blocks project.

  7. Relativistic density functional for nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to provide a detailed introduction to the state-of-the-art covariant density functional theory, which follows the Lorentz invariance from the very beginning and is able to describe nuclear many-body quantum systems microscopically and self-consistently. Covariant density functional theory was introduced in nuclear physics in the 1970s and has since been developed and used to describe the diversity of nuclear properties and phenomena with great success. In order to provide an advanced and updated textbook of covariant density functional theory for graduate students and nuclear physics researchers, this book summarizes the enormous amount of material that has accumulated in the field of covariant density functional theory over the last few decades as well as the latest developments in this area. Moreover, the book contains enough details for readers to follow the formalism and theoretical results, and provides exhaustive references to explore the research literature.

  8. Direct reactions with exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obertelli A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct reactions have been a unique tool to address the nuclear many-body problem from the experimental side. They are now routinely used in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams (RIB. However, weakly bound nuclei have recently raised questions on the applicability of reaction formalisms benchmarked on stable nuclei to the study of single-particle properties and correlations in these unstable systems. The study of the most exotic species produced at low intensity have triggered new technical developments to increase the sensitivity of the setup, with a focused attention to direct reactions such as transfer at low incident energy or knockout at intermediate energies.

  9. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolev, Yu G; EXON-2014

    2015-01-01

    The production and the properties of nuclei in extreme conditions, such as high isospin, temperature, angular momenta, large deformations etc., have become the subject of detailed investigations in all scientific centers. The main topics discussed at the Symposium were: Synthesis and Properties of Exotic Nuclei; Superheavy Elements; Rare Processes, Nuclear Reactions, Fission and Decays; Experimental Facilities and Scientific Projects. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the newest results of the investigations in the main scientific centers such as GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), GANIL (Caen, France), RIKEN (Wako-shi, Japan), MSU (Michigan, USA), and JINR (Dubna, Russia).

  10. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P.G. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  11. Ultra-fast timing study of exotic neutron-rich Fe isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Olaizola, Bruno; Mach, Henryk

    The cornerstone of nuclear structure, as we know it from stable nuclei, is the existence of magic numbers. The most stable nuclei arise for completely occupied shells, closed shells, and give rise to the magic numbers. At the Valley of Stability their values are 8, 20, 28, 50, 82 and 126. The steady development of the production, separation and identication of exotic nuclei, together with the improvement of the detection techniques, makes it possible to experimentally explore nuclei further away from the Valley of Stability. These exotic nuclei with nucleon numbers supposed to be magic do not always have the properties one would expect. As extra nucleons are added (or removed) from stable nuclei, the single particle energies are modied and strong quadrupole correlations appear, which may neutralize the spherical meanfield shell gaps. The investigation of the evolution of shell structure far from stability has become a major subject in Nuclear Physics. Research in this field has strong implications also in nuc...

  12. Nuclear structure of light Ca and heavy Cr isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, A.

    2007-07-01

    In the present thesis, the shell structure in exotic nuclei has been investigated. The focus of the work was on finding new experimental data in neutron-rich Cr and proton-rich Ca isotopes. The investigation of light Ca isotopes concentrated on the nucleus {sup 36}Ca which was produced in a knockout reaction from a radioactive {sup 37}Ca beam. For {sup 36}Ca, the excitation energy of the first 2{sup +} state has been measured for the first time. Furthermore, momentum distributions were analyzed using a Monte-Carlo simulation of the knockout reaction. This analysis yielded the contributions of neutrons from individual orbitals to the total knockout cross section. In principle, these may be used to calculate spectroscopic factors, but such a calculation is hampered by difficulties of present knockout-reaction models in predicting precise single-particle cross sections. The measured branching ratio to the ground and excited states, on the other hand, is close to the predicted value. A remaining difference might be due to emission of protons which cannot be detected with the present experimental setup. Both the branching ratio and the large excitation energy are compatible with a large N=16 gap in {sup 36}Ca that leads to relatively pure configurations both in the ground state and the excited 2{sup +} state. As a by-product of the experiment, two excitation energies in the T=2 nuclei {sup 32}Ar and {sup 28}S have been confirmed, and two {gamma}-ray transitions have been observed for the first time in {sup 37}Ca. While the mirror energy differences in the T=2 pairs {sup 36}Ca-{sup 36}S, {sup 32}Ar-{sup 32}Si, and {sup 28}S-{sup 28}Mg can be reproduced in shell model calculations using a modified USD interaction, these modifications are not sufficient to explain the mirror energy differences for the pair {sup 37}Ca-{sup 37}Cl. In the heavy Cr isotopes, new experimental evidence for a sub-shell closure at N=32 was found in a measurement of B(E2) values using high

  13. Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File and Related Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Jagdish K.

    2005-05-01

    The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is a leading resource for experimental nuclear data. It is maintained and distributed by the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The file is mainly contributed to by an international network of evaluators under the auspice of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The ENSDF is updated, generally by mass number, i.e., evaluating together all isobars for a given mass number. If, however, experimental activity in an isobaric chain is limited to a particular nuclide, then only that nuclide is updated. The evaluations are published in the Journal of Nuclear Data Sheets, Academic Press, a division of Elsevier.

  14. Nuclear Structures Surrounding Internal Lamin Invaginations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Laur, O.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Sehnalová, Petra; Bártová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 3 (2014), s. 476-487 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11020 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : LAMINS * NUCLEAR PORES * CHROMATIN Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.263, year: 2014

  15. Stress Management and Nuclear Anxiety: A Structured Group Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Thomas A.; Crisan, Pamela

    1984-01-01

    Describes a structured workshop in which group members explore their fears of nuclear holocaust and the effects this fear has had on their lives. By using logotherapy ideals, the participants create a renewed sense of purpose and hope. (Author)

  16. Nuclear structure notes on element 115 decay chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Forsberg, U.

    2015-10-01

    Hitherto collected data on more than hundred α-decay chains stemming from element 115 are combined to probe some aspects of the underlying nuclear structure of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory.

  17. Nuclear Structure Notes on Element 115 Decay Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, Dirk; Sarmiento, Luis; Forsberg, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Hitherto collected data on more than hundred α-decay chains stemming from element 115 are combined to probe some aspects of the underlying nuclear structure of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory.

  18. Determination of Structures of Proteins in Solution using Nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 8. Determination of Structures of Proteins in Solution using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Siddhartha P Sarma. Research News Volume 8 Issue 8 August 2003 pp 86-99 ...

  19. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  20. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  1. Exotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, W R

    1980-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, Lassa fever, monkeypox, and Ebola virus diseases of humans have all been recognized since 1967. These are examples of some of the exotic virus diseases which through importation may present a potential public health problem in the United States. Some of these viruses are also highly hazardous to laboratory and medical personnel. This paper is a review of the general characteristics, the epidemiology, and laboratory diagnosis of the exotic viruses which have been described during the last 25 years.

  2. Exotic viral diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Dowdle, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, Lassa fever, monkeypox, and Ebola virus diseases of humans have all been recognized since 1967. These are examples of some of the exotic virus diseases which through importation may present a potential public health problem in the United States. Some of these viruses are also highly hazardous to laboratory and medical personnel. This paper is a review of the general characteristics, the epidemiology, and laboratory diagnosis of the exotic viruses which have been describ...

  3. Exotic Mammal Laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy is an evolving field in veterinary medicine, and there is an increased interest in using laparoscopic techniques in nondomestic mammals, including zoo animals, wildlife, and exotic pets. The aim of this article is to summarize the approach to laparoscopic procedures, including instrumentation, patient selection and preparation, and surgical approaches, and to review the current literature on laparoscopy in exotic mammals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Afsaneh [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  5. Nuclear structures: Twinning and modulation in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petříček, Václav; Dušek, Michal

    2017-10-01

    Crystal structure analysis is a standard technique routinely applied to single crystals as well as powders. However the process is not so straightforward if the crystal sample is affected by twinning or if the structure is modulated. In such cases the standard procedures are not directly applicable. The main purpose of this contribution is to show how to solve and refine such difficult structures. While for twinned structures the basic property of crystal - translation symmetry in three dimensional space-remains valid, for modulated crystals a special superspace theory must be exploited in order to describe the atomic structure with crystallographic methods generalized for superspace.

  6. Structuring Cooperative Nuclear RIsk Reduction Initiatives with China.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Larry [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Reinhardt, Jason Christian [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hecker, Siegfried [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation engaged several Chinese nuclear organizations in cooperative research that focused on responses to radiological and nuclear terrorism. The objective was to identify joint research initiatives to reduce the global dangers of such threats and to pursue initial technical collaborations in several high priority areas. Initiatives were identified in three primary research areas: 1) detection and interdiction of smuggled nuclear materials; 2) nuclear forensics; and 3) radiological (“dirty bomb”) threats and countermeasures. Initial work emphasized the application of systems and risk analysis tools, which proved effective in structuring the collaborations. The extensive engagements between national security nuclear experts in China and the U.S. during the research strengthened professional relationships between these important communities.

  7. Dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures: an evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, H.J.

    1980-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) evaluated the applications of system identification techniques to the dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures and subsystems. These experimental techniques involve exciting a structure and measuring, digitizing, and processing the time-history motions that result. The data can be compared to parameters calculated using finite element or other models of the test systems to validate the model and to verify the seismic analysis. This report summarizes work in three main areas: (1) analytical qualification of a set of computer programs developed at LLL to extract model parameters from the time histories; (2) examination of the feasibility of safely exciting nuclear power plant structures and accurately recording the resulting time-history motions; (3) study of how the model parameters that are extracted from the data be used best to evaluate structural integrity and analyze nuclear power plants.

  8. From nuclear structure to neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandolfi Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutronrich matter. As a demonstration, we show that the agreement between theoretical calculations of the charge form factor of 12C and the experimental data is excellent. Applying similar methods to isospin-asymmetric systems allows one to describe neutrons confined in an external potential and homogeneous neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  9. Analysis of statistical model properties from discrete nuclear structure data

    OpenAIRE

    Firestone Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental M1, E1, and E2 photon strengths have been compiled from experimental data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF). Over 20,000 Weisskopf reduced transition probabilities were recovered from the ENSDF and EGAF databases. These transition strengths have been analyzed for their dependence on transition energies, initial and final level energies, spin/parity dependence, and nuclear deformation. ENSDF BE1W values were fou...

  10. Structural integrity of materials in nuclear service: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1977-06-07

    This report contains 679 abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) computer file dated 1973 through 1976 covering material properties with respect to structural integrity. All materials important to the nuclear industry (except concrete) are covered for mechanical properties, chemical properties, corrosion, fracture or failure, radiation damage, creep, cracking, and swelling. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for the convenience of the user.

  11. Reactions of exotic nuclei with the quark-meson coupling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, E.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2017-11-01

    The nucleon-nucleon interaction is an important requirement for investigations of nuclear structure and reactions, as well as for astrophysical models such as r-process nucleosynthesis and neutron stars. The traditional approach to low-energy nuclear physics is to treat nucleons as immutable objects interacting via phenomenological forces. The use of phenomenological interactions, rather than one derived from a microscopic theory, raises questions as to the reliability of predictions for exotic regions of the nuclear chart. The quark-meson coupling (QMC) model uses a relativistic mean-field approach to provide a microscopically derived nucleon-nucleon interaction, which takes into account the quark structure of the nucleon. The Skyrme energy density functional is a popular phenomenological tool in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. In this work, the QMC density functional was used to produce a set of Skyrme parameterisations, in the hopes that they will give more reliable predictions for exotic nuclei. In conjunction with Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations, the Skyrme-QMC (SQMC) parameterisations have been used to model the ground-state properties of individual nuclei and nucleus-nucleus potentials for Ca + Sn reactions. The SQMC parameterisation performs with an accuracy comparable to modern phenomenological functionals. From this, one can investigate the importance of the isovector terms of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which are particularly significant for exotic, neutron-rich regions of the nuclear chart. One of the notable successes of the QMC model is its derivation of nuclear spin-orbit coupling. The isovector dependence of the spin-orbit equation of state is remarkably similar to that of the modern UNEDF1 phenomenological density functional. HFB calculations along the Sn isotopic chain reveal that the isovector properties of the spin-orbit term impact binding energies to a level that will be significant for astrophysical r

  12. Exotic Higgs searches

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccioni, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Exotic Higgs searches cover a wide range of signatures, thus leading to indications to new physics beyond Standard Model. We report a review on exotic Higgs searches for lepton flavour violating Higgs decays, for "mono-Higgs" searches, for Higgs decays to invisible and for high mass Higgs searches. Both ATLAS and CMS results will be shown, for Run-1 data statistics collected at the energy of $\\sqrt s$ = 7,8 TeV and for the first data collected during Run-2 phase at the energy of $\\sqrt s$ = 13 TeV.

  13. Supplements for exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Colitz, Carmen M H

    2014-09-01

    The use of supplements has become commonplace in an effort to complement traditional therapy and as part of long-term preventive health plans. This article discusses historical and present uses of antioxidants, vitamins, and herbs. By complementing traditional medicine with holistic and alternative nutrition and supplements, the overall health and wellness of exotic pets can be enhanced and balanced. Further research is needed for understanding the strengths and uses of supplements in exotic species. Going back to the animals' origin and roots bring clinicians closer to nature and its healing powers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. RIB Production at LNL: the EXOTIC Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Mazzocco

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear reactions involving radioactive isotopes are extremely relevant in several astrophysical scenarios, from the Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis to Supernovae explosions. In this contribution the production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) by means of the in-flight technique is reviewed. In particular, the use of direct reactions in inverse kinematics for the production of light weakly-bound RIBs by means of the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL (Italy) will be described in detail.

  15. Correlation between muonic levels and nuclear structure in muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.M., E-mail: dongjm07@lzu.edu.cn [Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(18), Beijing 102413 (China); Zuo, W., E-mail: zuowei@impcas.ac.cn [Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, H.F. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Scheid, W. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Justus-Liebig-University, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Gu, J.Z., E-mail: gujianzhong2000@yahoo.com.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(18), Beijing 102413 (China); Wang, Y.Z. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(18), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2011-10-25

    A method that deals with the nucleons and the muon unitedly is employed to investigate the muonic lead, with which the correlation between the muon and nucleus can be studied distinctly. A 'kink' appears in the muonic isotope shift at a neutron magic number where the nuclear shell structure plays a key role. This behavior may have very important implications for the experimentally probing the shell structure of the nuclei far away from the {beta}-stable line. We investigate the variations of the nuclear structure due to the interaction with the muon in the muonic atom and find that the nuclear structure remains basically unaltered. Therefore, the muon is a clean and reliable probe for studying the nuclear structure. In addition, a correction that the muon-induced slight change in the proton density distribution in turn shifts the muonic levels is investigated. This correction to muonic level is as important as the Lamb shift and high order vacuum polarization correction, but is larger than anomalous magnetic moment and electron shielding correction.

  16. Educating the exotic animal technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, Kellie A; Schulte, Michelle S

    2005-09-01

    The thorough education of a skilled exotic animal technician is an ongoing process. Providing the educational tools is only the beginning. Building on the initial educational groundwork is required to excel. Veterinary technicians interested in exotic animal medicine must lobby to promote awareness of the demand for exotic pet care; be able to accept, adapt, and apply new data frequently; and receive constant support and encouragement from the exotic animal veterinarian.

  17. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams; Noyaux exotiques et faisceaux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-12-31

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Direct observation of an isomeric state in {sup 98}Rb and nuclear properties of exotic rubidium isotopes measured by laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, T.J.; Garnsworthy, A.B.; Levy, C.D.P.; Pearson, M.R. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Behr, J.A.; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Billowes, J. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J.E.; Leary, A.; Shelbaya, O.; Al Tamimi, W. [McGill University, Physics Department, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cheal, B. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mane, E. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ministry of External Relations, Rio Bianco Institute, Brasilia (Brazil); Stolz, M. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Voss, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2015-02-01

    Fast-beam collinear laser spectroscopy experiments on rubidium have been performed at the ISAC radioactive ion beam facility at TRIUMF. Most recently, the neutron-rich {sup 98}Rb isotope has been studied for the investigation of shape coexistence. Two long-lived nuclear states in {sup 98}Rb have been clearly observed for the first time: a low-spin state, assigned a spin of I = 0, and a high-spin state. The high-spin state is tentatively assigned a spin of I = 3 based on this analysis in combination with gamma decay results. The measured nuclear properties of the two states are presented, alongside unpublished values of the neutron-deficient isotopes investigated previously. The mean-square charge radii of both states in {sup 98}Rb are observed to continue along the isodeformation line present after the N = 60 onset of deformation. (orig.)

  19. Exotic invasive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Barbara G. Phillips; Laura P. Moser

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997). After habitat loss, the spread of exotic species is...

  20. Detailed requirements for a next generation nuclear data structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-07-05

    This document attempts to compile the requirements for the top-levels of a hierarchical arrangement of nuclear data such as found in the ENDF format. This set of requirements will be used to guide the development of a new data structure to replace the legacy ENDF format.

  1. Optical spectroscopy by Hantaro Nagaoka Pioneer nuclear structure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Takashi T.

    2000-08-01

    Hantaro Nagaoka is a Japanese physicist who made an experimental pioneer work on optical spectroscopy for nuclear structure studies in 1920s. Today much attention should be paid to this work rather than to his famous atomic model that died away long time ago along with Thomson's model.

  2. Optical spectroscopy by Hantaro Nagaoka - Pioneer nuclear structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamura, Takashi T. [Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory (Poland)], E-mail: inamura@slcj.uw.edu.pl

    2000-08-15

    Hantaro Nagaoka is a Japanese physicist who made an experimental pioneer work on optical spectroscopy for nuclear structure studies in 1920s. Today much attention should be paid to this work rather than to his famous atomic model that died away long time ago along with Thomson's model.

  3. Structure of nuclear transition matrix elements for neutrinoless ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The structure of nuclear transition matrix elements (NTMEs) required for the study of neutrinoless double- decay within light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism is disassembled in the PHFB model. The NTMEs are calculated using a set of HFB intrinsic wave functions, the reliability of which has been previously ...

  4. Structure of nuclear transition matrix elements for neutrinoless ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The structure of nuclear transition matrix elements (NTMEs) required for the study of neutrinoless double-β decay within light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism is disassembled in the PHFB model. The NTMEs are calculated using a set of HFB intrinsic wave functions, the reliability of which has been previously ...

  5. Submicro and Nano Structured Porous Materials for the Production of High-Intensity Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Stora, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    ISOLDE, the CERN Isotope Separator On-line DEvice is a unique source of low energy beams of radioactive isotopes - atomic nuclei that have too many or too few neutrons to be stable. The facility is like a small ‘chemical factory’, giving the possibility of changing one element to another, by selecting the atomic mass of the required isotope beam in the mass separator, rather as the ‘alchemists’ once imagined. It produces a total of more than 1000 different isotopes from helium to radium, with half-lives down to milliseconds, by impinging a 1.4 GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) onto special targets, yielding a wide variety of atomic fragments. Different components then extract the nuclei and separate them according to mass. The post-accelerator REX (Radioactive beam EXperiment) at ISOLDE accelerates the radioactive beams up to 3 MeV/u for many experiments. A wide international user radioactive ion beam (RIB) community investigates fundamental aspects of nuclear physics, particle...

  6. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC, which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling.

  7. Spectroscopy of Exotic Nuclei via Quasi-free Scattering Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Stefanos

    2017-09-01

    In the work presented here we are interested in examining the single-particle strength of nucleons in stable and exotic nuclei and the reduction compared to the independent particle model. The motivation for this work has been the reported reduction of single-particle strengths and in particular the dependency of this reduction as a function of isospin asymmetry expressed in terms of nucleon separation energies. In particular, in (e,e p) experiments single-particle strengths of the order of 60-70 p) experiments were reported for nuclei close to stability but with a strong dependency of the single-particle strength on the proton-neutron asymmetry. The origin of this strong asymmetry is not fully understood and results from transfer reactions do not support this evidence. In this work I will present our results where quasi-free scattering reactions have been extended and used in inverse kinematics with radioactive beams and a hydrogen-rich target. In particular, I will discuss results on the single-particle structure of stable and exotic nuclei along the oxygen isotopic chain from an experiment that was carried out at the R3B/LAND setup at GSI, Germany, and discuss the dependency on neutron/proton separation energy as well as possible dependencies on the reaction theory used for extracting this nuclear structure information.

  8. Exotics: Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Lange, Jens Sören; Stone, Sheldon

    2017-11-01

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e+e- and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ;exotics;. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c c bar or b b bar pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two-antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ;molecules; similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  9. Exotics. Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Lange, Jens Soeren [Giessen Univ. (Germany). II. Physikalisches Inst.; Stone, Sheldon [Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    2017-07-15

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ''exotics''. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c anti c or b anti b pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ''molecules'' similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  10. Status of exotic states at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Yeletskikh, Ivan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We review the status of searches and measurements of exotic hadron states at ATLAS. Among them: the search for the beauty partner of X(3872) charmonium state, the measurement of differential cross-section of the prompt and non-prompt production of X(3872) in the J/psi pi pi final states, the search for the structure in the B_s pi invariant mass, reported by D0 experiment, search for exotic states in B-hadron decays: pentaquarks in Lambda_b decays and tetraquarks in B-meson decays. ATLAS results and ongoing analyses perspectives are highlighted together with CMS and LHCb results.

  11. Equation of state of dense nuclear matter and neutron star structure from nuclear chiral interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombaci, Ignazio; Logoteta, Domenico

    2018-02-01

    Aims: We report a new microscopic equation of state (EOS) of dense symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter, and asymmetric and β-stable nuclear matter at zero temperature using recent realistic two-body and three-body nuclear interactions derived in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) and including the Δ(1232) isobar intermediate state. This EOS is provided in tabular form and in parametrized form ready for use in numerical general relativity simulations of binary neutron star merging. Here we use our new EOS for β-stable nuclear matter to compute various structural properties of non-rotating neutron stars. Methods: The EOS is derived using the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone quantum many-body theory in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. Neutron star properties are next computed solving numerically the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov structure equations. Results: Our EOS models are able to reproduce the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter, the symmetry energy Esym, and its slope parameter L at the empirical saturation density n0. In addition, our EOS models are compatible with experimental data from collisions between heavy nuclei at energies ranging from a few tens of MeV up to several hundreds of MeV per nucleon. These experiments provide a selective test for constraining the nuclear EOS up to 4n0. Our EOS models are consistent with present measured neutron star masses and particularly with the mass M = 2.01 ± 0.04 M⊙ of the neutron stars in PSR J0348+0432.

  12. Microscopic description of nuclear structure; La structure nucleaire decrite par les theories microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girod, M.; Berger, J.F.; Peru, S.; Dancer, H. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2002-07-01

    After briefly recalling the formalism of the mean field approach with an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, the theoretical framework of the nuclear structure studies performed at CEA-DAM, applications of this theory to various nuclear systems: shape and spin isomeric states, neutron and proton rich nuclei, superheavy and hyper-heavy nuclei, and to the fission process are presented. (authors)

  13. Nuclear structure studies for the astrophysical r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, B; Thielemann, F K; Walters, W B

    2001-01-01

    The production of the heaviest elements in nature occurs via the r-process, i.e. a combination of rapid neutron captures, the inverse photodisintegrations, and slower beta sup - -decays, beta-delayed processes as well as fission and possibly interactions with intense neutrino fluxes. A correct understanding and modeling requires the knowledge of nuclear properties far from stability and a detailed prescription of the astrophysical environment. Experiments at radioactive ion beam facilities have played a pioneering role in exploring the characteristics of nuclear structure in terms of masses and beta-decay properties. Initial examinations paid attention to highly unstable nuclei with magic neutron numbers and their beta-decay properties, related to the location and height of r-process peaks, while recent activities focus on the evolution of shell effects at large distances from the valley of stability. We show in site-independent applications the effect of both types of nuclear properties on r-process abundanc...

  14. Nuclear effects in atomic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Pálffy, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects that can be identified in atomic structure data. An introduction to the theory of isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting of atomic spectra is given, together with an overview of the typical experimental techniques used in high-precision atomic spectroscopy. More exotic effects at the borderline between atomic and nuclear physics, such as parity violation in atomic transitions due to the weak interaction, or nuclear polarization and nuclear excitation by electron capture, are also addressed.

  15. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  16. Nuclear structure in cold rearrangement processes in fission and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, P.

    1998-11-01

    In fission and fusion of heavy nuclei large numbers of nucleons are rearranged at a scale of excitation energy very small compared to the binding energy of the nuclei. The energies involved are less than 40 MeV at nuclear temperatures below 1.5 MeV. The shapes of the configurations in the rearrangement of a binary system into a monosystem in fusion, or vice versa in fission, change their elongations by as much as 8 fm, the radius of the monosystem. The dynamics of the reactions macroscopically described by a potential energy surface, inertia parameters, dissipation, and a collision energy is strongly modified by the nuclear structure of the participating nuclei. Experiments showing nuclear structure effects in fusion and fission of the heaviest nuclei are reviewed. The reaction kinematics and the multitude of isotopes involved are investigated by detector techniques and by recoil spectrometers. The advancement of the latter allows to find very small reaction branches in the range of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10}. The experiments reveal nuclear structure effects in all stages of the rearrangement processes. These are discussed pointing to analogies in fusion and fission on the microscopic scale, notwithstanding that both processes macroscopically are irreversible. Heavy clusters, as 132Sn, 208Pb, nuclei with closed shell configurations N=82,126, Z=50,82 survive in large parts of the nuclear rearrangement. They determine the asymmetry in the mass distribution of low energy fission, and they allow to synthesise superheavy elements, until now up to element 112. Experiments on the cold rearrangement in fission and fusion are presented. Here, in the range of excitation energies below 12 MeV the phenomena are observed most convincingly. (orig.)

  17. TUNL Nuclear Structure Data Evaluation on A = 2-20 Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thinh; Kelley, John; Sheu, Grace

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear data represents measured or evaluated probabilities of various physical interactions involving the nuclei of atoms. The nuclear data group at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) compiles, evaluates and disseminates nuclear structure data relevant to light nuclei in the mass region of A = 2 - 20. Our activities primarily involve surveying literature articles and producing recommended values for inclusion into various United States Nuclear Data Program databases, such as Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL) and Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). We have projects related to analyzing beta-decay lifetimes, compiling structure data from recently published articles, and producing full nuclear structure data evaluations of nuclides based on all existing literature. The nuclear data disseminated is used for theoretical model development of nuclear physics and for applications involving radiation and nuclear power technologies. This work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation Grant No. NSF-PHY-1461204 and Duke/TUNL.

  18. From the stable to the exotic: clustering in light nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, C.

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of research work has been undertaken in alpha-clustering study since the pioneering discovery of 12C+12C molecular resonances half a century ago. Our knowledge on physics of nuclear molecules has increased considerably and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. The occurrence of "exotic" shapes in light N=Z alpha-like nuclei is investigated. Various approaches of ...

  19. EVALUATED NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATA FILE -- A MANUAL FOR PREPARATION OF DATA SETS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TULI, J.K.

    2001-02-01

    This manual describes the organization and structure of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). This computer-based file is maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network. For every mass number (presently, A {le} 293), the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) contains evaluated structure information. For masses A {ge} 44, this information is published in the Nuclear Data Sheets; for A < 44, ENSDF is based on compilations published in the journal Nuclear Physics. The information in ENSDF is updated by mass chain or by nuclide with a varying cycle time dependent on the availability of new information.

  20. Evaluated nuclear structure data file: A manual for preparation of data sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuli, J.K.

    1987-04-01

    This manual describes the organization and structure of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). This computer-based file is maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network. For every mass number (presently, Aless than or equal to263), the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) contains evaluated structure information. For masses Agreater than or equal to45, this information is documented in the Nuclear Data Sheets; for A<45, ENSDF is based on compilations published in the journal Nuclear Physics. The information in ENSDF is updated by mass chains with a present cycle time of approximately six years.

  1. Recent Astrophysical Studies with Exotic Beams at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL

    2006-02-01

    The availability of exotic beams has produced great opportunities for advances in our understanding of the nucleosynthesis occurring in stellar burning and stellar explosions such as novae, X-ray bursts, and supernovae. In these extreme environments, synthesized radioactive nuclei can undergo subsequent nuclear processing before they decay, and thus to understand these events, we must understand reaction rates involving radioactive nuclei. At the ORNL Holi led Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), we have made several recent measurements using proton-rich beams such as 18F and 7Be and neutron-rich beams such as 82Ge and 84Se that help clarify the structure of astrophysically-important nuclei. We are also poised to begin studies with doubly-magic 132Sn. The experimental methods and results are discussed.

  2. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  3. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  4. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R&D Roadmap for Concrete, "Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap", focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  5. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  6. ATLAS Exotic Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousson Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the outstanding performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC that delivered more than 2 fb−1 of proton-proton collision data at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the ATLAS experiment has been able to explore a wide range of exotic models trying to address the questions unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics. Searches for leptoquarks, new heavy quarks, vector-like quarks, black holes, hidden valley and contact interactions are reviewed in these proceedings.

  7. Mammal Research: Exotic Ungulates in Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A review, of the exotic ungulate industry in Florida was made by mailing questionnaires to exotic ungulate permittees, phone interviews, interviews with exotic...

  8. Nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors: Structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Peter J.; Fairall, Louise; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Co-repressor proteins, such as SMRT and NCoR, mediate the repressive activity of unliganded nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. They appear to act as intrinsically disordered “hub proteins” that integrate the activities of a range of transcription factors with a number of histone modifying enzymes. Although these co-repressor proteins are challenging targets for structural studies due to their largely unstructured character, a number of structures have recently been determined of co-repressor interaction regions in complex with their interacting partners. These have yielded considerable insight into the mechanism of assembly of these complexes, the structural basis for the specificity of the interactions and also open opportunities for targeting these interactions therapeutically. PMID:21925568

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can counterbalance the negative influence of the exotic tree species Eucalyptus camaldulensis on the structure and functioning of soil microbial communities in a sahelian soil

    OpenAIRE

    Kisa, Marija; Sanon, Arsène; Thioulouse, J.; Assigbetse, Komi; Sylla, Samba; Spichiger, R. (collab.); Dieng, Lamine; Berthelin, J.; Prin, Y; Galiana, A.; Lepage, Michel; Duponnois, Robin

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that bacterial communities would differentiate under Eucalyptus camaldulensis and that an enhancement of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) density would minimize this exotic plant species effect. Treatments consisted of control plants, preplanting fertilizer application and AM inoculation. After 4 months of culture in autoclaved soil, E. camaldulensis seedlings were either harvested for growth measurement or transferred into containers filled with the same so...

  10. Seismic margin analysis technique for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choi, In Kil

    2001-04-01

    In general, the Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) and the Seismic Margin Assessment(SAM) are used for the evaluation of realistic seismic capacity of nuclear power plant structures. Seismic PRA is a systematic process to evaluate the seismic safety of nuclear power plant. In our country, SPRA has been used to perform the probabilistic safety assessment for the earthquake event. SMA is a simple and cost effective manner to quantify the seismic margin of individual structural elements. This study was performed to improve the reliability of SMA results and to confirm the assessment procedure. To achieve this goal, review for the current status of the techniques and procedures was performed. Two methodologies, CDFM (Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin) sponsored by NRC and FA (Fragility Analysis) sponsored by EPRI, were developed for the seismic margin review of NPP structures. FA method was originally developed for Seismic PRA. CDFM approach is more amenable to use by experienced design engineers including utility staff design engineers. In this study, detailed review on the procedures of CDFM and FA methodology was performed.

  11. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  12. Clinical approach to dermatologic disease in exotic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Brian S; Roberts, Helen

    2013-09-01

    Skin disease is an extremely common presenting complaint to the exotic animal practitioner. A systematic diagnostic approach is necessary in these cases to achieve a diagnosis and formulate an effective treatment plan. In all exotic species, husbandry plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous disease, so a thorough evaluation of the husbandry is critical for successful management. The clinical approach to skin disease in exotic animal patients is reviewed with specific focus on structure and function of the skin, diagnostic testing, and differential diagnoses for commonly encountered cutaneous diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  14. Optimization of in vitro multiplication for exotic banana (Musa spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    win7

    2015-06-17

    Jun 17, 2015 ... Optimization of in vitro multiplication for exotic banana. (Musa spp.) in Pakistan. Mehnaz Qamar. 1. *, Sadaf Tabassum Qureshi. 1. , Imtiaz Ahmed Khan. 2 and Saboohi Raza. 2. 1Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan. 2Nuclear Institute of Agriculture (NIA), Tando Jam, Pakistan.

  15. POLAREX. Study of polarized exotic nuclei at millikelvin temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risegari, L.; Astier, A.; Audi, G.; Cabaret, S.; Gaulard, C.; Georgiev, G. [CSNSM, Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Orsay (France); Stone, N.J. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stone, J.R. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College Park, MD (United States)

    2009-12-15

    POLAREX (POLARization of EXotic nuclei) is a new facility for the study of nuclear magnetic moments and decay modes of exotic nuclei using the established On-Line Nuclear Orientation (OLNO) method. A radioactive beam of interest is implanted into a ferromagnetic host foil held at a temperature of order 10mK in a {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator. The foil is magnetized by an applied magnetic field and the nuclear spins become polarized through the internal hyperfine field. The angular distribution of decay products from the polarized sample is measured. Accurate values of nuclear moment are obtained by NMR. The new facility will have access to neutron-rich nuclides produced at the ALTO facility (Linear Accelerator at Orsay Tandem) by fission induced by electrons from the linear electron accelerator. Basic concepts and initial tests are outlined. (orig.)

  16. Probing exotic phenomena at the interface of nuclear and particle physics with the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms: A unique window to hadronic and semi-leptonic CP violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, N. [RIKEN, Wako, iTHES Research Group, Saitama (Japan); Far Eastern Federal University, Complex Simulation Group, School of Biomedicine, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Sahoo, B.K. [Physical Research Laboratory, Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Division, Ahmedabad (India); Yoshinaga, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama (Japan); Sato, T. [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Asahi, K. [RIKEN, Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and International Education and Research Center of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Das, B.P. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and International Education and Research Center of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The current status of electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms which involves the synergy between atomic experiments and three different theoretical areas, i.e. particle, nuclear and atomic, is reviewed. Various models of particle physics that predict CP violation, which is necessary for the existence of such electric dipole moments, are presented. These include the standard model of particle physics and various extensions of it. Effective hadron level combined charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) symmetry violating interactions are derived taking into consideration different ways in which a nucleon interacts with other nucleons as well as with electrons. Nuclear structure calculations of the CP-odd nuclear Schiff moment are discussed using the shell model and other theoretical approaches. Results of the calculations of atomic electric dipole moments due to the interaction of the nuclear Schiff moment with the electrons and the P and time-reversal (T) symmetry violating tensor-pseudotensor electron-nucleus are elucidated using different relativistic many-body theories. The principles of the measurement of the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms are outlined. Upper limits for the nuclear Schiff moment and tensor-pseudotensor coupling constant are obtained combining the results of atomic experiments and relativistic many-body theories. The coefficients for the different sources of CP violation have been estimated at the elementary particle level for all the diamagnetic atoms of current experimental interest and their implications for physics beyond the standard model is discussed. Possible improvements of the current results of the measurements as well as quantum chromodynamics, nuclear and atomic calculations are suggested. (orig.)

  17. Structural analysis of strained quantum dots using nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhovich, E A; Kavokin, K V; Puebla, J; Krysa, A B; Hopkinson, M; Andreev, A D; Sanchez, A M; Beanland, R; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2012-10-01

    Strained semiconductor nanostructures can be used to make single-photon sources, detectors and photovoltaic devices, and could potentially be used to create quantum logic devices. The development of such applications requires techniques capable of nanoscale structural analysis, but the microscopy methods typically used to analyse these materials are destructive. NMR techniques can provide non-invasive structural analysis, but have been restricted to strain-free semiconductor nanostructures because of the significant strain-induced quadrupole broadening of the NMR spectra. Here, we show that optically detected NMR spectroscopy can be used to analyse individual strained quantum dots. Our approach uses continuous-wave broadband radiofrequency excitation with a specially designed spectral pattern and can probe individual strained nanostructures containing only 1 × 10(5) quadrupole nuclear spins. With this technique, we are able to measure the strain distribution and chemical composition of quantum dots in the volume occupied by the single confined electron. The approach could also be used to address problems in quantum information processing such as the precise control of nuclear spins in the presence of strong quadrupole effects.

  18. ROR nuclear receptors: structures, related diseases, and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Luo, Xiao-yu; Wu, Dong-hai; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors that regulate metabolism, development and immunity. The NR superfamily is one of the major classes of drug targets for human diseases. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR) α, β and γ belong to the NR superfamily, and these receptors are still considered as 'orphan' receptors because the identification of their endogenous ligands has been controversial. Recent studies have demonstrated that these receptors are regulated by synthetic ligands, thus emerge as important drug targets for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, etc. Studying the structural basis and ligand development of RORs will pave the way for a better understanding of the roles of these receptors in human diseases. Here, we review the structural basis, disease relevance, strategies for ligand identification, and current status of development of therapeutic ligands for RORs.

  19. Hydroxyapatites: Key Structural Questions and Answers from Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, César; Aussenac, Fabien; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Osaka, Akiyoshi; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Babonneau, Florence; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Bonhomme, Christian

    2017-10-03

    We demonstrate that NMR/DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) allows an unprecedented description of carbonate substituted hydroxyapatite (CHAp). Key structural questions related to order/disorder and clustering of carbonates are tackled using distance sensitive DNP experiments using 13 C- 13 C recoupling. Such experiments are easily implemented due to unprecedented DNP gain (orders of magnitude). DNP is efficiently mediated by quasi one-dimensional spin diffusion through the hydroxyl columns present in the CHAp structure (thought of as "highways" for spin diffusion). For spherical nanoparticles and ϕ dynamics and line shape resolution). Finally, all 2D DNP experiments can be interpreted in terms of domains exhibiting well identified types of substitution: local order and carbonate clustering are clearly favored.

  20. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B; Martin, Kayla A; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J; Denny, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    ... the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger-Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes...

  1. Gravitational lensing by exotic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Hideki

    2017-11-01

    This paper reviews a phenomenological approach to the gravitational lensing by exotic objects such as the Ellis wormhole lens, where the exotic lens objects may follow a non-standard form of the equation of state or may obey a modified gravity theory. A gravitational lens model is proposed in the inverse powers of the distance, such that the Schwarzschild lens and exotic lenses can be described in a unified manner as a one parameter family. As observational implications, the magnification, shear, photo-centroid motion and time delay in this lens model are discussed.

  2. Experiments with stored relativistic exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissel, H.; Radon, T.; Attallah, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    Beams of relativistic exotic nuclei were produced, separated and investigated with the combination of the fragment separator FRS and the storage ring ESR. The following experiments are presented: (1) Direct mass measurements of relativistic nickel and bismuth projectile fragments were performed using Schottky spectrometry. Applying electron cooling, the relative velocity spread of the circulating secondary nuclear beams of low intensity was reduced to below 10{sup -6}. The achieved mass resolving power of m/{Delta}m = 6.5 . 10{sup 5} (FWHM) in recent measurements represents an improvement by a factor of two compared to our previous experiments. The previously unknown masses of more than 100 proton-rich isotopes have been measured in the range of 54 {<=} Z {<=} 84. The results are compared with mass models and estimated values based on extrapolations of experimental values. (2) Exotic nuclei with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling can be investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique has been successfully applied in a first measurement with nickel fragments. A mass resolving power of m/{Delta}m = 1.5 . 10{sup 5} (FWHM) was achieved in this mode of operation. (3) Nuclear half-lives of stored and cooled bare projectile fragments have been measured to study the influence of the ionic charge state on the beta-decay probability. (orig.)

  3. Evaluated nuclear structure data file. a manual for preparation of data sets

    CERN Document Server

    Tuli, J K

    2001-01-01

    This manual describes the organization and structure of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). This computer-based file is maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network. For every mass number (presently, A = 44, this information is published in the Nuclear Data Sheets; for A < 44, ENSDF is based on compilations published in the journal Nuclear Physics. The information in ENSDF is updated by mass chain or by nuclide with a varying cycle time dependent on the availability of new information.

  4. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draayer, Jerry P. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  5. Nonlocalized clustering: a new concept in nuclear cluster structure physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Funaki, Y; Horiuchi, H; Ren, Zhongzhou; Röpke, G; Schuck, P; Tohsaki, A; Xu, Chang; Yamada, T

    2013-06-28

    We investigate the α+^{16}O cluster structure in the inversion-doublet band (Kπ=0(1)±}) states of 20Ne with an angular-momentum-projected version of the Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (THSR) wave function, which was successful "in its original form" for the description of, e.g., the famous Hoyle state. In contrast with the traditional view on clusters as localized objects, especially in inversion doublets, we find that these single THSR wave functions, which are based on the concept of nonlocalized clustering, can well describe the Kπ=0(1)- band and the Kπ=0(1)+ band. For instance, they have 99.98% and 99.87% squared overlaps for 1- and 3- states (99.29%, 98.79%, and 97.75% for 0+, 2+, and 4+ states), respectively, with the corresponding exact solution of the α+16O resonating group method. These astounding results shed a completely new light on the physics of low energy nuclear cluster states in nuclei: The clusters are nonlocalized and move around in the whole nuclear volume, only avoiding mutual overlap due to the Pauli blocking effect.

  6. Search for the exotic states at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    We review recent results on charmonium-like exotic states from the Belle experiment. The two-photon process $\\gamma \\gamma \\to \\phi \\jpsi$ is measured to search for Y(4140). No signal for the $Y(4140) \\to \\phi \\jpsi$ is observed. But a narrow peak with a significance of 3.2$\\sigma$ deviations including systematic uncertainty is observed at 4350.6 MeV/$c^2$ that we named X(4350). We also search for charmonium-like states, including X(3872), Y(4140), X(3915) and X(4350), in $\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\Upsilon(2S)$ radiative decays. No significant signal of any charmonium-like state is observed. The processes $\\gamma \\gamma \\to VV$ ($V=\\omega$ or $\\phi$) are also measured to search for the possible exotic states in low mass region. There are clear resonant structures in all the decay modes.

  7. Extending the lifespan of nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (US)

    1995-04-01

    By the end of this decade, 63 of the 111 commercial nuclear power plants in the United States will be more than 20 years old, with some nearing the end of their 40-year operating license term. Faced with the prospect of having to replace lost generating capacity from other sources and substantial shutdown and decommissioning costs, many utilities are expected to apply to continue the service of their plants past the initial licensing period. In support of such applications, evidence should be provided that the capacity of the safety-related systems and structures to mitigate potential extreme events has not deteriorated unacceptably due to either aging or environmental stressor effects during the previous service history.

  8. Nuclear Structure of N $\\simeq$ 56 Krypton Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In view of the strong overlap in subject matter, the proposals IP-39 and 40 were considered together by the ISOLDE-Committee, and a combined investigation was suggested to be presented to the PSCC.\\\\ \\\\ First results on $\\beta$-decay properties of very neutron-rich Br isotopes (Z=35) indicate a rather smooth onset of deformation already below N=60 and the existence of a deformed N=56 subshell gap. This behaviour is in contrast to earlier observations of a sudden onset of strong deformations at N=60 for $ \\% Z ge $ 37 nuclei. \\\\ \\\\ We propose to study at CERN-ISOLDE nuclear structure properties of N=55 - 57 Kr isotopes from $\\beta$-decay of $^9

  9. Impact of structural aging on seismic risk assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingwood, B.; Song, J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program is addressing the potential for degradation of concrete structural components and systems in nuclear power plants over time due to aging and aggressive environmental stressors. Structures are passive under normal operating conditions but play a key role in mitigating design-basis events, particularly those arising from external challenges such as earthquakes, extreme winds, fires and floods. Structures are plant-specific and unique, often are difficult to inspect, and are virtually impossible to replace. The importance of structural failures in accident mitigation is amplified because such failures may lead to common-cause failures of other components. Structural condition assessment and service life prediction must focus on a few critical components and systems within the plant. Components and systems that are dominant contributors to risk and that require particular attention can be identified through the mathematical formalism of a probabilistic risk assessment, or PRA. To illustrate, the role of structural degradation due to aging on plant risk is examined through the framework of a Level 1 seismic PRA of a nuclear power plant. Plausible mechanisms of structural degradation are found to increase the core damage probability by approximately a factor of two.

  10. Exotic nuclei and astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penionzhkevich Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nuclear physics investigations of the laws of the microscopic world contributed significantly to extension of our knowledge of phenomena occurring in the macroscopic world (Universe and made a formidable contribution to the development of astrophysical and cosmological theories. First of all, this concerns the expanding universe model, the evolution of stars, and the abundances of elements, as well as the properties of various stars and cosmic objects, including “cold” and neutron stars, black holes, and pulsars. Without claiming to give a full account of all cosmological problems, we will dwell upon those of them that, in my opinion, have much in common with nuclear-matter properties manifesting themselves in nuclear interactions.

  11. Nuclear matrix and structural and functional compartmentalization of the eucaryotic cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razin, S V; Borunova, V V; Iarovaia, O V; Vassetzky, Y S

    2014-07-01

    Becoming popular at the end of the 20th century, the concept of the nuclear matrix implies the existence of a nuclear skeleton that organizes functional elements in the cell nucleus. This review presents a critical analysis of the results obtained in the study of nuclear matrix in the light of current views on the organization of the cell nucleus. Numerous studies of nuclear matrix have failed to provide evidence of the existence of such a structure. Moreover, the existence of a filamentous structure that supports the nuclear compartmentalization appears to be unnecessary, since this function is performed by the folded genome itself.

  12. Nuclear structure of 76Se from inelastic neutron scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha

    2017-09-01

    The low-lying, low-spin levels of 76Se were studied with the (n,n' γ) reaction. Gamma-ray excitation function measurements were performed at incident neutron energies from 2.0 to 3.5 MeV, and γ-ray angular distributions were measured at neutron energies of 2.4, 3.0 and 3.7 MeV. From these measurements, level spins, level lifetimes, γ-ray intensities, and multipole mixing ratios were determined. Interpreting the nuclear structure of the stable Se nuclei is challenging, with shape transitions, shape coexistence, and triaxiality in evidence. The low-lying structure of 76Se appears to be the most vibrational of the Se isotopes, with a two-phonon (0+, 2+, 4+) triplet of collective states. In addition to these clearly collective excitations, we have identified and characterized a 4+ ->2+ ->0+ cascade of two E 2 transitions built on the first excited 0+ state at 1122 keV. The picture for 76Se thus differs from 72Se and 74Se, and indicates that the configuration mixing of this coexisting band is less than exhibited in the other Se nuclei. Comparison of the low-lying level schemes of 76Ge and 76Se, the double-beta decay daughter, shows a marked difference. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1606890.

  13. Nuclear containment structure subjected to commercial and fighter aircraft crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadique, M.R., E-mail: rehan.sadique@gmail.com; Iqbal, M.A., E-mail: iqbalfce@iitr.ernet.in; Bhargava, P., E-mail: bhpdpfce@iitr.ernet.in

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear containment response has been studied against aircraft crash. • Concrete damaged plasticity and Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic models were employed. • Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts caused global failure of containment. • Airbus A320 and Boeing 707-320 aircrafts caused local damage. • Tension damage of concrete was found more prominent compared to compression damage. -- Abstract: The response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear containment vessel has been studied against commercial and fighter aircraft crash using a nonlinear finite element code ABAQUS. The aircrafts employed were Boeing 747-400, Boeing 767-400, Airbus A-320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4. The containment was modeled as a three-dimensional deformable reinforced concrete structure while the loading of aircraft was assigned using the respective reaction–time curve. The location of strike was considered near the junction of dome and cylinder, and the angle of incidence, normal to the containment surface. The material behavior of the concrete was incorporated using the damaged plasticity model while that of the reinforcement, the Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic model. The containment could not sustain the impact of Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts and suffered rupture of concrete around the impact region leading to global failure. On the other hand, the maximum local deformation at the point of impact was found to be 0.998 m, 0.099 m, 0.092 m, 0.089 m, and 0.074 m against Boeing 747-400, Phantom F4, Boeing 767, Boeing 707-320 and Airbus A-320 aircrafts respectively. The results of the present study were compared with those of the previous analytical and numerical investigations with respect to the maximum deformation and overall behavior of the containment.

  14. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  15. Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

  16. Approaches and Software for Multi-Objective Optimization of Nuclear Power Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Andrianov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the approaches and software developed for multi-objective optimization of nuclear power structures: the modules for energy planning package MESSAGE intended for modeling purposes of developing nuclear power systems and multi-objective evaluation of its effectiveness and an integrated approach based on the method of system dynamics and parameter space investigation, allowing the problem of optimizing a nuclear power system structure in multi-objective formulation to be solved. Some results of implementation of these tools for multi-objective optimization of nuclear power structures are shown.

  17. The shell model. Towards a unified description of nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, Alfredo [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma Cantoblanco, 28049 - Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    In this series of lectures we present the foundations of the spherical shell model that we treat as an approximation to the exact solution of the full secular problem. We introduce the notions of valence space, effective interaction and effective operator. We analyse the structure of the realistic effective interactions, identifying their monopole part with the spherical mean field. The multipole Hamiltonian is shown to have a universal (simple) form that includes pairing (isovector and isoscalar), quadrupole, octupole, deca-pole, and ({sigma}{center_dot}{tau})({sigma}{center_dot}{tau}). We describe the methods of resolution of the secular problem, in particular the Lanczos method. The model is applied to the description of nuclear deformation and its relationship with the deformed mean field theories is studied. We propose a new symmetry, `quasi`-SU3, to understand deformation in the spherical basis. Finally, we discuss the domain of nuclei very far from the valley of {beta} stability, addressing the vanishing of some magic closures that can be explained in terms of intruder states. (author) 53 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Analysis of statistical model properties from discrete nuclear structure data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Richard B.

    2012-02-01

    Experimental M1, E1, and E2 photon strengths have been compiled from experimental data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF). Over 20,000 Weisskopf reduced transition probabilities were recovered from the ENSDF and EGAF databases. These transition strengths have been analyzed for their dependence on transition energies, initial and final level energies, spin/parity dependence, and nuclear deformation. ENSDF BE1W values were found to increase exponentially with energy, possibly consistent with the Axel-Brink hypothesis, although considerable excess strength observed for transitions between 4-8 MeV. No similar energy dependence was observed in EGAF or ARC data. BM1W average values were nearly constant at all energies above 1 MeV with substantial excess strength below 1 MeV and between 4-8 MeV. BE2W values decreased exponentially by a factor of 1000 from 0 to 16 MeV. The distribution of ENSDF transition probabilities for all multipolarities could be described by a lognormal statistical distribution. BE1W, BM1W, and BE2W strengths all increased substantially for initial transition level energies between 4-8 MeV possibly due to dominance of spin-flip and Pygmy resonance transitions at those excitations. Analysis of the average resonance capture data indicated no transition probability dependence on final level spins or energies between 0-3 MeV. The comparison of favored to unfavored transition probabilities for odd-A or odd-Z targets indicated only partial support for the expected branching intensity ratios with many unfavored transitions having nearly the same strength as favored ones. Average resonance capture BE2W transition strengths generally increased with greater deformation. Analysis of ARC data suggest that there is a large E2 admixture in M1 transitions with the mixing ratio δ ≈ 1.0. The ENSDF reduced transition strengths were considerably stronger than those derived from capture gamma ray

  19. Analysis of statistical model properties from discrete nuclear structure data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firestone Richard B.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental M1, E1, and E2 photon strengths have been compiled from experimental data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF and the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF. Over 20,000 Weisskopf reduced transition probabilities were recovered from the ENSDF and EGAF databases. These transition strengths have been analyzed for their dependence on transition energies, initial and final level energies, spin/parity dependence, and nuclear deformation. ENSDF BE1W values were found to increase exponentially with energy, possibly consistent with the Axel-Brink hypothesis, although considerable excess strength observed for transitions between 4-8 MeV. No similar energy dependence was observed in EGAF or ARC data. BM1W average values were nearly constant at all energies above 1 MeV with substantial excess strength below 1 MeV and between 4-8 MeV. BE2W values decreased exponentially by a factor of 1000 from 0 to 16 MeV. The distribution of ENSDF transition probabilities for all multipolarities could be described by a lognormal statistical distribution. BE1W, BM1W, and BE2W strengths all increased substantially for initial transition level energies between 4-8 MeV possibly due to dominance of spin-flip and Pygmy resonance transitions at those excitations. Analysis of the average resonance capture data indicated no transition probability dependence on final level spins or energies between 0-3 MeV. The comparison of favored to unfavored transition probabilities for odd-A or odd-Z targets indicated only partial support for the expected branching intensity ratios with many unfavored transitions having nearly the same strength as favored ones. Average resonance capture BE2W transition strengths generally increased with greater deformation. Analysis of ARC data suggest that there is a large E2 admixture in M1 transitions with the mixing ratio δ ≈ 1.0. The ENSDF reduced transition strengths were considerably stronger than those derived from

  20. MINOS: A vertex tracker coupled to a thick liquid-hydrogen target for in-beam spectroscopy of exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obertelli, A.; Delbart, A.; Anvar, S.; Audirac, L.; Authelet, G.; Bruyneel, B.; Calvet, D.; Chateau, F.; Corsi, A.; Gheller, J.M.; Giganon, A.; Lahonde-Hamdoun, C.; Leboeuf, D.; Loiseau, D.; Mohamed, A.; Mols, J.P.; Peron, C.; Peyaud, A.; Pollacco, E.C.; Prono, G.; Rousse, J.Y.; Santamaria, C. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Baba, H.; Doornenbal, P.; Otsu, H.; Uesaka, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    MINOS is a new apparatus dedicated to in-beam nuclear structure experiments with low-intensity exotic beams in inverse kinematics at intermediate energies above 150 MeV/nucleon. The device is composed of a thick liquid-hydrogen target coupled to a compact time projection chamber (TPC) serving as a vertex tracker. Either used for in-beam gamma spectroscopy of bound excited states or invariant-mass spectroscopy of unbound states, MINOS aims at improving the luminosity by a very significant factor compared to standard solid-target material experiments while improving experimental resolutions. (orig.)

  1. Shell model calculations for exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Warburton, E.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Wildenthal, B.H. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-02-01

    In this paper we review the progress of the shell-model approach to understanding the properties of light exotic nuclei (A < 40). By shell-model'' we mean the consistent and large-scale application of the classic methods discussed, for example, in the book of de-Shalit and Talmi. Modern calculations incorporate as many of the important configurations as possible and make use of realistic effective interactions for the valence nucleons. Properties such as the nuclear densities depend on the mean-field potential, which is usually separately from the valence interaction. We will discuss results for radii which are based on a standard Hartree-Fock approach with Skyrme-type interactions.

  2. Improved estimates of the nuclear structure corrections in μD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, O.J., E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Ji, C., E-mail: jichen@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bacca, S., E-mail: bacca@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Nevo Dinur, N., E-mail: nir.nevo@mail.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 9190401 (Israel); Barnea, N., E-mail: nir@phys.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 9190401 (Israel)

    2014-09-07

    We calculate the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in muonic deuterium by using state-of-the-art nucleon–nucleon potentials derived from chiral effective field theory. Our calculations complement previous theoretical work obtained from phenomenological potentials and the zero range approximation. The study of the chiral convergence order-by-order and the dependence on cutoff variations allows us to improve the estimates on the nuclear structure corrections and the theoretical uncertainty coming from nuclear potentials. This will enter the determination of the nuclear radius from ongoing muonic deuterium experiments at PSI.

  3. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  4. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiaxing; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2017-12-01

    The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  5. Accelerating Full Configuration Interaction Calculations for Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chao; Sternberg, Philip; Maris, Pieter; Ng, Esmond; Sosonkina, Masha; Le, Hung Viet; Vary, James; Yang, Chao

    2008-04-14

    One of the emerging computational approaches in nuclear physics is the full configuration interaction (FCI) method for solving the many-body nuclear Hamiltonian in a sufficiently large single-particle basis space to obtain exact answers - either directly or by extrapolation. The lowest eigenvalues and correspondingeigenvectors for very large, sparse and unstructured nuclear Hamiltonian matrices are obtained and used to evaluate additional experimental quantities. These matrices pose a significant challenge to the design and implementation of efficient and scalable algorithms for obtaining solutions on massively parallel computer systems. In this paper, we describe the computational strategies employed in a state-of-the-art FCI code MFDn (Many Fermion Dynamics - nuclear) as well as techniques we recently developed to enhance the computational efficiency of MFDn. We will demonstrate the current capability of MFDn and report the latest performance improvement we have achieved. We will also outline our future research directions.

  6. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Half life for the emission of exotic clusters like 8Be, 12C, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si are computed taking Coulomb and proximity potentials as interacting barrier and many of these are found well within the present upper limit of measurement. These results lie very close to those values reported by Shanmugam et al using ...

  8. Exotic meson studies at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreps Michal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations of several states. Using the pp collisions data collected at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment, we performed studies of the X(3872 decay rate to ψ (2Sγ final state, as well as confirmation the Z(4430+ state.

  9. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... determine the charge density distributions of short-lived exotic nuclei by elastic electron scattering. The first collision ... Electron scattering of highly unstable nuclei is not easy because it is difficult to produce ... both ends form a mirror potential to keep the ions longitudinally inside the SCRIT device, and the ...

  10. How Illinois kicked the exotic habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis M. Harty

    1998-01-01

    For the purpose of this paper, an exotic species is defined as "a plant or animal not native to North America." The history of folly surrounding the premeditated and accidental introduction of exotic animals has been well-documented. In 1963, Dr. E. Raymond Hall wrote, "Introducing exotic species of vertebrates is unscientific, economically wasteful,...

  11. Exotic pests: major threats to forest health

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Robert Bridges

    1995-01-01

    Over 360 exotic forest insects and about 20 exotic diseases have become established in the U.S. Many of these organisms have become serious pests, causing great economic impacts and irreversible ecological harm. Despite efforts to exclude exotic species, forest insects and disease organisms continue to be introduced at a rather rapid rate. In the last few years, one...

  12. Update on the U.S. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluation Program*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) maintains and provides easy access to several large databases to assist scientists to sift through and assess the vast quantity of published nuclear structure and decay data. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) presents evaluated experimental nuclear data; the Nuclear Structure Reference (NSR) database provides bibliographic information; an Experimental Unevaluated Data Listing (XUNDL)has also recently been established to provide rapid access to data from the most recent publications (primarily in high-spin physics). In addition to the ongoing revision of data in ENSDF, information from the latest evaluations for A=21-44 by Endt[1] and evaluated data for recently-discovered heavy elements (up to Z=118) are currently being incorporated into ENSDF. An overview of nuclear structure and decay data available through the USNDP will be presented, with emphasis on recent and forthcoming additions to the material available. Feedback concerning the extent to which users' nuclear structure and decay data needs are being met by this data program will be welcomed. 1. P.M. Endt, Nucl. Phys. A521, 1 (1998). *On behalf of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program

  13. [Structure and function of nuclear matrix associated regions (S/MARs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, I P; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2004-01-01

    Modern concepts on the chromatin loop-domain organization and the role of the DNA regions specifically binding the nuclear matrix (nuclear scaffold, or S/MARs) in its formation, maintenance, and regulation are discussed. Some S/MAR structural features, properties of binding the nuclear matrix, and probable mechanisms of their involvement in regulation of gene activity are considered. The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 2004, vol. 30, no. 1; see also http://www.maik.ru.

  14. Nuclear Structure and Dynamics in the Quasi-Continuum of ²⁴⁰Pu

    OpenAIRE

    Zeiser, Fabio Balthasar

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength functions are essential quantities in various fields of basic and applied research involving nuclear matter. From microscopic calculations and structure research to nuclear reactor models and astrophysical applications a good knowledge of these parameters determines fundamental properties of the systems. This study analyses the level density and strength function of ²⁴⁰Pu below the particle separation threshold with the Oslo Method. The results are u...

  15. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  16. The origin of clonal diversity and structure of Populus alba in Sardinia: evidence from nuclear and plastid microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundu, Giuseppe; Lupi, Renato; Zapelli, Ilaria; Fossati, Tiziana; Patrignani, Giuseppe; Camarda, Ignazio; Sala, Francesco; Castiglione, Stefano

    2008-12-01

    Populus alba is a thermophilic forest tree present in the Mediterranean basin. Its habitat is highly fragmented and its distribution range has been subject to long-term human interference, resulting in debate surrounding whether certain populations are native or exotic in origin. In particular, populations from the islands of Corsica and Sardinia are of uncertain origin. While populations of P. alba mainly reproduce sexually, clonal reproduction is also common. The aims of this study were to locate and molecularly characterize the poorly studied island populations of P. alba and compare these with samples from various spatial scales, in order to provide information on the genetic structure and phylogeography of this species. This information will provide evidence on whether the species is native to Sardinia, which is important for the development of conservation strategies. DNA extracts were obtained from the following P. alba trees: 159 from Sardinia, 47 from Ticino regional park (northern Italy), 15 acquired from an Italian Germoplasm Bank (IRC; Italian Reference Collection) and 28 from the Mediterranean basin (MB). Genetic polymorphisms were revealed at nuclear and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) microsatellite loci, both at the island scale (Sardinia) and at broader scales, for comparative assessment of the genetic and genotypic diversity and phylogeography. Based on nuclear microsatellite loci, Sardinian white poplar consists of a small number of genets (26), each of which is represented by several ramets. Despite the uniqueness of the Sardinian haplotypes and the very low value of genetic diversity at the cpDNA level (vK = 0.15), the HT (0.60) and the AR (3.61) values, estimated at the nuclear level for Sardinia, were comparable with those of the other populations and collections. The uniqueness of the cpDNA haplotypes, the prevalence of clonality and the restricted number of genets recorded suggest that Sardinian white poplar could be a floristic relict of the

  17. Nuclear shapes: from earliest ideas to multiple shape coexisting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of the atomic nucleus being characterized by an intrinsic property such as shape came as a result of high precision hyperfine studies in the field of atomic physics, which indicated a non-spherical nuclear charge distribution. Herein, we describe the various steps taken through ingenious experimentation and bold theoretical suggestions that mapped the way for later work in the early 50s by Aage Bohr, Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater. We lay out a long and winding road that marked, in the period of 50s to 70s, the way shell-model and collective-model concepts were reconciled. A rapid increase in both accelerator and detection methods (70s towards the early 2000s) opened new vistas into nuclear shapes, and their coexistence, in various regions of the nuclear mass table. Next, we outline a possible unified view of nuclear shapes: emphasizing decisive steps taken as well as questions remaining, next to the theoretical efforts that could result in an emerging understanding of nuclear shapes, building on the nucleus considered as a strongly interacting system of nucleons as the microscopic starting point.

  18. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  19. Nuclear analysis of structural damage and nuclear heating on enhanced K-DEMO divertor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Im, K.; Kwon, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, D.; Woo, M.; Shin, C.

    2017-12-01

    This paper addresses nuclear analysis on the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) divertor to estimate the overall trend of nuclear heating values and displacement damages. The K-DEMO divertor model was created and converted by the CAD (Pro-Engineer™) and Monte Carlo automatic modeling programs as a 22.5° sector of the tokamak. The Monte Carlo neutron photon transport and ADVANTG codes were used in this calculation with the FENDL-2.1 nuclear data library. The calculation results indicate that the highest values appeared on the upper outboard target (OT) area, which means the OT is exposed to the highest radiation conditions among the three plasma-facing parts (inboard, central and outboard) in the divertor. Especially, much lower nuclear heating values and displacement damages are indicated on the lower part of the OT area than others. These are important results contributing to thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analyses on the divertor and also it is expected that the copper alloy materials may be partially used as a heat sink only at the lower part of the OT instead of the reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel due to copper alloy’s high thermal conductivity.

  20. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction−acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiuchi, M., E-mail: sergei@jaea.go.jp; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Nishio, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Skobelev, I. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperature (Russian Federation); Orlandi, R. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Koura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Kando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Yamauchi, T. [Graduate School of Maritime Sciences (Japan); Watanabe, Y. [Kyushu University, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences (Japan); Bulanov, S. V., E-mail: svbulanov@gmail.com; Kondo, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); and others

    2016-04-15

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction–acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  1. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  2. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A; Comunian, M; Maggiore, M; Manzolaro, M; Angot, J; Lamy, T

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  3. Nuclear hormone receptor architecture - form and dynamics: The 2009 FASEB Summer Conference on Dynamic Structure of the Nuclear Hormone Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Iain J; Nardulli, Ann M

    2009-12-31

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) represent a large and diverse family of ligand-activated transcription factors involved in regulating development, metabolic homeostasis, salt balance and reproductive health. The ligands for these receptors are typically small hydrophobic molecules such as steroid hormones, thyroid hormone, vitamin D3 and fatty acid derivatives. The first NHR structural information appeared approximately 20 years ago with the solution and crystal structures of the DNA binding domains and was followed by the structure of the agonist and antagonist bound ligand binding domains of different NHR members. Interestingly, in addition to these defined structural features, it has become clear that NHRs also possess significant structural plasticity. Thus, the dynamic structure of the NHRs was the topic of a recent stimulating and informative FASEB Summer Research Conference held in Vermont.

  4. The effects of exotic weed Flaveria bidentis with different invasion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new exotic weed, Flaveria bidentis, is spreading in central China where it forms dense monospecific patches modifying the structure of different native ecosystems and threatening native aboveground biodiversity. However, little is known about the consequences of such an invasion for soil bacterial community, especially ...

  5. Ecosystem impacts of exotic annual invaders in the genus Bromus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Germino; Jayne Belnap; John M. Stark; Edith B Allen; Benjamin Rau

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the impacts of exotic plant species on ecosystems is necessary to justify and guide efforts to limit their spread, restore natives, and plan for conservation. Invasive annual grasses such as Bromus tectorum, B. rubens, B. hordeaceus, and B. diandrus (hereafter collectively referred to as Bromus) transform the structure and function of ecosystems...

  6. An introduction to using the FORTRAN programs provided with Computational Nuclear Physics 1 Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytos, Matthew A.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The authors of this paper have provided a set of ready-to-run FORTRAN programs that should be useful in the field of theoretical nuclear physics. The purpose of this document is to provide a simple synopsis of the programs and their use. A separate section is devoted to each program set and includes: abstract; files; compiling, linking, and running; obtaining results; and a tutorial.

  7. Logarithmic exotic conformal Galilean algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Malte, E-mail: Malte.henkel@univ-lorraine.fr [Groupe de Physique Statistique, Institut Jean Lamour (CNRS UMR 7198), Université de Lorraine Nancy, B.P. 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Hosseiny, Ali, E-mail: al_hosseiny@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rouhani, Shahin, E-mail: rouhani@ipm.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11165-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Logarithmic representations of the conformal Galilean algebra (CGA) and the Exotic Conformal Galilean algebra (ECGA) are constructed. This can be achieved by non-decomposable representations of the scaling dimensions or the rapidity indices, specific to conformal Galilean algebras. Logarithmic representations of the non-exotic CGA lead to the expected constraints on scaling dimensions and rapidities and also on the logarithmic contributions in the co-variant two-point functions. On the other hand, the ECGA admits several distinct situations which are distinguished by different sets of constraints and distinct scaling forms of the two-point functions. Two distinct realisations for the spatial rotations are identified as well. This is the first concrete example of a reducible, but non-decomposable representation, without logarithmic terms. Such cases had been anticipated before.

  8. Nuclear spectrin-like proteins are structural actin-binding proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Munive, Clara; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2011-03-01

    Although actin is a relevant component of the plant nucleus, only three nuclear ABPs (actin-binding proteins) have been identified in plants to date: cofilin, profilin and nuclear myosin I. Although plants lack orthologues of the main structural nuclear ABPs in animals, such as lamins, lamin-associated proteins and nesprins, their genome does contain sequences with spectrin repeats and N-terminal calponin homology domains for actin binding that might be distant relatives of spectrin. We investigated here whether spectrin-like proteins could act as structural nuclear ABPs in plants. We have investigated the presence of spectrins in Allium cepa meristematic nuclei by Western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy, using antibodies against α- and β-spectrin chains that cross-react in plant nuclei. Their role as nuclear ABPs was analysed by co-immunoprecipitation and IF (immunofluorescence) co-localization and their association with the nuclear matrix was investigated by sequential extraction of nuclei with non-ionic detergent, and in low- and high-salt buffers after nuclease digestion. Our results demonstrate the existence of several spectrin-like proteins in the nucleus of onion cells that have different intranuclear distributions in asynchronous meristematic populations and associate with the nuclear matrix. These nuclear proteins co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize with actin. These results reveal that the plant nucleus contains spectrin-like proteins that are structural nuclear components and function as ABPs. Their intranuclear distribution suggests that plant nuclear spectrin-like proteins could be involved in multiple nuclear functions.

  9. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dimitriou, P. [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A. L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    The 21st meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 20 to 24 April 2015 under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 36 scientists from 15 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, and actions agreed by the participants, as well as recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document.

  10. Applications of a global nuclear-structure model to studies of the heaviest elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    We present some new results on heavy-element nuclear-structure properties calculated on the basis of the finite-range droplet model and folded-Yukawa single-particle potential. Specifically, we discuss calculations of nuclear ground-state masses and microscopic corrections, {alpha}-decay properties, {beta}-decay properties, fission potential-energy surfaces, and spontaneous-fission half-lives. These results, obtained in a global nuclear-structure approach, are particularly reliable for describing the stability properties of the heaviest elements.

  11. The present and future of nuclear structure with hadronic probes

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, N W

    1974-01-01

    The author discusses the scattering of medium energy pions by nuclei in anticipation of an increase in intensity of about three orders of magnitude from the meson factories. It is shown that pion scattering at around 200 MeV is not likely to vary revealing except in two respects:- (i) the scattering problems itself, and (ii) simple spectroscopy of double charge exchange, which reactions allow the study of the energy states of strange nuclear species such as /sup 5 /Be and /sup 18/C. Nuclear properties will be more easily extracted from low energy (50 MeV) pion scattering and, in the case of high momentum properties, from high energy (2 GeV) scattering. (18 refs).

  12. Theoretical nuclear structure and astrophysics. Progress report for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidry, M.W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the fields of radioactive ion beam physics, gamma ray spectroscopy, computational and nuclear astrophysics, and the interface between these disciplines. The authors report substantial progress in all those areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 43 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 15 invited presentations at conferences and workshops.

  13. Joliot-Curie School of Nuclear Physics, 1997; Ecole Joliot-Curie de Physique Nucleaire, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, Y. [L`Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules du CNRS (India2P3), 75 - Paris (France); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    This document contains the lectures of the Joliot-Curie International School of Nuclear Physics held at Maubuisson, France on 8-13 September 1997. The following lectures of nuclear interest were given: The N-body problem (relativistic and non-relativistic approaches); The shell model (towards a unified of the nuclear structure); Pairing correlations in extreme conditions; Collective excitations in nuclei; Exotic nuclei (production, properties and specificities); Exotic nuclei (halos); Super and hyper deformation (from discrete to continuum, from EUROGAM to EUROBALL); and The spectroscopy of fission fragments. Important new facts are reported and discussed theoretically, concerning the nuclei in high excitation and high states and of the nuclei far off stability. Important technical achievements are reported among which the production of radioactive beams, sophisticated multi-detectors as well as significant advances in the nuclear theoretical methods. The double goal of training of young researchers and of permanent formation and information of the older ones seems to have been reached

  14. Tom W. Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics Lecture: The limits of nuclear landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2012-03-01

    Understanding nuclei is a quantum many-body problem of incredible richness and diversity and studies of nuclei address some of the great challenges that are common throughout modern science. Nuclear structure research strives to build a unified and comprehensive microscopic framework in which bulk nuclear properties, nuclear excitations, and nuclear reactions can all be described. A new and exciting focus in this endeavor lies in the description of exotic and short-lived nuclei at the limits of proton-to-neutron asymmetry, mass, and angular momentum. In this talk, advances in the nuclear density functional theory will be reviewed in the context of the main scientific questions, experimental developments, and the advent of extreme-scale computing platforms.

  15. Low densities in nuclear and neutron matters and in the nuclear surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldo, M. E-mail: baldo@ct.infn.it; Maieron, C.; Schuck, P.; Vinas, X

    2004-05-31

    Nuclear and neutron matters are investigated in the low density region, well below the nuclear saturation density. Microscopic calculations, based on the Bethe-Brueckner approach with a few realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, are compared with the predictions of a set of phenomenological effective interactions, mostly employed in nuclear structure studies. An energy functional is constructed on the basis of the microscopic bulk EoS and applied to a selection of nuclei throughout the mass table. The results provide a microscopic basis for a link between nuclear surface behaviour and neutron EoS previously observed with phenomenological effective forces. Possible effects of pairing on asymmetric nuclear matter are also analyzed in detail. The results are expected to illuminate the physical mechanisms which determine the behaviour of the surface density tail in exotic nuclei.

  16. Nuclear Effects in Extraction of Polarized Structure Functions of the Neutron at Large x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswari, Dhiraj; Sargsian, Misak

    2017-09-01

    Currently there are active experimental efforts to extract the deep inelastic polarized structure functions of neutron from experiments in which polarized electron scatters off the polarized deuteron or 3He target. Special emphasize in these experiments is given to the large Bjorken x region where predictions of different QCD models largely diverge. The extraction of the neutron structure functions at large Bjorken x from nuclear DIS data is very sensitive to nuclear effects due to the correspondence of the large x region to the large internal momenta of bound nucleon in the nucleus. To account for these nuclear effects, we developed a theoretical approach for calculation of nuclear DIS scattering based on light-front approximation which allows to account for the relativistic effects of bound nucleon motion in the self consistent way. We present the model and the extraction of the polarized neutron DIS structure functions from the existing deuteron and 3He data. Supported by US Department of Energy Grant.

  17. THE AIMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND DECAY DATA EVALUATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NICHOLS,A.L.; TULI, J.K.

    2007-04-22

    International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators consists of a number of evaluation groups and data service centers in several countries that appreciate the merits of working together to maintain and ensure the quality and comprehensive content of the ENSDF database (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File). Biennial meetings of the network are held under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assign evaluation responsibilities, monitor progress, discuss improvements and emerging difficulties, and agree on actions to be undertaken by individual members. The evaluated data and bibliographic details are made available to users via various media, such as the journals ''Nuclear Physics A'' and ''Nuclear Data Sheets'', the World Wide Web, on CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides and ''Nuclear Wallet Cards''. While the ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, these data are also available from other nuclear data centers including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, in cooperation with the IAEA, organizes workshops on NSDD at regular intervals. The primary aims of these particular workshops are to provide hands-on training in the data evaluation processes, and to encourage new evaluators to participate in NSDD activities. The technical contents of these NSDD workshops are described, along with the rationale for the inclusion of various topics.

  18. Investigation of the nuclear matter density distributions of the exotic {sup 12}Be,{sup 14}Be and {sup 8}B nuclei by elastic proton scattering in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilieva, Stoyanka

    2008-07-01

    In the current experiment, the differential cross sections for proton elastic scattering on the isotopes {sup 7,9,10,11,12,14}Be and {sup 8}B were measured. As results from the experiment, the absolute differential cross sections d{sigma}/dt as a function of the four momentum transfer t were obtained. In this work the differential cross sections for elastic p-{sup 12}Be, p-{sup 14}Be and p-{sup 8}B scattering at low t (t{<=}0.05(GeV/c){sup 2}) are presented. The measured cross sections were analyzed within the Glauber multiple-scattering theory using different density parameterizations, and the nuclear matter density distributions and radii of the investigated isotopes were determined. The determined rms matter radius is 3.11{+-}0.04{+-}0.13 fm. In the case of the {sup 12}Be nucleus the results showed an extended matter distribution as well. For this nucleus a matter radius of 2.82{+-}0.03{+-}0.12 fm was determined. An interesting result is that the free {sup 12}Be nucleus behaves differently from the core of {sup 14}Be and is much more extended than it. Preliminary experimental results for the isotope {sup 8}B are also presented. An extended matter distribution was obtained (though much more compact as compared to the neutron halos). A proton halo structure was observed for the first time with the proton elastic scattering method. The deduced matter radius is 2.60{+-}0.02{+-}0.26 fm. Results from the feasibility studies of the EXL detector setup, performed at the present ESR storage ring, are presented. (orig.)

  19. Structural Aging Program to evaluate continued performance of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the Structural Aging (SAG) Program which is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the United States Nuclear Regulatory commission (USNRC). The SAG Program is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing improved technical bases for their continued service. The program is organized into three technical tasks: Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technologies, and Quantitative Methodology for continued Service Determinations. Objectives and a summary of recent accomplishments under each of these tasks are presented.

  20. The density matrix renormalization group and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittel, S.; Thakur, B. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Sandulescu, N. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 76900 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-12-15

    We briefly review the Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) method and its potential use in large-scale nuclear shell-model calculations. We propose the use of angular-momentum-conserving variant of the method (the JDMRG) and report the first test results of such an approach for the nucleus {sup 48}Cr The positive results of these calculations have motivated us to search for an even more efficient means of implementing the DMRG strategy and the status of these efforts is also described. (Author)

  1. New density-independent interactions for nuclear structure calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennaceur K.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new two-body finite-range and momentum-dependent but density-independent effective interaction, which can be interpreted as a regularized zerorange force. We show that no three-body or density-dependent terms are needed for a correct description of saturation properties in infinite matter, that is, on the level of lowenergy density functional, the physical three-body effects can be efficiently absorbed in effective two-body terms. The new interaction gives a satisfying equation of state of nuclear matter and opens up extremely interesting perspectives for the mean-field and beyond-mean-field descriptions of atomic nuclei.

  2. Nuclear Structure and Galactic γ-Ray Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, J

    2000-01-01

    The observation of galactic γ lines following the decay of radioactive nuclei provides a direct link between nuclear physics experiments in earth-based laboratories and astrophysical observations with space-based observatories. Two examples are presented to illustrate this interplay: the measurement of the lifetime of (44)Ti to allow an improved determination of the (44)Ti mass of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A from the observed γ ray activity and the measurements of excited states in (24)Si to determine the reaction rate of (23)Al(p, γ)(24)Si which might be important for a reduced production of (22)Na in novae.

  3. Microscopic Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations in the FMD Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.; Langanke, K.

    We present here a first application of the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) approach to low-energy nuclear reactions, namely the $^3$He($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^7$Be radiative capture reaction. We divide the Hilbert space into an external region where the system is described as $^3$He and $^4$He clusters interacting only via the Coulomb interaction and an internal region where the nuclear interaction will polarize the clusters. Polarized configurations are obtained by a variation after parity and angular momentum projection procedure with respect to the parameters of all single particle states. A constraint on the radius of the intrinsic many-body state is employed to obtain polarized clusters at desired distances. The boundary conditions for bound and scattering states are implemented using the Bloch operator. The FMD calculations reproduce the correct energy for the centroid of the $3/2^-$ and $1/2^-$ bound states in $^7$Be. The charge radius of the ground state is in good agreement with recent experimental results. The FMD calculations also describe well the experimental phase shift data in the $1/2^+$, $3/2^+$ and $5/2^+$ channels that are important for the capture reaction at low energies. Using the bound and scattering many-body wave functions we calculate the radiative capture cross section. The calculated $S$ factor agrees very well, both in absolute normalization and energy dependence, with the recent experimental data from the Weizmann, LUNA, Seattle and ERNA experiments.

  4. Nuclear Structure Studies with Stable and Radioactive Beams: The SPES radioactive ion beam project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; SPES Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-04-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  5. Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Felix [Fermilab

    2014-07-10

    We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.

  6. Structural and functional adaptations of the mammalian nuclear envelope to meet the meiotic requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jana; Jahn, Daniel; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies in the past years provided definite evidence that the nuclear envelope is much more than just a simple barrier. It rather constitutes a multifunctional platform combining structural and dynamic features to fulfill many fundamental functions such as chromatin organization, regulation of transcription, signaling, but also structural duties like maintaining general nuclear architecture and shape. One additional and, without doubt, highly impressive aspect is the recently identified key function of selected nuclear envelope components in driving meiotic chromosome dynamics, which in turn is essential for accurate recombination and segregation of the homologous chromosomes. Here, we summarize the recent work identifying new key players in meiotic telomere attachment and movement and discuss the latest advances in our understanding of the actual function of the meiotic nuclear envelope.

  7. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of the telomere repeat sequence in hamster sperm nuclear structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lara, J; Wydner, K L; Hyland, K M; Ward, W S

    1993-11-01

    The flat, hooked-shaped architecture of the hamster sperm nucleus makes this an excellent model for in situ hybridization studies of the three dimensional structure of the genome. We have examined the structure of the telomere repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n with respect to the various nuclear structures present in hamster spermatozoa, using fluorescent in situ hybridization. In fully condensed, mature sperm nuclei, the telomere sequences appeared as discrete spots of various sizes interspersed throughout the volume of the nuclei. While the pattern of these signals was non-random, it varied significantly in different nuclei. These discrete telomere foci were seen to gradually lengthen into linear, beaded signals as sperm nuclei were decondensed, in vitro, and were not associated with the nuclear annulus. We also examined the relationship of telomeres to the sperm nuclear matrix, a residual nuclear structure that retains the original size and shape of the nucleus. In these structures the DNA extends beyond the perimeter of the nucleus to form a halo around it, representing the arrangement of the chromosomal DNA into loop domains attached at their bases to the nuclear matrix. Telomere signals in these structures were also linear and equal in length to those of the decondensed nuclei, and each signal represented part of a single DNA loop domain. The telomeres were attached at one end to the nuclear matrix and extended into the halo. Sperm nuclear matrices treated with Eco RI retained the telomere signals. These data support sperm DNA packaging models in which DNA is coiled into discrete foci, rather than spread out linearly along the length of the sperm nucleus.

  8. Exotic Small Mammals and Bartonella

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    In this podcast, Dr. Nina Marano discusses Bartonella, a bacterial agent that’s prevalent in many species, including cats, dogs, and cattle. Wild animals are normally thought to carry Bartonella, so when animals are caught in the wild for pet trade, the risk that humans can become infected with Bartonella increases. Bartonella is an identified risk associated with ownership of exotic animals and has serious health consequences.  Created: 4/9/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/9/2009.

  9. ATLAS Run II Exotics Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    While Standard Model is in a good shape especially after Higgs boson discovery, there are a lot of questions beyond SM. The ATLAS detector is performing about 50 Exotics searches addressed these questions. This talk is discussing some of them with datasets collected during the 2015-2016 LHC run from 3 fb^-1 to 18 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy . Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  10. Nuclear dependence of structure functions in the shadowing region of deep inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.L.; Qiu, Jianwei

    1988-07-27

    A discussion of nuclear shadowing in deep inelastic lepton scattering is presented. We show that the parton recombination model suggests that shadowing should begin to occur at larger values of Bjorken x as A increases. This expectation as well as that of weak dependence on Q/sup 2/, and the trend of the x dependence of the shadowing phenomenon are consistent with recent data. Shadowing at small x is combined with nuclear bound state effects, responsible for nuclear dependence at larger x, to provide description of the A dependence of the structure function for the entire range of x. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Epigenetic stochasticity, nuclear structure and cancer: the implications for medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize an evolution of thinking about the epigenetic basis of human cancer, from the earliest studies of altered DNA methylation in cancer to the modern comprehensive epigenomic era. Converging data from epigenetic studies of primary cancers and from experimental studies of chromatin in development and epithelial–mesenchymal transition suggest a role for epigenetic stochasticity as a driving force of cancer, with Darwinian selection of tumour cells at the expense of the host. This increased epigenetic stochasticity appears to be mediated by large-scale changes in DNA methylation and chromatin in domains associated with the nuclear lamina. The implications for diagnosis include the potential to identify stochastically disrupted progenitor cells years before cancer develops, and to target drugs to epigenetic drivers of gene expression instability rather than to mean effects per se. PMID:24635672

  12. Adaptive multi-resolution 3D Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solver for nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, J. C.; Fann, G. I.; Harrison, R. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Shi, Yue; Thornton, S.

    2014-08-01

    hfodd that is based on the harmonic-oscillator basis expansion. Several examples are considered, including the self-consistent HFB problem for spin-polarized trapped cold fermions and the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (+BCS) problem for triaxial deformed nuclei. Conclusions: The new madness-hfb framework has many attractive features when applied to nuclear and atomic problems involving many-particle superfluid systems. Of particular interest are weakly bound nuclear configurations close to particle drip lines, strongly elongated and dinuclear configurations such as those present in fission and heavy-ion fusion, and exotic pasta phases that appear in neutron star crust.

  13. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Structures - Overview of Methods and Related Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to provide an overview of the methods that are available for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete and metallic structures, and to provide an assessment of the status of methods that address inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. In meeting these objectives a general description of nuclear power plant safety-related structures was provided as well as identification of potential degradation factors, testing and inspection requirements, and operating experience; methods for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures and containment metallic pressure boundaries were identified and described; and applications of nondestructive evaluation methods specifically related to inspection of thick-section reinforced concrete structures and inaccessible portions of containment metallic pressure boundaries were summarized. Recommendations are provided on utilization of test article(s) to further advance nondestructive evaluation methods related to thick-section, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary representative of nuclear power plant containments. Conduct of a workshop to provide an update on applications and needed developments for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear power plant structures would also be of benefit.

  14. Shamir secret sharing scheme with dynamic access structure (SSSDAS). Case study on nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Thandra, Prasanth Kumar; Rajan, J.; Satyamurthy, S.A.V. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam (India). Computer Div.; Aghila, G. [National Institute of Technology, Karaikal (India). Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering

    2015-05-15

    In recent years, due to the sophistication offered by the Internet, strategic organizations like nuclear power plants are linked to the outside world communication through the Internet. The entry of outside world communication into strategic organization (nuclear power plant) increases the hacker's attempts to crack its security and to trace any information which is being sent among the top level officials. Information security system in nuclear power plant is very crucial as even small loophole in the security system will lead to a major disaster. Recent cyber attacks in nuclear power plant provoked information security professionals to look deeply into the information security aspects of strategic organizations (nuclear power plant). In these lines, Shamir secret sharing scheme with dynamic access structure (SSSDAS) is proposed in the paper which provides enhanced security by providing dynamic access structure for each node in different hierarchies. The SSSDAS algorithm can be applied to any strategic organizations with hierarchical structures. In this paper the possible scenarios where SSSDAS algorithm can be applied to nuclear power plant is explained as a case study. The proposed SSSDAS scheme identifies the wrong shares, if any, used for reconstruction of the secret. The SSSDAS scheme also address the three major security parameters namely confidentiality, authentication and integrity.

  15. Observation of J/ψϕ Structures Consistent with Exotic States from Amplitude Analysis of B^{+}→J/ψϕK^{+} Decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Batsukh, B; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, I; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2017-01-13

    The first full amplitude analysis of B^{+}→J/ψϕK^{+} with J/ψ→μ^{+}μ^{-}, ϕ→K^{+}K^{-} decays is performed with a data sample of 3  fb^{-1} of pp collision data collected at sqrt[s]=7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. The data cannot be described by a model that contains only excited kaon states decaying into ϕK^{+}, and four J/ψϕ structures are observed, each with significance over 5 standard deviations. The quantum numbers of these structures are determined with significance of at least 4 standard deviations. The lightest has mass consistent with, but width much larger than, previous measurements of the claimed X(4140) state.

  16. Exotic Options: a Chooser Option and its Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Martinkutė-Kaulienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial instruments traded in the markets and investors’ situation in such markets are getting more and more complex. This leads to more complex derivative structures used for hedging that are harder to analyze and which risk is harder managed. Because of the complexity of these instruments, the basic characteristics of many exotic options may sometimes be not clearly understood. Most scientific studies have been focused on developing models for pricing various types of exotic options, but it is important to study their unique characteristics and to understand them correctly in order to use them in proper market situations. The paper examines main aspects of options, emphasizing the variety of exotic options and their place in financial markets and risk management process. As the exact valuation of exotic options is quite difficult, the article deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of pricing of chooser options that suggest a broad range of usage and application in different market conditions. The calculations made in the article showed that the price of the chooser is closely correlated with the choice time and low correlated with its strike price. So the first mentioned factor should be taken into consideration when making appropriate hedging and investing decisions.

  17. Generalization of exotic quark searches

    CERN Document Server

    Garberson, F

    2013-01-01

    General limits on exotic heavy quarks T, B and X with masses above 300 GeV are presented for arbitrary branching fractions of T=>Wb, T=>Zt, T=>Ht, B=>Wt, B=>Zb, B=>Hb and X=>Wt. The results are based on a CMS search in final states with three isolated leptons (electron or muon) or two isolated leptons with the same electric charge. Exotic heavy quark pair production through the strong interaction is considered. In the context of vector-like quark models, T quarks with a mass mT < 480 GeV and mT < 550 GeV are excluded for weak isospin singlets and doublets, respectively, and B quarks with a mass mB < 480 GeV are excluded for singlets, all at 95% confidence level. Mass limits at 95% confidence level for T and B singlets, (T,B) doublets and (X,T) doublets are presented as a function of the corresponding heavy quark masses. For equal mass mT = mB and mX = mT vector-like quarks are excluded at 95% confidence level with masses below 550 GeV for T and B singlets, 640 GeV for a (T,B) doublet and 640 GeV for ...

  18. Relation between molecular electronic structure and nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Štěpánek, Petr; Coriani, Sonia; Sundholm, Dage

    2017-01-01

    The recently theoretically described nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism (NSCD) is a promising method for the optical detection of nuclear magnetization. NSCD involves both optical excitations of the molecule and hyperfine interactions and, thus, it offers a means to realize a spectroscopy...... with the spatial distribution of the excited states and couplings between them, reflecting changes in molecular structure and conformation. This constitutes a marked difference to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift, which only reflects the local molecular structure in the ground electronic state...... are discussed. The results underline NSCD spectroscopy as a plausible tool with a power for the identification of not only different molecules, but their specific structures as well....

  19. Experimental evidence for hadroproduction of exotic mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J. M. Bishop; V. A. Bodyagin; B. B. Brabson; D. S. Brown; N. M. Cason; S. U. Chung; R. R. Crittenden; J. P. Cummings; K. Danyo; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J. P. Dowd; A. R. Dzierba; P. Eugenio; J. Gunter; R. W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; E. I. Ivanov; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; R. Lindenbusch; V. Lipaev; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A. I. Ostrovidov; T. K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. R. Rust; D. Ryabchikov; A. H. Sanjari; L. I. Sarycheva; E. Scott; K. K. Seth; N. Shenhav; W. D. Shephard; N. B. Sinev; J. A. Smith; P. T. Smith; D. L. Stienike; T. Sulanke; S. A. Taegar; S. Teige; D. R. Thompson; I. N. Vardanyan; D. P. Weygand; D. White; H. J. Willutzki; J. Wise; M. Witkowski; A. A. Yershov; D. Zhao

    2001-01-01

    New measurements of peripheral meson production are presented. The data confirm the existence of exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c2. The latter state dominates the eta'pi- decay spectrum. The data on eta pi+pi-pi- decay show large strength in several exotic (Jpc = 1- +) waves as well.

  20. Domestic exotics and the perception of invasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Robert Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility of an area to invasion by exotic species is often judged by the fraction of introduced species in the local biota. However, the degree of invasion, particularly in mainland areas, has often been underestimated because of the exclusion of ‘domestic exotics’ (those introduced to internal units from within the national border) in calculations. Because all...

  1. Heavy exotic molecules with charm and bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the (0+ ,1+) multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the (0- ,1-) multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets (0± ,1±) cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for J ≤ 1. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC =1++ bind, which we identify as the reported neutral X (3872). Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC =1+- binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics Zb+ (10610) and Zb+ (10650). The bound isosinglet with JPC =1++ is suggested as a possible neutral Xb (10532) not yet reported.

  2. Nuclear structure in odd-odd nucleus [sup 138]Pr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzutto, M.A.; Cybulska, E.W.; Vanin, V.R.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Emediato, L.G.R.; Ribas, R.V.; Seale, W.A.; Rao, M.N.; Medina, N.H.; Botelho, S.; Acquadro, J.C.; Lima, C.L. (Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Lab. Pelletron)

    1992-12-01

    With the view of extending the systematics of odd-odd Pr nuclei toward the N=82 closed shell, high-spin states in [sup 138]Pr nucleus have been investigated with the [sup 128]Te([sup 14]N, 4n[gamma]) reaction. Configurations and spin assignments are suggested for three of the observed band-structures. (orig.).

  3. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... the scattering chamber in a honey comb structure arrangement, mounted at a distance of. 4 cm from the target. It covered ∼35% of the total solid angle at the target (figure 2) and each BGO detector covered nearly equal solid angle. This BGO array [11] was used as total energy and/or gamma multiplicity ...

  4. Fundamental tests of nature with cooled and stored exotic ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The presentation will concentrate on recent applications with exciting results of Penning traps in atomic and nuclear physics with cooled and stored exotic ions. These are high-accuracy mass measurements of short-lived radionuclides, g-factor determinations of the bound-electron in highly-charged, hydrogen-like ions and g-factor measurements of the proton and antiproton. The experiments are dedicated, e.g., to astrophysics studies and to tests of fundamental symmetries in the case of mass measurements on radionuclides, and to the determination of fundamental constants and a CPT test in the case of the g-factor measurements.

  5. The Legnaro National Laboratories and the SPES facility: nuclear structure and reactions today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Fiorentini, Gianni

    2016-11-01

    There is a very long tradition of studying nuclear structure and reactions at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics). The wide expertise acquired in building and running large germanium arrays has made the laboratories one of the most advanced research centers in γ-ray spectroscopy. The ’gamma group’ has been deeply involved in all the national and international developments of the last 20 years and is currently one of the major contributors to the AGATA project, the first (together with its American counterpart GRETINA) γ-detector array based on γ-ray tracking. This line of research is expected to be strongly boosted by the coming into operation of the SPES radioactive ion beam project, currently under construction at LNL. In this report, written on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Nobel prize awarded to Aage Bohr, Ben R Mottelson and Leo Rainwater and particularly focused on the physics of nuclear structure, we intend to summarize the different lines of research that have guided nuclear structure and reaction research at LNL in the last decades. The results achieved have paved the way for the present SPES facility, a new laboratories infrastructure producing and accelerating radioactive ion beams of fission fragments and other isotopes.

  6. Chromatin insulator bodies are nuclear structures that form in response to osmotic stress and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoborg, Todd; Rickels, Ryan; Barrios, Josh; Labrador, Mariano

    2013-07-22

    Chromatin insulators assist in the formation of higher-order chromatin structures by mediating long-range contacts between distant genomic sites. It has been suggested that insulators accomplish this task by forming dense nuclear foci termed insulator bodies that result from the coalescence of multiple protein-bound insulators. However, these structures remain poorly understood, particularly the mechanisms triggering body formation and their role in nuclear function. In this paper, we show that insulator proteins undergo a dramatic and dynamic spatial reorganization into insulator bodies during osmostress and cell death in a high osmolarity glycerol-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent manner, leading to a large reduction in DNA-bound insulator proteins that rapidly repopulate chromatin as the bodies disassemble upon return to isotonicity. These bodies occupy distinct nuclear territories and contain a defined structural arrangement of insulator proteins. Our findings suggest insulator bodies are novel nuclear stress foci that can be used as a proxy to monitor the chromatin-bound state of insulator proteins and provide new insights into the effects of osmostress on nuclear and genome organization.

  7. Chromatin insulator bodies are nuclear structures that form in response to osmotic stress and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoborg, Todd; Rickels, Ryan; Barrios, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin insulators assist in the formation of higher-order chromatin structures by mediating long-range contacts between distant genomic sites. It has been suggested that insulators accomplish this task by forming dense nuclear foci termed insulator bodies that result from the coalescence of multiple protein-bound insulators. However, these structures remain poorly understood, particularly the mechanisms triggering body formation and their role in nuclear function. In this paper, we show that insulator proteins undergo a dramatic and dynamic spatial reorganization into insulator bodies during osmostress and cell death in a high osmolarity glycerol–p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase–independent manner, leading to a large reduction in DNA-bound insulator proteins that rapidly repopulate chromatin as the bodies disassemble upon return to isotonicity. These bodies occupy distinct nuclear territories and contain a defined structural arrangement of insulator proteins. Our findings suggest insulator bodies are novel nuclear stress foci that can be used as a proxy to monitor the chromatin-bound state of insulator proteins and provide new insights into the effects of osmostress on nuclear and genome organization. PMID:23878275

  8. Technology development on the assessment of structural integrity of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choun, Y. S.; Choi, I. K. and others

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear power plants in Korea show drop off in their performance and safety margin as the age of plants increase. The reevaluation of Kori-1 Unit on its performance and safety for life extension is expected in the near future. However, technologies and information related are insufficient to quantitatively estimate them. The final goal of this study is to develop the basic testing and evaluation techniques related with structural integrity of important nuclear equipment and structures. A part of the study includes development of equipment qualification technique. To ensure the structural integrity of structures, systems, and equipment in nuclear power plants, the following 5 research tasks were performed in the first year. - Analysis of dynamic characteristics of reactor internals - Analysis of engineering characteristics of instrumental earthquakes recorded in Korea - Analysis of ultimate pressure capacity and failure mode of containments building - Development of advanced NDE techniques using ultrasonic resonance scattering - Development of equipment qualification technique against vibration aging. These technologies developed in this study can be used to ensure the structural safety of operational nuclear power plants, and for the long-term life management. (author)

  9. Photoproduction of exotic baryon resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Karliner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We point out that the new exotic resonances recently reported by LHCb in the J/ψp channel are excellent candidates for photoproduction off a proton target. This test is crucial to confirming the resonant nature of such states, as opposed to their being kinematical effects. We specialize to an interpretation of the heavier narrow state as a molecule composed of Σc and D¯⁎, and estimate its production cross section using vector dominance. The relevant photon energies and fluxes are well within the capabilities of the GlueX and CLAS12 detectors at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB. A corresponding calculation is also performed for photoproduction of an analogous resonance which is predicted to exist in the ϒp channel.

  10. Exotic RG flows from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Nitti, Francesco; Silva Pimenta, Leandro [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France)

    2017-02-15

    Holographic RG flows are studied in an Einstein-dilaton theory with a general potential. The superpotential formalism is utilized in order to characterize and classify all solutions that are associated with asymptotically AdS space-times. Such solutions correspond to holographic RG flows and are characterized by their holographic β-functions. Novel solutions are found that have exotic properties from a RG point-of view. Some have β-functions that are defined patch-wise and lead to flows where the β-function changes sign without the flow stopping. Others describe flows that end in non-neighboring extrema in field space. Finally others describe regular flows between two minima of the potential and correspond holographically to flows driven by the VEV of an irrelevant operator in the UV CFT. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

    1951-05-01

    In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete Jordan

    2010-09-01

    This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

  13. The determination of the in situ structure by nuclear spin contrast variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS Forschungszentrum, Geesthacht (Germany); Nierhaus, K.H. [Max-Planch-Institut fuer Molekulare Genetik, Berlin (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    Polarized neutron scattering from polarized nuclear spins in hydrogenous substances opens a new way of contrast variation. The enhanced contrast due to proton spin polarization was used for the in situ structure determination of tRNA of the functional complex of the E.coli ribosome.

  14. Developing a Computerized Aging Management System for Concrete Structures in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Neshawy, F.; Piironen, J.; Sistonen, E.; Vesikari, E.; Tuomisto, M.; Hradil, P.; Ferreira, M.

    2013-07-01

    Finland has four nuclear reactors units in two power plants. The first unit started operation in 1977 and in the early 1980's all four units were in use. During the last few years the aging management of the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) concrete structures has grown an important issue because the existing structures are reaching the end of their licensed operating lifetime (about 40 years). Therefore the nuclear power companies are developing aging management systems to avoid premature degradation of NPP facilities and to be able to extend their operating lifetime. This paper is about the development of a computerized ageing management system for the nuclear power plants concrete structures. The computerized ageing management system is built upon central database and implementation applications. It will assist the personnel of power companies to implement the aging management activities at different phases of the lifetime of a power plant. It will provide systematic methods for planning, surveillance, inspection, monitoring, condition assessment, maintenance and repair of structures.

  15. Nuclear Structure of the Heaviest Elements – Investigated at SHIP-GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heßberger Fritz Peter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The quest for the heaviest nuclei that can exist is a basic topic in natural science as their stability is characterized by a delicate interplay of short range nuclear forces acting between the nucleons (protons and neutrons and long-range Coulomb forces acting solely between charged particles, i.e. the protons. As the stability of a nucleus is strongly correlated to its structure, understanding the nuclear structure of heaviest nuclei is presently a main challenge of experimental and theoretical investigations concerning the field of Superheavy Elements. At the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt an extensive program on nuclear structure investigations has been started about a decade ago. The project covered both as well systematic investigations of single particle levels in odd-mass isotopes populated by α-decay as investigation of two- or fourquasi-particle states forming K isomers and was supplemented by direct mass measurements at SHIPTRAP and investigation of spontaneous fission properties. Recent experimental studies allowed to extend the systematics of low lying levels in N = 151 and N = 153 up to 255Rf and 259Sg, investigation of possible relations between nuclear structure and fission properties of odd-mass nuclei and investigation of shell strengths at N = 152 and towards N = 162.

  16. Chromatin organization at the nuclear periphery as revealed by image analysis of structured illumination microscopy data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišerová, Jindřiška; Efenberková, Michaela; Sieger, T.; Maninová, Miloslava; Uhlířová, Jana; Hozák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 12 (2017), s. 2066-2077 ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-08835Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Structured illumination * Image analysis * Chromation * Nucleus * Histone modification * Nuclear pore complexes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.431, year: 2016

  17. Proceedings of the 1st conference on nuclear structure data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.; Shirley, V.S.; Dairiki, J.M. (eds.)

    1982-04-01

    The 1st Conference on Nuclear Structure Data Evaluation was organized by the Isotopes Project of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in order to encourage the open discussion of the scientific aspects of ENSDF production and usage. Summaries of the roundtable discussion sessions, abstracts of the presented papers, and additional contributed papers are contained in these Proceedings.

  18. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    measurement of different clad components. Measurement of cladding residual stresses in a decommissioned reactor pressure vessel head, which was exposed to service conditions (pressure test, temperature, neutron irradiation, etc.), and the results from the cladding in a cut-out-piece, which did not experience any service or test pressure, basically showed similar profiles. Considering the low scatter and the reproducible data, the hole-drilling technique is recommended in measurement of the peak of the cladding residual stresses. The profile and magnitude of the cladding residual stresses depend mainly upon cladding composition, cladding thickness, clad component geometry and clad component temperature. The peak of the cladding residual stresses is actually about 2-3 mm under the surface of the clad layer, and values in the range of 150 and 500 MPa are reported. Fracture assessments on different clad components at different loading conditions reveal that fracture assessments based on LEFM and ASME Kk curve lead to unrealistic conservative results, and the cladding residual stresses are of importance for surface crack behaviour, especially under cold loads. The NESC projects have shown that the Master Curve methodology can give good predictions of the conducted experiments. It is reasonable to assume a peak value of cladding residual stresses in the whole clad layer to be equal to the yield strength of the cladding material (around 300 MPa) at room temperature. Providing that the clad component has received PWHT, it can be assumed no residual stresses in the underlying base material. For the nuclear pressure vessel, it is also reasonable to assume that the cladding stress free temperature is at the operation temperature of the vessel (around 300 deg C). It has been shown that the cladding residual stresses have negligible influence on subclad crack behaviour in clad components (receiving PWHT). It has also been shown that the crack growth for subclad cracks would be towards the

  19. How exotic plants integrate into pollination networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouffer, Daniel B; Cirtwill, Alyssa R; Bascompte, Jordi; Bartomeus, Ignasi

    2014-11-01

    There is increasing world-wide concern about the impact of the introduction of exotic species on ecological communities. Since many exotic plants depend on native pollinators to successfully establish, it is of paramount importance that we understand precisely how exotic species integrate into existing plant-pollinator communities. In this manuscript, we have studied a global data base of empirical pollination networks to determine whether community, network, species or interaction characteristics can help identify invaded communities. We found that a limited number of community and network properties showed significant differences across the empirical data sets - namely networks with exotic plants present are characterized by greater total, plant and pollinator richness, as well as higher values of relative nestedness.We also observed significant differences in terms of the pollinators that interact with the exotic plants. In particular, we found that specialist pollinators that are also weak contributors to community nestedness are far more likely to interact with exotic plants than would be expected by chance alone.Synthesis. By virtue of their interactions, it appears that exotic plants may provide a key service to a community's specialist pollinators as well as fill otherwise vacant 'coevolutionary niches'.

  20. Chaotic features of nuclear structure and dynamics: selected topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir; Volya, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Quantum chaos has become an important element of our knowledge about physics of complex systems. In typical mesoscopic systems of interacting particles the dynamics invariably become chaotic when the level density, growing by combinatorial reasons, leads to the increasing probability of mixing simple mean-field (particle-hole) configurations. The resulting stationary states have exceedingly complicated structures that are comparable to those in random matrix theory. We discuss the main properties of mesoscopic quantum chaos and show that it can serve as a justification for application of statistical mechanics to mesoscopic systems. We show that quantum chaos becomes a powerful instrument for experimental, theoretical and computational work. The generalization to open systems and effects in the continuum are discussed with the help of the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian; it is shown how to formulate this approach for numerous problems of quantum signal transmission. The artificially introduced randomness can also be helpful for a deeper understanding of physics. We indicate the problems that require more investigation so as to be understood further.

  1. Study of the nuclear structure of {sup 155}Eu; Estudo da estrutura nuclear do {sup 155}Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genezini, Frederico Antonio

    2004-07-01

    The {sup 155}Eu nuclide was investigated by the directional angular correlation technique following the {beta} decay of {sup 155}Sm. The angular correlation measurements were carried out using a setup with 4 Ge detectors and a multi parametric data acquisition system. To perform the data analysis a new methodology was developed . The multipole mixing ratios of twenty sixty {gamma}- transitions were determined. Seven of them agreed with the results of earlier angular correlation studies and nineteen obtained for the first time confirmed the multipolarity suggested in earlier electron capture studies. Besides, the spin of the level at 1106.83 keV as well as the parity of the level at 1301.41 keV have also been suggested. The nuclear structure of {sup 155}Eu was discussed successfully in terms of the single particle model using a deformed Woods-Saxon potential plus residual pairing interaction permitting the description of the rotational quasi-proton band heads. (author)

  2. Large-Scale Computations Leading to a First-Principles Approach to Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W E; Navratil, P

    2003-08-18

    We report on large-scale applications of the ab initio, no-core shell model with the primary goal of achieving an accurate description of nuclear structure from the fundamental inter-nucleon interactions. In particular, we show that realistic two-nucleon interactions are inadequate to describe the low-lying structure of {sup 10}B, and that realistic three-nucleon interactions are essential.

  3. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area.

  4. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of molecular structure in liquids and liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucker, S.P.

    1991-07-01

    Magnetic couplings between protons, such as through-space dipole couplings, and scalar J-couplings depend sensitively on the structure of the molecule. Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments provide a powerful tool for measuring these couplings, correlating them to specific pairs of protons within the molecule, and calculating the structure. This work discusses the development of NMR methods for examining two such classes of problems -- determination of the secondary structure of flexible molecules in anisotropic solutions, and primary structure of large biomolecules in aqueous solutions. 201 refs., 84 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis of Isolated Nuclear Power Plants in Frequency Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One important aspect of applying seismic isolation to Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs is that the complex interactions of flexible soil, flexible isolators, and stiff structures require careful investigation. In this paper, a NPP model was used to investigate the effects of SSI and the effects of changing soil and isolator properties on seismic response of an isolated NPP. The following aspects are considered in the study: horizontal excitation and vertical excitation; linear and equivalent-linear models of the isolators; scaling of the shear modulus of the soil profile model; and scaling of the horizontal equivalent stiffness of the isolators. It was found that Pseudospectral Acceleration (PSA in the nuclear structure at the frequencies near the natural frequency of the structure increase with elevation, and the difference between the in-structure response spectral acceleration with and without SSI effects is concentrated at the frequencies near the natural frequencies of the superstructure. It is also found that the linear SSI analysis underestimates the in-structure response of the nuclear structures compared to the equivalent-linear SSI analyses, and the soil profile properties directly affect the effectiveness of the isolation system.

  6. Structural characterization by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of ozonized triolein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Díaz, Maritza

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study ozonized triolein with 739 mmolequiv/ kg peroxide index is characterized by NMR.The triolein and ozonized triolein show very similar 1H NMR spectra except for the resonances at δ 9.74 ppm, which correspond to aldehydic protons and δ 5.14 ppm (ozonides methylic protons. Other new signal assignments are based on the connectivities provided by the proton scalar coupling constants δ 2.41 ppm (methylenic group allylic to aldehydic protons and ozonides methynic protons and δ 1.67 ppm (methylenic protons in position with respect to ozonides methylic protons. From the 13C and 1H-13C spectrum of the ozonized triolein, the presence of ozonides was confirmed by the signals δ 104.2 and 104.3 ppm, respectively. Other new signals in δ 43.9 ppm confirm the presence of methylenic carbon ozonides. From the structural elucidation of ozonated triglycerides, relevant chemical information about ozonated vegetable oil can be found .En el presente estudio ha sido caracterizada por RMN la trioleina ozonizada con índice de peróxidos de 739 mmolequiv/ kg. La trioleina y la trioleina ozonizada muestran espectros muy similares exceptuando los valores de las resonancias δ 9,74 ppm de los protones aldehídicos, y δ 5,14 ppm (protones metínicos de los ozónidos. Otras nuevas asignaciones fueron basadas en las conectividades obtenidas por las constantes de acoplamiento escalar como δ 2,41 ppm (grupo metilénico alilico a los protones aldehídicos y protones metínicos de los ozónidos y δ 1,67 ppm (protones metilénicos en posición βcon respecto a los protones metínicos de los ozónidos. En los espectros 13C y 1H-13C de la trioleina ozonizada la presencia de ozónidos fue atribuida, respectivamente, por las señales δ 104,2 y δ 104,3 ppm. Una nueva señal en δ 43,9 ppm confirma la presencia de carbono metilénico de ozónidos. Estos resultados indican que la elucidación estructural de triglicéridos ozonizados, ofrece información qu

  7. Crystal structure of rice importin-α and structural basis of its interaction with plant-specific nuclear localization signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Wen; Couñago, Rafael Lemos Miguez; Williams, Simon J; Bodén, Mikael; Kobe, Boštjan

    2012-12-01

    In the classical nucleocytoplasmic import pathway, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in cargo proteins are recognized by the import receptor importin-α. Importin-α has two separate NLS binding sites (the major and the minor site), both of which recognize positively charged amino acid clusters in NLSs. Little is known about the molecular basis of the unique features of the classical nuclear import pathway in plants. We determined the crystal structure of rice (Oryza sativa) importin-α1a at 2-Å resolution. The structure reveals that the autoinhibitory mechanism mediated by the importin-β binding domain of importin-α operates in plants, with NLS-mimicking sequences binding to both minor and major NLS binding sites. Consistent with yeast and mammalian proteins, rice importin-α binds the prototypical NLS from simian virus 40 large T-antigen preferentially at the major NLS binding site. We show that two NLSs, previously described as plant specific, bind to and are functional with plant, mammalian, and yeast importin-α proteins but interact with rice importin-α more strongly. The crystal structures of their complexes with rice importin-α show that they bind to the minor NLS binding site. By contrast, the crystal structures of their complexes with mouse (Mus musculus) importin-α show preferential binding to the major NLS binding site. Our results reveal the molecular basis of a number of features of the classical nuclear transport pathway specific to plants.

  8. Online Monitoring of Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these

  9. Nuclear Structure Studies at ISOLDE and their Impact on the Astrophysical r-Process

    CERN Document Server

    Kratz, K L; Thielemann, F K; Walters, W B

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the present review is the production of the heaviest elements in nature via the r-process. A correct understanding and modeling requires the knowledge of nuclear properties far from stability and a detailed prescription of the astrophysical environment. Experiments at CERN/ISOLDE have played a pioneering role in exploring the characteristics of nuclear structure in terms of masses and beta-decay properties. Initial examinations paid attention to far unstable nuclei with magic neutron numbers related to r-process peaks, while present activities are centered on the evolution of shell effects with the distance from the valley of stability. We first show in site-independent applications the effect of both types of nuclear properties on r-process abundances. Then, we explore the results of calculations related to two different `realistic' astrophysical sites, (i) the supernova neutrino wind and (ii) neutron star mergers. We close with a list of remaining theoretical and experimental challenges needed ...

  10. Seismic resistance design of nuclear power plant building structures in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitano, Takehito [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Japan is one of the countries where earthquakes occur most frequently in the world and has incurred a lot of disasters in the past. Therefore, the seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant plays a very important role in Japan. This report describes the general method of seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant giving examples of PWR and BWR type reactor buildings in Japan. Nuclear facilities are classified into three seismic classes and is designed according to the corresponding seismic class in Japan. Concerning reactor buildings, the short-term allowable stress design is applied for the S1 seismic load and it is confirmed that the structures have a safety margin against the S2 seismic load. (J.P.N.)

  11. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and...

  12. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-01-01

    .... In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of the model...

  13. Search for exotic physics with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-01-01

    At the LHC, the program of research in particle physics beyond the Standard Model is extremely rich. With the ATLAS detector, besides SUSY mainstream studies, many exotic theoretical models will be investigated. They range from compositeness of fundamental fermions to extra dimension scenarii through GUT models and include many variants. I shall review some selected typical studies by the ATLAS collaboration on exotic physics, highlighting the discovery prospects and the recent analyses using the latest full detector simulations.

  14. Meteors, space aliens, and other exotic encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom. Hofacker

    1998-01-01

    Exotics have had a big impact on our environment. If you do not think so, just look at how many people believe that humans would not exist on this planet were it not for exotics. This belief centers on two main theories: (1) that humans could not have evolved were it not for a huge meteor from outer space striking the earth resulting in extinction of the dinasours, the...

  15. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Davide M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Riccioni, Fabio [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Risoli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-12-21

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T{sup 6}/[ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2}] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  16. Everyday and Exotic Foodborne Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn B Lee

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyday foodborne parasites, which are endemic in Canada, include the protozoans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. However, these parasites are most frequently acquired through unfiltered drinking water, homosexual activity or close personal contact such as in daycare centres and occasionally via a food vehicle. It is likely that many foodborne outbreaks from these protozoa go undetected. Transmission of helminth infections, such as tapeworms, is rare in Canada because of effective sewage treatment. However, a common foodborne parasite of significance is Toxoplasma gondii. Although infection can be acquired from accidental ingestion of oocysts from cat feces, infection can also result from consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat, such as pork or lamb. Congenital transmission poses an immense financial burden, costing Canada an estimated $240 million annually. Also of concern is toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients, which may lead to toxoplasmosis encephalitis, the second most common AIDS-related opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. Exotic parasites (ie, those acquired from abroad or from imported food are of growing concern because more Canadians are travelling and the number of Canada?s trading partners is increasing. Since 1996, over 3000 cases of Cyclospora infection reported in the United States and Canada were epidemiologically associated with importation of Guatemalan raspberries. Unlike toxoplasmosis, where strategies for control largely rest with individual practices, control of cyclosporiasis rests with government policy, which should prohibit the importation of foods at high risk.

  17. Exotic birds increase generalization and compensate for native bird decline in plant-frugivore assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Daniel; Martínez, Daniel; Stouffer, Daniel B; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2014-11-01

    Exotic species are thought to alter the structure of natural communities and disrupt ecosystem functioning through invasion. Nevertheless, exotic species may also provide ecological insurance when they contribute to maintain ecosystem functions after the decline of native species following anthropogenic disturbance. Here, this hypothesis is tested with the assemblage of frugivorous birds and fleshy-fruited plants of New Zealand, which has suffered strong historical declines in native birds while simultaneously gaining new frugivores introduced by European settlers. We studied the plant-frugivore assemblage from measures of fruit and bird abundances and fruit consumption in nine forest patches, and tested how this changed across a gradient of relative abundance of exotic birds. We then examined how each bird species' role in the assemblage (the proportion of fruits and the number of plant species consumed) varied with their relative abundance, body size and native/exotic status. The more abundant and, to a lesser extent, larger birds species consumed a higher proportion of fruits from more plant species. Exotic birds consumed fruits less selectively and more proportionate to the local availability than did native species. Interaction networks in which exotic birds had a stronger role as frugivores had higher generalization, higher nestedness and higher redundancy of plants. Exotic birds maintained frugivory when native birds became rarer, and diversified the local spectrum of frugivores for co-occurring native plants. These effects seemed related to the fact that species abundances, rather than trait-matching constraints, ultimately determined the patterns of interactions between birds and plants. By altering the structure of plant-frugivore assemblages, exotic birds likely enhance the stability of the community-wide seed dispersal in the face of continued anthropogenic impact. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  18. String consistency, heavy exotics, and the 750 GeV diphoton excess at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetic, Mirjam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor (Slovenia); Halverson, James [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Langacker, Paul [School of Natural Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-10-15

    String consistency conditions are stronger than anomaly cancellation and can require the addition of exotics in the visible sector. We study such exotics and demonstrate that they may account for the modest excess at 750 GeV in recent diphoton resonance searches performed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. In a previous analysis of type II MSSM D-brane quivers we systematically added up to five exotics for the sake of satisfying string consistency conditions. Using this dataset, we demonstrate that 89780 of the 89964 quivers have exotics, 78155 of which include singlets that may couple to MSSM or exotic multiplets with coupling structures governed by U(1) symmetries that are often anomalous. We demonstrate that certain sets of exotics are far preferred over others and study the structure of singlet couplings to heavy exotics carrying standard model charges. Typical possibilities include singlets that may decay to vector-like quarks and/or vector-like leptons and subsequently to two photons. We show that a narrow width diphoton excess can be accounted for while evading existing bounds if multiple exotics are added, with vector-like leptons of mass M{sub L}

  19. Development of Structural Health Monitoring System for pipes in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, H. S.; Choi, Y. C.; Shin, S. H.; Youn, D. B.; Park, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has becoming an important issue in the maintenance of various structures such as large steel plates, vessels, and pipes in nuclear power plants. There are important factors to be considered in developing an SHM system. With consideration of these factors, we have developed a computerized multi-channel ultrasonic system that can handle array transducers and generate a high-power pulse for online SHM of the plates and pipes. The proposed system is compact but has all the necessary functions for SHM of important structure such as pipes and plates in a NPP

  20. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Physics, Auckland Park (South Africa); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  1. Laser assisted nuclear decay spectroscopy: A new method for studying neutron-deficient francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Kara Marie

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive decay studies of rare isotopes produced at radioactive ion beam facilities have often been hindered by the presence of isobaric and isomeric contamination. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN uses laser radiation to stepwise excite and ionize an atomic beam in a particular isomeric state. Deflection of this selectively ionized beam of exotic nuclei, from the remaining neutral contaminants, allows ultra-sensitive detection of rare isotopes and nuclear structure measurements in background-free conditions.\

  2. 3rd International Conference on High-energy Physics and Nuclear Structure

    CERN Document Server

    High energy physics and nuclear structure

    1970-01-01

    In preparing the program for this Conference, the third in the series, it soon became evident that it was not possible to in­ clude in a conference of reasonable duration all the topics that might be subsumed under the broad title, "High Energy Physics and Nuclear Structure. " From their initiation, in 1963, it has been as much the aim of these Conferences to provide some bridges between the steadily separating domains of particle and nuclear physics, as to explore thoroughly the borderline territory between the two -­ the sort of no-man's-land that lies unclaimed, or claimed by both sides. The past few years have witnessed the rapid development of many new routes connecting the two major areas of 'elementary par­ ticles' and 'nuclear structure', and these now spread over a great expanse of physics, logically perhaps including the whole of both subjects. (As recently as 1954, an International Conference on 'Nuclear and Meson Physics' did, in fact, embrace both fields!) Since it is not now possibl...

  3. Future prospects in nuclear physics and the Japanese hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metag, V. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Giessen Univ. (Germany). 2. Physikalisches Inst.

    1998-05-01

    The Japanese Hadron Facility (JHF) will provide new perspectives for a broad research program covering nuclear and particle physics, condensed matter physics, material sciences, and life sciences. In this talk, the future prospects of nuclear physics, as they are discussed within the community, are addressed. Recommendations worked out by the study groups, evaluating the long term perspectives of GSI, have hereby been used as a guideline. Nuclear physics is considered here in a broad sense as the physics of extended structured objects bound by the strong interaction, i.e. mesons, baryons, and nuclei. Preference is given to those subfields which would benefit most from the new experimental possibilities to the JHF. Consequently, the structure of exotic nuclei and hypernuclei, the properties of compressed hadronic matter and medium modifications of hadrons, spectroscopy of mesons, glueballs and baryons, and the parton structure of the nucleon are addressed and analyzed with regard to their future physics potential. (orig.)

  4. Next-generation fragment separators for exotic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Laura Leigh

    The next generation of nuclear physics research will require advanced exotic beam facilities based on heavy-ion drivers. Exotic beams of rare nuclei will be produced via fragmentation and fission reactions resulting from a high-energy heavy-ion beam hitting a target. A large aperture fragment separator with superconducting magnets is needed for capture, selection, and transport of rare isotopes for experiments. The code COSY INFINTIY uses powerful differential algebra (DA) methods for computing the dynamics of the beam in the fragment separator. A hybrid map-Monte Carlo code has been developed and added to COSY to calculate beam-material interactions. This code tracks the fragmentation and fission of the beam in target and absorber material while computing energy loss and energy and angular straggling as well as charge state evolution of the beam by implementing auxiliary codes such as ATIMA and GLOBAL. EPAX has been utilized to return the cross-sections of fragmentation products. The special case of fission has been treated by integrating the code MCNPX to accurately predict cross-sections and dynamics of exotic beams produced by a 238U beam incident on a Li or C target. Fragment separator designs based on optical symmetries and optimized to be aberration-free are presented. For isotope separation, the Brho-DeltaE-Brho method is used, requiring the addition of an energy absorber. Shaped surfaces are used in order to reduce optical aberrations, resulting in a high-purity rare isotope beam. Beam purity is investigated for four rare isotope production mechanisms, namely light and heavy nuclear fragmentation and light and heavy nuclear fission. Each of these presents unique challenges due to the dynamics of the beam and background contamination produced. Optimized fragment separator settings are presented for each production reaction mechanism and purity results are shown after each selection stage. These include a first- and second-stage achromatic selection and gas

  5. Synaptic activity induces dramatic changes in the geometry of the cell nucleus: interplay between nuclear structure, histone H3 phosphorylation, and nuclear calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Malte; Queisser, Gillian; Eder, Anja; Wiegert, J Simon; Bengtson, C Peter; Hellwig, Andrea; Wittum, Gabriel; Bading, Hilmar

    2009-11-25

    Synaptic activity initiates many adaptive responses in neurons. Here we report a novel form of structural plasticity in dissociated hippocampal cultures and slice preparations. Using a recently developed algorithm for three-dimensional image reconstruction and quantitative measurements of cell organelles, we found that many nuclei from hippocampal neurons are highly infolded and form unequally sized nuclear compartments. Nuclear infoldings are dynamic structures, which can radically transform the geometry of the nucleus in response to neuronal activity. Action potential bursting causing synaptic NMDA receptor activation dramatically increases the number of infolded nuclei via a process that requires the ERK-MAP kinase pathway and new protein synthesis. In contrast, death-signaling pathways triggered by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors cause a rapid loss of nuclear infoldings. Compared with near-spherical nuclei, infolded nuclei have a larger surface and increased nuclear pore complex immunoreactivity. Nuclear calcium signals evoked by cytosolic calcium transients are larger in small nuclear compartments than in the large compartments of the same nucleus; moreover, small compartments are more efficient in temporally resolving calcium signals induced by trains of action potentials in the theta frequency range (5 Hz). Synaptic activity-induced phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine 10 was more robust in neurons with infolded nuclei compared with neurons with near-spherical nuclei, suggesting a functional link between nuclear geometry and transcriptional regulation. The translation of synaptic activity-induced signaling events into changes in nuclear geometry facilitates the relay of calcium signals to the nucleus, may lead to the formation of nuclear signaling microdomains, and could enhance signal-regulated transcription.

  6. Growth performance of exotic Oreochromis niloticus, exotic Oreochromis niloticus fed with pelleted feeds in flow-through system

    OpenAIRE

    Eyo, A.A.; Okoye, F.C.; Sebiola, D.

    1999-01-01

    Local, exotic and hybrid tilapia fingerlings were fed 45% crude protein diet containing 18% fish meal in a flow through system in triplicate and their growth and food utilization observed for 14 weeks. At the end of the study, the hybrid (Exotic Oreochromis niloticus male x Exotic Oreochromis aureus female) fingerlings had higher growth rate and food conversion ratio (FCR) than the other treatments. This was followed by Exotic Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings. The exotic Oreochromis niloticu...

  7. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Alan L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Dimitrious, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators’ abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  8. Superallowed Beta Decay: the Role of Nuclear Structure in Standard-Model Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    2009-03-01

    Measurements on superallowed 0+ rightarrow 0+ nuclear beta transitions currently provide the most demanding test of the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and the most precise value for the up-down element, Vud, of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. Both are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model. Analysis of the experimental results depends on small radiative and isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections, some of which depend on the specific structure of the parent and daughter nuclei involved. These calculated corrections affect the precision of the results, and experiments are currently focused on reducing their uncertainties. Although nuclear structure only contributes to rather small corrections, it plays a crucial role in these fundamental tests.

  9. Native and exotic plants of fragments of sagebrush steppe produced by geomorphic processes versus land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntly, N.; Bangert, R.; Hanser, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and invasion by exotic species are regarded as major threats to the biodiversity of many ecosystems. We surveyed the plant communities of two types of remnant sagebrush-steppe fragments from nearby areas on the Snake River Plain of southeastern Idaho, USA. One type resulted from land use (conversion to dryland agriculture; hereafter AG Islands) and the other from geomorphic processes (Holocene volcanism; hereafter kipukas). We assessed two predictions for the variation in native plant species richness of these fragments, using structural equation models (SEM). First, we predicted that the species richness of native plants would follow the MacArthur-Wilson (M-W) hypothesis of island biogeography, as often is expected for the communities of habitat fragments. Second, we predicted a negative relationship between native and exotic plants, as would be expected if exotic plants are decreasing the diversity of native plants. Finally, we assessed whether exotic species were more strongly associated with the fragments embedded in the agricultural landscape, as would be expected if agriculture had facilitated the introduction and naturalization of non-native species, and whether the communities of the two types of fragments were distinct. Species richness of native plants was not strongly correlated with M-W characteristics for either the AG Islands or the **kipukas. The AG Islands had more species and higher cover of exotics than the kipukas, and exotic plants were good predictors of native plant species richness. Our results support the hypothesis that proximity to agriculture can increase the diversity and abundance of exotic plants in native habitat. In combination with other information, the results also suggest that agriculture and exotic species have caused loss of native diversity and reorganization of the sagebrush-steppe plant community. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  10. Probing the nuclear symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Filippo E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion collisions (HIC have been widely used to extract the parametrization of symmetry energy term of nuclear equation of state as a function of barionic density. HIC in fact are a unique tool in terrestrial laboratories to explore the symmetry energy around the saturation density (ρ0 = 0.16fm−3 from sub-saturation densities (Fermi energies towards compressed nuclear matter (ρ > 2 − 3ρ0 that can be reached at relativistic energies, as a function of different conditions of temperature, mass asymmetry and isospin. One of the main study at present is to reach a coherent description of EOS of asymmetric nuclear matter from heavy ion collisions of stable and exotic nuclei, nuclear structure studies and astrophysical observations. In this work an overview of the current status of the research is shortly reviewed together with new perspectives aimed to reduce the present experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  11. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Lolium Species Surveyed on Nuclear Simple Sequence Repeat and Cytoplasmic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Cai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the genetic diversity and population structure of Lolium species, we used 32 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR markers and 7 cytoplasmic gene markers to analyze a total of 357 individuals from 162 accessions of 9 Lolium species. This survey revealed a high level of polymorphism, with an average number of alleles per locus of 23.59 and 5.29 and an average PIC-value of 0.83 and 0.54 for nuclear SSR markers and cytoplasmic gene markers, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 16.27 and 16.53% of the total variation was due to differences among species, with the remaining 56.35 and 83.47% due to differences within species and 27.39 and 0% due to differences within individuals in 32 nuclear SSR markers set and 6 chloroplast gene markers set, respectively. The 32 nuclear SSR markers detected three subpopulations among 357 individuals, whereas the 6 chloroplast gene markers revealed three subpopulations among 160 accessions in the STRUCTURE analysis. In the clustering analysis, the three inbred species clustered into a single group, whereas the outbreeding species were clearly divided, especially according to nuclear SSR markers. In addition, almost all Lolium multiflorum populations were clustered into group C4, which could be further divided into three subgroups, whereas Lolium perenne populations primarily clustered into two groups (C2 and C3, with a few lines that instead grouped with L. multiflorum (C4 or Lolium rigidum (C6. Together, these results will useful for the use of Lolium germplasm for improvement and increase the effectiveness of ryegrass breeding.

  12. Research on a laser ultrasound method for testing the quality of a nuclear radiation protection structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Liyin

    2017-02-01

    Laser ultrasonics has been investigated for inspecting the quality of a nuclear radiation protection structure. A possibility is proposed to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a laser ultrasonic inspection system. Then, a nuclear radiation protection structure composed of an AISI 1045 steel sheet connected with a lead alloy sheet by using an epoxy resin adhesive was manufactured with simulated defects. A non-contact laser ultrasonic inspection system, where the measured signals were filtered using a wavelet threshold de-noising method, was established to conduct a series of experiments. The proposed signal processing method can significantly improve the SNR of measured laser ultrasound signals on a rough solid surface. Compared with the SNR of original ultrasonic signals measured in transmission and reflection, the SNR of processed transmitted and reflected signals is improved by 13.8 and 16.6 dB, respectively. Moreover, laser ultrasonic C-scans based on the transmission and pulse-echo method can detect the simulated de-bonding defects, and the relative deviation between the measured sizes and design values is below 9%. Therefore, the laser ultrasonic method combined with effective signal processing can achieve the quantitative characterization of de-bonding defects in nuclear radiation protection structures.

  13. (Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

  14. High-throughput automated platform for nuclear magnetic resonance-based structural proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarov, Dmitriy A; Markley, John L

    2005-01-01

    The development of new systems and strategies capable of synthesizing any desired soluble, labeled protein or protein fragment on a preparative scale is one of the most important tasks in biotechnology today. The Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (WI, USA), in co-operation with Ehime University (Matsuyama, Japan) and CellFree Sciences Co., Ltd, has developed an automated platform for nuclear magnetic resonance-based structural proteomics that employs wheat germ extracts for cell-free production of labeled protein. The platform utilizes a single construct for all targets without any redesign of the DNA or RNA. Therefore, it offers advantages over commercial cell-free methods utilizing Escherichia coli extracts that require multiple constructs or redesign of the open reading frame. The protein production and labeling protocol is no more costly than E. coli cell-based approaches, is robust and scalable for high-throughput applications. This protocol has been used in the authors center to screen eukaryotic open reading frames from the Arabidopsis thaliana and human genomes and for the determination of nuclear magnetic resonance structures. With the recent addition of the GeneDecoder 1000 (CellFree Sciences Co., Ltd) robotic system, the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics is able to carry out as many as 384 small-scale (50 microl) screening reactions per week. Furthermore, the Protemist (CellFree Sciences Co., Ltd) robotic system enables the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics to carry out 16 production-scale (4 ml) reactions per week. Utilization of this automated platform technology to screen targets for expression and solubility and to produce stable isotope-labeled samples for nuclear magnetic resonance structure determinations is discussed.

  15. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Singh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger–Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR, consistent with their Pelger–Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbric/+, and the (NZW×B6.LbricF1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.LbricF1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Faslpr mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.LbricF1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO or proteinase 3 (PR3, was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  16. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B; Martin, Kayla A; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J; Denny, Michael F

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger-Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger-Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW) was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbr(ic/+)), and the (NZW×B6.Lbr(ic))F1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.Lbr(ic))F1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Fas(lpr) mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.Lbr(ic))F1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3), was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  17. Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Guiqiu, E-mail: guiqiuzheng@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Xu, Peng [Westinghouse Electric Company, Columbia, SC 29209 (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Allen, Todd [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18 were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to understand the structure and microstructure of nuclear graphite. The lattice parameter (a), degree of graphitization (g{sup ¯}), crystallite size parallel and perpendicular to c-direction (L{sub c} and L{sub ⊥}), anisotropy (B), as well as in-plane crystallite size (L{sub a}) were calculated and compared based on XRD patterns and Raman spectra. Results indicate that IG-110 has a larger crystallite size and higher degree of graphitization, but lower anisotropy than NBG-18. These differences are attributed to the properties of coke source and manufacturing processes. Additionally, the shape of the pores and crystallized filler particles, the interface between binders and fillers, Mrozowski cracks and nano-cracks, and the defects of disclination were observed and characterized from SEM and HR-TEM images. The similarities and differences in microstructure between IG-110 and NBG-18 are discussed. The results in this work provide useful information to guide selection of nuclear graphite for the design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNP)

  18. Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiqiu Zheng; Peng Xu; Kumar Sridharan; Todd Allen

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18 were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to understand the structure and microstructure of nuclear graphite. The lattice parameter (a), degree of graphitization ( ), crystallite size parallel and perpendicular to c-direction (Lc and L ), anisotropy (B), as well as in-plane crystallite size (La) were calculated and compared based on XRD patterns and Raman spectra. Results indicate that IG-110 has a larger crystallite size and higher degree of graphitization, but lower anisotropy than NBG-18. These differences are attributed to the properties of coke source and manufacturing processes. Additionally, the shape of the pores and crystallized filler particles, the interface between binders and fillers, Mrozowski cracks and nano-cracks, and the defects of disclination were observed and characterized from SEM and HR-TEM images. The similarities and differences in microstructure between IG-110 and NBG-18 are discussed. The results in this work provide useful information to guide selection of nuclear graphite for the design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNP).

  19. Feasibility Study on The Modulization of Structure and System Facility for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This final report is a results of Study on applicable to SC(Steel Concrete) structure for NPPS and experimentation of SC wall-Support joint carried out by KEPRI from 2001.7.1 to 2000.3.27. The major objectives is to study on application of SC structure and behavior of SC wall-support joint. This result is applicable to plan a main project for ''Development of Modular Construction System in the Nuclear Power Plant''. (author). 45 refs., 19 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Ataxin-1 with an expanded glutamine tract alters nuclear matrix-associated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, P J; Koshy, B T; Cummings, C J

    1997-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by an expansion of a polyglutamine tract. It is characterized by ataxia, progressive motor deterioration, and loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To understand the pathogenesis of SCA1, we examined.......5 microm across, whereas the expanded ataxin-1 localizes to a single approximately 2-microm structure, before the onset of ataxia. Mutant ataxin-1 localizes to a single nuclear structure in affected neurons of SCA1 patients. Similarly, COS-1 cells transfected with wild-type or mutant ataxin-1 show...

  1. A four-scale homogenization analysis of creep of a nuclear containment structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, A.B. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); EDF R and D – Département MMC Site des Renardières – Avenue des Renardières - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Department of Applied Informatics in Construction, National University of Civil Engineering, 55 Giai Phong Road, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Yvonnet, J., E-mail: julien.yvonnet@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); He, Q.-C. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Toulemonde, C.; Sanahuja, J. [EDF R and D – Département MMC Site des Renardières – Avenue des Renardières - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15

    A four-scale approach is proposed to predict the creep behavior of a concrete structure. The behavior of concrete is modeled through a numerical multiscale methodology, by successively homogenizing the viscoelastic behavior at different scales, starting from the cement paste. The homogenization is carried out by numerically constructing an effective relaxation tensor at each scale. In this framework, the impact of modifying the microstructural parameters can be directly observed on the structure response, like the interaction of the creep of concrete with the prestressing tendons network, and the effects of an internal pressure which might occur during a nuclear accident.

  2. Methodology for reliability based condition assessment. Application to concrete structures in nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Y.; Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (US). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-08-01

    Structures in nuclear power plants may be exposed to aggressive environmental effects that cause their strength to decrease over an extended period of service. A major concern in evaluating the continued service for such structures is to ensure that in their current condition they are able to withstand future extreme load events during the intended service life with a level of reliability sufficient for public safety. This report describes a methodology to facilitate quantitative assessments of current and future structural reliability and performance of structures in nuclear power plants. This methodology takes into account the nature of past and future loads, and randomness in strength and in degradation resulting from environmental factors. An adaptive Monte Carlo simulation procedure is used to evaluate time-dependent system reliability. The time-dependent reliability is sensitive to the time-varying load characteristics and to the choice of initial strength and strength degradation models but not to correlation in component strengths within a system. Inspection/maintenance strategies are identified that minimize the expected future costs of keeping the failure probability of a structure at or below an established target failure probability during its anticipated service period.

  3. A study in the reliability analysis method for nuclear power plant structures (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan; Choi, Seong Cheol; Shin, Ho Sang; Yang, In Hwan; Kim, Yi Sung; Yu, Young; Kim, Se Hun [Seoul, Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    Nuclear power plant structures may be exposed to aggressive environmental effects that may cause their strength and stiffness to decrease over their service life. Although the physics of these damage mechanisms are reasonably well understood and quantitative evaluation of their effects on time-dependent structural behavior is possible in some instances, such evaluations are generally very difficult and remain novel. The assessment of existing steel containment in nuclear power plants for continued service must provide quantitative evidence that they are able to withstand future extreme loads during a service period with an acceptable level of reliability. Rational methodologies to perform the reliability assessment can be developed from mechanistic models of structural deterioration, using time-dependent structural reliability analysis to take loading and strength uncertainties into account. The final goal of this study is to develop the analysis method for the reliability of containment structures. The cause and mechanism of corrosion is first clarified and the reliability assessment method has been established. By introducing the equivalent normal distribution, the procedure of reliability analysis which can determine the failure probabilities has been established. The influence of design variables to reliability and the relation between the reliability and service life will be continued second year research.

  4. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  5. Development of a seismic damage assessment program for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyun Moo; Cho, Ho Hyun; Cho, Yang Hui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-12-15

    Some of nuclear power plants operating currently in Korea have been passed about 20 years after construction. Moreover, in the case of KORI I the service year is over 20 years, so their abilities are different from initial abilities. Also, earthquake outbreak increase, our country is not safe area for earthquake. Therefore, need is to guarantee the safety of these power plant structures against seismic accident, to decide to maintain them operational and to obtain data relative to maintenance/repair. Such objectives can be reached by damage assessment using inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation. It appears to be more important particularly for the structure enclosing the nuclear reactor that must absolutely protect against any radioactive leakage. Actually, the tendency of the technical world, led by the OECD/NEA, BNL in the United States, CEA in France and IAEA, is to develop researches or programs to assess the seismic safety considering aging degradation of operating nuclear power plants. Regard to the above-mentioned international technical trend, a technology to establish inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation so as to assess damage level and seismic safety margin appears to be necessary. Damage assessment and prediction system to grasp in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and damage level by 3-dimensional graphic representations are also required.

  6. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Cheng, Chu; Martinez, Jose A; Ng, Hilarie; de la Hoz, Cristiane; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2017-03-01

    Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Cajal bodies (CBs), unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN) proteins was reduced - a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kobayashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN. Cajal bodies (CBs, unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN proteins was reduced – a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs, also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG, and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy.

  8. Evolution of Structure in Nuclei: Meditation by Sub-Shell Modifications and Relation to Binding Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, R. F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the development of configuration mixing, coherence, collectivity, and deformation in nuclei is one of the crucial challenges in nuclear structure physics, and one which has become all the more important with the advent of next generation facilities for the study of exotic nuclei. We will discuss recent work on phase/shape transitional behavior in nuclei, and the role of changes in sub-shell structure in mediating such transitional regions. We will also discuss a newly found, much deeper, link between nuclear structure and nuclear binding energies.

  9. Optically-based Sensor System for Critical Nuclear Facilities Post-Event Seismic Structural Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Petrone, Floriana [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Buckle, Ian [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Wu, Suiwen [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Coates, Jason [California State Univ., Chico, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has ownership and operational responsibility for a large enterprise of nuclear facilities that provide essential functions to DOE missions ranging from national security to discovery science and energy research. These facilities support a number of DOE programs and offices including the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Science, and Office of Environmental Management. With many unique and “one of a kind” functions, these facilities represent a tremendous national investment, and assuring their safety and integrity is fundamental to the success of a breadth of DOE programs. Many DOE critical facilities are located in regions with significant natural phenomenon hazards including major earthquakes and DOE has been a leader in developing standards for the seismic analysis of nuclear facilities. Attaining and sustaining excellence in nuclear facility design and management must be a core competency of the DOE. An important part of nuclear facility management is the ability to monitor facilities and rapidly assess the response and integrity of the facilities after any major upset event. Experience in the western U.S. has shown that understanding facility integrity after a major earthquake is a significant challenge which, lacking key data, can require extensive effort and significant time. In the work described in the attached report, a transformational approach to earthquake monitoring of facilities is described and demonstrated. An entirely new type of optically-based sensor that can directly and accurately measure the earthquake-induced deformations of a critical facility has been developed and tested. This report summarizes large-scale shake table testing of the sensor concept on a representative steel frame building structure, and provides quantitative data on the accuracy of the sensor measurements.

  10. Theoretical nuclear structure and astrophysics. Progress report for 1993--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidry, M.W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the developing fields of radioactive ion beam (RIB) physics, computational and nuclear astrophysics, and the interface between these disciplines. The authors are concerned both with the application of existing technologies and concepts to guide the initial RIB program, and the development of new ideas and new technologies to influence the longer-term future of nuclear structure physics and astrophysics. The authors report substantial progress in both areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 70 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 46 invited presentations at conferences and workshops.

  11. Linking empowering leadership to safety participation in nuclear power plants: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Córcoles, Mario; Schöbel, Markus; Gracia, Francisco J; Tomás, Inés; Peiró, José M

    2012-07-01

    Safety participation is of paramount importance in guaranteeing the safe running of nuclear power plants. The present study examined the effects of empowering leadership on safety participation. Based on a sample of 495 employees from two Spanish nuclear power plants, structural equation modeling showed that empowering leadership has a significant relationship with safety participation, which is mediated by collaborative team learning. In addition, the results revealed that the relationship between empowering leadership and collaborative learning is partially mediated by the promotion of dialogue and open communication. The implications of these findings for safety research and their practical applications are outlined. An empowering leadership style enhances workers' safety performance, particularly safety participation behaviors. Safety participation is recommended to detect possible rule inconsistencies or misunderstood procedures and make workers aware of critical safety information and issues. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear medium modification of the F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajjad Athar, M., E-mail: sajathar@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India); Ruiz Simo, I.; Vicente Vacas, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    We study the nuclear effects in the electromagnetic structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) in the deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering process by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. The ratios R{sub F}{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2})=(2F{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}))/(AF{sub 2}{sup D}(x,Q{sup 2})) are obtained and compared with recent JLab results for light nuclei with special attention to the slope of the x distributions. This magnitude shows a non-trivial A dependence and it is insensitive to possible normalization uncertainties. The results have also been compared with some of the older experiments using intermediate mass nuclei.

  13. Wildlife, Exotic Pets, and Emerging Zoonoses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotto, Albino; Meslin, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic; wildlife constitutes a large and often unknown reservoir. Wildlife can also be a source for reemergence of previously controlled zoonoses. Although the discovery of such zoonoses is often related to better diagnostic tools, the leading causes of their emergence are human behavior and modifications to natural habitats (expansion of human populations and their encroachment on wildlife habitat), changes in agricultural practices, and globalization of trade. However, other factors include wildlife trade and translocation, live animal and bushmeat markets, consumption of exotic foods, development of ecotourism, access to petting zoos, and ownership of exotic pets. To reduce risk for emerging zoonoses, the public should be educated about the risks associated with wildlife, bushmeat, and exotic pet trades; and proper surveillance systems should be implemented. PMID:17370509

  14. Potentially of using vertical and three dimensional isolation systems in nuclear structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhiuang [Research Institute of Structural Engineering and Disaster Reduction, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Wong, Jenna [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley (United States); Mahin, Stephen [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP), with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D) isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary.

  15. Nuclear Structure Functions at Low-$x$ in a Holographic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Agozzino, L; Colangelo, P

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear effects in deep inelastic scattering at low$-x$ are phenomenologically described changing the typical dynamical and/or kinematical scales characterizing the free nucleon case. In a holographic approach, this rescaling is an analytical property of the computed structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$. This function is given by the sum of a conformal term and of a contribution due to quark confinement, depending on IR hard-wall parameter $z_0$ and on the mean square distances, related to a parameter $Q^\\prime$, among quarks and gluons in the target. The holographic structure function per nucleon in a nucleus $A$ is evaluated showing that a rescaling of the typical nucleon size, $z_0$ and $Q^\\prime$, due to nuclear binding, can be reabsorbed in a $Q^2$-rescaling scheme. The difference between neutron and proton structure functions and the effects of the longitudinal structure functions can also be taken into account. The obtained theoretical results favourably compare with the experimental data.

  16. Developing a structural health monitoring system for nuclear dry cask storage canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyi; Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Knight, Travis; Lam, Poh-Sang; Yu, Lingyu

    2015-03-01

    Interim storage of spent nuclear fuel from reactor sites has gained additional importance and urgency for resolving waste-management-related technical issues. In total, there are over 1482 dry cask storage system (DCSS) in use at US plants, storing 57,807 fuel assemblies. Nondestructive material condition monitoring is in urgent need and must be integrated into the fuel cycle to quantify the "state of health", and more importantly, to guarantee the safe operation of radioactive waste storage systems (RWSS) during their extended usage period. A state-of-the-art nuclear structural health monitoring (N-SHM) system based on in-situ sensing technologies that monitor material degradation and aging for nuclear spent fuel DCSS and similar structures is being developed. The N-SHM technology uses permanently installed low-profile piezoelectric wafer sensors to perform long-term health monitoring by strategically using a combined impedance (EMIS), acoustic emission (AE), and guided ultrasonic wave (GUW) approach, called "multimode sensing", which is conducted by the same network of installed sensors activated in a variety of ways. The system will detect AE events resulting from crack (case for study in this project) and evaluate the damage evolution; when significant AE is detected, the sensor network will switch to the GUW mode to perform damage localization, and quantification as well as probe "hot spots" that are prone to damage for material degradation evaluation using EMIS approach. The N-SHM is expected to eventually provide a systematic methodology for assessing and monitoring nuclear waste storage systems without incurring human radiation exposure.

  17. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  18. Exotic propulsion systems - A space exploration imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloulakos, V. E.

    1992-07-01

    Treatment is given to the need for and use of unusual propulsion systems in the forthcoming development of space vehicles. The requirements of lunar and Martian outposts are set forth, and the expected delta velocities, vehicle masses, and specific energy levels are listed. Exotic propulsion systems are considered that can provide the specific impulse levels needed for the scenarios discussed. Discussed are antimatter propulsion, teleportation, and antigravity machines, and the theoretical and practical implications of their development and use are mentioned. The use of antiprotons in medical treatment and materials processing is explained and extended to the propulsion application. The paper demonstrates the potential of exotic propulsion systems to contribute to space exploration.

  19. The Pricing of Multiple-Expiry Exotics

    OpenAIRE

    Hyong-Chol O; Mun-Chol KiM

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we extend Buchen's method to develop a new technique for pricing of some exotic options with several expiry dates(more than 3 expiry dates) using a concept of higher order binary option. At first we introduce the concept of higher order binary option and then provide the pricing formulae of $n$-th order binaries using PDE method. After that, we apply them to pricing of some multiple-expiry exotic options such as Bermudan option, multi time extendable option, multi shout option a...

  20. Structure and conformational plasticity of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montemayor, Eric J.; Didychuk, Allison L.; Liao, Honghong; Hu, Panzhou; Brow, David A.; Butcher, Samuel E. (UW)

    2017-01-01

    U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is a key component of the active site of the spliceosome, a large ribonucleoprotein complex that catalyzes the splicing of precursor messenger RNA. Prior to its incorporation into the spliceosome, U6 is bound by the protein Prp24, which facilitates unwinding of the U6 internal stem-loop (ISL) so that it can pair with U4 snRNA. A previously reported crystal structure of the `core' of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) contained an ISL-stabilized A62G mutant of U6 bound to all four RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domains of Prp24 [Montemayoret al.(2014),Nature Struct. Mol. Biol.21, 544–551]. The structure revealed a novel topology containing interlocked rings of protein and RNA that was not predicted by prior biochemical and genetic data. Here, the crystal structure of the U6 snRNP core with a wild-type ISL is reported. This complex crystallized in a new space group, apparently owing in part to the presence of an intramolecular cross-link in RRM1 that was not observed in the previously reported U6-A62G structure. The structure exhibits the same protein–RNA interface and maintains the unique interlocked topology. However, the orientation of the wild-type ISL is altered relative to the A62G mutant structure, suggesting inherent structural dynamics that may facilitate its pairing with U4. Consistent with their similar architectures in the crystalline state, the wild-type and A62G variants of U6 exhibit similar Prp24-binding affinities and electrophoretic mobilities when analyzed by gel-shift assay.

  1. The nuclear higher-order structure defined by the set of topological relationships between DNA and the nuclear matrix is species-specific in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santiago, Evangelina; Pardo, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2017-01-15

    During the interphase the nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to constituents of a nuclear substructure or compartment known as the nuclear matrix. The stable interactions between DNA and the nuclear matrix (NM) correspond to a set of topological relationships that define a nuclear higher-order structure (NHOS). Current evidence suggests that the NHOS is cell-type-specific. Biophysical evidence and theoretical models suggest that thermodynamic and structural constraints drive the actualization of DNA-NM interactions. However, if the topological relationships between DNA and the NM were the subject of any biological constraint with functional significance then they must be adaptive and thus be positively selected by natural selection and they should be reasonably conserved, at least within closely related species. We carried out a coarse-grained, comparative evaluation of the DNA-NM topological relationships in primary hepatocytes from two closely related mammals: rat and mouse, by determining the relative position to the NM of a limited set of target sequences corresponding to highly-conserved genomic regions that also represent a sample of distinct chromosome territories within the interphase nucleus. Our results indicate that the pattern of topological relationships between DNA and the NM is not conserved between the hepatocytes of the two closely related species, suggesting that the NHOS, like the karyotype, is species-specific. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanophenomena at surfaces fundamentals of exotic condensed matter phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Michailov, Michail

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art in nanoscale surface physics. It outlines contemporary trends in the field covering a wide range of topical areas: atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces, molecular films and polymer adsorption, biologically inspired nanophysics, surface design and pattern formation, and computer modeling of interfacial phenomena. Bridging 'classical' and 'nano' concepts, the present volume brings attention to the physical background of exotic condensed-matter properties. The book is devoted to Iwan Stranski and Rostislaw Kaischew, remarkable scientists, who played

  3. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-11-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms.

  4. Exotic Plant Invasion Risk in the Western United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This model was constructed to model the risk of invasion by exotic plant species. Roads may directly influence exotic plant dispersal via disturbance during road...

  5. ISOLTRAP mass measurements of exotic nuclides at $\\delta$m/m=10$^{-8}$

    CERN Document Server

    Blaum, K.; Beck, D.; Bollen, G.; Delahaye, P.; George, S.; Guénaut, C.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lunney, D.; Mukherjee, M.; Schwarz, S.; Schweikhard, L.; Yazidjian, C.

    2005-01-01

    The ISOLTRAP experiment at the ISOLDE facility at CERN is a Penning trap mass spectrometer for on-line mass measurements on short-lived radionuclides. It allows the determination of atomic masses of exotic nuclides with a relative uncertainty of only 10$^{-8}$. The results provide important information for, for example, weak interaction studies and nuclear models. Recent ISOLTRAP investigations and applications of high-precision mass measurements are discussed.

  6. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglia, R. A.; Bortignon, P. F.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Idini, A.; Potel, G.

    2016-06-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen-Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions.

  7. Assessment of modular construction for safety-related structures at advanced nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.; Morante, R.; Hofmayer, C.

    1997-03-01

    Modular construction techniques have been successfully used in a number of industries, both domestically and internationally. Recently, the use of structural modules has been proposed for advanced nuclear power plants. The objective in utilizing modular construction is to reduce the construction schedule, reduce construction costs, and improve the quality of construction. This report documents the results of a program which evaluated the proposed use of modular construction for safety-related structures in advanced nuclear power plant designs. The program included review of current modular construction technology, development of licensing review criteria for modular construction, and initial validation of currently available analytical techniques applied to concrete-filled steel structural modules. The program was conducted in three phases. The objective of the first phase was to identify the technical issues and the need for further study in order to support NRC licensing review activities. The two key findings were the need for supplementary review criteria to augment the Standard Review Plan and the need for verified design/analysis methodology for unique types of modules, such as the concrete-filled steel module. In the second phase of this program, Modular Construction Review Criteria were developed to provide guidance for licensing reviews. In the third phase, an analysis effort was conducted to determine if currently available finite element analysis techniques can be used to predict the response of concrete-filled steel modules.

  8. Nonobservable nature of the nuclear shell structure: Meaning, illustrations, and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, T.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Somà, V.

    2015-09-01

    Background: The concept of single-nucleon shells constitutes a basic pillar of our understanding of nuclear structure. Effective single-particle energies (ESPEs) introduced by French [Proceedings of the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi," Course XXXVI, Varenna 1965, edited by C. Bloch (Academic Press, New York, 1966)] and Baranger [Nucl. Phys. A 149, 225 (1970), 10.1016/0375-9474(70)90692-5] represent the most appropriate tool to relate many-body observables to a single-nucleon shell structure. As briefly discussed in Duguet and Hagen [Phys. Rev. C 85, 034330 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.034330], the dependence of ESPEs on one-nucleon transfer probability matrices makes them purely theoretical quantities that "run" with the nonobservable resolution scale λ employed in the calculation. Purpose: Given that ESPEs provide a way to interpret the many-body problem in terms of simpler theoretical ingredients, the goal is to specify the terms, i.e., the exact sense and conditions, in which this interpretation can be conducted meaningfully. Methods: While the nuclear shell structure is both scale and scheme dependent, the present study focuses on the former. A detailed discussion is provided to illustrate the scale (in)dependence of observables and nonobservables and the reasons why ESPEs, i.e., the shell structure, belong to the latter category. State-of-the-art multireference in-medium similarity renormalization group and self-consistent Gorkov Green's function many-body calculations are employed to corroborate the formal analysis. This is done by comparing the behavior of several observables and of nonobservable ESPEs (and spectroscopic factors) under (quasi) unitary similarity renormalization group transformations of the Hamiltonian parametrized by the resolution scale λ . Results: The formal proofs are confirmed by the results of ab initio many-body calculations in their current stage of implementation. In practice, the unitarity of the similarity

  9. CHANGE IN DEFORMATION PROPERTIES MODELING OF CONCRETE IN PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTOR BY IONIZING RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Agakhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of studying the effect impact of elementary particles impact on the strength and deformation materials properties used in protective constructions nuclear reactors and reactor technology has been stipulated. A nuclear reactor pressure vessel from prestressed concrete, combining the functions of biological protection is to be considered. The neutron flux problem distribution in the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor has been solved. The solution is made in axisymmetric with the finite element method using a flat triangular finite element. Computing has been conducted in Matlab package. The comparison with the results has been obtained using the finite difference method, as well as the graphs of changes under the influence of radiation exposure and the elastic modulus of concrete radiation deformations have been constructed. The proposed method allows to simulate changes in the deformation properties of concrete under the influence of neutron irradiation. Results of the study can be used in the calculation of stress-strain state of structures, taking into account indirect heterogeneity caused by the physical fields influence.

  10. Structural and isospin effects on balance energy and transition energy via different nuclear charge radii parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeeta; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2017-10-01

    The structural and isospin effects have been studied through isospin dependent and independent nuclear charge radii parameterizations on the collective flow within the framework of Isospin-dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model. The calculations have been carried out by using two approaches: (i) for the reaction series having fixed N / Z ratio and (ii) for the isobaric reaction series with different N / Z ratio. Our results indicate that there is a considerable effect of radii parameterizations on the excitation function of reduced flow (∂v1/∂Yred) and elliptical flow (v2). Both balance energy (Ebal) and transition energy (Etrans) are enhanced with increase in radii of reacting nuclei and found to follow a power law with nuclear charge radii. The exponent τ values show that the elliptical flow is more sensitive towards different nuclear charge radii as compared to reduced flow. Moreover, we observe that our theoretical calculation of Ebal and Etrans are in agreement with the experimental data provided by GSI, INDRA and FOPI collaborations.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance T 2 spectrum: multifractal characteristics and pore structure evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian-Ping; He, Xu; Geng, Bin; Hu, Qin-Hong; Feng, Chun-Zhen; Kou, Xiao-Pan; Li, Xing-Wen

    2017-06-01

    Pore structure characteristics are important to oil and gas exploration in complex low-permeability reservoirs. Using multifractal theory and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we studied the pore structure of low-permeability sandstone rocks from the 4th Member (ES4) of the Shahejie Formation in the south slope of the Dongying Sag. We used the existing pore structure data from petrophysics, core slices, and mercury injection tests to classify the pore structure into three categories and five subcategories. Then, the T 2 spectra of samples with different pore structures were interpolated, and the one- and three-dimensional fractal dimensions and the multifractal spectrum were obtained. Parameters α (intensity of singularity) and f (α) (density of distribution) were extracted from the multifractal spectra. The differences in the three fractal dimensions suggest that the pore structure types correlate with α and f (α). The results calculated based on the multifractal spectrum is consistent with that of the core slices and mercury injection. Finally, the proposed method was applied to an actual logging profile to evaluate the pore structure of low-permeability sandstone reservoirs.

  12. Study of special challenges for NDT-methods on nuclear structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maack, Stefan; Wiggenhauser, Herbert [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany); Thunell, Bjoern [Scanscot Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    The special design of buildings, constructed for nuclear power plants is a particular challenge for the nondestructive testing in the building industry. In particular the major component thicknesses, the degree of reinforcement and surface coating systems make the application of NDT methods difficult. The studies first steps were undertaken to determine to which extent established applications of these techniques are useable in the field of infrastructure buildings. Methods have been evaluated that are already state of the art. So for example the ground penetrating radar was used for locating metallic mounting parts. Furthermore, the low-lying internal structure of the containment was investigated with the ultrasonic method.

  13. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  14. Time to Come in from the Cold (War): Nuclear Force Structure for an Uncertain World

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace R Turnbull

    2015-01-01

      The US nuclear deterrent is at a turning point. Seven decades have passed since a nuclear weapon was used, and many noted leaders have called for the abolition of nuclear weapons altogether -- a "Global Zero...

  15. Structure of a herpesvirus nuclear egress complex subunit reveals an interaction groove that is essential for viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Kendra E.; Sharma, Mayuri; Mansueto, My Sam; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Wagner, Gerhard; Coen, Donald M.; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses require a nuclear egress complex (NEC) for efficient transit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The NEC orchestrates multiple steps during herpesvirus nuclear egress, including disruption of nuclear lamina and particle budding through the inner nuclear membrane. In the important human pathogen human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this complex consists of nuclear membrane protein UL50, and nucleoplasmic protein UL53, which is recruited to the nuclear membrane through its interaction with UL50. Here, we present an NMR-determined solution-state structure of the murine CMV homolog of UL50 (M50; residues 1–168) with a strikingly intricate protein fold that is matched by no other known protein folds in its entirety. Using NMR methods, we mapped the interaction of M50 with a highly conserved UL53-derived peptide, corresponding to a segment that is required for heterodimerization. The UL53 peptide binding site mapped onto an M50 surface groove, which harbors a large cavity. Point mutations of UL50 residues corresponding to surface residues in the characterized M50 heterodimerization interface substantially decreased UL50–UL53 binding in vitro, eliminated UL50–UL53 colocalization, prevented disruption of nuclear lamina, and halted productive virus replication in HCMV-infected cells. Our results provide detailed structural information on a key protein–protein interaction involved in nuclear egress and suggest that NEC subunit interactions can be an attractive drug target. PMID:26150520

  16. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Carvalho, A. [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); Chaves, P.C. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Reis, M.A., E-mail: mareis@ctn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 10{sup 3} barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing {sup 57}Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  17. [Microbiological conservation medicine and exotic pets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassl, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The keeping and the breeding of exotic pets in privacy is a hobby with increasing popularity in industrialised countries. The growing demand for animals usually imported from the tropics, the growing demand for unprofessionally bred feeder organisms, and the increasing number of cases of faulty caring behaviour lead to the creation of new infectiological niches in the interface between exotic pet--nurse--feed--vivarium. These niches are filled preferably by ubiquitous, facultative pathogenic, stress- and age-deduced opportunists with a broad host spectrum. On the one hand these extraordinary germ faunas, relating to their compositions, may generate broad relevance in human medicine, lead to bizarre clinical pictures in specific cases, and may contribute to a reduction of the mean span of life of exotic pets kept in human care. On the other hand the quantitative composition of the fauna may also be a direct measure of the degree of stress the pets are suffering in captivity. Thus, a professional designation of the germ fauna of an exotic pet may contribute to an optimisation of the captivity conditions.

  18. Results from searches for exotic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will review the current state of experimental searches for "exotic" physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. The talk will cover a wide range of searches from ATLAS and CMS, in a (hopefully) jargon free pedagogical fashion, showing the big picture of the field at this time.

  19. A New Era of Exotic Electromagnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 2. A New Era of Exotic Electromagnetism. K Porsezian Ancemma Joseph. General Article Volume 17 Issue 2 February 2012 pp 163-176. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. EXOTIC PLANTATIONS IN BELETE FOREST[1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. The potential for regeneration of native woody species in exotic plantation stands and in the adjacent natural forest in Belete forest was studied. The objective of the study was to assess the diversity and density of the naturally regenerated woody species in plantations at Belete forest. Vegetation assessment within ...

  1. Biodiversity and the exotic species threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter S. White

    1998-01-01

    Exotic species invasions, called by one conservation biologist the "least reversible" of all human impacts, cause harm to economies (e.g., fisheries, wildlife populations, tourism), the environment (e.g., in the form of broadcast of pesticides and herbicides), human health and wellbeing (e.g., allergic responses and the increase in fire severity in some...

  2. Eye Removal Surgeries in Exotic Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Kathryn A; McKinnon, Jo-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article covers considerations and techniques of eye removal surgeries in exotic pets. After issues including surgical indications, anesthesia, patient preparation, and instrumentation are explored, surgical techniques are described. Enucleation/exenteration and modified evisceration are discussed, with species-specific nuances of small mammals, birds, reptiles, snakes, amphibians, and fish highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Proceeding for the conference plenary talk at HEPMAD16, Madagascar on the topic of "Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS" (ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2016-807 https://cds.cern.ch/record/2225222) Deadline: 16/12/2016 (could be postponed for some days later upon request as recently suggested by the conference organizer)

  4. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry O. Britton

    1998-01-01

    Invasive exotic pest plants, diseases, and insects, have had a dramatic impact on the health and composition of the Eastern forests for many decades. Chestnut blight was discovered in the United States in 1904. Since then, it has virtually destroyed the chestnut population, which once occupied 25 percent of the eastern forest. In the 1860's, the gypsy moth was...

  5. Concurrent invaders--four exotic species of Monogenea now established on exotic freshwater fishes in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, A D; Ernst, I

    1998-11-01

    Four species of exotic monogeneans are reported from five species of exotic freshwater fish in Australia: Gytrodactylus bullatarudis from Poecilia reticulata and Xiphophorus helleri in Queensland; Gyrodactylus macracanthus from Misgurnus anguillicaudatus in the Australian Capital Territory; Dactylogyrus extensus from Cyprinus carpio in the Australian Capital Territory; and Dactylogyrus anchoratus from Carassius auratus in the Australian Capital Territory. This is the first published record of described species of monogeneans of the genus Dactylogyrus or Gyrodactylus from Australia and the first report of parasites of M. anguillicaudatus in Australia. The establishment of exotic monogenean populations on Australian native fishes via host-switching is considered less likely than for other parasitic groups due to the generally high host-specificity of monogeneans, combined with the phylogenetic dissimilarity of native and exotic fishes. Similar establishments have occurred elsewhere, however, and the risk of these events increases with each new fish species introduction.

  6. Exotic plant invasions in tropical forests: Patterns and hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Denslow; S.J. DeWalt

    2008-01-01

    In the tropics, exotic plants have been widely introduced for industrial timber, for land reclamation and forage crops, and as ornamentals. In spite of the apparent opportunity for naturalization and spread, invasive exotic plants are scarce in many continental tropical forests. We examine several conditions under which exotic species do pose substantial threats to...

  7. Exotic Forest Insect Pests and Their Impact on Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack

    2003-01-01

    More than 4500 exotic organisms are now established in the United States, of which over 400 are insects that feed on trees and shrubs. While most exotic insects cause little or no damage, a few have become serious pests and have greatly altered native forest ecosystems. Three of the most recently introduced exotic forest pests are the pine shoot beetle, the Asian...

  8. Bounds on charged lepton mixing with exotic charged leptons Ф

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EL. 0-. R = 0-. OR. 0-. ER. (2) in which subscripts 'O' and 'E' stand for ordinary and exotic leptons respectively. Here we classify all charged leptons as either ordinary or exotic according to their ... EL is a column vector of СL exotic fields. ..... universal reduction of the strength of the normal neutral current, due to mixing.

  9. A new tool for the search of nuclides with properties suitable for nuclear solid state physics based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagl, M.A., E-mail: matthias@nagl.eu [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Barbosa, M.B. [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Departamento de Física e Astronomia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); CERN-EP, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Vetter, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Correia, J.G. [CERN-EP, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); ITN, IST, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Professor Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Hofsäss, H.C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-10-21

    A software tool for the displaying of nuclear decay schemes, the calculation of angular γ emission anisotropies, and the automated search for appropriate decay cascade properties based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF) was created and published for free download. After a short introduction of this tool, candidate nuclides for time differential perturbed γ–γ angular correlation (TDPAC) measurements are presented. These candidates are grouped according to their parent nuclides’ half-life periods in groups for online, on-site, and off-site measurements. For all candidates angular correlation coefficients (also called anisotropy values) were computed and are shown alongside magnetic and quadrupole moments from the ENSDF database and other sources. An extension of the presented software for the search of nuclides for Mössbauer spectroscopy, Nuclear Resonant Scattering, and other methods is easily possible.

  10. A new tool for the search of nuclides with properties suitable for nuclear solid state physics based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, M. A.; Barbosa, M. B.; Vetter, U.; Correia, J. G.; Hofsäss, H. C.

    2013-10-01

    A software tool for the displaying of nuclear decay schemes, the calculation of angular γ emission anisotropies, and the automated search for appropriate decay cascade properties based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF) was created and published for free download. After a short introduction of this tool, candidate nuclides for time differential perturbed γ-γ angular correlation (TDPAC) measurements are presented. These candidates are grouped according to their parent nuclides’ half-life periods in groups for online, on-site, and off-site measurements. For all candidates angular correlation coefficients (also called anisotropy values) were computed and are shown alongside magnetic and quadrupole moments from the ENSDF database and other sources. An extension of the presented software for the search of nuclides for Mössbauer spectroscopy, Nuclear Resonant Scattering, and other methods is easily possible.

  11. A study of nuclear structure for 244Cm, 241Am, 238Pu, 210Po, 147Pm, 137Cs, 90Sr and 63Ni nuclei used in nuclear battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artun, Ozan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we intend to extend the nuclear data of 244Cm, 241Am, 238Pu, 210Po, 147Pm, 137Cs, 90Sr and 63Ni nuclei used in nuclear battery technology, because, these nuclei are quite important for space investigations in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) and for microelectronic technologies in betavoltaic batteries. Therefore, the nuclear structure properties of nuclei such as separation energies, neutron skin thicknesses, proton, charge and neutron density distributions as a function of radius, the root mean square (rms) proton, charge and neutron radii, binding energies per particle, have been investigated by Hartree-Fock with eight different Skyrme forces. The obtained results have been compared with the experimental data in literature and relativistic mean field theory (RMFT) results.

  12. Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to study the internal structure and measure weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornoza-Indart, A.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Outdoor stone heritage is prone to decay due to its direct exposure to weathering agents such us thermal shock caused by isolation processes, salt crystallization phenomena, atmospheric pollutants effects on stone surfaces, freezing and thawing cycles or biodeterioration o decay provoked by biogenic activity. These damages use to affect the surface of the objects or elements causing de-cohesions (flaking, spallings, grain disintegration), material loss or color changes, but also use to affect the internal structure of the objects, although they are not visible, causing internal pressures, fissures and fractures, mineral transformations or inner biodeterioration compromising objects conservation. For this reason, the study of the internal structure of the objects is necessary to establish its weathering and conservation state, to determine its restoration needs and achieve its conservation. Moreover, in cultural heritage where the originality of the objects and their historical or artistic values are so important the use of non-destructive techniques result necessary for their study without causing any damage by sampling. In this work X ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) are used to analyze rock samples (dolostones used in historical buildings from Central Spain and Madrid both in the city and in the province) subjected to different artificial accelerated ageing tests (thermal shock, salt crystallization, freezing and thawing cycles and marine aerosol) to simulate the most common outdoor heritage deterioration scenarios. The changes in the internal structure and pore system modifications are studied with these non-destructive techniques. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (both imaging and relaxometry) experiments were performed in stone specimens to observe and to quantify the location and distribution of water inside the objects, been able to analyze pore size and location. X ray Computed Tomography was used for visualizing and locating

  13. Synthesis of the Novel MAX Phases for the Future Nuclear Fuel Cladding and Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Hyeok [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taehee; Lee, Taegyu; Ryu, H. J. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    With these properties, the MAX phases are expected to be used for the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) cladding and oxidation/corrosion resistance materials. Especially, the MAX phase can be used for the Gen-IV, SFR and HTGR, component materials which have to possess the thermal and corrosion resistance. The zirconium has been used to the nuclear industry for fuel cladding because of the small thermal neutron cross-section. Zr-based MAX phase was discovered by group Lapauw et al. They observed the Zr{sub 2}AlC and Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and backscattered electron detector. Fabrication of the Zr-containing MAX phase was investigated for nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials applications. A MAX phase with the Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} structure was synthesized by spark plasma sintering of a powder mixture targeting (Zr{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 4}AlC{sub 3}. The formation of MAX phases was confirmed by XRD and EDS of sintered samples. In the future work, the electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are required to certain analyze the elements composition and formation of the MAX phase.

  14. Numerical analysis of nuclear power plant structure subjected to aircraft crash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Reza; Alinejad, Majid; Mahdavi, Mir Omid; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2017-12-01

    An aircraft crashing into a nuclear containment may induce a series of disasters related to containment capacity, including local penetration and perforation of the containment, intensive vibrations, and fire ignited after jet fuel leakage. In this study, structural safety of a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV) has been studied against the direct hit of Airbus A320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4 aircrafts. ABAQUS/explicit finite element code has been used to carry out the three-dimensional numerical simulations. The impact locations identified on the nuclear containment structure are mid height of containment, center of the cylindrical portion, junction of dome and cylinder, and over the cylindrical portion close to the foundation level. The loading of the aircraft has been assigned through the corresponding reaction-time response curve. The concrete damaged plasticity model was predicted to simulate the behavior of concrete while the behavior of steel reinforcement was incorporated using elastoplastic material model. Dynamic loading conditions were considered using dynamic increase factor. The mid height of containment and center of cylindrical portion have been found to experience most severe deformation against each aircraft crash. It has also been found that compression damage in concrete is not critical at none of the impact locations.

  15. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travelli, A.

    1985-10-25

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  16. Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

  17. Numerical analysis of nuclear power plant structure subjected to aircraft crash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Reza; Alinejad, Majid; Mahdavi, Mir Omid; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2017-10-01

    An aircraft crashing into a nuclear containment may induce a series of disasters related to containment capacity, including local penetration and perforation of the containment, intensive vibrations, and fire ignited after jet fuel leakage. In this study, structural safety of a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV) has been studied against the direct hit of Airbus A320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4 aircrafts. ABAQUS/explicit finite element code has been used to carry out the three-dimensional numerical simulations. The impact locations identified on the nuclear containment structure are mid height of containment, center of the cylindrical portion, junction of dome and cylinder, and over the cylindrical portion close to the foundation level. The loading of the aircraft has been assigned through the corresponding reaction-time response curve. The concrete damaged plasticity model was predicted to simulate the behavior of concrete while the behavior of steel reinforcement was incorporated using elastoplastic material model. Dynamic loading conditions were considered using dynamic increase factor. The mid height of containment and center of cylindrical portion have been found to experience most severe deformation against each aircraft crash. It has also been found that compression damage in concrete is not critical at none of the impact locations.

  18. Natively Unfolded FG Repeats Stabilize the Structure of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onischenko, Evgeny; Tang, Jeffrey H; Andersen, Kasper R; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Vallotton, Pascal; Derrer, Carina P; Kralt, Annemarie; Mugler, Christopher F; Chan, Leon Y; Schwartz, Thomas U; Weis, Karsten

    2017-11-02

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are ∼100 MDa transport channels assembled from multiple copies of ∼30 nucleoporins (Nups). One-third of these Nups contain phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-rich repeats, forming a diffusion barrier, which is selectively permeable for nuclear transport receptors that interact with these repeats. Here, we identify an additional function of FG repeats in the structure and biogenesis of the yeast NPC. We demonstrate that GLFG-containing FG repeats directly bind to multiple scaffold Nups in vitro and act as NPC-targeting determinants in vivo. Furthermore, we show that the GLFG repeats of Nup116 function in a redundant manner with Nup188, a nonessential scaffold Nup, to stabilize critical interactions within the NPC scaffold needed for late steps of NPC assembly. Our results reveal a previously unanticipated structural role for natively unfolded GLFG repeats as Velcro to link NPC subcomplexes and thus add a new layer of connections to current models of the NPC architecture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The multi-layered structure of Dps with a novel di-nuclear ferroxidase center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bin; Tibbelin, Gudrun; Kajino, Tsutomu; Asami, Osamu; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2003-06-06

    The crystallization of cellular components represents a unique survival strategy for bacterial cells under stressed conditions. A highly ordered, layered structure is often formed in such a process, which may involve one or more than one type of bio-macromolecules. The main advantage of biocrystallization has been attributed to the fact that it is a physical process and thus is independent of energy consumption. Dps is a protein that crystallizes to form a multi-layered structure in starved cells in order to protect DNA against oxidative damage and other detrimental factors. The multi-layered crystal structure of a Dps protein from Bacillus brevis has been revealed for the first time at atomic resolution in the absence of DNA. Inspection of the structure provides the first direct evidence for the existence of a di-nuclear ferroxidase center, which possesses unique features among all the di-iron proteins identified so far. It constitutes the structural basis for the ferroxidase activity of Dps in the crystalline state as well as in solution. This finding proves that the enzymatic process of detoxification of metal ions, which may cause severe oxidative damage to DNA, is the other important aspect of the defense mechanism performed by Dps. In the multi-layered structure, Dps dodecamers are organized in a highly ordered manner. They adopt the classic form of hexagonal packing in each layer of the structure. Such arrangement results in reinforced structural features that would facilitate the attraction and absorption of metal ions from the environment. The highly ordered layered structure may provide an ideal basis for the accommodation of DNA between the layers so that it can be isolated and protected from harmful factors under stress conditions.

  20. Development of an automated fracture assessment system for nuclear structures (appendix 1/1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Timo P. J.; Raiko, Heikki

    1992-10-01

    A program system for fracture assessment of nuclear power plant structures was developed. The system consists of a program for engineering analysis and an automated finite element program system for accurate analysis with solid three dimensional models. The VTTSIF (Technical Research Center of Finland Stress Intensity Factor) program for engineering fracture assessment applies either the weight function method or superposition method in calculating the stress intensity factor. The fatigue crack growth analysis is based on the Paris equation. The generation of a three dimensional finite element model of a cracked structure is automated by the ACR (automatic finite element model generation for part through cracks) program. The finite element analyses are created with commercial programs. The virtual crack extension method is used for fracture parameter evaluation by the VTTVIRT postprocessor program (program for J-integral evaluation using virtual crack extension method). The test cases demonstrated that the accuracy of the system is satisfactory.

  1. Understanding the genetic structure of Symplocos laurina Wall. populations using nuclear gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Sofia; Bhagwat, R M; Kadoo, N Y; Lagu, M D; Gupta, V S

    2010-02-01

    To characterize the genetic diversity of present populations of Symplocos laurina, which grow in the montane forests in India, we analyzed the DNA sequences of a nuclear gene. Using the 881 bp sequence of cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, we detected 24 haplotypes among 195 individuals sampled from 14 populations. Two dominant haplotypes were distributed over the entire range of this species in India and several private haplotypes were found. Low genetic diversity within population, high differentiation, number of population specific haplotypes and deviation from neutral evolution characterized the present populations of S. laurina. An analysis of molecular variance indicated the presence of geographic structure within the haplotype distribution. The occurrence of S. laurina preglaciation in India is the most parsimonious explanation for the current geographic structure observed. The populations are presumably ancient and might have spread across its extant distribution range in India through a recent range expansion event.

  2. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G. (LNLS)

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  3. Crystal structure of the shrimp proliferating cell nuclear antigen: structural complementarity with WSSV DNA polymerase PIP-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Miranda, Jesus S; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Brieba, Luis G; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA). This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein). The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems.

  4. Crystal structure of the shrimp proliferating cell nuclear antigen: structural complementarity with WSSV DNA polymerase PIP-box.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus S Carrasco-Miranda

    Full Text Available DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA. This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein. The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems.

  5. Potentiality of Using Vertical and Three-Dimensional Isolation Systems in Nuclear Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP, with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary.

  6. Nuclear structure with unitarily transformed two-body plus phenomenological three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anneke

    2011-02-02

    The importance of three-nucleon forces for a variety of nuclear structure phenomena is apparent in various investigations. This thesis provides a first step towards the inclusion of realistic three-nucleon forces by studying simple phenomenological threebody interactions. The Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) and the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) provide two different approaches to derive soft phase-shift equivalent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions via unitary transformations. Although their motivations are quite different the NN interactions obtained with the two methods exhibit some similarities. The application of the UCOM- or SRG-transformed Argonne V18 potential in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation and including the second-order energy corrections emerging from many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) reveals that the systematics of experimental ground-state energies can be reproduced by some of the interactions considering a series of closed-shell nuclei across the whole nuclear chart. However, charge radii are systematically underestimated, especially for intermediate and heavy nuclei. This discrepancy to experimental data is expected to result from neglected three-nucleon interactions. As first ansatz for a three-nucleon force, we consider a finite-range three-body interaction of Gaussian shape. Its influence on ground-state energies and charge radii is discussed in detail on the basis of HF plus MBPT calculations and shows a significant improvement in the description of experimental data. As the handling of the Gaussian three-body interaction is time-extensive, we show that it can be replaced by a regularized three-body contact interaction exhibiting a very similar behavior. An extensive study characterizes its properties in detail and confirms the improvements with respect to nuclear properties. To take into account information of an exact numerical solution of the nuclear eigenvalue problem, the No-Core Shell Model is applied to

  7. Inflation and Topological Phase Transition Driven by Exotic Smoothness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Asselmeyer-Maluga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We will discuss a model which describes the cause of inflation by a topological transition. The guiding principle is the choice of an exotic smoothness structure for the space-time. Here we consider a space-time with topology S3×ℝ. In case of an exotic S3×ℝ, there is a change in the spatial topology from a 3-sphere to a homology 3-sphere which can carry a hyperbolic structure. From the physical point of view, we will discuss the path integral for the Einstein-Hilbert action with respect to a decomposition of the space-time. The inclusion of the boundary terms produces fermionic contributions to the partition function. The expectation value of an area (with respect to some surface shows an exponential increase; that is, we obtain inflationary behavior. We will calculate the amount of this increase to be a topological invariant. Then we will describe this transition by an effective model, the Starobinski or R2 model which is consistent with the current measurement of the Planck satellite. The spectral index and other observables are also calculated.

  8. Structures of peptide families by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.

    1989-12-01

    The three dimensional structures of several small peptides were determined using a combination of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and distance geometry calculations. These techniques were found to be particularly helpful for analyzing structural differences between related peptides since all of the peptides' {sup 1}H NMR spectra are very similar. The structures of peptides from two separate classes are presented. Peptides in the first class are related to apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide toxin from honey bee venom. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments and secondary structure determination of apamin were done previously. Quantitative NMR measurements and distance geometry calculations were done to calculate apamin's three dimensional structure. Peptides in the second class are 48 amino acid toxins from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin II were done previously. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin III and the distance geometry calculations for both peptides are presented.

  9. FUSTIPEN—the France-U.S. Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papenbrock, Thomas [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-03-22

    FUSTIPEN, the France-U.S. Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei, was an international venue for theoretical research on the physics of nuclei during an era of particularly active experimental investigations of rare isotopes, see http://fustipen.ganil.fr/. It was dedicated to collaborative research between U.S.-based and French nuclear physicists, drawing on the complementary expertise in the two countries. The grant provided travel and local support for visits by U.S. nuclear physicists to GANIL, where the FUSTIPEN offices are located, and also supported collateral travel to other French research institutions.

  10. Nuclei far from stability using exotic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmy, J B; Brown, R E; Flynn, E R; Thomas, K E; Van der Plicht, J

    1981-01-01

    The meson factories have made possible high fluence medium energy proton beams that can be used for spallation reactions to produce macro quantities of unstable isotopes. Targets of over 10 g/cm/sup 2/ can be exposed to total fluence approaching 1 A-hour resulting in spallation yields in the 0.01-10 mg range for many isotopes of potential interest for nuclear structure studies. With the use of hot cell facilities, chemical processing can isolate the desired material and this coupled with subsequent isotope separation can result in usable quantities of material for nuclear target application. With offstable isotopes as target materials, conventional nuclear spectroscopy techniques can be employed to study nuclei far from stability. The irradiation and processing requirements for such an operation, along with the isotope production possibilities, are discussed. Also presented are initial experiments using a /sup 148/Gd (t/sub 1/2/=75a) target to perform the (p, t) reaction to establish levels in the proposed do...

  11. Statistical model of exotic rotational correlations in emergent space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig; Kwon, Ohkyung; Richardson, Jonathan

    2017-06-06

    A statistical model is formulated to compute exotic rotational correlations that arise as inertial frames and causal structure emerge on large scales from entangled Planck scale quantum systems. Noncommutative quantum dynamics are represented by random transverse displacements that respect causal symmetry. Entanglement is represented by covariance of these displacements in Planck scale intervals defined by future null cones of events on an observer's world line. Light that propagates in a nonradial direction inherits a projected component of the exotic rotational correlation that accumulates as a random walk in phase. A calculation of the projection and accumulation leads to exact predictions for statistical properties of exotic Planck scale correlations in an interferometer of any configuration. The cross-covariance for two nearly co-located interferometers is shown to depart only slightly from the autocovariance. Specific examples are computed for configurations that approximate realistic experiments, and show that the model can be rigorously tested.

  12. New results on the search for spin-exotic mesons with COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nerling, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The COMPASS fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS studies the structure and spectrum of hadrons. One important goal using hadron beams is the search for new states, in particlular spin-exotic mesons and glueballs. As a first input to the puzzle, COMPASS observed a significant $J^{PC}$ spin-exotic signal in the 2004 pilot run data (190\\,GeV/$c$ $\\pi^{-}$ beam, Pb target) in three charged pion final states consistent with the disputed $\\pi_1(1600)$. We started our hadron spectroscopy programme in 2008 by collecting very high statistics using a 190 GeV/$c$ negative pion beam scattered off a liquid hydrogen (proton) target. The current status and new results from the 2008 data on the search for the $\\pi_1(1600)$ resonance with exotic $J^{PC}=1^{-+}$ quantum numbers obtained from partial-wave analyses of the $\\rho\\pi$ and $\\eta'\\pi$ decay channels are presented.

  13. A Neutron Diffraction Study of the Nuclear and Magnetic Structure of MnNb2O6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Oliver Vindex; Lebech, Bente; Krebs Larsen, F.

    1976-01-01

    A neutron diffraction study was made of the nuclear and the magnetic structure of MnNb2O6 single crystals. The thirteen nuclear parameters (space group Pbcn) were determined from 304 reflections at room temperature. The antiferromagnetic structure (Neel temperature=4.4K), determined at 1.2K......, is a superposition of G- and A-type structures of the form 0.90 Gx+0.34 Gy+0.28 Az. The corresponding magnetic space group is P2'1/c....

  14. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world's first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density ...

  15. Structural determination of importin alpha in complex with beak and feather disease virus capsid nuclear localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Edward I. [Charles Sturt University, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Dombrovski, Andrew K. [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Swarbrick, Crystall M.D. [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Raidal, Shane R. [Charles Sturt University, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Forwood, Jade K., E-mail: jforwood@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Circovirus capsid proteins contain large nuclear localization signals (NLS). •A method of nuclear import has not been elucidated. •Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid NLS was crystallized with importin α. •The structure showed BFDV NLS binding to the major site of importin α. •Result shows implications for mechanism of nuclear transport for all circoviruses. -- Abstract: Circoviruses represent a rapidly increasing genus of viruses that infect a variety of vertebrates. Replication requires shuttling viral molecules into the host cell nucleus, a process facilitated by capsid-associated protein (Cap). Whilst a nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been shown to mediate nuclear translocation, the mode of nuclear transport remains to be elucidated. To better understand this process, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) Cap NLS was crystallized with nuclear import receptor importin-α (Impα). Diffraction yielded structural data to 2.9 Å resolution, and the binding site on both Impα and BFDV Cap NLS were well resolved. The binding mechanism for the major site is likely conserved across circoviruses as supported by the similarity of NLSs in circovirus Caps. This finding illuminates a crucial step for infection of host cells by this viral family, and provides a platform for rational drug design against the binding interface.

  16. Genetic structure of Populus hybrid zone along the Irtysh River provides insight into plastid-nuclear incompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Duan, Ai-Guo; Abuduhamiti, Bawerjan

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the maintenance of species integrity despite hybridization has often been explained by the co-adaption of nuclear gene complexes. However, the interaction between plastid and nuclear sub-genomes has been underestimated. Here, we analyzed the genetic structure of a Populus alba and P. tremula hybrid zone along the Irtysh River system in the Altai region, northwest China, using both nuclear microsatellites and plastid DNA sequences. We found high interspecific differentiation, although the hybrid P. × canescens was prevalent. Bayesian inference classified most hybrids into F1, followed by a few back-crosses to P. alba, and fewer F2 hybrids and back-crosses to P. tremula, indicating a few introgressions but preference toward P. alba. When plastid haplotypes in parental species were distinct, P. × canescens carried the haplotypes of both parents, but showed significant linkage between intraspecific haplotype and nuclear genotypes at several microsatellite loci. Selection, rather than migration and assortative mating, might have contributed to such plastid-nuclear disequilibria. By removing later-generated hybrids carrying interspecific combinations of haplotype and nuclear genotypes, plastid-nuclear incompatibility has greatly limited the gene exchange between P. alba and P. tremula via backcrossing with hybrids, demonstrating a significant association between plastid haplotype and the proportion of nuclear admixture. PMID:27306416

  17. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  18. Mutations causing Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly uncouple enzymatic from structural functions of a nuclear membrane protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton, P; Fischer, B; Mann, A.; Mansour, S.; Rossier, E; Van der Veen, M.; C. Lang; Baasanjav, S.; Kieslich, M.; Brossuleit, K.; Gravemann, S; Schnipper, N.; Karbasyian, M.; Demuth, I.; Zwerger, M.

    2010-01-01

    The lamin B receptor (LBR) is an inner nuclear membrane protein with a structural function interacting with chromatin and lamins, and an enzymatic function as a sterol reductase. Heterozygous LBR mutations cause nuclear hyposegmentation in neutrophils (Pelger anomaly), while homozygous mutations cause prenatal death with skeletal defects and abnormal sterol metabolism (Greenberg dysplasia). It has remained unclear whether the lethality in Greenberg dysplasia is due to cholesterol defects or a...

  19. A NEW METHOD FOR EXTRACTING SPIN-DEPENDENT NEUTRON STRUCTURE FUNCTIONS FROM NUCLEAR DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Y.F.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2009-01-01

    High-energy electrons are currently the best probes of the internal structure of nucleons (protons and neutrons). By collecting data on electrons scattering off light nuclei, such as deuterium and helium, one can extract structure functions (SFs), which encode information about the quarks that make up the nucleon. Spin-dependent SFs, which depend on the relative polarization of the electron beam and the target nucleus, encode quark spins. Proton SFs can be measured directly from electron-proton scattering, but those of the neutron must be extracted from proton data and deuterium or helium-3 data because free neutron targets do not exist. At present, there is no reliable method for accurately determining spin-dependent neutron SFs in the low-momentum-transfer regime, where nucleon resonances are prominent and the functions are not smooth. The focus of this study was to develop a new method for extracting spin-dependent neutron SFs from nuclear data. An approximate convolution formula for nuclear SFs reduces the problem to an integral equation, for which a recursive solution method was designed. The method was then applied to recent data from proton and deuterium scattering experiments to perform a preliminary extraction of spin-dependent neutron SFs in the resonance region. The extraction method was found to reliably converge for arbitrary test functions, and the validity of the extraction from data was verifi ed using a Bjorken integral, which relates integrals of SFs to a known quantity. This new information on neutron structure could be used to assess quark-hadron duality for the neutron, which requires detailed knowledge of SFs in all kinematic regimes.

  20. Exotic annual Bromus invasions: Comparisons among species and ecoregions in the western United States [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew L. Brooks; Cynthia S. Brown; Jeanne C. Chambers; Carla M. D' Antonio; Jon E. Keeley; Jayne Belnap

    2016-01-01

    Exotic annual Bromus species are widely recognized for their potential to invade, dominate, and alter the structure and function of ecosystems. In this chapter, we summarize the invasion potential, ecosystem threats, and management strategies for different Bromus species within each of five ecoregions of the western United States. We characterize invasion...

  1. Comparison of leaf decomposition and macroinvertebrate colonization between exotic and native trees in a freshwater ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, A.; Gonzalez-Munoz, N.; Castro-Diez, P.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important sources of energy in aquatic ecosystems is the allochthonous input of detritus. Replacement of native tree species by exotic ones affects the quality of detritus entering freshwater ecosystems. This replacement can alter nutrient cycles and community structure in aquatic

  2. The nuclear activity and central structure of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5322

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Knapen, Johan H.; Williams, David R. A.; Beswick, Robert J.; Bendo, George; Baldi, Ranieri D.; Argo, Megan; McHardy, Ian M.; Muxlow, Tom; Westcott, J.

    2018-01-01

    We have analysed a new high-resolution e-MERLIN 1.5 GHz radio continuum map together with HST and SDSS imaging of NGC 5322, an elliptical galaxy hosting radio jets, aiming to understand the galaxy's central structure and its connection to the nuclear activity. We decomposed the composite HST + SDSS surface brightness profile of the galaxy into an inner stellar disc, a spheroid, and an outer stellar halo. Past works showed that this embedded disc counter-rotates rapidly with respect to the spheroid. The HST images reveal an edge-on nuclear dust disc across the centre, aligned along the major-axis of the galaxy and nearly perpendicular to the radio jets. After careful masking of this dust disc, we find a central stellar mass deficit Mdef in the spheroid, scoured by SMBH binaries with final mass MBH such that Mdef/MBH ˜ 1.3 - 3.4. We propose a three-phase formation scenario for NGC 5322 where a few (2 - 7) `dry' major mergers involving SMBHs built the spheroid with a depleted core. The cannibalism of a gas-rich satellite subsequently creates the faint counter-rotating disc and funnels gaseous material directly onto the AGN, powering the radio core with a brightness temperature of TB, core ˜ 4.5 × 107 K and the low-power radio jets (Pjets ˜ 7.04 × 1020 W Hz-1) which extend ˜1.6 kpc. The outer halo can later grow via minor mergers and the accretion of tidal debris. The low-luminosity AGN/jet-driven feedback may have quenched the late-time nuclear star formation promptly, which could otherwise have replenished the depleted core.

  3. RATU2. The Finnish research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants. Interim report 1995 - April 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solin, J.; Sarkimo, M.; Asikainen, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity] [eds.

    1997-06-01

    The projects within the Finnish public funded research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants (RATU2) are briefly introduced and the scientific and technical results obtained during the first two years, 1995-April 1997, are summarised in this report. The RATU2 programme was started in 1995 and will be continued until 1998. In 1996 this programme represented 6 % of the nuclear energy R and D in Finland. The research programme is mainly publicly funded and supplies impartial expertise for the regulation of nuclear energy. It also plays an important role in the education of new experts, technology transfer and international exchange of scientific results. The programme is organised into five research projects on the following topics: Material degradation in the reactor environment, Reliability of nondestructive inspections of nuclear power plants, Structural analyses for nuclear power plant components, Maintenance strategies and dependability, and Fire safety. The ageing of the structures and components in the Finnish nuclear power plants is one of the main issues to be considered when safety and economic operation of the plants is evaluated. At the same time, ways are being sought to extend the lifetime of components. The first half of the RATU2 research programme has already brought significant scientific findings and useful applications for ensuring the reliability of NPP components. New technology has been transferred to domestic use through active participation to international co-operation. On the other hand, international acceptance of the results has provided valuable feedback and benchmarking. (orig.). 112 refs.

  4. Crystal structure of an archaeal DNA sliding clamp: proliferating cell nuclear antigen from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, S; Ishino, Y; Morikawa, K

    2001-01-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is now recognized as one of the key proteins in DNA metabolic events because of its direct interactions with many proteins involved in important cellular processes. We have determined the crystal structure of PCNA from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (pfuPCNA), at 2.1 A resolution. pfuPCNA forms a toroidal, ring-shaped structure consisting of homotrimeric molecules, which is also observed in the PCNA crystals from human and yeast. The overall structure of pfuPCNA is highly conserved with other PCNA proteins, as well as with the bacterial ss clamp and the bacteriophage gp45. This result shows that the three-dimensional structure of the sliding clamp is conserved in the three domains of life. pfuPCNA has two remarkable features compared with the human and yeast PCNA molecules: it has more ion pairs and fewer intermolecular main chain hydrogen bonds. The former may contribute to the thermal stability of pfuPCNA, and the latter may be the cause of the stimulatory effect of pfuPCNA on the DNA synthesizing activity of P. furiosus DNA polymerases in the absence of the clamp loader replication factor C in vitro.

  5. Jacking mechanism for upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, James E.; Wineman, Arthur L.

    1984-01-01

    A jacking mechanism for raising the upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor which jacking mechanism uses a system of gears and drive shafts to transmit force from a single motor to four mechanically synchronized ball jacks to raise and lower support columns which support the upper internals structure. The support columns have a pin structure which rides up and down in a slot in a housing fixed to the reactor head. The pin has two locking plates which can be rotated around the pin to bring bolt holes through the locking plates into alignment with a set of bolt holes in the housing, there being a set of such housing bolt holes corresponding to both a raised and a lowered position of the support column. When the locking plate is so aligned, a surface of the locking plate mates with a surface in the housing such that the support column is then supported by the locking plate and not by the ball jacks. Since the locking plates are to be installed and bolted to the housing during periods of reactor operation, the ball jacks need not be sized to react the large forces which occur or potentially could occur on the upper internals structure of the reactor during operation. The locking plates react these loads. The ball jacks, used only during refueling, can be smaller, which enable conventionally available equipment to fulfill the precision requirements for the task within available space.

  6. Nuclear receptor engineering based on novel structure activity relationships revealed by farnesyl pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyanka, Ritu; Das, Sharmistha; Samuels, Herbert H; Cardozo, Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) comprise the second largest protein family targeted by currently available drugs, acting via specific ligand interactions within the ligand binding domain (LBD). Recently, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) was shown to be a unique promiscuous NR ligand, activating a subset of NR family members and inhibiting wound healing in skin. The current study aimed at visualizing the unique basis of FPP interaction with multiple receptors in order to identify general structure-activity relationships that operate across the NR family. Docking of FPP to the 3D structures of the LBDs of a diverse set of NRs consistently revealed an electrostatic FPP pyrophosphate contact with an NR arginine conserved in the NR family, a hydrophobic farnesyl contact with NR helix-12 and a ligand binding pocket volume between 300 and 430 Å(3) as the minimal requirements for FPP activation of any NR. Lack of any of these structural features appears to render a given NR resistant to FPP activation. We used these structure-activity relationships to rationally design and successfully engineer several mutant human estrogen receptors that retain responsiveness to estradiol but no longer respond to FPP.

  7. Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.; Pedersen, D.R.; Baker, L. Jr.

    The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and can be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed of sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

  8. Deciphering the Structure and Function of Nuclear Pores Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Siegfried M; Grünwald, David

    2016-05-22

    Due to its central role in macromolecular trafficking and nucleocytoplasmic information transfer, the nuclear pore complex (NPC) has been studied in great detail using a wide spectrum of methods. Consequently, many aspects of its architecture, general function, and role in the life cycle of a cell are well understood. Over the last decade, fluorescence microscopy methods have enabled the real-time visualization of single molecules interacting with and transiting through the NPC, allowing novel questions to be examined with nanometer precision. While initial single-molecule studies focused primarily on import pathways using permeabilized cells, it has recently proven feasible to investigate the export of mRNAs in living cells. Single-molecule assays can address questions that are difficult or impossible to answer by other means, yet the complexity of nucleocytoplasmic transport requires that interpretation be based on a firm genetic, biochemical, and structural foundation. Moreover, conceptually simple single-molecule experiments remain technically challenging, particularly with regard to signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio, and the analysis of noise, stochasticity, and precision. We discuss nuclear transport issues recently addressed by single-molecule microscopy, evaluate the limits of existing assays and data, and identify open questions for future studies. We expect that single-molecule fluorescence approaches will continue to be applied to outstanding nucleocytoplasmic transport questions, and that the approaches developed for NPC studies are extendable to additional complex systems and pathways within cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Di-nucleon structures in homogeneous nuclear matter based on two- and three-nucleon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, Hugo F. [University of Chile, Department of Physics - FCFM, Santiago (Chile); CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Isaule, Felipe [University of Chile, Department of Physics - FCFM, Santiago (Chile); Rios, Arnau [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    We investigate homogeneous nuclear matter within the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) approach in the limits of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) as well as pure neutron matter at zero temperature. The study is based on realistic representations of the internucleon interaction as given by Argonne v{sub 18}, Paris, Nijmegen I and II potentials, in addition to chiral N{sup 3}LO interactions, including three-nucleon forces up to N{sup 2}LO. Particular attention is paid to the presence of di-nucleon bound states structures in {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}SD{sub 1} channels, whose explicit account becomes crucial for the stability of self-consistent solutions at low densities. A characterization of these solutions and associated bound states is discussed. We confirm that coexisting BHF single-particle solutions in SNM, at Fermi momenta in the range 0.13-0.3 fm{sup -1}, is a robust feature under the choice of realistic internucleon potentials. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear structure investigations of 84Sr and 86Sr using γ-ray spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckwitz, H.; Petkov, P.; Thomas, T.; Ahn, T.; Blazhev, A.; Cooper, N.; Fransen, C.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Jolie, J.; Werner, V.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the low-spin structure of 84Sr and 86Sr, two fusion-evaporation experiments using the (p,2n) reaction have been performed. The data have been evaluated in terms of γ-ray spectroscopy, i.e. the level scheme was built up, branching intensities were determined, nuclear state spin and parity assignments were made after γγ angular correlation analyses. The previously known level scheme information was extended. In addition, lifetimes were determined by means of the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM). In 86Sr, a new method for lifetime determinations, the Spectral Difference Method (SDM), was applied for the first time. In cases where all necessary input variables were known, reduced transition strengths were calculated with Monte Carlo simulated probability density functions. It is stressed that linear error propagation for the calculated errors of reduced transition strengths is not universally applicable. As both nuclei lie in the vicinity of the N=50 neutron shell closure and on a possible proton subshell closure of the 2p3/2 orbital at Z=38, Nuclear Shell Model calculations for 84Sr, 86Sr, and 88Sr have been performed in the truncated (2p3/2, 1f5/2, 2p1/2, 1g9/2) model space for protons and neutrons with the empirical JUN45 residual interaction. The comparison between experimental results and theoretical predictions show a large degree of consistency.

  11. Superallowed Beta Decay Studies at TRIUMF --- Nuclear Structure and Fundamental Symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganjar, E. F.; Achtzehn, T.; Albers, D.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A. N.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Behr, J. A.; Biosvert, G. C.; Bricault, P.; Bishop, S.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D.; Cunningham, E.; D'Auria, J. M.; Dombsky, M.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hanemaayer, V.; Hardy, J. C.; Hodgson, D. F.; Hyland, B.; Iacob, V.; Klages, P.; Koopmans, K. A.; Kulp, W. D.; Lassen, J.; Lavoie, J. P.; Leslie, J. R.; Linder, T.; MacDonald, J. A.; Mak, H.-B.; Melconian, D.; Morton, A. C.; Ormand, W. E.; Osborne, C. J.; Pearson, C. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Phillips, A. A.; Piechaczek, A.; Ressler, J.; Sarazin, F.; Savard, G.; Schumaker, M. A.; Scraggs, H. C.; Svensson, C. E.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Towner, I. S.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Wendt, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2007-04-01

    Precision measurement of the beta -decay half-life, Q-value, and branching ratio between nuclear analog states of Jpi = 0+ and T=1 can provide critical and fundamental tests of the Standard Model's description of electroweak interactions. A program has been initiated at TRIUMF-ISAC to measure the ft values of these superallowed beta transitions. Two Tz = 0, A > 60 cases, 74Rb and 62Ga, are presented. These are particularly relevant because they can provide critical tests of the calculated nuclear structure and isospin-symmetry breaking corrections that are predicted to be larger for heavier nuclei, and because they demonstrate the advance in the experimental precision on ft at TRIUMF-ISAC from 0.26% for 74Rb in 2002 to 0.05% for 62Ga in 2006. The high precision world data on experimental ft and corrected Ft values are discussed and shown to be consistent with CVC at the 10-4 level, yielding an average Ft = 3073.70(74) s. This Ft leads to Vud = 0.9737(4) for the up-down element of the Standard Model's CKM matrix. With this value and the Particle Data Group's 2006 values for Vus and Vub, the unitarity condition for the CKM matrix is met. Additional measurements and calculations are needed, however, to reduce the uncertainties in that evaluation. That objective is the focus of the continuing program on superallowed-beta decay at TRIUMF-ISAC.

  12. Kulit ikan kakap tersamak: Exotic dan prospektif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Kasmudjiastuti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kakap fish skins are waste products of fillet industry. Up to now they have been wasted, of course accumulatively will cause environmental pollution. They are classified as the type of non conventional leather and exotic ones for the reasons of having special, beautiful, unique, typical, and attractive grain. Kakap fish skin have relatively small dimentions, there fore the tanning process can be done by home industry because simple equipments are possible to be used to process the fish skins into leather. In addition, Kakap fish leather have physical property of good tensile strength that may be used as material for leather goods. Although small however the exotic leather of kakap fish skins are prospective to be developed as material to manufacture exclusive leather goods, especially for niche markets. They also can be used as an alternative to substitute conventional leather.

  13. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as "wormholes" and "warp drives". However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg-Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions isinvestigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energyfluctuations, cosmological scalar (i.e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  14. Search for exotic phenomena at the CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazana Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signs of physics beyond the Standard Model are widely searched for in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. We review results of exotic physics searches based on 20 fb−1 of data collected in 2012 by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. Selected benchmark analyses are presented, including searches in topologies with leptons, photons and jets, as well as a description of techniques to identify the production of exotic objects such as massive long-lived charged particles. No statistically-significant excess of events is observed in the data, therefore results are presented in terms of exclusion limits on the mass and the production cross section of hypothetical particles.

  15. Learning Nuclear Science with Marbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constan, Zach

    2010-01-01

    Nuclei are "small": if an atom was the size of a football field, the nucleus would be an apple sitting on the 50-yd line. At the same time, nuclei are "dense": the Earth, compressed to nuclear density, could fit inside four Sears Towers. The subatomic level is strange and exotic. For that reason, it's not hard to get young minds excited about…

  16. Toward Predictive Theories of Nuclear Reactions Across the Isotopic Chart: Web Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blackmon, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Elster, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Launey, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scielzo, N. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-12

    Recent years have seen exciting new developments and progress in nuclear structure theory, reaction theory, and experimental techniques, that allow us to move towards a description of exotic systems and environments, setting the stage for new discoveries. The purpose of the 5-week program was to bring together physicists from the low-energy nuclear structure and reaction communities to identify avenues for achieving reliable and predictive descriptions of reactions involving nuclei across the isotopic chart. The 4-day embedded workshop focused on connecting theory developments to experimental advances and data needs for astrophysics and other applications. Nuclear theory must address phenomena from laboratory experiments to stellar environments, from stable nuclei to weakly-bound and exotic isotopes. Expanding the reach of theory to these regimes requires a comprehensive understanding of the reaction mechanisms involved as well as detailed knowledge of nuclear structure. A recurring theme throughout the program was the desire to produce reliable predictions rooted in either ab initio or microscopic approaches. At the same time it was recognized that some applications involving heavy nuclei away from stability, e.g. those involving fi ssion fragments, may need to rely on simple parameterizations of incomplete data for the foreseeable future. The goal here, however, is to subsequently improve and refine the descriptions, moving to phenomenological, then microscopic approaches. There was overarching consensus that future work should also focus on reliable estimates of errors in theoretical descriptions.

  17. Remarks on the exotic U-meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan Hongmo [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom); Tsou Sheungtsun [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Mathematical Inst.

    1991-12-01

    In expectation of imminent results from the new hyperon beam experiment at CERN concerning the exotic U-meson at 3.1 GeV, we propose a detailed program of experimental tests to check the suggestion that U is a qqq-barq-bar ``M-diquonium`` state. Apart from some very characteristic decay modes, the U is expected to occur together with several analogous states with various quantum numbers to which it is intimately related. (author).

  18. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  19. Exotic rotational correlations in quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig

    2017-05-01

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  20. Unexpected high-energy γ emission from decaying exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gottardo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The N=52 Ga83 β decay was studied at ALTO. The radioactive 83Ga beam was produced through the ISOL photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ-ray emission following β decay. While β-delayed neutron emission has been measured to be 56–85% of the decay path, in this experiment an unexpected high-energy 5–9 MeV γ-ray yield of 16(4% was observed, coming from states several MeVs above the neutron separation threshold. This result is compared with cutting-edge QRPA calculations, which show that when neutrons deeply bound in the core of the nucleus decay into protons via a Gamow–Teller transition, they give rise to a dipolar oscillation of nuclear matter in the nucleus. This leads to large electromagnetic transition probabilities which can compete with neutron emission, thus affecting the β-decay path. This process is enhanced by an excess of neutrons on the nuclear surface and may thus be a common feature for very neutron-rich isotopes, challenging the present understanding of decay properties of exotic nuclei.

  1. Commissioned article: management of exotic snakebites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, D A

    2009-09-01

    Exotic (foreign or non-native) snakes, including venomous species, are becoming increasingly popular pets in Western countries. Some of them are kept illegally (as defined by the UK Dangerous Wild Animals Act of 1976). There is a large international market for such animals, with contraventions of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). In the UK, several other European countries and the USA the reported numbers of bites by venomous exotic snakes, although small, are increasing but still underestimate the occurrence of these occasionally fatal events because of the victims' reluctance to seek medical care. Victims are predominantly young men who have been drinking alcohol. Bites may be intentionally provoked. In Europe, the species most often involved are cobras, green mambas, American pit vipers particularly rattlesnakes, African adders, vipers and Asian green pit vipers. To illustrate the special problems involved, case histories are presented of bites by exotic species in the UK and of bites abroad, where patients were repatriated for treatment. In view of the relative rarity and diversity of these cases, expert advice must usually be sought. These requests should include information about the species thought to have been responsible and the history and timing of the evolution of envenoming. Sources of advice and antivenom are discussed together with recommendations for appropriate first aid and emergency treatment while this is being awaited. Respiratory and cardiovascular resuscitation may be required and when systemic or severe local envenoming develops, specific (equine or ovine) antivenom is indicated.

  2. Overview of activities in the U.S. related to continued service of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naus D.J.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described and commentary on continued service assessments of these structures is provided. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The license renewal process in the U.S. is outlined and its current status noted. A summary of operating experience related to U.S. nuclear power plant concrete structures is presented. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of NPP concrete structures. Finally current ORNL activities related to aging-management of concrete structures are outlined: development of operating experience database, application of structural reliability theory, and compilation of elevated temperature concrete material property data and information.

  3. Study of the elastic scattering and of the (p,n) charge exchange reaction with neutron-rich light exotic beams; Etude de la diffusion elastique et de la reaction d`echange de charge (p,n) avec des faisceaux exotiques legers riches en neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D.

    1996-07-05

    We have measured at GANIL, with the high resolution spectrometer SPEG, the elastic scattering of several neutron rich secondary beams ({sup 6}He, {sup 10}Be and {sup 11}Be) on a polypropylene target and the charge exchange reaction p({sup 6}He, {sup 6}Li)n. These exotic beams were produced by nuclear fragmentation and re-focalized with the SISSI device (superconducting solenoids). The signature of a halo structure in these nuclei has been analysed. Special attention has been paid to several aspects of the associated calculations namely, the proton and neutron density distributions and the small binding energy for the last nucleons in these exotic nuclei. Break-up mechanisms are seen to play an important role in these nuclei. 100 refs.

  4. Stability of Complex Biomolecular Structures: Vander Waals, Hydrogen Bond Cooperativity, and Nuclear Quantum Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Mariana; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Biomolecules are complex systems stabilized by a delicate balance of weak interactions, making it important to assess all energetic contributions in an accurate manner. However, it is a priori unclear which contributions make more of an impact. Here, we examine stacked polyglutamine (polyQ) strands, a peptide repeat often found in amyloid aggregates. We investigate the role of hydrogen bond (HB) cooperativity, van der Waals (vdW) dispersion interactions, and quantum contributions to free energies, including anharmonicities through density functional theory and ab initio path integral simulations. Of these various factors, we find that the largest impact on structural stabilization comes from vdW interactions. HB cooperativity is the second largest contribution as the size of the stacked chain grows. Competing nuclear quantum effects make the net quantum contribution small but very sensitive to anharmonicities, vdW, and the number of HBs. Our results suggest that a reliable treatment of these systems can only ...

  5. Nuclear structure effects in quasifission – understanding the formation of the heaviest elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasifission is an important process suppressing the fusion of two heavy nuclei in reactions used to create superheavy elements. Quasifission results in rapid separation of the dinuclear system initially formed at contact. Achieving reliable a priori prediction of quasifission probabilities is a very diffcult problem. Through measurements with projectiles from C to Ni, the Australian National University’s Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer have been used to map out mass-angle distributions (MAD - the fission mass-ratio as a function of centre-of-mass angle. These provide information on quasifission dynamics in the least modeldependent way. Average quasifission time-scales have been extracted, and compared with TDHF calculations of the collisions, with good agreement being found. With the baseline information from the survey of experimental MAD, strong influences of the nuclear structure of the projectile and target nuclei can be clearly determined.

  6. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Regulation of HIV-1 latency by chromatin structure and nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusic, Marina; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-02-13

    Current antiretroviral therapies fail to cure HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) infection because HIV-1 persists as a transcriptionally inactive provirus in resting memory CD4(+) T cells. Multiple molecular events are known to regulate HIV-1 gene expression, yet the mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of latency remain incompletely understood. Here we summarize different molecular aspects of viral latency, from its establishment in resting CD4(+) T cells to the mechanisms involved in the reactivation of latent viral reservoirs. We focus on the relevance of chromatin structure and nuclear architecture in determining the transcriptional fate of integrated HIV-1 genomes, in light of recent findings indicating that proximity to specific subnuclear neighborhoods regulates HIV-1 gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of the membrane-coating Nup84 complex: paradigm for the nuclear pore complex structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debler, Erik W; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang; Nagy, Vivien; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Hoelz, André

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) function as selective gates for nucleocytoplasmic transport. Although the NPC was discovered more than half a century ago, our knowledge of NPC components in atomic detail has exploded only over the past few years. Recent structural, biochemical, and in vivo studies of NPC components, in particular the membrane-coating heptameric Nup84 complex, have shed light onto the NPC architecture as well as onto its dynamic nature. Striking similarities were revealed between the components of the NPC and of coat protein complexes in the endocytic and secretory pathways, supporting their common evolutionary origin in a progenitor protocoatomer. Here, we summarize these findings and discuss emerging concepts that underlie the molecular architecture and the dynamics of the NPC. We conclude that the uncovered principles are not limited to the NPC, but are likely to extend to other macromolecular assemblies.

  9. A sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance study of structural and organisational changes in the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Tunnah, S K

    2000-01-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on understanding the role of membrane lipids in many different areas of biochemistry. It is of interest to determine what interactions may occur between membrane lipids and drug species. Furthermore, an increasing body of evidence suggests that membrane lipids are involved in the pathology of numerous diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and HIV. Clearly, the more information available on the mechanisms involved in diseases, the greater the potential for identifying a cure or even a prevention. sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the alterations in membrane lipid organisation and structure in intact, viable cultured cells. Changes in the sup 1 H NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation measurements of the human K562 and the rat FRTL-5 cell lines were observed on the addition of the fatty acid species: triolein, evening primrose oil, arachidonic acid and ITF 1779. Results indicate that the membrane lipids are reorganised to a...

  10. A study of thermal, structural and shielding safety analysis for dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S. H. [Kyungpook Nationl Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-15

    As a replaced method for MRS, the dry storage has been intensively developed by the advanced countries of nuclear power technology. Currently, the domestic technology for the dry storage is also under development. In the present study, the developed technical standards for USNRC and its operation are summarized. Futhermore, the SAR for VECTRA's NUHOMES satisfied with DOE and NRC's requirements is inversely analyzed and combined with both USNRC's regulatory guide and LLNL's SARS. In the safety analysis of a dry storage, the principal design criteria which identifies the structural and mechanical safety criteria is investigated. Based on the design criteria, hypothetical accident analysis as well as off-normal operation analysis are investigated.

  11. Structures and Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling Tensors of a Series of Chlorine-Containing Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikkumbura, Asela S.; Webster, Erica R.; Dorris, Rachel E.; Peebles, Rebecca A.; Peebles, Sean A.; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Rotational spectra for gauche-1,2-dichloroethane (12DCE), gauche-1-chloro-2-fluoroethane (1C2FE) and both anti- and gauche-2,3-dichloropropene (23DCP) have been observed using chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy in the 6-18 GHz region. Although the anti conformers for all three species are predicted to be more stable than the gauche forms, they are nonpolar (12DCE) or nearly nonpolar (predicted dipole components for anti-1C2FE: μ_a = 0.11 D, μ_b = 0.02 D and for anti-23DCP: μ_a = 0.25 D, μ_b = 0.02 D); nevertheless, it was also possible to observe and assign the spectrum of anti-23DCP. Assignments of parent spectra and 37Cl and 13C substituted isotopologues utilized predictions at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level and Pickett's SPCAT/SPFIT programs. For the weak anti-23DCP spectra, additional measurements also utilized a resonant-cavity FTMW spectrometer. Full chlorine nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors for gauche-12DCE and both anti- and gauche-23DCP have been diagonalized to allow comparison of coupling constants. Kraitchman's equations were used to determine r_s coordinates of isotopically substituted atoms and r_0 structures were also deduced for gauche conformers of 12DCE and 1C2FE. Structural details and chlorine nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of all three molecules will be compared, and effects of differing halogen substitution and carbon chain length on molecular properties will be evaluated.

  12. Input/Output of ab-initio nuclear structure calculations for improved performance and portability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghave, Nikhil [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Many modern scientific applications rely on highly computation intensive calculations. However, most applications do not concentrate as much on the role that input/output operations can play for improved performance and portability. Parallelizing input/output operations of large files can significantly improve the performance of parallel applications where sequential I/O is a bottleneck. A proper choice of I/O library also offers a scope for making input/output operations portable across different architectures. Thus, use of parallel I/O libraries for organizing I/O of large data files offers great scope in improving performance and portability of applications. In particular, sequential I/O has been identified as a bottleneck for the highly scalable MFDn (Many Fermion Dynamics for nuclear structure) code performing ab-initio nuclear structure calculations. We develop interfaces and parallel I/O procedures to use a well-known parallel I/O library in MFDn. As a result, we gain efficient I/O of large datasets along with their portability and ease of use in the down-stream processing. Even situations where the amount of data to be written is not huge, proper use of input/output operations can boost the performance of scientific applications. Application checkpointing offers enormous performance improvement and flexibility by doing a negligible amount of I/O to disk. Checkpointing saves and resumes application state in such a manner that in most cases the application is unaware that there has been an interruption to its execution. This helps in saving large amount of work that has been previously done and continue application execution. This small amount of I/O provides substantial time saving by offering restart/resume capability to applications. The need for checkpointing in optimization code NEWUOA has been identified and checkpoint/restart capability has been implemented in NEWUOA by using simple file I/O.

  13. x- and xi-scaling of the Nuclear Structure Function at Large x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Arrington; C. S. Armstrong; T. Averett; O. K. Baker; L. de Bever; C. W. Bochna; W. Boeglin; B. Bray; R. D. Carlini; G. Collins; C. Cothran; D. Crabb; D. Day; J. A. Dunne; D. Dutta; R. Ent; B. W. Filippone; A. Honegger; E. W. Hughes; J. Jensen; J. Jourdan; C. E. Keppel; D. M. Koltenuk; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D. J Mack; J. McCarthy; R. D. McKeown; D. Meekins; J. H. Mitchell; H. G. Mkrtchyan; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; I. Sick; C. Smith; B. Terburg; W. F. Vulcan; S. A. Wood; C. Yan; J. Zhao; B. Zihlmann

    2001-07-01

    Inclusive electron scattering data are presented for {sup 2}H and Fe targets at an incident electron energy of 4.045 GeV for a range of momentum transfers from Q{sup 2} = 1 to 7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Data were taken at Jefferson Laboratory for low values of energy loss, corresponding to values of Bjorken x greater than or near 1. The structure functions do not show scaling in x in this range, where inelastic scattering is not expected to dominate the cross section. The data do show scaling, however, in the Nachtmann variable {xi}. This scaling may be the result of Bloom Gilman duality in the nucleon structure function combined with the Fermi motion of the nucleons in the nucleus. The resulting extension of scaling to larger values of {xi} opens up the possibility of accessing nuclear structure functions in the high-x region at lower values of Q{sup 2} than previously believed.

  14. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutu, Narinder K.; Ginsberg, Theodore; Klages, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  15. Structured information analysis for human reliability analysis of emergency tasks in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Dea; Kim, Jae Whan; Park, Jin Kyun; Ha, Jae Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    More than twenty HRA (Human Reliability Analysis) methodologies have been developed and used for the safety analysis in nuclear field during the past two decades. However, no methodology appears to have universally been accepted, as various limitations have been raised for more widely used ones. One of the most important limitations of conventional HRA is insufficient analysis of the task structure and problem space. To resolve this problem, we suggest SIA (Structured Information Analysis) for HRA. The proposed SIA consists of three parts. The first part is the scenario analysis that investigates the contextual information related to the given task on the basis of selected scenarios. The second is the goals-means analysis to define the relations between the cognitive goal and task steps. The third is the cognitive function analysis module that identifies the cognitive patterns and information flows involved in the task. Through the three-part analysis, systematic investigation is made possible from the macroscopic information on the tasks to the microscopic information on the specific cognitive processes. It is expected that analysts can attain a structured set of information that helps to predict the types and possibility of human error in the given task. 48 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  16. Assessment of structural changes of human teeth by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qingwen; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    A technique of low-field pulsed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation is described for assessment of age-related structural changes (dentin and pulp) of human teeth in vitro. The technique involves spin-spin relaxation measurement and inversion spin-spin spectral analysis methods. The spin-spin relaxation decay curve is converted into a T2 distribution spectrum by a sum of single exponential decays. The NMR spectra from the extracted dentin-portion-only and dental pulp-cells-only were compared with the whole extracted teeth spectra, for the dentin and pulp peak assignments. While dentin and pulp are highly significant parameters in determining tooth quality, variations in these parameters with age can be used as an effective tool for estimating tooth quality. Here we propose an NMR calibration method—the ratio of the amount of dentin to the amount of pulp obtained from NMR T2 distribution spectra can be used for measuring the age-related structural changes in teeth while eliminating any variations in size of teeth. Eight teeth (third molars) extracted from humans, aged among 17-67 years old, were tested in this study. It is found that the intensity ratio of dentin to pulp sensitively changes from 0.48 to 3.2 approaching a linear growth with age. This indicates that age-related structural changes in human teeth can be detected using the low-field NMR technique.

  17. Database structure and file layout of Nuclear Power Plant Database. Database for design information on Light Water Reactors in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Izumi, Fumio

    1995-12-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Database (PPD) has been developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to provide plant design information on domestic Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to be used for nuclear safety research and so forth. This database can run on the main frame computer in the JAERI Tokai Establishment. The PPD contains the information on the plant design concepts, the numbers, capacities, materials, structures and types of equipment and components, etc, based on the safety analysis reports of the domestic LWRs. This report describes the details of the PPD focusing on the database structure and layout of data files so that the users can utilize it efficiently. (author).

  18. Nuclear networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  19. Development of integrated D/B system for the safety-related structures in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, M. S.; Song, Y. C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S.; Choi, W. S. [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The integrated D/B system is developed for digitalizing the history of the safety-related structures of nuclear power plant. It have 5 database which are consist of Generals, Structural and Design, Materials, Construction, Aging and repair information D/B. For efficient operation of the system, we are to set up the outline of the system, find out data field for target structures, and develop utilities. Utilities will be the aging and repair data management program, the close examination management program, the data search engine with various options which help users to find the information quickly, and the data management program restoring, updating and exchanging input data. Development of the integrated D/B system of the safety-related structures will contribute to management of the structures of nuclear power plant with advanced technology.

  20. Mutations causing Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly uncouple enzymatic from structural functions of a nuclear membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Peter; Fischer, Björn; Mann, Anuska; Mansour, Sahar; Rossier, Eva; Veen, Markus; Lang, Christine; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Kieslich, Moritz; Brossuleit, Katja; Gravemann, Sophia; Schnipper, Nele; Karbasyian, Mohsen; Demuth, Ilja; Zwerger, Monika; Vaya, Amparo; Utermann, Gerd; Mundlos, Stefan; Stricker, Sigmar; Sperling, Karl; Hoffmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The lamin B receptor (LBR) is an inner nuclear membrane protein with a structural function interacting with chromatin and lamins, and an enzymatic function as a sterol reductase. Heterozygous LBR mutations cause nuclear hyposegmentation in neutrophils (Pelger anomaly), while homozygous mutations cause prenatal death with skeletal defects and abnormal sterol metabolism (Greenberg dysplasia). It has remained unclear whether the lethality in Greenberg dysplasia is due to cholesterol defects or altered nuclear morphology.To answer this question we characterized two LBR missense mutations and showed that they cause Greenberg dysplasia. Both mutations affect residues that are evolutionary conserved among sterol reductases. In contrast to wildtype LBR, both mutations failed to rescue C14 sterol reductase deficient yeast, indicating an enzymatic defect. We found no Pelger anomaly in the carrier parent excluding marked effects on nuclear structure. We studied Lbr in mouse embryos and demonstrate expression in skin and the developing skeletal system consistent with sites of histological changes in Greenberg dysplasia. Unexpectedly we found in disease-relevant cell types not only nuclear but also cytoplasmatic LBR localization. The cytoplasmatic LBR staining co-localized with ER-markers and is thus consistent with the sites of endogeneous sterol synthesis. We conclude that LBR missense mutations can abolish sterol reductase activity, causing lethal Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly. The findings separate the metabolic from the structural function and indicate that the sterol reductase activity is essential for human intrauterine development.

  1. Searches for Exotic Transient Signals with a Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel scheme for searching for physics beyond the Standard Model. The idea is based on correlation of time-synchronized readouts of distant ($\\gtrsim$100~km) optical magnetometers. Such an approach limits hard-to-identify local transient noise, providing the system with unique capabilities of identification of global transient events. Careful analysis of the signal can reveal the nature of the events (e.g., its nonmagnetic origin), which opens avenues for new class of exotic-physics searches (searches for global transient exotic spin couplings) and tests of yet unverified theoretical models.

  2. Exotic grasses and feces deposition by an exotic herbivore combine to reduce the relative abundance of native forbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Rebecca J

    2008-11-01

    Increased resource availability can facilitate establishment of exotic plant species, especially when coincident with propagule supply. Following establishment, increased resource availability may also facilitate the spread of exotic plant species if it enhances their competitive abilities relative to native species. Exotic Canada geese (Branta canadensis) introduce both exotic grass seed and nutrients to an endangered plant community on the Gulf Islands of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. I used greenhouse experiments to assess the competitive advantage of the exotic grasses relative to native and exotic forbs in this community and to test the impacts of nutrient addition from goose feces on competitive outcomes. I grew experimental communities varying in their proportion of forbs versus exotic grasses, and added goose feces as a nutrient source. I found that both native and exotic forbs produced significantly more biomass in competition with conspecifics than in competition with the grasses, and that the proportional abundance of two out of three native forbs was lowest in the combined presence of exotic grasses and nutrient addition. In a second experiment, I found that in monoculture all species of forbs and grasses showed equal growth responses to nutrients. The exotic species did not convert additional nutrients into additional biomass at a higher rate, but did germinate earlier and grow larger than the native species regardless of nutrient availability. This suggests that the exotic species may have achieved their competitive advantage partly by pre-empting resources in community mixtures. Small and late-germinating native forbs may be particularly vulnerable to competitive suppression from exotic grasses and forbs and may be at an even greater disadvantage if their competitors are benefiting from early access to additional nutrients. In combination, the input of exotic propagules and additional nutrients by nesting geese may compromise efforts to

  3. A predictive framework and review of the ecological impacts of exotic plant invasions on reptiles and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Leigh J; Murray, Brad R

    2011-05-01

    The invasive spread of exotic plants in native vegetation can pose serious threats to native faunal assemblages. This is of particular concern for reptiles and amphibians because they form a significant component of the world's vertebrate fauna, play a pivotal role in ecosystem functioning and are often neglected in biodiversity research. A framework to predict how exotic plant invasion will affect reptile and amphibian assemblages is imperative for conservation, management and the identification of research priorities. Here, we present a new predictive framework that integrates three mechanistic models. These models are based on exotic plant invasion altering: (1) habitat structure; (2) herbivory and predator-prey interactions; (3) the reproductive success of reptile and amphibian species and assemblages. We present a series of testable predictions from these models that arise from the interplay over time among three exotic plant traits (growth form, area of coverage, taxonomic distinctiveness) and six traits of reptiles and amphibians (body size, lifespan, home range size, habitat specialisation, diet, reproductive strategy). A literature review provided robust empirical evidence of exotic plant impacts on reptiles and amphibians from each of the three model mechanisms. Evidence relating to the role of body size and diet was less clear-cut, indicating the need for further research. The literature provided limited empirical support for many of the other model predictions. This was not, however, because findings contradicted our model predictions but because research in this area is sparse. In particular, the small number of studies specifically examining the effects of exotic plants on amphibians highlights the pressing need for quantitative research in this area. There is enormous scope for detailed empirical investigation of interactions between exotic plants and reptile and amphibian species and assemblages. The framework presented here and further testing of

  4. Vaccinia virus G8R protein: a structural ortholog of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Da Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic DNA replication involves the synthesis of both a DNA leading and lagging strand, the latter requiring several additional proteins including flap endonuclease (FEN-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in order to remove RNA primers used in the synthesis of Okazaki fragments. Poxviruses are complex viruses (dsDNA genomes that infect eukaryotes, but surprisingly little is known about the process of DNA replication. Given our previous results that the vaccinia virus (VACV G5R protein may be structurally similar to a FEN-1-like protein and a recent finding that poxviruses encode a primase function, we undertook a series of in silico analyses to identify whether VACV also encodes a PCNA-like protein. RESULTS: An InterProScan of all VACV proteins using the JIPS software package was used to identify any PCNA-like proteins. The VACV G8R protein was identified as the only vaccinia protein that contained a PCNA-like sliding clamp motif. The VACV G8R protein plays a role in poxvirus late transcription and is known to interact with several other poxvirus proteins including itself. The secondary and tertiary structure of the VACV G8R protein was predicted and compared to the secondary and tertiary structure of both human and yeast PCNA proteins, and a high degree of similarity between all three proteins was noted. CONCLUSIONS: The structure of the VACV G8R protein is predicted to closely resemble the eukaryotic PCNA protein; it possesses several other features including a conserved ubiquitylation and SUMOylation site that suggest that, like its counterpart in T4 bacteriophage (gp45, it may function as a sliding clamp ushering transcription factors to RNA polymerase during late transcription.

  5. Age-Related Somatic Structural Changes in the Nuclear Genome of Human Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Razzaghian, Hamid R.; Pakalapati, Geeta; Waite, Lindsay; Thilbeault, Krista Stanton; Ronowicz, Anna; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Boomsma, Dorret; Westerman, Maxwell P.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Lyle, Robert; Essand, Magnus; Eriksson, Fredrik; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Iribarren, Carlos; Strachan, Eric; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Absher, Devin; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Structural variations are among the most frequent interindividual genetic differences in the human genome. The frequency and distribution of de novo somatic structural variants in normal cells is, however, poorly explored. Using age-stratified cohorts of 318 monozygotic (MZ) twins and 296 single-born subjects, we describe age-related accumulation of copy-number variation in the nuclear genomes in vivo and frequency changes for both megabase- and kilobase-range variants. Megabase-range aberrations were found in 3.4% (9 of 264) of subjects ≥60 years old; these subjects included 78 MZ twin pairs and 108 single-born individuals. No such findings were observed in 81 MZ pairs or 180 single-born subjects who were ≤55 years old. Recurrent region- and gene-specific mutations, mostly deletions, were observed. Longitudinal analyses of 43 subjects whose data were collected 7–19 years apart suggest considerable variation in the rate of accumulation of clones carrying structural changes. Furthermore, the longitudinal analysis of individuals with structural aberrations suggests that there is a natural self-removal of aberrant cell clones from peripheral blood. In three healthy subjects, we detected somatic aberrations characteristic of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. The recurrent rearrangements uncovered here are candidates for common age-related defects in human blood cells. We anticipate that extension of these results will allow determination of the genetic age of different somatic-cell lineages and estimation of possible individual differences between genetic and chronological age. Our work might also help to explain the cause of an age-related reduction in the number of cell clones in the blood; such a reduction is one of the hallmarks of immunosenescence. PMID:22305530

  6. Genetic Structure of the Polymorphic Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) Complex in the Hawaiian Islands Using Nuclear Microsatellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaugh, Danica T.; Wagner, Warren L.; Percy, Diana M.; James, Helen F.; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Five species of Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) are recognized in the Hawaiian Islands, including the widespread M. polymorpha, and are characterized by a multitude of distinctive, yet overlapping, habit, ecological, and morphological forms. It remains unclear, despite several previous studies, whether the morphological variation within Hawaiian Metrosideros is due to hybridization, genetic polymorphism, phenotypic plasticity, or some combination of these processes. The Hawaiian Metrosideros complex has become a model system to study ecology and evolution; however this is the first study to use microsatellite data for addressing inter-island patterns of variation from across the Hawaiian Islands. Methodology/Principal Findings Ten nuclear microsatellite loci were genotyped from 143 individuals of Metrosideros. We took advantage of the bi-parental inheritance and rapid mutation rate of these data to examine the validity of the current taxonomy and to investigate whether Metrosideros plants from the same island are more genetically similar than plants that are morphologically similar. The Bayesian algorithm of the program structure was used to define genetic groups within Hawaiian Metrosideros and the closely related taxon M. collina from the Marquesas and Austral Islands. Several standard and nested AMOVAs were conducted to test whether the genetic diversity is structured geographically or taxonomically. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that Hawaiian Metrosideros have dynamic gene flow, with genetic and morphological diversity structured not simply by geography or taxonomy, but as a result of parallel evolution on islands following rampant island-island dispersal, in addition to ancient chloroplast capture. Results also suggest that the current taxonomy requires major revisions in order to reflect the genetic structure revealed in the microsatellite data. PMID:19259272

  7. Genetic structure of the polymorphic metrosideros (Myrtaceae) complex in the Hwaiian islands using nuclear microsatellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaugh, Danica T; Wagner, Warren L; Percy, Diana M; James, Helen F; Fleischer, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    Five species of Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) are recognized in the Hawaiian Islands, including the widespread M. polymorpha, and are characterized by a multitude of distinctive, yet overlapping, habit, ecological, and morphological forms. It remains unclear, despite several previous studies, whether the morphological variation within Hawaiian Metrosideros is due to hybridization, genetic polymorphism, phenotypic plasticity, or some combination of these processes. The Hawaiian Metrosideros complex has become a model system to study ecology and evolution; however this is the first study to use microsatellite data for addressing inter-island patterns of variation from across the Hawaiian Islands. Ten nuclear microsatellite loci were genotyped from 143 individuals of Metrosideros. We took advantage of the bi-parental inheritance and rapid mutation rate of these data to examine the validity of the current taxonomy and to investigate whether Metrosideros plants from the same island are more genetically similar than plants that are morphologically similar. The Bayesian algorithm of the program structure was used to define genetic groups within Hawaiian Metrosideros and the closely related taxon M. collina from the Marquesas and Austral Islands. Several standard and nested AMOVAs were conducted to test whether the genetic diversity is structured geographically or taxonomically. The results suggest that Hawaiian Metrosideros have dynamic gene flow, with genetic and morphological diversity structured not simply by geography or taxonomy, but as a result of parallel evolution on islands following rampant island-island dispersal, in addition to ancient chloroplast capture. Results also suggest that the current taxonomy requires major revisions in order to reflect the genetic structure revealed in the microsatellite data.

  8. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 controls nuclear organization and chromatin structure of insulators and subtelomeres in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babett Steglich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, local chromatin structure and chromatin organization in the nucleus both influence transcriptional regulation. At the local level, the Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 is essential for maintaining proper chromatin structure at centromeres and subtelomeres in fission yeast. Using genome-wide mapping and live cell imaging, we show that this role is linked to controlling nuclear organization of its targets. In fft3∆ cells, subtelomeres lose their association with the LEM domain protein Man1 at the nuclear periphery and move to the interior of the nucleus. Furthermore, genes in these domains are upregulated and active chromatin marks increase. Fft3 is also enriched at retrotransposon-derived long terminal repeat (LTR elements and at tRNA genes. In cells lacking Fft3, these sites lose their peripheral positioning and show reduced nucleosome occupancy. We propose that Fft3 has a global role in mediating association between specific chromatin domains and the nuclear envelope.

  10. Structural safety analysis based on seismic service conditions for butterfly valves in a nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Uk; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Lee, Myeong-Gon; Lee, Kwon-Hee; Han, Seung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135 MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements.

  11. Structure of the intact PPAR-Υ-RXR-α nuclear receptor complex on DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Vikas; Huang, Pengxiang; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Raghuram, Srilatha; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P; Rastinejad, Fraydoon [Penn. Bio.; (ExSAR); (UV)

    2009-01-09

    Nuclear receptors are multi-domain transcription factors that bind to DNA elements from which they regulate gene expression. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) form heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor (RXR), and PPAR-{gamma} has been intensively studied as a drug target because of its link to insulin sensitization. Previous structural studies have focused on isolated DNA or ligand-binding segments, with no demonstration of how multiple domains cooperate to modulate receptor properties. Here we present structures of intact PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha} as a heterodimer bound to DNA, ligands and coactivator peptides. PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha} form a non-symmetric complex, allowing the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of PPAR-{gamma} to contact multiple domains in both proteins. Three interfaces link PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha}, including some that are DNA dependent. The PPAR-{gamma} LBD cooperates with both DNA-binding domains (DBDs) to enhance response-element binding. The A/B segments are highly dynamic, lacking folded substructures despite their gene-activation properties.

  12. Environmental effects related to the local absence of exotic fish

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Dorothée; Syväranta, Jari; Figuerola, Jordi; Compin, Arthur; Santoul, Frédéric; Céréghino, Régis

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Given the extent of biological invasions in industrialized countries, our understanding of the determinants of overall patterns of biological invasions could gain most from consideration of why exotic species are absent from some areas, rather than from distribution patterns of exotic species. Fish communities were sampled at 381 sites representing 221 rivers in the Adour-Garonne stream system (116 000 km², SW France). Very few rivers were not colonized by exotic fish ...

  13. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  14. Structure of the nuclear exosome component Rrp6p reveals an interplay between the active site and the HRDC domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Assenholt, Jannie; Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen

    2006-01-01

    The multisubunit eukaryotic exosome is an essential RNA processing and degradation machine. In its nuclear form, the exosome associates with the auxiliary factor Rrp6p, which participates in both RNA processing and degradation reactions. The crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6p...

  15. Insight into structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex by utilizing the genome of a eukaryotic thermophile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amlacher, Stefan; Sarges, Phillip; Flemming, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which is composed of ~30 nucleoporins (Nups), remain elusive. Here, we report the genome of the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum (ct) and identify the complete repertoire of Nups therein. The the...... of a thermophilic eukaryote for studying complex molecular machines....

  16. Investigating the effects of stress on the pore structures of nuclear grade graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Joshua E.L., E-mail: joshua.taylor@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Hall, Graham N., E-mail: graham.n.hall@manchester.ac.uk; Mummery, Paul M., E-mail: paul.m.mummery@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-03-15

    Graphite is used as a moderating material and as a structural component in a number of current generation nuclear reactors. During reactor operation stresses develop in the graphite components, causing them to deform. It is important to understand how the microstructure of graphite affects the material's response to these stresses. A series of experiments were performed to investigate how the pore structures of Pile Grade A and Gilsocarbon graphites respond to loading stresses. A compression rig was used to simulate the build-up of operational stresses in graphite components, and a confocal laser microscope was used to study variation of a number of important pore properties. Values of elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio were calculated and compared to existing literature to confirm the validity of the experimental techniques. Mean pore areas were observed to decrease linearly with increasing applied load, mean pore eccentricity increased linearly, and a small amount of clockwise pore rotation was observed. The response to build-up of stresses was dependent on the orientation of the pores and basal planes and the shapes of the pores with respect to the loading axis. It was proposed that pore closure and pore reorientation were competing processes. Pore separation was quantified using ‘nearest neighbour’ and Voronoi techniques, and non-pore regions were found to shrink linearly with increasing applied load. - Highlights: • Effects of stress on pore structures of Gilsocarbon and PGA graphites were studied. • Application of a compressive load was used to generate stresses in graphite. • Inverse linear relationship between stress and pore area was observed. • Mean pore eccentricity increased, clockwise pore rotation observed. • Separation of pores quantified using Voronoi and ‘nearest-neighbour’ methods.

  17. Nuclear structure features of very heavy and superheavy nuclei—tracing quantum mechanics towards the ‘island of stability’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, D.; Theisen, Ch

    2017-08-01

    The quantum-mechanic nature of nuclear matter is at the origin of the vision of a region of enhanced stability at the upper right end of the chart of nuclei, the so-called ‘island of stability’. Since the 1960s in the early second half of the last century, various models predict closed shells for proton numbers 114-126 and neutron numbers such as 172 or 184. Being stabilized by quantum-mechanic effects only, those extremely heavy man-made nuclear species are an ideal laboratory to study the origin of the strong nuclear interaction which is the driving force for matter properties in many fields ranging from microscopic scales like hadronic systems to cosmic scales in stellar environments like neutron stars. Since the 1950s, experiments on the synthesis of new elements and isotopes have also revealed various exciting nuclear structure features. The contribution of Bohr, Mottelson and Rainwater with, in particular, the development of the unified model played an essential role in this context. Although not anticipated in the region of the heaviest nuclei, many phenomena were subsequently discovered like the interplay of collective features manifesting themselves e.g. in nuclear deformation, ranging from spherical to prolate and oblate shapes with the possible occurrence of triaxial symmetries, and single particle states and their excitation into quasiparticle configurations. The continuous development of modern experimental techniques employing advanced detection set-ups was essential to reveal these exciting nuclear structure aspects in the actinide and transactinide regions since the production cross-section becomes extremely small with increasing mass and charge. Further technological progress, in particular, high intensity stable ion beam accelerator facilities presently under construction, as well as potentially in the farther future radioactive neutron rich ion beams provide a high discovery potential for the basic understanding of nuclear matter.

  18. New results on exotic baryon resonances at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Observation of exotic resonant structures decaying into $J/\\psi p$ found in the LHCb experiment is discussed. Examination of the $J/\\psi p$ system in $\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\to J/\\psi K^{-} p$ decays shows two states, each of which must be composed of at least $c \\bar{c} uud$ quarks, and are thus consistent with pentaquarks. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. Their masses are ($4 380 \\pm 8 \\pm 29$) MeV and ($4 449.8 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 2.5$) MeV, and their corresponding widths are ($205 \\pm 18 \\pm 86$) MeV, and ($39 \\pm 5 \\pm 19$) MeV. The preferred $J^{P}$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  19. X-ray emission of exotic ions in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Dachicourt, R.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2017-03-01

    Hollow ion X-ray emission has been observed in experiments studying interaction of heavy ion beams with solids and their occurrence has been ascribed to charge exchange processes occurring when highly charged ions interact with a metal surface. In high temperature high-density plasmas, like, e.g., high intensity laser produced plasmas or high current Z-pinches, numerous researchers have reported about "exotic" X-ray transitions of hollow ions: K0LX →K1LX-1+hνhollow. Although atomic structure calculations seem to confirm that measured line positions correspond to transitions in hollow ions, line identification is difficult and the observed high intensity remains a mystery (by orders of magnitude) up to present days.

  20. QCD Coulomb Gauge Approach to Exotic Hadrons

    OpenAIRE

    Cotanch, Stephen R.; General, Ignacio J.; Wang, Ping

    2006-01-01

    The Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian model is used to calculate masses for selected J^{PC} states consisting of exotic combinations of quarks and gluons: ggg glueballs (oddballs), q bar{q} g hybrid mesons and q bar{q} q bar{q} tetraquark systems. An odderon Regge trajectory is computed for the J^{--} glueballs with intercept much smaller than the pomeron, explaining its nonobservation. The lowest 1^{-+} hybrid meson mass is found to be just above 2.2 GeV while the lightest tetraquark state mass with...

  1. Exotic woody plant invaders of the Transvaal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Henderson

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and abundance o ;f exotic, woody plant invaders were recorded in 60% of the quarter degree squares in the study area. Sixty-one invaders were encountered o f which the most important and aggressive were Acacia dealbaia, Populus spp.,  Melia azedarach, Opuntia ficus-indica, Salix babylonica and  Acacia mearnsii. Invasion patterns are discussed and an attempt is made to correlate distribution with environmental factors. Attention is drawn to the areas of greatest invasion and the areas that are liable to show the greatest expansion in the future.

  2. Amplitudes for exotic states at JPAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilloni, Alessandro; JPAC Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the activity of the Joint Physics Analysis Center in building models which satisfy S-matrix principles. In particular, we show some results on the analysis of the ηπ exotic resonances at COMPASS, and we discuss how to extend our formalism to photon beams to be used in the GlueX experiment. We also discuss a model to fit the J / ψp spectrum measured at GlueX, of interest for the search of hidden charm pentaquarks.

  3. Nuclear c-Abl-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation induces chromatin structural changes through histone modifications that include H4K16 hypoacetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Kazumasa; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Kubota, Sho; Morinaga, Takao; Horiike, Yasuyoshi; Yuki, Ryuzaburo; Takahashi, Akinori; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto, E-mail: nyama@p.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2011-12-10

    c-Abl tyrosine kinase, which is ubiquitously expressed, has three nuclear localization signals and one nuclear export signal and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. c-Abl plays important roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosis. Recently, we developed a pixel imaging method for quantitating the level of chromatin structural changes and showed that nuclear Src-family tyrosine kinases are involved in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation. Using this method, we show here that nuclear c-Abl induces chromatin structural changes in a manner dependent on the tyrosine kinase activity. Expression of nuclear-targeted c-Abl drastically increases the levels of chromatin structural changes, compared with that of c-Abl. Intriguingly, nuclear-targeted c-Abl induces heterochromatic profiles of histone methylation and acetylation, including hypoacetylation of histone H4 acetylated on lysine 16 (H4K16Ac). The level of heterochromatic histone modifications correlates with that of chromatin structural changes. Adriamycin-induced DNA damage stimulates translocation of c-Abl into the nucleus and induces chromatin structural changes together with H4K16 hypoacetylation. Treatment with trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, blocks chromatin structural changes but not nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by c-Abl. These results suggest that nuclear c-Abl plays an important role in chromatin dynamics through nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation-induced heterochromatic histone modifications.

  4. Probability based load criteria for the design of nuclear structures: a critical review of the state-of-the-art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozuka, M.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Wang, P.C.; Meyer, C.; Wen, Y.K.; Kao, S.; Shooman, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1981-04-01

    Structures for nuclear power plant facilities must be designed to withstand safely and effectively all kinds of loads and load combinations that may be expected to occur during their lifetime. The traditional methods of structural design attempt to account for the inevitable variability in the loads, material strengths, in-service environments, and fabrication process, etc., through the use of safety factor, allowable stresses or load and resistance factors. These approaches may result in an unknown and nonuniform reliability because of the subjective manner in which the safety factors have been determined. The stochastic nature loads and the uncertainties in material properties dictate a probabilistic approach for a rational assessment of structural safety and performance. This report presents: an in-depth review of the state-of-the-art pertaining to probability-based analysis and design of civil engineering structures; basis for extending existing probability-based methods to seismic category I nuclear structures; and the availability of the pertinent data required to perform probabilistic analysis for seismic category I nuclear structures.

  5. Numerical analysis of nuclear power plant structure subjected to aircraft crash

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saberi, Reza; Alinejad, Majid; Mahdavi, Mir Omid; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft crashing into a nuclear containment may induce a series of disasters related to containment capacity, including local penetration and perforation of the containment, intensive vibrations...

  6. Dissertation Award in Nuclear Physics Recipient: Nuclear structure at the Edge: Proton decay and the invariant-mass Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyle W.

    2017-09-01

    Two-nucleon decay is the most recently discovered nuclear-decay mode. For proton-rich nuclei, most multi-proton decays occur via sequential steps of one-proton emission. Direct two-proton (2p) decay was believed to occur only in even-Z nuclei beyond the proton-drip line where one-proton decay is energy forbidden. This has been observed for the ground states of around a dozen nuclei including 6Be, the lightest case, and 54 Zn , the heaviest case. Direct 2p decay has also recently been observed for isobaric-analog states where all possible 1p intermediates are either isospin allowed and energy forbidden, or energy allowed and isospin forbidden. For light proton emitters (A measuring the decay energy, intrinsic width, and, for multi-proton decays, the momentum correlations between the fragments. I will describe recent measurements of proton emitters using the invariant-mass technique with the High-Resolution Array (HiRA). I will present a new, high-statistics measurement on the decay of the ground and excited states in 12 O . By measuring the momentum correlations between the decay fragments, one can observe how the decay transitions from direct to sequential as the decay energy increases. I will present data on the isobaric-analog pair 8C and 8BIAS, which highlight the two known types of direct 2p decay. I will also present the first observation of 11O, the mirror of the well-known halo nucleus 11 Li .

  7. Correlated factors in amphibian decline: Exotic species and habitat change in western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Amphibian declines may frequently be associated with multiple, correlated factors. In western North America, exotic species and hydrological changes are often correlated and are considered 2 of the greatest threats to freshwater systems. Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) introductions are frequently cited as a threat to lentic-breeding anurans native to western North America and are a suspected factor in the decline of red-legged frogs (Rana aurora) in California. Introduced fish and habitat change are cited less frequently but are equally viable hypotheses. I examined the relation among introduced species, habitat, and the distribution and abundance of red-legged frogs in western Washington. Red-legged frog occurrence in the Puget Lowlands was more closely associated with habitat structure and the presence of exotic fish than with the presence of bull-frogs. The spread of exotics is correlated with a shift toward greater permanence in wetland habitats regionally. Conservation of more ephemeral wetland habitats may have direct benefits for some native amphibians and may also reduce the threat of exotic fish and bullfrogs, both of which were associated with permanent wetlands. Research and conservation efforts for lowland anurans in the West should emphasize the complexities of multiple contributing factors to amphibian losses.

  8. Quantum nuclear pasta and nuclear symmetry energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattoyev, F. J.; Horowitz, C. J.; Schuetrumpf, B.

    2017-05-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries, collectively referred to as "nuclear pasta," are expected to appear naturally in dense nuclear matter found in the crusts of neutron stars and supernovae environments. The pasta geometries depend on the average baryon density, proton fraction, and temperature and are critically important in the determination of many transport properties of matter in supernovae and the crusts of neutron stars. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals, we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0.03 ≤ρ ≤0.10 fm-3 , proton fractions 0.05 ≤Yp≤0.40 , and zero temperature. The full quantum simulations, in particular, allow us to thoroughly investigate the role and impact of the nuclear symmetry energy on pasta configurations. We use the Sky3D code that solves the Skyrme Hartree-Fock equations on a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. For the nuclear interaction we use the state-of-the-art UNEDF1 parametrization, which was introduced to study largely deformed nuclei, hence is suitable for studies of the nuclear pasta. Density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is simulated by tuning two purely isovector observables that are insensitive to the current available experimental data. We find that a minimum total number of nucleons A =2000 is necessary to prevent the results from containing spurious shell effects and to minimize finite size effects. We find that a variety of nuclear pasta geometries are present in the neutron star crust, and the result strongly depends on the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of the nuclear symmetry energy is less pronounced as the proton fractions increase. Quantum nuclear pasta calculations at T =0 MeV are shown to get easily trapped in metastable states, and possible remedies to avoid metastable solutions are discussed.

  9. Nuclear structure properties and stellar weak rates for 76Se: Unblocking of the Gamow Teller strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Ishfaq, Mavra; Böyükata, Mahmut; Riaz, Muhammad

    2017-10-01

    At finite temperatures (≥ 107K), 76Se is abundant in the core of massive stars and electron capture on 76Se has a consequential role to play in the dynamics of core-collapse. The present work may be classified into two main categories. In the first phase we study the nuclear structure properties of 76Se using the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). The IBM-1 investigations include the energy levels, B (E 2) values and the prediction of the geometry. We performed the extended consistent-Q formalism (ECQF) calculation and later the triaxial formalism calculation (constructed by adding the cubic term to the ECQF). The geometry of 76Se can be envisioned within the formalism of the potential energy surface based on the classical limit of IBM-1 model. In the second phase, we reconfirm the unblocking of the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength in 76Se (a test case for nuclei having N > 40 and Z data and previous calculations. The calculated GT distribution fulfills the Ikeda sum rule. Rates for β-delayed neutrons and emission probabilities are also calculated. Our study suggests that at high stellar temperatures and low densities, the β+-decay on 76Se should not be neglected and needs to be taken into consideration along with electron capture rates for simulation of presupernova evolution of massive stars.

  10. Decay study of neutron-deficient La isotopes for atomic masses and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Akihiko; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Sekine, Toshiaki [Department of Materials Science, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (JP)] [and others

    2000-06-01

    We report the decay spectroscopic studies with the TIARA-ISOL connected to an AVF cyclotron at the Takasaki site of JAERI between 1994 and 1998 under the Universities-JAERI Collaborative Research Project. Decay spectroscopic studies have been carried out for neutron-deficient La-Ce-Pr isotopes in the mass 120-130 region, which were prepared by on-line mass-separation following the fusion-evaporation reactions {sup 92,nat}Mo({sup 36}Ar, 3pxn). The {sup 125}Pr isotope was newly identified with a half-life of 3.3(7) s and its decay scheme was presented. The assignment of the 135.8 keV {gamma}-ray to the decay of {sup 125}Pr was supported by its coincidence with Ce X-rays and {beta}{sup +} rays. Low-spin states in {sup 124,} {sup 126,} {sup 128,} {sup 130}Ba fed by the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of their La parents were investigated by means of the {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation measurement. Q{sub EC}-values/atomic masses of neutron-deficient {sup 124-130}La were determined by {beta}{sup +}-ray maximum energy measurement. Half-lives of the first 2{sup +} state in {sup 122,} {sup 124,} {sup 126}Ba were measured using a {beta}-{gamma} delayed coincidence method. The experimental results obtained for the nuclear structure of the Ba isotopes are discussed in comparison with theory. (author)

  11. Analysis of Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction for a Nuclear Power Plant (HTR-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of nuclear power plants (NPPs to seismic events is affected by soil-structure interactions (SSI. In the present paper, a finite element (FE model with transmitting boundaries is used to analyse the SSI effect on the response of NPP buildings subjected to vertically incident seismic excitation. Analysis parameters that affect the accuracy of the calculations, including the dimension of the domain and artificial boundary types, are investigated through a set of models. A numerical SSI analysis for the 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Test Reactor (HTR-10 under seismic excitation was carried out using the developed model. The floor response spectra (FRS produced by the SSI analysis are compared with a fixed-base model to investigate the SSI effect on the dynamic response of the reactor building. The results show that the FRS at foundation level are reduced and those at higher floor levels are altered significantly when taking SSI into account. The peak frequencies of the FRS are reduced due to the SSI, whereas the acceleration at high floor levels is increased at a certain frequency range. The seismic response of the primary system components, however, is reduced by the analysed SSI for the HTR-10 on the current soil site.

  12. Nuclear quantum effects in the structure and lineshapes of the N2 NEXAFS spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatehi, Shervin; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-12-04

    We study the relative ability of several models of the X-ray absorption spectrum to capture the Franck-Condon structure apparent from an experiment on gaseous nitrogen. In doing so, we adopt the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and a constrained density functional theory method for computing the energies of the X-ray-excited molecule. Starting from an otherwise classical model for the spectrum, we systematically introduce more realistic physics, first by substituting the quantum mechanical nuclear radial density in the bond separation R for the classical radial density, then by adding the effect of zero-point energy and other level shifts, and finally by including explicit rovibrational quantization of both the ground and excited states. The quantization is determined exactly, using a discrete variable representation. We show that the NEXAFS spectrum can be predicted semiquantiatively within this framework. We also address the possibility of non-trivial temperature dependence in the spectrum. Finally, we show that it is possible to improve the predicted spectrum by using constrained DFT in combination with more accurate potentials.

  13. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Joshua J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Smith, Rebecca E.; Strydom, Gerhard; Windes, William E.

    2017-09-01

    For the next generation of nuclear reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress warrants inclusion in the license applications of many international regulators. Much research on oxidation rates of various graphite grades under a number of conditions has been undertaken to address such an event. However, consequences to the reactor result from the microstructural changes to the graphite rather than directly from oxidation. The microstructure is inherent to a graphite's properties and ultimately degradation to the graphite's performance must be determined to establish the safety of reactor design. To understand the oxidation induced microstructural change and its corresponding impact on performance, a thorough understanding of the reaction system is needed. This article provides a thorough review of the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction in terms of kinetics, mass and energy transport, and structural evolution: all three play a significant role in the observed rate of graphite oxidation. These provide the foundations of a microstructurally informed model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system, a model kinetically independent of graphite grade, and capable of describing both the observed and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.

  14. Unified field theory from the classical wave equation: Preliminary application to atomic and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Múnera, Héctor A., E-mail: hmunera@hotmail.com [Centro Internacional de Física (CIF), Apartado Aéreo 4948, Bogotá, Colombia, South America (Colombia); Retired professor, Department of Physics, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia, South America (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    It is postulated that there exists a fundamental energy-like fluid, which occupies the flat three-dimensional Euclidean space that contains our universe, and obeys the two basic laws of classical physics: conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of total energy; the fluid is described by the classical wave equation (CWE), which was Schrödinger’s first candidate to develop his quantum theory. Novel solutions for the CWE discovered twenty years ago are nonharmonic, inherently quantized, and universal in the sense of scale invariance, thus leading to quantization at all scales of the universe, from galactic clusters to the sub-quark world, and yielding a unified Lorentz-invariant quantum theory ab initio. Quingal solutions are isomorphic under both neo-Galilean and Lorentz transformations, and exhibit nother remarkable property: intrinsic unstability for large values of ℓ (a quantum number), thus limiting the size of each system at a given scale. Unstability and scale-invariance together lead to nested structures observed in our solar system; unstability may explain the small number of rows in the chemical periodic table, and nuclear unstability of nuclides beyond lead and bismuth. Quingal functions lend mathematical basis for Boscovich’s unified force (which is compatible with many pieces of evidence collected over the past century), and also yield a simple geometrical solution for the classical three-body problem, which is a useful model for electronic orbits in simple diatomic molecules. A testable prediction for the helicoidal-type force is suggested.

  15. Structure of conceptual models in the senior operating staff of nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oboznov A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The relationships between conceptual model structures and an operator’s professional efficiency are of direct practical importance, particularly in the case of large-scale industrial complexes combining several human-machine systems. A typical example is the power unit of a nuclear power plant (NPP. Objective and methods. The purpose of this study was to explore the conceptual models of senior reactor operators (SROs of NPPs. The study involved 64 men working as SRO at five NPPs in Russia. The methods included: structured interviews, expert estimations, multidimensional scaling (ALSCAL, the K-means clustering algorithm, and frequency analysis. The procedure was as follows: 32 key characteristics of the power unit were defined, including shift operators’ jobs and duties, technical subsystems, types of equipment, and the crucial power unit parameters. The participants were offered a 32×32 matrix for pair-wise estimation of the strength of the links between these key characteristics on a seven-point scale (496 links in total. Results. A general scheme of key characteristics in the conceptual models was defined. is scheme was displayed in the operators regardless of their employment history. Within the scheme, however, two types of conceptual models were identified, which could be distinguished by the relative number of strong links between the key characteristics. With respect to intersystem links including key characteristics of the reactor and turbine NPP departments, this number was significantly higher in models of Type 1 than in those of Type 2. A positive correlation between the number of these links and the professional efficiency indicators was also established. Operators with Type 1 models were able to more predictably represent the power unit operation. Conclusion. The main role in creating predictable and efficient conceptual models was played by strong intersystem links in mental representations of workflow.

  16. Natively Unfolded FG Repeats Stabilize the Structure of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onischenko, Evgeny; Tang, Jeffrey H; Andersen, Kasper R

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are ∼100 MDa transport channels assembled from multiple copies of ∼30 nucleoporins (Nups). One-third of these Nups contain phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-rich repeats, forming a diffusion barrier, which is selectively permeable for nuclear transport receptors that interact...

  17. Dirac-Fock atomic electronic structure calculations using different nuclear charge distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, L; Dyall, KG

    1997-01-01

    Numerical Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for the first 109 elements of the periodic table are presented. The results give the total electronic energy, as a function of the nuclear model that is used, for four different models of the nuclear charge distribution. The

  18. Seismic fragility analysis of a nuclear building based on probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and soil-structure interaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, R.; Ni, S.; Chen, R.; Han, X.M. [CANDU Energy Inc, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Mullin, D. [New Brunswick Power, Point Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    Seismic fragility analyses are conducted as part of seismic probabilistic safety assessment (SPSA) for nuclear facilities. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) has been undertaken for a nuclear power plant in eastern Canada. Uniform Hazard Spectra (UHS), obtained from the PSHA, is characterized by high frequency content which differs from the original plant design basis earthquake spectral shape. Seismic fragility calculations for the service building of a CANDU 6 nuclear power plant suggests that the high frequency effects of the UHS can be mitigated through site response analysis with site specific geological conditions and state-of-the-art soil-structure interaction analysis. In this paper, it is shown that by performing a detailed seismic analysis using the latest technology, the conservatism embedded in the original seismic design can be quantified and the seismic capacity of the building in terms of High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) can be improved. (author)

  19. A Theory of Island Biogeography for Exotic Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kevin C

    2015-10-01

    The theory of island biogeography has played a pivotal role in the way ecologists view communities. However, it does not account for exotic species explicitly, which limits its use as a conservation tool. Here, I present the results of a long-term study of plant communities inhabiting an archipelago of small islands off the coast of New Zealand and derive a modified version of the theory of island biogeography to predict differences in the turnover and diversity of native and exotic species. Empirical results showed that, although species richness of both native and exotic plant species increased with island area, native species consistently outnumbered exotic species. Species turnover increased with species richness in both groups. However, opposite to species-area patterns, turnover increased more rapidly with species richness in exotic species. Empirical results were consistent with the modified version of the theory of island biogeography, which distinguishes exotic species from native species by decoupling extinction rates of exotic species from island area, because they are represented by only small populations at the initial stages of invasion. Overall results illustrate how the theory of island biogeography can be modified to reflect the dynamics of exotic species as they invade archipelagos, expanding its use as a conservation tool.

  20. Quark-antiquark-gluon exotic fields for lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Jeffrey E.

    1984-02-01

    Fields with exotic spin-parity made of a quark, anti-quark and gluon field strength tensor (“hermaphrodites”) are constructed for lattice QCD. Using three- and four-dimensional cubic symmetry, non-exotic contributions are removed as completely as theoretically possible.

  1. Quark-antiquark-gluon exotic fields for lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandula, J.E.

    1984-02-02

    Fields with exotic spin-parity made of a quark, anti-quark and gluon field strength tensor ('hermaphrodites') are constructed for lattice QCD. Using three- and four-dimensional cubic symmetry, non-exotic contributions are removed as completely as theoretically possible.

  2. Preliminary comparison of birds inhabiting exotic Acacia and native ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. In East Africa, studies have found that exotic plantations have negative impacts on birds, causing declines in abundance (Calson 1986, Pomeroy & Dranzoa 1998) and low nesting potential (John & Kabigumila 2007). Further studies on the effects of exotic plantations on birds have shown that the plantations ...

  3. Exotic species patterns and function in urban landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne C. Zipperer

    2003-01-01

    Mack et al. (2000) state "Biotic invaders are species that establish a new range in which they proliferate, spread, and persist to the detriment of the environment." This statement is true for many natural landscapes. In urban landscapes, however, exotic species are critical components of the landscape and enhance its livability. Exotic species provide...

  4. Exotic branes and non-perturbative seven branes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyras, E; Lozano, Y

    2000-01-01

    We construct the effective action of certain exotic branes in the Type Ii theories which are not predicted by their space-time supersymmetry algebras. We analyze in detail the case of the NS-7B brane, S-dual to the D7-brane, and connected by T-duality to other exotic branes in Type IIA: the KK-6A

  5. Invasion of exotic earthworms into ecosystems inhabited by native earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. F. Hendrix; G. H. Baker; M. A. Callaham Jr; G. A. Damoff; Fragoso C.; G. Gonzalez; S. W. James; S. L. Lachnicht; T. Winsome; X. Zou

    2006-01-01

    The most conspicuous biological invasions in terrestrial ecosystems have been by exotic plants, insects and vertebrates. Invasions by exotic earthworms, although not as well studied, may be increasing with global commerce in agriculture, waste management and bioremediation. A number of cases has documented where invasive earthworms have caused significant changes in...

  6. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vol. 57, No. 1. — journal of. July 2001 physics pp. 161–164. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions. SAMIT MANDAL, J GERL, H GEISSEL, K HAUSCHILD. ¿. , M HELLSTR ¨OM, ... large [2,3] to perform a meaningful high spin decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei. At the same time relativistic Coulomb ...

  7. Calcium and Phosphorus Content Of Exotic, Local and Frozen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tissue differences in the content of minerals in chicken muscle. The calcium and phosphorus content of the local chicken places it in a very vintage position to compete favorably with frozen and exotic chicken. Key words: Calcium, Phosphorus, local, exotic and frozen chicken. Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social ...

  8. Exotic galilean symmetry, non-commutativity & the Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Horvathy, P.

    2005-01-01

    The ``exotic'' particle model associated with the two-parameter central extension of the planar Galilei group can be used to derive the ground states of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. Similar equations arise for a semiclassical Bloch electron. Exotic Galilean symmetry is also be shared by Chern-Simons field theory of the Moyal type.

  9. Diseases of Forest Trees: Consequences of Exotic Ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Otrosina

    1998-01-01

    Much attention is now given to risks and impacts of exotic pest introductions in forest ecosystems. This concern is for good reason because, once introduced, an exotic pathogen or insect encounters little resistance in the native plant population and can produce catastrophic losses in relatively short periods of time. Most native fungal pathogens of forest trees have...

  10. Exotic nuclei studied with the 8pi spectrometer at TRIUMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnsworthy, A. B.

    2015-05-01

    The 8pi gamma-ray spectrometer has performed decay spectroscopy experiments at TRIUMF-ISAC between 2000 and 2013. A series of ancillary detector subsystems have been developed to enable or enhance particular aspects of decay spectroscopy. This facility allows a broad range of research in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and fundamental symmetries. In this contribution, an overview is given of the detector systems and the research performed with the device during its operation at ISAC.

  11. Links between nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy; Structuration des liens entre medecine nucleaire et radiopharmacie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelegrin, M. [Inserm, U896, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier (IRCM), universite Montpellier 1, 34 - Montpellier (France); Francois-Joubert, A. [Service de medecine nucleaire, centre hospitalier de Chambery, 73 - Chambery (France); Chassel, M.L. [Radiopharmacie, service de pharmacie, centre hospitalier de Chambery, 73 - Chambrry (France); Desruet, M.D. [Service de radiopharmacie et service pharmaceutique, clinique universitaire de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Grenoble, 38 - Grenoble (France); Bolot, C. [Service de radiopharmacie, service pharmaceutique, centre de medecine nucleaire, groupement hospitalier Est, 69 - Bron (France); Lao, S. [Service de radiopharmacie, medecine nucleaire, hopital de l' Archet, 06 - Nice (France)

    2010-11-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are nowadays under the responsibility of the radio-pharmacist because of their medicinal product status. Radiopharmacy belongs to the hospital pharmacy department, nevertheless, interactions with nuclear medicine department are important: rooms are included or located near nuclear medicine departments in order to respect radiation protection rules, more over staff, a part of the material and some activities are shared between the two departments. Consequently, it seems essential to formalize links between the radiopharmacy and the nuclear medicine department, setting the goals to avoid conflicts and to ensure patients' security. Modalities chosen for this formalization will depend on the establishment's organization. (authors)

  12. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13 Section 352.13 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY...

  13. How exotic does an exotic information and education initiative about the impact of non-indigenous species need to be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    William F. Hammond

    1998-01-01

    Providing individuals with effective information, programs, and educational materials about "exotics" or non-indigenous species is generally not a very effective way to get people to act to control, eliminate, and restore damage from exotic species to native ecosystems. Information tends to inform the motivated and educated. Educational research and marketing...

  14. Casimir Energy, Extra Dimensions and Exotic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, R.; Saharian, A.

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next generation of particle accelerators. This adjustment of the size of the higher dimension could serve as a technological mechanism to locally adjust the dark energy density and change the local expansion of spacetime. This idea holds tantalizing possibilities in the context of exotic spacecraft propulsion.

  15. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  16. Microsporidiosis in Vertebrate Companion Exotic Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Vergneau-Grosset

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Veterinarians caring for companion animals may encounter microsporidia in various host species, and diagnosis and treatment of these fungal organisms can be particularly challenging. Fourteen microsporidial species have been reported to infect humans and some of them are zoonotic; however, to date, direct zoonotic transmission is difficult to document versus transit through the digestive tract. In this context, summarizing information available about microsporidiosis of companion exotic animals is relevant due to the proximity of these animals to their owners. Diagnostic modalities and therapeutic challenges are reviewed by taxa. Further studies are needed to better assess risks associated with animal microsporidia for immunosuppressed owners and to improve detection and treatment of infected companion animals.

  17. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Guertin, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and non-governmental organization (NGO) partners in the southwest. This project is an ongoing effort to compile and distribute regional data on the occurrence of non-native invasive plants in the southwestern United States. The database represents the known sites (represented by a point location, i.e. site) of non-native invasive plant infestations within Arizona and New Mexico, and adjacent portions of California, Colorado, Nevada and Utah. These data, collected from 1911 to 2006, represent the field observations of various state, federal, tribal and county agencies, along with some specimen data from Herbaria. The SWEMP database comprises a compilation of data submitted through 2006.

  18. NES consensus redefined by structures of PKI-type and Rev-type nuclear export signals bound to CRM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güttler, Thomas; Madl, Tobias; Neumann, Piotr; Deichsel, Danilo; Corsini, Lorenzo; Monecke, Thomas; Ficner, Ralf; Sattler, Michael; Görlich, Dirk

    2010-11-01

    Classic nuclear export signals (NESs) confer CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Here we present crystal structures of the RanGTP-CRM1 complex alone and bound to the prototypic PKI or HIV-1 Rev NESs. These NESs differ markedly in the spacing of their key hydrophobic (Φ) residues, yet CRM1 recognizes them with the same rigid set of five Φ pockets. The different Φ spacings are compensated for by different conformations of the bound NESs: in the case of PKI, an α-helical conformation, and in the case of Rev, an extended conformation with a critical proline docking into a Φ pocket. NMR analyses of CRM1-bound and CRM1-free PKI NES suggest that CRM1 selects NES conformers that pre-exist in solution. Our data lead to a new structure-based NES consensus, and explain why NESs differ in their affinities for CRM1 and why supraphysiological NESs bind the exportin so tightly.

  19. PREFACE: 10th International Conference on Clustering Aspects of Nuclear Structure and Dynamics (CLUSTER'12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovas, R. G.; Dombrádi, Zs; Kiss, G. G.; Kruppa, A. T.; Lévai, G.

    2013-04-01

    As Editors of this Proceedings volume and organizers as well as participants of the Conference, let us sum up a few facts about the Conference and let us add some subjective notes. The conference was held at Köolcsey Centre, a prestigious site of scientific and business meetings and cultural events in the city of Debrecen, Hungary, 24-28 September 2012. The city was chosen as the home of the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the home institution of the organizers. The Institute was visited by some of the participants. The organizing team was complemented by some belonging to the University of Debrecen, which made it possible to hold the conference dinner in the marvellous covered 'ceremonial court' of the University. The participants were taken for an excursion and wine tasting to a wine cellar at Tokaj, centre of, historically, the most significant wine producing area in Hungary. By coincidence, the closing day coincided with the day of what is called the Researchers' Night in the European Union. That night, (or rather, that evening) every year there is a public lecture in the Institute of Nuclear Research for a general audience, mainly secondary-school pupils. The public lecture scheduled on this occasion was held by one of the participants of the conference who represented the world outside Hungary and yet was able to deliver a talk in Hungarian. He is Professor Kálmán Varga, Vanderbilt University. The title of his talk was Simulation of Nanosystems ( http://kutatokejszakaja.hu/2012/esemenynaptar/esemeny.php?id=112&menu_id=4). There were 115 registered participants, representing 22 countries of Europe, Africa, Asia, Central, South and North America. We had 44 plenary talks and 47 talks presented in parallel sessions. In the Programme list the talks are arranged following the session structure of the Conference. In this list the invited speakers are marked by asterisks. All the talks in the plenary sessions were invited talks

  20. Qualitative and Quantitative Structure of Zooplankton Associations in the Danube Thermal Discharge Area of Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda

    OpenAIRE

    ŞUNDRI, Mirela Iuliana; GOMOIU, Marian-Traian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: The authors presents the structure of zooplankton community recorded in the Danube River sector influenced by the thermal discharge from the Nuclear Power Plant at Cernavoda (Romania). On the basis of samples collected in the summer season of the 1999-2001 and 2007, in three key stations (Danube River waters upstream NPP – St.1, thermal effluent – St. 4 and downstream effluent – St.6) 31 species were recorded; zooplankton associations, having relative high densitie...