WorldWideScience

Sample records for exotic beam facility

  1. Euroschool on Exotic Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Pfützner, Marek; The Euroschool on Exotic Beams, vol. IV

    2014-01-01

    This is the forth volume in a series of Lecture Notes based on the highly successful Euro Summer School on Exotic Beams. The aim of these notes is to provide a thorough introduction to radioactive ion-beam physics at the level of graduate students and young postdocs starting out in the field. Each volume covers a range of topics from nuclear theory to experiment and applications. Vol I has been published as LNP 651, Vol II has been published as LNP 700, and Vol. III has been published as LNP 764.

  2. RIB Production at LNL: the EXOTIC Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Mazzocco

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear reactions involving radioactive isotopes are extremely relevant in several astrophysical scenarios, from the Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis to Supernovae explosions. In this contribution the production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) by means of the in-flight technique is reviewed. In particular, the use of direct reactions in inverse kinematics for the production of light weakly-bound RIBs by means of the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL (Italy) will be described in detail.

  3. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  4. Recent results in the study of exotic nuclei using the 'Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil' (RIBRAS) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Guimaraes, V.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Benjamim, E.A.; Faria, P.N. de; Leistenschneider, E.; Gasques, L.R.; Morais, M.C.; Pampa Condori, R.; Pires, K.C.C.; Scarduelli, V.; Zamora, J.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Morcelle, V. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (IF/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Descouvemont, P. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Matematique; Assuncao, M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil); Moro, A.M. [Universidad de Sevilla (Spain). Fac. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear (FAMN); Arazi, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. TANDAR; Barioni, A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The 'Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil' (RIBRAS) facility consists of two super-conducting solenoids of maxi- mum magnetic field B 6.5T, coupled to the 8UD-Pelletron tandem Accelerator installed at the University of Sao Paulo Physics Institute. It is the first radioactive beam facility of the Southern Hemisphere. The production mechanism of the radioactive ions is by transfer reactions, using {sup 9}Be, {sup 3}He, LiF and other production targets, and the forward focused reaction products are selected and focalized by the solenoids into a scattering chamber. Low energy (3-5 MeV/u) radioactive beams of {sup 6}He, {sup 8}Li, {sup 7,10}Be and {sup 8,12}B are produced currently and used to study elastic, inelastic, and transfer reactions on a variety of light, medium mass and heavy ({sup 9}Be, {sup 12}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup 51}V and {sup 120}Sn) secondary targets. The data are analyzed, using most of the time, the Sao Paulo Potential (SPP) and compared to optical model and continuum discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) calculations. The total reaction cross section as a function of energy has been extracted from the elastic scattering data and the role of breakup of weakly bound or exotic nuclei is discussed. Some examples of reactions recently studied are {sup 1}H({sup 8}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 5}He, {sup 1}H({sup 8}Li,{sup 1}H){sup 8}Li using thick (CH{sub 2}){sub n} targets to measure their excitation functions. The transfer reaction {sup 12}C({sup 8}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 16}N, leading to well defined excited states of {sup 16}N, through the transfer of {sup 4}H or the sequential decay {sup 3}H+n, is also being studied. (author)

  5. Recent Astrophysical Studies with Exotic Beams at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL

    2006-02-01

    The availability of exotic beams has produced great opportunities for advances in our understanding of the nucleosynthesis occurring in stellar burning and stellar explosions such as novae, X-ray bursts, and supernovae. In these extreme environments, synthesized radioactive nuclei can undergo subsequent nuclear processing before they decay, and thus to understand these events, we must understand reaction rates involving radioactive nuclei. At the ORNL Holi led Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), we have made several recent measurements using proton-rich beams such as 18F and 7Be and neutron-rich beams such as 82Ge and 84Se that help clarify the structure of astrophysically-important nuclei. We are also poised to begin studies with doubly-magic 132Sn. The experimental methods and results are discussed.

  6. Next-generation fragment separators for exotic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Laura Leigh

    The next generation of nuclear physics research will require advanced exotic beam facilities based on heavy-ion drivers. Exotic beams of rare nuclei will be produced via fragmentation and fission reactions resulting from a high-energy heavy-ion beam hitting a target. A large aperture fragment separator with superconducting magnets is needed for capture, selection, and transport of rare isotopes for experiments. The code COSY INFINTIY uses powerful differential algebra (DA) methods for computing the dynamics of the beam in the fragment separator. A hybrid map-Monte Carlo code has been developed and added to COSY to calculate beam-material interactions. This code tracks the fragmentation and fission of the beam in target and absorber material while computing energy loss and energy and angular straggling as well as charge state evolution of the beam by implementing auxiliary codes such as ATIMA and GLOBAL. EPAX has been utilized to return the cross-sections of fragmentation products. The special case of fission has been treated by integrating the code MCNPX to accurately predict cross-sections and dynamics of exotic beams produced by a 238U beam incident on a Li or C target. Fragment separator designs based on optical symmetries and optimized to be aberration-free are presented. For isotope separation, the Brho-DeltaE-Brho method is used, requiring the addition of an energy absorber. Shaped surfaces are used in order to reduce optical aberrations, resulting in a high-purity rare isotope beam. Beam purity is investigated for four rare isotope production mechanisms, namely light and heavy nuclear fragmentation and light and heavy nuclear fission. Each of these presents unique challenges due to the dynamics of the beam and background contamination produced. Optimized fragment separator settings are presented for each production reaction mechanism and purity results are shown after each selection stage. These include a first- and second-stage achromatic selection and gas

  7. Facilities and methods for radioactive ion beam production

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Van Duppen, P

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive ion beam facilities are transforming nuclear science by making beams of exotic nuclei with various properties available for experiments. New infrastructures and development of existing installations enlarges the scientific scope continuously. An overview of the main production, separation and beam handling methods with focus on recent developments is done, as well as a survey of existing and forthcoming facilities world-wide.

  8. Target materials for exotic ISOL beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, A

    2016-01-01

    The demand for intensity, purity, reliability and availability of short-lived isotopes far from stability is steadily high, and considerably exceeding the supply. In many cases the ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) method can provide beams of high intensity and purity. Limitations in terms of accessible chemical species and minimum half-life are driven mainly by chemical reactions and physical processes inside of the thick target. A wide range of materials are in use, ranging from thin metallic foils and liquids to refractory ceramics, while poly-phasic mixed uranium carbides have become the reference target material for most ISOL facilities world-wide. Target material research and development is often complex and especially important post-irradiation analyses are hindered by the high intrinsic radiotoxicity of these materials. However, recent achievements have proven that these investigations are possible if the effort of different facilities is combined, leading to the development of new material matrices t...

  9. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams; Noyaux exotiques et faisceaux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-12-31

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs.

  10. 14. Euro summer school on exotic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This school is intended for thesis students and young post-docs working in areas related to radioactive beams. It consists of several lecture courses given by specialists in their field, starting from a basic level. This document gathers only the slides of the following presentations: 1) clusters in nuclei, 2) the production of radioactive ion beams - in-flight methods, 3) ab-initio calculations for light nuclei, 4) the production of radioactive ion beams - ISOL methods, 5) neutrons for science, and 6) the production of radioactive ion beams - charge breeding.

  11. Spes: Exotic Beams for Nuclear Physics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Corradetti, Stefano; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesu; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-02-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported.

  12. The radioactive ion beams facility in Brazil RIBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenthaler, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    A double superconducting solenoid system is installed at the Pelletron Laboratory of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This system allows the production of secondary beams of {sup 8}Li, {sup 6}He, {sup 7}Be and other light exotic nuclei. The first results using this facility are presented. (Author)

  13. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  14. ISOL science at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beene, James R [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Tatum, B Alan [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The Holi eld Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated as a National User Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, producing high quality ISOL beams of short-lived, radioactive nuclei for studies of exotic nuclei, astrophysics research, and various societal applications. The primary driver, the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, produces rare isotopes by bombarding highly refractory targets with light ions. The radioactive isotopes are ionized, formed into a beam, mass selected, injected into the 25-MV Tandem, accelerated, and used in experiments. This article reviews HRIBF and its science.

  15. The radioactive beam facility ALTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essabaa, Saïd, E-mail: essabaa@ipno.in2p3.fr; Barré-Boscher, Nicole; Cheikh Mhamed, Maher; Cottereau, Evelyne; Franchoo, Serge; Ibrahim, Fadi; Lau, Christophe; Roussière, Brigitte; Saïd, Abdelhakim; Tusseau-Nenez, Sandrine; Verney, David

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Research at the ALTO TNA-facility. • R and D on radioactive ion sources. • R and D on the lanthanide beam production by fluorination. • Recent developments on uranium carbide targets. -- Abstract: The Transnational Access facility ALTO (TNA07-ENSAR/FP7) has been commissioned and received from the French safety authorities, the operation license. It is allowed to run at nominal intensity to produce 10{sup 11} fissions/s in a thick uranium carbide target by photo-fission using a 10 μA, 50 MeV electron beam. In addition the recent success in operating the selective laser ion source broadens the physics program with neutron-rich nuclear beams possible at this facility installed at IPN Orsay. The facility also aims at being a test bench for the SPIRAL2 project. In that framework an ambitious R and D program on the target ion source system is being developed.

  16. The experimental set-up of the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Nicoletto, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Toniolo, N.; Torresi, D.; Tortone, G.; Anastasio, A.; Bettini, M.; Cassese, C.; Castellani, L.; Corti, D.; Costa, L.; De Fazio, B.; Galet, G.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Pontoriere, G.; Rocco, R.; Romoli, M.; Roscilli, L.; Sandoli, M.; Stroe, L.; Tessaro, M.; Zatti, P. G.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the experimental set-up of the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) in-flight facility EXOTIC consisting of: (a) two position-sensitive Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs), dedicated to the event-by-event tracking of the produced RIBs and to time of flight measurements and (b) the new high-granularity compact telescope array EXPADES (EXotic PArticle DEtection System), designed for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics experiments employing low-energy light RIBs. EXPADES consists of eight ΔE -Eres telescopes arranged in a cylindrical configuration around the target. Each telescope is made up of two Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) with a thickness of 40/60 μm and 300 μm for the ΔE and Eres layer, respectively. Additionally, eight ionization chambers were constructed to be used as an alternative ΔE stage or, in conjunction with the entire DSSSD array, to build up more complex triple telescopes. New low-noise multi-channel charge-sensitive preamplifiers and spectroscopy amplifiers, associated with constant fraction discriminators, peak-and-hold and Time to Amplitude Converter circuits were developed for the electronic readout of the ΔE stage. Application Specific Integrated Circuit-based electronics was employed for the treatment of the Eres signals. An 8-channel, 12-bit multi-sampling 50 MHz Analog to Digital Converter, a Trigger Supervisor Board for handling the trigger signals of the whole experimental set-up and an ad hoc data acquisition system were also developed. The performance of the PPACs, EXPADES and of the associated electronics was obtained offline with standard α calibration sources and in-beam by measuring the scattering process for the systems 17O+58Ni and 17O+208Pb at incident energies around their respective Coulomb barriers and, successively, during the first experimental runs with the RIBs of the EXOTIC facility.

  17. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.B.; Allen, W.R.; Buhl, R.A.; Packan, N.H.; Cook, S.W.; Mansur, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm/sup 2/ in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..m. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Acoustics of finite asymmetric exotic beams: Examples of Airy and fractional Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine the properties of finite asymmetric exotic scalar (acoustic) beams with unusual properties using the angular spectrum decomposition in plane waves. Such beams possess intrinsic uncommon characteristics that make them attractive from the standpoint of particle manipulation, handling and rotation, and possibly other applications in particle clearing and separation. Assuming a specific apodization function at the acoustic source, the angular spectrum function is calculated and used to synthesize the radiated pressure field (i.e., excluding evanescent waves that decay away from the source) in the forward direction of wave motion (i.e., away from the source). Moreover, a generalized hybrid method combining the angular spectrum approach with the multipole expansion formalism in spherical coordinates is developed, which is applicable to any finite beam of arbitrary wavefront. The improved approach allows adequate computation of the resonance scattering, radiation force, and spin torque components on an object of arbitrary shape, located on or off the axis of the incident beam in space. Considering the illustrative example of a viscous fluid sphere submerged in a non-viscous liquid and illuminated by finite asymmetric beams such as the Airy and the Bessel vortex beam with fractional order, numerical computations for the scattering, radiation force, and torque components are performed with an emphasis on the distance from the source, the arbitrary location of the particle ,and the asymmetric nature of the incident field. Moreover, beamforming calculations are presented with supplementary animations for the pressure field distribution in space, with an emphasis on the intrinsic properties of the selected beams. The numerical predictions illustrate the scattering, radiation force, and spin torque properties depending on the beam parameters and the distance separating the sphere from the source. This study provides a generalized

  19. Exotic Optical Beam Classes for Free-Space Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    communications systems through variations in the intensity of light. Unlike longer-wavelength fields like radio waves , however, visible light fields can...of beams with previously unknown correlations could be generated with a simple analytic model amenable to atmospheric propagation studies. In this...correlated beam (NUC), a Gaussian Schell- model beam (GSM), and a coherent Gaussian beam, as a function of propagation distance through moderate

  20. The SPES Radioactive-Ion Beam Facility of INFN

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.; Calabretta, L.

    2015-11-01

    A new radioactive-ion beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using a UCx direct target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam will be provided by a high-current cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions will be produced by proton-induced fission on a uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes will be re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107-109 pps. The aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high-intensity radioactive-ion beams of neutron-rich nuclei for nuclear physics research, as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radioisotope production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  1. The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility of INFN

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; Spes Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-02-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 40 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  2. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  3. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A; Comunian, M; Maggiore, M; Manzolaro, M; Angot, J; Lamy, T

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  4. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrede C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB is a United States Department of Energy user facility currently under construction on the campus of Michigan State University. Based on a 400 kW, 200 MeV/u heavy-ion driver linac, FRIB will deliver high-quality fast, thermalized, and re-accelerated beams of rare isotopes with unprecedented intensities to a variety of experimental areas and equipment. New science opportunities at the frontiers of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries, and societal applications will be enabled by this future world-leading rare-isotope beam facility.

  5. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, C.

    2015-05-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a United States Department of Energy user facility currently under construction on the campus of Michigan State University. Based on a 400 kW, 200 MeV/u heavy-ion driver linac, FRIB will deliver high-quality fast, thermalized, and re-accelerated beams of rare isotopes with unprecedented intensities to a variety of experimental areas and equipment. New science opportunities at the frontiers of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries, and societal applications will be enabled by this future world-leading rare-isotope beam facility.

  6. The ISOLDE Facility: Radioactive beams at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Isope Separation On-Line (ISOL) technique evolved from chemical techniques used to separate radioactive isotopes off-line from irradiated "targets". The ISOL targets of today, used at e.g. ISOLDE, can be of many different types and in different phases but the isotopes are always delivered at very low energies making the technique ideal for study of ground state properties and collections for other applications such as solid state physics and medical physics. The possibility of accelerating these low energy beams for nuclear structure studies, and in the long term future for neutrino physics, is now being explored at first generation radioactive beam facilities. The upgrade towards HIE-ISOLDE aim to consolidate ISOLDE's position as a world leading radioactive nuclear beam facility and it will be a pre-cursor to a future all European ISOL facility, EURISOL, with order of magnitudes higher radioactive beam intensities and energies. Prerequisite knowledge and references: None

  7. A neutron beam facility at Spiral-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledoux, X.; Bauge, E.; Belier, G.; Ethvignot, T.; Taieb, J.; Varignon, C. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France); Andriamonje, S.; Dore, D.; Dupont, E.; Gunsing, F.; Ridikas, D.; Takibayev, A. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SPhN, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blideanu, V. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/Senac, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, 33 (France); Ban, G.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marie, N.; Steckmeyer, J.C. [LPC, 14 - Caen (France); Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G. [IPHC, 57 - Strasbourg (France); Bem, P.; Mrazek, J.; Novak, J. [NPI, Rez (Czech Republic); Blomgren, J.; Pomp, S. [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (Sweden); Fischer, U.; Herber, S.; Simakov, S.P. [FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Jacquot, B.; Rejmund, F. [GANIL, 14 - Caen (France); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Borcea, C.; Negoita, F.; Petrascu, M. [NIPNE, Bucharest (Romania); Oberstedt, S.; Plompen, A.J.M. [JRC/IRMM, Geel (Belgium); Shcherbakov, O. [PNPI, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Fallot, M. [Subatech, 44 - Nantes (France); Smith, A.G.; Tsekhanovich, I. [Manchester Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Serot, O.; Sublet, J.C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Perrot, L.; Tassan-Got, L. [IPNO, 91 - Orsay (France); Caillaud, T.; Giot, L.; Landoas, O.; Ramillon, J.M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I. [CIMAP, 14 - Caen (France); Balanzat, E.; Bouffard, S.; Guillous, S.; Oberstedt, A. [Orebro Univ. (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    The future Spiral-2 facility, dedicated to the production of intense radioactive ion beams, is based on a high-power superconducting driver Linac, delivering high-intensity deuteron, proton and heavy ion beams. These beams are particularly well suited to the production of neutrons in the 100 keV- 40 MeV energy range, a facility called 'Neutrons for Science' (NFS) will be built in the LINAG Experimental Area (LEA). NFS, operational in 2012, will be composed of a pulsed neutron beam for in-flight measurements and irradiation stations for activation measurements and material studies. Thick C and Be converters and a deuteron beam will produce an intense continuous neutron spectrum, while a thin {sup 7}Li target and a proton beam allow to generate quasi-mono-energetic neutrons. In the present work we show how the primary ion beam characteristics (energy, time resolution and intensity) are adequate to create a neutron time-of-flight facility delivering intense neutron fluxes in the 100 keV-40 MeV energy range. Irradiation stations for neutron, proton and deuteron reactions will also allow to perform cross-section measurements by means of the activation technique. Light-ion beams will be used to study radiation damage effects on materials for the nuclear industry. (authors)

  8. Beam Instrumentation for the Single Electron DAFNE Beam Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitelli, G; Valente, P; Vescovi, M

    2003-01-01

    The DAΦNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) has been successfully commissioned in February 2002, and started operation in November of the same year. Although the BTF is a beam transfer line optimized for single particle production, mainly for high energy detectors calibration, it can provide electrons and positrons in a wide range of multiplicity: between 1-1010, with energies from a few tens of MeV up to 800 MeV. The large multiplicity range requires many different diagnostic devices, from high-energy calorimeters and ionization/fluorescence chambers in the few particles range, to standard beam diagnostics systems. The schemes of operation, the commissioning results, as well as the beam diagnostics are presented.

  9. A radioactive ion beam facility using photofission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, William T.

    1999-08-01

    Use of a high-power electron linac as the driver accelerator for a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is proposed. An electron beam of 30 MeV and 100 kW can produce nearly 5×10 13 fissions/s from an optimized 235U target and about 60% of this from a natural uranium target. An electron beam can be readily transmitted through a thin window at the exit of the accelerator vacuum system and transported a short distance through air to a water-cooled Bremsstrahlung-production target. The Bremsstrahlung radiation can, in turn, be transported through air to the isotope-production target. This separates the accelerator vacuum system, the Bremsstrahlung target and the isotope-production target, reducing remote handling problems. The electron beam can be scanned over a large target area to reduce the power density on both the Bremsstrahlung and isotope-production targets. These features address one of the most pressing technological challenges of a high-power RIB facility, namely the production of high yields of neutron-rich ions with reasonable power density in the target. The cost of an electron linac of the required specifications, including the facility shielding, is significantly less than the cost of any other primary-beam accelerator that could produce a comparable fission yield. A high-power electron linac could also be used with a multifoil helium-jet target. A large number of thin uranium foils could be irradiated with the scanned Bremsstrahlung beam and the fission fragments captured in aerosol-loaded helium and transported to an ion source that is well removed from the intense radiation fields of the primary target. The fission yield would be less than 1% of that available from a thick target, but this approach might be the easiest technical solution to obtain useable yields with manageable radiation-safety problems.

  10. A radioactive ion beam facility using photofission

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1999-01-01

    Use of a high-power electron linac as the driver accelerator for a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is proposed. An electron beam of 30 MeV and 100 kW can produce nearly 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 fissions/s from an optimized sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U target and about 60% of this from a natural uranium target. An electron beam can be readily transmitted through a thin window at the exit of the accelerator vacuum system and transported a short distance through air to a water-cooled Bremsstrahlung-production target. The Bremsstrahlung radiation can, in turn, be transported through air to the isotope-production target. This separates the accelerator vacuum system, the Bremsstrahlung target and the isotope-production target, reducing remote handling problems. The electron beam can be scanned over a large target area to reduce the power density on both the Bremsstrahlung and isotope-production targets. These features address one of the most pressing technological challenges of a high-power RIB facility, namely the production o...

  11. A Polarized High-Energy Photon Beam for Production of Exotic Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senderovich, Igor [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This work describes design, prototyping and testing of various components of the Jefferson Lab Hall D photon beamline. These include coherent bremsstrahlung radiators to be used in this facility for generating the photon beam, a fine resolution hodoscope for the facility's tagging spectrometer, and a photon beam position sensor for stabilizing the beam on a collimator. The principal instrumentation project was the hodoscope: its design, implementation and beam testing will be thoroughly described. Studies of the coherent bremsstrahlung radiators involved X-ray characterization of diamond crystals to identify the appropriate line of manufactured radiators and the proper techniques for thinning them to the desired specification of the beamline. The photon beam position sensor project involved completion of a designed detector and its beam test. The results of these shorter studies will also be presented. The second part of this work discusses a Monte Carlo study of a possible photo-production and decay channel in the GlueX experiment that will be housed in the Hall D facility. Specifically, the γ p → Xp → b1 π → ω π+1 π-1 channel was studied including its Amplitude Analysis. This exercise attempted to generate a possible physics signal, complete with internal angular momentum states, and be able to reconstruct the signal in the detector and find the proper set of JPC quantum numbers through an amplitude fit. Derivation of the proper set of amplitudes in the helicity basis is described, followed by a discussion of the implementation, generation of the data sets, reconstruction techniques, the amplitude fit and results of this study.

  12. MINOS: A vertex tracker coupled to a thick liquid-hydrogen target for in-beam spectroscopy of exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obertelli, A.; Delbart, A.; Anvar, S.; Audirac, L.; Authelet, G.; Bruyneel, B.; Calvet, D.; Chateau, F.; Corsi, A.; Gheller, J.M.; Giganon, A.; Lahonde-Hamdoun, C.; Leboeuf, D.; Loiseau, D.; Mohamed, A.; Mols, J.P.; Peron, C.; Peyaud, A.; Pollacco, E.C.; Prono, G.; Rousse, J.Y.; Santamaria, C. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Baba, H.; Doornenbal, P.; Otsu, H.; Uesaka, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    MINOS is a new apparatus dedicated to in-beam nuclear structure experiments with low-intensity exotic beams in inverse kinematics at intermediate energies above 150 MeV/nucleon. The device is composed of a thick liquid-hydrogen target coupled to a compact time projection chamber (TPC) serving as a vertex tracker. Either used for in-beam gamma spectroscopy of bound excited states or invariant-mass spectroscopy of unbound states, MINOS aims at improving the luminosity by a very significant factor compared to standard solid-target material experiments while improving experimental resolutions. (orig.)

  13. Radioactive Ion Beam Development at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Stracener, Dan; Beene, James R; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Blackmon, Jeff C; Carter, Ken; Dowling, Darryl; Juras, Raymond; Kawai, Yoko; Kronenberg, Andreas; Liu, Yuan; Meigs, Martha; Müller, Paul; Spejewski, Eugene H; Tatum, A

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive beams are produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) technique. Radioactive nuclei are produced in a thick target via irradiation with energetic light ions (protons, deuterons, helium isotopes) and then post-accelerated to a few MeV/nucleon for use in nuclear physics experiments. An overview of radioactive beam development at the HRIBF will be presented, including ion source development, improvements in the ISOL production targets, and a description of techniques to improve the quality (intensity and purity) of the beams. Facilities for radioactive ion beam development include two ion source test facilities, a target/ion source preparation and quality assurance facility, and an in-beam test facility where low intensity production beams are used. A new test facility, the High Power Target Laboratory, will be available later this year. At this facility, high intensity production beams will be available t...

  14. Exotic nuclei studied via the (d,3He) reaction with `fastâ' and `not-so-fast' beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuosmaa, Alan

    2017-09-01

    Proton-removal reactions open a window to the properties of exotic neutron-rich nuclei that is complementary to neutron-adding reactions that have been the focus of considerable recent study. Nucleon removal probes not only the states populated in the final nucleus, but also the ground-state wave function of target, and can reveal connections between the initial and final states as well as providing detailed information about the filling of nuclear shells. For exotic nuclei, reactions typically must be performed in inverse kinematics with weak secondary beams. While the reduced beam intensities introduce technical challenges, the inverse-kinematic regime gives access to additional experimental observables that can provide clean signatures for weak transitions that might otherwise not be visible. I will describe two examples of neutron-rich nuclei studied with the proton-removing (d,3He) reaction studied with different approaches: possible proton-intruder configurations in neutron-rich boron isotopes 13,14B produced from 14,15C beams near the Coulomb barrier, and a new determination of the properties of the `super-heavy' isotope of hydrogen 5H from `fast' 6He beams. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, under Grants DE-FG02-04ER41320, DE-SC0014552, DE-AC02-06CH11357, and DE-FG02-87ER40316, and the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-1068217, PHY-1068192 and PHY-1102511.

  15. National facility for neutron beam research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sign and development of a stainless steel framework as a holding device etc., to enable nickel coating of some 400 glass plates. A high vacuum coating plant was ... and actinides showing exotic magnetic properties. (ii) Quasi-elastic scattering studies using MARX (multi angle reflecting crystal) spectrometer have related to:.

  16. Beam instrumentation in a multidisciplinary accelerator facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, J.M.; Boon, S.N.; Dermois, O.C.; Kiewiet, H.H.

    Some recently developed beam diagnostic devices for the beam lines of the AGOR cyclotron are reviewed. The range of applications is from low background nuclear physics experiments at "zero degree" to radiation therapy with proton beams. In particular a method to improve beam quality and the

  17. Beam Line Design for the CERN Hiradmat Test Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Hessler, C.; Assmann, R.; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Weterings, W

    2009-01-01

    The LHC phase II collimation project requires beam shock and impact tests of materials used for beam intercepting devices. Similar tests are also of great interest for other accelerator components such as beam entrance/exit windows and protection devices. For this purpose a dedicated High Radiation Material test facility (HiRadMat) is under study. This facility may be installed at CERN at the location of a former beam line. This paper describes the associated beam line which is foreseen to de...

  18. {gamma}-spectroscopy and radioactive beams: search for highly deformed exotic nuclei; Detection {gamma} et faisceaux radioactifs: recherche de noyaux exotiques tres deformes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosse, B

    2006-07-15

    This work is devoted to the search for highly deformed nuclei under extreme conditions of isospin, located near the proton drip-line, around A {approx} 130. The experiment was performed at GANIL (Caen) with the SPIRAL radioactive beam facility. The nuclei of interest were produced by fusion-evaporation reactions induced by the neutron deficient Kr{sup 76} radioactive beam (T1/2 = 14.8 h). {gamma}-rays were detected by the EXOGAM array, composed of 11 segmented germanium clover detectors, for which a new segment calibration method has been developed. To extract fusion-evaporation events of a overwhelming background due to the radioactivity of the beam, the EXOGAM array was coupled with the light charged particle detector DIAMANT and the high acceptance VAMOS spectrometer. The latter was used for the first time to detect fusion-evaporation residues. The detailed data analysis allowed us to demonstrate that the EXOGAM + DIAMANT + VAMOS coupling is operational and essential to investigate the structure of these nuclei. Furthermore, the first {gamma} transition was observed in the very exotic odd-odd Pm{sup 130} nucleus. The results have been interpreted with static and dynamic self-consistent microscopic calculations in collaboration with the Theoretical Physicists of the IPN Lyon. (author)

  19. Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Development and Status

    CERN Document Server

    Tatum, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a national user facility dedicated to nuclear structure, reactions, and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) using the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique. An integrated strategic plan for physics, experimental systems, and RIB production facilities have been developed and implementation of the plan is under way. Specific research objectives are defined for studying the nature of nucleonic matter, the origin of elements, solar physics, and synthesis of heavy elements. Experimental systems upgrade plans include new detector arrays and beam lines, and expansion and upgrade of existing devices. A multifaceted facility expansion plan includes a $4.75M High Power Target Laboratory (HPTL), presently under construction, to provide a facility for testing new target materials, target geometries, ion sources, and beam preparation techniques. Additional planned upgrades include a second RIB production system (IRIS2), an external axi...

  20. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  1. Production of exotic, short lived carbon isotopes in ISOL-type facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Franberg, Hanna; Köster, Ulli; Ammann, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The beam intensities of short-lived carbon isotopes at Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facilities have been limited in the past for technical reasons. The production of radioactive ion beams of carbon isotopes is currently of high interest for fundamental nuclear physics research. To produce radioactive ions a target station consisting of a target in a container connected to an ion source via a transfer line is commonly used. The target is heated to vaporize the product for transport. Carbon in elementary form is a very reactive element and react strongly with hot metal surfaces. Due to the strong chemisorption interaction, in the target and ion source unit, the atoms undergo significant retention on their way from the target to the ion source. Due to this the short lived isotopes decays and are lost leading to low ion yields. A first approach to tackle these limitations consists of incorporating the carbon atoms into less reactive molecules and to use materials for the target housing and the transfer line ...

  2. ECR ion source based low energy ion beam facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mass analyzed highly charged ion beams of energy ranging from a few keV to a few MeV plays an important role in various aspects of research in modern physics. In this paper a unique low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) set up at Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) for providing low and medium energy multiply charged ion ...

  3. Extraction and beam transfer for the SHiP facility

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, Brennan; Borburgh, Jan; Balhan, Bruno; Le Godec, Gilles; Zerlauth, Markus; Tommasini, Davide; Kain, Verena; Cornelis, Karel; Wenninger, Jorg; Jensen, Lars; Todd, Benjamin; Bauche, Jeremie; Puccio, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    This document summarises the key feasibility issues associated with the SPS extraction and beam transfer systems required for the SHiP facility. It describes the expected performance limits of the electrostatic septa, the expected beam losses during extraction and consequences, the design of the new beamline geometry and equipment systems and the expected extracted spill structure.

  4. Nuclear Structure Studies of Exotic Nuclei with Radioactive Ion Beams A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winger, Jeff Allen [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Beta-decay spectroscopy provides important information on nuclear structure and properties needed to understand topics as widely varied as fundamental nuclear astrophysics to applied nuclear reactor design. However, there are significant limitations of our knowledge due to an inability to experimentally measure everything. Therefore, it is often necessary to rely on theoretical calculations which need to be vetted with experimental results. The focus of this report will be results from experimental research performed by the Principal Investigator (PI) and his research group at Mississippi State University in which the group played the lead role in proposing, implementing, performing and analyzing the experiment. This research was carried out at both the National Superconduction Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The primary emphasis of the research was the use of \\bdec spectroscopy as a tool to understand the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei which could then be applied to improve theory and to increase the overall knowledge of nuclear structure.

  5. A beam expander facility for studying x-ray optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Frederiksen, P.

    1992-01-01

    The detailed study of the performance of full scale x-ray optics often requires the illumination of large areas. This paper describes a beam expander facility at the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Facility. It combines monochromatization and beam expansion in one dimension. The beam expansion...... x-ray telescope will be studied, is described in detail. Review of Scientific Instruments is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....... is obtained from an extremely asymmetric reflection in a large single crystal of Si. An expansion of a factor of 50 was obtained in one dimension. The expanded beam of ~85 mm is limited only by the crystal size. The facility is installed in a 12-m-long hutch. A specific application, in which a high throughput...

  6. Beam position and phase measurements of microampere beams at the Michigan State University REA3 facility

    CERN Document Server

    Crisp, J; Durickovic, B; Kiupel, G; Krause, S; Leitner, D; Nash, S; Rodriguez, J A; Russo, T; Webber, R; Wittmer, W; Eddy, N; Briegel, C; Fellenz, B; Slimmer, D; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    A high power CW, heavy ion linac will be the driver accelerator for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being designed at Michigan State University (MSU). The linac requires a Beam Position Monitoring (BPM) system with better than 100 micron resolution at 100 microamperes beam current. A low beam current test of the candidate technology, button pick-ups and direct digital down-conversion signal processing, was conducted in the ReA3 re-accelerated beam facility at Michigan State University. The test is described. Beam position and phase measurement results, demonstrating ~250 micron and ~1.5 degree resolution in a 45 kHz bandwidth for a 1.0 microampere beam current, are reported.

  7. Beam Diagnostic Devices and Data Acquisition for the HICAT Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, A; Schwickert, M

    2005-01-01

    A set of 92 diagnostic devices for beam diagnostics in the heavy ion cancer therapy facility (HICAT) at the university hospital in Heidelberg is currently under development at GSI. For the HICAT facility that is presently under construction, all beam diagnostic devices will be fully computer controlled and will allow an automated detection of all relevant beam parameters. The HICAT raster scan method with active variation of intensity, energy and beam size requires the exact knowledge of the time resolved and spatial structure of the ion beam. An overview of the integrated devices is presented, particularly the time-of-flight method for energy measurement in the Linac is described in detail. The real-time PXI data acquisition system using Acqiris ADC modules with a sampling rate of 4 GSa/s and 1 GHz analog bandwidth, is reviewed. Additionally, the embedding of the diagnostics devices in the timing and control system of HICAT is described.

  8. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  9. CERN AWAKE Facility Readiness for First Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Butterworth, Andrew; Damerau, Heiko; Döbert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentin; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Gschwendtner, Edda; Höfle, Wolfgang; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Vincke, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN was approved in August 2013 and since then a big effort was made to be able to probe the acceleration of electrons before the "2019-2020 Long Shutdown". The next steps in this challenging schedule will be a dry run of all the beam line systems, at the end of the HW commissioning in June 2016, and the first proton beam sent to the plasma cell one month later. The current status of the project is presented together with an outlook over the foreseen works for operation with electrons in 2018.

  10. The ISOLDE Facility: Radioactive beams at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Some of the experimental techniques used will be introduced; more focus will be put on what physics questions can be answered by using radioactive beams. A brief overview is given of the present and future European developments in this rapidly evolving field. Prerequisite knowledge: none

  11. Muon Beam Studies in the H4 beam line and the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++)

    CERN Document Server

    Margraf, Rachel; CERN. Geneva. EN Department

    2017-01-01

    In this report, I summarize my work of detailed study and optimization of the muon beam configuration of H4 beam line in SPS North Area. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, I studied the properties and behavior of the muon beam in combination with the field of the large, spectrometer “ GOLIATH” magnet at -1.5, -1.0, 0, 1.0 and 1.5 Tesla, which is shown to affect the central x position of the muon beam that is delivered to the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++). I also studied the muon beam for different configurations of the two XTDV beam dumps upstream of GIF++ in the H4 beam line. I will also discuss my role in mapping the magnetic field of the GOLIATH magnet in the H4 beam line.

  12. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y; Cui, B; Ma, R; Tang, B; Chen, L; Huang, Q; Jiang, W

    2014-02-01

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org, p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30-300 keV/1 pA-10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  13. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Olvegård

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high-intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addressed experimentally at the CLIC test facility where up to 55% of the power is extracted from the beam in the test beam line, a small-scale version of the CLIC drive-beam decelerator, leaving the beam with a very wide energy profile. For monitoring of the transverse beam profile and Twiss parameters we use optical transition radiation screens and quadrupole scans. The intra-pulse-train energy spectrum before and after deceleration is measured with segmented beam dumps. In this paper we discuss the performance of these diagnostic devices with a particular emphasis on the large energy spread and its effect on the beam imaging techniques, and with a final outlook to the CLIC drive-beam diagnostics.

  14. Spallation RI beam facility and heavy element nuclear chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagame, Yuichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    An outline of the spallation RI (Radioactive Ion) beam facility is presented. Neutron-rich nuclides are produced in the reaction of high intensity (10-1000 {mu}A) protons with energy of 1.5 GeV and an uranium carbide target. Produced nuclides are ionized in an isotope separator on-line (ISOL) and accelerated by the JAERI tandem and the booster linac. Current progress and a future project on the development of the RI beam facility are given. Studies of transactinide elements, including the synthesis of superheavy elements, nuclear structure far from stability, and RI-probed material science are planned with RI beams. An outlook of the transactinide nuclear chemistry studies using neutron-rich RI beams is described. (author)

  15. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  16. New developments on preparation of cooled and bunched Radioactive Ion beams at ISOL facilities the ISCOOL project and the rotating wall cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Podadera-Aliseda, I

    2006-01-01

    The future of physics research with radioactive isotopes is linked to the development of more accurate and specific experiments which will work with more exotic and energetic nuclei. Requirements from experiments are getting more and more stringent and represent a big challenge for the preparation of ion beams, since each one demands different optical specifications to optimize its setup and improve its results. This thesis focuses on the new developments achieved in preparation of RIB's (Radioactive Ion Beams) at ISOL facilities. Optical beam improvements based on cooling and bunching are the main points of the work. The design of a new general purpose second generation RFQCB (Radio Frequency ion Quadrupole Cooler and Buncher) for ISOLDE, the oldest ISOL facility, will be completely described. Nowadays, RFQCB's are one of the most important devices in the beam preparation stage thanks to the capacity to cool and bunch low-intensity ion beams quickly, easily and with great efficiency. The thesis will detail t...

  17. Transmitted Laser Beam Diagnostic at the Omega Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, C; Antonini, G; Compton, S; Glenzer, S; Hargrove, D; Moody, J; Kirkwood, R; Rekow, V; Sorce, C; Armstrong, W; Bahr, R; Keck, R; Pien, G; Seka, W; Thorp, K

    2004-04-01

    We have developed and commissioned a transmitted beam diagnostic (TBD) for the 2{omega} high intensity interaction beam at the Omega laser facility. The TBD consists of a bare-surface reflector mounted near the target, which collects and reflects 4% of the transmitted light to a detector assembly outside the vacuum chamber. The detector includes a time integrating near-field camera that measures beam spray, deflection and the absolute transmitted power. We present a detailed description of the instrument and the calibration method and include first measurements on laser heated gasbag targets to demonstrate the performance of the diagnostic.

  18. Prospects for high-power radioactive beam facilities worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, Jerry A

    2003-01-01

    Advances in accelerators, targets, ion sources, and experimental instrumentation are making possible ever more powerful facilities for basic and applied research with short-lived radioactive isotopes. There are several current generation facilities, based on a variety of technologies, operating worldwide. These include, for example, those based on the in-flight method such as the recently upgraded National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, the facility at RIKEN in Japan, GANIL in Caen, France, and GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Present facilities based on the Isotope-Separator On-Line method include, for example, the ISOLDE laboratory at CERN, HRIBF at Oak Ridge, and the new high-power facility ISAC at TRIUMF in Vancouver. Next-generation facilities include the Radioactive-Ion Factory upgrade of RIKEN to higher energy and intensity and the upgrade of ISAC to a higher energy secondary beam; both of these projects are in progress. A new project, LINAG, to upgrade the capabilities at...

  19. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  20. A button - type beam position monitor design for TARLA facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gündoğan, M. Tural, E-mail: mugetural@yahoo.com; Yavaş, Ö., E-mail: yavas@ankara.edu.tr [Dept. of Eng. of Physics, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey); Kaya, Ç., E-mail: c.kaya@ankara.edu.tr [Institute of Accelerator Technologies, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) facility is proposed as an IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility as the first facility of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC). TARLA is essentially proposed to generate oscillator mode FEL in 3-250 microns wavelengths range, will consist of normal conducting injector system with 250 keV beam energy, two superconducting RF accelerating modules in order to accelerate the beam 15-40 MeV. The TARLA facility is expected to provide two modes, Continuous wave (CW) and pulsed mode. Longitudinal electron bunch length will be changed between 1 and 10 ps. The bunch charge will be limited by 77pC. The design of the Button-type Beam Position Monitor for TARLA IR FEL is studied to operate in 1.3 GHz. Mechanical antenna design and simulations are completed considering electron beam parameters of TARLA. Ansoft HFSS and CST Particle Studio is used to compare with results of simulations.

  1. Submicro and Nano Structured Porous Materials for the Production of High-Intensity Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Stora, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    ISOLDE, the CERN Isotope Separator On-line DEvice is a unique source of low energy beams of radioactive isotopes - atomic nuclei that have too many or too few neutrons to be stable. The facility is like a small ‘chemical factory’, giving the possibility of changing one element to another, by selecting the atomic mass of the required isotope beam in the mass separator, rather as the ‘alchemists’ once imagined. It produces a total of more than 1000 different isotopes from helium to radium, with half-lives down to milliseconds, by impinging a 1.4 GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) onto special targets, yielding a wide variety of atomic fragments. Different components then extract the nuclei and separate them according to mass. The post-accelerator REX (Radioactive beam EXperiment) at ISOLDE accelerates the radioactive beams up to 3 MeV/u for many experiments. A wide international user radioactive ion beam (RIB) community investigates fundamental aspects of nuclear physics, particle...

  2. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Gencer, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between View the MathML source10μA and View the MathML source1.2mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam ...

  3. The PRESPEC liquid-hydrogen target for in-beam gamma spectroscopy of exotic nuclei at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louchart, C.; Gheller, J. M.; Chesny, Ph.; Authelet, G.; Rousse, J. Y.; Obertelli, A.; Boutachkov, P.; Pietri, S.; Ameil, F.; Audirac, L.; Corsi, A.; Dombradi, Z.; Gerl, J.; Gillibert, A.; Korten, W.; Mailleret, C.; Merchan, E.; Nociforo, C.; Pietralla, N.; Ralet, D.; Reese, M.; Stepanov, V.

    2014-02-01

    We report on a new liquid hydrogen and deuterium target dedicated to in-beam γ spectroscopy experiments in inverse kinematics at relativistic incident energies at GSI/FAIR. Target thicknesses from 10 to 80 mm can be achieved for an effective diameter of 60 mm. The target-cell and entrance window are maded of 200 μm thick Mylar. The design has the advantage of being free of absorbing material at forward angles and 90°, allowing the detection of photons in a wide angular range. A commissioning experiment with a 54Cr beam at 130 MeV/nucleon has been performed at GSI, using the Rare Isotopes INvestigation at GSI (RISING) detectors. The target has been shown to behave as expected and is ready for experiments at fragmentation Radioactive-Ion Beam Facilities.

  4. Towards multi-hit readout of TPCs for exotic beam tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, Timothy; Enders, Joachim; Hucka, Jan-Paul; Schlemme, Steffen [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Super-FRS beam diagnostics system supports the set up and adjustment of the separator and provides tracking and event-by-event particle identification. A TPC-type detector with GEM amplification and with multi-hit single-strip readout is proposed to be used as a tracking detector. The main challenges for such a detector are position resolution below 1 mm, high dynamic range (1000) and high-efficiency tracking up to 10 MHz ion rate. One of the planned improvements towards a high-rate capability of single-ion tracking is the multi-hit readout of the TPC detectors. Present TPC detectors with delay-line readout were tested with multihit electronics at the GSI fragment separator FRS with Au beam at 1 GeV/nucl. up to 150 kHz. Results are presented in comparison to single-hit readout.

  5. Radioactive beam EXperiments at ISOLDE : Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer reactions of exotic nuclei.

    CERN Multimedia

    Kugler, E; Ratzinger, U; Wenander, F J C

    2002-01-01

    % IS347 \\\\ \\\\We propose to perform a pilot experiment to study very neutron rich (A<32) Na-Mg and (A<52) K-Ca isotopes in the region around the neutron shell closures of N=20 and N=28 after Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer, and to demonstrate highly efficient and cost-effective ways to bunch, charge-state breed and accelerate already existing mass-separated singly-charged radioactive ion beams. \\\\ \\\\To do this we plan to accelerate the ISOLDE beams up to 2~MeV/u by means of a novel acceleration scheme and to install an efficient $\\gamma$-ray array for low-multiplicity events around the target position.

  6. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Physics, Auckland Park (South Africa); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  7. Extraction simulations and emittance measurements of a Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility electron beam plasma source for radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, A. J. II; Liu, Y. [Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a variety of ion sources used to produce radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Of these, the workhorse is an electron beam plasma (EBP) ion source. The recent addition of a second RIB injector, the Injector for Radioactive Ion Species 2 (IRIS2), for the HRIBF tandem accelerator prompted new studies of the optics of the beam extraction from the EBP source. The source was modeled using SIMION V8.0, and results will be presented, including comparison of the emittances as predicted by simulation and as measured at the HRIBF offline ion source test facilities. Also presented will be the impact on phase space shape resulting from extraction optics modifications implemented at IRIS2.

  8. Prospects for electron scattering on unstable, exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Toshimi; Simon, Haik

    2017-09-01

    Electron scattering off radioactive ions becomes feasible for the first time due to advances in storage ring and trapping techniques in conjunction with intense secondary beams from novel beam facilities. Using a point-like purely leptonic probe enables the investigation of charge distributions and electromagnetic excitations in β-unstable exotic nuclei with an enhanced overshoot in proton and neutron numbers and the use of QED, one of the most precisely studied theories, for describing the scattering process.

  9. An irradiation facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological studies

    CERN Document Server

    Besserer, J; Dellert, M; Gahn, C; Moosburger, M; Pemler, P; Quicken, P; Distel, L; Schuessler, H

    1999-01-01

    A vertical beam facility for radiobiological experiments was designed and constructed at the Munich Tandem-Accelerator Laboratory. The main part of the facility is a 90 deg. dipole magnet bending the beam of protons or heavy particles into a vertical upward direction, which is advantageous for wet-cell irradiation. After collimation the beam is spread out passively by thin scattering foils and dynamically by magnetic coils. A homogeneity of the radiation field better than +-5% has been achieved over the diameter of the exit window of 60 mm. The dose rate can be widely adjusted from single particles to more than 10 sup 1 sup 0 particles (i.e. hundreds of Grays) per second. The dose measurement is based on single-particle counting and on standard dosimeters. The detector system for dosimetry and irradiation control is described. In a first radiobiological experiment the cell survival of chinese hamster cells was measured after irradiation with 22.7 MeV protons and compared with the X-ray result.

  10. The PRESPEC liquid-hydrogen target for in-beam gamma spectroscopy of exotic nuclei at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louchart, C., E-mail: C.Louchart-Henning@gsi.de [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gheller, J.M.; Chesny, Ph.; Authelet, G.; Rousse, J.Y.; Obertelli, A. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Boutachkov, P. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); IKP, TU Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, S.; Ameil, F. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Audirac, L.; Corsi, A. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dombradi, Z. [ATOMKI, P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Gerl, J. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Gillibert, A.; Korten, W.; Mailleret, C. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Merchan, E. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); IKP, TU Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Nociforo, C. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietralla, N.; Ralet, D. [IKP, TU Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2014-02-01

    We report on a new liquid hydrogen and deuterium target dedicated to in-beam γ spectroscopy experiments in inverse kinematics at relativistic incident energies at GSI/FAIR. Target thicknesses from 10 to 80 mm can be achieved for an effective diameter of 60 mm. The target-cell and entrance window are maded of 200μm thick Mylar. The design has the advantage of being free of absorbing material at forward angles and 90°, allowing the detection of photons in a wide angular range. A commissioning experiment with a {sup 54}Cr beam at 130 MeV/nucleon has been performed at GSI, using the Rare Isotopes INvestigation at GSI (RISING) detectors. The target has been shown to behave as expected and is ready for experiments at fragmentation Radioactive-Ion Beam Facilities. -- Highlights: • We report on a new liquid hydrogen target for gamma spectroscopy experiments at FAIR. • A commissioning experiment has been performed at GSI, using the RISING detectors. • The target behaves as expected and is ready for experiments.

  11. Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

  12. Progress report of the innovated KIST ion beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joonkon; Eliades, John A.; Yu, Byung-Yong; Lim, Weon Cheol; Chae, Keun Hwa; Song, Jonghan, E-mail: jonghansong@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, Seoul, Republic of (S.) Korea) ion beam facility consists of three electrostatic accelerators: a 400 kV single ended ion implanter, a 2 MV tandem accelerator system and a 6 MV tandem accelerator system. The 400 kV and 6 MV systems were purchased from High Voltage Engineering Europa (HVEE, Netherlands) and commissioned in 2013, while the 2 MV system was purchased from National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC, USA) in 1995. These systems are used to provide traditional ion beam analysis (IBA), isotope ratio analysis (ex. accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS), and ion implantation/irradiation for domestic industrial and academic users. The main facility is the 6 MV HVEE Tandetron system that has an AMS line currently used for {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36} Cl, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 129}I analyses, and three lines for IBA that are under construction. Here, these systems are introduced with their specifications and initial performance results.

  13. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccaria, P. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: pierluigi.zaccaria@igi.cnr.it; Dal Bello, S. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Marcuzzi, D. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Masiello, A. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Cordier, J.J. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Hemsworth, R. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Antipenkov, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Day, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dremel, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mack, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jones, T. [UKAEA Culham EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coniglio, A. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Pillon, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Sandri, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Speth, E. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Tanga, A. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Antoni, V. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Pietro, E. Di [EFDA CSU, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mondino, P.L. [EFDA CSU, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER international team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D{sup -} ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimise the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring.

  14. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccaria, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Coniglio, A.; Antoni, V. [Consorzio RFX Association Euratom-ENEA, Padova (Italy); Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (DSM/DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Antipenkov, A.; Day, C.; Dremel, M.; Mack, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Physik; Pillon, M.; Sandri, S. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia; Speth, E.; Tanga, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP CSU, Garching (Germany); Jones, T. [UKAEA Culham Euratom/Ukaea Fusion Association Culham Science Centre, Abingdom OX (United Kingdom); Di Pietro, E.; Mondino, P.L. [EFDA CSU, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER International Team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D{sup -} ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimize the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring. (authors)

  15. Recent developments and research projects at the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H., E-mail: yamag@cns.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubono, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502,Japan (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y.K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D.N.; Khiem, L.H.; Duy, N.N. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, HaNoi (Viet Nam)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • CRIB is a unique low-energy RI beam separator of the University of Tokyo. • CRIB has been produced various RI beams mainly on the proton-rich side. • The major topics studied at CRIB are resonant scatterings and (alpha, p) reactions. • Strong alpha resonances were observed with {sup 7}Be + alpha resonant scattering. -- Abstract: CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. An overview of the recent developments and status of CRIB, including a detailed summary of beam parameters, is presented. Studies on proton and α resonant scatterings, direct measurements of (α,p) reactions, and other types of measurements (β-decay lifetimes, etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests in astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be + α resonant scattering is discussed.

  16. Development of beam instruments at JAERI cyclotron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Ishibori, Ikuo; Agematsu, Takashi; Yokota, Watalu; Nara, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiteru; Arakawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A beam phase monitor and two kinds of fluence distribution monitors have been developed for measuring characteristics of cyclotron beams. The beam phase monitor provides a beam phase signal for tuning a beam chopping system and a beam phase selection system. A two-dimensional fluence distribution on a large area is measured with fluence distribution monitors. (author)

  17. Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

    1984-11-13

    The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

  18. The Beam Profile Monitoring System for the CERN IRRAD Proton Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ravotti, F; Glaser, M; Matli, E; Pezzullo, G; Gan, K K; Kagan, H; Smith, S; Warner, J D

    2016-01-01

    To perform proton irradiation experiments, CERN built during LS1 a new irradiation facility in the East Area at the Proton Synchrotron accelerator. At this facility, named IR-RAD, a high-intensity 24 GeV/c proton beam is used. During beam steering and irradiation, the intensity and the transverse profile of the proton beam are monitored online with custom-made Beam Profile Monitor (BPM) devices. In this work, we present the design and the architecture of the IRRAD BPM system, some results on its performance with the proton beam, as well as its planned grades.

  19. Beam line shielding calculations for an Electron Accelerator Mo-99 production facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-03

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the photon and neutron fields in and around the latest beam line design for the Mo-99 production facility. The radiation dose to the beam line components (quadrupoles, dipoles, beam stops and the linear accelerator) are calculated in the present report. The beam line design assumes placement of two cameras: infra red (IR) and optical transition radiation (OTR) for continuous monitoring of the beam spot on target during irradiation. The cameras will be placed off the beam axis offset in vertical direction. We explored typical shielding arrangements for the cameras and report the resulting neutron and photon dose fields.

  20. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Zwaska, R.; Atherton, A.; Caretta, O.; Davenne,T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Roberts, S.; Kuksenko, V.; Butcher, M.; Calviani, M.; Guinchard, M.; Losito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  1. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, t; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, P; O'Dell, J; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, v; Butcher, M; Calviani, M; Guinchard, M; Losito, R

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  2. POLAREX. Study of polarized exotic nuclei at millikelvin temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risegari, L.; Astier, A.; Audi, G.; Cabaret, S.; Gaulard, C.; Georgiev, G. [CSNSM, Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Orsay (France); Stone, N.J. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stone, J.R. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College Park, MD (United States)

    2009-12-15

    POLAREX (POLARization of EXotic nuclei) is a new facility for the study of nuclear magnetic moments and decay modes of exotic nuclei using the established On-Line Nuclear Orientation (OLNO) method. A radioactive beam of interest is implanted into a ferromagnetic host foil held at a temperature of order 10mK in a {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator. The foil is magnetized by an applied magnetic field and the nuclear spins become polarized through the internal hyperfine field. The angular distribution of decay products from the polarized sample is measured. Accurate values of nuclear moment are obtained by NMR. The new facility will have access to neutron-rich nuclides produced at the ALTO facility (Linear Accelerator at Orsay Tandem) by fission induced by electrons from the linear electron accelerator. Basic concepts and initial tests are outlined. (orig.)

  3. HiRadMat: A high‐energy, pulsed beam, material irradiation facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    HiRadMat is a facility constructed in 2011, designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where different material samples or accelerator components can be tested. The facility, located at the CERN SPS accelerator complex, uses a 440 GeV proton beam with a pulse length up to 7.2 μs and a maximum intensity up to 1E13 protons / pulse. The facility, a unique place for performing state-of-the art beam-to-material experiments, operates under transnational access and welcomes and financially supports, under certain conditions, experimental teams to perform their experiments.

  4. HiRadMat: A high-energy, pulsed beam, material irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charitonidis, N.; Fabich, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I. [CERN, EN-MEF-LE, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    HiRadMat is a recently constructed facility designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where different material samples or accelerator components can be tested. The facility, located at the CERN SPS accelerator complex, uses a 440 GeV proton beam with a pulse length up to 7.2 μs and a maximum intensity up to 10{sup 13} protons / pulse. The facility, a unique place for performing state-of-the art beam-to-material experiments, operates under transnational access and welcomes and financially supports, under certain conditions, experimental teams to perform their experiments. (authors)

  5. Beta Beams: an accelerator based facility to explore Neutrino oscillation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Payet, J; Chance, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, VL; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; De Rosa, G; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery that the neutrino changes flavor as it travels through space has implications for the Standard Model of particle physics (SM)[1]. To know the contribution of neutrinos to the SM, needs precise measurements of the parameters governing the neutrino oscillations. This will require a high intensity beam-based neutrino oscillation facility. The EURONu Design Study will review three currently accepted methods of realizing this facility (the so-called Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make a decision on the layout and construction of the future European neutrino oscillation facility. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron neutrino and antineutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and letting them decay in a race-track shaped storage ring. EURONu Beta Beams are based on CERNs infrastructure and the fact that some of the already ...

  6. Low energy beam line at the AGOR facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toprek, D; Formanoy, [No Value; Brandenburg, S

    The origin of the low transmission through the low energy beam line between the electron cyclotron resonance source and the AGOR cyclotron has been investigated. Measurements of beam size and emittance, determined with the "varying quadrupole method," are compared with calculations including fringe

  7. 3w Transmitted Beam Diagnostic at the Omega Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, D H; Rekow, V; Sorce, C; Piston, K; Knight, R; Alvarez, S; Griffith, R; Hargrove, D; Ross, J S; Dixit, S; Pollock, B; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Armstrong, W; Bahr, R; Thorp, K; Pien, G

    2006-04-24

    A 3{omega} transmitted beam diagnostic has been commissioned on the Omega Laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester [Soures et.al., Laser Part. Beams 11 (1993)]. Transmitted light from one beam is collected by a large focusing mirror and directed onto a diagnostic platform. The near field of the transmitted light is imaged; the system collects information from twice the original f-cone of the beam. Two gated optical cameras capture the near field image of the transmitted light. Thirteen spatial positions around the measurement region are temporally resolved using fast photodiodes to allow a measure of the beam spray evolution. The Forward stimulated Raman scattering and forward simulated Brillion scattering are spectrally and temporally resolved at 5 independent locations within twice the original f-cone. The total transmitted energy is measured in two spectral bands ({delta}{lambda} < 400 nm and {delta}{lambda} > 400 nm).

  8. Beam Loss Estimates and Control for the BNL Neutrino Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Wu-Tsung; Raparia, Deepak; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wei, Jie; Yung Lee, Yong; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    BNL plans to upgrade the AGS proton beam from the current 0.14 MW to higher than 1.0 MW for a very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. This increase in beam power is mainly due to the faster repetition rate of the AGS by a new 1.5 GeV superconductiong linac as injector, replacing the existing booster. The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations for achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realising the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H-

  9. THE BOOSTER APPLICATION FACILITY (BAF) BEAM TRANSPORT LINE OF BNL-AGS BOOSTER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TSOUPAS,N.; BROWN,K.A.; CULLEN,J.R.; LEE,Y.Y.; MCNERNEY,A.J.; PILE,P.H.; ROSER,T.; SOUKAS,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.E.

    1999-03-29

    An experimental facility, to irradiate materials with energetic ion beams, has been proposed to be built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The BAF facility will mainly consist of the AGS-Booster slow extraction, of a beam transport line, and a target room. The beam transport line will transport the slow extracted beam of the AGS-Booster to the target location for the irradiation of various materials and specimens. A variety of ion beams like (p, {sup 28}Si, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 63}Cu, {sup 197}Au) in the energy range of 0.04 to 3.07 GeV/nucleon will be transported by the BAF line which is designed to provide variable beam spot sizes on the BAF target with sizes varying from 2.0 cm to 20.0 cm in diameter. The beam spot sizes will include 95% of the beam intensity with the beam distributed normally (Gaussian) on the target area. It is also possible by introducing magnetic octupoles at specified locations along the beam transport line, to modify the distribution on the BAF target and provide well confined beams with rectangular cross section and with uniform distribution on the target.

  10. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  11. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    OpenAIRE

    Olvegård, M.; Adli, E.; Andreazza, W; Bolzon, B; Bravin, E.; Chritin, N; Dabrowski, A.; Döbert, S; Duraffourg, M; Lefèvre, T.; Lillestøl, R.; Ziemann, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider, CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addre...

  12. Tungsten spectroscopy at the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G.V; Gu, M.F; Lundberg, H; Podpaly, Y; Trabert, E

    2011-01-01

    .... In this paper, an overview of recent results from the Livermore WOLFRAM spectroscopy project is presented, which includes experimental investigations at the EBIT-I and SuperEBIT electron beam ion traps...

  13. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Buecherl, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Zou, Y., E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Guo, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-09-21

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  14. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  15. Expanded beam x-ray optics calibration facility at the Daresbury Synchrotron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; FREDERIKSEN, P

    1994-01-01

    A facility for the calibration of X-ray Space Instrumentation has been established for the Daresbury Synchrotron. The facility provides a continuously tunable beam with (Delta) (lambda) /(lambda)

  16. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, J.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The status of the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late this year is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program also is given.

  17. Through the looking glass: probing the nucleus using accelerated radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, P A

    2005-01-01

    Through the advent of post-accelerated beams of radioactive nuclei, probing nuclear properties of exotic nuclear species is now possible. Recent results from the new European radioactive ion beam facilities will be presented together with the prospects offered by the planned facilities such as SPIRAL2 and HIE-ISOLDE. The current ideas for the "third generation" radioactive ion beam facility EURISOL will also be briefly presented.

  18. Through the looking glass: probing the nucleus using accelerated radioactive beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, P. A.

    2005-04-01

    Through the advent of post-accelerated beams of radioactive nuclei, probing nuclear properties of exotic nuclear species is now possible. Recent results from the new European radioactive ion beam facilities will be presented together with the prospects offered by the planned facilities such as SPIRAL2 and HIE-ISOLDE. The current ideas for the "third generation" radioactive ion beam facility EURISOL will also be briefly presented.

  19. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  20. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracco, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.bracco@cern.ch; Gschwendtner, Edda, E-mail: edda.gschwendtner@cern.ch; Petrenko, Alexey, E-mail: alexey.petrenko@cern.ch; Timko, Helga, E-mail: helga.timko@cern.ch; Argyropoulos, Theodoros, E-mail: theodoros.argyropoulos@cern.ch; Bartosik, Hannes, E-mail: hannes.bartosik@cern.ch; Bohl, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.bohl@cern.ch; Esteban Müller, Juan, E-mail: juan.esteban.muller@cern.ch; Goddard, Brennan, E-mail: brennan.goddard@cern.ch; Meddahi, Malika, E-mail: malika.meddahi@cern.ch; Pardons, Ans, E-mail: ans.pardons@cern.ch; Shaposhnikova, Elena, E-mail: elena.chapochnikova@cern.ch; Velotti, Francesco M., E-mail: francesco.maria.velotti@cern.ch; Vincke, Helmut, E-mail: helmut.vincke@cern.ch

    2014-03-11

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R and D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented. - Highlights: • A proton driven plasma wakefield experiment using the first time protons as drive beam is proposed. • The integration of AWAKE experiment, the proton, laser and electron beam line in an existing CERN facility is demonstrated. • The necessary modifications in the experimental facility are presented. • Proton beam optics and a new electron beam line are adapted to match with the required beam parameters. • Short high-intensity bunches were studied in the SPS to guide the design parameters of the AWAKE project.

  1. Preliminary results of proton beam characterization for a facility of broad beam in vitro cell irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wera, A.-C. [Laboratoire d' Analyses par Reactions Nucleaires (LARN), University of Namur-FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)], E-mail: anne-catherine.wera@fundp.ac.be; Donato, K. [Ion Beam Application, Chemin du Cyclotron 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Michiels, C. [Unite de Recherche en Biologie Cellulaire (URBC), University of Namur-FUNDP (Belgium); Jongen, Y. [Ion Beam Application, Chemin du Cyclotron 3, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Lucas, S. [Laboratoire d' Analyses par Reactions Nucleaires (LARN), University of Namur-FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2008-05-15

    The interaction of charged particles with living matter needs to be well understood for medical applications. Particularly, it is useful to study how ion beams interact with tissues in terms of damage, dose released and dose rate. One way to evaluate the biological effects induced by an ion beam is by the irradiation of cultured cells at a particle accelerator, where cells can be exposed to different ions at different energies and flux. In this paper, we report the first results concerning the characterization of a broad proton beam obtained with our 2 MV tandem accelerator. For broad beam in vitro cell irradiation, the beam has to be stable over time, uniform over a {approx}0.5 cm{sup 2} surface, and a dose rate ranging from 0.1 to 10 Gy/min must be achievable. Results concerning the level of achievement of these requirements are presented in this paper for a 1 MeV proton beam.

  2. Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00003703

    2016-01-01

    A selection of results for searches for exotic physics at the LHC are presented. These include a search for massive resonances, dark matter with a high energy jet in association with large missing transverse momentum, long-lived neutral particles, and narrow dijet resonances. The results are based on 20/fb of LHC proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV taken with the CMS detector.

  3. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  4. Exotic nuclei explored at in-flight separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Sakurai, H.; Watanabe, H.

    2017-11-01

    In-flight separators have played a significant role in the physics of exotic nuclei. In the last decade, in particular, this field has expanded rapidly with the advent of the new-generation (3rd-generation) in-flight-separator facility, the RI-beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN that was commissioned in 2007. In addition, new experimental methods, techniques and state-of-the-art detectors at in-flight separators have developed rapidly, which has contributed considerably to this progress. One can now reach very far from the stable nuclei towards the drip lines, and even beyond in some cases. Hundreds of new isotopes have been identified, and new exotic isomers have been observed. β decays and relevant γ decays, including isomeric states, have clarified many new aspects of nuclear structures. A variety of direct reactions, making the best use of in-flight rare isotope (RI) beams at intermediate/high energies, have been applied for a wide range of rare isotopes. New experimental results using these methods have shown that one needs a new framework to understand structures and dynamics of exotic nuclei, such as new or lost magic numbers, novel neutron halo/skin structures and relevant reactions/excitations. A wide range of reactions associated with nucleo-synthesis in the Universe and the equation of state (EoS) of neutron-rich nuclear matter have also been studied through experiments using rare isotopes available at in-flight separators. This review article focuses its attention on how recent experimental techniques have been developed and applied to exotic nuclei at in-flight separators. We also make remarks on prospects for the near future: in the era when the 3rd-generation RI-beam facilities based on in-flight separators are being completed world-wide.

  5. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report FY17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominsky, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmidt, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rivera, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Uplegger, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Asaadi, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Freeman, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Price, J. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Casey, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ehrlich, R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Belmont, R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Boose, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Conners, M. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Haggerty, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, K. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hodges, A. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Huang, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kistenev, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lajoie, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Mannel, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Osborn, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pontieri, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sarsour, M. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Sen, A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Skoby, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Stoll, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Toldo, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ujvari, B. [Debrecen Univ., Debrecen (Hungary); Woody, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ronzhin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hanagaki, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Apresyan, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bose, T. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Canepa, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Demina, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Gershtein, Y. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Halkiadakis, E. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Haytmyradov, M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Hazen, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Hindrichs, O. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Korjenevski, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Nachtman, J. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Narain, M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Nash, K. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Onel, Y. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Osherson, M. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Rankin, D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Schneider, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stone, B. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Metcalfe, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benoit, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Vicente, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); di Bello, F. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Cavallaro, E. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Chakanov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frizzell, D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Kiehn, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Meng, L. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Miucci, A. [Univ. of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Nodulman, L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Terzo, S. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Wang, Rui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Weston, T. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Xie, Junqie [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Xu, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaffaroni, E. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Zhang, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Argelles, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Axani, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Katori, T. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Noulai, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Mandalia, S. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Sandstrom, P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Kryemadhi, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Barner, L. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Grove, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Mohler, J. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Roth, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Beuzekom, M. van [Nikhef National Inst. for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dall' Occo, E. [Nikhef National Inst. for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schindler, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Paley, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Badgett, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Denisov, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lukic, S. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Ujic, P. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Lebrun, P. L.G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Fields, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Christian, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zaki, R. [Radboud Univ., Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2018-01-23

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab Test Beam operations for FY2017. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF and are listed in Table 1. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  6. Developments of the ISOLDE RILIS for radioactive ion beam production and the results of their application in the study of exotic mercury isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086245; Marsh, Bruce

    This work centres around development and applications of the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility based at CERN. The RILIS applies step-wise resonance photo-ionization, to achieve an unparalleled degree of element selectivity, without compromising on ion source efficiency. Because of this, it has become the most commonly used ion source at ISOLDE, operating for up to 75% of ISOLDE experiments. In addition to its normal application as an ion source, the RILIS can be exploited as a spectroscopic tool for the study of nuclear ground state and isomer properties, by resolving the influence of nuclear parameters on the atomic energy levels of the ionization scheme. There are two avenues of development by which to widen the applicability of the RILIS: laser ionization scheme development, enabling new or more efficient laser ionized ion beams and the development of new laser-atom interaction regions. New ionization schemes for chromium, tellurium, germanium, mercu...

  7. A Micromegas Detector for Neutron Beam Imaging at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviani, M; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Giomataris, Y; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Iguaz, F J; Kebbiri, M; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Tsinganis, A; Vlachoudis, V; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Corté-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Marítnez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A J M; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors are gas detectors consisting of a stack of one ionization and one proportional chamber. A micromesh separates the two communicating regions, where two different electric fields establish respectively a charge drift and a charge multiplication regime. The n\\_TOF facility at CERN provides a white neutron beam (from thermal up to GeV neutrons) for neutron induced cross section measurements. These measurements need a perfect knowlodge of the incident neutron beam, in particular regarding its spatial profile. A position sensitive micromegas detector equipped with a B-10 based neutron/charged particle converter has been extensively used at the n\\_TOF facility for characterizing the neutron beam profile and extracting the beam interception factor for samples of different size. The boron converter allowed to scan the energy region of interest for neutron induced capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy, determined by the time of flight. Experimental ...

  8. Physics and Technology for the Next Generation of Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities: EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Catherall, R; Giles, T; Stora, T; Wenander, F K

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1935, nuclear scientists have developed tools to study nuclei far from stability. A major breakthrough came in the eighties when the first high energy radioactive beams were produced at Berkeley, leading to the discovery of neutron halos. The field of nuclear structure received a new impetus, and the major accelerator facilities worldwide rivalled in ingenuity to produce more intense, purer and higher resolution rare isotope beams, leading to our much improved knowledge and understanding of the general evolution of nuclear properties throughout the nuclear chart. However, today, further progress is hampered by the weak beam intensities of current installations which correlate with the difficulty to reach the confines of nuclear binding where new phenomena are predicted, and where the r-process path for nuclear synthesis is expected to be located. The advancement of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science calls for the development of so-called next-generation facil...

  9. Design study of beam transport lines for BioLEIR facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghithan, S.; Roy, G.; Schuh, S.

    2017-09-01

    The biomedical community has asked CERN to investigate the possibility to transform the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) accelerator into a multidisciplinary, biomedical research facility (BioLEIR) that could provide ample, high-quality beams of a range of light ions suitable for clinically oriented, fundamental research on cell cultures and for radiation instrumentation development. The present LEIR machine uses fast beam extraction to the next accelerator in the chain, eventually leading to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . To provide beam for a biomedical research facility, a new slow extraction system must be installed. Two horizontal and one vertical experimental beamlines were designed for transporting the extracted beam to three experimental end-stations. The vertical beamline (pencil beam) was designed for a maximum energy of 75 MeV/u for low-energy radiobiological research, while the two horizontal beamlines could deliver up to 440 MeV/u. One horizontal beamline shall be used preferentially for biomedical experiments and shall provide pencil beam and a homogeneous broad beam, covering an area of 5 × 5 cm2 with a beam homogeneity of ±5%. The second horizontal beamline will have pencil beam only and is intended for hardware developments in the fields of (micro-)dosimetry and detector development. The minimum full aperture of the beamlines is approximately 100 mm at all magnetic elements, to accommodate the expected beam envelopes. Seven dipoles and twenty quadrupoles are needed for a total of 65 m of beamlines to provide the specified beams. In this paper we present the optical design for the three beamlines.

  10. Target irradiation facility and targetry development at 160 MeV proton beam of Moscow linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuikov, B L; Konyakhin, N A; Vincent, J

    1999-01-01

    A facility has been built and successfully operated with the 160 MeV proton beam of Moscow Meson factory LINAC, Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) of Russian Academy of Science, Troitsk. The facility was created for various isotope production goals as well as for fundamental nuclear investigations at high intensity beam (100 mu A and more). An important part of the facility targetry system is a high-intensity beam monitoring collimator device. Measurements of the temperature distribution between collimator sectors, cooling water flow and temperature, and the beam current, provide an opportunity to compute beam losses and beam position. The target holder design allows easy insertion by manipulator and simultaneous bombardment of several different targets of various types and forms, and variation of proton energy on each target over a wide range below 160 MeV. The main target utilized for commercial sup 8 sup 2 Sr isotope production is metallic rubidium in a stainless-steel container. A regular wet chemistry ...

  11. Initial electron-beam characterizations for the Los Alamos APEX Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Apgar, S.A.; Feldman, D.W.; O' Shea, P.G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, Silver Spring, MD (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing upgrade of the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Facility involves the addition of a photoelectric injector (PEI) and acceleration capability to about 40 MeV. The electron-beam and high-speed diagnostics provide key measurements of charge, beam position and profile, divergence emittance, energy (centroid, spread, slew, and extraction efficiency), micropulse duration, and phase stability. Preliminary results on the facility include optical transition radiation interferometer measurements of divergence (1 to 2 mrad), FEL extraction efficiency (0.6 {plus minus} 0.2%), and drive laser phase stability (< 2 ps (rms)). 10 refs.

  12. Initial electron-beam characterizations for the Los Alamos APEX Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Apgar, S.A.; Feldman, D.W.; O`Shea, P.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The ongoing upgrade of the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Facility involves the addition of a photoelectric injector (PEI) and acceleration capability to about 40 MeV. The electron-beam and high-speed diagnostics provide key measurements of charge, beam position and profile, divergence emittance, energy (centroid, spread, slew, and extraction efficiency), micropulse duration, and phase stability. Preliminary results on the facility include optical transition radiation interferometer measurements of divergence (1 to 2 mrad), FEL extraction efficiency (0.6 {plus_minus} 0.2%), and drive laser phase stability (< 2 ps [rms]). 10 refs.

  13. A Dual-Beam Irradiation Facility for a Novel Hybrid Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabchevski, Svilen Petrov; Idehara, Toshitaka; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Miyoshi, Norio; Tatsukawa, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the main ideas and discuss both the feasibility and the conceptual design of a novel hybrid technique and equipment for an experimental cancer therapy based on the simultaneous and/or sequential application of two beams, namely a beam of neutrons and a CW (continuous wave) or intermittent sub-terahertz wave beam produced by a gyrotron for treatment of cancerous tumors. The main simulation tools for the development of the computer aided design (CAD) of the prospective experimental facility for clinical trials and study of such new medical technology are briefly reviewed. Some tasks for a further continuation of this feasibility analysis are formulated as well.

  14. Facile electron-beam lithography technique for irregular and fragile substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex, E-mail: azettl@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    A facile technique is presented which enables high-resolution electron beam lithography on irregularly-shaped, non-planar or fragile substrates such as the edges of a silicon chip, thin and narrow suspended beams and bridges, or small cylindrical wires. The method involves a spin-free dry-transfer of pre-formed uniform-thickness polymethyl methacrylate, followed by conventional electron beam writing, metal deposition, and lift-off. High-resolution patterning is demonstrated for challenging target substrates. The technique should find broad application in micro- and nano-technology research arenas.

  15. The JANNUS Saclay facility: A new platform for materials irradiation, implantation and ion beam analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, S.; Trocellier, P.; Miro, S.; Serruys, Y.; Bordas, É.; Martin, H.; Chaâbane, N.; Vaubaillon, S.; Gallien, J. P.; Beck, L.

    2012-02-01

    The third accelerator of the multi-ion irradiation platform JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nanosciences and NUclear Simulation), a 6SDH-2 Pelletron from National Electrostatic Corporation, Middleton was installed at Saclay in October 2009. The first triple beam irradiation combining Fe, He and H ion beams has been performed in March 2010. In the first part of this paper, we give a technical description of the triple beam facility, its performances and experimental capabilities. Typically, damage dose up to 100 dpa can be reached in 10 h irradiation with heavy ion beams, with or without simultaneous bombardment by protons, helium-4 ions or any other heavy ion beam. In the second part of this paper, we illustrate some IBA results obtained after irradiation and implantation experiments.

  16. The JANNUS Saclay facility: A new platform for materials irradiation, implantation and ion beam analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrino, S., E-mail: stephanie.pellegrino@cea.fr [CEA, INSTN, UEPTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Trocellier, P.; Miro, S.; Serruys, Y.; Bordas, E.; Martin, H. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chaabane, N.; Vaubaillon, S. [CEA, INSTN, UEPTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gallien, J.P.; Beck, L. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-02-15

    The third accelerator of the multi-ion irradiation platform JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nanosciences and NUclear Simulation), a 6SDH-2 Pelletron from National Electrostatic Corporation, Middleton was installed at Saclay in October 2009. The first triple beam irradiation combining Fe, He and H ion beams has been performed in March 2010. In the first part of this paper, we give a technical description of the triple beam facility, its performances and experimental capabilities. Typically, damage dose up to 100 dpa can be reached in 10 h irradiation with heavy ion beams, with or without simultaneous bombardment by protons, helium-4 ions or any other heavy ion beam. In the second part of this paper, we illustrate some IBA results obtained after irradiation and implantation experiments.

  17. Nuclear astrophysics and the Daresbury Recoil Separator at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.S.

    1997-12-01

    The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been installed for nuclear astrophysics research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. It will be used for direct measurements of capture reactions on radioactive ions which occur in stellar explosions such as novae, supernovae and X-ray bursts. These measurements will be made in inverse kinematics with radioactive heavy ion beams incident on hydrogen and helium targets, and the DRS will separate the capture reaction recoils from the intense flux of beam particles. Details of the new DRS experimental equipment and preliminary results from the first commissioning experiments with stable beams are described, along with the plans for the first measurements with radioactive beams. Other astrophysics research efforts at ORNL--in theoretical astrophysics, nuclear astrophysics data evaluation, heavy element nucleosynthesis, theoretical atomic astrophysics, and atomic astrophysics data--are also briefly described.

  18. Relativistic exotic nuclei as projectile beams. New perspectives of studies on the properties of nuclei; Relativistische exotische Kerne als Projektilstrahlen. Neue Perspektiven zum Studium der Kerneigenschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissel, H.

    1997-03-01

    Examinations of the production cross-sections and the kinematics permitted refinement of model concepts of the peripheral reactions in exotic nuclei at energies from 100 to 1000 A MeV. Due to the strong selectivity and resolution achieved it was possible to discover a large number of novel isotopes at the fragment separator FRS, despite the relatively low projectile beam intensities of the SIS. The two twice magic nuclei found, Ni 78 and Sn 100, are particularly interesting, as they could not be measured so far with other experimental systems. Fission of relativistic uranium ions proved to be a particularly successful process yielding many medium-heavy, neutron-rich nuclei. Insight into the structure of light neutron halos could be improved. The superlarge spatial dimensions of the nuclear halos is discussed. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Untersuchungen der Produktionsquerschnitte und der Kinematik fuehr ten zu einer Verfeinerung der Modellvorstellungen der peripheren Kernr eaktionen an exotischen Kernen bei Energien im Bereich von 100- 1000 A MeV. Die hohe Selektivitaet und Aufloesung waren die Voraussetzung, da ss schon bei den vergleichsweise niedrigen Projektilstrahlintensitaete n des SIS eine grosse Anzahl von neuen Isotopen am Fragmentseparator F RS entdeckt werden konnten. Besonders erwaehnenswert sind die beiden d oppelt magischen Kerne Ni 78 und Sn 100, die mit anderen experimentel len Anlagen vorher nicht zugaenglich waren.Die Spaltung relativistisch er Uranionen hat sich als eine besonders ergiebige Quelle fuer mittels chwere neutronenreiche Kerne erwiesen. Die Kenntnisse der Struktur lei chter Neutronen- Halokerne konnten erweitert werden. Die uebergrosse r aeumliche Ausdehnung der Halokerne wurde aufgezeigt.

  19. The Xingguang-III laser facility: precise synchronization with femtosecond, picosecond and nanosecond beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qihua; Zhou, Kainan; Su, Jingqin; Xie, Na; Huang, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiaodong; Zuo, Yanlei; Jiang, Dongbin; Zhao, Lei; Li, Fuquan; Hu, Dongxia; Zheng, Kuixing; Dai, Wanjun; Chen, Dehuai; Dang, Zhao; Liu, Lanqin; Xu, Dangpeng; Lin, Donghui; Zhang, Xiongjun; Deng, Ying; Xie, Xudong; Feng, Bin; Peng, Zhitao; Zhao, Runchang; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Li; Guo, Yi; Zhou, Song; Wen, Jing; Wu, Zhaohui; Li, Qing; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Deen; Jiang, Xuejun; Gu, Yuqiu; Jing, Feng; Zhang, Baohan

    2018-01-01

    We report a high-intensity laser facility named Xingguang-III that generates femtosecond, picosecond, and nanosecond beams with three wavelengths, i.e. 800 nm, 1053 nm, and 527 nm, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the laser facility is the first one which produces three beams with different pulse widths and wavelengths. An optical synchronization technique, combining super continuum generation and femtosecond optical parametric amplification, was developed to ensure three beams are from the same source to achieve precise synchronization. The femtosecond beam is a double chirped-pulse-amplification Ti:sapphire laser which applies cross-polarized wave generation to improve the temporal contrast. The picosecond/nanosecond beams utilize the optical parametric amplification  +  Nd:glass mixed amplification scheme. The output energy and pulse width of the three beams are 20.1 J/26.8 fs, 370.2 J/0.48 ps (shortest), and 575.4 J/1.0 ns, respectively. The smallest synchronization time (peak-to-valley) and the shot-to-shot timing jitter (peak-to-peak) of less than 1.32 ps have been achieved for the femtosecond and picosecond beams.

  20. Evolution of a beam dynamics model for the transport line in a proton therapy facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rizzoglio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During the conceptual design of an accelerator or beamline, first-order beam dynamics models are essential for studying beam properties. However, they can only produce approximate results. During commissioning, these approximate results are compared to measurements, which will rarely coincide if the model does not include the relevant physics. It is therefore essential that this linear model is extended to include higher-order effects. In this paper, the effects of particle-matter interaction have been included in the model of the transport lines in the proton therapy facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI in Switzerland. The first-order models of these beamlines provide an approximated estimation of beam size, energy loss and transmission. To improve the performance of the facility, a more precise model was required and has been developed with opal (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library, a multiparticle open source beam dynamics code. In opal, the Monte Carlo simulations of Coulomb scattering and energy loss are performed seamless with the particle tracking. Beside the linear optics, the influence of the passive elements (e.g., degrader, collimators, scattering foils, and air gaps on the beam emittance and energy spread can be analyzed in the new model. This allows for a significantly improved precision in the prediction of beam transmission and beam properties. The accuracy of the opal model has been confirmed by numerous measurements.

  1. The TRIUMF-ISAC facility: two decades of discovery with rare isotope beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, G. C.; Hackman, G.; Krücken, R.

    2016-09-01

    Since 1999, the TRIUMF-ISAC facility has been providing rare isotope beams for nuclear physics experiments. The three pillars of the program are nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, and fundamental symmetries. This article reviews highlights of each of these aspects of the ISAC science program, including tests of the collective behaviors, first explained by Bohr, Mottelson and Rainwater, at the limits of nuclear stability, and future prospects with the ARIEL facility at TRIUMF.

  2. Facility for the testing of the TFTR prototype neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haughian, J.M.

    1977-07-01

    The design of the prototype neutral beam injection system for TFTR is nearing completion at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper describes some of the features of the facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory where this prototype will be assembled and tested.

  3. Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Leitgab, M

    2014-01-01

    In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power beams before issuing launch licenses for SSP satellite systems. This paper proposes to collect representative and comprehensive data of the interaction of power beams with the atmosphere by extending the infrastructure of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. Estimates of the transmission infrastructure performance as well as measurement devices and scientific capabilities of possible upgrade scenarios will be discussed. The proposed upgrade of the HAARP facility is expected to d...

  4. Preliminary design of safety and interlock system for indian test facility of diagnostic neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Himanshu, E-mail: htyagi@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Soni, Jignesh [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Yadav, Ratnakar; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Gahlaut, Agrajit [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Bansal, Gourab; Pandya, Kaushal; Chakraborty, Arun [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Indian Test Facility being built to characterize DNB for ITER delivery. • Interlock system required to safeguard the investment incurred in building the facility and protecting ITER deliverable components. • Interlock levels upto 3IL-3 identified. • Safety instrumented system for occupational safety being designed. Safety I&C functions of SIL-2 identified. • The systems are based on ITER PIS and PSS design guidelines. - Abstract: Indian Test Facility (INTF) is being built in Institute For Plasma Research to characterize Diagnostic Neutral Beam in co-operation with ITER Organization. INTF is a complex system which consists of several plant systems like beam source, gas feed, vacuum, cryogenics, high voltage power supplies, high power RF generators, mechanical systems and diagnostics systems. Out of these, several INTF components are ITER deliverable, that is, beam source, beam line components and power supplies. To ensure successful operation of INTF involving integrated operation of all the constituent plant systems a matured Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) is required. The INTF DACS is based on CODAC platform following on PCDH (Plant Control Design Handbook) guidelines. The experimental phases involve application of HV power supplies (100 KV) and High RF power (∼800 KW) which will produce energetic beam of maximum power 6MW within the facility for longer durations. Hence the entire facility will be exposed tohigh heat fluxes and RF radiations. To ensure investment protection and to provide occupational safety for working personnel a matured Safety and Interlock system is required for INTF. The Safety and Interlock systems are high-reliability I&C systems devoted completely to the specific functions. These systems will be separate from the conventional DACS of INTF which will handle the conventional control and acquisition functions. Both, the Safety and Interlock systems are based on IEC 61511 and IEC 61508 standards as

  5. Review of the Drive Beam Stabilization in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Skowronski, P; Tecker, F; Persson, T

    2013-01-01

    CTF3 is a Test Facility focusing on beam-based studies of the key concepts of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. Over the past several years many aspects of the CLIC two-beam acceleration scheme were studied in CTF3, including the crucial issue of drive beam stability. The main sources of drifts and instabilities have been identified and mitigated, helping to improve the machine performance and showing significant progress towards the experimental demonstration of the very stringent requirements on current, energy and phase stability needed in CLIC. In this paper, the more effective techniques and feed-backs are summarized. The latest measurements on beam stability are reported and their relevance to CLIC is discussed.

  6. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-01

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60J on target in a 500fs pulse, around 100TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054μm. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 1019Wcm-2 and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  7. General design of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility deuteron injector: Source and beam linea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, R.; Blideanu, V.; Bogard, D.; Bourdelle, G.; Chauvin, N.; Delferrière, O.; Girardot, P.; Jannin, J. L.; Langlois, S.; Loiseau, D.; Pottin, B.; Rousse, J.-Y.; Senée, F.

    2010-02-01

    In the framework of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility-Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (IFMIF-EVEDA) project, CEA/IRFU is in charge of the design and realization of the 140 mA cw deuteron Injector. The electron cyclotron resonance ion source operates at 2.45 GHz and a 4 electrode extraction system has been chosen. A 2 solenoid beam line, together with a high space charge compensation have been optimized for a proper beam injection in the 175 MHz radio frequency quadrupole. The injector will be tested with proton and deuteron beam production either in pulsed mode or in cw mode on the CEA-Saclay site before to be shipped to Japan. Special attention was paid to neutron emission due to (d,D) reaction. In this paper, the general IFMIF Injector design is reported, pointing out beam dynamics, radioprotection, diagnostics, and mechanical aspects.

  8. Installation of Ion Beam Facility with Mass Production System for Industrial Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Young; Lee, Jae Sang; Kim, Yong Gi; Min, Yi Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dae Han [Shinki Intermobile Co., Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Electroplated baths produce hexavalent chromium, restricted by environmental legislation. Therefore the development of alternative processes is required. The ion beam process has been known to be environmentally friendly because the processing is done in a vacuum environment and only a small addition of the elements is required to change the optical properties of the polymeric components effectively. In earlier stage of study, it had been studied the change of PC/ABS polymer (polycarbonate (PC) / acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS)) surface glossiness after ion beam irradiation. As a result, surface degradations can be prevented or greatly reduced under long term UV (Ultra-violet) and visible light exposure test. To apply manufacturing of industrial products, we designed and installed ion beam equipment with mass production system which is the simplest and most economical process for economic feasibility. The objective of the study is the development of a ion beam accelerator with about 90keV/30mA used for industrial applications on the basis of experiences obtained from the construction of the DuoPIGatron ion source and acceleration tube. Also, We submitted design approval and received its confirmation for sale from KINS (Korea Institute Nuclear Safety). A ion beam facility with beam energy of 90keV and current 30mA had designed and constructed for industrial application. Design and construction of the ion beam facility, Design and construction of ion source and acceleration tube. No-load discharge test for arcing and beam extraction test for 90keV/30mA, Design approval acquisition from KINS for sale.

  9. Exploring the energy/beam current parameter space for the isotope production facility (IPF) at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulley, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bach, Hong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nortier, Francis M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitteker, Leo J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; John, Kevin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, Frank O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seifter, Achim [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-07

    IPF has recently investigated isotope production with proton beams at energies other than the 100-MeV currently available to the IPF beam line. To maximize the yield of a particular isotope, it is necessary to measure the production rate and cross section versus proton beam energy. Studies were conducted at 800 MeV and 197 MeV to determine the cross section of Tb-159. Also, the ability to irradiate targets at different proton beam energies opens up the possibility of producing other radioisotopes. A proof-of-principle test was conducted to develop a 40-MeV tune in the 100-MeV beam line. Another parameter explored was the beam current, which was raised from the normal limit of 250 {mu}A up to 356 {mu}A via both power and repetition rate increase. This proof-of-principle test demonstrated the capability of the IPF beam line for high current operation with potential for higher isotope yields. For the full production mode, system upgrades will need to be in place to operate at high current and high duty factor. These activities are expected to provide the data needed for the development of a new and unique isotope production capability complementing the existing 100-MeV IPF facility.

  10. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos [CERN; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias [CERN; Fabich, Adrian [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  11. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/201...

  12. NA61/SHINE facility at the CERN SPS: beams and detector system

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N.; Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Anticic, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Blumer, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Bogusz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S.A.; Christakoglou, P.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Debieux, S.; Dembinski, H.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Ereditato, A.; Fabich, A.; Feofilov, G.A.; Fodor, Z.; Fulop, A.; Gazdzicki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Idczak, R.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Jokovic, D.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kielczewska, D.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kiss, T.; Kleinfelder, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V.P.; Korzenev, A.; Koversarski, P.; Kowalski, S.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; Laszlo, A.; Lyubushkin, V.V.; Maćkowiak-Pawlowska, M.; Majka, Z.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A.I.; Maletic, D.; Manglunki, D.; Manic, D.; Marchionni, A.; Marcinek, A.; Marin, V.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.J; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G.L.; Messina, M.; Mrówczyński, St.; Murphy, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Palczewski, T.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Paul, T.; Peryt, W.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Planeta, R.; Pluta, J.; Popov, B.A.; Posiadala, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzovic, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczyński, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Savic, M.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Sipos, R.; Skrzypczak, E.; Słodkowski, M.; Sosin, Z.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Stroebele, H.; Susa, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tolyhi, T.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberic, D.; Vechernin, V.V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarz, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zipper, W.

    2014-01-01

    NA61/SHINE (SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) is a multi-purpose experimental facility to study hadron production in hadron-proton, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. It recorded the first physics data with hadron beams in 2009 and with ion beams (secondary 7Be beams) in 2011. NA61/SHINE has greatly profited from the long development of the CERN proton and ion sources and the accelerator chain as well as the H2 beamline of the CERN North Area. The latter has recently been modified to also serve as a fragment separator as needed to produce the Be beams for NA61/SHINE. Numerous components of the NA61/SHINE set-up were inherited from its predecessors, in particular, the last one, the NA49 experiment. Important new detectors and upgrades of the legacy equipment were introduced by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration. This paper describes the state of the NA61/SHINE facility - the beams and the detector system - before the CERN Long Shutdown I, which started in March ...

  13. Characterization of Dosimetry of the Bmrr Horizontal Thimble Tubes and Broad Beam Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, F. J.-P.; Reciniello, R. N.; Holden, N. E.

    2009-08-01

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was a 5 mega-watts, light-water cooled and heavy-graphite moderated research facility. It has two shutter-equipped treatment rooms, three horizontally extended thimble tubes, and an ex-core broad beam facility. The three experimental thimbles, or activation ports, external to the reactor tank were designed for several uses, including the investigations on diagnostic and therapeutic methods using radioactive isotopes of very short half-life, the analysis of radiation exposure on tissue-equivalent materials using a collimated neutron beam, and the evaluation of dose effects on biological cells to improve medical treatment. At the broad beam facility where the distribution of thermal neutrons was essentially uniform, a wide variety of mammalian whole-body exposures were studied using animals such as burros or mice. Also studied at the broad beam were whole-body phantom experiments, involving the use of a neutron or photon beam streaming through a screen to obtain the flux spectrum suitable for dose analysis on the sugar-urea-water mixture, a tissue-equivalent material. Calculations of the flux and the dose at beam ports based on Monte Carlo particle-transport code were performed, using ENDF/B-V and B-VI continuous neutron cross section data libraries which include thermal neutron treatment data sets. Measurements conducted at the same tally locations were also performed using bare or cadmium-covered gold foils. Computational results of the flux and dose obtained from neutron-photon coupled code runs show good agreement with measured data when statistical uncertainty is ≤5% from code outputs. Detailed dosimetry performed is presented in the paper.

  14. The CERN n_TOF Facility: Neutron Beams Performances for Cross Section Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, E; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Hernández-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M S; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sabaté-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of the existing CERN n\\_TOF neutron beam facility (n\\_TOF-EAR1 with a flight path of 185 meters) and the future one (n\\_TOF EAR-2 with a flight path of 19 meters), which will operate in parallel from Summer 2014. The new neutron beam will provide a 25 times higher neutron flux delivered in 10 times shorter neutron pulses, thus offering more powerful capabilities for measuring small mass, low cross section and/or high activity samples.

  15. The CERN n_TOF Facility: Neutron Beams Performances for Cross Section Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaveri, E.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Mallick, A.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Robles, M. S.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of the existing CERN n_TOF neutron beam facility (n_TOF-EAR1 with a flight path of 185 meters) and the future one (n_TOF EAR-2 with a flight path of 19 meters), which will operate in parallel from Summer 2014. The new neutron beam will provide a 25 times higher neutron flux delivered in 10 times shorter neutron pulses, thus offering more powerful capabilities for measuring small mass, low cross section and/or high activity samples.

  16. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: Which method is the most efficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunoury, L.; Delahaye, P.; Angot, J.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Frigot, R.; Grinyer, J.; Jardin, P.; Leboucher, C.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO2), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well.

  17. Application of an atomic oxygen beam facility to the investigation of shuttle glow chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, G. S.; Peplinski, D. R.

    1985-09-01

    A facility for the investigation of the interactions of energetic atomic oxygen with solids is described. The facility is comprised of a four chambered, differentially pumped molecular beam apparatus which can be equipped with one of a variety of sources of atomic oxygen. The primary source is a dc arc heated supersonic nozzle source which produces a flux of atomic oxygen in excess of 10 to the 15th power sq cm/sec at the target, at a velocity of 3.5 km/sec. Results of applications of this facility to the study of the reactions of atomic oxygen with carbon and polyimide films are briefly reviewed and compared to data obtained on various flights of the space shuttle. A brief discussion of possible application of this facility to investigation of chemical reactions which might contribute to atmosphere induced vehicle glow is presented.

  18. The development of the sup 1 sup 7 F beam at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Welton, R F

    2002-01-01

    This report details some of the key technological developments employed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) to produce beams of sup 1 sup 7 F using the sup 1 sup 6 O(d, n) sup 1 sup 7 F reaction. The oxide fiber target material used at the HRIBF is described and a comparison is made between the sup 1 sup 7 F yield achieved using light (Al) and heavy (Hf) metal oxide fibers. The development of the Kinetic Ejection Negative Ion Source (KENIS) employed in this work is also discussed along with the operational principles of the source. Finally, a detailed description of the HfO sub 2 target configuration used to produce 10 sup 7 -10 sup 8 sup 1 sup 7 F ions/s for over 850 hours of operation is provided. To date, seven nuclear physics experiments using accelerated beams of sup 1 sup 7 F and sup 1 sup 8 F produced using this apparatus have been performed over an energy range of 10-170 MeV.

  19. Linear and second order optics corrections for the KEK Accelerator Test Facility final focus beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Okugi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the linear and second order optics corrections for the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2 final focus beam line are described. The beam optics of the ATF2 beam line is designed based on a local chromaticity correction scheme similar to the ILC final focus system. Beam measurements in 2012 revealed skew sextupole field errors that were much larger than expected from magnetic field measurements. The skew sextupole field error was a critical limitation of the beam size at the ATF2 virtual interaction point (IP. Therefore, four skew sextupole magnets were installed to correct the field error in August 2012. By using the four skew sextupole magnets, the predicted tolerances of the skew sextupole field errors of the ATF2 magnets were increased. Furthermore, analyzing field maps of the sextupole magnets identified the source of the skew sextupole field error. After the field error source was removed, the IP vertical beam size could more easily be focused to less than 65 nm.

  20. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The first part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  1. Thermal shock tests with beryllium coupons in the electron beam facility JUDITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Schuster, J.L.A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Several grades of American and Russian beryllium have been tested in high heat flux tests by means of an electron beam facility. For safety reasons, major modifications of the facility had to be fulfilled in advance to the tests. The influence of energy densities has been investigated in the range between 1 and 7 MJ/m{sup 2}. In addition the influence of an increasing number of shots at constant energy density has been studied. For all samples, surface profiles have been measured before and after the experiments. Additional information has been gained from scanning electron microscopy, and from metallography.

  2. ISABELLE: a 400 x 400 GeV proton--proton colliding beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design report is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility beams of protons with energies up to 400 GeV will be collided in six experimental areas. At each area particle physicists will install detector apparatus to study the interaction and reaction products for such very high energy collisions. The proposal results from several years of study and development work on such a facility. Topics discussed include: (1) introduction and summary of the proposal; (2) physics at ISABELLE (including physics objectives and typical experiments and detectors); description of ISABELLE (overview; magnetic ring structure and lattice characteristics; performance; beam transfer, stacking, and acceleration; magnet system; refrigeration system; vacuum system; power supplies, instrumentation, and control system; physical plant and experimental halls; and operation and safety); and (3) cost estimate and schedule.

  3. Control of RILIS lasers at IGISOL facilities using a compact atomic beam reference cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kron, T., E-mail: kron@uni-mainz.de [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Ferrer-Garcia, R. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica (Belgium); Lecesne, N. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Sonnenschein, V. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland); Raeder, S. [TRIUMF - Canada' s National Laboratory for Nuclear and Particle Physics (Canada); Rossnagel, J.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The choice and proper operation of the laser systems for laser ion sources at on-line facilities using multi-step resonance ionization processes is the basis for production of intense and pure radioactive ion beams. These pave the way for numerous fundamental studies in nuclear and astrophysics. A comparison between systems of medium or high repetition rate pulsed tunable lasers based on dyes or crystals as active medium has been carried out at the IGISOL facility at Louvain-la-Neuve. The importance of properly controlling the operation conditions of the individual lasers via a reference atomic beam chamber is highlighted and design and implementation of such a compact device for permanent monitoring as well as possible regulation of the various laser parameters of relevance is discussed.

  4. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world's first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density ...

  5. A low energy accumulation stage for a beta-beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Källberg, Anders; Lindroos, Mats

    2006-01-01

    The EU supported EURISOL Design Study encompasses a beta-beam facility for neutrino physics. Intense electron (anti-)neutrino beams are in such a machine generated through the decay of radioactive ions in a high energy storage ring. The two main candidate isotopes for the generation of a neutrino and an antineutrino beam are 6He and 18Ne. The intensities required are hard to reach, in particular for the neon case. A possible solution to increase the intensity is to use an accumulator ring with an electron cooler. Critical parameters such as cooling times and current limitations due to space charge and tune shifts are presently being optimized. We will in this presentation give an overview of the low energy accumulation stage and review recent work on this option.

  6. Materials science and biophysics applications at the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, U

    2011-01-01

    The ISOLDE isotope separator facility at CERN provides a variety of radioactive ion beams, currently more than 800 different isotopes from ~65 chemical elements. The radioisotopes are produced on-line by nuclear reactions from a 1.4 GeV proton beam with various types of targets, outdiffusion of the reaction products and, if possible, chemically selective ionisation, followed by 60 kV acceleration and mass separation. While ISOLDE is mainly used for nuclear and atomic physics studies, applications in materials science and biophysics account for a significant part (currently ~15%) of the delivered beam time, requested by 18 different experiments. The ISOLDE materials science and biophysics community currently consists of ~80 scientists from more than 40 participating institutes and 21 countries. In the field of materials science, investigations focus on the study of semiconductors and oxides, with the recent additions of nanoparticles and metals, while the biophysics studies address the toxicity of metal ions i...

  7. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1  μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  8. Beam Position Monitor and Energy Analysis at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, David Juarez [Univ. of Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-08-01

    Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility has produced its first beam with an energy of 20 MeV. This energy is obtained by the acceleration at the Electron Gun and the Capture Cavity 2 (CC2). When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one International Liner Collider (ILC)-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We calculated the total energy of the beam and the corresponding energy to the Electron Gun and CC2. Subsequently, a Beam Position Monitors (BPM) error analysis was done, to calculate the device actual resolution.

  9. The Beam Profile Monitoring System for the IRRAD Proton Facility at the CERN PS East Area

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Matli, Emanuele; Ravotti, Federico; Gan, Kock Kiam; Kagan, Harris; Smith, Shane; Warner, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments, devices are frequently required to withstand a certain radiation level. As a result, detectors and electronics must be irradiated to determine their level of radiation tolerance. To perform these irradiations, CERN built a new irradiation facility in the East Area at the Proton Synchrotron (PS) accelerator. At this facility, named IRRAD, a high-intensity 24 GeV/c proton beam is used. During irradiation, it is necessary to monitor the intensity and the transverse profile of the proton beam. The Beam Profile Monitor (BPM) for IRRAD uses 39-channel pixel detectors to monitor the beam position. These pixel detectors are constructed using thin foil copper pads positioned on a flex circuit. When protons pass through the copper pads, they induce a measurable current. To measure this current and determine the total flux of protons passing through the thin foil copper detectors, a new data acquisition system was designed as well as a new database and on-line display system. In...

  10. A Micromegas Detector for Neutron Beam Imaging at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Giomataris, Y.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Iguaz, F. J.; Kebbiri, M.; Pancin, J.; Papaevangelou, T.; Tsinganis, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Corté-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Gurusamy, P.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Marítnez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T. J.; Žugec, P.

    2014-05-01

    Micromegas (Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors are gas detectors consisting of a stack of one ionization and one proportional chamber. A micromesh separates the two communicating regions, where two different electric fields establish respectively a charge drift and a charge multiplication regime. The n_TOF facility at CERN provides a white neutron beam (from thermal up to GeV neutrons) for neutron induced cross section measurements. These measurements need a perfect knowlodge of the incident neutron beam, in particular regarding its spatial profile. A position sensitive micromegas detector equipped with a 10B based neutron/charged particle converter has been extensively used at the n_TOF facility for characterizing the neutron beam profile and extracting the beam interception factor for samples of different size. The boron converter allowed to scan the energy region of interest for neutron induced capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy, determined by the time of flight. Experimental results will be presented and compared to simulations, performed by means of the FLUKA code.

  11. Development of a Beam-based Phase Feedforward Demonstration at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083344; Christian, Glenn

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposal for a future linear electron--positron collider that could achieve collision energies of up to 3~TeV. In the CLIC concept the main high energy beam is accelerated using RF power extracted from a high intensity drive beam, achieving an accelerating gradient of 100~MV/m. This scheme places strict tolerances on the drive beam phase stability, which must be better than $0.2^\\circ$ at 12~GHz. To achieve the required phase stability CLIC proposes a high bandwidth (${>}17.5$~MHz), low latency drive beam ``phase feedforward'' (PFF) system. In this system electromagnetic kickers, powered by 500~kW amplifiers, are installed in a chicane and used to correct the phase by deflecting the beam on to longer or shorter trajectories. A prototype PFF system has been installed at the CLIC Test Facility, CTF3; the design, operation and commissioning of which is the focus of this work. Two kickers have been installed in the pre-existing chicane in the TL2 transfer line at CTF3 for t...

  12. Trajectory measurements and correlations in the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Renier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the beam delivery system of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC as well as to define and to test the tuning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. ATF2 commissioning started in December 2008, and thanks to submicron resolution beam position monitors (BPMs, it has been possible to measure the beam position fluctuation along the final focus of ATF2 during the 2009 runs. The optics was not the nominal one yet, with a lower focusing to make the tuning easier. In this paper, a method to measure the noise of each BPM every pulse, in a model-independent way, will be presented. A method to reconstruct the trajectory’s fluctuations is developed which uses the previously determined BPM resolution. As this reconstruction provides a measurement of the beam energy fluctuations, it was also possible to measure the horizontal and vertical dispersion function at each BPMs parasitically. The spatial and angular dispersions can be fitted from these measurements with uncertainties comparable with usual measurements.

  13. Development of a low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the MARA separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Philippos, E-mail: philippos.papadakis@jyu.fi; Moore, Iain; Pohjalainen, Ilkka; Sarén, Jan; Uusitalo, Juha [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    A low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the production and study of nuclei produced close to the proton drip line is under development at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The facility will take advantage of the mass selectivity of the recently commissioned MARA vacuum-mode mass separator. The ions selected by MARA will be stopped and thermalised in a small-volume gas cell prior to extraction and further mass separation. The gas cell design allows for resonance laser ionisation/spectroscopy both in-gas-cell and in-gas-jet. The facility will include experimental setups allowing ion counting, mass measurement and decay spectroscopy.

  14. Development of a low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the MARA separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Philippos; Moore, Iain; Pohjalainen, Ilkka; Sarén, Jan; Uusitalo, Juha

    2016-12-01

    A low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the production and study of nuclei produced close to the proton drip line is under development at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The facility will take advantage of the mass selectivity of the recently commissioned MARA vacuum-mode mass separator. The ions selected by MARA will be stopped and thermalised in a small-volume gas cell prior to extraction and further mass separation. The gas cell design allows for resonance laser ionisation/spectroscopy both in-gas-cell and in-gas-jet. The facility will include experimental setups allowing ion counting, mass measurement and decay spectroscopy.

  15. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  16. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P.

    2017-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  17. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  18. Hydrodynamic response of solid target heated by heavy ion beams from future facility HIAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jieru; Zhao, Yongtao; Cheng, Rui; Xu, Zhongfeng; Xiao, Guoqing

    2017-09-01

    The hydrodynamic response of solid target heated by heavy ion beams at High Intensity Accelerator Facility (HIAF) project was simulated with 1-D computer code. The energy deposition was benchmarked by a 2-D program. The work serves to show the prospect of HIAF project for High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) study, and provide helpful information for the future experiments. Various target materials and schemes are used in the calculation. The results show that in the first phase of HIAF project, the available ion beam is already a powerful tool to generate HED matter with specially designed target, and the second phase of the project will extend the accessible state of matter a big step further. What's more, the hydrodynamic behavior of the target under direct heating indicates that the beam parameter design for HEDP research should come to a compromise, which means, for example, with higher intensity or smaller focal spot, the beam pulse length must be compressed short enough to avoid the target dispersal before the end of the pulse.

  19. A High Rigidity Spectrometer for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers, Remco

    2017-01-01

    The High Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) will be the centerpiece experimental tool of the Facility for Rare-Isotope Beams (FRIB) fast-beam program. The fast-beam program has tremendous discovery potential, enabling experiments with beam intensities of a few ions per second or less through the luminosity afforded by thick targets. The high magnetic rigidity of the HRS (up to 8 Tm) will match the rigidities at which rare-isotope production yields at the FRIB fragment separator are maximum across the entire chart of nuclei and enable experiments with the most neutron-rich nuclei available at FRIB. Gain factors in luminosity of ten or more are achievable compared to running with existing spectrometers, which have a maximum rigidity of 4 Tm, with the highest gains for the most neutron-rich unstable isotopes. To enable a broad spectrum of experiments, the HRS will accommodate different ion-optical modes and provide the flexibility to run in coincidence with a diverse set of other detector systems, such as the Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA) and the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA-LISA). In the presentation, an overview of the scientific opportunities with the HRS and the present layout, based on ion-optical and magnet-feasibility studies, will be given. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office for Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-SC0014554.

  20. The measurement, control, and validation of critical parameters in an electron beam sterilization facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, P.; Drewell, N. H.; McKeown, J.

    1996-06-01

    The delivery and validation of a specified dose to a medical device are key concerns of operators of electron beam irradiation facilities. In an IMPELA-based irradiator , four of the parameters that directly influence the absorbed dose distribution in the product are controllable in real time — the electron energy, average beam current, scanned area, and the product exposure time. The 10 MeV accelerator operates at 50 kW with a stream of 200 μs wide, 100 mA pulses at a repetition rate of 250 Hz. The combination of short-term intra-pulse regulation with long-term pulse-to-pulse stability makes the IMPELA output attractive for the sterilization of medical products. The measurement and closed-loop control techniques used in the IMPELA design with be described with reference to facilitating compliance with medical sterilization standards. IMPELA is a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.

  1. Measurements of electron beam emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility damping ring operated in multibunch modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Honda

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the measurement results of electron beam emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility damping ring operated in multibunch modes. The measurements were carried out with an upgraded laser wire beam profile monitor. The monitor has now a vertical wire as well as a horizontal one and is able to make much faster measurements thanks to an increased effective laser power inside the cavity. The measured emittance shows no large bunch-to-bunch dependence in either the horizontal or vertical directions. The values of the vertical emittance are similar to those obtained in the single-bunch operation. The present results are an important step toward the realization of a high-energy linear collider.

  2. Numerical analysis of the beam position monitor pickup for the Iranian light source facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, M.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Rahighi, J.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a button type Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the low emittance storage ring of the Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF). First, we calculate sensitivities, induced power and intrinsic resolution based on solving Laplace equation numerically by finite element method (FEM), in order to find the potential at each point of BPM's electrode surface. After the optimization of the designed BPM, trapped high order modes (HOM), wakefield and thermal loss effects are calculated. Finally, after fabrication of BPM, it is experimentally tested by using a test-stand. The results depict that the designed BPM has a linear response in the area of 2×4 mm2 inside the beam pipe and the sensitivity of 0.080 and 0.087 mm-1 in horizontal and vertical directions. Experimental results also depict that they are in a good agreement with numerical analysis.

  3. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Masahiro, E-mail: hino@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Masaaki [Center for Experimental Studies, KMI, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamada, Norifumi L. [Neutron Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 203-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Tasaki, Seiji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kawabata, Yuji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS.

  4. Numerical analysis of the beam position monitor pickup for the Iranian light source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiee, M., E-mail: mehdish@ipm.ir [Radiation Applications Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Feghhi, S.A.H. [Radiation Applications Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahighi, J. [Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF), Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a button type Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the low emittance storage ring of the Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF). First, we calculate sensitivities, induced power and intrinsic resolution based on solving Laplace equation numerically by finite element method (FEM), in order to find the potential at each point of BPM's electrode surface. After the optimization of the designed BPM, trapped high order modes (HOM), wakefield and thermal loss effects are calculated. Finally, after fabrication of BPM, it is experimentally tested by using a test-stand. The results depict that the designed BPM has a linear response in the area of 2×4 mm{sup 2} inside the beam pipe and the sensitivity of 0.080 and 0.087 mm{sup −1} in horizontal and vertical directions. Experimental results also depict that they are in a good agreement with numerical analysis.

  5. Positron annihilation spectroscopy on a beam of positrons the LEPTA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmanova, E. V.; Eseev, M. K.; Kobets, A. G.; Meshkov, I. N.; Orlov, O. S.; Sidorin, A. A.; Siemek, K.; Horodek, P.

    2017-01-01

    The results and possibilities of the samples surfaces research by the Doppler method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) for a monochromatic beam of positrons at the LEPTA facility are presented in this paper. Method with high-resolution sensitivity to defects like vacancies and dislocations allows scanning of the surface and near-surface sample layers to a depth of several micrometers by the method of Doppler broadening of annihilation lines. The opportunities for the development of a PAS method based on the measurement of the positron lifetime in the sample irradiated by ordered flow of positrons from the injector of accelerator complex LEPTA at JINR are discussed.

  6. sup 4 He sup 1 H sub 2 sup + and sup 4 He sup 2 H sup + , exotic impurities in sup 6 He sup + beam

    CERN Document Server

    Miljanic, D; Aliotta, M; Cherubini, S; Davinson, T; Di Pietro, A; Figuera, P; Gaelens, M; Galster, W; Loiselet, M; Ninane, A; Ostrowski, A N; Ryckewaert, G; Shotter, A C; Soic, N; Spitaleri, C

    2000-01-01

    sup 4 He sup 1 H sub 2 sup + ions were observed as an impurity in a 17.0 MeV sup 6 He sup + beam produced by CYCLONE, with the ratio of intensities being 1 : 5400. A sup 4 He sup 2 H sup + beam was also observed, having 60 times weaker intensity and slightly lower magnetic rigidity than original sup 6 He sup + beam.

  7. The n_TOF facility: Neutron beams for challenging future measurements at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaveri, E.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brown, A.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Göbel, K.; García, A. R.; Gawlik, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heinitz, S.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Kalamara, A.; Kavrigin, P.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kurtulgil, D.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Masi, A.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Musumarra, A.; Negret, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Radeck, D.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schumann, D.; Smith, A. G.; Sosnin, N. V.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    The CERN n_TOF neutron beam facility is characterized by a very high instantaneous neutron flux, excellent TOF resolution at the 185 m long flight path (EAR-1), low intrinsic background and coverage of a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to a few GeV. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform high-accuracy measurements of neutron-induced reaction cross-sections and angular distributions of interest for fundamental and applied Nuclear Physics. Since 2001, the n_TOF Collaboration has collected a wealth of high quality nuclear data relevant for nuclear astrophysics, nuclear reactor technology, nuclear medicine, etc. The overall efficiency of the experimental program and the range of possible measurements has been expanded with the construction of a second experimental area (EAR-2), located 20 m on the vertical of the n_TOF spallation target. This upgrade, which benefits from a neutron flux 30 times higher than in EAR-1, provides a substantial extension in measurement capabilities, opening the possibility to collect data on neutron cross-section of isotopes with short half-lives or available in very small amounts. This contribution will outline the main characteristics of the n_TOF facility, with special emphasis on the new experimental area. In particular, we will discuss the innovative features of the EAR-2 neutron beam that make possible to perform very challenging measurements on short-lived radioisotopes or sub-mg samples, out of reach up to now at other neutron facilities around the world. Finally, the future perspectives of the facility will be presented.

  8. The n_TOF facility: Neutron beams for challenging future measurements at CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaveri E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The CERN n_TOF neutron beam facility is characterized by a very high instantaneous neutron flux, excellent TOF resolution at the 185 m long flight path (EAR-1, low intrinsic background and coverage of a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to a few GeV. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform high-accuracy measurements of neutron-induced reaction cross-sections and angular distributions of interest for fundamental and applied Nuclear Physics. Since 2001, the n_TOF Collaboration has collected a wealth of high quality nuclear data relevant for nuclear astrophysics, nuclear reactor technology, nuclear medicine, etc. The overall efficiency of the experimental program and the range of possible measurements has been expanded with the construction of a second experimental area (EAR-2, located 20 m on the vertical of the n_TOF spallation target. This upgrade, which benefits from a neutron flux 30 times higher than in EAR-1, provides a substantial extension in measurement capabilities, opening the possibility to collect data on neutron cross-section of isotopes with short half-lives or available in very small amounts. This contribution will outline the main characteristics of the n_TOF facility, with special emphasis on the new experimental area. In particular, we will discuss the innovative features of the EAR-2 neutron beam that make possible to perform very challenging measurements on short-lived radioisotopes or sub-mg samples, out of reach up to now at other neutron facilities around the world. Finally, the future perspectives of the facility will be presented.

  9. Development of a prompt gamma activation analysis facility using diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Byun, S H; Choi, H D

    2002-01-01

    A prompt gamma activation analysis facility has recently been developed at Hanaro, the 24 MW research reactor in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Polychromatic thermal neutrons are extracted by setting pyrolytic graphite crystals at a Bragg angle of 45 deg. . The detection system comprises a large single n-type HPGe detector, signal electronics and a fast ADC. Neutron beam characterization was performed both theoretically and experimentally. The neutron flux was measured to be 7.9x10 sup 7 n/cm sup 2 s in a 1x1 cm sup 2 beam area at the sample position with a uniformity of 12%. The corresponding Cd-ratio for gold was found to be 266. The beam quality was compared with other representative thermal neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. The detection efficiency was calibrated up to 11 MeV using a set of radionuclides and the (n,gamma) reactions of N and Cl. Finally, the sensitivities and the detection limits were obtained for several elements.

  10. Proton beam characterization in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, F.; Rovituso, M.; Fabiano, S.; Piffer, S.; Manea, C.; Lorentini, S.; Lanzone, S.; Wang, Z.; Pasini, M.; Burger, W. J.; La Tessa, C.; Scifoni, E.; Schwarz, M.; Durante, M.

    2017-10-01

    As proton therapy is becoming an established treatment methodology for cancer patients, the number of proton centres is gradually growing worldwide. The economical effort for building these facilities is motivated by the clinical aspects, but might be also supported by the potential relevance for the research community. Experiments with high-energy protons are needed not only for medical physics applications, but represent also an essential part of activities dedicated to detector development, space research, radiation hardness tests, as well as of fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics. Here we present the characterization of the beam line installed in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy Centre (Italy). Measurements of beam spot size and envelope, range verification and proton flux were performed in the energy range between 70 and 228 MeV. Methods for reducing the proton flux from typical treatments values of 106-109 particles/s down to 101-105 particles/s were also investigated. These data confirm that a proton beam produced in a clinical centre build by a commercial company can be exploited for a broad spectrum of experimental activities. The results presented here will be used as a reference for future experiments.

  11. Integrating supervision, control and data acquisition—The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchetta, A., E-mail: adriano.luchetta@igi.cnr.it; Manduchi, G.; Taliercio, C.; Breda, M.; Capobianco, R.; Molon, F.; Moressa, M.; Simionato, P.; Zampiva, E.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The paper describes the experience gained in the integration of different systems for the control and data acquisition system of the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility. • It describes the way the different frameworks have been integrated. • It reports some lessons learnt during system integration. • It reports some authors’ considerations about the development the ITER CODAC. - Abstract: The ITER Neutral Beam (NBI) Test Facility, under construction in Padova, Italy consists in the ITER full scale ion source for the heating neutral beam injector, referred to as SPIDER, and the full size prototype injector, referred to as MITICA. The Control and Data Acquisition System (CODAS) for SPIDER has been developed and is going to be in operation in 2016. The system is composed of four main components: Supervision, Slow Control, Fast Control and Data Acquisition. These components interact with each other to carry out the system operation and, since they represent a common pattern in fusion experiments, software frameworks have been used for each (set of) component. In order to reuse as far as possible the architecture developed for SPIDER, it is important to clearly define the boundaries and the interfaces among the system components so that the implementation of any component can be replaced without affecting the overall architecture. This work reports the experience gained in the development of SPIDER components, highlighting the importance in the definition of generic interfaces among component, showing how the specific solutions have been adapted to such interfaces and suggesting possible approaches for the development of other ITER subsystems.

  12. SUITABILITY OF A NEW CALORIMETER FOR EXOTIC MESON SEARCHES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookwalter, C.; Ostrovidov, A.; Eugenio, P.

    2007-01-01

    Exotic mesons, particles that have quantum numbers that are inaccessible to conventional quark-model mesons, are predicted by quantum chromodynamics (QCD), but past experiments seeking to identify exotic candidates have produced controversial results. The HyCLAS experiment (E04005) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) proposes the use of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B to study the photoproduction of exotic mesons. However, the base detector package at CLAS is not ideal for observing and measuring neutral particles, particularly at forward angles. The Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) experiment at TJNAF has commissioned a new calorimeter for detecting small-angle photons, but studies must be performed to determine its suitability for a meson spectroscopy experiment. The ηπ system has been under especial scrutiny in the community as a source for potential exotics, so the new calorimeter’s ability at reconstructing these resonances must be evaluated. To achieve this, the invariant mass of showers in the calorimeter are reconstructed. Also, two electroproduction reaction channels analogous to photoproduction channels of interest to HyCLAS are examined in DVCS data. It is found that, while not ideal, the new calorimeter will allow access to additional reaction channels, and its inclusion in HyCLAS is warranted. Results in basic shower reconstruction show that the calorimeter has good effi ciency in resolving π° decays, but its η reconstruction is not as strong. When examining ep → epπ°η, preliminary reconstruction of the ηπ° system shows faint signals in the a0(980) region. In the ep → e n π+ η channel, preliminary reconstruction of the ηπ+ system gave good signals in the a0(980) and a2(1320) regions, but statistics were poor. While more analyses are necessary to improve statistics and remove background, these preliminary results support the claim

  13. Beam loss distribution calculation and collimation efficiency simulation of a cooler storage ring in a heavy ion research facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou is an ion cooler storage ring facility in China’s Institute of Modern Physics. The beams are accumulated, electron cooled, accelerated, and extracted from the main cooler storage ring (CSRm to the experimental ring or different terminals. The heavy ion beams are easily lost at the vacuum chamber along the CSRm when it is used to accumulate intermediate charge state particles. The vacuum pressure bump due to the ion-induced desorption in turn leads to an increase in beam loss rate. In order to avoid the complete beam loss, the collimation system is investigated and planned to be installed in the CSRm. First, the beam loss distribution is simulated considering the particle charge exchanged process. Then the collimation efficiency of the lost particles is calculated and optimized under different position and geometry of the collimators and beam emittance and so on. Furthermore, the beam orbit distortion that is caused by different types of errors in the ring will affect the collimation efficiency. The linearized and inhomogeneous equations of particle motion with these errors are derived and solved by an extended transfer matrix method. Actual magnet alignment errors are adopted to investigate the collimation efficiency of the lost particles in the CSRm. Estimation of the beam loss positions and optimization of the collimation system is completed by a newly developed simulation program.

  14. Direct reactions with exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obertelli A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct reactions have been a unique tool to address the nuclear many-body problem from the experimental side. They are now routinely used in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams (RIB. However, weakly bound nuclei have recently raised questions on the applicability of reaction formalisms benchmarked on stable nuclei to the study of single-particle properties and correlations in these unstable systems. The study of the most exotic species produced at low intensity have triggered new technical developments to increase the sensitivity of the setup, with a focused attention to direct reactions such as transfer at low incident energy or knockout at intermediate energies.

  15. Heavy exotic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+1 binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb-(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  16. Ion Beam Facilities at the National Centre for Accelerator based Research using a 3 MV Pelletron Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, T.; Patel, Shiv P.; Chandra, P.; Bajpai, P. K.

    A 3.0 MV (Pelletron 9 SDH 4, NEC, USA) low energy ion accelerator has been recently installed as the National Centre for Accelerator based Research (NCAR) at the Department of Pure & Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur, India. The facility is aimed to carried out interdisciplinary researches using ion beams with high current TORVIS (for H, He ions) and SNICS (for heavy ions) ion sources. The facility includes two dedicated beam lines, one for ion beam analysis (IBA) and other for ion implantation/ irradiation corresponding to switching magnet at +20 and -10 degree, respectively. Ions with 60 kV energy are injected into the accelerator tank where after stripping positively charged ions are accelerated up to 29 MeV for Au. The installed ion beam analysis techniques include RBS, PIXE, ERDA and channelling.

  17. A table-top ion and electron beam facility for ionization quenching measurement and gas detector calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraz, J.F.; Médard, J.; Couturier, C.; Fourrel, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Lamy, T.; Marton, M.; Riffard, Q.; Sortais, P.; Santos, D.; Sauzet, N.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the MiMAC project, the LPSC (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie) has developed COMIMAC, a miniaturized and transportable table-top beam line, producing ions or electrons to make measurements of the “quenching” factor in ionization and detector calibration. The energy range of the COMIMAC beam facility starts from a few tens of eV up to 50 keV.

  18. A table-top ion and electron beam facility for ionization quenching measurement and gas detector calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraz, J. F.; Médard, J.; Couturier, C.; Fourrel, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Lamy, T.; Marton, M.; Riffard, Q.; Sortais, P.; Santos, D.; Sauzet, N.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the MiMAC project, the LPSC (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie) has developed COMIMAC, a miniaturized and transportable table-top beam line, producing ions or electrons to make measurements of the "quenching" factor in ionization and detector calibration. The energy range of the COMIMAC beam facility starts from a few tens of eV up to 50 keV.

  19. HiRadMat at CERN/SPS - A dedicated facility providing high intensity beam pulses to material samples

    CERN Multimedia

    Charitonidis, N; Efthymiopoulos, I

    2014-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials), constructed in 2011, is a facility at CERN designed to provide high‐intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, high power beam targets, collimators…) can be tested. The facility uses a 440 GeV proton beam extracted from the CERN SPS with a pulse length of up to 7.2 us, and with a maximum pulse energy of 3.4 MJ (3xE13 proton/pulse). In addition to protons, ion beams with energy of 440 GeV/charge and total pulse energy of 21 kJ can be provided. The beam parameters can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. HiRadMat is not an irradiation facility where large doses on equipment can be accumulated. It is rather a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high‐intensity pulsed beams on materials or accelerator component assemblies in a controlled environment. The fa‐ cility is designed for a maximum of 1E16 protons per year, dist...

  20. Review of ion-source developments for radioactive ion-beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Lettry, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    The ion-sources dedicated to the production of radioactive ion beams (RIB) shall be highly efficient, selective and fast. This efficiency is mandatory since only limited amounts of radionuclides are produced. Chemical selectivity is needed to confine other elements near to the production site and to suppress isobaric contaminants. Eventually, the ion-source shall only decay the radioisotopes by a fraction of their half-life to reduce decay losses. The world wide spread RIB facilities came up with a large variety of solutions to meet part or all of these requirements such as: ion traps, surface, plasma, sputtering, electron cyclotron resonance and laser ion- sources. In this review, the latest developments are presented and their applications to charge states breeder systems proposed for post-acceleration are discussed. (59 refs).

  1. Results of a beam dump experiment at the CERN SPS neutrino facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hansl

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available We report results from a beam dump experiment that has been performed at the CERN SPS neutrino facility using the CDHS neutrino counter detector. Limits on dimuon and trimuon production by new penetrating neutral particles are given. A new source of prompt electron and muon neutrinos has been observed giving (1.2±0.4× 10−7 νe or νμ per incident proton with neutrino angle smaller than 1.85 mrad and Eν > 20 GeV. If these prompt neutrinos are attributed to charmed meson pair production, the inclusive DD production cross section could be of the order of 30 ωb. If axions are existing their production rate relative to π0 mesons is found to be less than 0.5 × 10−8.

  2. The SPS beam parameters, the operational cycle, and proton sharing with the SHiP facility

    CERN Document Server

    Arduini, Gianluigi; Gatignon, Lau; Cornelis, Karel

    2015-01-01

    The SHiP experiment aims at acquiring a total of 4×1019 protons on target per year. Based on demonstrated SPS performance for CNGS, the expected proton sharing between the TCC2 targets and SHiP is estimated taking into account the constraints in the super-cycle composition. We review the SPS beam parameters, the operational cycles taking into account the concurrent operation of the SPS as LHC injector and for the TCC2 experiments and the limitations on the maximum possible power dissipation and the expected sharing of the protons on target of the SHiP facility with the TCC2 targets. As a typical example this aim could be achieved while maintaining a duty cycle for the other fixed target experiments of about 18%.

  3. Laboratory Facilities and Measurement Techniques for Beamed-Energy-Propulsion Experiments in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos; Chanes Júnior, José Brosler; Cordeiro Marcos, Thiago Victor; Pinto, David Romanelli; Santos Vilela, Renan Guilherme; Barros Galvão, Victor Alves; Mantovani, Arthur Freire; da Costa, Felipe Jean; dos Santos Assenção, José Adeildo; dos Santos, Alberto Monteiro; de Paula Toro, Paulo Gilberto; Sala Minucci, Marco Antonio; da Silveira Rêgo, Israel; Salvador, Israel Irone; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2011-11-01

    Laser propulsion is an innovative concept of accessing the space easier and cheaper where the propulsive energy is beamed to the aerospace vehicle in flight from ground—or even satellite-based high-power laser sources. In order to be realistic about laser propulsion, the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Brazilian Air Force in cooperation with the United States Air Force and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are seriously investigating its basic physics mechanisms and engineering aspects at the Henry T. Hamamatsu Laboratory of Hypersonic and Aerothermodynamics in São José dos Campos, Brazil. This paper describes in details the existing facilities and measuring systems such as high-power laser devices, pulsed-hypersonic wind tunnels and high-speed flow visualization system currently utilized in the laboratory for experimentation on laser propulsion.

  4. High Energy Tests of Advanced Materials for Beam Intercepting Devices at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Dos Santos, S; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaeelli, S; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2012-01-01

    Predicting by simulations the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting Collimators and other Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) is a fundamental issue for machine protection: this can be done by resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, these codes require reliable material models that, at the extreme conditions generated by a beam impact, are either imprecise or non-existent. To validate relevant constitutive models or, when unavailable, derive new ones, a comprehensive experimental test foreseeing intense particle beam impacts on six different materials, either already used for present BID or under development for future applications, is being prepared at CERN HiRadMat facility. Tests will be run at medium and high intensity using the SPS proton beam (440 GeV). Material characterization will be carried out mostly in real time relying on embarked instrumentation (strain gauges, microphones, temperature and pressure sensors) and on remote acquisition dev...

  5. ISABELLE: a proton-proton colliding beam facility. [Proposal for the construction of ISABELLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-04-01

    A proposal is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility, colliding beams of protons will be produced and studied by particle physicists. This proposal combines the interests of these particle physicists in exploring a new energy regime with the challenge of building a new research instrument. The proposal results from several years of considering such devices in parallel with extensive developmental work. The proposal is divided into several major parts. Following an introduction is an overall summary of the proposal covering its highlights. Part II contains a thorough discussion of the physics objectives that can be addressed by the storage ring. It begins with an explanation of current theoretical concepts that occupy the curiosity of high energy physicists. Then follows a brief discussion of possible experiments that might be assembled at the interaction regions to test these concepts. The third part of the proposal goes into the details of the design of the intersecting storage accelerators. It begins with a description of the entire facility and the design of the magnet ring structure. The processes of proton beam accumulation and acceleration are thoroughly described. The discussion then turns to the design of the components and subsystems for the accelerator. The accelerator elements are described followed by a description of the physical plant. The cost estimate and time scales are displayed in Part IV. Here the estimate has been based on the experience gained from working with the prototype units at the laboratory. The appendices are an important part of the proposal. The parameter list for the 200 x 200 GeV ISABELLE is carefully documented. An example of a possible research program can be found in an appendix. The performance of prototype units is documented in one of the appendices.

  6. The external beam facility used to characterize corrosion products in metallic statuettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzutto, M. A.; Tabacniks, M. H.; Added, N.; Barbosa, M. D. L.; Curado, J. F.; Santos, W. A.; Lima, S. C.; Melo, H. G.; Neiva, A. C.

    2005-10-01

    To open new possibilities in nuclear applied physics research, mainly for the analysis of art objects in air, an external beam facility was installed at LAMFI (Laboratório de Análise de Materiais por Feixes Iônicos) of University of São Paulo. PIXE measurements were made using an XR-100CR (Si-PIN) X-ray detector pointed to the sample mounted after an approximate 11 mm air path, hence with effective beam energy of 0.9 MeV. This setup was used to characterize the corrosion products of two ethnological metallic statuettes from the African collection of the Museum of Archaeology and Etnology. PIXE analysis of the corrosion free base of one statuette showed that Cu and Zn are the main components of the alloy, while Pb is present in smaller amount. The analysis of some corrosion products showed a Zn:Cu relationship higher than that of the base, evidencing selective corrosion. The main components of the other statuette were Cu and Pb, while S and Zn were found in smaller amounts.

  7. The external beam facility used to characterize corrosion products in metallic statuettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzutto, M.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcia.rizzutto@dfn.if.usp.br; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Added, N. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barbosa, M.D.L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curado, J.F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, W.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, S.C. [Laboratorio de Conservacao e Restauracao, Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Prof. Almeida Prado, 1466, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Melo, H.G. [Laboratorio de Eletroquimica e CorroSao, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.380, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neiva, A.C. [Laboratorio de Eletroquimica e CorroSao, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.380, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-10-15

    To open new possibilities in nuclear applied physics research, mainly for the analysis of art objects in air, an external beam facility was installed at LAMFI (Laboratorio de Analise de Materiais por Feixes Ionicos) of University of Sao Paulo. PIXE measurements were made using an XR-100CR (Si-PIN) X-ray detector pointed to the sample mounted after an approximate 11 mm air path, hence with effective beam energy of 0.9 MeV. This setup was used to characterize the corrosion products of two ethnological metallic statuettes from the African collection of the Museum of Archaeology and Etnology. PIXE analysis of the corrosion free base of one statuette showed that Cu and Zn are the main components of the alloy, while Pb is present in smaller amount. The analysis of some corrosion products showed a Zn:Cu relationship higher than that of the base, evidencing selective corrosion. The main components of the other statuette were Cu and Pb, while S and Zn were found in smaller amounts.

  8. 16th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Beam Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the 16th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Beam Facilities (NUFACT 2014) that was held at the University of Glasgow (Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom) from 25-30 August 2014. This edition of the NUFACT annual meetings, which started in 1999, consisted of 24 plenary and 92 parallel talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 124 delegates. Furthermore, the International Neutrino Summer School 2014 was held from 10-22 August 2014 at St Andrews, Scotland, in the two weeks before NUFACT 2014. It was intended for young scientists with an interest in neutrino physics in such a way that they would be able to participate and contribute to the NUFACT workshop as well. The objectives of the NUFACT workshops are to review progress on different studies for future accelerator-based neutrino oscillation facilities, with the goal to discover the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, CP violation in the leptonic s...

  9. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolev, Yu G; EXON-2014

    2015-01-01

    The production and the properties of nuclei in extreme conditions, such as high isospin, temperature, angular momenta, large deformations etc., have become the subject of detailed investigations in all scientific centers. The main topics discussed at the Symposium were: Synthesis and Properties of Exotic Nuclei; Superheavy Elements; Rare Processes, Nuclear Reactions, Fission and Decays; Experimental Facilities and Scientific Projects. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the newest results of the investigations in the main scientific centers such as GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), GANIL (Caen, France), RIKEN (Wako-shi, Japan), MSU (Michigan, USA), and JINR (Dubna, Russia).

  10. Extraction and low energy beam transport from a surface ion source at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Ames, F.; Bricault, P.; Lassen, J.; Laxdal, A.; Mjos, A.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of radioactive beams produced and delivered at TRIUMF's isotope separator and accelerator facility, ISAC, are using either a surface ion source or a resonant ionization laser ion source, which share a common design. To characterize the operation of the ion sources, simulations were performed to determine the ion beam optics and beam envelope properties of the extracted beam. Furthermore ion-optics calculations were performed to determine the transmission parameters through the mass separator magnet. Emittances are measured in the ISAC low energy beam line right after the mass separator. The recent addition of a channeltron to the Allison emittance meter scanner now allows us to measure emittances for ion beams with intensities as low as 105 ions/s. This is particularly useful for establishing high resolution, high throughput mass separator tunes for radioactive isotope beams. This paper discusses emittance measurements of low intensity beams, typical emittance scans for the surface ion source and the resonant laser ionized source for different source parameters. The observed results are compared to the simulations and discussed.

  11. Extraction and low energy beam transport from a surface ion source at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A., E-mail: asen.kvi@gmail.com; Ames, F.; Bricault, P.; Lassen, J.; Laxdal, A.; Mjos, A.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of radioactive beams produced and delivered at TRIUMF’s isotope separator and accelerator facility, ISAC, are using either a surface ion source or a resonant ionization laser ion source, which share a common design. To characterize the operation of the ion sources, simulations were performed to determine the ion beam optics and beam envelope properties of the extracted beam. Furthermore ion-optics calculations were performed to determine the transmission parameters through the mass separator magnet. Emittances are measured in the ISAC low energy beam line right after the mass separator. The recent addition of a channeltron to the Allison emittance meter scanner now allows us to measure emittances for ion beams with intensities as low as 10{sup 5} ions/s. This is particularly useful for establishing high resolution, high throughput mass separator tunes for radioactive isotope beams. This paper discusses emittance measurements of low intensity beams, typical emittance scans for the surface ion source and the resonant laser ionized source for different source parameters. The observed results are compared to the simulations and discussed.

  12. A novel diamond-based beam position monitoring system for the High Radiation to Materials facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2092886; Höglund, Carina

    The High Radiation to Materials facility employs a high intensity pulsed beam imposing several challenges on the beam position monitors. Diamond has been shown to be a resilient material with its radiation hardness and mechanical strength, while it is also simple due to its wide bandgap removing the need for doping. A new type of diamond based beam position monitor has been constructed, which includes a hole in the center of the diamond where the majority of the beam is intended to pass through. This increases the longevity of the detectors as well as allowing them to be used for high intensity beams. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the performance of the detectors in the High Radiation to Materials facility for various beam parameters, involving differences in position, size, bunch intensity and bunch number. A prestudy consisting of calibration of the detectors using single incident particles is also presented. The detectors are shown to work as intended after a recalibration of the algorithm, alb...

  13. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology.

  14. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  15. Study of the elastic scattering and of the (p,n) charge exchange reaction with neutron-rich light exotic beams; Etude de la diffusion elastique et de la reaction d`echange de charge (p,n) avec des faisceaux exotiques legers riches en neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D.

    1996-07-05

    We have measured at GANIL, with the high resolution spectrometer SPEG, the elastic scattering of several neutron rich secondary beams ({sup 6}He, {sup 10}Be and {sup 11}Be) on a polypropylene target and the charge exchange reaction p({sup 6}He, {sup 6}Li)n. These exotic beams were produced by nuclear fragmentation and re-focalized with the SISSI device (superconducting solenoids). The signature of a halo structure in these nuclei has been analysed. Special attention has been paid to several aspects of the associated calculations namely, the proton and neutron density distributions and the small binding energy for the last nucleons in these exotic nuclei. Break-up mechanisms are seen to play an important role in these nuclei. 100 refs.

  16. Exotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, W R

    1980-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, Lassa fever, monkeypox, and Ebola virus diseases of humans have all been recognized since 1967. These are examples of some of the exotic virus diseases which through importation may present a potential public health problem in the United States. Some of these viruses are also highly hazardous to laboratory and medical personnel. This paper is a review of the general characteristics, the epidemiology, and laboratory diagnosis of the exotic viruses which have been described during the last 25 years.

  17. Exotic viral diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Dowdle, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, Lassa fever, monkeypox, and Ebola virus diseases of humans have all been recognized since 1967. These are examples of some of the exotic virus diseases which through importation may present a potential public health problem in the United States. Some of these viruses are also highly hazardous to laboratory and medical personnel. This paper is a review of the general characteristics, the epidemiology, and laboratory diagnosis of the exotic viruses which have been describ...

  18. Exotic Mammal Laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy is an evolving field in veterinary medicine, and there is an increased interest in using laparoscopic techniques in nondomestic mammals, including zoo animals, wildlife, and exotic pets. The aim of this article is to summarize the approach to laparoscopic procedures, including instrumentation, patient selection and preparation, and surgical approaches, and to review the current literature on laparoscopy in exotic mammals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  20. Design of Data Acquisition and Control System for Indian Test Facility of Diagnostics Neutral Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Jignesh, E-mail: jsoni@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Tyagi, Himanshu; Yadav, Ratnakar; Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 380 025, Gujarat (India); Bansal, Gourab; Gahluat, Agrajit [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Sudhir, Dass; Joshi, Jaydeep; Prasad, Rambilas [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 380 025, Gujarat (India); Pandya, Kaushal [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Shah, Sejal; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 380 025, Gujarat (India); Chakraborty, Arun [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • More than 900 channels Data Acquisition and Control System. • INTF DACS has been designed based on ITER-PCDH guidelines. • Separate Interlock and Safety system designed based on IEC 61508 standard. • Hardware selected from ITER slow controller and fast controller catalog. • Software framework based on ITER CODAC Core System and LabVIEW software. - Abstract: The Indian Test Facility (INTF) – a negative hydrogen ion based 100 kV, 60 A, 5 Hz modulated NBI system having 3 s ON/20 s OFF duty cycle. Prime objective of the facility is to install a full-scale test bed for the qualification of all Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) parameters, prior to installation in ITER. The automated and safe operation of the INTF will require a reliable and rugged instrumentation and control system which provide control, data acquisition (DAQ), interlock and safety functions, referred as INTF-DACS. The INTF-DACS has been decided to be design based on the ITER CODAC architecture and ITER-PCDH guidelines since the technical understanding of CODAC technology gained from this will later be helpful in development of plant system I&C for DNB. For complete operation of the INTF, approximately 900 numbers of signals are required to be superintending by the DACS. In INTF conventional control loop time required is within the range of 5–100 ms and for DAQ except high-end diagnostics, required sampling rates in range of 5 sample per second (Sps) to 10 kSps; to fulfill these requirements hardware components have been selected from the ITER slow and fast controller catalogs. For high-end diagnostics required sampling rates up to 100 MSps normally in case of certain events, therefore event and burst based DAQ hardware has been finalized. Combined use of CODAC core software (CCS) and NI-LabVIEW has been finalized due to the fact that full required DAQ support is not available in present version of CCS. Interlock system for investment protection of facility and Safety system for

  1. Production of radioactive molecular beams for CERN-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)703149; Kröll, Thorsten

    SOLDE, the Isotope Separation On-Line facility, at CERN is a leading facility for the production of beams of exotic radioactive isotopes. Currently over 1000 different isotopes with half lives down to milliseconds can be extracted with beam intensities of up to 10^11 ions per second. However, due to the reactive target environment not all isotopes are extractable in sufficient amounts. In this work the extraction of short lived carbon and boron isotopes is investigated. Therefore a variety of experimental and computanional techniques have been used.

  2. Production of radioactive molecular beams for CERN-ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiffert, Christoph

    2015-06-15

    ISOLDE, the Isotope Separation On-Line facility, at CERN is a leading facility for the production of beams of exotic radioactive isotopes. Currently over 1000 different isotopes with half lives down to milliseconds can be extracted with beam intensities of up to 10{sup 11} ions per second. However, due to the reactive target environment not all isotopes are extractable in sufficient amounts. In this work the extraction of short lived carbon and boron isotopes is investigated. Therefore a variety of experimental and computational techniques have been used.

  3. New target solution for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility: The granular waterfall target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Jie Cai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new target solution, the granular waterfall target, is proposed here for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility, especially for the moment which adopts a 15 MW continuous-wave (cw superconducting linac. Compared to the mercury jet target, the granular waterfall target works by a much simpler mechanism which can operate with a much more powerful beam, which are indicated by the detailed investigations into the heat depositions and the evaluations of the temperature increases for different target concepts. By varying proton beam kinetic energy and the geometrical parameters of the waterfall target, an overall understanding of the figure of merit concerning muon production for this target concept as the target solutions of the long-baseline neutrino factory and the medium-baseline moment is obtained. With 8 GeV beam energy and the optimal geometrical parameters, the influence on muon yield by adopting different beam-target interaction parameters is explored. Studies and discussions of the design details concerning beam dumping are also presented.

  4. Remarks on the exotic U-meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan Hongmo [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom); Tsou Sheungtsun [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Mathematical Inst.

    1991-12-01

    In expectation of imminent results from the new hyperon beam experiment at CERN concerning the exotic U-meson at 3.1 GeV, we propose a detailed program of experimental tests to check the suggestion that U is a qqq-barq-bar ``M-diquonium`` state. Apart from some very characteristic decay modes, the U is expected to occur together with several analogous states with various quantum numbers to which it is intimately related. (author).

  5. Charge exchange reactions as tests for structures of exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Karataglidis, S

    2010-01-01

    Charge exchange reactions serve as alternative tests of the structures of exotic nuclei. Of particular relevance is the (p, n) reaction, which is related to the Gamow-Teller matrix element. The (p, n) reaction is also related to (p, p′) in the case of transitions to the isobaric analogue state (IAS). There are few measurements of (p, n) reactions using exotic beams. We revisit the case of 6He(p, n)6Li and discuss apparent discrepancies with other available data.

  6. LICORNE: A new and unique facility for producing intense, kinematically focused neutron beams at the IPN Orsay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson J.N.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available LICORNE is a new neutron source recently installed at the tandem accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay, where a Li7-beam is used to bombard a hydrogen-containing target to produce an intense forward-directed neutron beam. The directionality of the beam, which is the unique characteristic of LICORNE, will permit the installation of γ-ray detectors dedicated to the investigation of fission fragment de-excitation which are unimpeded by neutrons from the source. A first experimental program will focus on the measurement of prompt γ-ray emission in the neutron-induced fission of fertile and fissile isotopes at incident neutron energies relevant for the core design of Generation-IV nuclear reactors. Other potential uses of the LICORNE facility for both fundamental and applied physics research are also presented.

  7. A new small-footprint external-beam PIXE facility for cultural heritage applications using pulsed proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadrucci, M.; Bazzano, G.; Borgognoni, F.; Chiari, M.; Mazzinghi, A.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ruberto, C.; Taccetti, F.

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the COBRA project, elemental analyses of cultural heritage objects based on the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) are planned in a collaboration between the APAM laboratory of ENEA-Frascati and the LABEC laboratory of INFN in Florence. With this aim a 3-7 MeV pulsed proton beam, driven by the injector of the protontherapy accelerator under construction for the TOP-IMPLART project, will be used to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique with a small-footprint pulsed accelerator to Italian small and medium enterprises interested in the composition analysis of ancient artifacts. The experimental set-up for PIXE analysis on the TOP-IMPLART machine consists of a modified assembly of the vertical beam line usually dedicated to radiobiology experiments: the beam produced by the injector (RFQ + DTL, a PL7 ACCSYSHITACHI model) is bent to 90° by a magnet, is collimated by a 300 μm aperture inserted in the end nozzle and extracted into ambient pressure by an exit window consisting of a Upilex foil 7.5 μm thick. The beam is pulsed with a variable pulse duration of 20-100 μs and a repetition rate variable from 10 to 100 Hz. The X-ray detection system is based on a Ketek Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) with 7 mm2 active area and 450 μm thickness, with a thin Beryllium entrance window (8 μm). The results of the calibration of this new PIXE set-up using thick target standards and of the analysis of the preliminary measurements on pigments are presented.

  8. Study of beam transport lines for a biomedical research facility at CERN based on LEIR

    CERN Document Server

    Abler, D; Garonna, A; Peach, K

    2014-01-01

    The Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) at CERN has been proposed to provide ion beams with magnetic rigidities up to 6.7 T.m for biomedical research, in parallel to its continued operation for LHC and SPS fixed target physics experiments. In the context of this project, two beamlines are proposed for transporting the extracted beam to future experimental end-stations: a vertical beamline for specific low-energy radiobiological research, and a horizontal beamline for radiobiology and medical physics experimentation. This study presents a first linear-optics design for the delivery of 1–5mm FWHM pencil beams and 5 cm 5 cm homogeneous broad beams to both endstations. High field uniformity is achieved by selection of the central part of a strongly defocused Gaussian beam, resulting in low beam utilisation.

  9. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  10. Exotic Higgs searches

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccioni, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Exotic Higgs searches cover a wide range of signatures, thus leading to indications to new physics beyond Standard Model. We report a review on exotic Higgs searches for lepton flavour violating Higgs decays, for "mono-Higgs" searches, for Higgs decays to invisible and for high mass Higgs searches. Both ATLAS and CMS results will be shown, for Run-1 data statistics collected at the energy of $\\sqrt s$ = 7,8 TeV and for the first data collected during Run-2 phase at the energy of $\\sqrt s$ = 13 TeV.

  11. Supplements for exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Colitz, Carmen M H

    2014-09-01

    The use of supplements has become commonplace in an effort to complement traditional therapy and as part of long-term preventive health plans. This article discusses historical and present uses of antioxidants, vitamins, and herbs. By complementing traditional medicine with holistic and alternative nutrition and supplements, the overall health and wellness of exotic pets can be enhanced and balanced. Further research is needed for understanding the strengths and uses of supplements in exotic species. Going back to the animals' origin and roots bring clinicians closer to nature and its healing powers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Steps Towards a 3 mA, 1.8 MW Proton Beam at the PSI Cyclotron Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelzbach, Pierre A; Adelmann, Andreas; Fitze, Hansruedi; Heidenreich, Gerd; Raguin, Jean-Yves; Rohrer, Urs; Sigg, Peter K

    2005-01-01

    The PSI Cyclotron Facility produces routinely a 1.8-1.9 mA proton beam at 590 MeV. The beam power reaches 1.1 MW at the the pion production targets and 0.7 MW at the neutron spallation target SINQ. The accelerator complex will be analysed in respect to his potential for future improvements. The ongoing developments aiming to increase the beam intensity to 3 mA and hence the beam power to 1.8 MW will be discussed. Smooth extrapolations of the observed machine parameters as well as recent advances in the theoretical treatment of space charge dominated beams show that this goal can be achieved with available technologies. IA new RF-cavity operated at a voltage in excess of 1 MV has been successfully tested and installed in the Ring Cyclotron. Bunchers for the low energy and the medium energy transfer lines are in the design phase. A conceptual study of new accelerating cavities to replace the obsolete flattop-cavities of the Injector Cyclotron has been performed. While the upgrade of the Ring Cyclotron with four...

  13. Photoproduction of exotic baryon resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Karliner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We point out that the new exotic resonances recently reported by LHCb in the J/ψp channel are excellent candidates for photoproduction off a proton target. This test is crucial to confirming the resonant nature of such states, as opposed to their being kinematical effects. We specialize to an interpretation of the heavier narrow state as a molecule composed of Σc and D¯⁎, and estimate its production cross section using vector dominance. The relevant photon energies and fluxes are well within the capabilities of the GlueX and CLAS12 detectors at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB. A corresponding calculation is also performed for photoproduction of an analogous resonance which is predicted to exist in the ϒp channel.

  14. Educating the exotic animal technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, Kellie A; Schulte, Michelle S

    2005-09-01

    The thorough education of a skilled exotic animal technician is an ongoing process. Providing the educational tools is only the beginning. Building on the initial educational groundwork is required to excel. Veterinary technicians interested in exotic animal medicine must lobby to promote awareness of the demand for exotic pet care; be able to accept, adapt, and apply new data frequently; and receive constant support and encouragement from the exotic animal veterinarian.

  15. Exotic invasive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Barbara G. Phillips; Laura P. Moser

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997). After habitat loss, the spread of exotic species is...

  16. Exotic nuclear matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenske H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments of nuclear structure theory for exotic nuclei are addressed. The inclusion of hyperons and nucleon resonances is discussed. Nuclear multipole response functions, hyperon interactions in infinite matter and in neutron stars and theoretical aspects of excitations of nucleon resonances in nuclei are discussed.

  17. Stabilization of the Beam Intensity in the Linac at the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Bathe, BN; Srivastava, S

    2013-01-01

    A new electron beam stabilization system has been introduced in CTF3 in order to open new possibilities for CLIC beam studies in ultra-stable conditions and to provide a sustainable tool to keep the beam intensity and energy at its reference values for long term operations. The stabilization system is based on a pulse-to-pulse feedback control of the electron gun to compensate intensity deviations measured at the end of the injector and at the beginning of the linac. Thereby it introduces negligible beam distortions at the end of the linac and it significantly reduces energy deviations. A self-calibration mechanism has been developed to automatically configure the feedback controller for the optimum performance. The residual intensity jitter of 0.045% of the stabilized beam was measured whereas the CLIC requirement is 0.075%.

  18. Design of a 3 GHz Accelerator Structure for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF 3) Drive Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Carron, G; Jensen, E.; Luong, M.; Millich, A.; Rugo, E.; Syratchev, I; Thorndahl, L

    2000-01-01

    For the CLIC two-beam scheme, a high-current, long-pulse drive beam is required for RF power generation. Taking advantage of the 3 GHz klystrons available at the LEP injector once LEP stops, a 180 MeV electron accelerator is being constructed for a nominal beam current of 3.5 A and 1.5 microsecond pulse length. The high current requires highly effective suppression of dipolar wakes. Two concepts are investigated for the accelerating structure design: the "Tapered Damped Structure" developed f...

  19. Design of a 3 GHz Accelerator Structure for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF 3) Drive Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Carron, G; Jensen, E.; Luong, M.; Millich, A.; Rugo, E.; Syratchev, I; Thorndahl, L

    2000-01-01

    For the CLIC two-beam scheme, a high-current, long-pulse drive beam is required for RF power generation. Taking advantage of the 3 GHz klystrons available at the LEP injector once LEP stops, a 180 MeV electron accelerator is being constructed for a nominal beam current of 3.5 A and 1.5 ms pulse length. The high current requires highly effective suppression of dipolar wakes. Two concepts are investigated for the accelerating structure design: the "Tapered Damped Structure" developed for the CL...

  20. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control {ampersand} laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, E.

    1996-11-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control & Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. IMPACT: A facility to study the interaction of low-energy intense particle beams with dynamic heterogeneous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, J. P.; Nieto, M.; Hendricks, M. R.; Plotkin, P.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2007-11-01

    The Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) experimental facility is furnished with multiple ion sources and in situ diagnostics to study the modification of surfaces undergoing physical, chemical, and electronic changes during exposure to energetic particle beams. Ion beams with energies in the range between 20 and 5000eV can bombard samples at flux levels in the range of 1010-1015cm-2s-1; parameters such as ion angle of incidence and exposed area are also controllable during the experiment. IMPACT has diagnostics that allow full characterization of the beam, including a Faraday cup, a beam imaging system, and a retarding field energy analyzer. IMPACT is equipped with multiple diagnostics, such as electron (Auger, photoelectron) and ion scattering spectroscopies that allow different probing depths of the sample to monitor compositional changes in multicomponent and/or layered targets. A unique real-time erosion diagnostic based on a dual quartz crystal microbalance measures deposition from an eroding surface with rates smaller than 0.01nm/s, which can be converted to a sputter yield measurement. The monitoring crystal can be rotated and placed in the target position so that the deposited material on the quartz crystal oscillator surface can be characterized without transfer outside of the vacuum chamber.

  2. A new 2.5 MeV injector and beam test facility for the spallation neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, R. F.; Aleksandrov, A.; Han, B. X.; Kang, Y. W.; Middendorf, M. M.; Murray, S. N.; Piller, M.; Pennisi, T. R.; Peplov, V.; Saethre, R.; Santana, M.; Stinson, C.; Stockli, M. P.

    2017-08-01

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now operates with 1.2 MW of beam power on target with the near-term goal of delivering 1.4 MW and a longer-term goal of delivering >2 MW to support a planned second target station. Presently, H- beam pulses (50-60 mA, 1 ms, 60 Hz) from an RF-driven, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion source are first accelerated to 2.5 MeV by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, injected into a ˜1 GeV linac, compressed to transmission, the initial applications of the BTF will be to conduct 6D beam dynamic studies, develop & demonstrate ion sources capable of meeting the current and future requirements of the SNS, and contribute to neutron moderator development. This report provides a facility update, description of the BTF ion source systems as well as a discussion of the first LEBT and RFQ beam current measurements performed at the BTF.

  3. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Palma, M., E-mail: mauro.dallapalma@igi.cnr.it; Pasqualotto, R.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); Sartori, E. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova 35122 (Italy); Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); INFN-LNL, Legnaro (PD) 35020 (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  4. On Start to End Simulation and Modeling Issues of the Megawatt Proton Beam Facility at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Adelmann, Andreas; Fitze, Hansruedi; Geus, Roman; Humbel, Martin; Stingelin, Lukas

    2005-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) we routinely extract a one megawatt (CW) proton beam out of our 590 MeV Ring Cyclotron. In the frame of the ongoing upgrade program, large scale simulations have been undertaken in order to provide a sound basis to assess the behaviour of very intense beams in cyclotrons. The challenges and attempts towards massive parallel three dimensional start-to- end simulations will be discussed. The used state of the art numerical tools (mapping techniques, time integration, parallel FFT and finite element based multigrid Poisson solver) and their parallel implementation will be discussed. Results will be presented in the area of: space charge dominated beam transport including neighbouring turns, eigenmode analysis to obtain accurate electromagnetic fields in large the rf cavities and higher order mode interaction between the electromagnetic fields and the particle beam. For the problems investigated so far a good agreement between theory i.e. calculations and measurements is obtain...

  5. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Palma, M; Pasqualotto, R; Sartori, E; Spagnolo, S; Spolaore, M; Veltri, P

    2016-11-01

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  6. Experience at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility with the use of alloy Inconel 718 as an enclosure for a beam degrader and as a proton beam entry window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.; Brown, R.D.; Cedillo, C.M.; Zimmerman, E.

    1994-09-01

    Operation of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) began in 1972 and continues at present. An injector delivers protons to a 0.8 kin long linear accelerator which produces a particle energy of 800 MeV; the protons are then transported to a variety of experimental areas. The proton beam is transported in a vacuum tube, controlled and bent by electromagnets. The highest intensity beam, at a maximum level of 1 mA, is delivered to the experimental area designated as Area A. At the end of the experimental area, the beam is transported through an interface between beamline vacuum and one atmosphere air pressure. This interface is made of metal and is generally referred to as a beam entry window. At LAMPF, after the beam has exited the vacuum tube, it becomes incident on a number of experiments or ``targets.`` These include capsules for radiation damage studies, a beam ``degrader`` for the long-term neutrino experiment, and as many nine targets in the Isotope Production (IP) stringer system used to produce medically significant isotopes. Following the IP system is a beam stop used for the purpose its name implies. The beam stop also contains a beam entry window, whose purpose is to separate the 250 psig water cooling environment from I atmosphere of air. The beam entry window, the beam degrader, and the beam stop window are made of alloy Inconel 718, have endured a lengthy irradiation service time at LAMPF, and are the subject of this report.

  7. Status of an automatic Beam Steering for the CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dabrowski, A; Schulte, D; Shaker, SH; Skowronski, P; Tecker, F; Tomás, R

    2008-01-01

    An automatic beam steering application for CTF 3 is being designed in order to automatize operation of the machine, as well as providing a test-bed for advanced steering algorithms for CLIC. Beam-based correction including dispersion free steering have been investigated. An approach based on a PLACET on-line model has been tested. This paper gives an overview of the current status and the achieved results of the CTF3 automatic steering.

  8. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, M.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, Andrei; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; Densham, C.; Greenhalgh, R.Justin; Jackson, F.; Kalinin, A.; Zimmermann, F.; Zagorodnov, I.; Sugimoto, Y.; Walston, S.; Burton, D.; Smith, J.; Shales, N.; Sopczak, A.; Tucker, R.; Barlow, R.; Kurevlev, G.; Mercer, A.; Hildreth, M.; Burrows, P.; Christian, G.; Clarke, C.; Hartin, A.; Molloy, S.; White, G.; Mueller, W.; Weiland, T.; Watson, N.; Bailey, D.; Cussans, D.; Kolomensky, Y.; Slater, M.; Thomson, M.; Ward, D.; Boogert, S.; Liapine, A.; Malton, S.; Miller, D.J.; Wing, M.; Arnold, R.; Sinev, N.; Torrence, E.

    2005-01-01

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  9. Present status of the radioactive nuclear beam facility at KEK-Tanashi and the E-arena in the KEK-JAERI joint project

    CERN Document Server

    Miyatake, H; Ishiyama, H; Ishida, Y; Kawakami, H; Yoshikawa, N; Katayama, I; Tanaka, M H; Tojyo, E; Oyaizu, M; Arai, S; Tomizawa, S; Niki, K; Arakaki, Y; Okada, M; Takeda, Y; Wada, M; Strasser, P; Kubono, S; Nomura, T

    2002-01-01

    The performance of the RNB facility at KEK-Tanashi, which is a pilot facility for the E-arena in the KEK-JAERI joint project, is presented. The muonic X-ray spectroscopy of unstable nuclei by combining the RNB with muon-beam from the M-arena in the joint project is introduced.

  10. GEANT4 used for neutron beam design of a neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouardi, A.; Machmach, A.; Alami, R.; Bensitel, A.; Hommada, A.

    2011-09-01

    Neutron imaging has a broad scope of applications and has played a pivotal role in visualizing and quantifying hydrogenous masses in metallic matrices. The field continues to expand into new applications with the installation of new neutron imaging facilities. In this scope, a neutron imaging facility for computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography is currently being developed around 2.0MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear Research Center in Morocco (Reuscher et al., 1990 [1]; de Menezes et al., 2003 [2]; Deinert et al., 2005 [3]). The neutron imaging facility consists of neutron collimator, real-time neutron imaging system and imaging process systems. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the tangential channel was selected. For power of 250 kW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux measured at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 3×10 11 ncm 2/s. This facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with two circular diaphragms with diameters of 4 and 2 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio of 165 and 325, respectively. These diaphragms' sizes allow reaching a compromise between good flux and efficient L/D-ratio. Convergent-divergent collimator geometry has been adopted. The beam line consists of a gamma filter, fast neutrons filter, neutron moderator, neutron and gamma shutters, biological shielding around the collimator and several stages of neutron collimator. Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 were used to design the neutron beam line ( http://www.info.cern.ch/asd/geant4/geant4.html[4]). To enhance the neutron thermal beam in terms of quality, several materials, mainly bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) were examined as gamma and neutron filters respectively. The GEANT4 simulations showed that the gamma and epithermal and fast neutron could be filtered using the bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) filters, respectively. To get a good cadmium ratio, GEANT 4 simulations were used to

  11. TWAC facility and the use of the laser ion source for production of intense heavy ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sharkov, B Yu; Shumshurov, A V; Meshcheryakov, N D; Rudskoy, I; Homenko, S; Makarov, K; Rörich, V; Stepanov, A; Satov, Yu A; Haseroth, H; Kugler, H; Lisi, N; Scrivens, R

    1999-01-01

    Current activities on upgrading of the ITEP heavy ion accelerator complex in the framework of the ITEP-TWAC project are reported. The project being in progress since 1997 is aiming at production of intense (100 kJ/100 ns) heavy ion beams. The basic idea of the project is the application of the non-Liouvillian technique in an existing accelerator facility based on a heavy ion synchrotron for its adaptation to heavy ion fusion related experiments. Special attention is paid to the results on generation of highly charged medium mass and heavy ions in the laser produced plasma. Development of key elements of the laser ion source based on the use of a 100 J repetition rate CO/sub 2/-laser for filling of ITEP and CERN accelerator facilities in the single turn injection mode is presented. (4 refs).

  12. Thermionic gun control system for the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pico, R.; Diamond, B.; Fugitt, J.; Bork, R.

    1989-01-01

    The injector for the CEBAF accelerator must produce a high-quality electron beam to meet the overall accelerator specifications. A Hermosa electron gun with a 2 mm-diameter cathode and a control aperture has been chosen as the electron source. This must be controlled over a wide range of operating conditions to meet the beam specifications and to provide flexibility for accelerator commissioning. The gun is controlled using Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC IEEE-583) technology. The system employs the CAMAC-based control architecture developed at CEBAF. The control system has been tested, and early operating data on the electron gun and the injector beam transport system has been obtained. This system also allows gun parameters to be stored at the operator location, without paralyzing operation. This paper describes the use of this computer system in the control of the CEBAF electron gun. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Yield calculations for a facility for short-lived nuclear beams

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, C L; Gomes, I; Heinz, A M; Nolen, Jerry A; Rehm, K E; Savard, G; Schiffer, J P

    2002-01-01

    Yields for a broad range of radioactive nuclei produced by spallation reactions, neutron-induced fission, in-flight projectile fragmentation and in-flight fission have been calculated for beams of stable nuclei at energies of 100-1000 MeV/u. Calculations of cross-sections and yields, attenuation effects due to absorption, production from secondary reactions, and transport efficiencies for mass selection are discussed. Rare isotope yields as functions of bombarding energies for both reaccelerated and directly produced fast-fragmentation beams are presented. This information provides a foundation for a cost-effective design of a next generation rare isotope accelerator.

  14. Use of a wire scanner for monitoring residual gas ionization in Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility 20 keV∕u proton∕deuteron low energy beam transport beam line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainas, B; Eliyahu, I; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D

    2012-02-01

    The ion source end of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility accelerator consists of a proton∕deuteron ECR ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) beam line. An observed reduction of the radio frequency quadrupole transmission with increase of the LEBT current prompted additional study of the LEBT beam properties. Numerous measurements have been made with the LEBT bream profiler wire biased by a variable voltage. Current-voltage characteristics in presence of the proton beam were measured even when the wire was far out of the beam. The current-voltage characteristic in this case strongly resembles an asymmetric diodelike characteristic, which is typical of Langmuir probes monitoring plasma. The measurement of biased wire currents, outside the beam, enables us to estimate the effective charge density in vacuum.

  15. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08

    After more than 40 years of operation, the AGS is still at the heart of the Brookhaven hadron accelerator complex. This system of accelerators presently comprises a 200 MeV linac for the pre-acceleration of high intensity and polarized protons, two Tandem Van der Graaffs for the pre-acceleration of heavy ion beams, a versatile Booster that allows for efficient injection of all three types of beams into the AGS and, most recently, the two RHIC collider rings that produce high luminosity heavy ion and polarized proton collisions. For several years now, the AGS has held the world intensity record with more than 7 x 10{sup 13} protons accelerated in a single pulse. The requirements for the proton beam for the super neutrino beam are summarized and a schematic of the upgraded AGS is shown. Since the present number of protons per fill is already close to the required number, the upgrade is based on increasing the repetition rate and reducing beam losses (to avoid excessive shielding requirements and to maintain activation of the machine components at workable level). It is also important to preserve all the present capabilities of the AGS, in particular its role as injector to RHIC. The AGS Booster was built not only to allow the injection of any species of heavy ion into the AGS but to allow a fourfold increase of the AGS intensity. It is one-quarter the circumference of the AGS with the same aperture. However, the accumulation of four Booster loads in the AGS takes about 0.6 s, and is therefore not well suited for high average beam power operation. To minimize the injection time to about 1 ms, a 1.2 GeV linac will be used instead. This linac consists of the existing warm linac of 200 MeV and a new superconducting linac of 1.0 GeV. The multi-turn H{sup -} injection from a source of 30 mA and 720 {micro}s pulse width is sufficient to accumulate 9 x 10{sup 13} particle per pulse in the AGS[10]. The minimum ramp time of the AGS to full energy is presently 0.5 s; this must

  16. Exotic hadrons from heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungtae; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Maeda, Saori; Miyahara, Kenta; Morita, Kenji; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Song, Taesoo; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are excellent ways for producing heavy hadrons and composite particles, including the light (anti)nuclei. With upgraded detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it has become possible to measure hadrons beyond their ground states. Therefore, heavy ion collisions provide a new method for studying exotic hadrons that are either molecular states made of various hadrons or compact system consisting of multiquarks. Because their structures are related to the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), studying exotic hadrons is currently one of the most active areas of research in hadron physics. Experiments carried out at various accelerator facilities have indicated that some exotic hadrons may have already been produced. The present review is a summary of the current understanding of a selected set of exotic particle candidates that can be potentially measured in heavy ion collisions. It also includes discussions on the production of resonances, exotics and hadronic molecular states in these collisions based on the coalescence model and the statistical model. A more detailed discussion is given on the results from these models, leading to the conclusion that the yield of a hadron that is a compact multiquark state is typically an order of magnitude smaller than if it is an excited hadronic state with normal quark numbers or a loosely bound hadronic molecule. Attention is also given to some of the proposed heavy exotic hadrons that could be produced with sufficient abundance in heavy ion collisions because of the significant numbers of charm and bottom quarks that are produced at RHIC and even larger numbers at LHC, making it possible to study them in these experiments. Further included in the discussion are the general formalism for the coalescence model that involves resonance particles and its implication on the present estimated yield for resonance production. Finally

  17. The Proton Beams for the New Time-of-Flight Neutron Facility at the CERN-PS

    CERN Document Server

    Cappi, R; Métral, G

    2000-01-01

    The experimental determination of neutron cross sections in fission and capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy is of primary importance in nuclear physics. Recent developments at CERN and elsewhere have shown that many fields of research and development, such as the design of Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) for nuclear waste incineration, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental nuclear physics, dosimetry for radiological protection and therapy, would benefit from a better knowledge of neutron cross sections. A neutron facility at the CERN-PS has been proposed with the aim of carrying out a systematic and high resolution study of neutron cross sections through Time-Of-Flight (n-TOF) measurement. The facility requires a high intensity proton beam (about 0.7x1013 particles/bunch) distributed in a short bunch (about 25 ns total length) to produce the neutrons by means of a spallation process in a lead target. To achieve these characteristics, a number of complex beam gymnastics have to be performed. All...

  18. Calculation of production and decay of radioisotopes for future irradiation experiments and ion beam facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, M.; Miksch, S.; Lettry, J.; Stora, T.; Catherall, R.

    2007-11-01

    The design of future radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilites requires the forecast of radio isotope inventory after irradiation. At CERN ISOLDE, we developed a software that estimates the activity of irradiated materials as a function of time dedicated to radioactive waste management. This tool can also be used for licensing procedures, planning of irradiation experiments and the estimation of yields.

  19. Optimisation analysis and improvement of the effective beam sizes in Accelerator Test Facility 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082063; Kisiel, Adam

    2016-10-20

    A lepton linear collider is considered by the accelerator and particle physics communities as an appropriate machine to perform high precision particle physics research in the TeV energy regime. There are two proposals for the future e+e- linear collider: the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC), both developed by two wide international collaborations with strong overlap between them. Both designs satisfy the particle physics requirements. At the TeV energy regime the cross sections of many processes of interest are small, therefore large luminosities on the order of 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} at the interaction point (IP) are required to deliver the required event rates. The luminosity inversely depends on the transverse size of the colliding beams which restricts the beam sizes at the IP to the nanometer level. The strong focusing of the beams occurs in the final focus system (FFS), the most inner part of a linear collider, where the beams are focused at the IP by means of t...

  20. Transfer reaction experiments with radioactive beams: from halos to the r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Kate L

    2013-01-01

    Transfer reactions are a powerful probe of the properties of atomic nuclei. When used in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams they can provide detailed information on the structure of exotic nuclei and can inform nucleosynthesis calculations. There are a number of groups around the world who use these reactions, usually with particle detection in large silicon arrays. Sometimes these arrays are coupled to gamma-ray detectors, and occasionally smaller arrays of silicon detectors are mounted within a solenoid magnet. Modern techniques using transfer reactions in inverse kinematics are covered, with specific examples, many from measurements made with beams from the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  1. Amplitudes for exotic states at JPAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilloni, Alessandro; JPAC Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the activity of the Joint Physics Analysis Center in building models which satisfy S-matrix principles. In particular, we show some results on the analysis of the ηπ exotic resonances at COMPASS, and we discuss how to extend our formalism to photon beams to be used in the GlueX experiment. We also discuss a model to fit the J / ψp spectrum measured at GlueX, of interest for the search of hidden charm pentaquarks.

  2. Design of the 'half-size' ITER neutral beam source for the test facility ELISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.heinemann@ipp.mpg.de; Falter, H.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Gutser, R.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Staebler, A.; Wuenderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Agostinetti, P. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Jiang, T. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, ChengDu (China)

    2009-06-15

    In 2007 the radio frequency driven negative hydrogen ion source developed at IPP in Garching was chosen by the ITER board as the new reference source for the ITER neutral beam system. In order to support the design and the commissioning and operating phases of the ITER test facilities ISTF and NBTF in Padua, IPP is presently constructing a new test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment). ELISE will be operated with the so-called 'half-size ITER source' which is an intermediate step between the present small IPP RF sources (1/8 ITER size) and the full size ITER source. The source will have approximately the width but only half the height of the ITER source. The modular concept with 4 drivers will allow an easy extrapolation to the full ITER size with 8 drivers. Pulsed beam extraction and acceleration up to 60 kV (corresponding to pre-acceleration voltage of SINGAP) is foreseen. The aim of the design of the ELISE source and extraction system was to be as close as possible to the ITER design; it has however some modifications allowing a better diagnostic access as well as more flexibility for exploring open questions. Therefore one major difference compared to the source of ITER, NBTF or ISTF is the possible operation in air. Specific requirements for RF sources as found on IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU are implemented [A. Staebler, et al., Development of a RF-driven ion source for the ITER NBI system, SOFT Conference 2008, Fusion Engineering and Design, 84 (2009) 265-268].

  3. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, Gabriela [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Experimentacao e Simulacao Computacional em Fisica Medica; Costa, Paulo Roberto, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear. Lab. de Dosimetria das Radiacoes e Fisica Medica

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and compared to The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) data for lead. Their influence on the transmission curves as well the study of the influence of the shielding material composition and beam geometry on the outgoing spectra were performed. Characteristics of transmitted spectra, such as shape, average energy and Half-Value Layer (HVL), were also evaluated. The Geant4 toolkit benchmark for the energy resulting from the positron annihilation phenomena and its application in transmission curves description shown good agreement between data published by American Association on Physicists in Medicine task group 108 and experimental data published by Brazil. The transmission properties for different material compositions were also studied and have shown low dependency with the considered thicknesses. The broad and narrow beams configuration presented significant differences on the result. The fitting parameter for determining the transmission curves equations, according to Archer model is presented for different material. As conclusion were defined that beam geometry has significant influence and the composition has low influence on transmission curves for shielding design for the range of energy applied to PET. (author)

  4. ATLAS Exotic Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousson Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the outstanding performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC that delivered more than 2 fb−1 of proton-proton collision data at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the ATLAS experiment has been able to explore a wide range of exotic models trying to address the questions unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics. Searches for leptoquarks, new heavy quarks, vector-like quarks, black holes, hidden valley and contact interactions are reviewed in these proceedings.

  5. 1000 MeV Proton beam therapy facility at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute Synchrocyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrosimov, N K [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Gavrikov, Yu A [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Ivanov, E M [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Karlin, D L [Central Research Institute of Roentgenology and Radiology, 197758, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khanzadeev, A V [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Yalynych, N N [Central Research Institute of Roentgenology and Radiology, 197758, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Riabov, G A [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Seliverstov, D M [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, V M [Central Research Institute of Roentgenology and Radiology, 197758, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    Since 1975 proton beam of PNPI synchrocyclotron with fixed energy of 1000 MeV is used for the stereotaxic proton therapy of different head brain diseases. 1300 patients have been treated during this time. The advantage of high energy beam (1000 MeV) is low scattering of protons in the irradiated tissue. This factor allows to form the dose field with high edge gradients (20%/mm) that is especially important for the irradiation of the intra-cranium targets placed in immediate proximity to the life critical parts of the brain. Fixation of the 6 0mm diameter proton beam at the isodose centre with accuracy of {+-}1.0 mm, two-dimensional rotation technique of the irradiation provide a very high ratio of the dose in the irradiation zone to the dose at the object's surface equal to 200:1. The absorbed doses are: 120-150 Gy for normal hypophysis, 100-120 Gy for pituitary adenomas and 40-70 Gy for arterio-venous malformation at the rate of absorbed dose up to 50 Gy/min. In the paper the dynamics and the efficiency of 1000 MeV proton therapy treatment of the brain deceases are given. At present time the feasibility study is in progress with the goal to create a proton therapy on Bragg peak by means of the moderation of 1000 MeV proton beam in the absorber down to 200 MeV, energy required for radiotherapy of deep seated tumors.

  6. Review of the neutral-beam current requirements for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.D.; Coensgen, F.H.; Devoto, R.S.; Molvik, A.W.; Osher, J.F.; Shearer, J.W.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1978-08-04

    The techniques used to evaluate the beam-current requirements for MFTF are similar to those in previous studies but incorporate some improvements. In particular, we have enlarged the radial code BUILDUP to allow for a smaller radial grid and to improve the numerical accuracy; we have also improved the model of the atomic physics processes and the particle-equilibrium calculations. Also, a model of plasma containment that conserves energy as well as particles but does not include any effect of the expected drift-cyclotron loss-cone (DCLC) turbulence has been incorporated into the previous studies. We show that the DCLC turbulence increases the average ion energy and decreases the particle confinement time. Because these effects cancel to first order, the beam-current requirements are independent of the turbulence. We find that 24 of the present LBL source modules would sustain a plasma with an average beta of 0.46. This figure is within 10% of the MFTF goal and is within our calculational accuracies. We further show that the beam-current requirements for the large-diameter plasma are consistent with those of experiments to study the buildup of a field-reversed plasma.

  7. Nuclear Structure Studies with Stable and Radioactive Beams: The SPES radioactive ion beam project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; SPES Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-04-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  8. HEDgeHOB High-energy density matter generated by heavy ion beams at the future facility for antiprotons and ion research

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Wouchuk, G; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E; Hoffmann, D H H; Schmidt, R

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the theoretical work that has been carried out during the past few years to assess the capabilities of intense heavy ion beams to induce states of High-Energy Density (HED) in matter. This work has shown that two different experimental schemes can be used to study HED physics employing intense ion beams. These schemes have been named HIHEX [Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion] and LAPLAS [LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences], respectively. The first scheme involves isochoric and uniform heating and subsequent isentropic expansion of matter while the latter deals with low entropy compression of matter using multiple shock reflection technique. This work has been done within the framework of the HEDgeHOB [High Energy Density Matter Generated by Heavy Ion Beams] collaboration that has been formed to organize and facilitate construction of experimental facilities and later to perform experimental work in the field of HED matter at the future accelerator facility, FAIR [Facility for Antipr...

  9. Mammal Research: Exotic Ungulates in Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A review, of the exotic ungulate industry in Florida was made by mailing questionnaires to exotic ungulate permittees, phone interviews, interviews with exotic...

  10. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  11. Measurement of neutron energy spectra behind shielding of a 120 GeV/c hadron beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Noriaki [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA 94022 (United States)]. E-mail: nakao@slac.stanford.edu; Taniguchi, Shingo [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Rokni, Sayed H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA 94022 (United States); Roesler, Stefan [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brugger, Markus [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hagiwara, Masayuki [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Vincke, Heinz [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA 94022 (United States); Khater, Hesham [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA 94022 (United States); Prinz, Alyssa A. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA 94022 (United States)

    2006-06-23

    Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the lateral shield of the CERF (CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field) facility at CERN with a 120 GeV/c positive hadron beam (mainly a mixture of protons and pions) on a cylindrical copper target (7-cm diameterx50-cm long). NE213 organic liquid scintillator (12.7-cm diameterx12.7-cm long) was located at various longitudinal positions behind shields of 80- and 160-cm thick concrete and 40-cm thick iron. Neutron energy spectra in the energy range between 12 and 380 MeV were obtained by unfolding the measured pulse height spectra with the detector response functions which have been experimentally verified in the neutron energy range up to 380 MeV in separate experiments. The corresponding MARS15 Monte Carlo simulations generally gave good agreements with the experimental energy spectra.

  12. Determination of the Neutron Fluence, the Beam Characteristics and the Backgrounds at the CERN-PS TOF Facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Leal, L C; Kitis, G; Guber, K H; Quaranta, A; Koehler, P E

    2002-01-01

    In the scope of our programme we propose to start in July 2000 with measurements on elements of well known cross sections, in order to check the reliability of the whole experimental installation at the CERN-TOF facility. These initial exploratory measurements will provide the key-parameters required for the further experimentation at the CERN-TOF neutron beam. The neutron fluence and energy resolution will be determined as a function of the neutron kinetic energy by reproducing standard capture and fission cross sections. The measurements of capture cross sections on elements with specific cross section features will allow to us to disentangle the different components of backgrounds and estimate their level in the experimental area. The time-energy calibration will be determined and monitored with a set of monoenergetic filters as well as by the measurements of elements with resonance-dominated cross sections. Finally, in this initial phase the behaviour of several detectors scheduled in successive measureme...

  13. Hyperon Beam Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment WA89 uses the upgraded Omega facility together with a hyperon beam installed at the end of the H1 beamline. The beam can deliver 2~10$ ^{5} \\% Sigma ^- $ per machine burst at 330 GeV/c with a background of 5 10$ ^{5} \\% \\pi ^- $. \\\\ \\\\ The goals of the experiment are: observation of charmed particles, mainly the charmed-strange baryons and measurements of their production in the kinematical range x$ _{F} $~$>$~0.2, and their decay properties, a search for exotic states such as U(3100) observed in the previous CERN hyperon beam experiment WA62, measurements of hyperon polarization and production properties. \\\\ \\\\ A vertex detector consisting of 24 silicon microstrip planes with 25~$\\mu$m pitch and 6~planes with 50~$\\mu$m pitch provides track measurements of sufficient accuracy to identify the decays of short living charmed particles and measure their lifetimes. A RICH detector provides good $\\pi$/K separation for momenta up to 100~GeV/c and $\\pi$/p separation up to 150~GeV/c. Photons are detecte...

  14. Experiments with stored relativistic exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissel, H.; Radon, T.; Attallah, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    Beams of relativistic exotic nuclei were produced, separated and investigated with the combination of the fragment separator FRS and the storage ring ESR. The following experiments are presented: (1) Direct mass measurements of relativistic nickel and bismuth projectile fragments were performed using Schottky spectrometry. Applying electron cooling, the relative velocity spread of the circulating secondary nuclear beams of low intensity was reduced to below 10{sup -6}. The achieved mass resolving power of m/{Delta}m = 6.5 . 10{sup 5} (FWHM) in recent measurements represents an improvement by a factor of two compared to our previous experiments. The previously unknown masses of more than 100 proton-rich isotopes have been measured in the range of 54 {<=} Z {<=} 84. The results are compared with mass models and estimated values based on extrapolations of experimental values. (2) Exotic nuclei with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling can be investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique has been successfully applied in a first measurement with nickel fragments. A mass resolving power of m/{Delta}m = 1.5 . 10{sup 5} (FWHM) was achieved in this mode of operation. (3) Nuclear half-lives of stored and cooled bare projectile fragments have been measured to study the influence of the ionic charge state on the beta-decay probability. (orig.)

  15. Towards powerful negative ion beams at the test facility ELISE for the ITER and DEMO NBI systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, U.; Hopf, C.; Wünderlich, D.; Friedl, R.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Kurutz, U.; Riedl, R.; Nocentini, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2017-11-01

    The test facility ELISE represents an important step in the European R&D roadmap towards the neutral beam injection (NBI) systems on ITER. ELISE provides early experience with operation of large radio frequency (RF) driven negative hydrogen ion sources. Starting with first plasma pulses in March 2013, ELISE has demonstrated stable 1 h plasma discharges with repetitive 10 s beam extraction pulses every 3 min in hydrogen and deuterium at the pressure of 0.3 Pa required by ITER. Stable ion currents of 9.3 A and 5.8 A have been extracted using only one quarter of the available RF power and reducing the extraction voltage in order to control the co-extracted electrons. The best hydrogen pulse for the required 1000 s for hydrogen gave an extracted current of 21.4 A and resulted in an accelerated current of 17.9 A, using only 53 kW per driver. Linear scaling towards full RF power (90 kW/driver) predicts that the target value of the negative ion current (H-: 33 A extracted, 23 A accelerated; D-: 28 A extracted and 20 A accelerated) can be achieved or even exceeded. Issues in long pulse operation are the caesium dynamics and the stability of the co-extracted electron current, for which the caesium management and the magnetic field configuration are promising tools for optimisation. Operation at high RF power for long pulses has highest priority for the next experimental campaign. In parallel or in a later stage, ELISE could serve as a test bed for studies on a DEMO NBI system. Examples are concepts concerning RF efficiency, operation with largely reduced caesium consumption or with caesium alternatives, and neutralization of the accelerated ion beam by a laser neutralizer in order to improve efficiency and reliability of NBI systems. Lab scale experiments on these topics are carried out presently in parallel with ELISE operation.

  16. Plumbing neutron stars to new depths with the binding energy of the exotic nuclide 82Zn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R N; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Böhm, Ch; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Chamel, N; Goriely, S; Herfurth, F; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Minaya Ramirez, E; Naimi, S; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Stanja, J; Wienholtz, F; Zuber, K

    2013-01-25

    Modeling the composition of neutron-star crusts depends strongly on binding energies of neutron-rich nuclides near the N = 50 and N = 82 shell closures. Using a recent development of time-of-flight mass spectrometry for on-line purification of radioactive ion beams to access more exotic species, we have determined for the first time the mass of (82)Zn with the ISOLTRAP setup at the ISOLDE-CERN facility. With a robust neutron-star model based on nuclear energy-density-functional theory, we solve the general relativistic Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations and calculate the neutron-star crust composition based on the new experimental mass. The composition profile is not only altered but now constrained by experimental data deeper into the crust than before.

  17. New Concepts in FFAG Design for Secondary Beam Facilities and Other Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Craddock, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerators offer much higher acceptances and repetition rates - and therefore higher beam intensities - than synchrotrons, at the cost of more complicated magnet and rf cavity designs. Perhaps because of the difficulty and expense anticipated, early studies never progressed beyond the stage of successful electron models, but in recent years, with improvements in magnet and rf design technology, FFAGs have become the focus of renewed attention. Two proton machines have now been built, and three more, plus a muon phase rotator, are under construction. In addition, more than 20 designs are under study for the acceleration of protons, heavy ions, electrons and muons, with applications as diverse as treating cancer, irradiating materials, driving subcritical reactors, boosting high-energy proton intensity, and producing neutrinos. Moreover, it has become apparent that FFAG designs need not be restricted to the traditional 'scaling' approach, in which the orbit shape, optics and t...

  18. Cloud a particle beam facility to investigate the influence of cosmic rays on clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01

    Palaeoclimatic data provide extensive evidence for solar forcing of the climate during the Holocene and the last ice age, but the underlying mechanism remains a mystery. However recent observations suggest that cosmic rays may play a key role. Satellite data have revealed a surprising correlation between cosmic ray intensity and the fraction of the Earth covered by low clouds \\cite{svensmark97,marsh}. Since the cosmic ray intensity is modulated by the solar wind, this may be an important clue to the long-sought mechanism for solar-climate variability. In order to test whether cosmic rays and clouds are causally linked and, if so, to understand the microphysical mechanisms, a novel experiment known as CLOUD\\footnotemark\\ has been proposed \\cite{cloud_proposal}--\\cite{cloud_addendum_2}. CLOUD proposes to investigate ion-aerosol-cloud microphysics under controlled laboratory conditions using a beam from a particle accelerator, which provides a precisely adjustable and measurable artificial source of cosmic rays....

  19. The Eurisol report. A feasibility study for a European isotope-separation-on-line radioactive ion beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-01

    The Eurisol project aims at a preliminary design study of the next-generation European isotope separation on-line (ISOL) radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility. In this document, the scientific case of high-intensity RIBs using the ISOL method is first summarised, more details being given in appendix A. It includes: 1) the study of atomic nuclei under extreme and so-far unexplored conditions of composition (i.e. as a function of the numbers of protons and neutrons, or the so-called isospin), rotational angular velocity (or spin), density and temperature, 2) the investigation of the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the Universe, an important part of nuclear astrophysics, 3) a study of the properties of the fundamental interactions which govern the properties of the universe, and in particular of the violation of some of their symmetries, 4) potential applications of RIBs in solid-state physics and in nuclear medicine, for example, where completely new fields could be opened up by the availability of high-intensity RIBs produced by the ISOL method. The proposed Eurisol facility is then presented, with particular emphasis on its main components: the driver accelerator, the target/ion-source assembly, the mass-selection system and post-accelerator, and the required scientific instrumentation. Special details of these components are given in appendices B to E, respectively. The estimates of the costs of the Eurisol, construction and running costs, have been performed in as much details as is presently possible. The total capital cost (installation manpower cost included) of the project is estimated to be of the order of 630 million Euros within 20%. In general, experience has shown that operational costs per annum for large accelerator facilities are about 10% of the capital cost. (A.C.)

  20. Black Holes and Exotic Spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Hoff da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exotic spin structures are non-trivial liftings, of the orthogonal bundle to the spin bundle, on orientable manifolds that admit spin structures according to the celebrated Geroch theorem. Exotic spin structures play a role of paramount importance in different areas of physics, from quantum field theory, in particular at Planck length scales, to gravity, and in cosmological scales. Here, we introduce an in-depth panorama in this field, providing black hole physics as the fount of spacetime exoticness. Black holes are then studied as the generators of a non-trivial topology that also can correspond to some inequivalent spin structure. Moreover, we investigate exotic spinor fields in this context and the way exotic spinor fields branch new physics. We also calculate the tunneling probability of exotic fermions across a Kerr-Sen black hole, showing that the exotic term does affect the tunneling probability, altering the black hole evaporation rate. Finally we show that it complies with the Hawking temperature universal law.

  1. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  2. Gravitational lensing by exotic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Hideki

    2017-11-01

    This paper reviews a phenomenological approach to the gravitational lensing by exotic objects such as the Ellis wormhole lens, where the exotic lens objects may follow a non-standard form of the equation of state or may obey a modified gravity theory. A gravitational lens model is proposed in the inverse powers of the distance, such that the Schwarzschild lens and exotic lenses can be described in a unified manner as a one parameter family. As observational implications, the magnification, shear, photo-centroid motion and time delay in this lens model are discussed.

  3. Material-related issues at high-power and high-energy ion beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, M.; Tomut, M.; Trautmann, C.

    2015-01-01

    When solids are exposed to energetic ions (MeV-GeV), their physical and chemical structure can be severely modified. The change is governed by ultrafast dynamical processes starting from the deposition of large energy densities, electronic excitation and ionization processes, and finally damage creation in the atomic lattice system. In many materials, each projectile creates a cylindrical track with a few nanometers in diameter and up to many μm in length. To study and monitor the creation of damage, the GSI irradiation facility dedicated to materials science provides different in-situ and on-line techniques such as high resolution microscopy, X-ray diffraction, optical absorption spectroscopy, thermal imaging and residual gas analysis. The irradiation experiments can be performed under various gas atmospheres and under cryogenic or elevated temperature.

  4. Spin and exotic Galilean symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duval, C.; Horvathy, P.A

    2002-11-07

    A slightly modified and regularized version of the non-relativistic limit of the relativistic anyon model considered by Jackiw and Nair yields particles associated with the twofold central extension of the Galilei group, with independent spin and exotic structure.

  5. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bambade, P; Amann, J; Angal-Kalinin, D; Apsimon, R; Araki, S; Aryshev, A; Bai, S; Bellomo, P; Bett, D; Blair, G; Bolzon, B; Boogert, S; Boorman, G; Burrows, P N; Christian, G; Coe, P; Constance, B; Delahaye, J P; Deacon, L; Elsen, E; Faus-Golfe, A; Fukuda, M; Gao, J; Geffroy, N; Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Guler, H; Hayano, H; Heo, A Y; Honda, Y; Huang, J Y; Hwang, W H; Iwashita, Y; Jeremie, A; Jones, J; Kamiya, Y; Karataev, P; Kim, E S; Kim, H S; Kim, S H; Komamiya, S; Kubo, K; Kume, T; Kuroda, S; Lam, B; Lyapin, A; Masuzawa, M; McCormick, D; Molloy, S; Naito, T; Nakamura, T; Nelson, J; Okamoto, D; Okugi, T; Oroku, M; Park, Y J; Parker, B; Paterson, E; Perry, C; Pivi, M; Raubenheimer, T; Renier, Y; Resta-Lopez, J; Rimbault, C; Ross, M; Sanuki, T; Scarfe, A; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Spencer, C; Suehara, T; Sugahara, R; Swinson, C; Takahashi, T; Tauchi, T; Terunuma, N; Tomas, R; Urakawa, J; Urner, D; Verderi, M; Wang, M H; Warden, M; Wendt, M; White, G; Wittmer, W; Wolski, A; Woodley, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamanaka, T; Yan, Y; Yoda, H; Yokoya, K; Zhou, F; Zimmermann, F; 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.13.042801

    2010-01-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  6. ExNOTic: Should We Be Keeping Exotic Pets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Grant

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent trend towards keeping non-traditional companion animals, also known as exotic pets. These pets include parrots, reptiles, amphibians and rabbits, as well as small species of rodent such as degus and guinea pigs. Many of these exotic pet species are not domesticated, and often have special requirements in captivity, which many owners do not have the facilities or knowledge to provide. Keeping animals in settings to which they are poorly adapted is a threat to their welfare. Additionally, owner satisfaction with the animal may be poor due to a misalignment of expectations, which further impacts on welfare, as it may lead to repeated rehoming or neglect. We investigate a range of commonly kept exotic species in terms of their suitability as companion animals from the point of view of animal welfare and owner satisfaction, and make recommendations on the suitability of various species as pets.

  7. The SPES radioactive ion beam project of INFN

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Spes Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2014-07-01

    The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility at INFN-LNL is presently in the construction phase. The facility is based on the Isol (Isotope separation on-line) method with an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.20.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced Uranium fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting Linac at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A = 130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES project is to provide a facility for high intensity radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics research as well as to develop an interdisciplinary research center based on the cyclotron proton beam.

  8. An assessment of the secondary neutron dose in the passive scattering proton beam facility of the national cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Eun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the additional neutron effective dose during passive scattering proton therapy. Monte Carlo code (Monte Carlo N-Particle 6) simulation was conducted based on a precise modeling of the National Cancer Center's proton therapy facility. A three-dimensional neutron effective dose profile of the interior of the treatment room was acquired via a computer simulation of the 217.8-MeV proton beam. Measurements were taken with a 3He neutron detector to support the simulation results, which were lower than the simulation results by 16% on average. The secondary photon dose was about 0.8% of the neutron dose. The dominant neutron source was deduced based on flux calculation. The secondary neutron effective dose per proton absorbed dose ranged from 4.942 ± 0.031 mSv/Gy at the end of the field to 0.324 ± 0.006 mSv/Gy at 150 cm in axial distance.

  9. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Goodacre, T Day; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized. A link to the complete version of this document will be added here following publication:

  10. The SPES project of INFN: Facility and detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-04-01

    The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility at INFN-LNL is presently in the construction phase. The facility is based on the Isol (Isotope separation on-line) method with an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced Uranium fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting Linac at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A = 130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES project is to provide a facility for high intensity radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics research as well as to develop an interdisciplinary research center based on the cyclotron proton beam.

  11. The SPES project of INFN: Facility and detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Angelis G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility at INFN-LNL is presently in the construction phase. The facility is based on the Isol (Isotope separation on-line method with an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced Uranium fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting Linac at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A = 130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES project is to provide a facility for high intensity radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics research as well as to develop an interdisciplinary research center based on the cyclotron proton beam.

  12. SPES and the neutron facilities at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrin, L.; Bisello, D.; Esposito, J.; Mastinu, P.; Prete, G.; Wyss, J.

    2016-03-01

    The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, now in the construction phase at INFN-LNL, has the aim to provide high-intensity and high-quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to develop an interdisciplinary research center based on the cyclotron proton beam. The SPES system is based on a dual-exit high-current cyclotron, with tunable proton beam energy 35-70MeV and 0.20-0.75mA. The first exit is used as proton driver to supply an ISOL system with an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10kW. The expected fission rate in the target is of the order of 10^{13} fissions per second. The exotic isotopes will be re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10 A MeV and higher, for masses around A=130 amu, with an expected beam intensity of 10^7 - 10^9 pps. The second exit will be used for applied physics: radioisotope production for medicine and neutrons for material studies. Fast neutron spectra will be produced by the proton beam interaction with a conversion target. A production rate in excess of 10^{14} n/s can be achieved: this opens up the prospect of a high-flux neutron irradiation facility (NEPIR) to produce both discrete and continuous energy neutrons. A direct proton beam line is also envisaged. NEPIR and the direct proton line would dramatically increase the wide range of irradiation facilities presently available at LNL. We also present LENOS, a proposed project dedicated to accurate neutron cross-sections measurements using intense, well-characterized, broad energy neutron beams. Other activities already in operation at LNL are briefly reviewed: the SIRAD facility for proton and heavy-ion irradiation at the TANDEM-ALPI accelerator and the BELINA test facility at CN van de Graaff accelerator.

  13. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  14. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008<β=v/c<0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication, and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3–4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  15. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  16. Initial commissioning results with the NSCL Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Leitner, D.; Ottarson, J.; Portillo, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Bollen, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kester, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    The ReA reaccelerator is being added to the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) fragmentation facility in order to provide exotic rare-isotope beams, not available at the Isotope Separation On-Line facilities, in the several-MeV/u energy range. The first stage of the NSCL reaccelerator complex, consisting of an EBIT charge breeder, a room-temperature radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and superconducting linear accelerator modules, has been completed and is being put into operation. Commissioning of the EBIT has started by extracting charge-bred residual gas ions, ions created from a Ne gas jet directed across the EBIT's electron beam and ions captured from an external test ion source. Charge-bred ions from the Ne gas jet have been extracted as a pulse and accelerated through the RFQ and the two cryomodules.

  17. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dubrovskiy, A; Syratchev, I; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter reg...

  18. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Adli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter regime of CLIC.

  19. New results on the search for spin-exotic mesons with COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nerling, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The COMPASS fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS studies the structure and spectrum of hadrons. One important goal using hadron beams is the search for new states, in particlular spin-exotic mesons and glueballs. As a first input to the puzzle, COMPASS observed a significant $J^{PC}$ spin-exotic signal in the 2004 pilot run data (190\\,GeV/$c$ $\\pi^{-}$ beam, Pb target) in three charged pion final states consistent with the disputed $\\pi_1(1600)$. We started our hadron spectroscopy programme in 2008 by collecting very high statistics using a 190 GeV/$c$ negative pion beam scattered off a liquid hydrogen (proton) target. The current status and new results from the 2008 data on the search for the $\\pi_1(1600)$ resonance with exotic $J^{PC}=1^{-+}$ quantum numbers obtained from partial-wave analyses of the $\\rho\\pi$ and $\\eta'\\pi$ decay channels are presented.

  20. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC-LAB test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); “Tor Vergata” University, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU “MEPhI”, Kashirskoe highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A. [Dipartimento SBAI Universitá di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, via Antonio Scarpa 14/16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Paroli, B. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Rossi, A.R. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zigler, A. [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC-LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation. - Highlights: • The betatron radiation parameters in SPARC-LAB wakefiled experiments were studied. • The differences with betatron radiation in other wake-field experiments were highlighted. • The solution for betatron radiation detection was investigated.

  1. Beam instability induced by rf deflectors in the combiner ring of the CLIC test facility and mitigation by damped deflecting structures

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, D; Biscari, C; Ghigo, A; Corsini, R

    2011-01-01

    In the CTF3 (CLIC test facility 3) run of November 2007, a vertical beam instability has been found in the combiner ring during operation. After a careful analysis, the source of the instability has been identified in the vertical deflecting modes trapped in the rf deflectors and excited by the beam passage. A dedicated tracking code that includes the induced transverse wakefield and the multibunch multipassage effects has been written and the results of the beam dynamics analysis are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the instability was similar to the beam breakup in a linear accelerator or in an energy recovery linac. The results of the code allowed identifying the main key parameters driving such instability and allowed finding the main knobs to mitigate it. To completely suppress such beam instability, two new rf deflectors have been designed, constructed, and installed in the ring. In the new structures the frequency separation between the vertical and horizontal deflecting modes has been increase...

  2. Exotic Non-relativistic String

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Longhi, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    We construct a classical non-relativistic string model in 3+1 dimensions. The model contains a spurion tensor field that is responsible for the non-commutative structure of the model. Under double dimensional reduction the model reduces to the exotic non-relativistic particle in 2+1 dimensions.

  3. Exotic smoothness and quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, T, E-mail: torsten.asselmeyer-maluga@dlr.d [German Aerospace Center, Berlin, Germany and Loyola University, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Since the first work on exotic smoothness in physics, it was folklore to assume a direct influence of exotic smoothness to quantum gravity. Thus, the negative result of Duston (2009 arXiv:0911.4068) was a surprise. A closer look into the semi-classical approach uncovered the implicit assumption of a close connection between geometry and smoothness structure. But both structures, geometry and smoothness, are independent of each other. In this paper we calculate the 'smoothness structure' part of the path integral in quantum gravity assuming that the 'sum over geometries' is already given. For that purpose we use the knot surgery of Fintushel and Stern applied to the class E(n) of elliptic surfaces. We mainly focus our attention to the K3 surfaces E(2). Then we assume that every exotic smoothness structure of the K3 surface can be generated by knot or link surgery in the manner of Fintushel and Stern. The results are applied to the calculation of expectation values. Here we discuss the two observables, volume and Wilson loop, for the construction of an exotic 4-manifold using the knot 5{sub 2} and the Whitehead link Wh. By using Mostow rigidity, we obtain a topological contribution to the expectation value of the volume. Furthermore, we obtain a justification of area quantization.

  4. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Half life for the emission of exotic clusters like 8Be, 12C, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si are computed taking Coulomb and proximity potentials as interacting barrier and many of these are found well within the present upper limit of measurement. These results lie very close to those values reported by Shanmugam et al using ...

  5. Exotic meson studies at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreps Michal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations of several states. Using the pp collisions data collected at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment, we performed studies of the X(3872 decay rate to ψ (2Sγ final state, as well as confirmation the Z(4430+ state.

  6. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... determine the charge density distributions of short-lived exotic nuclei by elastic electron scattering. The first collision ... Electron scattering of highly unstable nuclei is not easy because it is difficult to produce ... both ends form a mirror potential to keep the ions longitudinally inside the SCRIT device, and the ...

  7. Exotic charmonium spectroscopy with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ronchese, P

    2015-01-01

    The latest results of CMS in the area of exotic quarkonium decays will be presented: observation of a peaking structure in $J/\\psi\\Phi$ mass spectrum in the decay $B^\\pm \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Phi K^\\pm$, search for new bottomonium states in $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})\\pi^+\\pi^-$ mass spectrum, measurement of prompt $J/\\psi$ pair production.

  8. How Illinois kicked the exotic habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis M. Harty

    1998-01-01

    For the purpose of this paper, an exotic species is defined as "a plant or animal not native to North America." The history of folly surrounding the premeditated and accidental introduction of exotic animals has been well-documented. In 1963, Dr. E. Raymond Hall wrote, "Introducing exotic species of vertebrates is unscientific, economically wasteful,...

  9. Exotic pests: major threats to forest health

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Robert Bridges

    1995-01-01

    Over 360 exotic forest insects and about 20 exotic diseases have become established in the U.S. Many of these organisms have become serious pests, causing great economic impacts and irreversible ecological harm. Despite efforts to exclude exotic species, forest insects and disease organisms continue to be introduced at a rather rapid rate. In the last few years, one...

  10. Exotic nuclear studies around and below A = 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara Singh, B. S.; Wadsworth, R.; Brock, T. S. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Boutachkov, P.; Grawe, H.; Go, M.; Pietri, S.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Caceres, L.; Engert, T.; Farinon, F.; Gerl, J.; Goel, N.; Gottardo, A.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Merchant, E.; Nociforo, C.; Prochazka, A.; Schaffner, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2011-11-30

    A RISING experiment with an aim to study exotic Cd nuclei was carried out at GSI-FRS facility. Some preliminary results from this experiment are presented here. In particular, the {beta} decay of {sup 96}Cd to {sup 96}Ag revealed the existence of a high spin isomer predicted a few decades ago. In this context, the structures of both these nuclei are discussed. Shell model calculations using the Gross-Frenkel interaction are used to interpret the results.

  11. Recent progress of in-flight separators and rare isotope beam production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    New-generation in-flight separators are being developed worldwide, including the Super-FRS separator at the GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), the ARIS separator at the Michigan State University (MSU) Facility for Rare Isotopes Beams (FRIB), and the BigRIPS separator at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF), each of which is aimed at expanding the frontiers of rare isotope (RI) production and advancing experimental studies on exotic nuclei far from stability. Here, the recent progress of in-flight separators is reviewed, focusing on the advanced features of these three representative separators. The RI beam production that we have conducted using the BigRIPS separator at RIKEN RIBF is also outlined.

  12. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, University of North Texas, Department of Physics, 1155 Union Circle 311427, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-07-03

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from {approx}20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and

  13. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D.

    2013-07-01

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from ˜20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and

  14. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam-matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Raginel, V.; Wollmann, D.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam-matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the numerical

  15. A rich revenue from the use of radioactive beams and radioactive targets: recent highlights from the nTOF and ISOLDE facilities (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE is a facility dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for a great number of different experiments, e.g. in the field of nuclear and atomic physics, solid-state physics, life sciences and material science. At ISOLDE, radioactive nuclides are produced in thick high-temperature targets via spallation, fission or fragmentation reactions. The targets are placed in the external proton beam of the PSB, which has an energy of 1.0 or 1.4 GeV and an intensity of about 2 microA. The target and ion-source together represent a small chemical factory for converting the nuclear reaction products into a radioactive ion beam. An electric field accelerates the ions, which are mass separated and steered to the experiments. Until now more than 600 isotopes of more than 60 elements (Z=2 to 88) have been produced with half-lives down to milliseconds and intensities up to 1011 ions per second. Through the advent of post-accelerated beams with the REX-ISOLDE c...

  16. Logarithmic exotic conformal Galilean algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Malte, E-mail: Malte.henkel@univ-lorraine.fr [Groupe de Physique Statistique, Institut Jean Lamour (CNRS UMR 7198), Université de Lorraine Nancy, B.P. 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Hosseiny, Ali, E-mail: al_hosseiny@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rouhani, Shahin, E-mail: rouhani@ipm.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11165-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Logarithmic representations of the conformal Galilean algebra (CGA) and the Exotic Conformal Galilean algebra (ECGA) are constructed. This can be achieved by non-decomposable representations of the scaling dimensions or the rapidity indices, specific to conformal Galilean algebras. Logarithmic representations of the non-exotic CGA lead to the expected constraints on scaling dimensions and rapidities and also on the logarithmic contributions in the co-variant two-point functions. On the other hand, the ECGA admits several distinct situations which are distinguished by different sets of constraints and distinct scaling forms of the two-point functions. Two distinct realisations for the spatial rotations are identified as well. This is the first concrete example of a reducible, but non-decomposable representation, without logarithmic terms. Such cases had been anticipated before.

  17. Interaction of Super Proton Synchrotron beam with solid copper target: Simulations of future experiments at HiRadMat facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Brugger, M; Assmann, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Fortov, V E; Piriz, A R; Deutsch, C; Hoffmann, D H H

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of interaction of 450 GeV/c proton beam that is generated by Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, with a solid copper target. These simulations have been carried out using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2. This study has been done to assess the damage caused by these highly relativistic protons to equipment including collimators, absorbers and others in case of an uncontrolled accidental release of the beam. In fact a dedicated experimental facility named HiRadMat is under construction at CERN that will allow one to study these problems experimentally. The simulations presented in this paper will be very useful in designing these experiments and later to interpret the experimental results.

  18. Fragmentation of exotic oxygen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leistenschneider, A.; Elze, Th.W.; Gruenschloss, A.; Palit, R. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Aumann, T.; Cortina, D.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Emling, H.; Geissel, H.; Helariutta, K.; Hellstroem, M.; Ilievski, S.; Jones, K.; Muenzenberg, G.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Suemmerer, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Boretzky, K.; Kratz, J.V.; Le Hong, Khiem [Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. fue Kernchemie; Canto, L.F. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Carlson, B.V. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA). Dept. de Fisica; Hussein, M.S. [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Kulessa, R.; Lubkiewicz, E.; Wajda, E.; Walus, W. [Uniwersytet Jagellonski, Krakow (Poland). Instytut Fizyki; Reiter, P. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Garching (Germany). Sektion Physik; Simon, H. [Technische Univ., Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2003-06-01

    Abrasion-ablation models and the empirical EPAX parametrization of projectile fragmentation are described. Their cross section predictions are compared to recent data of the fragmentation of secondary beams of neutron-rich, unstable {sup 19,20,21} O isotopes at beam energies near 600 MeV/nucleon as well as data for stable {sup 17,18} O beams. (author)

  19. Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNR) provides neutron and proton beams for basic, applied, and defense-related research. Neutron beams with energies ranging...

  20. Latest developments on fibered MOPA in mJ range with hollow-core fiber beam delivery and fiber beam shaping used as seeder for large scale laser facilities (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleyze, Jean-François; Scol, Florent; Perrin, Arnaud; Gouriou, Pierre; Valentin, Constance; Bouwmans, Géraud; Hugonnot, Emmanuel

    2017-05-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) is a French large scale laser facility dedicated to inertial fusion and plasma physics research. LMJ front-ends are based on fiber laser technology at nanojoule range [1]. Scaling the energy of those fiber seeders to the millijoule range is a way to upgrade LMJ's front ends architecture and could also be used as seeder for lasers for ELI project for example. However, required performances are so restrictive (optical-signal-to-noise ratio higher than 50 dB, temporally-shaped nanosecond pulses and spatial single-mode top-hat beam output) that such fiber systems are very tricky to build. High-energy fiber amplifiers In 2015, we have demonstrated, an all-fiber MOPA prototype able to produce a millijoule seeder, but unfortunately not 100% conform for all LMJ's performances. A major difficulty was to manage the frequency modulation used to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering, to amplitude modulation (FM-AM) conversion, this limits the energy at 170µJ. For upgrading the energy to the millijoule range, it's necessary to use an amplifier with a larger core fiber. However, this fiber must still be flexible; polarization maintaining and exhibit a strictly single-mode behaviour. We are thus developing a new amplifier architecture based on an Yb-doped tapered fiber: its core diameter is from a narrow input to a wide output (MFD 8 to 26 µm). A S² measurement on a 2,5m long tapered fiber rolled-up on 22 cm diameter confirmed that this original geometry allows obtaining strictly single-mode behaviour. In a 1 kHz repetition rate regime, we already obtain 750 µJ pulses, and we are on the way to mJ, respecting LMJ performances. Beam delivery In LMJ architecture the distance between the nanojoule fiber seeder and the amplifier stages is about 16 m. Beam delivery is achieved with a standard PM fiber, such a solution is no longer achievable with hundreds of kilowatt peak powers. An efficient way to minimize nonlinear effects is to use hollow-core (HC

  1. On the possible use of the MASURCA reactor as a flexible, high-intensity, fast neutron beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioni, Luca; Jacqmin, Robert; Sumini, Marco; Stout, Brian

    2017-09-01

    In recent work [1, 2], we have shown that the MASURCA research reactor could be used to deliver a fairly-intense continuous fast neutron beam to an experimental room located next to the reactor core. As a consequence of the MASURCA favorable characteristics and diverse material inventories, the neutron beam intensity and spectrum can be further tailored to meet the users' needs, which could be of interest for several applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to characterize in detail the extracted neutron (and photon) beam entering the experimental room. These numerical simulations were done for two different bare cores: A uranium metallic core (˜30% 235U enriched) and a plutonium oxide core (˜25% Pu fraction, ˜78% 239Pu). The results show that the distinctive resonance energy structures of the two core leakage spectra are preserved at the channel exit. As the experimental room is large enough to house a dedicated set of neutron spectrometry instruments, we have investigated several candidate neutron spectrum measurement techniques, which could be implemented to guarantee well-defined, repeatable beam conditions to users. Our investigation also includes considerations regarding the gamma rays in the beams.

  2. The SPES radioactive ion beam project of LNL: status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Prete, G.; Andrigetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 8 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.7 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  3. X-ray beam splitting design for concurrent imaging at hard X-ray FELs and synchrotron facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberta, P., E-mail: peter.oberta@rigaku.com [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, Praha 8, CZ-18221 (Czech Republic); Rigaku, Novodvorská 994, Praha 4, CZ-14221 (Czech Republic); Mokso, R. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-11-21

    A new configuration of diffractive–refractive optics for beam splitting is investigated. The set-up can be applied to perform imaging with two beams simultaneously. It brings advantages toward dynamic studies using image guided diffraction or fluorescence spectroscopy. The optimal energy range of operation for the beam-splitter is between 7 keV and 24 keV, reaching best efficiency at an energy of 10 keV. Due to the long focusing distances (several tens of meters) created by the diffractive–refractive optics and the higher refraction efficiency in the softer energy range, the presented set-ups are ideal for hard X-ray FEL sources.

  4. Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Felix [Fermilab

    2014-07-10

    We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.

  5. Photoproduction of Light and Exotic Mesons in Hall D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Curtis

    2000-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall D collaboration is proposing a program to search for and study gluonic excitations of mesons using 8-9 GeV linearly polarized photon beams. By extending the nearly non-existent meson data in photoproduction, as well as taking advantage of a spin 1 probe, we expect to be able to produce and study hybrid mesons with exotic, or non q-barq quantum numbers. The properties of these mesons yield information on the dynamic nature of gluons, and yield information on the issue of confinement.

  6. Linear Collider Test Facility: Twiss Parameter Analysis at the IP/Post-IP Location of the ATF2 Beam Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzon, Benoit; /Annecy, LAPP; Jeremie, Andrea; /Annecy, LAPP; Bai, Sha; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bambade, Philip; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, Glen; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    At the first stage of the ATF2 beam tuning, vertical beam size is usually bigger than 3 {micro}m at the IP. Beam waist measurements using wire scanners and a laser wire are usually performed to check the initial matching of the beam through to the IP. These measurements are described in this paper for the optics currently used ({beta}{sub x} = 4cm and {beta}{sub y} = 1mm). Software implemented in the control room to automate these measurements with integrated analysis is also described. Measurements showed that {beta} functions and emittances were within errors of measurements when no rematching and coupling corrections were done. However, it was observed that the waist in the horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane was abnormally shifted and simulations were performed to try to understand these shifts. They also showed that multiknobs are needed in the current optics to correct simultaneously {alpha}{sub x}, {alpha}{sub y} and the horizontal dispersion (D{sub x}). Such multiknobs were found and their linearity and orthogonality were successfully checked using MAD optics code. The software for these multiknobs was implemented in the control room and waist scan measurements using the {alpha}{sub y} knob were successfully performed.

  7. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction−acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiuchi, M., E-mail: sergei@jaea.go.jp; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Nishio, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Skobelev, I. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperature (Russian Federation); Orlandi, R. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Koura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Kando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Yamauchi, T. [Graduate School of Maritime Sciences (Japan); Watanabe, Y. [Kyushu University, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences (Japan); Bulanov, S. V., E-mail: svbulanov@gmail.com; Kondo, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); and others

    2016-04-15

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction–acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  8. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, G.; Togo, V.

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: (i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. (ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ˜1,000 m2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4 × 10-16 cm-2 s-1 sr-1for 4 ×10-5SLIM experiment at the high altitude Chacaltaya lab (5,230 m a.s.l.), using 427 m2 of CR39 detectors exposed for 4.22 years, gave an upper limit for IMMs of ˜1.3 × 10-15 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The experiments yielded interesting upper limits also on the fluxes of the other mentioned exotic particles. (iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  9. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ~1000 m^2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4x10^-16 cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for 4x10^-5 exotic particles. iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  10. Exotics: Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Lange, Jens Sören; Stone, Sheldon

    2017-11-01

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e+e- and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ;exotics;. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c c bar or b b bar pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two-antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ;molecules; similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  11. Exotics. Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Lange, Jens Soeren [Giessen Univ. (Germany). II. Physikalisches Inst.; Stone, Sheldon [Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    2017-07-15

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ''exotics''. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c anti c or b anti b pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ''molecules'' similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  12. Shell Structure of Exotic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw University; Michel, N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL); Rotureau, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical predictions and experimental discoveries for neutron-rich, short-lived nuclei far from stability indicate that the familiar concept of nucleonic shell structure should be considered as less robust than previously thought. The notion of single-particle motion in exotic nuclei is reviewed with a particular focus on three aspects: (i) variations of nuclear mean field with neutron excess due to tensor interactions; (ii) importance of many-body correlations; and (iii) influence of open channels on properties of weakly bound and unbound nuclear states.

  13. Exotic Small Mammals and Bartonella

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    In this podcast, Dr. Nina Marano discusses Bartonella, a bacterial agent that’s prevalent in many species, including cats, dogs, and cattle. Wild animals are normally thought to carry Bartonella, so when animals are caught in the wild for pet trade, the risk that humans can become infected with Bartonella increases. Bartonella is an identified risk associated with ownership of exotic animals and has serious health consequences.  Created: 4/9/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/9/2009.

  14. ATLAS Run II Exotics Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    While Standard Model is in a good shape especially after Higgs boson discovery, there are a lot of questions beyond SM. The ATLAS detector is performing about 50 Exotics searches addressed these questions. This talk is discussing some of them with datasets collected during the 2015-2016 LHC run from 3 fb^-1 to 18 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy . Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  15. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  16. First on-line results from the CRIS (Collinear Resonant Ionisation Spectroscopy) beam line at ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, T. J., E-mail: thomas.procter@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Flanagan, K. T. [University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Collaboration: CRIS Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    The CRIS (Collinear Resonant Ionisation Spectroscopy) experiment at the on-line isotope separator facility, ISOLDE, CERN, has been constructed for high-sensitivity laser spectroscopy measurements on radioactive isotopes. The technique determines the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments, nuclear spin and changes in mean-square charge radii of exotic nuclei via measurement of their hyperfine structures and isotope shifts. In November 2011 the first on-line run was performed using the CRIS beam line, when the hyperfine structure of {sup 207}Fr was successfully measured. This paper will describe the technique and experimental setup of CRIS and present the results from the first on-line experiment.

  17. Generalization of exotic quark searches

    CERN Document Server

    Garberson, F

    2013-01-01

    General limits on exotic heavy quarks T, B and X with masses above 300 GeV are presented for arbitrary branching fractions of T=>Wb, T=>Zt, T=>Ht, B=>Wt, B=>Zb, B=>Hb and X=>Wt. The results are based on a CMS search in final states with three isolated leptons (electron or muon) or two isolated leptons with the same electric charge. Exotic heavy quark pair production through the strong interaction is considered. In the context of vector-like quark models, T quarks with a mass mT < 480 GeV and mT < 550 GeV are excluded for weak isospin singlets and doublets, respectively, and B quarks with a mass mB < 480 GeV are excluded for singlets, all at 95% confidence level. Mass limits at 95% confidence level for T and B singlets, (T,B) doublets and (X,T) doublets are presented as a function of the corresponding heavy quark masses. For equal mass mT = mB and mX = mT vector-like quarks are excluded at 95% confidence level with masses below 550 GeV for T and B singlets, 640 GeV for a (T,B) doublet and 640 GeV for ...

  18. Assembling of a low energy ion beam analysis facility and use of Nuclear Microprobe techniques in geological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utui, R.

    1996-11-01

    In this work, both PIXE and ion beam induced luminescence, or just Ionoluminescence (IL) were used for geochemical studies. The possibility of rapid absolute quantification of elements in the ppm level by PIXE combined with the yet higher sensitivity of IL to transition metals and Rare Earth Elements (REE) activators, in the absence of quenching phenomena, allow for a synergic use of the two methods in geological applications with enhanced sensitivity. IL and PIXE were combined for studying REE distribution in apatite minerals and ion beam induced damage in inorganic material in general with emphasis to synthetically grown zircon crystals doped with REE. Due to the sensitivity of IL to changes in chemical bonding in the material, beam damage effects can be studied even at low integrated doses, through wavelength shift or fading of the induced light. Micro PIXE technique was used for studying profile concentrations of trace elements in pyrite grains and of elements used as geothermometers. Geothermometry allowed to assess the cooling rates in iron meteorites and the mineralization conditions in metamorphic rocks, attempting to describe the tectonic history of the terranes, with application in petrologic studies and geological prospecting. 148 refs.

  19. Experimental evidence for hadroproduction of exotic mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J. M. Bishop; V. A. Bodyagin; B. B. Brabson; D. S. Brown; N. M. Cason; S. U. Chung; R. R. Crittenden; J. P. Cummings; K. Danyo; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J. P. Dowd; A. R. Dzierba; P. Eugenio; J. Gunter; R. W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; E. I. Ivanov; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; R. Lindenbusch; V. Lipaev; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A. I. Ostrovidov; T. K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. R. Rust; D. Ryabchikov; A. H. Sanjari; L. I. Sarycheva; E. Scott; K. K. Seth; N. Shenhav; W. D. Shephard; N. B. Sinev; J. A. Smith; P. T. Smith; D. L. Stienike; T. Sulanke; S. A. Taegar; S. Teige; D. R. Thompson; I. N. Vardanyan; D. P. Weygand; D. White; H. J. Willutzki; J. Wise; M. Witkowski; A. A. Yershov; D. Zhao

    2001-01-01

    New measurements of peripheral meson production are presented. The data confirm the existence of exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c2. The latter state dominates the eta'pi- decay spectrum. The data on eta pi+pi-pi- decay show large strength in several exotic (Jpc = 1- +) waves as well.

  20. Domestic exotics and the perception of invasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Robert Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility of an area to invasion by exotic species is often judged by the fraction of introduced species in the local biota. However, the degree of invasion, particularly in mainland areas, has often been underestimated because of the exclusion of ‘domestic exotics’ (those introduced to internal units from within the national border) in calculations. Because all...

  1. Heavy exotic molecules with charm and bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the (0+ ,1+) multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the (0- ,1-) multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets (0± ,1±) cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for J ≤ 1. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC =1++ bind, which we identify as the reported neutral X (3872). Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC =1+- binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics Zb+ (10610) and Zb+ (10650). The bound isosinglet with JPC =1++ is suggested as a possible neutral Xb (10532) not yet reported.

  2. Beam-Based Alignment in CTF3 Test Beam Line

    OpenAIRE

    Sterbini, G; Dӧbert, S; Marín, E.; Lillestol, RL; Schulte, D.; Adli, E.

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC linear collider is based on the two beams acceleration scheme. During acceleration of the colliding beams, the drive beam suffers a large build up on its energy spread. In order to efficiently transport such a beam, beam-based alignment techniques together with tight prealignment tolerances are crucial. To evaluate the performance of these steering algorithms, a beam-based steering campaign has been conducted at the Test Beam Line of the CLIC Test Facility. In the following we presen...

  3. One-nucleon transfer reactions induced by secondary beam of {sup 11}Be: study of the nuclear structure of the exotic nuclei {sup 11}Be and {sup 10}Li; Reactions de transfert d'un nucleon induites par un faisceau secondaire de {sup 11}Be: etude de la structure des noyaux exotiques {sup 11}Be et {sup 10}Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pita, S

    2000-09-01

    of studies of the shell properties of exotic nuclei using transfer reactions induced by radioactive beams and constitutes the beginning of a program devoted to this kind of experiment. (author)

  4. Exotic RG flows from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Nitti, Francesco; Silva Pimenta, Leandro [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France)

    2017-02-15

    Holographic RG flows are studied in an Einstein-dilaton theory with a general potential. The superpotential formalism is utilized in order to characterize and classify all solutions that are associated with asymptotically AdS space-times. Such solutions correspond to holographic RG flows and are characterized by their holographic β-functions. Novel solutions are found that have exotic properties from a RG point-of view. Some have β-functions that are defined patch-wise and lead to flows where the β-function changes sign without the flow stopping. Others describe flows that end in non-neighboring extrema in field space. Finally others describe regular flows between two minima of the potential and correspond holographically to flows driven by the VEV of an irrelevant operator in the UV CFT. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  6. Post-acceleration of sup 7 Be at the Louvain-la-Neuve radioactive ion beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Gaelens, M; Loiselet, M; Ryckewaert, G

    2003-01-01

    The development of an intense and pure post-accelerated sup 7 Be beam at Louvain-la-Neuve will be discussed. Given its properties (metallic nature, long half-life (53 days)) and the special beam parameters required (multi-charge ions, high purity), a range of special techniques had to be investigated. At Louvain-la-Neuve, sup 7 Be is produced by irradiating a lithium target with 30 mu A of 27 MeV protons and is extracted using offline chemical separation techniques. Because of the large amounts of activity required, the chemistry has to be adapted for use in hotcells. The ionization is performed with an Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with the sup 7 Be injected in the source by means of sputtering. Special techniques have to be used to prevent the beryllium atoms from being lost on the plasma chamber walls. A dedicated heated plasma chamber for the ion source was developed. The ionization efficiency was increased by studying the chemistry involved in the ion source. The atoms are ionized to the 1+ or ...

  7. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  8. Measurement and Calculation of High-Energy Neutron Spectra behind Shielding at the CERF 120 GeV/c Hadron Beam Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Nakao, N; Roesler, S; Brugger, M; Hagiwara, M; Vincke, H; Khater, H; Prinz, A A; Rokni, S H; Kosako, K

    2008-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the lateral shield of the CERF (CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field) facility at CERN with a 120 GeV/c positive hadron beam (a mixture of mainly protons and pions) on a cylindrical copper target (7-cm diameter by 50-cm long). An NE213 organic liquid scintillator (12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long) was located at various longitudinal positions behind shields of 80- and 160-cm thick concrete and 40-cm thick iron. The measurement locations cover an angular range with respect to the beam axis between 13 and 133 degrees. Neutron energy spectra in the energy range between 32 MeV and 380 MeV were obtained by unfolding the measured pulse height spectra with the detector response functions which have been verified in the neutron energy range up to 380 MeV in separate experiments. Since the source term and experimental geometry in this experiment are well characterized and simple, and results are given in the form of energy spectra, these experimental results are very useful a...

  9. Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Scheme for Direct-Drive: Modeling and Evidence from National Ignition Facility Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been shown to significantly reduce the laser absorption and implosion speed in direct-drive implosion experiments on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Mitigating CBET assists in achieving ignition-relevant hot-spot pressures in deuterium-tritium cryogenic OMEGA implosions. In addition, reducing CBET permits lower, more hydrodynamically stable, in-flight aspect ratio ignition designs with smaller nonuniformity growth during the acceleration phase. Detuning the wavelengths of the crossing beams is one of several techniques under investigation at the University of Rochester to mitigate CBET. This talk will describe these techniques with an emphasis on wavelength detuning. Recent experiments designed and predicted using multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET on the NIF have exploited the wavelength arrangement of the NIF beam geometry to demonstrate CBET mitigation through wavelength detuning in polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions. Shapes and trajectories inferred from time-resolved x-ray radiography of the imploding shell, scattered-light spectra, and hard x-ray spectra generated by suprathermal electrons all indicate a reduction in CBET. These results and their implications for direct-drive ignition will be presented and discussed. In addition, hydrodynamically scaled ignition-relevant designs for OMEGA implosions exploiting wavelength detuning will be presented. Changes required to the OMEGA laser to permit wavelength detuning will be discussed. Future plans for PDD on the NIF including more-uniform implosions with CBET mitigation will be explored. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. The new ECR charge breeder for the Selective Production of Exotic Species project at INFN—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galatà, A., E-mail: alessio.galata@lnl.infn.it; Patti, G.; Roncolato, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Padova, Legnaro (Italy); Angot, J.; Lamy, T. [LPSC-Université Grenoble Alpes-CNRS/IN2P3, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble CEDEX (France)

    2016-02-15

    The Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project is an ISOL facility under construction at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare–Laboratori Nationali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). 1+ radioactive ions, produced and extracted from the target-ion-source system, will be charge bred to high charge states by an ECR charge breeder (SPES-CB): the project will adopt an upgraded version of the PHOENIX charge breeder, developed since about twenty years by the Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC). The collaboration between LNL and LPSC started in 2010 with charge breeding experiments performed on the LPSC test bench and led, in June 2014, to the signature of a Research Collaboration Agreement for the delivery of a complete charge breeder and ancillaries, satisfying the SPES requirements. Important technological aspects were tackled during the construction phase, as, for example, beam purity issues, electrodes alignment, and vacuum sealing. This phase was completed in spring 2015, after which the qualification tests were carried out at LPSC on the 1+/q+ test stand. This paper describes the characteristics of the SPES-CB, with particular emphasis on the results obtained during the qualification tests: charge breeding of Ar, Xe, Rb, and Cs satisfied the SPES requirements for different intensities of the injected 1+ beam, showing very good performances, some of which are “best ever” for this device.

  11. The new ECR charge breeder for the Selective Production of Exotic Species project at INFN—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Roncolato, C.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project is an ISOL facility under construction at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Laboratori Nationali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). 1+ radioactive ions, produced and extracted from the target-ion-source system, will be charge bred to high charge states by an ECR charge breeder (SPES-CB): the project will adopt an upgraded version of the PHOENIX charge breeder, developed since about twenty years by the Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC). The collaboration between LNL and LPSC started in 2010 with charge breeding experiments performed on the LPSC test bench and led, in June 2014, to the signature of a Research Collaboration Agreement for the delivery of a complete charge breeder and ancillaries, satisfying the SPES requirements. Important technological aspects were tackled during the construction phase, as, for example, beam purity issues, electrodes alignment, and vacuum sealing. This phase was completed in spring 2015, after which the qualification tests were carried out at LPSC on the 1+/q+ test stand. This paper describes the characteristics of the SPES-CB, with particular emphasis on the results obtained during the qualification tests: charge breeding of Ar, Xe, Rb, and Cs satisfied the SPES requirements for different intensities of the injected 1+ beam, showing very good performances, some of which are "best ever" for this device.

  12. How exotic plants integrate into pollination networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouffer, Daniel B; Cirtwill, Alyssa R; Bascompte, Jordi; Bartomeus, Ignasi

    2014-11-01

    There is increasing world-wide concern about the impact of the introduction of exotic species on ecological communities. Since many exotic plants depend on native pollinators to successfully establish, it is of paramount importance that we understand precisely how exotic species integrate into existing plant-pollinator communities. In this manuscript, we have studied a global data base of empirical pollination networks to determine whether community, network, species or interaction characteristics can help identify invaded communities. We found that a limited number of community and network properties showed significant differences across the empirical data sets - namely networks with exotic plants present are characterized by greater total, plant and pollinator richness, as well as higher values of relative nestedness.We also observed significant differences in terms of the pollinators that interact with the exotic plants. In particular, we found that specialist pollinators that are also weak contributors to community nestedness are far more likely to interact with exotic plants than would be expected by chance alone.Synthesis. By virtue of their interactions, it appears that exotic plants may provide a key service to a community's specialist pollinators as well as fill otherwise vacant 'coevolutionary niches'.

  13. Extraction of pure thermal neutron beam for the proposed PGNAA facility at the TRIGA research reactor of AERE, Savar, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sabina; Zaman, M. A.; Islam, S. M. A.; Ahsan, M. H.

    1993-10-01

    A study on collimators and filters for the design of a spectrometer for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) at one of the radial beamports of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at AERE, Savar has been carried out. On the basis of this study a collimator and a filter have been designed for the proposed PGNAA facility. Calculations have been done for measuring neutron flux at various positions of the core of the reactor using the computer code TRIGAP. Gamma dose in the core of the reactor has also been measured experimentally using TLD technique in the present work.

  14. Frequency tripling of convergent beam employing crystals tiling in large-aperture high-energy laser facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhua; Li, Dazhen; Wang, Bo; Yang, Jing; Yang, Houwen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Cheng, Wenyong

    2017-11-01

    In inertial confinement fusion, ultraviolet laser damage of the fused silica lens is an important limiting factor for load capability of the laser driver. To solve this problem, a new configuration of frequency tripling is proposed in this paper. The frequency tripling crystal is placed on downstream of the focusing lens, thus sum frequency generation of fundamental frequency light and doubling frequency light occurs in the beam convergence path. The focusing lens is only irradiated by fundamental light and doubling frequency lights. Thus, its damage threshold will increase. LiB3O5 (LBO) crystals are employed as frequency tripling crystals for its larger acceptance angle and higher damage threshold than KDP/DKDP crystals'. With the limitation of acceptance angle and crystal growth size are taken into account, the tiling scheme of LBO crystals is proposed and designed optimally to adopt to the total convergence angle of 36.0 mrad. Theoretical results indicate that 3 LBO crystals titling with different cutting angles in θ direction can meet the phase matching condition. Compared with frequency tripling of parallel beam using one LBO crystal, 83.8% (93.1% with 5 LBO crystals tiling) of the frequency tripling conversion efficiency can be obtained employing this new configuration. The results of a principle experiment also support this scheme. By employing this new design, not only the load capacity of a laser driver will be significantly improved, but also the fused silica lens can be changed to K9 glass lens which has the mature technology and low cost.

  15. Design, Fabrication, Installation and Commissioning of the Helium Refrigeration system Supporting Superconducting Radio Frequency Testing at Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, F.; Fila, A.; Nguyen, C.; Tatsumoto, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a scientific user facility for the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC). The FRIB linear accelerator (LINAC) will be comprised of cryomodules each with multiple Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities operating at 2 K. A helium refrigeration system was designed, fabricated, installed and commissioned in the SRF high bay building to test and certify these cavities and cryomodules before installation in the FRIB LINAC tunnel. The helium refrigeration system includes a helium refrigerator which has nominal capacity of 900 W at 4 K, 5000 L liquid helium storage Dewar, helium gas storage, two room temperature vacuum pumps capable of 2.5 g/s each for 2 K testing, purifier, purifier recovery compressor, and the distribution system for liquid nitrogen and helium. The helium refrigeration system is now operational supporting three below grade cavity testing Dewars and one cryomodule testing bunker meeting the required throughput of 1 cavity per day.

  16. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area.

  17. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, Mikhail [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Mokhov, Nikolai [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Niita, Koji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  18. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and...

  19. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-01-01

    .... In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of the model...

  20. Search for exotic physics with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-01-01

    At the LHC, the program of research in particle physics beyond the Standard Model is extremely rich. With the ATLAS detector, besides SUSY mainstream studies, many exotic theoretical models will be investigated. They range from compositeness of fundamental fermions to extra dimension scenarii through GUT models and include many variants. I shall review some selected typical studies by the ATLAS collaboration on exotic physics, highlighting the discovery prospects and the recent analyses using the latest full detector simulations.

  1. Meteors, space aliens, and other exotic encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom. Hofacker

    1998-01-01

    Exotics have had a big impact on our environment. If you do not think so, just look at how many people believe that humans would not exist on this planet were it not for exotics. This belief centers on two main theories: (1) that humans could not have evolved were it not for a huge meteor from outer space striking the earth resulting in extinction of the dinasours, the...

  2. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Davide M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Riccioni, Fabio [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Risoli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-12-21

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T{sup 6}/[ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2}] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  3. Everyday and Exotic Foodborne Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn B Lee

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyday foodborne parasites, which are endemic in Canada, include the protozoans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. However, these parasites are most frequently acquired through unfiltered drinking water, homosexual activity or close personal contact such as in daycare centres and occasionally via a food vehicle. It is likely that many foodborne outbreaks from these protozoa go undetected. Transmission of helminth infections, such as tapeworms, is rare in Canada because of effective sewage treatment. However, a common foodborne parasite of significance is Toxoplasma gondii. Although infection can be acquired from accidental ingestion of oocysts from cat feces, infection can also result from consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat, such as pork or lamb. Congenital transmission poses an immense financial burden, costing Canada an estimated $240 million annually. Also of concern is toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients, which may lead to toxoplasmosis encephalitis, the second most common AIDS-related opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. Exotic parasites (ie, those acquired from abroad or from imported food are of growing concern because more Canadians are travelling and the number of Canada?s trading partners is increasing. Since 1996, over 3000 cases of Cyclospora infection reported in the United States and Canada were epidemiologically associated with importation of Guatemalan raspberries. Unlike toxoplasmosis, where strategies for control largely rest with individual practices, control of cyclosporiasis rests with government policy, which should prohibit the importation of foods at high risk.

  4. Measurement and calculation of high-energy neutron spectra behind shielding at the CERF 120 GeV/c hadron beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, N. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)], E-mail: nakao@fnal.gov; Taniguchi, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Roesler, S.; Brugger, M. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hagiwara, M. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Vincke, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Khater, H.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Kosako, K. [Shimizu Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the lateral shield of the CERF (CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field) facility at CERN with a 120 GeV/c positive hadron beam (a mixture of mainly protons and pions) on a cylindrical copper target (7-cm diameter by 50-cm long). An NE213 organic liquid scintillator (12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long) was located at various longitudinal positions behind shields of 80- and 160-cm thick concrete and 40-cm thick iron. The measurement locations cover an angular range with respect to the beam axis between 13 and 133{sup o}. Neutron energy spectra in the energy range between 32 MeV and 380 MeV were obtained by unfolding the measured pulse height spectra with the detector response functions which have been verified in the neutron energy range up to 380 MeV in separate experiments. Since the source term and experimental geometry in this experiment are well characterized and simple and results are given in the form of energy spectra, these experimental results are very useful as benchmark data to check the accuracies of simulation codes and nuclear data. Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental set up were performed with the FLUKA, MARS and PHITS codes. Simulated spectra for the 80-cm thick concrete often agree within the experimental uncertainties. On the other hand, for the 160-cm thick concrete and iron shield differences are generally larger than the experimental uncertainties, yet within a factor of 2. Based on source term simulations, observed discrepancies among simulations of spectra outside the shield can be partially explained by differences in the high-energy hadron production in the copper target.

  5. Measurement and calculation of high-energy neutron spectra behind shielding at the CERF 120 GeV/c hadron beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, N.; Taniguchi, S.; Roesler, S.; Brugger, M.; Hagiwara, M.; Vincke, H.; Khater, H.; Prinz, A. A.; Rokni, S. H.; Kosako, K.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the lateral shield of the CERF (CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field) facility at CERN with a 120 GeV/c positive hadron beam (a mixture of mainly protons and pions) on a cylindrical copper target (7-cm diameter by 50-cm long). An NE213 organic liquid scintillator (12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long) was located at various longitudinal positions behind shields of 80- and 160-cm thick concrete and 40-cm thick iron. The measurement locations cover an angular range with respect to the beam axis between 13 and 133°. Neutron energy spectra in the energy range between 32 MeV and 380 MeV were obtained by unfolding the measured pulse height spectra with the detector response functions which have been verified in the neutron energy range up to 380 MeV in separate experiments. Since the source term and experimental geometry in this experiment are well characterized and simple and results are given in the form of energy spectra, these experimental results are very useful as benchmark data to check the accuracies of simulation codes and nuclear data. Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental set up were performed with the FLUKA, MARS and PHITS codes. Simulated spectra for the 80-cm thick concrete often agree within the experimental uncertainties. On the other hand, for the 160-cm thick concrete and iron shield differences are generally larger than the experimental uncertainties, yet within a factor of 2. Based on source term simulations, observed discrepancies among simulations of spectra outside the shield can be partially explained by differences in the high-energy hadron production in the copper target.

  6. A tailored 200 parameter VME based data acquisition system for IBA at the Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility - Hardware and software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, Mikael; Ros, Linus; Kristiansson, Per; Nilsson, E. J. Charlotta; Pallon, Jan

    2016-03-01

    With the recent advances towards modern Ion Beam Analysis (IBA), going from one- or few-parameter detector systems to multi-parameter systems, it has been necessary to expand and replace the more than twenty years old CAMAC based system. A new VME multi-parameter (presently up to 200 channels) data acquisition and control system has been developed and implemented at the Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF). The system is based on the VX-511 Single Board Computer (SBC), acting as master with arbiter functionality and consists of standard VME modules like Analog to Digital Converters (ADC's), Charge to Digital Converters (QDC's), Time to Digital Converters (TDC's), scaler's, IO-cards, high voltage and waveform units. The modules have been specially selected to support all of the present detector systems in the laboratory, with the option of future expansion. Typically, the detector systems consist of silicon strip detectors, silicon drift detectors and scintillator detectors, for detection of charged particles, X-rays and γ-rays. The data flow of the raw data buffers out from the VME bus to the final storage place on a 16 terabyte network attached storage disc (NAS-disc) is described. The acquisition process, remotely controlled over one of the SBCs ethernet channels, is also discussed. The user interface is written in the Kmax software package, and is used to control the acquisition process as well as for advanced online and offline data analysis through a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). In this work the system implementation, layout and performance are presented. The user interface and possibilities for advanced offline analysis are also discussed and illustrated.

  7. Growth performance of exotic Oreochromis niloticus, exotic Oreochromis niloticus fed with pelleted feeds in flow-through system

    OpenAIRE

    Eyo, A.A.; Okoye, F.C.; Sebiola, D.

    1999-01-01

    Local, exotic and hybrid tilapia fingerlings were fed 45% crude protein diet containing 18% fish meal in a flow through system in triplicate and their growth and food utilization observed for 14 weeks. At the end of the study, the hybrid (Exotic Oreochromis niloticus male x Exotic Oreochromis aureus female) fingerlings had higher growth rate and food conversion ratio (FCR) than the other treatments. This was followed by Exotic Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings. The exotic Oreochromis niloticu...

  8. Spectroscopy of Exotic Nuclei via Quasi-free Scattering Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Stefanos

    2017-09-01

    In the work presented here we are interested in examining the single-particle strength of nucleons in stable and exotic nuclei and the reduction compared to the independent particle model. The motivation for this work has been the reported reduction of single-particle strengths and in particular the dependency of this reduction as a function of isospin asymmetry expressed in terms of nucleon separation energies. In particular, in (e,e p) experiments single-particle strengths of the order of 60-70 p) experiments were reported for nuclei close to stability but with a strong dependency of the single-particle strength on the proton-neutron asymmetry. The origin of this strong asymmetry is not fully understood and results from transfer reactions do not support this evidence. In this work I will present our results where quasi-free scattering reactions have been extended and used in inverse kinematics with radioactive beams and a hydrogen-rich target. In particular, I will discuss results on the single-particle structure of stable and exotic nuclei along the oxygen isotopic chain from an experiment that was carried out at the R3B/LAND setup at GSI, Germany, and discuss the dependency on neutron/proton separation energy as well as possible dependencies on the reaction theory used for extracting this nuclear structure information.

  9. A Facility to Search for Hidden Particles (SHiP) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Anelli, M; Arduini, G; Back, J J; Bagulya, A; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barker, G J; Barsuk, S; Battistin, M; Bauche, J; Bay, A; Bayliss, V; Bellagamba, L; Bencivenni, G; Bertani, M; Bezshyyko, O; Bick, D; Bingefors, N; Blondel, A; Bogomilov, M; Boyarsky, A; Bonacorsi, D; Bondarenko, D; Bonivento, W; Borburgh, J; Bradshaw, T; Brenner, R; Breton, D; Brook, N; Bruschi, M; Buonaura, A; Buontempo, S; Cadeddu, S; Calcaterra, A; Calviani, M; Campanelli, M; Capoccia, C; Cecchetti, A; Chatterjee, A; Chauveau, J; Chepurnov, A; Chernyavskiy, M; Ciambrone, P; Cicalo, C; Conti, G; Cornelis, K; Courthold, M; G Dallavalle, M; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Serio, M; Dedenko, L; Di Crescenzo, A; Di Marco, N; Dib, C; Dietrich, J; Dijkstra, H; Domenici, D; Donskov, S; Druzhkin, D; Ebert, J; Egede, U; Egorov, A; Egorychev, V; El Alaoui, M A; Enik, T; Etenko, A; Fabbri, F; Fabbri, L; Fedorova, G; Felici, G; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Fini, R A; Franke, M; Fraser, M; Galati, G; Giacobbe, B; Goddard, B; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gorbunov, D; Graverini, E; Grenard, J-L; Guler, A M; Hagner, C; Hakobyan, H; Helo, J C; van Herwijnen, E; Horvath, D; Iacovacci, M; Iaselli, G; Jacobsson, R; Kadenko, I; Kamiscioglu, M; Kamiscioglu, C; Khaustov, G; Khotjansev, A; Kilminster, B; Kim, V; Kitagawa, N; Kodama, K; Kolesnikov, A; Kolev, D; Komatsu, M; Konovalova, N; Koretskiy, S; Korolko, I; Korzenev, A; Kovalenko, S; Kudenko, Y; Kuznetsova, E; Lacker, H; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Lauria, A; Lebbolo, H; Levy, J -M; Lista, L; Loverre, P; Lukiashin, A; Lyubovitskij, V E; Malinin, A; Manfredi, M; Perillo-Marcone, A; Marrone, A; Matev, R; Messomo, E N; Mermod, P; Mikado, S; Mikhaylov, Yu; Miller, J; Milstead, D; Mineev, O; Mingazheva, R; Mitselmakher, G; Miyanishi, M; Monacelli, P; Montanari, A; Montesi, M C; Morello, G; Morishima, K; Movtchan, S; Murzin, V; Naganawa, N; Naka, T; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Nurakhov, N; Obinyakov, B; Ocalan, K; Ogawa, S; Oreshkin, V; Orlov, A; Osborne, J; Pacholek, P; Panman, J; Paoloni, A; Paparella, L; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Petridis, K; Petrushin, M; Poli-Lener, M; Polukhina, N; Polyakov, V; Prokudin, M; Puddu, G; Pupilli, F; Rademakers, F; Rakai, A; Rawlings, T; Redi, F; Ricciardi, S; Rinaldesi, R; Roganova, T; Rogozhnikov, A; Rokujo, H; Romaniouk, A; Rosa, G; Rostovtseva, I; Rovelli, T; Ruchayskiy, O; Ruf, T; Saitta, G; Samoylenko, V; Samsonov, V; Sanz Ull, A; Saputi, A; Sato, O; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Serra, N; Sgobba, S; Shaposhnikov, M; Shatalov, P; Shaykhiev, A; Shchutska, L; Shevchenko, V; Shibuya, H; Shitov, Y; Silverstein, S; Simone, S; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, S; Solodko, E; Sosnovtsev, V; Spighi, R; Spinetti, M; Starkov, N; Storaci, B; Strabel, C; Strolin, P; Takahashi, S; Teterin, P; Tioukov, V; Tommasini, D; Treille, D; Tsenov, R; Tshchedrina, T; Ustyuzhanin, A; Vannucci, F; Venturi, V; Villa, M; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut; Vladymyrov, M; Xella, S; Yalvac, M; Yershov, N; Yilmaz, D; U Yilmazer, A; Vankova-Kirilova, G; Zaitsev, Y; Zoccoli, A; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2015-01-01

    A new general purpose fixed target facility is proposed at the CERN SPS accelerator which is aimed at exploring the domain of hidden particles and make measurements with tau neutrinos. Hidden particles are predicted by a large number of models beyond the Standard Model. The high intensity of the SPS 400~GeV beam allows probing a wide variety of models containing light long-lived exotic particles with masses below ${\\cal O}$(10)~GeV/c$^2$, including very weakly interacting low-energy SUSY states. The experimental programme of the proposed facility is capable of being extended in the future, e.g. to include direct searches for Dark Matter and Lepton Flavour Violation. The facility will be serviced by a new dedicated beam line branched off the splitter section on the North Area. It is followed by a new target station and a magnetic shield to suppress beam induced background. The proposed orientation of the beam line and the underground complex allows reserving more than 100~m of space beyond the experiment...

  10. Beam-beam instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  11. beam-beam interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The Beam 1 (represented in blue) and the Beam 2 (represented in red) are colliding with an angle at the Interaction Point (IP). The angle is needed to avoid unwanted multiple collisions along the interaction region. Despite of the separation introduced by the angle, the two beams interact via their electromagnetic field, the so called "beam-beam" interaction.

  12. Highlights of the ISOLDE Facility and the HIE-ISOLDE Project

    CERN Document Server

    Borge, M.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The ISOLDE radioactive beam facility is the dedicated CERN installation for the production and acceleration of radioactive nuclei. Exotic nuclei of most chemical elements are available for the study of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries and atomic physics, as well as for applications in condensed matter and life sciences. In order to broaden the scientific opportunities beyond the reach of the present facility, the on-going HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy) project provides major improvements in energy range, beam intensity and beam quality. A major element of the project is the increase of the final energy of the post-accelerated beams to 10 MeV/u throughout the periodic table. Physics with post-accelerated beams at 4 MeV/u has started this autumn. The increase in energy up to 10 MeV/u is fully funded and it will be implemented at the rate of one cryo-module per year reaching 10 MeV/u for A∕q = 4.5 at the start of 2018. In this contribution, a description of the ISOLDE fac...

  13. X-ray study of a test quadrant of the SODART telescopes using the expanded beam x-ray optics facility at the Daresbury synchrotron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Frederiksen, P.

    1994-01-01

    The imaging properties of a test model of the SODART telescopes have been studied using an expanded beam X-ray facility at the Daresbury synchrotron. The encircled power and the point spread function at three energies 6.627 keV, 8.837 keV and 11.046 keV have been measured using 1D and 2D position...... sensitive detectors. The data have been used to calculate the Half Power Diameter (HPD) for three different SODART focal plane detectors. The High Energy Proportional Counter (HEPC), the Low Energy Proportional Counter (LEPC) and the 19 element solid state array detector (SIXA). At 6.627 keV and 8.837 ke......V the HPD is 2.5 - 3.0 arcmin for all detectors whereas it is somewhat larger at 11.046 keV for HEPC and LEPC but essentially unchanged for SIXA. Finally, the data are used to point to improvements that can be introduced during the manufacture of the flight telescopes....

  14. X-ray emission of exotic ions in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Dachicourt, R.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2017-03-01

    Hollow ion X-ray emission has been observed in experiments studying interaction of heavy ion beams with solids and their occurrence has been ascribed to charge exchange processes occurring when highly charged ions interact with a metal surface. In high temperature high-density plasmas, like, e.g., high intensity laser produced plasmas or high current Z-pinches, numerous researchers have reported about "exotic" X-ray transitions of hollow ions: K0LX →K1LX-1+hνhollow. Although atomic structure calculations seem to confirm that measured line positions correspond to transitions in hollow ions, line identification is difficult and the observed high intensity remains a mystery (by orders of magnitude) up to present days.

  15. Radioactive ion beams for biomedical research and nuclear medical application

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen

    2002-01-01

    The ISOLDE facility at CERN is the world leading on On-Line Isotope Separator installation. The main aspects which makes ISOLDE produced radio-isotopes such valuable for use in biomedical research are: the availability of exotic or uncommon radioisotopes, the high purity and the ion beam quality. A short overview on research strategies, on experimental work and application of ISOLDE produced radionuclides used in the field of biomedicine over a period of more than 2 decades will be given. Special attention will be directed to the radio- lanthanides, because they can be seen as one single element providing the unique possibility to study systematically relationships between molecule parameters and a biological response without changes in the basic tracer molecule. Among those radionuclides we find any radiation properties we wish (single photon emission) suitable for SPECT, positron emission suitable for positron emission tomography (PET), alpha -, beta /sup -/- and Auger electron emission. (21 refs).

  16. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  17. Wildlife, Exotic Pets, and Emerging Zoonoses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotto, Albino; Meslin, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic; wildlife constitutes a large and often unknown reservoir. Wildlife can also be a source for reemergence of previously controlled zoonoses. Although the discovery of such zoonoses is often related to better diagnostic tools, the leading causes of their emergence are human behavior and modifications to natural habitats (expansion of human populations and their encroachment on wildlife habitat), changes in agricultural practices, and globalization of trade. However, other factors include wildlife trade and translocation, live animal and bushmeat markets, consumption of exotic foods, development of ecotourism, access to petting zoos, and ownership of exotic pets. To reduce risk for emerging zoonoses, the public should be educated about the risks associated with wildlife, bushmeat, and exotic pet trades; and proper surveillance systems should be implemented. PMID:17370509

  18. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  19. CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Multimedia

    Kossyvakis, I; Faus-golfe, A; Nguyen, F

    2007-01-01

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  20. Exotic propulsion systems - A space exploration imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloulakos, V. E.

    1992-07-01

    Treatment is given to the need for and use of unusual propulsion systems in the forthcoming development of space vehicles. The requirements of lunar and Martian outposts are set forth, and the expected delta velocities, vehicle masses, and specific energy levels are listed. Exotic propulsion systems are considered that can provide the specific impulse levels needed for the scenarios discussed. Discussed are antimatter propulsion, teleportation, and antigravity machines, and the theoretical and practical implications of their development and use are mentioned. The use of antiprotons in medical treatment and materials processing is explained and extended to the propulsion application. The paper demonstrates the potential of exotic propulsion systems to contribute to space exploration.

  1. The Pricing of Multiple-Expiry Exotics

    OpenAIRE

    Hyong-Chol O; Mun-Chol KiM

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we extend Buchen's method to develop a new technique for pricing of some exotic options with several expiry dates(more than 3 expiry dates) using a concept of higher order binary option. At first we introduce the concept of higher order binary option and then provide the pricing formulae of $n$-th order binaries using PDE method. After that, we apply them to pricing of some multiple-expiry exotic options such as Bermudan option, multi time extendable option, multi shout option a...

  2. Status of exotic states at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Yeletskikh, Ivan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We review the status of searches and measurements of exotic hadron states at ATLAS. Among them: the search for the beauty partner of X(3872) charmonium state, the measurement of differential cross-section of the prompt and non-prompt production of X(3872) in the J/psi pi pi final states, the search for the structure in the B_s pi invariant mass, reported by D0 experiment, search for exotic states in B-hadron decays: pentaquarks in Lambda_b decays and tetraquarks in B-meson decays. ATLAS results and ongoing analyses perspectives are highlighted together with CMS and LHCb results.

  3. Exotic States of Nuclear Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Umberto; Baldo, Marcello; Burgio, Fiorella; Schulze, Hans-Josef

    2008-02-01

    pt. A. Theory of nuclear matter EOS and symmetry energy. Constraining the nuclear equation of state from astrophysics and heavy ion reactions / C. Fuchs. In-medium hadronic interactions and the nuclear equation of state / F. Sammarruca. EOS and single-particle properties of isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter within the Brueckner theory / W. Zuo, U. Lombardo & H.-J. Schulze. Thermodynamics of correlated nuclear matter / A. Polls ... [et al.]. The validity of the LOCV formalism and neutron star properties / H. R. Moshfegh ... [et al.]. Ferromagnetic instabilities of neutron matter: microscopic versus phenomenological approaches / I. Vidaã. Sigma meson and nuclear matter saturation / A. B. Santra & U. Lombardo. Ramifications of the nuclear symmetry energy for neutron stars, nuclei and heavy-ion collisions / A. W. Steiner, B.-A. Li & M. Prakash. The symmetry energy in nuclei and nuclear matter / A. E. L. Dieperink. Probing the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities / M. Di Toro et al. Investigation of low-density symmetry energy via nucleon and fragment observables / H. H. Wolter et al. Instability against cluster formation in nuclear and compact-star matter / C. Ducoin ... [et al.]. Microscopic optical potentials of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering / Z.-Y. Ma, J. Rong & Y.-Q. Ma -- pt. B. The neutron star crust: structure, formation and dynamics. Neutron star crust beyond the Wigner-Seitz approximation / N. Chamel. The inner crust of a neutron star within the Wigner-Seitz method with pairing: from drip point to the bottom / E. E. Saperstein, M. Baldo & S. V. Tolokonnikov. Nuclear superfluidity and thermal properties of neutron stars / N. Sandulescu. Collective excitations: from exotic nuclei to the crust of neutron stars / E. Khan, M. Grasso & J. Margueron. Monte Carlo simulation of the nuclear medium: fermi gases, nuclei and the role of Pauli potentials / M. A. Pérez-García. Low-density instabilities in relativistic hadronic models / C. Provid

  4. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-11-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms.

  5. Exotic Plant Invasion Risk in the Western United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This model was constructed to model the risk of invasion by exotic plant species. Roads may directly influence exotic plant dispersal via disturbance during road...

  6. [Microbiological conservation medicine and exotic pets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassl, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The keeping and the breeding of exotic pets in privacy is a hobby with increasing popularity in industrialised countries. The growing demand for animals usually imported from the tropics, the growing demand for unprofessionally bred feeder organisms, and the increasing number of cases of faulty caring behaviour lead to the creation of new infectiological niches in the interface between exotic pet--nurse--feed--vivarium. These niches are filled preferably by ubiquitous, facultative pathogenic, stress- and age-deduced opportunists with a broad host spectrum. On the one hand these extraordinary germ faunas, relating to their compositions, may generate broad relevance in human medicine, lead to bizarre clinical pictures in specific cases, and may contribute to a reduction of the mean span of life of exotic pets kept in human care. On the other hand the quantitative composition of the fauna may also be a direct measure of the degree of stress the pets are suffering in captivity. Thus, a professional designation of the germ fauna of an exotic pet may contribute to an optimisation of the captivity conditions.

  7. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P.G. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  8. Results from searches for exotic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will review the current state of experimental searches for "exotic" physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. The talk will cover a wide range of searches from ATLAS and CMS, in a (hopefully) jargon free pedagogical fashion, showing the big picture of the field at this time.

  9. A New Era of Exotic Electromagnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 2. A New Era of Exotic Electromagnetism. K Porsezian Ancemma Joseph. General Article Volume 17 Issue 2 February 2012 pp 163-176. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. EXOTIC PLANTATIONS IN BELETE FOREST[1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. The potential for regeneration of native woody species in exotic plantation stands and in the adjacent natural forest in Belete forest was studied. The objective of the study was to assess the diversity and density of the naturally regenerated woody species in plantations at Belete forest. Vegetation assessment within ...

  11. Biodiversity and the exotic species threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter S. White

    1998-01-01

    Exotic species invasions, called by one conservation biologist the "least reversible" of all human impacts, cause harm to economies (e.g., fisheries, wildlife populations, tourism), the environment (e.g., in the form of broadcast of pesticides and herbicides), human health and wellbeing (e.g., allergic responses and the increase in fire severity in some...

  12. Eye Removal Surgeries in Exotic Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Kathryn A; McKinnon, Jo-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article covers considerations and techniques of eye removal surgeries in exotic pets. After issues including surgical indications, anesthesia, patient preparation, and instrumentation are explored, surgical techniques are described. Enucleation/exenteration and modified evisceration are discussed, with species-specific nuances of small mammals, birds, reptiles, snakes, amphibians, and fish highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Proceeding for the conference plenary talk at HEPMAD16, Madagascar on the topic of "Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS" (ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2016-807 https://cds.cern.ch/record/2225222) Deadline: 16/12/2016 (could be postponed for some days later upon request as recently suggested by the conference organizer)

  14. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry O. Britton

    1998-01-01

    Invasive exotic pest plants, diseases, and insects, have had a dramatic impact on the health and composition of the Eastern forests for many decades. Chestnut blight was discovered in the United States in 1904. Since then, it has virtually destroyed the chestnut population, which once occupied 25 percent of the eastern forest. In the 1860's, the gypsy moth was...

  15. Concurrent invaders--four exotic species of Monogenea now established on exotic freshwater fishes in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, A D; Ernst, I

    1998-11-01

    Four species of exotic monogeneans are reported from five species of exotic freshwater fish in Australia: Gytrodactylus bullatarudis from Poecilia reticulata and Xiphophorus helleri in Queensland; Gyrodactylus macracanthus from Misgurnus anguillicaudatus in the Australian Capital Territory; Dactylogyrus extensus from Cyprinus carpio in the Australian Capital Territory; and Dactylogyrus anchoratus from Carassius auratus in the Australian Capital Territory. This is the first published record of described species of monogeneans of the genus Dactylogyrus or Gyrodactylus from Australia and the first report of parasites of M. anguillicaudatus in Australia. The establishment of exotic monogenean populations on Australian native fishes via host-switching is considered less likely than for other parasitic groups due to the generally high host-specificity of monogeneans, combined with the phylogenetic dissimilarity of native and exotic fishes. Similar establishments have occurred elsewhere, however, and the risk of these events increases with each new fish species introduction.

  16. Design of the gas cell for the IGISOL facility at ELI-NP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, P., E-mail: paul.constantin@eli-np.ro [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Balabanski, D.L. [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Anh, L.T. [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Graduate University of Science and Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Cuong, P.V. [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Mei, B. [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania)

    2017-04-15

    One of the experimental programs that will be carried out at the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility is the production of exotic neutron-rich ion beams in an IGISOL facility via photofission in a stack of actinide targets placed at the center of a cell filled with He gas. Simulations with the Geant4 toolkit were done for the optimization of the target configuration that maximizes the rate of released photofission fragments. The cell geometry is established based on the stopping properties of these fragments. Studies, based on simulations with Geant4 and SIMION 8.1, of the space charge effect and its induced electric field in the gas cell are presented. Estimates of the extraction time and efficiency of the photofission fragments are derived.

  17. Estimate of the intensities of the radioactive nuclides produced at the super-FRS at the future GSI facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricciardi, M.V.

    2004-11-01

    The principal goal of the new facility is the construction of a worldwide unique and technically innovative accelerator system that will provide an extensive range of particle beams. Proton and antiproton beams will be available and ion beams of all chemical elements up to uranium will be produced with world-record intensities. The main employ of the high-intensity ion beams is the production of energetic beams of short-lived (radioactive) nuclei, in the following referred to as exotic or Rare Isotope Beams (RIBs). RIBs are produced in nuclear reactions experienced by the primary beams of stable particles. We report on the study of the production of radioactive nuclides and of their propagation through the Super-FRS. The study was performed by means of a nuclear-reaction Monte-Carlo code, ABRABLA, opportunely implemented for the above-described purpose. This work offers an overview of the radioactivity production in the Super-FRS area; the latter is the required starting knowledge for the design of the shielding structure. (orig.)

  18. Exotic plant invasions in tropical forests: Patterns and hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Denslow; S.J. DeWalt

    2008-01-01

    In the tropics, exotic plants have been widely introduced for industrial timber, for land reclamation and forage crops, and as ornamentals. In spite of the apparent opportunity for naturalization and spread, invasive exotic plants are scarce in many continental tropical forests. We examine several conditions under which exotic species do pose substantial threats to...

  19. Exotic Forest Insect Pests and Their Impact on Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack

    2003-01-01

    More than 4500 exotic organisms are now established in the United States, of which over 400 are insects that feed on trees and shrubs. While most exotic insects cause little or no damage, a few have become serious pests and have greatly altered native forest ecosystems. Three of the most recently introduced exotic forest pests are the pine shoot beetle, the Asian...

  20. Bounds on charged lepton mixing with exotic charged leptons Ф

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EL. 0-. R = 0-. OR. 0-. ER. (2) in which subscripts 'O' and 'E' stand for ordinary and exotic leptons respectively. Here we classify all charged leptons as either ordinary or exotic according to their ... EL is a column vector of СL exotic fields. ..... universal reduction of the strength of the normal neutral current, due to mixing.

  1. ISOLTRAP mass measurements of exotic nuclides at $\\delta$m/m=10$^{-8}$

    CERN Document Server

    Blaum, K.; Beck, D.; Bollen, G.; Delahaye, P.; George, S.; Guénaut, C.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lunney, D.; Mukherjee, M.; Schwarz, S.; Schweikhard, L.; Yazidjian, C.

    2005-01-01

    The ISOLTRAP experiment at the ISOLDE facility at CERN is a Penning trap mass spectrometer for on-line mass measurements on short-lived radionuclides. It allows the determination of atomic masses of exotic nuclides with a relative uncertainty of only 10$^{-8}$. The results provide important information for, for example, weak interaction studies and nuclear models. Recent ISOLTRAP investigations and applications of high-precision mass measurements are discussed.

  2. RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory project – Present status and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    able at the RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory project are introduced and discussed by demonstrating recent highlights. Special emphasis is given to the present status and future plans of new devices. Keywords. Spectroscopy on exotic nuclei; fast radioactive beam techniques. PACS Nos 21.10.-k; 23.20.-g; 25.60.

  3. Future prospects for secondary-beam production

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, K H; Enqvist, T; Junghans, A R; Rejmund, F; Ricciardi, M V

    2002-01-01

    This contribution discusses the characteristics of different types of nuclear reactions and the influence of the beam energy in view of future prospects for secondary-beam production. First, electronic interactions in the target are considered because they define the usable target thickness. Rather high beam energies are advantageous. Secondly, the nuclear-reaction aspects are discussed. Three reaction mechanisms provide the most promising prospects for the production of secondary beams. Fusion is best suited for the production of nuclei near the proton drip line and for the heaviest elements. Fission specifically populates mid-mass neutron-rich isotopes. Fragmentation and spallation reactions represent rather universal production mechanisms for both neutron-deficient and neutron-rich exotic nuclei, since the fluctuations in the N-over-Z ratio are very important. Due to these large fluctuations, this is the most promising reaction mechanism to reach extremely exotic nuclei over the whole mass range, if suffic...

  4. Tandem Van de Graaff facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Completed in 1970, the Tandem Van de Graaff facility was for many years the world's largest electrostatic accelerator facility. It can provide researchers with beams...

  5. Theoretical study on production cross sections of exotic actinide nuclei in multinucleon transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Long

    2017-12-01

    Within the dinuclear system (DNS) model, the multinucleon transfer reactions 129,136Xe + 248Cm, 112Sn + 238U, and 144Xe + 248Cm are investigated. The production cross sections of primary fragments are calculated with the DNS model. By using a statistical model, we investigate the influence of charged particle evaporation channels on production cross sections of exotic nuclei. It is found that for excited neutron-deficient nuclei the charged particle evaporation competes with neutron emission and plays an important role in the cooling process. The production cross sections of several exotic actinide nuclei are predicted in the reactions 112Sn + 238U and 136,144Xe + 248Cm. Considering the beam intensities, the collisions of 136,144Xe projectiles with a 248Cm target for producing neutron-rich nuclei with Z=92‑96 are investigated. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11605296) and Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (2016A030310208)

  6. Nuclei far from stability using exotic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmy, J B; Brown, R E; Flynn, E R; Thomas, K E; Van der Plicht, J

    1981-01-01

    The meson factories have made possible high fluence medium energy proton beams that can be used for spallation reactions to produce macro quantities of unstable isotopes. Targets of over 10 g/cm/sup 2/ can be exposed to total fluence approaching 1 A-hour resulting in spallation yields in the 0.01-10 mg range for many isotopes of potential interest for nuclear structure studies. With the use of hot cell facilities, chemical processing can isolate the desired material and this coupled with subsequent isotope separation can result in usable quantities of material for nuclear target application. With offstable isotopes as target materials, conventional nuclear spectroscopy techniques can be employed to study nuclei far from stability. The irradiation and processing requirements for such an operation, along with the isotope production possibilities, are discussed. Also presented are initial experiments using a /sup 148/Gd (t/sub 1/2/=75a) target to perform the (p, t) reaction to establish levels in the proposed do...

  7. Optimization of the irradiation beam in the BNCT research facility at IEA-R1 reactor; Otimizacao do feixe de irradiacao na instalacao para estudos em BNCT junto ao reator IEA-R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Vinicius Alexandre de

    2014-07-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapeutic technique for the treatment of some types of cancer whose useful energy comes from a nuclear reaction that occurs when thermal neutron impinges upon a Boron-10 atom. In Brazil there is a research facility built along the beam hole number 3 of the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN, which was designed to perform BNCT research experiments. For a good performance of the technique, the irradiation beam should be mostly composed of thermal neutrons with a minimum as possible gamma and above thermal neutron components. This work aims to monitor and evaluate the irradiation beam on the sample irradiation position through the use of activation detectors (activation foils) and also to propose, through simulation using the radiation transport code, MCNP, new sets of moderators and filters which shall deliver better irradiation fields at the irradiation sample position In this work, a simulation methodology, based on a MCNP card, known as wwg (weight window generation) was studied, and the neutron energy spectrum has been experimentally discriminated at 5 energy ranges by using a new set o activation foils. It also has been concluded that the BNCT research facility has the required thermal neutron flux to perform studies in the area and it has a great potential for improvement for tailoring the irradiation field. (author)

  8. Kulit ikan kakap tersamak: Exotic dan prospektif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Kasmudjiastuti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kakap fish skins are waste products of fillet industry. Up to now they have been wasted, of course accumulatively will cause environmental pollution. They are classified as the type of non conventional leather and exotic ones for the reasons of having special, beautiful, unique, typical, and attractive grain. Kakap fish skin have relatively small dimentions, there fore the tanning process can be done by home industry because simple equipments are possible to be used to process the fish skins into leather. In addition, Kakap fish leather have physical property of good tensile strength that may be used as material for leather goods. Although small however the exotic leather of kakap fish skins are prospective to be developed as material to manufacture exclusive leather goods, especially for niche markets. They also can be used as an alternative to substitute conventional leather.

  9. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as "wormholes" and "warp drives". However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg-Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions isinvestigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energyfluctuations, cosmological scalar (i.e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  10. Search for the exotic states at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    We review recent results on charmonium-like exotic states from the Belle experiment. The two-photon process $\\gamma \\gamma \\to \\phi \\jpsi$ is measured to search for Y(4140). No signal for the $Y(4140) \\to \\phi \\jpsi$ is observed. But a narrow peak with a significance of 3.2$\\sigma$ deviations including systematic uncertainty is observed at 4350.6 MeV/$c^2$ that we named X(4350). We also search for charmonium-like states, including X(3872), Y(4140), X(3915) and X(4350), in $\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\Upsilon(2S)$ radiative decays. No significant signal of any charmonium-like state is observed. The processes $\\gamma \\gamma \\to VV$ ($V=\\omega$ or $\\phi$) are also measured to search for the possible exotic states in low mass region. There are clear resonant structures in all the decay modes.

  11. Search for exotic phenomena at the CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazana Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signs of physics beyond the Standard Model are widely searched for in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. We review results of exotic physics searches based on 20 fb−1 of data collected in 2012 by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. Selected benchmark analyses are presented, including searches in topologies with leptons, photons and jets, as well as a description of techniques to identify the production of exotic objects such as massive long-lived charged particles. No statistically-significant excess of events is observed in the data, therefore results are presented in terms of exclusion limits on the mass and the production cross section of hypothetical particles.

  12. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  13. Exotic rotational correlations in quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig

    2017-05-01

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  14. Commissioned article: management of exotic snakebites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, D A

    2009-09-01

    Exotic (foreign or non-native) snakes, including venomous species, are becoming increasingly popular pets in Western countries. Some of them are kept illegally (as defined by the UK Dangerous Wild Animals Act of 1976). There is a large international market for such animals, with contraventions of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). In the UK, several other European countries and the USA the reported numbers of bites by venomous exotic snakes, although small, are increasing but still underestimate the occurrence of these occasionally fatal events because of the victims' reluctance to seek medical care. Victims are predominantly young men who have been drinking alcohol. Bites may be intentionally provoked. In Europe, the species most often involved are cobras, green mambas, American pit vipers particularly rattlesnakes, African adders, vipers and Asian green pit vipers. To illustrate the special problems involved, case histories are presented of bites by exotic species in the UK and of bites abroad, where patients were repatriated for treatment. In view of the relative rarity and diversity of these cases, expert advice must usually be sought. These requests should include information about the species thought to have been responsible and the history and timing of the evolution of envenoming. Sources of advice and antivenom are discussed together with recommendations for appropriate first aid and emergency treatment while this is being awaited. Respiratory and cardiovascular resuscitation may be required and when systemic or severe local envenoming develops, specific (equine or ovine) antivenom is indicated.

  15. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine; Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  16. Nuclear structure of weakly bound radioactive nuclei through elastic and and inelastic scattering on proton. Impacts of the couplings induced by these exotic nuclei on direct reactions; Structure de noyaux radioactifs faiblement lies par diffusions elastiques et inelastiques sur proton. Effets des couplages induits par ces noyaux exotiques sur les reactions directes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapoux, V

    2005-09-15

    Information on the structure, spectroscopy and target interaction potentials of exotic nuclei can be inferred by interpreting measured data from direct reactions on proton such as elastic or inelastic scattering of proton (p,p') or one-nucleon transfer reaction (p,d). A series of experimental results has been obtained at the GANIL facilities on the setting composed of the MUST telescope array used for the detection of light charged-particles and of CATS beam detectors. This setting aims at measuring reactions on light proton or deuteron targets through reverse kinematics. Particularly, results on C{sup 10}, C{sup 11} and on direct reactions with the He{sup 8} beam of Spiral are presented. The first chapter is dedicated to the description of the most important theories concerning the nucleus. The experimental tools used to probe the nucleus are reported in the second chapter. The third and fourth chapters present the framework that has allowed us to analyse results from (p,p') and (p,d) reactions on weakly bound exotic nuclei. The last chapter is dedicated to the description of future experimental programs. (A.C.)

  17. Prospects of warm dense matter research at HiRadMat facility at CERN using 440 MeV SPS proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Piriz, A R

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of heating of a solid copper cylinder by the 440 GeV proton beam delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. The beam is made of 288 proton bunches while each bunch comprises of 1.15$1011 so that the total number of protons in the beam is about 1.3$1013. The bunch length is 0.5 ns while two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns so that the beam duration is 7.2 ms. Particle intensity distribution in the transverse direction is a Gaussian and the beam can be focused to a spot size with s 1⁄4 0.1 mme1.0 mm. In this paper we present results using two values of s, namely 0.2 mm and 0.5 mm, respectively. The target length is 1.5 m with a radius 1⁄4 5 cm and is facially irradiated by the beam. The energy deposition code FLUKA and the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code BIG2 are employed using a suitable iteration time to simulate the hydrodynamic and the thermodynamic response of the target. The primary purpose of this work was to design fixed target...

  18. Accounting for sampling patterns reverses the relative importance of trade and climate for the global sharing of exotic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen R.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.

    2017-01-01

    AimThe distributions of exotic species reflect patterns of human-mediated dispersal, species climatic tolerances and a suite of other biotic and abiotic factors. The relative importance of each of these factors will shape how the spread of exotic species is affected by ongoing economic globalization and climate change. However, patterns of trade may be correlated with variation in scientific sampling effort globally, potentially confounding studies that do not account for sampling patterns.LocationGlobal.Time periodMuseum records, generally from the 1800s up to 2015.Major taxa studiedPlant species exotic to the United States.MethodsWe used data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) to summarize the number of plant species with exotic occurrences in the United States that also occur in each other country world-wide. We assessed the relative importance of trade and climatic similarity for explaining variation in the number of shared species while evaluating several methods to account for variation in sampling effort among countries.ResultsAccounting for variation in sampling effort reversed the relative importance of trade and climate for explaining numbers of shared species. Trade was strongly correlated with numbers of shared U.S. exotic plants between the United States and other countries before, but not after, accounting for sampling variation among countries. Conversely, accounting for sampling effort strengthened the relationship between climatic similarity and species sharing. Using the number of records as a measure of sampling effort provided a straightforward approach for the analysis of occurrence data, whereas species richness estimators and rarefaction were less effective at removing sampling bias.Main conclusionsOur work provides support for broad-scale climatic limitation on the distributions of exotic species, illustrates the need to account for variation in sampling effort in large biodiversity databases, and highlights the

  19. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  20. Searches for Exotic Transient Signals with a Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel scheme for searching for physics beyond the Standard Model. The idea is based on correlation of time-synchronized readouts of distant ($\\gtrsim$100~km) optical magnetometers. Such an approach limits hard-to-identify local transient noise, providing the system with unique capabilities of identification of global transient events. Careful analysis of the signal can reveal the nature of the events (e.g., its nonmagnetic origin), which opens avenues for new class of exotic-physics searches (searches for global transient exotic spin couplings) and tests of yet unverified theoretical models.

  1. Exotic grasses and feces deposition by an exotic herbivore combine to reduce the relative abundance of native forbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Rebecca J

    2008-11-01

    Increased resource availability can facilitate establishment of exotic plant species, especially when coincident with propagule supply. Following establishment, increased resource availability may also facilitate the spread of exotic plant species if it enhances their competitive abilities relative to native species. Exotic Canada geese (Branta canadensis) introduce both exotic grass seed and nutrients to an endangered plant community on the Gulf Islands of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. I used greenhouse experiments to assess the competitive advantage of the exotic grasses relative to native and exotic forbs in this community and to test the impacts of nutrient addition from goose feces on competitive outcomes. I grew experimental communities varying in their proportion of forbs versus exotic grasses, and added goose feces as a nutrient source. I found that both native and exotic forbs produced significantly more biomass in competition with conspecifics than in competition with the grasses, and that the proportional abundance of two out of three native forbs was lowest in the combined presence of exotic grasses and nutrient addition. In a second experiment, I found that in monoculture all species of forbs and grasses showed equal growth responses to nutrients. The exotic species did not convert additional nutrients into additional biomass at a higher rate, but did germinate earlier and grow larger than the native species regardless of nutrient availability. This suggests that the exotic species may have achieved their competitive advantage partly by pre-empting resources in community mixtures. Small and late-germinating native forbs may be particularly vulnerable to competitive suppression from exotic grasses and forbs and may be at an even greater disadvantage if their competitors are benefiting from early access to additional nutrients. In combination, the input of exotic propagules and additional nutrients by nesting geese may compromise efforts to

  2. PLANS FOR FUTURE MEGAWATT FACILITIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROSER,T.

    2004-10-13

    Proton accelerators producing beam powers of up to 1 MW are presently either operating or under construction and designs for Multi-Megawatt facilities are being developed. High beam power has applications in the production of high intensity secondary beams of neutrons, muons, kaons and neutrinos as well as in nuclear waste transmutation and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors. Each of these applications has additional requirements on beam energy and duty cycle. This paper will review how present designs for future Multi-Megawatt facilities meet these requirements and will also review the experience with present high power facilities.

  3. Environmental effects related to the local absence of exotic fish

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Dorothée; Syväranta, Jari; Figuerola, Jordi; Compin, Arthur; Santoul, Frédéric; Céréghino, Régis

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Given the extent of biological invasions in industrialized countries, our understanding of the determinants of overall patterns of biological invasions could gain most from consideration of why exotic species are absent from some areas, rather than from distribution patterns of exotic species. Fish communities were sampled at 381 sites representing 221 rivers in the Adour-Garonne stream system (116 000 km², SW France). Very few rivers were not colonized by exotic fish ...

  4. Muoproduction of exotic charmonia at COMPASS arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Guskov, A.

    Exotic charmonium-like states have been targeted by various experiments in the last 15 years, but their nature still is unknown. Photo-(muo)production is a new promising instrument to study them. COMPASS, a fixed target experiment at CERN, analyzed the full set of the data collected with a muon beam between 2002 and 2011, covering the range from 7 GeV to 19 GeV in the centre-of-mass energy of the (virtual)photon-nucleon system. Production of the X(3872) state in the reaction $\\mu^+~N \\rightarrow \\mu^+(J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^- )\\pi^{\\pm} N'$ has been observed with a statistical significance of around 5 $\\sigma$. The shape of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ mass distribution from the decay $X(3872)\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ shows disagreement with previous observations. The product of the cross section and the branching fraction of the $X(3872)$ decay into $J/\\psi\\pi\\pi$ is estimated as 71$\\pm$28(stat)$\\pm$39(syst) pb. The results obtained for the production of the $Z_c^{\\pm}(3900)$ are also reported as well as future perspectives...

  5. Unexpected high-energy γ emission from decaying exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gottardo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The N=52 Ga83 β decay was studied at ALTO. The radioactive 83Ga beam was produced through the ISOL photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ-ray emission following β decay. While β-delayed neutron emission has been measured to be 56–85% of the decay path, in this experiment an unexpected high-energy 5–9 MeV γ-ray yield of 16(4% was observed, coming from states several MeVs above the neutron separation threshold. This result is compared with cutting-edge QRPA calculations, which show that when neutrons deeply bound in the core of the nucleus decay into protons via a Gamow–Teller transition, they give rise to a dipolar oscillation of nuclear matter in the nucleus. This leads to large electromagnetic transition probabilities which can compete with neutron emission, thus affecting the β-decay path. This process is enhanced by an excess of neutrons on the nuclear surface and may thus be a common feature for very neutron-rich isotopes, challenging the present understanding of decay properties of exotic nuclei.

  6. QCD Coulomb Gauge Approach to Exotic Hadrons

    OpenAIRE

    Cotanch, Stephen R.; General, Ignacio J.; Wang, Ping

    2006-01-01

    The Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian model is used to calculate masses for selected J^{PC} states consisting of exotic combinations of quarks and gluons: ggg glueballs (oddballs), q bar{q} g hybrid mesons and q bar{q} q bar{q} tetraquark systems. An odderon Regge trajectory is computed for the J^{--} glueballs with intercept much smaller than the pomeron, explaining its nonobservation. The lowest 1^{-+} hybrid meson mass is found to be just above 2.2 GeV while the lightest tetraquark state mass with...

  7. Exotic woody plant invaders of the Transvaal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Henderson

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and abundance o ;f exotic, woody plant invaders were recorded in 60% of the quarter degree squares in the study area. Sixty-one invaders were encountered o f which the most important and aggressive were Acacia dealbaia, Populus spp.,  Melia azedarach, Opuntia ficus-indica, Salix babylonica and  Acacia mearnsii. Invasion patterns are discussed and an attempt is made to correlate distribution with environmental factors. Attention is drawn to the areas of greatest invasion and the areas that are liable to show the greatest expansion in the future.

  8. Simultaneous visualization of hohlraum-wall motion and inner-cone beam transport using mid-Z tracers and thin-wall patches at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Meezan, N.; Johnson, S.; Jones, O.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S.; Nikroo, A.; Jaquez, J.; Bailey, C.; Hardy, M.; Ehrlich, R.; Ralph, J.; Town, R. Pj.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    The shorter drive of the High-density carbon (HDC) ablator design allows us to use Intermediate gas-Fill Hohlraums (IFH, 0.3 0.6 mg/cc). Due to its reduced initial electron density, IFHs have lower backscatter, lower hot-electrons, and do not require CBET for radiation symmetry control. However, reduced tamping by the hohlraum gas allows more expansion of the hohlraum wall and the ablator. Therefore, the beam transport can be affected by the plasma filling of the hohlraum and the drive symmetry can be altered dynamically. We developed a method to visualize the energy deposition of the inner-cone beams by using thin-wall patches on the hohlraum. The inner-cone beams absorbed on the gold wall create 11 keV x-rays which are imaged though the thin-wall patches on the equator of the hohlraum. Clipping and absorption of the inner cone beams in the hohlraum is clearly observed with temporal resolution. Comparison of experimental data and rad-hydro simulation will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Proceedings of the international workshop on hadron facility technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1987-12-01

    The conference included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, accelerator hardware, and experimental facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for 43 papers in the conference proceedings. (LEW)

  10. A Theory of Island Biogeography for Exotic Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kevin C

    2015-10-01

    The theory of island biogeography has played a pivotal role in the way ecologists view communities. However, it does not account for exotic species explicitly, which limits its use as a conservation tool. Here, I present the results of a long-term study of plant communities inhabiting an archipelago of small islands off the coast of New Zealand and derive a modified version of the theory of island biogeography to predict differences in the turnover and diversity of native and exotic species. Empirical results showed that, although species richness of both native and exotic plant species increased with island area, native species consistently outnumbered exotic species. Species turnover increased with species richness in both groups. However, opposite to species-area patterns, turnover increased more rapidly with species richness in exotic species. Empirical results were consistent with the modified version of the theory of island biogeography, which distinguishes exotic species from native species by decoupling extinction rates of exotic species from island area, because they are represented by only small populations at the initial stages of invasion. Overall results illustrate how the theory of island biogeography can be modified to reflect the dynamics of exotic species as they invade archipelagos, expanding its use as a conservation tool.

  11. Quark-antiquark-gluon exotic fields for lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Jeffrey E.

    1984-02-01

    Fields with exotic spin-parity made of a quark, anti-quark and gluon field strength tensor (“hermaphrodites”) are constructed for lattice QCD. Using three- and four-dimensional cubic symmetry, non-exotic contributions are removed as completely as theoretically possible.

  12. Quark-antiquark-gluon exotic fields for lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandula, J.E.

    1984-02-02

    Fields with exotic spin-parity made of a quark, anti-quark and gluon field strength tensor ('hermaphrodites') are constructed for lattice QCD. Using three- and four-dimensional cubic symmetry, non-exotic contributions are removed as completely as theoretically possible.

  13. Preliminary comparison of birds inhabiting exotic Acacia and native ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. In East Africa, studies have found that exotic plantations have negative impacts on birds, causing declines in abundance (Calson 1986, Pomeroy & Dranzoa 1998) and low nesting potential (John & Kabigumila 2007). Further studies on the effects of exotic plantations on birds have shown that the plantations ...

  14. Exotic species patterns and function in urban landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne C. Zipperer

    2003-01-01

    Mack et al. (2000) state "Biotic invaders are species that establish a new range in which they proliferate, spread, and persist to the detriment of the environment." This statement is true for many natural landscapes. In urban landscapes, however, exotic species are critical components of the landscape and enhance its livability. Exotic species provide...

  15. Exotic branes and non-perturbative seven branes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyras, E; Lozano, Y

    2000-01-01

    We construct the effective action of certain exotic branes in the Type Ii theories which are not predicted by their space-time supersymmetry algebras. We analyze in detail the case of the NS-7B brane, S-dual to the D7-brane, and connected by T-duality to other exotic branes in Type IIA: the KK-6A

  16. Invasion of exotic earthworms into ecosystems inhabited by native earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. F. Hendrix; G. H. Baker; M. A. Callaham Jr; G. A. Damoff; Fragoso C.; G. Gonzalez; S. W. James; S. L. Lachnicht; T. Winsome; X. Zou

    2006-01-01

    The most conspicuous biological invasions in terrestrial ecosystems have been by exotic plants, insects and vertebrates. Invasions by exotic earthworms, although not as well studied, may be increasing with global commerce in agriculture, waste management and bioremediation. A number of cases has documented where invasive earthworms have caused significant changes in...

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vol. 57, No. 1. — journal of. July 2001 physics pp. 161–164. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions. SAMIT MANDAL, J GERL, H GEISSEL, K HAUSCHILD. ¿. , M HELLSTR ¨OM, ... large [2,3] to perform a meaningful high spin decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei. At the same time relativistic Coulomb ...

  18. Calcium and Phosphorus Content Of Exotic, Local and Frozen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tissue differences in the content of minerals in chicken muscle. The calcium and phosphorus content of the local chicken places it in a very vintage position to compete favorably with frozen and exotic chicken. Key words: Calcium, Phosphorus, local, exotic and frozen chicken. Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social ...

  19. Exotic galilean symmetry, non-commutativity & the Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Horvathy, P.

    2005-01-01

    The ``exotic'' particle model associated with the two-parameter central extension of the planar Galilei group can be used to derive the ground states of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. Similar equations arise for a semiclassical Bloch electron. Exotic Galilean symmetry is also be shared by Chern-Simons field theory of the Moyal type.

  20. Diseases of Forest Trees: Consequences of Exotic Ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Otrosina

    1998-01-01

    Much attention is now given to risks and impacts of exotic pest introductions in forest ecosystems. This concern is for good reason because, once introduced, an exotic pathogen or insect encounters little resistance in the native plant population and can produce catastrophic losses in relatively short periods of time. Most native fungal pathogens of forest trees have...

  1. Time-of-flight isotope separator for a second-generation ISOL facility

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquot, B

    2003-01-01

    We focus on the study of a low energy and a high resolving power separator dedicated for an exotic isotope accelerator facility. The approach is based on the use of a time-of-flight technique in a long isochronous section. Different ion species are bunched and then separated in time, in an energy-isochronous section. We then transform the time shift in a transverse shift by a chopper in order to eliminate the unwanted ions using slits. A mass-resolving power of R sub M =10,000 seems feasible for low energy, multi-charged or mono-charged beams with a transverse acceptance up to 50 pi mm mrad.

  2. The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) which allowed the first electron beam recombination in order to multiply the RF frequency from 3 GHz up to 15 GHz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210005_11: The CTF3 linac accelerates an electron beam up to 350 MeV. Photo 0210005_1: At the front, the yellow dipole is used for the spectrometer line. At the back, a doublet of blue quadrupole for the matching. Photo 0210005_03: The CTF3 transfer line between the electron linac and the isochronous ring. Photo 0210005_04: One arc of the EPA isochronous ring. Photo 0210005_06: The CTF3 bunching system. The first RF wave guide feeds the Pre-Buncher while the second RF wave guide feeds the Buncher. They provide a bunched electron beam at 4 MeV. The blue magnet is a solenoid around the Buncher. Photo 0210005_07: A LIL accelerating structure used for CTF3. It is 4.5 meters long and provides an energy gain of 45 MeV. One can see 3 quadrupoles around the RF structure.

  3. ANASEN: The array for nuclear astrophysics and structure with exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshchiy, E.; Blackmon, J. C.; Rogachev, G. V.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Baby, L.; Barber, P.; Bardayan, D. W.; Belarge, J.; Caussyn, D.; Johnson, E. D.; Kemper, K.; Kuchera, A. N.; Linhardt, L. E.; Macon, K. T.; Matoš, M.; Rasco, B. S.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2017-10-01

    An active target detector array, ANASEN, has been developed for nuclear reaction studies with rare isotope beams at low energies. It aims at measurements of the excitation functions for proton and α- particle elastic and inelastic scattering and direct measurements of (α, p) reactions with exotic nuclei in inverse kinematics. ANASEN is composed of three types of charged particle detectors. The length of the active area is 340 mm and the total covered area is 1300 cm2 (almost 3 π steradian solid angle coverage) providing high efficiency for experiments with low intensity radioactive beams. A mix of 78 conventional electronics channels (for Proportional Counter and CsI-detectors) and 480 dedicated high-density ASICs electronics channels for the silicon detector are used for readout.

  4. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  5. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13 Section 352.13 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY...

  6. How exotic does an exotic information and education initiative about the impact of non-indigenous species need to be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    William F. Hammond

    1998-01-01

    Providing individuals with effective information, programs, and educational materials about "exotics" or non-indigenous species is generally not a very effective way to get people to act to control, eliminate, and restore damage from exotic species to native ecosystems. Information tends to inform the motivated and educated. Educational research and marketing...

  7. Casimir Energy, Extra Dimensions and Exotic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, R.; Saharian, A.

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next generation of particle accelerators. This adjustment of the size of the higher dimension could serve as a technological mechanism to locally adjust the dark energy density and change the local expansion of spacetime. This idea holds tantalizing possibilities in the context of exotic spacecraft propulsion.

  8. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  9. Microsporidiosis in Vertebrate Companion Exotic Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Vergneau-Grosset

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Veterinarians caring for companion animals may encounter microsporidia in various host species, and diagnosis and treatment of these fungal organisms can be particularly challenging. Fourteen microsporidial species have been reported to infect humans and some of them are zoonotic; however, to date, direct zoonotic transmission is difficult to document versus transit through the digestive tract. In this context, summarizing information available about microsporidiosis of companion exotic animals is relevant due to the proximity of these animals to their owners. Diagnostic modalities and therapeutic challenges are reviewed by taxa. Further studies are needed to better assess risks associated with animal microsporidia for immunosuppressed owners and to improve detection and treatment of infected companion animals.

  10. Shell model calculations for exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Warburton, E.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Wildenthal, B.H. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-02-01

    In this paper we review the progress of the shell-model approach to understanding the properties of light exotic nuclei (A < 40). By shell-model'' we mean the consistent and large-scale application of the classic methods discussed, for example, in the book of de-Shalit and Talmi. Modern calculations incorporate as many of the important configurations as possible and make use of realistic effective interactions for the valence nucleons. Properties such as the nuclear densities depend on the mean-field potential, which is usually separately from the valence interaction. We will discuss results for radii which are based on a standard Hartree-Fock approach with Skyrme-type interactions.

  11. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Guertin, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and non-governmental organization (NGO) partners in the southwest. This project is an ongoing effort to compile and distribute regional data on the occurrence of non-native invasive plants in the southwestern United States. The database represents the known sites (represented by a point location, i.e. site) of non-native invasive plant infestations within Arizona and New Mexico, and adjacent portions of California, Colorado, Nevada and Utah. These data, collected from 1911 to 2006, represent the field observations of various state, federal, tribal and county agencies, along with some specimen data from Herbaria. The SWEMP database comprises a compilation of data submitted through 2006.

  12. Targets and Secondary Beam Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, Etam

    2014-02-01

    Several applications make use of secondary beams of particles generated by the interaction of a primary beam of particles with a target. Spallation neutrons, bremsstrahlung photon-produced neutrons, radioactive ions and neutrinos are available to users at state-of-the-art facilities worldwide. Plans for even higher secondary beam intensities place severe constraints on the design of targets. This article reports on the main targetry challenges and highlights a variety of solutions for targetry and secondary beam extraction. Issues related to target station layout, instrumentation at the beam-target interface, safety and radioprotection are also discussed.

  13. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  14. Ion beam production and study of radioactive isotopes with the laser ion source at ISOLDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosseev, Valentin; Chrysalidis, Katerina; Day Goodacre, Thomas; Marsh, Bruce; Rothe, Sebastian; Seiffert, Christoph; Wendt, Klaus

    2017-08-01

    At ISOLDE the majority of radioactive ion beams are produced using the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS). This ion source is based on resonant excitation of atomic transitions by wavelength tunable laser radiation. Since its installation at the ISOLDE facility in 1994, the RILIS laser setup has been developed into a versatile remotely operated laser system comprising state-of-the-art solid state and dye lasers capable of generating multiple high quality laser beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. A continuous programme of atomic ionization scheme development at CERN and at other laboratories has gradually increased the number of RILIS-ionized elements. At present, isotopes of 40 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized by the ISOLDE RILIS. Studies related to the optimization of the laser-atom interaction environment have yielded new laser ion source types: the laser ion source and trap and the versatile arc discharge and laser ion source. Depending on the specific experimental requirements for beam purity or versatility to switch between different ionization mechanisms, these may offer a favourable alternative to the standard hot metal cavity configuration. In addition to its main purpose of ion beam production, the RILIS is used for laser spectroscopy of radioisotopes. In an ongoing experimental campaign the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of long isotopic chains have been measured by the extremely sensitive in-source laser spectroscopy method. The studies performed in the lead region were focused on nuclear deformation and shape coexistence effects around the closed proton shell Z = 82. The paper describes the functional principles of the RILIS, the current status of the laser system and demonstrated capabilities for the production of different ion beams including the high-resolution studies of short-lived isotopes and other applications of RILIS lasers for ISOLDE experiments. This article belongs to the Focus on

  15. Flue gas cleaning by the electron-beam-process (I): Optimization of removal efficiency and energy consumption at the ITS-facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willibald, U.; Platzer, K.-H.; Wittig, S.

    Electron beam irradiation of flue gases is a method for simultaneous SO 2 and NO x control. The energy requirement for NO removal is determined only by the initial NO concentration and increases linearly with it. In analyzing the total NO x removal efficiency the production of NO 2 and N 2O has to be considered. For the SO 2 removal, the irradiation dose is not the single determining factor. The NH 3 mole ratio, the flue gas temperature and humidity are of predominant importance. The influence of the dose rate on the conversion efficiency has been investigated at the ITS for the first time by altering the irradiation conditions systematically.

  16. Measurements and calculations of air activation in the NuMI neutrino production facility at Fermilab with the 120-GeV proton beam on target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, I. L. [Fermilab; Hylen, J. [Fermilab; Kasper, P. [Fermilab; Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Quinn, M. [Fermilab; Striganov, S. I. [Fermilab; Vaziri, K. [Fermilab

    2017-09-18

    Measurements and calculations of the air activation at a high-energy proton accelerator are described. The quantity of radionuclides released outdoors depends on operation scenarios including details of the air exchange inside the facility. To improve the prediction of the air activation levels, the MARS15 Monte Carlo code radionuclide production model was modified to be used for these studies. Measurements were done to benchmark the new model and verify its use in optimization studies for the new DUNE experiment at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab. The measured production rates for the most important radionuclides – 11C, 13N, 15O and 41Ar – are in a good agreement with those calculated with the improved MARS15 code.

  17. Production of negatively charged radioactive ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Stracener, D. W.; Stora, T.

    2017-08-01

    Beams of short-lived radioactive nuclei are needed for frontier experimental research in nuclear structure, reactions, and astrophysics. Negatively charged radioactive ion beams have unique advantages and allow for the use of a tandem accelerator for post-acceleration, which can provide the highest beam quality and continuously variable energies. Negative ion beams can be obtained with high intensity and some unique beam purification techniques based on differences in electronegativity and chemical reactivity can be used to provide beams with high purity. This article describes the production of negative radioactive ion beams at the former holifield radioactive ion beam facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the CERN ISOLDE facility with emphasis on the development of the negative ion sources employed at these two facilities. ).

  18. Production data from a Leica ZBA31H+ shaped e-beam mask writer located at the Photronics facility, Manchester, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen; Loughran, Dominic; Osborne, Peter; Sixt, Pierre; Doering, Hans-Joachim

    1999-06-01

    The ZBA31H+) is a variable shaped spot, vector scan e- beam lithography system operating at 20 keV. The specified performance is designed to produce reticles to 250 nanometer design rules, and beyond. In November 98 the acceptance results of a newly installed Leica ZBA31H+), at Photonic Manchester, were presented in a paper at the VDE/VDI 15th European Conference on Mask Technology. This paper is a continuation of that work and presents data from a capability study carried out, on 4000 angstrom EBR9 HS31 resist. Analysis of: mean to target, uniformity, X/Y bias, isolated vs. dense linewidths, linearity, and registration performance of the tool is presented, and the effects of re- iterative develop on process capability compared. Theoretically, a shaped beam system has advantages over raster scan in terms of write time and edge definition capabilities. In this paper, comparative write times against an Etec Mebes 4500 system are included. The ZBA31H+) has to write very small polygons in order to image non-axial or non-45 degree features. The resulting effect on image quality and write time is investigated. In order to improve the fidelity of small OPC structures, Leica have investigated alternative writing strategies, and their results to data are presented here.

  19. Japan hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Tokushi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    JHF aims at promoting the variety of research fields using various secondary beams produced by high-intensity proton beams. The accelerator of JHF will be an accelerator complex of a 200 MeV LINAC, a 3 GeV booster proton synchrotron, and a 50 GeV proton synchrotron. The four main experimental facilities of K-Arena, M-Arena, N-Arena, and E-Arena are planed. The outline of the project is presented. (author)

  20. Facile fabrication of flower like self-assembled mesoporous hierarchical microarchitectures of In(OH){sub 3} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: In(OH){sub 3} micro flowers with electron beam sensitive thin petals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arul Prakasam, Balasubramaniam, E-mail: arul7777@yahoo.com [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, School of Engineering Science, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130, Mikkeli (Finland); Lahtinen, Manu; Peuronen, Anssi [Department of Chemistry, Laboratories of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014, University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Muruganandham, Manickavachagam [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 19122 (United States); Sillanpää, Mika [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, School of Engineering Science, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130, Mikkeli (Finland)

    2016-12-01

    A template and capping-reagent free facile fabrication method for mesoporous hierarchical microarchitectures of flower-like In(OH){sub 3} particles under benign hydrothermal conditions is reported. Calcination of In(OH){sub 3} to In{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the retention of morphology is also described. Both In(OH){sub 3} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures were analyzed with SEM, EDX, TEM and powder X-ray diffraction. The crystal sizes for In(OH){sub 3} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} were calculated using the Scherrer equation. In In(OH){sub 3} the thin flakes at the periphery of micro flowers were electron beam sensitive. The mechanism of self-assembly process was analyzed as well. - Highlights: • Hydrothermal fabrication In(OH){sub 3} self-assembled porous hierarchical architectures. • Induced dehydration in beam sensitive In(OH){sub 3} micro flowers. • Calcination of In(OH){sub 3} to In{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the retention of flower like morphology. • Phase pure synthesis of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the average crystal size of ∼37 nm.

  1. Clinical approach to dermatologic disease in exotic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Brian S; Roberts, Helen

    2013-09-01

    Skin disease is an extremely common presenting complaint to the exotic animal practitioner. A systematic diagnostic approach is necessary in these cases to achieve a diagnosis and formulate an effective treatment plan. In all exotic species, husbandry plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous disease, so a thorough evaluation of the husbandry is critical for successful management. The clinical approach to skin disease in exotic animal patients is reviewed with specific focus on structure and function of the skin, diagnostic testing, and differential diagnoses for commonly encountered cutaneous diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. About the Absence of Exotics and the Coulomb Branch Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Zotto, Michele; Sen, Ashoke

    2017-11-01

    The absence of exotics is a conjectural property of the spectrum of BPS states of four-dimensional {N=2} supersymmetric QFT's. In this note we revisit the precise statement of this conjecture, and develop a general strategy that, if applicable, entails the absence of exotic BPS states. Our method is based on the Coulomb branch formula and on quiver mutations. In particular, we obtain the absence of exotic BPS states for all pure SYM theories with simple, simply-laced gauge group G, and, as a corollary, of infinitely many other lagrangian {N=2} theories.

  3. Causes of exotic bird establishment across oceanic islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassey, Phillip; Blackburn, Tim M; Duncan, Richard P; Gaston, Kevin J

    2005-10-07

    The probability that exotic species will successfully establish viable populations varies between regions, for reasons that are currently unknown. Here, we use data for exotic bird introductions to 41 oceanic islands and archipelagos around the globe to test five hypotheses for this variation: the effects of introduction effort, competition, predation, human disturbance and habitat diversity (island biogeography). Our analyses demonstrate the primary importance of introduction effort for avian establishment success across regions, in concordance with previous analyses within regions. However, they also reveal a strong negative interaction across regions between establishment success and predation; exotic birds are more likely to fail on islands with species-rich mammalian predator assemblages.

  4. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolata, J.J., E-mail: jkolata@nd.edu [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Howard, A.M. [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Mittig, W. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Ahn, T. [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Becchetti, F.D. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Febbrarro, M. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W.G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Roberts, A. [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Shore, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Torres-Isea, R.O. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-09-11

    The total fusion excitation function for {sup 10}Be+{sup 40}Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) {sup 10}Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  5. First measurement of isoscalar giant resonances in a stored-beam experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zamora

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new technique developed for measuring nuclear reactions at low momentum transfer with stored beams in inverse kinematics was successfully used to study isoscalar giant resonances. The experiment was carried out at the experimental heavy-ion storage ring (ESR at the GSI facility using a stored 58Ni beam at 100 MeV/u and an internal helium gas-jet target. In these measurements, inelastically scattered α-recoils at very forward center-of-mass angles (θcm≤1.5° were detected with a dedicated setup, including ultra-high vacuum compatible detectors. Experimental results indicate a dominant contribution of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance at this very forward angular range. It was found that the monopole contribution exhausts 79−11+12% of the energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR, which agrees with measurements performed in normal kinematics. This opens up the opportunity to investigate the giant resonances in a large domain of unstable and exotic nuclei in the near future. It is a fundamental milestone towards new nuclear reaction studies with stored ion beams.

  6. Target-ion source unit ionization efficiency measurement by method of stable ion beam implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Panteleev, V.N; Fedorov, D.V; Moroz, F.V; Orlov, S.Yu; Volkov, Yu.M

    The ionization efficiency is one of the most important parameters of an on-line used target-ion source system exploited for production of exotic radioactive beams. The ionization efficiency value determination as a characteristic of a target-ion source unit in the stage of its normalizing before on-line use is a very important step in the course of the preparation for an on-line experiment. At the IRIS facility (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina) a reliable and rather precise method of the target-ion source unit ionization efficiency measurement by the method of stable beam implantation has been developed. The method worked out exploits an off-line mass-separator for the implantation of the ion beams of selected stable isotopes of different elements into a tantalum foil placed inside the Faraday cup in the focal plane of the mass-separator. The amount of implanted ions has been measured with a high accuracy by the current integrator connected to the Faraday cup. After the implantation of needed a...

  7. Successful start for new CLIC test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility is being built to study key feasibility issues for a possible future linear collider called CLIC. Commissioning of the first part of the facility began in June 2003 and nominal beam parameters have been achieved already.

  8. Issues and Opportunities in Exotic Hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, R. A.; Cohen, T. D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, J. J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, R. F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; Pennington, M. R.; Peters, K.; Richard, J. M.; Shen, C. P.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Swanson, E. S.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. It is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy (Cohen); the Institute of Modern Physics and Chinese Academy of Sciences under contract Y104160YQ0 and agreement No. 2015-BH-02 (Coito); the U.S. Department of Energy, for grant DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, manages and operates Jefferson Laboratory and DE-SC0006765, Early Career award (Dudek); Fermilab, operated by the Fermi Research Alliance under contract number DEAC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy (Eichten); BMBF, under contract No. 06GI7121, and the DAAD under contract No. 56889822 and by the Helmholtz International Center for FAIR within the LOEWE program of the State of Hesse (Fischer); the German Research Foundation DFG under contract number Collaborative Research Centre CRC-1044 (Gradl); the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq, Grant No. 305894/2009-9 and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP, Grant No. 2013/01907-0 (Krein); U.S. National Science Foundation, under grants PHY-1068286 and PHY-1403891 (Lebed); the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development under grant CNPq/CAPES-208188/2014-2 (Machado); U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-05ER41374

  9. Spin observables in reactions with radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo U, A.; Urrego B, J.P. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with exotic nuclei will provide important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms. We are currently engaged in exploring the use of polarization observables with radioactive ion beams and in the development of a polarized proton cryogenic target. (Author)

  10. RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory project–Present status and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Programs for studying nuclear reactions and structure of exotic nuclei available at the RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory project are introduced and discussed by demonstrating recent highlights. Special emphasis is given to the present status and future plans of new devices.

  11. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  12. Exotic and indigenous problem plants species used, by the Bapedi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    play a significant role in the primary health care needs of socio-economic vulnerable people. Keywords: Bapedi, exotics, indigenous problem plants, sexually transmitted infections. African Health ..... plants for the treatment of oral diseases in.

  13. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Riccioni, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond-Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana-Weyl spinor of O (D , D). Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor-spinor of O (D , D) is determined. This tensor-spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-)duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O (D , D) to GL (D), one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  14. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  15. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Bergshoeff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond–Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana–Weyl spinor of O(D,D. Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor–spinor of O(D,D is determined. This tensor–spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O(D,D to GL(D, one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  16. Searches for rare and exotic Higgs decays with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Prokoshin, Fedor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The HL-LHC will provide the opportunity to search for many rare and exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson. Data-driven techniques and multivariate analyses methods are needed to reach maximum discovery potential. In this talk an overview of the status of exotic searches at 13 TeV collisions is given and prospects for the ultimate reach at the HL-LHC will be made.

  17. Growth performance and nutrient digestibility of exotic turkey broilers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to determine the energy/protein (E/P) ratio of exotic turkeys in the humid tropical environment of Nigeria. In a 16 weeks feeding trial, a total of 144 day-old exotic poults with initial weight of 57g (± 0.4 SE) were randomly assigned to six dietary treatments in a 2×3 factorial design with 24 poults ...

  18. CLIC Drive Beam Phase Stabilisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schulte, Daniel

    The thesis presents phase stability studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and focuses in particular on CLIC Drive Beam longitudinal phase stabilisation. This topic constitutes one of the main feasibility challenges for CLIC construction and is an essential component of the current CLIC stabilisation campaign. The studies are divided into two large interrelated sections: the simulation studies for the CLIC Drive Beam stability, and measurements, data analysis and simulations of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam phase errors. A dedicated software tool has been developed for a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC Drive Beam. It uses realistic RF potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the Drive and Main Beam accelerating structures, complete models of the recombination scheme and compressor chicane as well as of further CLIC Drive Beam modules. The tool has been tested extensively and its functionality has been verified. The phase error propagation at CLIC h...

  19. The mass formula for an exotic BTZ black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Baocheng, E-mail: zhangbc.zhang@yahoo.com

    2016-04-15

    An exotic Bañados–Teitelboim–Zanelli (BTZ) black hole has an angular momentum larger than its mass in three dimension (3D), which suggests the possibility that cosmic censorship could be violated if angular momentum is extracted by the Penrose process. In this paper, we propose a mass formula for the exotic BTZ black hole and show no violation of weak cosmic censorship in the gedanken process above by understanding properly its mass formula. Unlike the other black holes, the total energy of the exotic BTZ black hole is represented by the angular momentum instead of the mass, which supports a basic point of view that the same geometry should be determined by the same energy in 3D general relativity whose equation of motion can be given either by normal 3D Einstein gravity or by exotic 3D Einstein gravity. However, only the mass of the exotic black hole is related to the thermodynamics and other forms of energy are “dumb”, which is consistent with the earlier thermodynamic analysis about exotic black holes.

  20. Systematic investigation of projectile fragmentation using beams of unstable B and C isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, R.; Heinz, A.; Adachi, T.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alcantara-Núñes, J.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Barr, M.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Camaño, M.; Caesar, C.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkäll, J.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespo, R.; Datta, U.; Díaz Fernández, P.; Dillmann, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Estradé, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Freer, M.; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubev, P.; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heine, M.; Henriques, A.; Holl, M.; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, A.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knöbel, R.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Lindberg, S.; Machado, J.; Marganiec, J.; Maroussov, V.; Mostazo, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Petri, M.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Röder, M.; Rossi, D.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Savran, D.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stoica, V.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J. T.; Tengblad, O.; Terashima, S.; Togano, Y.; Uberseder, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, P.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, C.; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, P.; Yakorev, D.; Zhukov, M. V.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.; R3B Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Background: Models describing nuclear fragmentation and fragmentation fission deliver important input for planning nuclear physics experiments and future radioactive ion beam facilities. These models are usually benchmarked against data from stable beam experiments. In the future, two-step fragmentation reactions with exotic nuclei as stepping stones are a promising tool for reaching the most neutron-rich nuclei, creating a need for models to describe also these reactions. Purpose: We want to extend the presently available data on fragmentation reactions towards the light exotic region on the nuclear chart. Furthermore, we want to improve the understanding of projectile fragmentation especially for unstable isotopes. Method: We have measured projectile fragments from 10,12 -18C and B-1510 isotopes colliding with a carbon target. These measurements were all performed within one experiment, which gives rise to a very consistent data set. We compare our data to model calculations. Results: One-proton removal cross sections with different final neutron numbers (1 p x n ) for relativistic 10,12 -18C and B-1510 isotopes impinging on a carbon target. Comparing model calculations to the data, we find that the epax code is not able to describe the data satisfactorily. Using abrabla07 on the other hand, we find that the average excitation energy per abraded nucleon needs to be decreased from 27 MeV to 8.1 MeV. With that decrease abrabla07 describes the data surprisingly well. Conclusions: Extending the available data towards light unstable nuclei with a consistent set of new data has allowed a systematic investigation of the role of the excitation energy induced in projectile fragmentation. Most striking is the apparent mass dependence of the average excitation energy per abraded nucleon. Nevertheless, this parameter, which has been related to final-state interactions, requires further study.

  1. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.M.; Alton, G.D.; Ball, J.B.; Biggerstaff, J.A.; Dowling, D.T.; Erb, K.A.; Haynes, D.L.; Hoglund, D.E.; Hudson, E.D.; Juras, R.C.

    1986-02-15

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility has been in routine operation since July 1982. Beams have been provided using both the tandem accelerator alone and a coupled mode in which the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron is used as an energy booster for tandem beams. The coupled mode has proved to be especially effective and has allowed us to provide a wide range of energetic beams for scheduled experiments. In this report we discuss our operational experience and recent development activities.

  2. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.M.; Alton, G.D.; Ball, J.B.; Biggerstaff, J.A.; Dowling, D.T.; Erb, K.A.; Haynes, D.L.; Hoglund, D.E.; Hudson, E.D.; Juras, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility has been in routine operation since July 1982. Beams have been provided using both the tandem accelerator alone and a coupled mode in which the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron is used as an energy booster for tandem beams. The coupled mode has proved to be especially effective and has allowed us to provide a wide range of energetic beams for scheduled experiments. In this report we discuss our operational experience and recent development activities.

  3. Ticks imported to Europe with exotic reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel

    2015-09-30

    It is known that traded exotic animals carry with them an immense number of associated symbionts, including parasites. Reptiles are no exception. Most of the imported reptiles originate from tropical countries and their possibility to carry potentially dangerous pathogens is high. According to CITES, Europe is currently the main reptile importer in the world. Despite this, there is no review or analysis available for the risk related to the importation of tick-borne diseases with traded reptile to the EU. The main aim of the manuscript is to provide a review on the available literature on ticks introduced to and exchanged between European countries via the live reptile trade. So far, the published reports of ticks imported on reptiles are limited to few European countries: Italy, Poland, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Slovenia and UK. The following species have been reported: Hyalomma aegyptium, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma exornatum, Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma fuscolineatum, Amblyomma latum, Amblyomma quadricavum, Amblyomma marmoreum, Amblyomma nuttalli, Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma sphenodonti, Amblyomma transversale and Amblyomma varanense. The majority of species are of African origin, followed by American and Asian species. All groups of reptiles (chelonians, snakes, lizards, crocodiles, tuataras) were involved. However, it seems that certain groups (i.e. tortoises of genus Testudo, monitor lizards of genus Varanus, snakes of genus Python) are more important as host for imported ticks, but this may be related to higher levels of international trade. Even fewer are the reports of tick-borne pathogens associated with imported reptile ticks. Despite the diversity of tick species reported on imported reptiles, the situations of truly invasive species are atypical and are limited in natural environments to maximum two cases where H. aegyptium was involved. Otherwise, the risk associated with reptile trade for introduction of invasive tick to Europe is low

  4. The ISOLDE facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherall, R.; Andreazza, W.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Dorsival, A.; Focker, G. J.; Gharsa, T. P.; J, Giles T.; Grenard, J.-L.; Locci, F.; Martins, P.; Marzari, S.; Schipper, J.; Shornikov, A.; Stora, T.

    2017-09-01

    The ISOLDE facility has undergone numerous changes over the last 17 years driven by both the physics and technical community with a common goal to improve on beam variety, beam quality and safety. Improvements have been made in civil engineering and operational equipment while continuing developments aim to ensure operations following a potential increase in primary beam intensity and energy. This paper outlines the principal technical changes incurred at ISOLDE by building on a similar publication of the facility upgrades by Kugler (2000 Hyperfine Interact. 129 23–42). It also provides an insight into future perspectives through a brief summary issues addressed in the HIE-ISOLDE design study Catherall et al (2013 Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 317 204–207).

  5. Beam Tests of a Prototype Stripline Beam Position Monitoring System for the Drive Beam of the CLIC Two-beam Module at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, Alfonso; Nappa, Jean-Marc; Vilalte, Sebastien; Wendt, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with LAPP and IFIC, two units of a prototype stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam (DB), and its associated readout electronics have been successfully installed and tested in the Two-Beam-Module (TBM) at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. This paper gives a short overview of the BPM system and presents the performance measured under different Drive Beam configurations.

  6. Beam line design using G4BeamLine

    CERN Document Server

    Dogan, Arda

    2014-01-01

    In Turkey in Ankara TAEK SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility (PAF), there is a cyclotron which produces a focused intense 30 MeV proton beam and sends this beam to four different arms, three of which uses this beam to produce pharmaceutical medicine. The remaining one is spared for R&D purposes and the idea was to use these protons coming out from the fourth arm to use space radiation tests, which cannot be done in Turkey at the moment. However, according to SCC 25100 standards which is for 30 MeV protons, the beam coming out of cyclotron is too intense and focused to use for space radiation tests. Therefore, the main aim of my project is to design a beam line which will defocus the beam and reduce the flux so that the space radiation tests can be done according to the standards of SCC 25100.

  7. Exotic sources of x-rays for iodine K-edge angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.

    1993-08-01

    Digital Subtractive Angiography (DSA) has been performed to image human coronary arteries using wiggler radiation from electron storage rings. The significant medical promise of this procedure motivates the development of smaller and less costly x-ray sources. Several exotic sources are candidates for consideration, using effects such as Cherenkov, channeling, coherent bremsstrahlung, laser backscattering, microundulator, parametric, Smith-Purcell, and transition radiation. In this work we present an analysis of these effects as possible sources of intense x-rays at the iodine K-edge at 33.169 key. The criteria we use are energy, efficiency, flux, optical properties, and technical realizability. For each of the techniques, we find that they suffer either from low flux, a low energy cutoff, target materials heating, too high electron beam energy requirement, optical mismatch to angiography, or a combination of these. We conclude that the foreseeable state-of-the-art favors a compact storage ring design.

  8. Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2013-01-01

    As soon as the first particles emerge from an ion source, the source characteristics need to be determined. The total beam intensity, the transverse particle distributions, the beam divergence and emittance as well as the longitudinal parameters of the beam must be measured. This chapter provides an overview of typical measurement methods and the instruments used, and shows the results obtained.

  9. The ideal neutrino beams

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Mats

    2009-01-01

    The advance in neutrino oscillation physics is driven by the availability of well characterized and high flux neutrino beams. The three present options for the next generation neutrino oscillation facility are super beams, neutrino factories and beta-beams. A super-beam is a very high intensity classical neutrino beam generated by protons impinging on a target where the neutrinos are generated by the secondary particles decaying in a tunnel down streams of the target. In a neutrino factory the neutrinos are generated from muons decaying in a storage ring with long straight sections pointing towards the detectors. In a beta-beam the neutrinos are also originating from decay in a storage ring but the decaying particles are radioactive ions rather than muons. I will in this presentation review the three options and discuss the pros and cons of each. The present joint design effort for a future high intensity neutrino oscillation in Europe within a common EU supported design study, EURONU, will also be presented....

  10. IBC - ION BEAM CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes von Borany

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Ion Beam Center (IBC, various set-ups – electrostatic accelerators, ion implanters, plasma-based ion implantation equipment, low-energy ion tools, an ion microscope etc. – are combined into a unique facility for research and applications using ion beams. Almost all ions from stable chemical nuclides are available in the ion energy range from 10 eV to about 60 MeV. In addition to broad beams, also focused (down to 1 nm and highly-charged (charge state up to 45+ ion beams, or ions extracted from a plasma can be provided. In total, the IBC operates more than 30 dedicated tools or beamline end-stations. The specific expertise of IBC is the modification and analysis of solids by energetic ions aimed to develop novel materials for information technology, electronics or energy systems. In addition, ion beam analysis techniques became of increasing importance for interdisciplinary fields like geochemistry, climate or environmental research and resources technology. Special add-on services offered ensure a successful realization of user experiments. Based on a long-term expertise, specific equipment and common commercial procedures, the IBC is strongly active in the use of ion beam techniques for industrial applications aimed to initiate valuable product innovation.

  11. Non-Native (Exotic Snake Envenomations in the U.S., 2005–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Warrick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-native (exotic snakes are a problematic source of envenomation worldwide. This manuscript describes the current demographics, outcomes and challenges of non-native snakebites in the United States (U.S.. We performed a retrospective case series of the National Poison Data System (NPDS database between 2005 and 2011. There were 258 human exposures involving at least 61 unique exotic venomous species (average = 37 per year; range = 33–40. Males comprised 79% and females 21%. The average age was 33 years with 16% less than 20 years old. 70% of bites occurred in a private residence and 86% were treated at a healthcare facility. 35% of cases received antivenom and 10% were given antibiotics. This study is compared to our previous study (1994–2004 in which there was a substantial coding error rate. Software modifications significantly reduced coding errors. Identification and acquisition of appropriate antivenoms pose a number of logistical difficulties in the management of these envenomations. In the U.S., poison centers have valuable systems and clinical roles in the provision of expert consultation and in the management of these cases.

  12. Beam distribution reconstruction simulation for electron beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong-Chun; Mao, Rui-Shi; Li, Peng; Kang, Xin-Cai; Yin, Yan; Liu, Tong; You, Yao-Yao; Chen, Yu-Cong; Zhao, Tie-Cheng; Xu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Yan-Yu; Yuan, You-Jin

    2017-07-01

    An electron beam probe (EBP) is a detector which makes use of a low-intensity and low-energy electron beam to measure the transverse profile, bunch shape, beam neutralization and beam wake field of an intense beam with small dimensions. While it can be applied to many aspects, we limit our analysis to beam distribution reconstruction. This kind of detector is almost non-interceptive for all of the beam and does not disturb the machine environment. In this paper, we present the theoretical aspects behind this technique for beam distribution measurement and some simulation results of the detector involved. First, a method to obtain a parallel electron beam is introduced and a simulation code is developed. An EBP as a profile monitor for dense beams is then simulated using the fast scan method for various target beam profiles, including KV distribution, waterbag distribution, parabolic distribution, Gaussian distribution and halo distribution. Profile reconstruction from the deflected electron beam trajectory is implemented and compared with the actual profile, and the expected agreement is achieved. Furthermore, as well as fast scan, a slow scan, i.e. step-by-step scan, is considered, which lowers the requirement for hardware, i.e. Radio Frequency deflector. We calculate the three-dimensional electric field of a Gaussian distribution and simulate the electron motion in this field. In addition, a fast scan along the target beam direction and slow scan across the beam are also presented, and can provide a measurement of longitudinal distribution as well as transverse profile simultaneously. As an example, simulation results for the China Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (CADS) and High Intensity Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) are given. Finally, a potential system design for an EBP is described.

  13. On hypercharge flux and exotics in F-theory GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; 10.1007

    2010-01-01

    We study SU(5) Grand Unified Theories within a local framework in F-theory with multiple extra U(1) symmetries arising from a small monodromy group. The use of hypercharge flux for doublet-triplet splitting implies massless exotics in the spectrum that are protected from obtaining a mass by the U(1) symmetries. We find that lifting the exotics by giving vacuum expectation values to some GUT singlets spontaneously breaks all the U(1) symmetries which implies that proton decay operators are induced. If we impose an additional R-parity symmetry by hand we find all the exotics can be lifted while proton decay operators are still forbidden. These models can retain the gauge coupling unification accuracy of the MSSM at 1-loop. For models where the generations are distributed across multiple curves we also present a motivation for the quark-lepton mass splittings at the GUT scale based on a Froggatt-Nielsen approach to flavour.

  14. Use of Radioactive Ion Beams for Biomedical Research 1. in vivo labelling of monoclonal antibodies with radio-lanthanides and $^{225}$Ac

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS330 \\\\ \\\\\\begin{enumerate} \\item The aim of this study was to contribute to developments of new radiopharmaceuticals for tumour diagnosis and therapy. CERN-ISOLDE is the leading facility in the world to provide radioactive ion beams with high selectivity, purity and intensity. Radioisotope production by spallation makes available a complete range of rare earth isotopes having as complete a diversity of types and energy of radiation, of half-life, and of ionic properties as one would wish. The availability of exotic nuclei, e.g. radionuclides of rare earth elements and $^{225}$Ac, opens new possibilities for the development of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy.\\\\ \\\\ \\item Two approaches were followed within the experimental program. The radioactive metal ions are bound either to bio-specific ligands (monoclonal antibodies or peptides) or to unspecific low molecular weight form. The aim of the experimental program is to evaluate relationships between physico-chemical parameters of the tracer m...

  15. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-15

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons {theta}{sup +} and {xi}{sup --}. A narrow resonance identified as the {theta}{sup +} was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK{sup 0}{sub S} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} revealed a narrow resonance in the pK{sup 0}{sub S} invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle {xi}{sup --} the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the {theta}{sup +}. An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} is determined. The search for the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated

  16. Exotic Galilean Symmetry and Non-Commutative Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Horváthy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Some aspects of the ''exotic'' particle, associated with the two-parameter central extension of the planar Galilei group are reviewed. A fundamental property is that it has non-commuting position coordinates. Other and generalized non-commutative models are also discussed. Minimal as well as anomalous coupling to an external electromagnetic field is presented. Supersymmetric extension is also considered. Exotic Galilean symmetry is also found in Moyal field theory. Similar equations arise for a semiclassical Bloch electron, used to explain the anomalous/spin/optical Hall effects.

  17. Annihilation physics of exotic galactic dark matter particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    Various theoretical arguments make exotic heavy neutral weakly interacting fermions, particularly those predicted by supersymmetry theory, attractive candidates for making up the large amount of unseen gravitating mass in galactic halos. Such particles can annihilate with each other, producing secondary particles of cosmic-ray energies, among which are antiprotons, positrons, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. Spectra and fluxes of these annihilation products can be calculated, partly by making use of positron electron collider data and quantum chromodynamic models of particle production derived therefrom. These spectra may provide detectable signatures of exotic particle remnants of the big bang.

  18. One health: zoonoses in the exotic animal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcy J

    2011-09-01

    Zoonoses make up approximately ¾ of today’s emerging infectious diseases; many of these zoonoses come from exotic pets and wildlife. Recent outbreaks in humans associated with nondomestic animals include Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Ebola virus, salmonellosis, and monkeypox. Expanding human populations, increased exotic pet ownership and changes in climate may contribute to increased incidence of zoonoses. Education and preventive medicine practices can be applied by veterinarians and other health professionals to reduce the risk of contracting a zoonotic disease. The health of humans, animals, and the environment must be treated as a whole to prevent the transmission of zoonoses.

  19. JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papenbrock, Thomas

    2014-05-16

    The grant “JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei ” (DOE DE-FG02-06ER41407) ran from 02/01/2006 thru 12/31/2013. JUSTIPEN is a venue for international collaboration between U.S.-based and Japanese scientists who share an interest in theory of rare isotopes. Since its inception JUSTIPEN has supported many visitors, fostered collaborations between physicists in the U.S. and Japan, and enabled them to deepen our understanding of exotic nuclei and their role in cosmos.

  20. SHiP: a new multipurpose beam-dump experiment at the SPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra H.B.

    2016-01-01

    to be constructed beam-dump facility at the CERN SPS. The SHiP Technical Proposal has been submitted to the CERN SPS Committee in April 2015. The 400 GeV/c proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating 2 × 1020 proton on target in five years. A detector located downstream of the target, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below a few GeV/c2. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals, i.e. search for Dark Photons, Light scalars and pseudo-scalars, and Heavy Neutral Leptons (HNL. The sensitivity to HNL will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained. Integrated in SHiP is an Emulsion Cloud Chamber, already used in the OPERA experiment, which will allow to study active neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions. In particular SHiP can distinguish between vτ and v̄τ, and their deep inelastic scattering cross sections will be measured with statistics three orders of magnitude larger than currently available.

  1. The ISOLDE Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST): Towards pure ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Daniel [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Heidelberg (Germany); Blaum, Klaus [University of Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Catheral, Richard; Fedosseev, Valentin; Gottberg, Alexander; Marsh, Bruce; Rossel, Ralf Erik; Rothe, Sebastian; Stora, Thierry [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kron, Tobias; Richter, Sven; Wendt, Klaus [University of Mainz (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The on-line isotope mass separator ISOLDE at CERN is a facility dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams. A high ionization efficiency combined with ultimate isotope selectivity is of utmost importance for all on-line experiments on exotic, short-lived radionuclides with the lowest production rates. The ionization technique that most closely meets this requirement is the element selective Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). Unfortunately, even when the RILIS is used, many rare isotope beams produced at ISOLDE remain contaminated with surface ionized isobars. In order to suppress the surface ions, a radio-frequency quadrupole device known as the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) has been developed at the University of Mainz and at CERN. After the first successful on-line test in 2011, the LIST was further improved in terms of efficiency, selectivity, and reliability through several off-line tests at Mainz University and at ISOLDE/CERN. In September 2012, the first on-line physics experiments to use the LIST took place at ISOLDE. A summary of the LIST technology and the results of the on-line characterization and experiments are given.

  2. SHiP: a new multipurpose beam-dump experiment at the SPS.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)387671

    2016-01-01

    SHiP is an experiment to look for very weakly interacting particles at a new to be constructed beam-dum p facility at the CERN SPS. The SHiP Technical Proposal has been submitted to the CERN SPS Committee in April 2015. The 400 GeV/c proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integ rating $2\\times 10^{20}$ proton on target in five years. A detector located downstream of the target, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below a few GeV/c$^2$. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals, i.e. search for Dark Photons, Light scalars and pseudo-scalars, and Heavy Neutral Leptons (HNL). The sensitivity to HNL will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained...

  3. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-04

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K{sup +} beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  4. Leda Beam Diagnostics Instrumentation Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, D

    2000-01-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  5. Magnetized and Flat Beam Experiment at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Fermilab; Hyun, J. [Sokendai, Tsukuba; Mihalcea, D. [NIU, DeKalb; Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Sen, T. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, C. [Fermilab

    2017-05-22

    A photocathode, immersed in solenoidal magnetic field, can produce canonical-angular-momentum (CAM) dominated or “magnetized” electron beams. Such beams have an application in electron cooling of hadron beams and can also be uncoupled to yield asymmetric-emittance (“flat”) beams. In the present paper we explore the possibilities of the flat beam generation at Fermilab’s Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. We present optimization of the beam flatness and four-dimensional transverse emittance and investigate the mapping and its limitations of the produced eigen-emittances to conventional emittances using a skew-quadrupole channel. Possible application of flat beams at the FAST facility are also discussed.

  6. A tritrophic approach to the preference–performance hypothesis involving an exotic and a native plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuna, T.; Woelke, J.; Hordijk, C.A.; Jansen, J.; van Dam, Nicole M.; Vet, L.E.M.; Harvey, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    [KEYWORDS: Exotic invasive species Volatiles Plant preference–performance Host shift Multitrophic interactions Bunias orientalis] Exotic plants often generate physical and chemical changes in native plant communities where they become established. A major challenge is to understand how novel plants

  7. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  8. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  9. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seabloom, Eric W. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Borer, Elizabeth T. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Buckley, Yvonne [ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072 Australia; Cleland, Elsa E. [Ecology, Behavior & Evolution Section, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093 USA; Davies, Kendi [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Firn, Jennifer [Queensland University of Technology, Biogeosciences, Brisbane Queensland 4000 Australia; Harpole, W. Stanley [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Hautier, Yann [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich Switzerland; Lind, Eric [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; MacDougall, Andrew [Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada; Orrock, John L. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Prober, Suzanne M. [CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Private Bag 5 Wembley WA 6913 Australia; Adler, Peter [Department of Wildland Resources and the Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan UT 84322 USA; Alberti, Juan [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Michael Anderson, T. [Department of Biology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 USA; Bakker, Jonathan D. [School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195-4115 USA; Biederman, Lori A. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Blumenthal, Dana [Rangeland Resources Research Unit, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Fort Collins CO 80526 USA; Brown, Cynthia S. [Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA; Brudvig, Lars A. [Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 USA; Caldeira, Maria [Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon Portugal; Chu, Chengjin [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 China; Crawley, Michael J. [Department of Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Ascot SL5 7PY UK; Daleo, Pedro [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Damschen, Ellen I. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; D' Antonio, Carla M. [Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106 USA; DeCrappeo, Nicole M. [U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Dickman, Chris R. [Desert Ecology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia; Du, Guozhen [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 China; Fay, Philip A. [USDA-ARS Grassland Soil and Water Research Lab, Temple TX 76502 USA; Frater, Paul [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Gruner, Daniel S. [Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 USA; Hagenah, Nicole [School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville Pietermaritzburg 3209 South Africa; Department of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven CT 06520 USA; Hector, Andrew [Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich Switzerland; Helm, Aveliina [Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu Estonia; Hillebrand, Helmut [Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Carl-von-Ossietzky University, Wilhelmshaven Germany; Hofmockel, Kirsten S. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Humphries, Hope C. [INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309-0450 USA; Iribarne, Oscar [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Jin, Virginia L. [USDA-ARS Agroecosystem Management Research Unit, Lincoln NE 68583 USA; Kay, Adam [Biology Department, University of St. Thomas, Saint Paul MN 55105 USA; Kirkman, Kevin P. [School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville Pietermaritzburg 3209 South Africa; Klein, Julia A. [Department Forest, Rangeland & Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523-1472 USA; Knops, Johannes M. H. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln NE 68588 USA; La Pierre, Kimberly J. [Department of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven CT 06520 USA; Ladwig, Laura M. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87103 USA; Lambrinos, John G. [Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Leakey, Andrew D. B. [Department of Plant Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana IL 61801 USA; Li, Qi [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 Qinghai China; Li, Wei [Yunnan Academy of Biodiversity, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming 650224 China; McCulley, Rebecca [Department of Plant & Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY 40546 USA; Melbourne, Brett [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Mitchell, Charles E. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC 27599 USA; Moore, Joslin L. [Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Melbourne, c/o School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Victoria 3010 Australia; Morgan, John [Department of Botany, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086 Victoria Australia; Mortensen, Brent [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; O' Halloran, Lydia R. [Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Pärtel, Meelis [Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu Estonia; Pascual, Jesús [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Pyke, David A. [U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Risch, Anita C. [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, 8903 Birmensdorf Switzerland; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto [ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072 Australia; Sankaran, Mahesh [National Centre for Biological Sciences, GKVK Campus, Bellary Road Bangalore 560065 India; Schuetz, Martin [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, 8903 Birmensdorf Switzerland; Simonsen, Anna [Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5S 3B2 Canada; Smith, Melinda [Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA; Stevens, Carly [Lancaster Environment Center, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ UK; Sullivan, Lauren [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Wardle, Glenda M. [Desert Ecology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M. [Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V6T 1Z4 Canada; Wragg, Peter D. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Wright, Justin [Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Yang, Louie [Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA

    2013-10-16

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  10. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: Is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabloom, Eric; Borer, Elizabeth; Buckley, Yvonne; Cleland, Elsa E.; Davies, Kendi; Firn, Jennifer; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Lind, Eric M.; MacDougall, Andrew; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Adler, Peter; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T. Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Biederman, Lori A.; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S.; Brudvig, Lars A.; Caldeira, Maria; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Crawley, Michael J.; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen Ingman; D'Antonio, Carla M.; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Dickman, Chris R.; Du, Guozhen; Fay, Philip A.; Frater, Paul; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hagenah, Nicole; Hector, Andrew; Helm, Aveliina; Hillebrand, Helmut; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Humphries, Hope C.; Iribarne, Oscar; Jin, Virginia L.; Kay, Adam; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Klein, Julia A.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Ladwig, Laura M.; ,; John, G.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Li, Qi; Li, Wei; McCulley, Rebecca; Melbourne, Brett; ,; Charles, E.; Moore, Joslin L.; Morgan, John; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Pärtel, Meelis; Pascual, Jesús; Pyke, David A.; Risch, Anita C.; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Sankaran, Mahesh; Schuetz, Martin; Simonsen, Anna; Smith, Melinda; Stevens, Carly; Sullivan, Lauren; Wardle, Glenda M.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; Wragg, Peter D.; Wright, Justin; Yang, Louie

    2013-01-01

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  11. Preparing the Small Animal Hospital for Avian and Exotic Animal Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Christina D

    2016-05-01

    Small animal veterinary hospitals will have exotic animal emergencies. Preparing the hospital space, equipment, and staff will provide optimal exotic animal emergency medicine and care. A well-gathered history can be more valuable in exotic pet medicine than most diagnostics. A gentle, well-planned approach, combined with common sense and focused observational skills, is necessary for avian and exotic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Beam Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, E

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '2 Beam Dynamics' with the content: 2 Beam Dynamics 2.1 Linear Transverse Beam Dynamics 2.2 Coupling 2.3 Liouville's Theorem 2.4 Momentum Dependent Transverse Motion 2.5 Longitudinal Motion

  13. Ion beam coolers in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    Cooling techniques for low-energy radioactive ion beams are reviewed together with applications on high-precision measurements of ground state properties of exotic nuclei. The emphasis in the presentation is on cooling, bunching and improving the overall characteristics of ion beams by RFQ-driven buffer gas cooling devices. Application of cooled and bunched beams in collinear laser spectroscopy to extract isotope shifts and hyperfine structure are presented with examples on radioactive Ti, Zr and Hf isotopes. The impact of the new-generation coolers on mass measurements of short-lived nuclei is discussed with examples on precision measurements of masses of super-allowed beta emitters. As a new concept, decay spectroscopy of radioactive ions trapped in a cooler Penning trap is presented.

  14. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grames, Joseph; Higinbotham, Douglas; Montgomery, Hugh

    2010-09-08

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  15. 50 CFR 15.41 - Criteria for including facilities as qualifying for imports. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criteria for including facilities as qualifying for imports. 15.41 Section 15.41 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Qualifying Facilities Breeding Exotic Birds in...

  16. 50 CFR 15.42 - List of foreign qualifying breeding facilities. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false List of foreign qualifying breeding facilities. 15.42 Section 15.42 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Qualifying Facilities Breeding Exotic Birds in...

  17. Physico-chemical properties of topsoil under indigenous and exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated selected physico-chemical properties of topsoil under monoculture plantation of an indigenous tree species - Nauclea diderrichii, and those of four exotic tree species – Theobroma cacao, Gmelina arborea, Pinus caribaea and Tectona grandis, located in Omo Biosphere Reserve, Ogun State, Nigeria.

  18. Climate change induced invasions by native and exotic pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse A. Logan

    2007-01-01

    The importance of effective risk assessment for introduction and establishment of exotic pest species has dramatically increased with an expanded global economy and the accompanying increase in international trade. Concurrently, recent climate warming has resulted in potential invasion of new habitats by native pest species. The time frame of response to changing...

  19. Nigerian Indigenous vs Exotic Hens: the Correlation Factor in Body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic interrelationship within and between strains was assessed using pure Nigerian normal feathered local, pure exotic and their crossbred hens for age and body weight at first lay, egg weight and egg internal quality traits. 100 layers comprising 20 Black Nera, 20 White Leghorn, 20 Normal feathered local chicken, 20 ...

  20. Comparative study of genetic influence on the susceptibility of exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative study of genetic influence on the susceptibility of exotic cockerels, pullets and broilers to infectious bursal disease virus. ... The clinical signs were severe depression, diarrhoea, anorexia, prostration followed by death. Mortality was 92%, 78% and 6% for cockerels, pullets and broilers, respectively, within 3 days ...