WorldWideScience

Sample records for exotic aoudad ammotragus

  1. Prospects for population expansion of the exotic aoudad (Ammotragus lervia; Bovidae) in the Iberian Peninsula: clues from habitat suitability modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassinello, Jorge; Acevedo, Pelayo; Hortal, Joaquín

    2006-01-01

    from the original release location, in Sierra Espuña mountains, and validated using data from another free-ranging population, originated independently in the Alicante province. The habitat suitability model for the purely environmental niche predicts a potential distribution along a SW-NE axis......We studied the geographical distribution and habitat suitability of an introduced ungulate, the aoudad (Ammotragus lervia), that is currently expanding its range in south-eastern Iberian Peninsula. We assessed the niche of the species using Ecological Niche Factor Analysis (ENFA) on (1......) environmental variables (climate and habitat type), and (2) potential aoudad landscape avoidance and human disturbance variables. We compared both niche descriptions to study the impact of human interference on niche selection of the species. ENFA models were calibrated using data on the population expanded...

  2. Effect of shortening the prefreezing equilibration time with glycerol on the quality of chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica), ibex (Capra pyrenaica), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and aoudad (Ammotragus lervia) ejaculates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradiee, J; O'Brien, E; Esteso, M C; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Marcos-Beltrán, J L; Vega, R S; Guillamón, F G; Martínez-Nevado, E; Guerra, R; Santiago-Moreno, J

    2016-08-01

    The present study reports the effect of shortening the prefreezing equilibration time with glycerol on the quality of frozen-thawed ejaculated sperm from four Mediterranean mountain ungulates: Cantabrian chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica), Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and aoudad (Ammotragus lervia). Ejaculated sperm from these species were divided into two aliquots. One was diluted with either a Tris-citric acid-glucose based medium (TCG-glycerol; for chamois and ibex sperm) or a Tris-TES-glucose-based medium (TTG-glycerol; for mouflon and aoudad sperm), and maintained at 5°C for 3h prior to freezing. The other aliquot was diluted with either TCG (chamois and ibex sperm) or TTG (mouflon and aoudad sperm) and maintained at 5°C for 1h before adding glycerol (final concentration 5%). After a 15min equilibration period in the presence of glycerol, the samples were frozen. For the ibex, there was enhanced (P<0.05) sperm viability and acrosome integrity after the 3h as compared with the 15min equilibration time. For the chamois, subjective sperm motility and cell membrane functional integrity were less (P<0.05) following 15min of equilibration. In the mouflon, progressive sperm motility and acrosome integrity was less (P<0.05) when the equilibration time was reduced to 15min. For the aoudad, the majority of sperm variables measured were more desirable after the 3h equilibration time. The freezing-thawing processes reduced the sperm head size in all the species studied; however, the equilibration time further affected the frozen-thawed sperm head variables in a species-dependent fashion. While the equilibration time for chamois sperm might be shortened, this appears not to be the case for all ungulates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The eye of the Barbary sheep or aoudad (Ammotragus lervia: Reference values for selected ophthalmic diagnostic tests, morphologic and biometric observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Fornazari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the normal ocular anatomy and establish reference values for ophthalmic tests in the Barbary sheep or aoudad (Ammotragus lervia. Aoudad eyes are large and laterally positioned in the head with several specialized anatomic features attributed to evolutionary adaptations for grazing. Normal values for commonly used ophthalmic tests were established, Schirmer tear test (STT - 27.22 ± 3.6 mm/min; Predominant ocular surface bacterial microbiota - Staphylococcus sp.; Corneal esthesiometry- 1.3 ± 0.4 cm; Intraocular pressure by rebound tonometry- 19.47 ± 3.9 mmHg; Corneal thickness- 630.07 ± 20.67 μm, B-mode ultrasonography of the globe- axial eye globe length 29.94 ± 0.96 mm, anterior chamber depth 5.03 ± 0.17 mm, lens thickness 9.4 ± 0.33 mm, vitreous chamber depth 14.1 ± 0.53 mm; Corneal diameter- horizontal corneal diameter 25.05 ± 2.18 mm, vertical corneal diameter 17.95 ± 1.68 mm; Horizontal palpebral fissure length- 34.8 ± 3.12 mm. Knowledge of these normal anatomic variations, biometric findings and normal parameters for ocular diagnostic tests may assist veterinary ophthalmologists in the diagnosis of ocular diseases in this and other similar species.

  4. First report of oestrosis in aoudad from southeastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Patricia; Ruiz-de-Ybáñez, Rocío; Martínez-Carrasco, Carlos; Gens, María J; Escribano, Fernando; Sánchez, Antonio; Pérez, Jesús M

    2017-07-01

    In spring 2016, we analyzed the skull of 44 aoudads (Ammotragus lervia) from Sierra Espuña Regional Park (SE Spain) for the presence of oestrid larvae. Oestrus ovis larvae were found in 27.3% of sampled hosts, with a mean intensity of 1.5 ± 6.1 larvae/per parasitized host (range 1-21). To our knowledge, this is the first report of oestrosis affecting this host species.

  5. The eye of the Barbary sheep or aoudad ( Ammotragus lervia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Normal values for commonly used ophthalmic tests were established, Schirmer tear test (STT) - 27.22 ± 3.6 mm/min; Predominant ocular surface bacterial microbiota - Staphylococcus sp.; Corneal esthesiometry- 1.3 ± 0.4 cm; Intraocular pressure by rebound tonometry- 19.47 ± 3.9 mmHg; Corneal thickness- 630.07 ± 20.67 ...

  6. The sequence and phylogenesis of the ?-globin genes of Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia), goat (Capra hircus), European mouflon (Ovis aries musimon) and Cyprus mouflon (Ovis aries ophion).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirastru, Monica; Multineddu, Chiara; Mereu, Paolo; Sannai, Mara; El Sherbini, El Said; Hadjisterkotis, Eleftherios; Nàhlik, Andràs; Franceschi, Paul; Manca, Laura; Masala, Bruno

    2009-09-01

    In order to investigate the polymorphism of ?-globin chain of hemoglobin amongst caprines, the linked (I)? and (II)? globin genes of Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia), goat (Capra hircus), European mouflon (Ovis aries musimon), and Cyprus mouflon (Ovis aries ophion) were completely sequenced, including the 5? and 3? untranslated regions. European and Cyprus mouflons, which do not show polymorphic ? globin chains, had almost identical ? globin genes, whereas Barbary sheep exhibit two different chains encoded by two nonallelic genes. Four different ? genes were observed and sequenced in goat, validating previous observations of the existence of allelic and nonallelic polymorphism. As in other vertebrates, interchromosomal gene conversion appears to be responsible for such polymorphism. Evaluation of nucleotide sequences at the level of molecular evolution of the (I)?-globin gene family in the caprine taxa suggests a closer relationship between the genus Ammotragus and Capra. Molecular clock estimates suggest sheep-mouflon, goat-aoudad, and ancestor-caprine divergences of 2.8, 5.7, and 7.1 MYBP, respectively.

  7. Multiquark exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The question Are Anomalons Multiquark Exotics is discussed. It is concluded that so far there is no convincing experimental evidence for any multiquark exotic bound state nor for any exotic resonance. Except for the delta and S* there are no candidates for bound states and no firm theoretical predictions waiting to be tested. Exotic resonances may exist in the 1.5 to 2.0 GeV region and in the charmed sector, e.g., the charmed-strange exotics. The experimental search for multiquark resonances is still open and active

  8. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backenstoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of exotic atoms are presented. The improved quality of accelerator facilities and experimental techniques leads to a more precise determination of data. This opens new fields in nuclear and particle physics to which exotic atoms may contribute valuable knowledge. (author)

  9. Exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The actual tendencies to study exotic nuclei; applications of exotic nuclei beams in material study and medicine; recent results obtained by GANIL and Berkeley Laboratories of measurements of binding energy and radii of light nuclei; the future experiences to be carry out in several international laboratories and; proposal of studies in Brazil using Pelletron-USP accelerator and the LINAC superconductor accelerator, in construction in the same laboratory, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  10. Concurrent spindle-cell thymoma and thymic cysts in a Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia): case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Ta; Chang, Hui-Wen; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Wang, Fun-In; Chang, Li-Jen; Pang, Victor Fei

    2016-11-01

    An ~21-year-old female Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia) died spontaneously following a lengthy episode of difficulty in walking. An ~6 × 3 × 3 cm, unilocular cystic growth was found in the cranioventral thorax. The fibrotic cystic wall, lined by a single layer of flattened to cuboidal epithelial cells, was invaginated and partially encircled solid masses of fusiform neoplastic cells with multiple intratumoral cystic structures. The fusiform neoplastic cells were intensely positive for cytokeratin (CK) and partially positive for α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, but negative for thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE). The intratumoral cysts were lined by CK-positive but TTF-1- negative, NSE-negative, flattened, cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells, suggestive of cystically dilated medullary duct epithelium-derived structures. Based on the location and histopathologic findings of the growth, concurrent spindle-cell thymoma and thymic cysts was diagnosed. We also discuss the correlation between thymic cysts and thymoma and review the literature of thymomas in ovine and wildlife species. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Exotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, W R

    1980-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, Lassa fever, monkeypox, and Ebola virus diseases of humans have all been recognized since 1967. These are examples of some of the exotic virus diseases which through importation may present a potential public health problem in the United States. Some of these viruses are also highly hazardous to laboratory and medical personnel. This paper is a review of the general characteristics, the epidemiology, and laboratory diagnosis of the exotic viruses which have been described during the last 25 years.

  12. Supplements for exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Colitz, Carmen M H

    2014-09-01

    The use of supplements has become commonplace in an effort to complement traditional therapy and as part of long-term preventive health plans. This article discusses historical and present uses of antioxidants, vitamins, and herbs. By complementing traditional medicine with holistic and alternative nutrition and supplements, the overall health and wellness of exotic pets can be enhanced and balanced. Further research is needed for understanding the strengths and uses of supplements in exotic species. Going back to the animals' origin and roots bring clinicians closer to nature and its healing powers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exotic Higgs searches

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccioni, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Exotic Higgs searches cover a wide range of signatures, thus leading to indications to new physics beyond Standard Model. We report a review on exotic Higgs searches for lepton flavour violating Higgs decays, for "mono-Higgs" searches, for Higgs decays to invisible and for high mass Higgs searches. Both ATLAS and CMS results will be shown, for Run-1 data statistics collected at the energy of $\\sqrt s$ = 7,8 TeV and for the first data collected during Run-2 phase at the energy of $\\sqrt s$ = 13 TeV.

  14. Exotic invasive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Barbara G. Phillips; Laura P. Moser

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997). After habitat loss, the spread of exotic species is...

  15. Light Exotic Mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenio, Paul

    2016-03-01

    tudies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as hybrids, exotics, multi-quarks, and glueballs. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of light quark exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV . Recent Lattice QCD calculations of the light-quark meson spectrum indicate a constituent gluon-like excitation contributing an additional JPC =1+- and mass 1 - 1 . 5 GeV resulting in the lightest hybrid nonets with masses near 2 . 0 GeV . High statistical yields from recent experiments along with new advances in analysis techniques have shed a new light towards the understanding the latest experimental exotic candidates. Recent results from hadro-production and photo-production will be presented followed by an overview of ongoing and future efforts to search for light exotic mesons.

  16. Glueballs, Hybrids and Exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, M. A.; Moreno, G.

    2006-01-01

    We comment on the physics analysis carried out by the Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) group of the Instituto de Fisica of the University of Guanajuato (IFUG), Mexico. In particular, this group has been involved in analysis carried out to search for glueball, hybrid and exotic candidates

  17. Exotic reptile bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, J; Ehrlich, M; Henderson, S O

    1997-09-01

    Reptiles are a growing part of the exotic pet trade, and reptile bites have been considered innocuous in the emergency medicine literature. Two cases are reported of reptile bites, one from a green iguana and the other from a reticulated python. The treatment concerns associated with reptile bites are discussed.

  18. Euroschool on Exotic Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Pfützner, Marek; The Euroschool on Exotic Beams, vol. IV

    2014-01-01

    This is the forth volume in a series of Lecture Notes based on the highly successful Euro Summer School on Exotic Beams. The aim of these notes is to provide a thorough introduction to radioactive ion-beam physics at the level of graduate students and young postdocs starting out in the field. Each volume covers a range of topics from nuclear theory to experiment and applications. Vol I has been published as LNP 651, Vol II has been published as LNP 700, and Vol. III has been published as LNP 764.

  19. Exotic physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, P A

    2006-01-01

    At the LHC, the program of research in particle physics is extremely rich. With the ATLAS detector, besides the SM Higgs search or SUSY mainstream studies, the implications of many other theoretical models are investigated. They range from compositeness of fundamental fermions to extra dimension scenarios through GUT models and include many variants. I shall review some selected typical studies by the ATLAS collaboration on exotic physics beyond the SM, highlighting the discovery prospects and the recent analyses using the latest full detector simulations.

  20. Exotic searches at lep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seager, P.

    2001-01-01

    The search for exotic processes at LEP is presented. The Standard Model Higgs has as yet not been observed. This provides freedom to search for processes beyond the Standard Model and even beyond the minimal version of the supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model. This paper outlines the searches for charged Higgs bosons, fermiophobic Higgs bosons, invisibly decaying Higgs bosons, technicolor, leptoquarks, unstable heavy leptons and excited leptons. The results presented are those from the LEP collaborations using data taken up to a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 202 GeV. (author)

  1. Mass measurements of exotic fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the experiments on exotic nuclei performed at Ganil are discussed. Data on the reaction cross section induced by exotic beams is summarized. A new technique developed to perform mass measurements at Ganil is described. Measurements in the N=20 region are presented. A mass resolution of about 3 x 10 -4 is obtained

  2. Diagnostic imaging of exotic pets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Radiographic, ultrasonographic, and computed tomographic (CT) imaging are important diagnostic modalities in exotic pets. The use of appropriate radiographic equipment, film-screen combinations, and radiographic projections enhances the information obtained from radiographs. Both normal findings and common radiographic abnormalities are discussed. The use of ultrasonography and CT scanning for exotic small mammals and reptiles is described

  3. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  4. Black Holes and Exotic Spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Hoff da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exotic spin structures are non-trivial liftings, of the orthogonal bundle to the spin bundle, on orientable manifolds that admit spin structures according to the celebrated Geroch theorem. Exotic spin structures play a role of paramount importance in different areas of physics, from quantum field theory, in particular at Planck length scales, to gravity, and in cosmological scales. Here, we introduce an in-depth panorama in this field, providing black hole physics as the fount of spacetime exoticness. Black holes are then studied as the generators of a non-trivial topology that also can correspond to some inequivalent spin structure. Moreover, we investigate exotic spinor fields in this context and the way exotic spinor fields branch new physics. We also calculate the tunneling probability of exotic fermions across a Kerr-Sen black hole, showing that the exotic term does affect the tunneling probability, altering the black hole evaporation rate. Finally we show that it complies with the Hawking temperature universal law.

  5. Gravitational lensing by exotic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Hideki

    2017-11-01

    This paper reviews a phenomenological approach to the gravitational lensing by exotic objects such as the Ellis wormhole lens, where the exotic lens objects may follow a non-standard form of the equation of state or may obey a modified gravity theory. A gravitational lens model is proposed in the inverse powers of the distance, such that the Schwarzschild lens and exotic lenses can be described in a unified manner as a one parameter family. As observational implications, the magnification, shear, photo-centroid motion and time delay in this lens model are discussed.

  6. Exotic statistics on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbo, T.D.; March-Russel, J.

    1990-01-01

    We investigate the allowed spectrum of statistics for n identical spinless particles on an arbitrary closed two-manifold M, by using a powerful topological approach to the study of quantum kinematics. On a surface of genus g≥1 statistics other than Bose or Fermi can only be obtained by utilizing multi-component state vectors transforming as an irreducible unitary representation of the fundamental group of the n-particle configuration space. These multi-component (or nonscalar) quantizations allow the possibility of fractional statistics, as well as other exotic, nonfractional statistics some of whose properties we discuss. On an orientable surface of genus g≥0 only anyons with rational statistical parameter θ/π=p/q are allowed, and their number is restricted to be sq-g+1 (selement ofZ). For nonorientable surfaces only θ=0, π are allowed. Finally, we briefly comment on systems of spinning particles and make a comparison with the results for solitons in the O(3)-invariant nonlinear sigma model with space manifold M. (orig.)

  7. Excitations in exotic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, S.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron scattering has played an important role in unravelling the mysteries of superconductivity. Studies of ordinary or conventional superconductors - materials such as aluminium and lead that lose their electrical resistance when cooled below a certain temperature - have focused on vibrations in the lattice structure of the crystal. In these cases magnetic excitations due to the collective motion of electron spins in the crystal are not particularly important and, moreover, are difficult to see. In contrast, magnetic excitations are thought to be important in the newer, exotic or unconventional superconductors such as heavy fermions and cuprates. Two independent groups working at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, and at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in Tokai have recently observed a new magnetic excitation in the superconducting state of the heavy fermion compound uranium-palladium-aluminium, UPd 2 Al 3 , (Phys. Rev. Lett.1998 81 4244; 1998 80 5417). A similar excitation has been observed in yttrium barium copper oxide (YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.93 ), a high-temperature superconductor. The results may hold clues about the nature of certain types of unconventional superconductivity. In this article the author describes these latest results. (UK)

  8. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs

  9. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Half life for the emission of exotic clusters like 8Be, 12C, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si are computed taking Coulomb and proximity potentials as interacting barrier and many of these are found well within the present upper limit of measurement. These results lie very close to those values reported by Shanmugam et ...

  10. Exotic charmonium spectroscopy with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ronchese, P

    2015-01-01

    The latest results of CMS in the area of exotic quarkonium decays will be presented: observation of a peaking structure in $J/\\psi\\Phi$ mass spectrum in the decay $B^\\pm \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Phi K^\\pm$, search for new bottomonium states in $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})\\pi^+\\pi^-$ mass spectrum, measurement of prompt $J/\\psi$ pair production.

  11. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geiger–Nuttall plots were studied for different clusters and are found to be linear. Inclusion of proximity potential will not produce much deviation to linear nature of Geiger–Nuttall plots. It is observed that neutron excess in the parent nuclei slow down the exotic decay process. These findings support the earlier observations ...

  12. Exotic meson studies at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreps Michal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations of several states. Using the pp collisions data collected at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment, we performed studies of the X(3872 decay rate to ψ (2Sγ final state, as well as confirmation the Z(4430+ state.

  13. Logarithmic exotic conformal Galilean algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Malte, E-mail: Malte.henkel@univ-lorraine.fr [Groupe de Physique Statistique, Institut Jean Lamour (CNRS UMR 7198), Université de Lorraine Nancy, B.P. 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Hosseiny, Ali, E-mail: al_hosseiny@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rouhani, Shahin, E-mail: rouhani@ipm.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11165-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Logarithmic representations of the conformal Galilean algebra (CGA) and the Exotic Conformal Galilean algebra (ECGA) are constructed. This can be achieved by non-decomposable representations of the scaling dimensions or the rapidity indices, specific to conformal Galilean algebras. Logarithmic representations of the non-exotic CGA lead to the expected constraints on scaling dimensions and rapidities and also on the logarithmic contributions in the co-variant two-point functions. On the other hand, the ECGA admits several distinct situations which are distinguished by different sets of constraints and distinct scaling forms of the two-point functions. Two distinct realisations for the spatial rotations are identified as well. This is the first concrete example of a reducible, but non-decomposable representation, without logarithmic terms. Such cases had been anticipated before.

  14. Bottomonium, charmonium and exotic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy quarkonia states have been extensively studied in the past decade by B-factories and other experiments, and have provided many surprises that suggest that our understanding of the meson is still incomplete. The recent BaBar and Belle data filled many of the missing seats in the bottomonium table such as η b or h b , while LHC experiments are also contributing, for example in the observation of χ b (3P) state by ATLAS. There are clear signs of exotic states, such as the charged Z b + and Z c + found by Belle, yet puzzling X(3872), and overpopulated Y state series. Recent progress on the bottomonium, charmonium and exotic states is discussed in this review. (author)

  15. Anatomizing Exotic Production of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Felix [Fermilab

    2014-07-10

    We discuss exotic production modes of the Higgs boson and how their phenomenology can be probed in current Higgs analyses. We highlight the importance of differential distributions in disentangling standard production mechanisms from exotic modes. We present two model benchmarks for exotic Higgs production arising from chargino-neutralino production and study their impact on the current Higgs dataset. As a corollary, we emphasize that current Higgs coupling fits do not fully explore the space of new physics deviations possible in Higgs data.

  16. Exotics. Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Lange, Jens Soeren [Giessen Univ. (Germany). II. Physikalisches Inst.; Stone, Sheldon [Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    2017-07-15

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ''exotics''. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c anti c or b anti b pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ''molecules'' similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  17. Exotics. Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Lange, Jens Soeren; Stone, Sheldon

    2017-07-01

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e + e - and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ''exotics''. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c anti c or b anti b pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ''molecules'' similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  18. ATLAS Run II Exotics Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    While Standard Model is in a good shape especially after Higgs boson discovery, there are a lot of questions beyond SM. The ATLAS detector is performing about 50 Exotics searches addressed these questions. This talk is discussing some of them with datasets collected during the 2015-2016 LHC run from 3 fb^-1 to 18 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy . Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  19. Exotic Small Mammals and Bartonella

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    In this podcast, Dr. Nina Marano discusses Bartonella, a bacterial agent that’s prevalent in many species, including cats, dogs, and cattle. Wild animals are normally thought to carry Bartonella, so when animals are caught in the wild for pet trade, the risk that humans can become infected with Bartonella increases. Bartonella is an identified risk associated with ownership of exotic animals and has serious health consequences.  Created: 4/9/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/9/2009.

  20. Experimental evidence for hadroproduction of exotic mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J. M. Bishop; V. A. Bodyagin; B. B. Brabson; D. S. Brown; N. M. Cason; S. U. Chung; R. R. Crittenden; J. P. Cummings; K. Danyo; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J. P. Dowd; A. R. Dzierba; P. Eugenio; J. Gunter; R. W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; E. I. Ivanov; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; R. Lindenbusch; V. Lipaev; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A. I. Ostrovidov; T. K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. R. Rust; D. Ryabchikov; A. H. Sanjari; L. I. Sarycheva; E. Scott; K. K. Seth; N. Shenhav; W. D. Shephard; N. B. Sinev; J. A. Smith; P. T. Smith; D. L. Stienike; T. Sulanke; S. A. Taegar; S. Teige; D. R. Thompson; I. N. Vardanyan; D. P. Weygand; D. White; H. J. Willutzki; J. Wise; M. Witkowski; A. A. Yershov; D. Zhao

    2001-01-01

    New measurements of peripheral meson production are presented. The data confirm the existence of exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c2. The latter state dominates the eta'pi- decay spectrum. The data on eta pi+pi-pi- decay show large strength in several exotic (Jpc = 1- +) waves as well

  1. Experimental evidence for hadroproduction of exotic mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J. M. Bishop; V. A. Bodyagin; B. B. Brabson; D. S. Brown; N. M. Cason; S. U. Chung; R. R. Crittenden; J. P. Cummings; K. Danyo; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J. P. Dowd; A. R. Dzierba; P. Eugenio; J. Gunter; R. W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; E. I. Ivanov; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; R. Lindenbusch; V. Lipaev; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A. I. Ostrovidov; T. K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. R. Rust; D. Ryabchikov; A. H. Sanjari; L. I. Sarycheva; E. Scott; K. K. Seth; N. Shenhav; W. D. Shephard; N. B. Sinev; J. A. Smith; P. T. Smith; D. L. Stienike; T. Sulanke; S. A. Taegar; S. Teige; D. R. Thompson; I. N. Vardanyan; D. P. Weygand; D. White; H. J. Willutzki; J. Wise; M. Witkowski; A. A. Yershov; D. Zhao

    2001-01-01

    New measurements of peripheral meson production are presented. The data confirm the existence of exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c2. The latter state dominates the eta'pi- decay spectrum. The data on eta pi+pi-pi- decay show large strength in several exotic (Jpc = 1- +) waves as well.

  2. Domestic exotics and the perception of invasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Robert Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility of an area to invasion by exotic species is often judged by the fraction of introduced species in the local biota. However, the degree of invasion, particularly in mainland areas, has often been underestimated because of the exclusion of ‘domestic exotics’ (those introduced to internal units from within the national border) in calculations. Because all...

  3. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  4. Exotic RG flows from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Nitti, Francesco; Silva Pimenta, Leandro [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France)

    2017-02-15

    Holographic RG flows are studied in an Einstein-dilaton theory with a general potential. The superpotential formalism is utilized in order to characterize and classify all solutions that are associated with asymptotically AdS space-times. Such solutions correspond to holographic RG flows and are characterized by their holographic β-functions. Novel solutions are found that have exotic properties from a RG point-of view. Some have β-functions that are defined patch-wise and lead to flows where the β-function changes sign without the flow stopping. Others describe flows that end in non-neighboring extrema in field space. Finally others describe regular flows between two minima of the potential and correspond holographically to flows driven by the VEV of an irrelevant operator in the UV CFT. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area.

  6. Litter feedbacks, evolutionary change and exotic plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, M.B.; Kaproth, M.A.; Collins, A.R.; Molofsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    1. Understanding the mechanisms driving exotic plant invasions is important for designing successful invader control strategies. Previous studies have highlighted different invasion mechanisms, including alteration of nutrient cycles through plant–soil feedback and evolutionary change toward more

  7. Trends in exotic-atom research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Horvath, D.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt was made to analyze the trends in the development of exotic-atom research on the basis of a recently compiled bibliography. The analysis of nearly 4000 publications demonstrated that: (1) exotic atoms are nuclear probes used in every field of physics, from the test of quantum electrodynamics (QED) to chemical physics, to materials sciences; (2) the role of nuclear and atomic physics in exotic atom research is decreasing (although it is still significant), while that of materials sciences and chemial physics is exponentially increasing; and (3) prior to 1980 most investigators were mainly interested in atoms with negative muons, while during the last few years the positive muon (μSR) studies have dominated exotic atom research

  8. Everyday and Exotic Foodborne Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn B Lee

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyday foodborne parasites, which are endemic in Canada, include the protozoans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. However, these parasites are most frequently acquired through unfiltered drinking water, homosexual activity or close personal contact such as in daycare centres and occasionally via a food vehicle. It is likely that many foodborne outbreaks from these protozoa go undetected. Transmission of helminth infections, such as tapeworms, is rare in Canada because of effective sewage treatment. However, a common foodborne parasite of significance is Toxoplasma gondii. Although infection can be acquired from accidental ingestion of oocysts from cat feces, infection can also result from consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat, such as pork or lamb. Congenital transmission poses an immense financial burden, costing Canada an estimated $240 million annually. Also of concern is toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients, which may lead to toxoplasmosis encephalitis, the second most common AIDS-related opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. Exotic parasites (ie, those acquired from abroad or from imported food are of growing concern because more Canadians are travelling and the number of Canada?s trading partners is increasing. Since 1996, over 3000 cases of Cyclospora infection reported in the United States and Canada were epidemiologically associated with importation of Guatemalan raspberries. Unlike toxoplasmosis, where strategies for control largely rest with individual practices, control of cyclosporiasis rests with government policy, which should prohibit the importation of foods at high risk.

  9. Deep electroproduction of exotic hybrid mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluate the leading order amplitude for the deep exclusive electroproduction of an exotic hybrid meson in the Bjorken regime. We show that, contrarily to naive expectation, this amplitude factorizes at the twist 2 level and thus scales like usual meson electroproduction when the virtual photon and the hybrid meson are longitudinally polarized. Exotic hybrid mesons may thus be studied in electroproduction experiments at JLAB, HERA (HERMES) or CERN (Compass)

  10. Meteors, space aliens, and other exotic encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom. Hofacker

    1998-01-01

    Exotics have had a big impact on our environment. If you do not think so, just look at how many people believe that humans would not exist on this planet were it not for exotics. This belief centers on two main theories: (1) that humans could not have evolved were it not for a huge meteor from outer space striking the earth resulting in extinction of the dinasours, the...

  11. Search for exotic physics with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-01-01

    At the LHC, the program of research in particle physics beyond the Standard Model is extremely rich. With the ATLAS detector, besides SUSY mainstream studies, many exotic theoretical models will be investigated. They range from compositeness of fundamental fermions to extra dimension scenarii through GUT models and include many variants. I shall review some selected typical studies by the ATLAS collaboration on exotic physics, highlighting the discovery prospects and the recent analyses using the latest full detector simulations.

  12. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Physics, Auckland Park (South Africa); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  13. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  14. Elastic magnetic form factors of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Tiekuang; Guo Yanqing; Ren Zhongzhou

    2007-01-01

    How to identify the orbital of the valence nucleon(s) of exotic nuclei is an important problem. The elastic magnetic electron scattering is an excellent probe to determine the valence structure of odd-A nuclei. The relativistic mean-field theory has been successfully applied to systematic studies of the elastic charge electron scattering from even-even exotic nuclei. The extension of this method to investigate the elastic magnetic electron scattering from odd-A exotic nuclei is a natural generalization. The experimental form factors of 17 O and 41 Ca are reproduced very well with the help of the spectroscopic factors which are introduced into the relativistic treatment of the magnetic electron scattering for the first time. The emphases are put on the magnetic form factors of 15,17,19 C, 23 O, 17 F, and 49,59 Ca calculated in the relativistic impulse approximation. Great differences have been found in the form factors of the same nucleus with different configurations. Therefore, the elastic magnetic electron scattering can be used to determine the orbital of the last nucleon of odd-A exotic nuclei. Our results can provide references for the electron scattering from exotic nuclei in the near future

  15. Structure and reactions of light exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Yabana, Y.; Lovas, R.G.; Varga, K.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of radioactive beams, light exotic nuclei have come to the focus of a great number of investigations. The most prominent phenomena found are the neutron halos. A fundamental and yet feasible microscopic approach has been developed to the description of light exotic nuclei. A comprehensive and didactically balanced review of the structure and reaction theory of light exotic nuclei is being developed. This general structure theory has been written up. This is followed by a brief review of cluster models, and that paves the way before introducing the multicluster approximation. That is the apt point to clarify the relationship of the microscopic multicluster approach to other microscopic approaches and to macroscopic models. The structure theory part is then completed with a review of calculations for actual cases. (K.A.)

  16. Quasi-exotic open-flavor mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A. [University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Institute of Physics, Graz (Austria)

    2017-06-15

    Meson states with exotic quantum numbers arise naturally in a covariant bound-state framework in QCD. We investigate the consequences of shifting quark masses such that the states are no longer restricted to certain C-parities, but only by J{sup P}. Then, a priori, one can no longer distinguish exotic or conventional states. In order to identify signatures of the different states to look for experimentally, we provide the behavior of masses, leptonic decay constants, and orbital-angular-momentum decomposition of such mesons, as well as the constellations in which they could be found. Most prominently, we consider the case of charged quasi-exotic excitations of the pion. (orig.)

  17. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Flocard, H.; Garcia Borge, M.J.; Nowacki, F.; Rombouts, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Marques, F.M.; Lacroix, D.; Dessagne, P.; Gaeggeler, H.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements

  18. Status of exotic states at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Yeletskikh, Ivan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We review the status of searches and measurements of exotic hadron states at ATLAS. Among them: the search for the beauty partner of X(3872) charmonium state, the measurement of differential cross-section of the prompt and non-prompt production of X(3872) in the J/psi pi pi final states, the search for the structure in the B_s pi invariant mass, reported by D0 experiment, search for exotic states in B-hadron decays: pentaquarks in Lambda_b decays and tetraquarks in B-meson decays. ATLAS results and ongoing analyses perspectives are highlighted together with CMS and LHCb results.

  19. Exotic invasive plants in southeastern forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller

    1998-01-01

    Invasive exotic plants usurp forest productivity, hinder forest-use activities, and limit diversity on millions of acres of forest land in the Southeast Infestations of these plants and their range are constantly expanding, This paper examines the various aspects of the problem. Outlined are the biology, origin, range, uses, and herbicide control for 14 of the most...

  20. Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Proceeding for the conference plenary talk at HEPMAD16, Madagascar on the topic of "Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS" (ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2016-807 https://cds.cern.ch/record/2225222) Deadline: 16/12/2016 (could be postponed for some days later upon request as recently suggested by the conference organizer)

  1. Biodiversity and the exotic species threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter S. White

    1998-01-01

    Exotic species invasions, called by one conservation biologist the "least reversible" of all human impacts, cause harm to economies (e.g., fisheries, wildlife populations, tourism), the environment (e.g., in the form of broadcast of pesticides and herbicides), human health and wellbeing (e.g., allergic responses and the increase in fire severity in some...

  2. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P.G. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  3. Results from searches for exotic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will review the current state of experimental searches for "exotic" physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. The talk will cover a wide range of searches from ATLAS and CMS, in a (hopefully) jargon free pedagogical fashion, showing the big picture of the field at this time.

  4. Recent advances in exotic nuclear beams

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, A C

    2000-01-01

    Not intended to be a review of the field, the present paper is the written version of a talk given at the APAC 1999 conference. It only aims at an outline of the important effort nowadays made for experiments with exotic beams. A comparatively long list of references is given where more complete information can be found. (49 refs).

  5. A New Era of Exotic Electromagnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 2. A New Era of Exotic Electromagnetism. K Porsezian Ancemma Joseph. General Article Volume 17 Issue 2 February 2012 pp 163-176. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Rutz, K.; Reinhard, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  7. Exotic Forest Insect Pests and Their Impact on Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack

    2003-01-01

    More than 4500 exotic organisms are now established in the United States, of which over 400 are insects that feed on trees and shrubs. While most exotic insects cause little or no damage, a few have become serious pests and have greatly altered native forest ecosystems. Three of the most recently introduced exotic forest pests are the pine shoot beetle, the Asian...

  8. Bounds on charged lepton mixing with exotic charged leptons Ф

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comprehensive analysis of the mixing between ordinary fermions with canon- ... EL. 0-. R = 0-. OR. 0-. ER. (2) in which subscripts 'O' and 'E' stand for ordinary and exotic leptons respectively. Here we classify all charged leptons as either ordinary or exotic according to their ... EL is a column vector of СL exotic fields.

  9. Search for exotic phenomena at the CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazana Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signs of physics beyond the Standard Model are widely searched for in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. We review results of exotic physics searches based on 20 fb−1 of data collected in 2012 by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. Selected benchmark analyses are presented, including searches in topologies with leptons, photons and jets, as well as a description of techniques to identify the production of exotic objects such as massive long-lived charged particles. No statistically-significant excess of events is observed in the data, therefore results are presented in terms of exclusion limits on the mass and the production cross section of hypothetical particles.

  10. Exotic particle mass spectrum of the BLMSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Chen, Jian-Bin; Xing, Li-Li

    2018-02-01

    To explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry, a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (SM) is proposed where baryon and lepton numbers are local-gauged (BLMSSM), and exotic superfields are introduced when gauge group is enlarged to SU(3)C ⊗SU(2)L ⊗U(1)Y ⊗U(1)B ⊗U(1)L. Owing to the consistency of the SM prediction and the observation of large hadron collider (LHC), the parameter space that related to the masses of new particles is stringently constrained. By diagonalizing the mass-squared matrices for neutral scalar sectors and the mass-squared matrices for exotic quarks, we obtain the mass of these particles, then present the contour plot of mass varying from different parameters with some assumptions, so the constraints on model parameter can be obtained with different lower limits of particle mass.

  11. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as "wormholes" and "warp drives". However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg-Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions isinvestigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energyfluctuations, cosmological scalar (i.e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  12. Kulit ikan kakap tersamak: Exotic dan prospektif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Kasmudjiastuti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kakap fish skins are waste products of fillet industry. Up to now they have been wasted, of course accumulatively will cause environmental pollution. They are classified as the type of non conventional leather and exotic ones for the reasons of having special, beautiful, unique, typical, and attractive grain. Kakap fish skin have relatively small dimentions, there fore the tanning process can be done by home industry because simple equipments are possible to be used to process the fish skins into leather. In addition, Kakap fish leather have physical property of good tensile strength that may be used as material for leather goods. Although small however the exotic leather of kakap fish skins are prospective to be developed as material to manufacture exclusive leather goods, especially for niche markets. They also can be used as an alternative to substitute conventional leather.

  13. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as “wormholes” and “warp drives”. However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg- Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions is investigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energy fluctuations, cosmological scalar (i. e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  14. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato , Paul; Trassinelli , Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  15. Remarks on the exotic U-meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan Hongmo [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom); Tsou Sheungtsun [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Mathematical Inst.

    1991-12-01

    In expectation of imminent results from the new hyperon beam experiment at CERN concerning the exotic U-meson at 3.1 GeV, we propose a detailed program of experimental tests to check the suggestion that U is a qqq-barq-bar ``M-diquonium`` state. Apart from some very characteristic decay modes, the U is expected to occur together with several analogous states with various quantum numbers to which it is intimately related. (author).

  16. Exotic rotational correlations in quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig

    2017-05-01

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  17. Production and identification of very exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pougheon, F.

    1986-01-01

    New very exotic nuclei have been produced by fragmentation of the projectile at intermediate energy at GANIL. They have been identified through time of flight and ΔE-E measurements after a magnetic separation with the 0 0 LISE spectrometer. New neutron rich isotopes have been identified up to Z = 26 and evidence for the stability of the new series Tz = -5/2 has been shown. These results improve the knowledge of the neutron and proton drip lines

  18. 2d orbifolds with exotic supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florakis, Ioannis; García-Etxebarria, Iñaki; Lüst, Dieter; Regalado, Diego

    2018-02-01

    We analyse various two dimensional theories arising from compactification of type II and heterotic string theory on asymmetric orbifolds. We find extra supersymmetry generators arising from twisted sectors, giving rise to exotic supersymmetry algebras. Among others we discover new cases with a large number of supercharges, such as N=(20,8), N=(24,8), N=(32,0), N=(24,24) and N=(48,0).

  19. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-01-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosi...

  20. Exotic Forms of Silicon for Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, P. Craig

    2015-03-01

    Over the last few decades many exotic forms of carbon, such as carbon-60, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have generated novel scientific discoveries and revolutionized many important applications. Similar potentially transformative breakthroughs may be expected with exotic forms of silicon. Such structures include, but are not necessarily limited to, (1) those formed under high pressure that are metastable at ambient pressure, (2) single layers of Si (silicene), (2) clathrate Si, which has been studied for superconducting and thermoelectric properties but not in any detail for semiconductor applications, (3) nanostructured forms of Si (nanodots and nanowires), including those composed of diamond Si, (4) porous Si, and (5) any other structures that differ in their structural, optical or electronic properties from bulk diamond Si. Silicon is an abundant, non-toxic element around which an advanced technology exists for semiconducting devices based on diamond Si. One of these exotic forms of Si could form the basis for the next revolution in electronics or even opto-electronics, since some forms exhibit direct, or nearly direct, band gaps. Recent results toward producing pure and dopable semiconductors out of Si nanodots imbedded in amorphous matrices and in clathrate Si and clathrate Si-Ge alloys will be discussed. The author acknowledges important collaborations with R. T. Collins, C. A. Koh, L. Krishna, M. Lusk, and P. Stradins. DOE SUNSHOT program, under Contract DE-EE0005326 and by the NSF MRSEC program under Grant DMR-0820518.

  1. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-11-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosis is once again being recognized as a resurgent disease. From 1993 to 1995, there were more than 20,000 laboratory-confirmed human cases of salmonellosis in Canada. The major source of Salmonella infection is food; however, an estimated 3 to 5% of all cases of salmonellosis in humans are associated with exposure to exotic pets. Among the isolates from these patients with salmonellosis, a variety of Salmonella serotypes were also associated with exotic pets and included the following: S. java, S. stanley, S. poona, S. jangwani, S. tilene, S. litchfield, S. manhattan, S. pomona, S. miami, S. rubislaw, S. marina subsp. IV, and S. wassenaar subsp. IV.

  2. Infectious threats from exotic pets: dermatological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ted; Jablon, Jennifer

    2003-04-01

    Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. More than 250 distinct zoonoses have been described in the literature. It is estimated that 56% of United States households contain at least one pet, and although considerable research has been performed regarding the more common household animals including dogs, cats, small birds, and rodents, surprisingly little is known about the zoonotic hazards of owning the more exotic pets. According to the 1997 USPHS/IDSA Report on the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, the immunocompromised patient should avoid contact with feces-laden soil, litter boxes, reptiles, most pet birds, and any animal less than 6 months old . It has also been documented that because of their inquisitive nature, children are at even higher risk for infection from animals than adolescents or immunocompetent adults. In this article the authors have reviewed the available data regarding hazards associated with the hedgehog, flying squirrel, iguana, chinchilla, and cockatoo. With the growing popularity of such exotic pets, further observation and research is warranted. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of zoonotic disease related to exotic pet ownership, and they should address this issue when obtaining a history and formulating a differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions suggestive of such illnesses.

  3. The role of exotic tree species in Nordic forestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Erik Dahl; Lobo, Albin; Myking, Tor

    2014-01-01

    the vegetation and forest history and its implications for the interest in using exotic species. We review to what extent exotic species can contribute to increased economic returns from forest plantings and the potential negative ecological effects associated with introduction of new species. Considering...... the expected climate changes, we discuss whether and how the increased use of exotic species can contribute to sustained and increased health and productivity of Nordic forests without jeopardising ecological and social values....

  4. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-03-01

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ˜ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of the model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. Depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ˜ 2.5TeV at the LHC and beyond 10TeV at a future 100TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.

  5. Discovering uncolored naturalness in exotic Higgs decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2015-12-01

    Solutions to the hierarchy problem usually require top partners. In standard SUSY or composite Higgs theories, the partners carry SM color and are becoming increasingly constrained by LHC searches. However, theories like Folded SUSY (FS), Twin Higgs (TH) and Quirky Little Higgs (QLH) introduce uncolored top partners, which can be SM singlets or carry electroweak charge. Their small production cross section left doubt as to whether the LHC can effectively probe such scenarios. Typically, these partners are charged under their own mirror color gauge group. In FS and QLH, the absence of light mirror matter allows glueballs to form at the bottom of the mirror spectrum. This is also the case in some TH realizations. The Higgs can decay to these mirror glueballs, with the glueballs decaying into SM particles with potentially observable lifetimes. We undertake the first detailed study of this glueball signature and quantitatively demonstrate the discovery potential of uncolored naturalness via exotic Higgs decays at the LHC and a potential future 100TeV collider. Our findings indicate that mirror glueballs are the smoking gun signature of natural FS and QLH type theories, in analogy to tree-level Higgs coupling shifts for the TH. We show that glueball masses in the ˜ 10-60 GeV mass range are theoretically preferred. Careful treatment of lifetime, mirror-hadronization and non-perturbative uncertainties is required to perform meaningful collider studies. We outline several new search strategies for exotic Higgs decays of the form h → XX → 4 f at the LHC, with X having lifetimes in the 10 μm to km range. We find that FS stops can be probed with masses up to 600 (1100) GeV at the LHC with 300 (3000) fb-1 of data, and TH top partners could be accessible with masses up to 900 (1500) GeV. This makes exotic Higgs decays the prime discovery channel for uncolored naturalness at the LHC.

  6. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  7. Hard production of exotic hybrid mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikin, I.; Teryaev, O.V. [Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Pire, B.; Anikin, I. [Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Szymanowski, I. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Liege Univ. (Belgium); Anikin, I.; Wallon, S. [Paris-11 Univ., Lab. de Physique Theorique, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2005-07-01

    Exotic hybrid mesons H, with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} may be copiously produced in the hard exclusive processes {gamma}{sup *}(Q{sup 2}){gamma} {yields} H and {gamma}{sup *}(Q{sup 2})P(p) {yields} HP(p') because they have a leading twist distribution amplitude with a sizable coupling constant f{sub H}, which may be estimated through QCD sum rules. The reaction rates scale in the same way as the corresponding rates for usual mesons. (authors)

  8. QCD Coulomb Gauge Approach to Exotic Hadrons

    OpenAIRE

    Cotanch, Stephen R.; General, Ignacio J.; Wang, Ping

    2006-01-01

    The Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian model is used to calculate masses for selected J^{PC} states consisting of exotic combinations of quarks and gluons: ggg glueballs (oddballs), q bar{q} g hybrid mesons and q bar{q} q bar{q} tetraquark systems. An odderon Regge trajectory is computed for the J^{--} glueballs with intercept much smaller than the pomeron, explaining its nonobservation. The lowest 1^{-+} hybrid meson mass is found to be just above 2.2 GeV while the lightest tetraquark state mass with...

  9. Amplitudes for exotic states at JPAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilloni, Alessandro; JPAC Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the activity of the Joint Physics Analysis Center in building models which satisfy S-matrix principles. In particular, we show some results on the analysis of the ηπ exotic resonances at COMPASS, and we discuss how to extend our formalism to photon beams to be used in the GlueX experiment. We also discuss a model to fit the J / ψp spectrum measured at GlueX, of interest for the search of hidden charm pentaquarks.

  10. Exotic nuclei from a theoretical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Univ. of Warsaw

    1998-01-01

    One of the main frontiers of nuclear structure today is the physics of radioactive nuclear beams. Experiments with radioactive beams will make it possible to look closely into many aspects of the nuclear many-body problem. What makes this subject both exciting and difficult is: (i) the weak binding and corresponding closeness of the particle continuum, implying a large diffuseness of the nuclear surface and extreme spatial dimensions characterizing the outermost nucleons, and (ii) access to the exotic combinations of proton and neutron numbers which offer prospects for completely new structural phenomena

  11. Shell model calculations for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.A.; Wildenthal, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the shell-model approach to understanding the properties of light exotic nuclei is given. Binding energies including p and p-sd model spaces and sd and sd-pf model spaces; cross-shell excitations around 32 Mg, including weak-coupling aspects and mechanisms for lowering the ntw excitations; beta decay properties of neutron-rich sd model, of p-sd and sd-pf model spaces, of proton-rich sd model space; coulomb break-up cross sections are discussed. (G.P.) 76 refs.; 12 figs

  12. Experiments with stored relativistic exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissel, H.; Radon, T.; Attallah, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    Beams of relativistic exotic nuclei were produced, separated and investigated with the combination of the fragment separator FRS and the storage ring ESR. The following experiments are presented: (1) Direct mass measurements of relativistic nickel and bismuth projectile fragments were performed using Schottky spectrometry. Applying electron cooling, the relative velocity spread of the circulating secondary nuclear beams of low intensity was reduced to below 10{sup -6}. The achieved mass resolving power of m/{Delta}m = 6.5 . 10{sup 5} (FWHM) in recent measurements represents an improvement by a factor of two compared to our previous experiments. The previously unknown masses of more than 100 proton-rich isotopes have been measured in the range of 54 {<=} Z {<=} 84. The results are compared with mass models and estimated values based on extrapolations of experimental values. (2) Exotic nuclei with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling can be investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique has been successfully applied in a first measurement with nickel fragments. A mass resolving power of m/{Delta}m = 1.5 . 10{sup 5} (FWHM) was achieved in this mode of operation. (3) Nuclear half-lives of stored and cooled bare projectile fragments have been measured to study the influence of the ionic charge state on the beta-decay probability. (orig.)

  13. Exotic hybrid mesons in hard electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the sizeable cross section for deep exclusive electroproduction of an exotic J PC =1 -+ hybrid meson in the Bjorken regime. The production amplitude scales like the one for usual meson electroproduction, i.e., as 1/Q 2 . This is due to the nonvanishing leading twist distribution amplitude for the hybrid meson, which may be normalized thanks to its relation to the energy-momentum tensor and to the QCD sum rules technique. The hard amplitude is considered up to next-to-leading order in α S and we explore the consequences of fixing the renormalization scale ambiguity through the Brodsky-Lepage-Mackenzie (BLM) procedure. We study the particular case where the hybrid meson decays through a πη meson pair. We discuss the πη generalized distribution amplitude and then calculate the production amplitude for this process. We propose a forward-backward asymmetry in the production of π and η mesons as a signal for the hybrid meson production. We briefly comment on hybrid electroproduction at very high energy, in the diffractive limit where a QCD Odderon exchange mechanism should dominate. The conclusion of our study is that hard electroproduction is a promising way to study exotic hybrid mesons, in particular, at JLAB, HERA (HERMES), or CERN (Compass)

  14. Experiments with stored relativistic exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.; Attallah, F.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Dolinskiy, A.; Eickhoff, H.; Franczak, B.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Hausmann, M.; Hellstroem, M.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kozhuharov, C.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nolden, F.; Quint, W.; Tradon, T.; Reich, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schlitt, B.; Steck, M.; Suemmerer, K.; Vermeeren, L.; Winkler, M.; Winkler, Th.; Falch, M.; Kerscher, Th.; Loebner, K.E.G.; Fujita, Y.; Novikov, Yu.; Patyk, Z.; Stadlmann, J.; Wollnik, H.

    1999-01-01

    Beams of relativistic exotic nuclei were produced, separated and investigated with the combination of the fragment separator FRS and the storage ring ESR. The following experiments are presented: 1) Direct mass measurements of relativistic nickel and bismuth projectile fragments were performed using Schottky spectrometry. Applying electron cooling, the relative velocity spread of the circulating secondary nuclear beams of low intensity was reduced to below 10 -6 . The achieved mass resolving power of m/Δm = 6.5·10 5 (FWHM) in recent measurements represents an improvement by a factor of two compared to authors' previous experiments. The previously unknown masses of more than 100 proton-rich isotopes have been measured in the range of 54≤Z≤84. The results are compared with mass models and estimated values based on extrapolations of experimental values. 2) Exotic nuclei with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling can be investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique has been successfully applied in a first measurement with nickel fragments. A mass resolving power of m/Δm = 1.5·10 5 (FWHM) was achieved in this mode of operation. 3) Nuclear half-lives of stored and cooled bare projectile fragments have been measured to study the influence of the ionic charge state on the beta-decay probability

  15. Exotic aspects of hadronic atoms-anomalous quasi-stabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1993-07-01

    Recently revealed, but hitherto unknown, new aspects of hadronic atoms, namely, anomalous quasi-stabilities of negative hadrons, are discussed. One is on long-lived antiprotonic helium atoms, characterized as 'atomic exotic halo' and the other is on deeply bound pionic atoms, characterized as 'nuclear exotic halo'. (author)

  16. Exotic species patterns and function in urban landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne C. Zipperer

    2003-01-01

    Mack et al. (2000) state "Biotic invaders are species that establish a new range in which they proliferate, spread, and persist to the detriment of the environment." This statement is true for many natural landscapes. In urban landscapes, however, exotic species are critical components of the landscape and enhance its livability. Exotic species provide...

  17. Rapid detection of exotic Lymantriids and Scolytids pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Ellen Dix

    2003-01-01

    Exotic invasive species, inadvertently introduced into North America through importation and travel, are threatening the integrity of North American forest ecosystems. The National Invasive Species Council in their 2001 Strategic Plan identified a collaborative program for early detection, diagnosis and response to high-risk, exotic, invasive insects, pathogens and...

  18. Comparative study of genetic influence on the susceptibility of exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated comparatively the genetic influence on the susceptibility of exotic cockerels, pullets and broilers to natural infection with infectious bursal disease (IBD) virus in a flock of 150 seven-week-old exotic breed of chickens comprising of 50 Black Harco cockerels, 50 Black Harco pullets and 50 White ...

  19. Exotic and indigenous problem plants species used, by the Bapedi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Tel: +27 152683126. Email: Sebuasemenya@gmail.com. Introduction. Exotic species are widespread in South Africa, both in cultivated and communal areas. At least 161 species have been declared as exotics, and cause serious ..... Edeoga HO, Osuagwu GGE, Omosun G,. Mbaebie BO, Osuagwu AN. Pharmaceutical and.

  20. A survey of exotic plants in federal wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marilyn Marler

    2000-01-01

    I conducted a survey of wilderness areas to provide an overview of plant invasions in the National Wilderness Preservation System. Fifteen per cent of responding mangers reported that exotic plants were among their top 10 management concerns, either because they are actively dealing with control of exotic pest plants or have prioritized prevention of their...

  1. Invasion of exotic earthworms into ecosystems inhabited by native earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. F. Hendrix; G. H. Baker; M. A. Callaham Jr; G. A. Damoff; Fragoso C.; G. Gonzalez; S. W. James; S. L. Lachnicht; T. Winsome; X. Zou

    2006-01-01

    The most conspicuous biological invasions in terrestrial ecosystems have been by exotic plants, insects and vertebrates. Invasions by exotic earthworms, although not as well studied, may be increasing with global commerce in agriculture, waste management and bioremediation. A number of cases has documented where invasive earthworms have caused significant changes in...

  2. Production and decay of exotic fermions in high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz Filho, Pedro Pacheco de

    1995-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the production and decay of exotic fermions predicted by some extensions of the standard model. We select for our study the more popular models: vector singlet, vector doublet and Fermion Mirror-Fermion. We want to establish the differences between these models and also in relation to the Standard Model. We make investigations by Monte Carlo simulations, to study the phenomenology of the particles expected in these models, particularly the exotic fermions. These studies were done for electron-proton collisions at DESY HERA energies. We considered the investigation of exotic quark production, electron-positron collisions in LEP II and NLC energies in order to study the production of exotic leptons, and virtual exotic lepton contribution in the specific process e + e - → ιν-bar ι W + . (author)

  3. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13 Section 352.13 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY...

  4. Shell model calculations for exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Warburton, E.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Wildenthal, B.H. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-02-01

    In this paper we review the progress of the shell-model approach to understanding the properties of light exotic nuclei (A < 40). By shell-model'' we mean the consistent and large-scale application of the classic methods discussed, for example, in the book of de-Shalit and Talmi. Modern calculations incorporate as many of the important configurations as possible and make use of realistic effective interactions for the valence nucleons. Properties such as the nuclear densities depend on the mean-field potential, which is usually separately from the valence interaction. We will discuss results for radii which are based on a standard Hartree-Fock approach with Skyrme-type interactions.

  5. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  6. Exotic meson decay widths using lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, M. S.; Fiebig, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    A decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson h, with J PC =1 -+ , is presented for the channel h→πa 1 . This quenched lattice QCD simulation employs Luescher's finite box method. Operators coupling to the h and πa 1 states are used at various levels of smearing and fuzzing, and at four quark masses. Eigenvalues of the corresponding correlation matrices yield energy spectra that determine scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative πa 1 momenta. Although the phase shift data is sparse, fits to a Breit-Wigner model are attempted, resulting in a decay width of about 60 MeV when averaged over two lattice sizes having a lattice spacing of 0.07 fm

  7. Casimir Energy, Extra Dimensions and Exotic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, R.; Saharian, A.

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next generation of particle accelerators. This adjustment of the size of the higher dimension could serve as a technological mechanism to locally adjust the dark energy density and change the local expansion of spacetime. This idea holds tantalizing possibilities in the context of exotic spacecraft propulsion.

  8. Invasive exotic plants suffer less herbivory than non-invasive exotic plants

    OpenAIRE

    Cappuccino, Naomi; Carpenter, David

    2005-01-01

    We surveyed naturally occurring leaf herbivory in nine invasive and nine non-invasive exotic plant species sampled in natural areas in Ontario, New York and Massachusetts, and found that invasive plants experienced, on average, 96% less leaf damage than non-invasive species. Invasive plants were also more taxonomically isolated than non-invasive plants, belonging to families with 75% fewer native North American genera. However, the relationship between taxonomic isolation at the family level ...

  9. Nuclear spectroscopy with fast exotic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gade, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The often surprising properties of neutron-rich nuclei have prompted extensive experimental and theoretical studies aimed at identifying the driving forces behind the dramatic changes encountered in the exotic regime. Challenging discovery experiments that search for new isotopes in the quest to delineate the limits of nuclear existence provide fundamental benchmarks for nuclear theory, addressing the question what combinations of protons and neutrons can be made into nuclei. As will be discussed here, the existence of certain nuclear species and their production cross sections can provide a first glimpse at nuclear structure effects in the most exotic regime. Striving for more detail on the evolution of nuclear structure, in-beam nuclear spectroscopy with fast beams and thick reaction targets—where γ-ray spectroscopy is used to tag the final state—provides information on the single-particle structure as well as on collective degrees of freedom in nuclei that are available for experiments at beam rates of only a few ions/s. This article will outline—with the example of shell evolution along the N = 40 isotone line—how in-beam experiments measure complementary observables, starting from the nuclear existence and production cross sections to the collective and single-particle properties of the lowest-lying excited states in the vicinity of the very neutron-rich Ti, Cr and Fe N = 40 isotones. The interplay of experimental results and theory will be emphasized at the intersection of nuclear structure and reactions in the joined quest of unraveling the driving forces of shell evolution. (paper)

  10. The exotic exchange of smoke rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, Antti J.

    2006-01-01

    Smoke rings are fascinating, to humans and animals alike. Experienced cigarette smokers blow them for entertainment while dolphins play with air-filled underwater rings that know how to puff. Smoke ring machines can be bought from science gadget shops and Lord Kelvin explains in a paper [Lord Kelvin, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. VI (1867), p. 94; reprinted in Philos. Mag. Vol. XXXIV (1867), p. 15] how one can be constructed from a cardboard box. Even Mount Etna [http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/696953.stm] and our Sun [http://spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast03feb 1 .htm] are known to be sources of huge smoke rings. But a smoke ring is not only fun to watch. It is also an organized structure with the ability to engage in complex acts, best exemplified by the leapfrogging motion of two smoke rings. Here we propose that the leapfrogging actually encodes very important Physics: It is a direct three dimensional generalization of the motion that in the two dimensional context is responsible for exotic exchange statistics which rules the properties of structures and materials such as quantum Hall systems and high-temperature superconductors. By employing very simple and universal concepts with roots in the hydrodynamical Euler equation, the universal law that describes the properties of fluids and gases, we argue that three dimensional exotic exchange statistics is commonplace. Our observations could have far reaching consequences in fluids and gases which are subject to the laws of quantum mechanics, from helium superfluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases and even metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases. (author)

  11. Issues and Opportunities in Exotic Hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, R. A.; Cohen, T. D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, J. J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, R. F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; Pennington, M. R.; Peters, K.; Richard, J. M.; Shen, C. P.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Swanson, E. S.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. It is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy (Cohen); the Institute of Modern Physics and Chinese Academy of Sciences under contract Y104160YQ0 and agreement No. 2015-BH-02 (Coito); the U.S. Department of Energy, for grant DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, manages and operates Jefferson Laboratory and DE-SC0006765, Early Career award (Dudek); Fermilab, operated by the Fermi Research Alliance under contract number DEAC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy (Eichten); BMBF, under contract No. 06GI7121, and the DAAD under contract No. 56889822 and by the Helmholtz International Center for FAIR within the LOEWE program of the State of Hesse (Fischer); the German Research Foundation DFG under contract number Collaborative Research Centre CRC-1044 (Gradl); the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq, Grant No. 305894/2009-9 and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP, Grant No. 2013/01907-0 (Krein); U.S. National Science Foundation, under grants PHY-1068286 and PHY-1403891 (Lebed); the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development under grant CNPq/CAPES-208188/2014-2 (Machado); U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-05ER41374

  12. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  13. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Bergshoeff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond–Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana–Weyl spinor of O(D,D. Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor–spinor of O(D,D is determined. This tensor–spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O(D,D to GL(D, one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  14. Exotic hybrid mesons in hard electroproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Anikin, I V; Szymanowski, L; Teryaev, O V; Wallon, S

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the sizeable cross section for deep exclusive electroproduction of an exotic $J^{PC}=1^{-+}$ hybrid meson in the Bjorken regime. The production amplitude scales like the one for usual meson electroproduction, i.e. as $1/Q^2$. This is due to the non-vanishing leading twist distribution amplitude for the hybrid meson, which may be normalized thanks to its relation to the energy momentum tensor and to the QCD sum rules technique. The hard amplitude is considered up to next-to-leading order in $\\alpha_{S}$ and we explore the consequences of fixing the renormalization scale ambiguity through the BLM procedure. We study the particular case where the hybrid meson decays through a $\\pi\\eta $ meson pair. We discuss the $\\pi\\eta$ generalized distribution amplitude and then calculate the production amplitude for this process. We propose a forward-backward asymmetry in the production of $\\pi$ and $\\eta$ mesons as a signal for the hybrid meson production. We briefly comment on hybrid electroproduction at very ...

  15. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ~1000 m^2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4x10^-16 cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for 4x10^-5 exotic particles. iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  16. Exotic quarkonium states in CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Using large data samples of di-muon events, CMS can perform detailed measurements and searches for new states in the field of exotic quarkonium. We present our results on the production of prompt and non-prompt $\\rm X(3872)$, detected in the ${\\rm J}/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay channel, which extend to higher $p_{\\rm T}$ values than in any previous measurement. The cross-section ratio with respect to the $\\psi(2S)$ is given differentially in $p_{\\rm T}$, as well as $p_{\\rm T}$ integrated. For the first time at the LHC, the fraction of $\\rm X(3872)$ coming from B hadron decays has been measured. After these studies of the charmonium $\\rm X$, we present a new search for its bottomonium counterpart, denoted as $\\rm X_b$, based on a data sample of pp collisions at 8 TeV collected by CMS in 2012. In analogy to the $\\rm X(3872)$ studies, the analysis uses the ${\\rm X_b} \\to \\Upsilon(1S) \\pi \\pi$ exclusive decay channel, with the $\\Upsilon(1S)$ decaying to $\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ pairs. No evidence for $\\rm X_b$ is observed and up...

  17. Exotic colored scalars at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Kfir; Efrati, Aielet; Frugiuele, Claudia; Nir, Yosef [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel)

    2017-02-21

    We study the phenomenology of exotic color-triplet scalar particles X with charge |Q|=2/3,4/3,5/3,7/3,8/3 and 10/3. If X is an SU(2){sub W}-non-singlet, mass splitting within the multiplet allows for cascade decays of the members into the lightest state. We study examples where the lightest state, in turn, decays into a three-body W{sup ±}jj final state, and show that in such case the entire multiplet is compatible with indirect precision tests and with direct collider searches for continuum pair production of X down to m{sub X}∼250 GeV. However, bound states S, made of XX{sup †} pairs at m{sub S}≈2m{sub X}, form under rather generic conditions and their decay to diphoton can be the first discovery channel of the model. Furthermore, for SU(2){sub W}-non-singlets, the mode S→W{sup +}W{sup −} may be observable and the width of S→γγ and S→jj may appear large as a consequence of mass splittings within the X-multiplet. As an example we study in detail the case of an SU(2){sub W}-quartet, finding that m{sub X}≃450 GeV is allowed by all current searches.

  18. Using exotic atoms to keep borders safe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocki, T J; Olsthoorn, J; Jason, A; Miyadera, H; Esch, E-I; Hoteling, N J; Heffner, R H; Green, A; Adelmann, A

    2011-01-01

    Muons, created by a particle accelerator, can be used to scan cargo for special nuclear materials (SNM). These muons have a sufficiently long lifetime and are penetrating enough that they can be used to actively scan cargo to ensure the non-proliferation of SNM. A set of 'proof-of-concept' experiments have been performed to show that active muon analysis can be used. Experiments were performed at high intensity, medium energy particle accelerators (TRIUMF and PSI). Negative muons form exotic atoms with one electron replaced by the muon. Since the muon is captured in an excited state, it will give off x-rays which can be detected by high purity germanium detectors. The characteristic x-ray spectrum can be potentially used to identify nuclides. The muonic x-rays corresponding to the SNM of interest have been measured, even with the use of various shielding configurations composed of lead, iron, polyethylene, or fibreglass. These preliminary results show that muon scanning systems can be successfully used to find shielded SNM, helping to ensure the safety of all citizens.

  19. Using exotic atoms to keep borders safe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jason, A.; Miyadera, H.; Esch, E.I.; Hoteling, N.J.; Adelmann, A.; Heffner, R.H.; Green, A.; Olsthoorn, J.; Stocki, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Muons, created by a particle accelerator, can be used to scan cargo for special nuclear materials (SNM). These muons exist long enough and are penetrating enough that they can be used to actively scan cargo to ensure the non-proliferation of SNM. A set of 'proof-of-concept' experiments have been performed to show that active muon analysis can be used. Experiments were performed at high intensity, medium energy particle accelerators (TRIUMF and PSI). Negative muons form exotic atoms with one electron replaced by the muon. Since the muon is captured in an excited state, it will give off x-rays which can be detected by high purity germanium detectors. These characteristic x-rays can be used to identify the nuclide. The muonic x-rays corresponding to the SNM of interest have been measured, even with the use of various shielding configurations composed of lead, iron, polyethylene, or fiberglass. These preliminary results show that muons can be successfully used to find shielded SNM. The safety of North Americans can be protected by the use of this technology.

  20. Using anti pp annihilation to find exotic mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Present data suggests that a number of mesons have been found which cannot be accommodated in standard anti qq multiplets. Theory suggests that such exotic mesons should exist in the spectrum of Quantum Chromodynamics, but provides little guide to their properties. It is argued that a high luminosity, low energy anti pp machine would be a powerful tool with which to search for such exotics.

  1. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams; Noyaux exotiques et faisceaux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-12-31

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Exotic Applied Magnetics: Biomagnetism; Kyomiaru jiki oyo: seitai denjikigaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Masatami [Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-09-25

    This paper discusses biomagnetic effects and their possible applications that are unfamiliar to cryogenic and superconducting engineers. Biomagnetism is exotic applied magnetics and a trans-disciplinary research target. There are two types of research methodology, physical and epidemiological. They are quite different. Both methodologies should be harmonized. The author proposes how to work in this transdisciplinary field. Finally, suggestions of guidelines for studing exotic phenomena are presented. (author)

  3. International symposium on exotic nuclear structures. Book of abstracst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The following topics were discussed at the meeting: Physics of weakly bound nuclei, neutron skin and halo; Evolution of shell structures for neutron-rich nuclei; Collective excitations in nuclei with exotic nuclear shapes; Cluster structures; Super- and hyperdeformed nuclei, exotic structures in the actinides; Superheavy elements; Towards understanding the structure of nucleons; New experimental techniques, facilities for radioactive beams. All abstracts (75 items) were submitted as full text to the INIS database. (R.P.)

  4. The exotic atoms of QCD: glueballs, hybrids and baryonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1984-05-01

    The theoretical basis underlying the expected ''exotic'' states in QCD, the theory of quarks and gluons, is reviewed in three lectures. The first lecture is an historical introduction to QCD. The second lecture is a critical review of the MIT bag model and QCD on a lattice. The status of three candidate ''exotic'' states seen in psi radiative decays, the i(1440), O(1700) and zeta(2220) are discussed in the third lecture. (author)

  5. The mass formula for an exotic BTZ black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Baocheng, E-mail: zhangbc.zhang@yahoo.com

    2016-04-15

    An exotic Bañados–Teitelboim–Zanelli (BTZ) black hole has an angular momentum larger than its mass in three dimension (3D), which suggests the possibility that cosmic censorship could be violated if angular momentum is extracted by the Penrose process. In this paper, we propose a mass formula for the exotic BTZ black hole and show no violation of weak cosmic censorship in the gedanken process above by understanding properly its mass formula. Unlike the other black holes, the total energy of the exotic BTZ black hole is represented by the angular momentum instead of the mass, which supports a basic point of view that the same geometry should be determined by the same energy in 3D general relativity whose equation of motion can be given either by normal 3D Einstein gravity or by exotic 3D Einstein gravity. However, only the mass of the exotic black hole is related to the thermodynamics and other forms of energy are “dumb”, which is consistent with the earlier thermodynamic analysis about exotic black holes.

  6. Effects of exotic species on Yellowstone's grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Daniel P.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Mattson, D.J.; Gunther, Kerry A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans have affected grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by direct mortality, competition for space and resources, and introduction of exotic species. Exotic organisms that have affected grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Area include common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), nonnative clovers (Trifolium spp.), domesticated livestock, bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Some bears consume substantial amounts of dandelion and clover. However, these exotic foods provide little digested energy compared to higher-quality bear foods. Domestic livestock are of greater energetic value, but use of this food by bears often leads to conflicts with humans and subsequent increases in bear mortality. Lake trout, blister rust, and brucellosis diminish grizzly bears foods. Lake trout prey on native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in Yellowstone Lake; white pine blister rust has the potential to destroy native whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) stands; and management response to bovine brucellosis, a disease found in the Yellowstone bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus), could reduce populations of these 2 species. Exotic species will likely cause more harm than good for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Managers have few options to mitigate or contain the impacts of exotics on Yellowstone's grizzly bears. Moreover, their potential negative impacts have only begun to unfold. Exotic species may lead to the loss of substantial highquality grizzly bear foods, including much of the bison, trout, and pine seeds that Yellowstone grizzly bears currently depend upon.

  7. Ticks imported to Europe with exotic reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel

    2015-09-30

    It is known that traded exotic animals carry with them an immense number of associated symbionts, including parasites. Reptiles are no exception. Most of the imported reptiles originate from tropical countries and their possibility to carry potentially dangerous pathogens is high. According to CITES, Europe is currently the main reptile importer in the world. Despite this, there is no review or analysis available for the risk related to the importation of tick-borne diseases with traded reptile to the EU. The main aim of the manuscript is to provide a review on the available literature on ticks introduced to and exchanged between European countries via the live reptile trade. So far, the published reports of ticks imported on reptiles are limited to few European countries: Italy, Poland, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Slovenia and UK. The following species have been reported: Hyalomma aegyptium, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma exornatum, Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma fuscolineatum, Amblyomma latum, Amblyomma quadricavum, Amblyomma marmoreum, Amblyomma nuttalli, Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma sphenodonti, Amblyomma transversale and Amblyomma varanense. The majority of species are of African origin, followed by American and Asian species. All groups of reptiles (chelonians, snakes, lizards, crocodiles, tuataras) were involved. However, it seems that certain groups (i.e. tortoises of genus Testudo, monitor lizards of genus Varanus, snakes of genus Python) are more important as host for imported ticks, but this may be related to higher levels of international trade. Even fewer are the reports of tick-borne pathogens associated with imported reptile ticks. Despite the diversity of tick species reported on imported reptiles, the situations of truly invasive species are atypical and are limited in natural environments to maximum two cases where H. aegyptium was involved. Otherwise, the risk associated with reptile trade for introduction of invasive tick to Europe is low

  8. Exotic fermions in the left-right symmetric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.; Volkas, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study is made of non-standard fermion multiplets in left-right symmetric models with gauge group SU(3) x SU(2) L x SU(2) R x U(1) BL . Constraints from gauge anomaly cancellation and invariance of Yukawa coupling terms are used to define interesting classes of exotic fermions. The standard quark lepton spectrum of left-right symmetric models was identified as the simplest member of an infinite class. Phenomenological implications of the next simplest member of this class are then studied. Classes of exotic fermions which may couple to the standard fermions through doublet Higgs bosons were also considered, then shown that some of these exotics may be used to induce a generalised universal see-saw mechanism. 12 refs., 1 tab

  9. Compounding and Extralabel Use of Drugs in Exotic Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lauren V; Davidson, Gigi

    2018-05-01

    Extralabel drug use is the use of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug in a manner different from what is stipulated on the approved label. Compounding is the process of preparing a medication in a manner not indicated on the label to create a formulation specifically tailored to the needs of an individual patient. Extralabel drug use and compounding are vital aspects of safe and effective drug delivery to patients in exotic animal practice. There are few FDA-approved drugs for exotic animal species, and many approved drugs for other species are not available in suitable formulations for use in exotic animals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Time delayed K sup + N reactions and exotic baryon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P

    2003-01-01

    Evidence and hints, from both the theoretical and experimental sides, of exotic baryon resonances with B = S, have been with us for the last 30 years. The poor status of the general acceptance of these Z* resonances is partly due to the prejudice against penta-quark baryons and partly due to the opinion that a proof of the existence of exotic states must be rigorous. This can refer to the quality and amount of data gathered, and also to the analytical methods applied in the study of these resonances. It then seems mandatory that all possibilities and aspects be exploited. We do that by analysing the time delay in K sup + N scattering, encountering clear signals of the exotic Z* resonances close to the pole values found in partial wave analyses.

  11. On hypercharge flux and exotics in F-theory GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; 10.1007

    2010-01-01

    We study SU(5) Grand Unified Theories within a local framework in F-theory with multiple extra U(1) symmetries arising from a small monodromy group. The use of hypercharge flux for doublet-triplet splitting implies massless exotics in the spectrum that are protected from obtaining a mass by the U(1) symmetries. We find that lifting the exotics by giving vacuum expectation values to some GUT singlets spontaneously breaks all the U(1) symmetries which implies that proton decay operators are induced. If we impose an additional R-parity symmetry by hand we find all the exotics can be lifted while proton decay operators are still forbidden. These models can retain the gauge coupling unification accuracy of the MSSM at 1-loop. For models where the generations are distributed across multiple curves we also present a motivation for the quark-lepton mass splittings at the GUT scale based on a Froggatt-Nielsen approach to flavour.

  12. JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papenbrock, Thomas

    2014-05-16

    The grant “JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei ” (DOE DE-FG02-06ER41407) ran from 02/01/2006 thru 12/31/2013. JUSTIPEN is a venue for international collaboration between U.S.-based and Japanese scientists who share an interest in theory of rare isotopes. Since its inception JUSTIPEN has supported many visitors, fostered collaborations between physicists in the U.S. and Japan, and enabled them to deepen our understanding of exotic nuclei and their role in cosmos.

  13. Exotic glueball 0±- states in QCD sum rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimikov, Alexandr; Lee, Hee-Jung; Kochelev, Nikolai; Zhang, Pengming; Khandramai, Viachaslau

    2017-12-01

    The lowest dimension three-gluon currents that couple to the exotic 0±- glueballs have been constructed using the helicity formalism. Based on the constructed currents, we obtain new QCD sum rules that have been used to extract the masses and the decay constants of the scalar exotic 0±- glueballs. We estimate the masses for the scalar state and for the pseudoscalar state to be m+=9.8-1.4+1.3 GeV and m-=6.8-1.2+1.1 GeV .

  14. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-15

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons {theta}{sup +} and {xi}{sup --}. A narrow resonance identified as the {theta}{sup +} was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK{sup 0}{sub S} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} revealed a narrow resonance in the pK{sup 0}{sub S} invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle {xi}{sup --} the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the {theta}{sup +}. An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} is determined. The search for the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated

  15. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-01

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons Θ + and Ξ -- . A narrow resonance identified as the Θ + was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon Θ + on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK 0 S → pπ + π - revealed a narrow resonance in the pK 0 S invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle Ξ -- the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon Ξ -- on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the Θ + . An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon Ξ -- is determined. The search for the exotic baryon Θ + on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon Θ + remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated luminosity that is several times higher than in previous data sets. After investigating all data sets collected with the HERMES

  16. One health: zoonoses in the exotic animal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcy J

    2011-09-01

    Zoonoses make up approximately ¾ of today’s emerging infectious diseases; many of these zoonoses come from exotic pets and wildlife. Recent outbreaks in humans associated with nondomestic animals include Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Ebola virus, salmonellosis, and monkeypox. Expanding human populations, increased exotic pet ownership and changes in climate may contribute to increased incidence of zoonoses. Education and preventive medicine practices can be applied by veterinarians and other health professionals to reduce the risk of contracting a zoonotic disease. The health of humans, animals, and the environment must be treated as a whole to prevent the transmission of zoonoses.

  17. Annihilation physics of exotic galactic dark matter particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    Various theoretical arguments make exotic heavy neutral weakly interacting fermions, particularly those predicted by supersymmetry theory, attractive candidates for making up the large amount of unseen gravitating mass in galactic halos. Such particles can annihilate with each other, producing secondary particles of cosmic-ray energies, among which are antiprotons, positrons, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. Spectra and fluxes of these annihilation products can be calculated, partly by making use of positron electron collider data and quantum chromodynamic models of particle production derived therefrom. These spectra may provide detectable signatures of exotic particle remnants of the big bang.

  18. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seabloom, Eric W. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Borer, Elizabeth T. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Buckley, Yvonne [ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072 Australia; Cleland, Elsa E. [Ecology, Behavior & Evolution Section, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093 USA; Davies, Kendi [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Firn, Jennifer [Queensland University of Technology, Biogeosciences, Brisbane Queensland 4000 Australia; Harpole, W. Stanley [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Hautier, Yann [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich Switzerland; Lind, Eric [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; MacDougall, Andrew [Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada; Orrock, John L. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Prober, Suzanne M. [CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Private Bag 5 Wembley WA 6913 Australia; Adler, Peter [Department of Wildland Resources and the Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan UT 84322 USA; Alberti, Juan [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Michael Anderson, T. [Department of Biology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 USA; Bakker, Jonathan D. [School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195-4115 USA; Biederman, Lori A. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Blumenthal, Dana [Rangeland Resources Research Unit, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Fort Collins CO 80526 USA; Brown, Cynthia S. [Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA; Brudvig, Lars A. [Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 USA; Caldeira, Maria [Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon Portugal; Chu, Chengjin [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 China; Crawley, Michael J. [Department of Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Ascot SL5 7PY UK; Daleo, Pedro [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Damschen, Ellen I. [Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; D' Antonio, Carla M. [Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106 USA; DeCrappeo, Nicole M. [U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Dickman, Chris R. [Desert Ecology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia; Du, Guozhen [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 China; Fay, Philip A. [USDA-ARS Grassland Soil and Water Research Lab, Temple TX 76502 USA; Frater, Paul [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Gruner, Daniel S. [Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 USA; Hagenah, Nicole [School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville Pietermaritzburg 3209 South Africa; Department of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven CT 06520 USA; Hector, Andrew [Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190 CH-8057 Zurich Switzerland; Helm, Aveliina [Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu Estonia; Hillebrand, Helmut [Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, Carl-von-Ossietzky University, Wilhelmshaven Germany; Hofmockel, Kirsten S. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Humphries, Hope C. [INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309-0450 USA; Iribarne, Oscar [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Jin, Virginia L. [USDA-ARS Agroecosystem Management Research Unit, Lincoln NE 68583 USA; Kay, Adam [Biology Department, University of St. Thomas, Saint Paul MN 55105 USA; Kirkman, Kevin P. [School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville Pietermaritzburg 3209 South Africa; Klein, Julia A. [Department Forest, Rangeland & Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523-1472 USA; Knops, Johannes M. H. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln NE 68588 USA; La Pierre, Kimberly J. [Department of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven CT 06520 USA; Ladwig, Laura M. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87103 USA; Lambrinos, John G. [Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Leakey, Andrew D. B. [Department of Plant Biology and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana IL 61801 USA; Li, Qi [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 Qinghai China; Li, Wei [Yunnan Academy of Biodiversity, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming 650224 China; McCulley, Rebecca [Department of Plant & Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY 40546 USA; Melbourne, Brett [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Mitchell, Charles E. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC 27599 USA; Moore, Joslin L. [Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Melbourne, c/o School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Victoria 3010 Australia; Morgan, John [Department of Botany, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086 Victoria Australia; Mortensen, Brent [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; O' Halloran, Lydia R. [Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Pärtel, Meelis [Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu Estonia; Pascual, Jesús [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (UNMdP-CONICET), Mar del Plata Argentina; Pyke, David A. [U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Corvallis OR 97331 USA; Risch, Anita C. [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, 8903 Birmensdorf Switzerland; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto [ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane Queensland 4072 Australia; Sankaran, Mahesh [National Centre for Biological Sciences, GKVK Campus, Bellary Road Bangalore 560065 India; Schuetz, Martin [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, 8903 Birmensdorf Switzerland; Simonsen, Anna [Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5S 3B2 Canada; Smith, Melinda [Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA; Stevens, Carly [Lancaster Environment Center, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ UK; Sullivan, Lauren [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 USA; Wardle, Glenda M. [Desert Ecology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 Australia; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M. [Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V6T 1Z4 Canada; Wragg, Peter D. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul MN 55108 USA; Wright, Justin [Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Yang, Louie [Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA

    2013-10-16

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  19. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: Is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabloom, Eric; Borer, Elizabeth; Buckley, Yvonne; Cleland, Elsa E.; Davies, Kendi; Firn, Jennifer; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Lind, Eric M.; MacDougall, Andrew; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Adler, Peter; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T. Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Biederman, Lori A.; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S.; Brudvig, Lars A.; Caldeira, Maria; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Crawley, Michael J.; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen Ingman; D'Antonio, Carla M.; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Dickman, Chris R.; Du, Guozhen; Fay, Philip A.; Frater, Paul; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hagenah, Nicole; Hector, Andrew; Helm, Aveliina; Hillebrand, Helmut; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Humphries, Hope C.; Iribarne, Oscar; Jin, Virginia L.; Kay, Adam; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Klein, Julia A.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Ladwig, Laura M.; ,; John, G.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Li, Qi; Li, Wei; McCulley, Rebecca; Melbourne, Brett; ,; Charles, E.; Moore, Joslin L.; Morgan, John; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Pärtel, Meelis; Pascual, Jesús; Pyke, David A.; Risch, Anita C.; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Sankaran, Mahesh; Schuetz, Martin; Simonsen, Anna; Smith, Melinda; Stevens, Carly; Sullivan, Lauren; Wardle, Glenda M.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; Wragg, Peter D.; Wright, Justin; Yang, Louie

    2013-01-01

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  20. Exotic Options: a Chooser Option and its Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Martinkutė-Kaulienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial instruments traded in the markets and investors’ situation in such markets are getting more and more complex. This leads to more complex derivative structures used for hedging that are harder to analyze and which risk is harder managed. Because of the complexity of these instruments, the basic characteristics of many exotic options may sometimes be not clearly understood. Most scientific studies have been focused on developing models for pricing various types of exotic options, but it is important to study their unique characteristics and to understand them correctly in order to use them in proper market situations. The paper examines main aspects of options, emphasizing the variety of exotic options and their place in financial markets and risk management process. As the exact valuation of exotic options is quite difficult, the article deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of pricing of chooser options that suggest a broad range of usage and application in different market conditions. The calculations made in the article showed that the price of the chooser is closely correlated with the choice time and low correlated with its strike price. So the first mentioned factor should be taken into consideration when making appropriate hedging and investing decisions.

  1. The effects of exotic weed Flaveria bidentis with different invasion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new exotic weed, Flaveria bidentis, is spreading in central China where it forms dense monospecific patches modifying the structure of different native ecosystems and threatening native aboveground biodiversity. However, little is known about the consequences of such an invasion for soil bacterial community, especially ...

  2. Exotic multifaceted medicinal plants of drugs and pharmaceutical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassia alata Linn, Nauclea latifolia, Clerodendron splendens and Bryophyllum pinnatum are some of the Nigerian exotic medicinal plants. These plants not only acts as ornamental but also exhibit antiviral, antifungal, antimalarial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. They are sources of drugs and are used in herbal ...

  3. Probing the partonic structure of exotic particles in hard electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2005-01-01

    We argue that the electroproduction of exotic particles is a useful tool for study of their partonic structure. In the case of hybrid mesons, the magnitude of their cross sections shows that they are accessible for measurements in existing electroproduction experiments

  4. {pi}{eta} pair hard electroproduction and exotic hybrid mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikin, I.V. [LPT, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay, France, UMR 8627 du CNRS (France); BLTP, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); CPHT, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France, UMR 7644 du CNRS (France); Pire, B. [CPHT, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France, UMR 7644 du CNRS (France); Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland) and Univ. de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Teryaev, O.V. [BLTP, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Wallon, S. [LPT, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay, France, UMR 8627 du CNRS (France)

    2005-06-13

    We show that hard electroproduction is a promising way to study exotic hybrid mesons, in particular through the hybrid decay channel H->{pi}{eta}. We discuss the {pi}{eta} generalized distribution amplitude, calculate the production amplitude and propose a forward-backward asymmetry as a signal for the hybrid meson production.

  5. πη pair hard electroproduction and exotic hybrid mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2005-01-01

    We show that hard electroproduction is a promising way to study exotic hybrid mesons, in particular through the hybrid decay channel H->πη. We discuss the πη generalized distribution amplitude, calculate the production amplitude and propose a forward-backward asymmetry as a signal for the hybrid meson production

  6. Physico-chemical properties of topsoil under indigenous and exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated selected physico-chemical properties of topsoil under monoculture plantation of an indigenous tree species - Nauclea diderrichii, and those of four exotic tree species – Theobroma cacao, Gmelina arborea, Pinus caribaea and Tectona grandis, located in Omo Biosphere Reserve, Ogun State, Nigeria.

  7. Present and Future Experiments with Stored Exotic Nuclei at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissel, H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent results and perspectives of experiments with stored exotic nuclei at GSI-FAIR will presented. An overview on the planned NUSTAR experiments will also presented. Relativistic exotic nuclei produced via projectile fragmentation and fission were separated in flight by the fragment separator FRS and injected into the storage-cooler ring ESR for accurate mass- and lifetime measurements. Direct mass measurements of electron-cooled exotic nuclei were performed using time-resolved Schottky spectrometry. Fragments with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling have been investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique gives access to all nuclei with half-lives down to the microsecond range and has been successfully applied. Lifetimes of stored bare and few-electron ions have been measured with the goal to study the beta-decay under ionization conditions prevailing in stellar plasma. For the first time the direct observation of bound-state beta decay has been achieved with 2 07T l fragments. The future project FAIR includes a new large-acceptance in-flight separator (Super-FRS) in combination with a new storage ring system (CR, NESR) which will be ideal tools to study exotic nuclei far from stability.(author)

  8. Bounds on neutrino mixing with exotic singlet neutrinos E

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This allows us to neglect the masses of light (known) neutrinos. In the SM the process occurs at tree level via light neutrino exchange in t- and u-channels. The neu- trino mixing in special cases (e.g. mixing of exotic and/or singlets), induces non-diagonal light–heavy neutrino neutral currents and additional contribution to the ...

  9. Characterization of Indian and exotic quality protein maize (QPM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymorphism analysis and genetic diversity of normal maize and quality protein maize (QPM) inbreds among locally well adapted germplasm is a prerequisite for hybrid maize breeding program. The diversity analyses of 48 maize accessions including Indian and exotic germplasm using 75 simple sequence repeat (SSR) ...

  10. Bounds on charged lepton mixing with exotic charged leptons Ф

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bounds on mixings in charged lepton sector. The threshold of the process. /. × = 2С is high, and masses of light .... between the two sectors (i.e., ordinary weak states ( 0-. OL(R)) to the heavy mass eigenstates (. hL(R)) and exotic ... Ш3 and Й denote third isospin compo- nent and electrical charge of the corresponding fields.

  11. Backward exotic meson production in π-n→px--

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantell, D.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion is given of some of the theory and theoretical techniques as well as actual previous experiments for the study of π - + n → p + X -- interactions. Included are the forces, classification, inclusive reactions, quark diagrams, properties of the unobserved X, cross sections, exotic mesons, duality and crossing, the working and normalization of some actual rexperiments, and analysis. 10 references

  12. 4th International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Carl J; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P; The European Physical Journal A : Volume 25, Supplement 1, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses (ENAM) has gained the status of the premier meeting for the physics of nuclei far from stability. The selected and refereed papers presenting the main results constitute valuable proceedings that offer everyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  13. Productivity of Indigenous and Exotic Cattle on Kenya Ranches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of productivity and adaptability of indigenous (Boran and Small East African Zebu) and the exotic (Sahiwal and Ayrshire) cattle on Kenyan ranches located in semi-arid areas of the Rift Valley Provinces was done. Data sets of the cattle breeds over the 1979-1993 period on Deloraine, Elkarama, Ilkerin, ...

  14. Evaluation of exotic genotypes of Taro ( Colocasia esculenta ) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of Taro {Colocasia esculenta (L) Schott} in Nigeria had stagnated and even began to decline in the last few years due to several constraints including poor yield of local cultivars worsened by advent of taro leaf blight (TLB). Introduction and evaluation of exotic cultivars for adaptation to local production is a ...

  15. Phenology of exotic invasive weeds associated with downy brome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The exotic and highly invasive annual grass downy brome (Bromus tectorum) has invaded millions of hectares of rangelands throughout the Intermountain West. Downy brome increases the chance, rate, season and spread of wildfires, resulting in the destruction of native plant communities and the wildli...

  16. Introduction: Exotic annual Bromus in the western USA [Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Germino; Jeanne C. Chambers; Cynthia S. Brown

    2016-01-01

    The spread and impacts of exotic species are unambiguous, global threats to many ecosystems. A prominent example is the suite of annual grasses in the Bromus genus (Bromus hereafter) that originate from Europe and Eurasia but have invaded or are invading large areas of the Western USA. This book brings a diverse, multidisciplinary group of authors together to...

  17. Ecosystem impacts of exotic annual invaders in the genus Bromus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Germino; Jayne Belnap; John M. Stark; Edith B Allen; Benjamin Rau

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the impacts of exotic plant species on ecosystems is necessary to justify and guide efforts to limit their spread, restore natives, and plan for conservation. Invasive annual grasses such as Bromus tectorum, B. rubens, B. hordeaceus, and B. diandrus (hereafter collectively referred to as Bromus) transform the structure and function of ecosystems...

  18. Antimicrobial Screening of Some Exotic Tree Species of Rajasthan Desert

    OpenAIRE

    B.B.S. Kapoor* and Shelja Pandita

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial screening of ethyl ether and alcoholic extracts of leaves of four selected exotic tree species growing inRajasthan Desert was carried out. Colophospermum mopane, Holoptelea integrifolia, Kigelia pinnata andPutranjiva roxburghii showed positive reactions against bacterial pathogens i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichiacoli and a fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

  19. Nigerian Indigenous vs Exotic Hens: the Correlation Factor in Body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic interrelationship within and between strains was assessed using pure Nigerian normal feathered local, pure exotic and their crossbred hens for age and body weight at first lay, egg weight and egg internal quality traits. 100 layers comprising 20 Black Nera, 20 White Leghorn, 20 Normal feathered local chicken, 20 ...

  20. Developing survey grids to substantiate freedom from exotic pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston; Frank H. Koch; William D. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Systematic, hierarchical intensification of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program hexagon for North America yields a simple procedure for developing national-scale survey grids. In this article, we describe the steps to create a national-scale survey grid using a risk map as the starting point. We illustrate the steps using an exotic pest example in which...

  1. Children prioritize virtual exotic biodiversity over local biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballouard, Jean-Marie; Brischoux, François; Bonnet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education is essential to stem current dramatic biodiversity loss, and childhood is considered as the key period for developing awareness and positive attitudes toward nature. Children are strongly influenced by the media, notably the internet, about biodiversity and conservation issues. However, most media focus on a few iconic, appealing, and usually exotic species. In addition, virtual activities are replacing field experiences. This situation may curb children knowledge and concerns about local biodiversity. Focusing our analyses on local versus exotic species, we examined the level of knowledge and the level of diversity of the animals that French schoolchildren are willing to protect, and whether these perceptions are mainly guided by information available in the internet. For that, we collected and compared two complementary data sets: 1) a questionnaire was administered to schoolchildren to assess their knowledge and consideration to protect animals, 2) an internet content analysis (i.e. Google searching sessions using keywords) was performed to assess which animals are the most often represented. Our results suggest that the knowledge of children and their consideration to protect animal are mainly limited to internet contents, represented by a few exotic and charismatic species. The identification rate of local animals by schoolchildren was meager, suggesting a worrying disconnection from their local environment. Schoolchildren were more prone to protect "virtual" (unseen, exotic) rather than local animal species. Our results reinforce the message that environmental education must also focus on outdoor activities to develop conservation consciousness and concerns about local biodiversity.

  2. The growth performance of exotic and indigenous tree species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The saplings were monitored for survival rates one year after transplanting and growth performances by measuring root collar diameters and heights. There was no significant difference among the species in survival. The mean height increment of the exotics significantly surpassed indigenous tree species. E. grandis ...

  3. On the exotic Higgs decays in effective field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélusca-Maïto, Hermès; Falkowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We discuss exotic Higgs decays in an effective field theory where the Standard Model is extended by dimension-6 operators. We review and update the status of two-body lepton- and quark-flavor-violating decays involving the Higgs boson. We also comment on the possibility of observing three-body flavor-violating Higgs decays in this context.

  4. Single primer amplification reaction methods reveal exotic and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ). Mulberry is the sole food source for mulberry silkworm and a number of indigenous and exotic varieties are used in sericulture. Studies on assessment of genetic diversity have been done amongst a few mulberry varieties using one or at the ...

  5. Searches for Exotic Physics with leptons with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    With the large sample of pp collisions recorded in the past year, ATLAS has taken full advantage of the opportunity to explore new territory at the TeV scale. In this seminar, an overview of searches for new exotic particles is presented, with a special emphasis on signatures with leptons.

  6. Climate change induced invasions by native and exotic pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse A. Logan

    2007-01-01

    The importance of effective risk assessment for introduction and establishment of exotic pest species has dramatically increased with an expanded global economy and the accompanying increase in international trade. Concurrently, recent climate warming has resulted in potential invasion of new habitats by native pest species. The time frame of response to changing...

  7. 405 Nigerian Indigenous vs Exotic Hens: the Correlation Factor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... Abstract. Genetic interrelationship within and between strains was assessed using pure. Nigerian normal feathered local, pure exotic and their crossbred hens for age and body weight at first lay, egg weight and egg internal quality traits. 100 layers comprising 20 Black Nera, 20 White Leghorn, 20 Normal.

  8. Status of indigenous tree species regeneration under exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential for regeneration of native woody species in exotic plantation stands and in the adjacent natural forest in Belete forest was studied. The objective of the study was to assess the diversity and density of the naturally regenerated woody species in plantations at Belete forest. Vegetation assessment within the ...

  9. Exotic plants along roads near La Paz, Bolivia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fernández-Murillo, M. P.; Rico, Adriana; Kindlmann, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2015), s. 565-573 ISSN 0043-1737 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR GB14-36098G Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : exotic species * roads * altitude * distribution * Pennisetum clandestinum Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.517, year: 2015

  10. KN Scattering Data and the Exotic Θ+ Baryon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakovsky, I. I.; Arndt, R. A.; Workman, R. L.; Briscoe, W. J.

    2004-11-01

    We review the recent history and pre-history of the exotic S = +1 Θ+ resonance. While seen in many recent experiments, evidence for this state is conspicuously absent in older kaon-induced reaction data. We concentrate on these older data and the constraints they imply for the Θ+ resonance.

  11. Native species that can replace exotic species in landscaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Regina Tempel Stumpf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Beyond aesthetics, the contemporary landscaping intends to provide other benefits for humans and environment, especially related to the environmental quality of urban spaces and conservation of the species. A trend in this direction is the reduction in the use of exotic plants in their designs, since, over time, they can become agents of replacement of native flora, as it has occurred in Rio Grande do Sul with many species introduced by settlers. However, the use of exotic species is unjustifiable, because the flora diversity of the Bioma Pampa offers many native species with appropriate features to the ornamental use. The commercial cultivation and the implantation of native species in landscaped areas constitute innovations for plant nurseries and landscapers and can provide a positive reduction in extractivism, contributing to dissemination, exploitation and preservation of native flora, and also decrease the impact of chemical products on environment. So, this work intends to identify native species of Bioma Pampa with features and uses similar to the most used exotic species at Brazilian landscaping. The species were selected from consulting books about native plants of Bioma Pampa and plants used at Brazilian landscaping, considering the similarity on habit and architecture, as well as characteristics of leafs, flowers and/or fruits and environmental conditions of occurrence and cultivation. There were identified 34 native species able to properly replace exotic species commonly used. The results show that many native species of Bioma Pampa have interesting ornamental features to landscape gardening, allowing them to replace exotic species that are traditionally cultivated.

  12. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and $B_c^+$ physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00266843

    2016-12-09

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from $pp$ collisions at the LHC. During Run~1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the $Z_c(4430)^-$ as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest on spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as $X \\to J/\\psi \\phi$, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of $B_c^+$ physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor $\\bar{b}$ and $c$ quarks. A synopsis of the the latest results is given.

  13. Retrospective investigation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome in 146 exotic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Mamoru; Kondo, Hirotaka; Ono, Sadaharu; Murakami, Akiyoshi; Harada, Tomoko; Sano, Tadashi

    2017-09-29

    The outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were retrospectively evaluated in 146 exotic animals including 20 pet birds, 47 rabbits, 34 hamsters, 18 ferrets, 7 turtles and 20 other small mammals in cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) at presentation or during hospitalization at an animal clinic. The rates of return of spontaneous circulation, survival after CPR and discharge were 9.3, 2.3 and 1.2%, respectively. The mean success rate of CPR in animals included in this study was lower than those previously reported in dogs and cats. This might have been because of the challenges in effective chest compression, airway management and monitoring as well as establishment of intravenous catheterization route in exotic animals.

  14. Continuum effects in the scattering of exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druet, T. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Physique Quantique, C.P. 165/82, Brussels (Belgium); Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, Brussels (Belgium); Descouvemont, P. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    We discuss continuum effects in the scattering of exotic nuclei, and more specifically on the {sup 11}Be + {sup 64}Zn scattering. {sup 11}Be is a typical example of an exotic nucleus, with a low binding energy. Elastic, inelastic and breakup cross-sections of the {sup 11}Be + {sup 64}Zn system are computed in the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel formalism, at energies near the Coulomb barrier. We show that converged cross-sections need high angular momenta as well as as large excitation energies in the wave functions of the projectile. Extensions to other systems are simulated by different collision energies, and by varying the binding energy of {sup 11}Be. (orig.)

  15. Excited and exotic charmonium spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liuming Liu, Graham Moir, Michael Peardon, Sinead Ryan, Christopher Thomas, Pol Vilaseca, Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Balint Joo, David Richards

    2012-07-01

    We present a spectrum of highly excited charmonium mesons up to around 4.5 GeV calculated using dynamical lattice QCD. Employing novel computational techniques and the variational method with a large basis of carefully constructed operators, we extract and reliably identify the continuum spin of an extensive set of excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers (0+-, 1-+, 2+-) and states with high spin. Calculations are performed on two lattice volumes with pion mass ? 400 MeV and the mass determinations have high statistical precision even for excited states. We discuss the results in light of experimental observations, identify the lightest 'supermultiplet' of hybrid mesons and comment on the phenomenological implications of the spectrum of exotic mesons.

  16. Excited and exotic charmonium spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Liuming; Moir, Graham; Peardon, Michael; Ryan, Sinead; Thomas, Christopher; Vilaseca, Pol; Dudek, Jozef; Edwards, Robert; Joo, Balint; Richards, David

    2012-01-01

    We present a spectrum of highly excited charmonium mesons up to around 4.5 GeV calculated using dynamical lattice QCD. Employing novel computational techniques and the variational method with a large basis of carefully constructed operators, we extract and reliably identify the continuum spin of an extensive set of excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers (0+-, 1-+, 2+-) and states with high spin. Calculations are performed on two lattice volumes with pion mass ? 400 MeV and the mass determinations have high statistical precision even for excited states. We discuss the results in light of experimental observations, identify the lightest 'supermultiplet' of hybrid mesons and comment on the phenomenological implications of the spectrum of exotic mesons.

  17. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  18. Exotic orientifolds in non-geometric flux cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, Cesar; Loaiza-Brito, Oscar [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guanajuato, C.P. 37150, León, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2013-07-23

    We report on the existence of a stable de Sitter vacum in Type IIB non-geometric string compactification on an isotropic tours with orientifold 3-planes in the presence of odd integer 3-form fluxes. These fluxes yields the presence of exotic orientifold 3-planes increasing the size of the flux configuration space. We also find that there exist suitable conditions for multi-field inflation driven by the Kähler and axio-dilaton moduli.

  19. Many-Body Coulomb Gauge Exotic and Charmed Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Cotanch, Stephen R.

    2000-01-01

    Utilizing a QCD Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian with linear confinement specified by lattice, we report a relativistic many-body calculation for the light exotic and charmed hybrid mesons. The Hamiltonian successfully describes both quark and gluon sectors, with vacuum and quasiparticle properties generated by a BCS transformation and more elaborate TDA and RPA diagonalizations for the meson ($q\\bar{q}$) and glueball ($gg$) masses. Hybrids entail a computationally intense relativistic three quasipa...

  20. Characteristic features of the exotic superconductors: A summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandow, B.

    1997-09-01

    The authors summarize the results of a comprehensive examination of the characteristic features of the exotic superconductors, the superconductors so-labelled by Uemura and co-workers. In both the electronic and the crystal-chemistry properties, they find anomalous features which appear to be universal for these materials, as well as other features which are clearly not universal but common enough to be considered typical for these materials. Some implications of these anomalies are discussed

  1. Global trade in exotic pets 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Emma R; Baker, Sandra E; Macdonald, David W

    2014-06-01

    International trade in exotic pets is an important and increasing driver of biodiversity loss and often compromises the standards required for good animal welfare. We systematically reviewed the scientific and gray literature and used the United Nations Environment Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) trade database to establish temporal and geographical trade patterns of live exotic birds, mammals, and reptiles and to describe trends in research, taxonomic representation, and level of threat and legal protection of species traded. Birds were the most species-rich and abundant class reported in trade; reptiles were second most abundant but unusually the most studied in this context; and mammals were least abundant in trade. Mammalian and reptilian species traded as pets were more likely to be threatened than expected by random. There have been a substantial number of Appendix I listed captive-bred mammals and birds and wild-caught birds and reptiles reported in trade to CITES. We identified the Middle East's emerging role as a driver of demand for exotic pets of all taxa alongside the well-established and increasing role of South America and Southeast Asia in the market. Europe, North America, and the Middle East featured most heavily in trade reports to CITES, whereas trade involving South America and Southeast Asia were given most emphasis in the literature. For effective monitoring of and appropriate response to the international exotic pet trade, it is imperative that the reliability and detail of CITES trade reports improve and that scientific research be directed toward those taxa and locations that are most vulnerable. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Camel as a transboundary vector for emerging exotic Salmonella serovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, Nahed H; Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Zaher, Hala

    2017-05-01

    The current study was conducted to shed light on the role of imported camels as a transboundary vector for emerging exotic Salmonella serovars. Fecal samples were collected from 206 camels directly after slaughtering including 25 local camels and 181 imported ones as well as stool specimens were obtained from 50 slaughterhouse workers at the same abattoir. The obtained samples were cultured while Salmonella serovars were identified through Gram's stain films, biochemical tests and serotyping with antisera kit. Moreover, the obtained Salmonella serovars were examined by PCR for the presence of invA and stn genes. The overall prevalence of Salmonella serovars among the examined camels was 8.3%. Stn gene was detected in the vast majority of exotic strains (11/14) 78.6% including emerging serovars such as Salmonella Saintpaul, S. Chester, S. Typhimurium whereas only one isolate from local camels carried stn gene (1/3) 33.3%. On the other hand, none of the examined humans yielded positive result. Our findings highlight the potential role of imported camels as a transboundary vector for exotic emerging Salomenella serovars.

  3. Infections Associated with Exotic Cuisine: The Dangers of Delicacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Natasha S; Bhadelia, Nahid

    2015-10-01

    "Exotic" food dishes are an expression of regional culture, religion, and ethnicity worldwide. With the increase in international travel to remote areas of the world, globalization of the food supply, and changes in food habits, more people are consuming dishes once considered exotic. Such behavioral changes require awareness by consumers and clinicians about the risks of food-borne infections. This chapter addresses pathogens associated with consumption of raw or undercooked seafood including anisakidosis, Diphyllobothrium latum infection, flukes, and other infectious and toxin-mediated diseases. We discuss the geographic distribution of the pathogens, symptomatology, and basic principles of treatment. Food products derived from turtles, snakes, and other reptiles are reviewed, and we address the risk of gnathostomiasis, sparganosis, trichinellosis, and other pathogens. In discussing infections associated with undercooked beef, pork, and bush meat, we address dysentery, amebiasis, toxoplasmosis, Taenia infections, and risks of novel viral infections, among others. We also review infectious risks from poultry, dairy, and other food items, focusing on those organisms encountered less frequently by clinicians in developed countries. The wide range of infectious organisms related to exotic cuisine underscores the importance of educating the adventurous traveler and warrants continued vigilance on the part of the clinician.

  4. Parent di-nuclear quasimolecular states as exotic resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, N.; Grama, C.; ZamfirescuI, I.

    2003-01-01

    An approach to bound and resonant states in the scattering by a central potential gV(r) with a barrier, based on the global method for all S-matrix poles analysis is presented. The Riemann surface R g (l) over the g-plane, on which the pole function k=k l (g) is single-valued and analytic is constructed. This method provides a new quantum number n with topological significance: it is the label of the sheets of the Riemann surface. New classes of poles and resonant states (exotic) are identified and their properties are studied. One shows that the parent di-nuclear quasimolecular state is an exotic resonant state that corresponds to a S-matrix pole in the neighbourhood of an attractor in the k-plane in the case of a potential made of a well and a Coulomb barrier. The properties of the parent quasimolecular states (energies, widths, deviation from the linear dependence of the energy on l(l + 1), doorway character and criteria for observability) result naturally from general properties of the exotic resonant states. (authors)

  5. Vulnerability of oak-dominated forests in West Virginia to invasive exotic plants: temporal and spatial patterns of nine exotic species using herbarium records and land classification data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia D. Huebner

    2003-01-01

    Are oak-dominated forests immune to invasive exotic plants? Herbarium and land classification data were used to evaluate the extent of spread of nine invasive exotic plants and to relate their distributions to remotely-sensed land use types in West Virginia. Collector-defined habitats indicated that the most common habitat was roadsides, but seven of the nine species...

  6. Reciprocal effects of litter from exotic and congeneric native plant species via soil nutrients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelein Meisner

    Full Text Available Invasive exotic plant species are often expected to benefit exclusively from legacy effects of their litter inputs on soil processes and nutrient availability. However, there are relatively few experimental tests determining how litter of exotic plants affects their own growth conditions compared to congeneric native plant species. Here, we test how the legacy of litter from three exotic plant species affects their own performance in comparison to their congeneric natives that co-occur in the invaded habitat. We also analyzed litter effects on soil processes. In all three comparisons, soil with litter from exotic plant species had the highest respiration rates. In two out of the three exotic-native species comparisons, soil with litter from exotic plant species had higher inorganic nitrogen concentrations than their native congener, which was likely due to higher initial litter quality of the exotics. When litter from an exotic plant species had a positive effect on itself, it also had a positive effect on its native congener. We conclude that exotic plant species develop a legacy effect in soil from the invaded range through their litter inputs. This litter legacy effect results in altered soil processes that can promote both the exotic plant species and their native congener.

  7. Potential Habitats for Exotic Life Within the Life Supporting Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Johannes J.; Firneis, Maria G.; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2010-05-01

    Questions like "Are we alone in the universe?", "How unique is Earth as a planet?" or "How unique is water-based life in the universe?" still are nowhere near of being answered. In recent years, discussions on these topics are more and more influenced by questions whether water is really the only possible solvent, or which conditions are necessary for life to evolve in planetary habitats. A change in our present geocentric mindset on the existence of life is required, in order to address these new questions [see also 1]. In May 2009 a new research platform at the University of Vienna was initiated in order to contribute to the solution of these questions. One task is to find essential biomarkers relevant to the problem of the detection of exotic life. In this context exotic life means: life, which is not necessarily based on a double bond between carbon and oxygen (C=O) and not on water as the only possible solvent. At present little is known about metabolistic systems, which are not based on C=O or on metabolisms which are operative in alternative solvents and a high effort of future laboratory work is necessary to open this window for looking for exotic life. To address the whole spectrum of life the concept of a general life supporting zone is introduced in order to extend the classical habitable zone (which is based on liquid water on a planetary surface, [2]). The life supporting zone of a planetary system is composed of different single "habitable zones" for the liquid phases of specific solvents and composites between water and other solvents. Besides exoplanetary systems which seem to be the most promising place for exotic life in our present understanding, some potential places could also exist within our Solar System and habitats like the subsurface of Enceladus, liquid ethane/methane lakes on Titan or habitable niches in the Venus atmosphere will also be taken into account. A preliminary list of appropriate solvents and their abundances in the Solar

  8. Native weeds and exotic plants: relationships to disturbance in mixed grass prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    The paper compares distributions of native weedy species and exotic species with respect to three kinds of disturbance, roads, trails, and prairie dog towns. Data were collected at the north and south units of Theodore Roosevelt National Park and at Wind Cave National Park. The paper concludes that many exotic species differ substantially from native weeds in their exploitation of disturbance. It is thus not useful to manage exotics as if they were just another weed.

  9. Differences in beta diversity between exotic and native grasslands vary with scale along a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Leanne M; Wilsey, Brian J

    2015-04-01

    Biodiversity can be partitioned into alpha, beta, and gamma components, and beta diversity is not as clearly understood. Biotic homogenization predicts that exotic species should lower beta diversity at global and continental scales, but it is still unclear how exotic species impact beta diversity at smaller scales. Exotic species could theoretically increase or decrease beta diversity relative to natives depending on many factors, including abiotic conditions, community assembly history, management, dispersal rates of species, and connectivity among patches. We sampled plant species abundances in 42 novel, exotic- and native-dominated (remnant) grasslands across a latitudinal gradient in the tallgrass prairie region, and tested whether exotic and native grasslands differed in beta diversity at three scales: across sites within the entire biome, across sites within regions, and across locations within sites. Exotic-dominated grasslands differed from native-dominated grasslands in beta diversity at all scales, but the direction of the difference changed from positive to negative as scales went from large to small. Contrary to expectations, exotic-dominated grasslands had higher beta diversity than native-dominated grasslands at the largest scale considered. This occurred because the identity of dominant exotic species varied across the latitudinal gradient, with many exotic grassland pairs exhibiting zero similarity, whereas native-dominated grasslands differed more gradually with distance. Beta diversity among sites within a region was variable, with exotic-dominated grasslands having 29% higher beta diversity than native grasslands in the south and 33% lower beta diversity in the north. Within sites, beta diversity was 26% lower in exotic-dominated than native grasslands. Our results provide evidence that different regional identities and abundances of exotics, and lack of connectivity in fragmented landscapes can alter beta diversity in unexpected ways across

  10. (2 + 1)D exotic Newton-Hooke symmetry, duality and projective phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Pedro D.; Gomis, Joaquim; Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2007-01-01

    A particle system with a (2 + 1)D exotic Newton-Hooke symmetry is constructed by the method of nonlinear realization. It has three essentially different phases depending on the values of the two central charges. The subcritical and supercritical phases (describing 2D isotropic ordinary and exotic oscillators) are separated by the critical phase (one-mode oscillator), and are related by a duality transformation. In the flat limit, the system transforms into a free Galilean exotic particle on the noncommutative plane. The wave equations carrying projective representations of the exotic Newton-Hooke symmetry are constructed

  11. A Search for Massive Exotic Particles at the NuTeV Neutrino Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Formaggio, Joseph Angelo [Columbia U.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis documents two distinct searches for exotic particles performed at the NuTeV neutrino experiment at Fermilab. The first search focuses on exotic particles with masses below 0.3 GeV/$c^2$ which decay to electrons. The low mass study specifically addresses the KARMEN timing anomaly, which has been interpreted as a signal for an exotic particle with a mass of 33.9 MeV/$c^2$ • The second search - the high mass search- focuses on particles with masses above 2.2 GeV/$c^2$ . The latter is a more general search for exotic particles in a region previously unexplored.

  12. Herbivory and dominance shifts among exotic and congeneric native plant species during plant community establishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelkes, Tim; Meisner, Annelein; Morriën, Elly

    2016-01-01

    exotic plant species due to reduced enemy exposure, few studies have actually analyzed the ecological consequences of this situation in the field. Here, we examined how exposure to aboveground herbivores influences shifts in dominance among exotic and phylogenetically related native plant species...... in a riparian ecosystem during early establishment of invaded communities. We planted ten plant communities each consisting of three individuals of each of six exotic plant species as well as six phylogenetically related natives. Exotic plant species were selected based on a rapid recent increase in regional...

  13. PREFACE: Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Michio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Aoi, Nori

    2006-11-01

    The International Symposium on `Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces' was held at The Koshiba Hall, University of Tokyo, on 9 - 12 March 2006. This symposium was organized as an activity of the Grant-in-Aid for the specially promoted area `Monte Carlo Shell Model' from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture (MEXT) of Japan. The symposium was sponsored by the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) and by RIKEN. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the study of the structure of exotic nuclei and its relationship with nuclear forces. There has been much progress recently in our understanding of what the structure of exotic nuclei is and how it can be linked to nuclear forces, with emerging intriguing perspectives. The following subjects were covered in this symposium Present status and future of the shell model Effective interaction theories Experimental results and perspectives Few-body methods including ab initio calculations Advancements of mean-fieeld models Transition between shell and cluster structure Nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure Particle physics and the shell model Emphasis was placed on the interplay between many-body structures and nuclear forces, and on the experimental clarification of these topics. Around 80 participants attended the symposium and we enjoyed 34 excellent and lively invited talks and 26 oral presentations. The organizing committee consisted of B A Brown (MSU), S Fujii (CNS), M Honma (Aizu), T Kajino (NAO), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Motobayashi (RIKEN), K Muto (TIT), T Otsuka (Chair, Tokyo/CNS/RIKEN), P Ring (TMU), N Shimizu (Scientific Secretary, Tokyo), S Shimoura (CNS), Y Utsuno (Scientific Secretary, JAEA). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium so successful.

  14. An exotic parasitoid provides an invasional lifeline for native parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Joanna K; Haye, Tim; Gariepy, Tara; Mason, Peter; Gillespie, David; McNeil, Jeremy N

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of an exotic species may alter food webs within the ecosystem and significantly affect the biodiversity of indigenous species at different trophic levels. It has been postulated that recent introduction of the brown marmorated stinkbug ( Halyomorpha halys (Stål)) represents an evolutionary trap for native parasitoids, as they accept H. halys egg masses as a host but produce no viable progeny. Interspecific interactions between European egg parasitoid, Trissolcus cultratus (Mayr), and an Asian parasitoid, Trissolcus japonicus (Ashmead), were assessed by providing egg masses to T. cultratus at various time intervals following the initial parasitization by T. japonicus . The suitability of the host for the parasitoid development was re-assessed by providing T. cultratus with fresh and frozen egg masses of various ages. The likelihood of T. cultratus being able to attack previously parasitized egg masses was determined by assessing the duration of egg mass guarding behavior by T. japonicus following parasitization. The results of experiments examining the interspecific interactions between a native European egg parasitoid, T. cultratus , and an Asian parasitoid, T. japonicus (a candidate for the biological control of H. halys ), showed that the native species can act as facultative hyperparasitoid of the exotic one. Although this is only possible during certain stages of T. japonicus development, the presence of the introduced parasitoid may reduce the impact of the evolutionary trap for indigenous parasitoid species. There is a possibility that the occurrence of facultative hyperparasitism between scelionid parasitoids associated with stinkbugs is common. This resulting intraguild predation could promote conservation and stabilization of natural communities by impacting the diversity and population dynamics of native stinkbugs and their parasitoids (e.g., by allowing native parasitoids to avoid wasting reproductive effort on unsuitable

  15. Exotic Attractors of the Nonequilibrium Rabi-Hubbard Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiró, M; Joshi, C; Bordyuh, M; Fazio, R; Keeling, J; Türeci, H E

    2016-04-08

    We explore the phase diagram of the dissipative Rabi-Hubbard model, as could be realized by a Raman-pumping scheme applied to a coupled cavity array. There exist various exotic attractors, including ferroelectric, antiferroelectric, and incommensurate fixed points, as well as regions of persistent oscillations. Many of these features can be understood analytically by truncating to the two lowest lying states of the Rabi model on each site. We also show that these features survive beyond mean field, using matrix product operator simulations.

  16. Calculation of the radii of neutron rich light exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charagi, S.K.; Gupta, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction cross section of a few unstable neutron rich nuclei have been measured using exotic isotope beams produced through the projectile fragmentation process in high energy heavy-ion collisions. Interaction cross section of He, Li, Be and B isotope projectiles with Be, C and Al targets have thus been measured at 790 MeV/nucleon. We have made a comprehensive analysis of the data on the interaction cross section, to extract the radii of these neutron rich light nuclei. 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  17. Overview of the status/results in the exotics sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengping; Li, Changsheng

    2016-11-01

    Many exotic hadronic states beyond the conventional quark model (called char-moniumlike/bottomoniumlike states or XYZ particles) were found in the B-factories or energy scans of the cross sections of e+e- annhilation into conventional quarkonia and light hadrons. Their nature properties were proposed including glueballs, hybrids, multi-quark states, hadron molecules, etc. Dramatic progress was made in the study of the them after the running of the B-factories. In this report, I present the most recent results on the XYZ results from Belle experiment.

  18. Overview of the status/results in the exotics sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chengping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many exotic hadronic states beyond the conventional quark model (called char-moniumlike/bottomoniumlike states or XYZ particles were found in the B-factories or energy scans of the cross sections of e+e− annhilation into conventional quarkonia and light hadrons. Their nature properties were proposed including glueballs, hybrids, multi-quark states, hadron molecules, etc. Dramatic progress was made in the study of the them after the running of the B-factories. In this report, I present the most recent results on the XYZ results from Belle experiment.

  19. Extended gauge symmetry as a possible source of exotic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, G.V.; Pirogov, Y.F.; Sultanov, S.F.

    1986-08-01

    Exotic events at the SPS involving large missing transverse momentum, pp-bar..-->..j(s)ep/sub t//sup (miss)/, j(s)p/sub t//sup (miss)/, are described in the framework of extended gauge symmetry due to production of a heavy gauge boson V with mass approx. =180 GeV/c/sup 2/ and its subsequent decay into the channel q-barQ with Q..-->..qW(Z), where Q is a heavy quark with mass approx. =100 GeV/c/sup 2/, followed by the decay W..-->..enu-bar (Z..--> nu..nu-bar).

  20. Photoproduction of Light and Exotic Mesons in Hall D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Curtis

    2000-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall D collaboration is proposing a program to search for and study gluonic excitations of mesons using 8-9 GeV linearly polarized photon beams. By extending the nearly non-existent meson data in photoproduction, as well as taking advantage of a spin 1 probe, we expect to be able to produce and study hybrid mesons with exotic, or non q-barq quantum numbers. The properties of these mesons yield information on the dynamic nature of gluons, and yield information on the issue of confinement.

  1. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsouleas, T.

    2004-10-11

    The reported results and discussions in the Working Group on High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Concepts are summarized. The working group focused largely on laser-generated proton and ion beams from solid targets, but also considered laser vacuum acceleration results, active media accelerator proposals, ferroelectric-based accelerator technology advances and beam conditioning concepts for free electron lasers. The charge to the working group was to develop a laser-based proton injector exceeding current capabilities in at least one important parameter.

  2. Experiments with beams of exotic nuclei at GSI and FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emling, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The facility for antiproton and ion research FAIR will provide the international science community with a technically novel and in many respects unique accelerator system for a multi-faceted physics program. Rare-isotope beams of much improved quality together with advanced experimental concepts promise detailed experimental investigations of nuclei far away from stability. A brief description of the rare-isotope beam facility at FAIR is presented, which allows to extend substantially the current successful experimental program with exotic nuclei at GSI. (author)

  3. Nanophenomena at surfaces fundamentals of exotic condensed matter phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Michailov, Michail

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art in nanoscale surface physics. It outlines contemporary trends in the field covering a wide range of topical areas: atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces, molecular films and polymer adsorption, biologically inspired nanophysics, surface design and pattern formation, and computer modeling of interfacial phenomena. Bridging 'classical' and 'nano' concepts, the present volume brings attention to the physical background of exotic condensed-matter properties. The book is devoted to Iwan Stranski and Rostislaw Kaischew, remarkable scientists, who played

  4. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fundamental tests of nature with cooled and stored exotic ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The presentation will concentrate on recent applications with exciting results of Penning traps in atomic and nuclear physics with cooled and stored exotic ions. These are high-accuracy mass measurements of short-lived radionuclides, g-factor determinations of the bound-electron in highly-charged, hydrogen-like ions and g-factor measurements of the proton and antiproton. The experiments are dedicated, e.g., to astrophysics studies and to tests of fundamental symmetries in the case of mass measurements on radionuclides, and to the determination of fundamental constants and a CPT test in the case of the g-factor measurements.

  6. Exotic pets are new allergenic sources: allergy to iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel-Moncín, M M; Pineda, F; Río, C; Alonso, R; Tella, R; Cisteró-Bahima, A

    2006-01-01

    Although furry animals are known sources of respiratory allergy, scaly animals are assumed not to be allergenic. Exotic animals such as iguanas are becoming increasingly common pets. Nevertheless, these animals are not suspected to be allergenic. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman suffering from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma caused by a pet iguana. Clear IgE-sensitization and respiratory allergy to iguana scales is demonstrated, suggesting that scaly pets should be taken into account as possible allergenic sources.

  7. Study of nuclear level densities for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Sepiani, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear level density is one of the properties of nuclei with widespread applications in astrophysics and nuclear medicine. Since there has been little experimental and theoretical research on the study of nuclei which are far from stability line, studying nuclear level density for these nuclei is of crucial importance. Also, as nuclear level density is an important input for nuclear research codes, hence studying the methods for calculation of this parameter is essential. Besides introducing various methods and models for calculating nuclear level density for practical applications, we used exact spectra distribution (SPDM) for determining nuclear level density of two neutron and proton enriched exotic nuclei with the same mass number.

  8. Radial excitations and exotic mesons via QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govaerts, J.

    1985-01-01

    We continue our investigation of anti qqG states via QCD sum rules. Using previous results for the vacuum polarization functions we study both states with equal mass quarks and open flavour states for J=0 and 1 with all possible combinations for the P and C quantum numbers, including several exotic combinations. Definite predictions are obtained in several channels. As before the resulting mass values come out high, but some of the states found can be connected to radial excitations of ordinary quarkonium states. (orig.)

  9. Properties of exotic matter for heavy-ion searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffner-Bielich, J.; Greiner, C.; Stoecker, H.; Vischer, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the properties of both forms of strange matter, small lumps of strange quark matter (strangelets) and of strange hadronic matter (metastable exotic multihypernuclear objects (MEMOs)) and their relevance for present and future heavy-ion searches. The strong and weak decays are discussed separately to distinguish between long- and short-lived candidates where the former ones are detectable in present heavy-ion experiments while the latter ones are present in future heavy-ion experiments, respectively. We find some long-lived strangelet candidates which are highly negatively charged with a mass-to-charge ratio like a anti deuteron (M/Z approx.= -2) but masses of A 10-16. We also predict many short-lived candidates, both in quark and hadronic form, which can be highly charged. Purely hyperonic nuclei such as the Ξα (2Ξ 0 2Ξ - ) are bound and have a negative charge while carrying a positive baryon number. We also demonstrate that multiply charmed exotics (charmlets) might be bound and can be produced at future heavy-ion colliders. (author)

  10. Exotic nuclei: α-decay, direct reactions and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Arun K.

    2003-01-01

    With input parameters from the microscopic studies of stable nuclei and their variations with respect to energy, density, asymmetry etc. one expects to describe the decay of unstable nuclei, their microscopic structure and various scattering and reaction cross sections. The exotic nuclei, both in the lower-mass region as well as in the super-heavy region also should be accessible for predictions and verification. Somehow the direct nuclear reactions of the transfer and knockout type, employed to investigate quantitatively the microscopic behaviour of nuclei, have been only marginally successful. Successful resolution of some of the striking gross disagreements between theory and observations has been achieved now. The manner in which information of the microscopic structure and the effective nuclear interaction affect the predictive power of the direct reactions is found to be remarkable. In the α-decay of heavy nuclei also the microscopic structure information of the target and residual nuclei play decisive role in the values of decay energy and half-life. The interior and surface parts of the α-particle residual nucleus effective interaction, control the energy and decay rates. Fitting the observations with microscopic model values lead to the required predictive power for decay properties of super-heavy nuclei. In a similar manner the analysis of scattering and reactions involving light exotic-nuclei gives information about their microscopic structure. (author)

  11. Introduction: Exotic Annual Bromus in the Western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Matthew; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brown, Cynthia S.

    2016-01-01

    The spread and impacts of exotic species are unambiguous, global threats to many ecosystems. A prominent example is the suite of annual grasses in the Bromus genus (Bromus hereafter) that originate from Europe and Eurasia but have invaded or are invading large areas of the Western USA. This book brings a diverse, multidisciplinary group of authors together to synthesize current knowledge, research needs, and management implications for Bromus. Exotic plant invasions are multifaceted problems, and understanding and managing them requires the biological, ecological, sociological, and economic perspectives that are integrated in this book. Knowing how well information from one geographic or environmental setting can transfer to another is a key need for broadly distributed Bromus species especially given ongoing climate change. Thus, the chapters in the book compare and contrast invasibility of different ecoregions and invasiveness of different Bromus species. A universal theme is managing for ecosystems that are resilient to disturbance and resistant to invasion which will be essential for adaptation to the human-caused problem of Bromus in the Western USA.

  12. Reduced mycorrhizal responsiveness leads to increased competitive tolerance in an invasive exotic plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauren P. Waller; Ragan M. Callaway; John N. Klironomos; Yvette K. Ortega; John L. Maron

    2016-01-01

    1. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can exert a powerful influence on the outcome of plant–plant competition. Since some exotic plants interact differently with soil biota such as AM fungi in their new range, range-based shifts in AM responsiveness could shift competitive interactions between exotic and resident plants, although this remains poorly studied. 2. We...

  13. Novel chemistry of invasive plants: exotic species have more unique metabolomic profiles than native congeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macel, M.; de Vos, R.C.H.; Jansen, J.J.; Van der Putten, W.H.; Van Dam, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    t is often assumed that exotic plants can become invasive when they possess novel secondary chemistry compared with native plants in the introduced range. Using untargeted metabolomic fingerprinting, we compared a broad range of metabolites of six successful exotic plant species and their native

  14. Parent tree distance-dependent recruitment limitation of native and exotic invasive seedlings in urban forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-García, L.B.; Pietrangelo, O.; Antunes, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Urban forests are more vulnerable to exotic species invasions than natural forests and are often a pathway for exotic invasions into natural areas. Investigating the mechanisms responsible for species coexistence in urban ecosystems is important to prevent forest invasions and conserve native

  15. The superior re-sprouting performance of exotic grass species under different environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caramaschi, Giovanna M.C.L.; Moribe Barbosa, Eduardo; Silva, da Dulce A.; Braga, Violeta B.; Borghetti, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The invasive success of exotic grass species has been linked to a better physiological performance under a variety of environmental conditions. Several studies showed that disturbances such as fire and herbivory might favor invasions by exotic grasses in detrimental of native species. However,

  16. New approaches for sampling and modeling native and exotic plant species richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, G.W.; Reich, R.M.; Kalkhan, M.A.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate new multi-phase, multi-scale approaches for sampling and modeling native and exotic plant species to predict the spread of invasive species and aid in control efforts. Our test site is a 54,000-ha portion of Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. This work is based on previous research wherein we developed vegetation sampling techniques to identify hot spots of diversity, important rare habitats, and locations of invasive plant species. Here we demonstrate statistical modeling tools to rapidly assess current patterns of native and exotic plant species to determine which habitats are most vulnerable to invasion by exotic species. We use stepwise multiple regression and modified residual kriging to estimate numbers of native species and exotic species, as well as probability of observing an exotic species in 30 × 30-m cells. Final models accounted for 62% of the variability observed in number of native species, 51% of the variability observed in number of exotic species, and 47% of the variability associated with observing an exotic species. Important independent variables used in developing the models include geographical location, elevation, slope, aspect, and Landsat TM bands 1-7. These models can direct resource managers to areas in need of further inventory, monitoring, and exotic species control efforts.

  17. Effects of biological control agents and exotic plant invasion on deer mouse populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette K. Ortega; Dean E. Pearson; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2004-01-01

    Exotic insects are commonly introduced as biological control agents to reduce densities of invasive exotic plants. Although current biocontrol programs for weeds take precautions to minimize ecological risks, little attention is paid to the potential nontarget effects of introduced food subsidies on native consumers. Previous research demonstrated that two gall flies (...

  18. Search for Multi-quark Exotic States with Heavy Flavor at D0 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Alexei [Serpukhov, IHEP

    2017-12-20

    We present the results for multi-quark exotic states search from D0 Collaboration at the FNAL Tevatron. This includes an evidence for a state (X(5568)) with hadronic decays of Bs meson, a confirmation of the X(5568) state with semileptonic decays of Bs meson, and a search for exotic baryons decaying to J/ψΛ pairs.

  19. Risk maps for targeting exotic plant pest detection programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.D. Magarey; D.M. Borchert; J.S. Engle; M Garcia-Colunga; Frank H. Koch; et al

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, pest risk maps are used by the Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey for spatial and temporal targeting of exotic plant pest detection programs. Methods are described to create standardized host distribution, climate and pathway risk maps for the top nationally ranked exotic pest targets. Two examples are provided to illustrate the risk mapping...

  20. Exotic plant traits lead to functional diversity decline in novel ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exotic species have become common and even dominant in some grasslands forming novel ecosystems because the species in them have no common evolutionary history. Recent work on these novel ecosystems suggest that exotic species contribute to diversity declines. In order to identify the plant traits...

  1. Factors relating to regional and local success of exotic plant species in their new range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speek, T.A.A.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Ozinga, W.A.; Tamis, W.L.M.; Schaminee, J.H.J.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim  To estimate invasiveness of exotic plant species, many studies have used the frequency of occurrence within a defined region. This measure is informative on how widespread exotics are, however, it does not inform on their local dominance, which is crucial for conservation of biodiversity and

  2. Factors relating to regional and local success of exotic plant species in their new range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speek, T.A.A.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Ozinga, W.A.; Tamis, W.L.M.; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim - To estimate invasiveness of exotic plant species, many studies have used the frequency of occurrence within a defined region. This measure is informative on how widespread exotics are, however, it does not inform on their local dominance, which is crucial for conservation of biodiversity and

  3. The experimental study of exotic nuclear states using multi-detector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 97–103. The experimental study of exotic nuclear states using multi-detector arrays. D L WATSON. Department of Physics, University of York, YO10 5DD, UK. Abstract. This contribution outlines the work of the CHARISSA collaboration in the investiga- tion of exotic states in nuclei. It outlines the background to the work, ...

  4. Reciprocal effects of litter from exotic and congeneric native plant species via soil nutrients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meisner, A.; De Boer, W.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Invasive exotic plant species are often expected to benefit exclusively from legacy effects of their litter inputs on soil processes and nutrient availability. However, there are relatively few experimental tests determining how litter of exotic plants affects their own growth conditions compared to

  5. A review of impacts by invasive exotic plants on forest ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Devine; Songlin. Fei

    2011-01-01

    Many of our forest ecosystems are at risk due to the invasion of exotic invasive plant species. Invasive plant species pose numerous threats to ecosystems by decreasing biodiversity, deteriorating ecosystem processes, and degrading ecosystem services. Literature on Kentucky's most invasive exotic plant species was examined to understand their potential impacts on...

  6. Novel chemistry of invasive plants: exotic species have more unique metabolomic profiles than native congeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macel, M.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Jansen, J.J.; Putten, van der W.H.; Dam, van N.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that exotic plants can become invasive when they possess novel secondary chemistry compared with native plants in the introduced range. Using untargeted metabolomic fingerprinting, we compared a broad range of metabolites of six successful exotic plant species and their native

  7. Effects of exotic invasive trees on nitrogen cycling: a case study in Central Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro-Diez, P.; González-Muñoz, N.; Alonso, A.; Gallardo, A.; Poorter, L.

    2009-01-01

    We assess the hypothesis that rates of nitrogen transformations in the soil are altered upon replacement of native by exotic trees, differing in litter properties. Ailanthus altissima and Robinia pseudoacacia, two common exotic trees naturalized in the Iberian Peninsula, were compared with the

  8. Nest site selection in native and exotic trees by Black-chinned Hummingbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch; Jeffrey Kelly

    2002-01-01

    We studied nest site selection and nesting success in Black-chinned Hummingbirds (Archilochus alexandri) along the middle Rio Grande, New Mexico. The study was conducted in association with an exotic woody plant removal program to determine whether the removal of exotic plants would affect wildlife populations and nesting success, either positively or negatively. Point...

  9. On exotic hybrid meson production in γ*γ collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Teryaev, O.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Universite de Liege; Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay; Wallon, S.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of exotic hybrid meson (J PC =1 -+ ) production in photon-photon collisions where one of the photons is deeply virtual, including twist two and twist three contributions. We calculate the cross section of this process, which turns out to be large enough to imply sizeable counting rates in the present high luminosity electron-positron colliders. We emphasize the importance of the πη decay channel for the detection of the hybrid meson candidate π 1 (1400) and calculate the cross section and the angular distribution for πη pair production in the unpolarized case. This angular distribution is a useful tool for disentangling the hybrid meson signal from the background. Finally, we calculate the single spin asymmetry associated with one initial longitudinally polarized lepton. (orig.)

  10. Human behavioral regularity, fractional Brownian motion, and exotic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-08-01

    The mix of competition and cooperation (C&C) is ubiquitous in human society, which, however, remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental method. Here, by developing a Janus game for treating C&C between two sides (suppliers and consumers), we show, for the first time, experimental and simulation evidences for human behavioral regularity. This property is proved to be characterized by fractional Brownian motion associated with an exotic transition between periodic and nonperiodic phases. Furthermore, the periodic phase echoes with business cycles, which are well-known in reality but still far from being well understood. Our results imply that the Janus game could be a fundamental method for studying C&C among humans in society, and it provides guidance for predicting human behavioral activity from the perspective of fractional Brownian motion.

  11. Exotic nuclei with charm and bottom flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibility of existence of exotic nuclei containing charm and bottom mesons. We study the interaction between $ar{D}$ (B mesons and nucleons from view of heavy quark symmetry, and derive the one pion exchange potentials. We apply these potentials to the two body system of $ar{D}$ (B meson and nucleon N , and find there are possible stable bound states with spin JP = 1/2− and isospin I = 0. We find that the tensor interaction mixing $ar{D}$N and $ar{D}$*N (BN and B*N plays an important role. We also qualitatively discuss the possible bound states of $ar{D}$ (B meson and two nucleons.

  12. EXOTIC SPECIES OF SOCOTRA ISLAND, YEMEN: A FIRST CONTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. SOMASHEKAR

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A first inventory of the exotic species of Socotra has been compiled on the basis of the published literature and original distribution data collected by field surveys from 2006 to 2008. A strictly geographical and conservative approach was adopted including only cultivated species and those with a native range separated from Socotra territory. The extracted aliens (87 taxa, 68 genera, 40 family represent approximately 9% of the total flora of the region (850 taxa. Most were introduced in the past 10 to 20 years. Agricultural cultivated or crop species dominated with 38 species (43.7%, fruit followed by basing 14 species (16.1% and ruder or ornamental species (35 species, 40.2%.

  13. COHERENT constraints to conventional and exotic neutrino physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulias, D. K.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2018-02-01

    The process of neutral-current coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering, consistent with the Standard Model (SM) expectation, has been recently measured by the COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source. On the basis of the observed signal and our nuclear calculations for the relevant Cs and I isotopes, the extracted constraints on both conventional and exotic neutrino physics are updated. The present study concentrates on various SM extensions involving vector and tensor nonstandard interactions as well as neutrino electromagnetic properties, with an emphasis on the neutrino magnetic moment and the neutrino charge radius. Furthermore, models addressing a light sterile neutrino state and scenarios with new propagator fields—such as vector Z' and scalar bosons—are examined, and the corresponding regions excluded by the COHERENT experiment are presented.

  14. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhardt, L. E.; Blackmon, J. C.; Matos, M.; Mondello, L. L.; Zganjar, E. F.; Johnson, E.; Rogachev, G.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2010-11-01

    The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array that is targeted primarily towards reaction studies with radioactive ion beams at FSU and the NSCL. ANASEN consists of 40 double-sided silicon-strip detectors backed with CsI scintillators and an innovative gas counter design that allows operation in a gas target/detector mode and experiments covering a broad range of center-of-mass energies simultaneously. Electronics based on ASIC components are being implemented to achieve a high channel count at low cost. Prototypes of all the detector components have been fabricated and are currently being tested. Performance of the individual components and plans for the first experiments that aim to improve our knowledge of the nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions will be reported.

  15. Exotic smoothness and physics differential topology and spacetime models

    CERN Document Server

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, T

    2007-01-01

    The recent revolution in differential topology related to the discovery of non-standard ("exotic") smoothness structures on topologically trivial manifolds such as R4 suggests many exciting opportunities for applications of potentially deep importance for the spacetime models of theoretical physics, especially general relativity. This rich panoply of new differentiable structures lies in the previously unexplored region between topology and geometry. Just as physical geometry was thought to be trivial before Einstein, physicists have continued to work under the tacit - but now shown to be incorrect - assumption that differentiability is uniquely determined by topology for simple four-manifolds. Since diffeomorphisms are the mathematical models for physical coordinate transformations, Einstein's relativity principle requires that these models be physically inequivalent. This book provides an introductory survey of some of the relevant mathematics and presents preliminary results and suggestions for further app...

  16. New results on exotic baryon resonances at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Observation of exotic resonant structures decaying into $J/\\psi p$ found in the LHCb experiment is discussed. Examination of the $J/\\psi p$ system in $\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\to J/\\psi K^{-} p$ decays shows two states, each of which must be composed of at least $c \\bar{c} uud$ quarks, and are thus consistent with pentaquarks. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. Their masses are ($4 380 \\pm 8 \\pm 29$) MeV and ($4 449.8 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 2.5$) MeV, and their corresponding widths are ($205 \\pm 18 \\pm 86$) MeV, and ($39 \\pm 5 \\pm 19$) MeV. The preferred $J^{P}$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  17. Exotic particle searches using the Purdue AMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javorsek, D. II; Elmore, D.; Fischbach, E.; Miller, T.

    2001-01-01

    Two exotic particle searches are being performed using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) at the Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab). Recent theoretical developments allow for the possibility of small violations of the symmetrization postulate, which may lead in turn to detectable violations of the Pauli exclusion principle. We report the results of a new experimental search for paronic (Pauli-violating) Be, denoted by Be', in samples where Be' retention would be highest. Our limits represent an improvement by a factor of approximately 300 over a previous search for Be'. There are also several recent cosmological motivations for strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs). We present results from our current search for anomalous heavy isotopes of Au in samples of Australian and laboratory gold with a limit on SIMP abundance ratios as low as 10 -12 . This experiment provides significant constraints on the existence of such particles in high Z nuclei

  18. An exotic k-essence interpretation of interactive cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, Monica [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-01-15

    We define a generalization of scalar fields with non-canonical kinetic term which we call exotic k-essence or, briefly, exotik. These fields are generated by the global description of cosmological models with two interactive fluids in the dark sector and under certain conditions they correspond to usual k-essences. The formalism is applied to the cases of constant potential and of inverse square potential and also we develop the purely exotik version for the modified holographic Ricci type (MHR) of dark energy, where the equations of state are not constant. With the kinetic function F = 1 + mx and the inverse square potential we recover, through the interaction term, the identification between k-essences and quintessences of an exponential potential, already known for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi type I geometries. Worked examples are shown that include the self-interacting MHR and also models with crossing of the phantom divide line (PDL). (orig.)

  19. A universal explanation of tunneling conductance in exotic superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongbae; Abergel, D S L

    2016-08-11

    A longstanding mystery in understanding cuprate superconductors is the inconsistency between the experimental data measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In particular, the gap between prominent side peaks observed in STS is much bigger than the superconducting gap observed by ARPES measurements. Here, we reconcile the two experimental techniques by generalising a theory which was previously applied to zero-dimensional mesoscopic Kondo systems to strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) exotic superconductors. We show that the side peaks observed in tunneling conductance measurements in all these materials have a universal origin: They are formed by coherence-mediated tunneling under bias and do not directly reflect the underlying density of states (DOS) of the sample. We obtain theoretical predictions of the tunneling conductance and the density of states of the sample simultaneously and show that for cuprate and pnictide superconductors, the extracted sample DOS is consistent with the superconducting gap measured by ARPES.

  20. On Emergent Physics, "Unparticles" and Exotic "Unmatter" States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergent physics refers to the formation and evolution of collective patterns in systems that are nonlinear and out-of-equilibrium. This type of large-scale behavior often develops as a result of simple interactions at the component level and involves a dynamic interplay between order and randomness. On account of its universality, there are credible hints that emergence may play a leading role in the Tera-ElectronVolt (TeV sector of particle physics. Following this path, we examine the possibility of hypothetical high-energy states that have fractional number of quanta per state and consist of arbitrary mixtures of particles and antiparticles. These states are similar to "un-particles", massless fields of non-integral scaling dimensions that were recently conjectured to emerge in the TeV sector of particle physics. They are also linked to "unmatter", exotic clusters of matter and antimatter introduced few years ago in the context of Neutrosophy.

  1. Can extra dimensional effects allow wormholes without exotic matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Sayan, E-mail: sayan@iitkgp.ac.in [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721 302 (India); Lahiri, Sayantani, E-mail: sayantani.lahiri@gmail.com [Institute for Physics, University Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); ZARM, University of Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); SenGupta, Soumitra, E-mail: tpssg@iacs.res.in [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mallick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2015-11-12

    We explore the existence of Lorentzian wormholes in the context of an effective on-brane, scalar-tensor theory of gravity. In such theories, the timelike convergence condition, which is always violated for wormholes, has contributions, via the field equations, from on-brane matter as well as from an effective geometric stress energy generated by a bulk-induced radion field. It is shown that, for a class of wormholes, the required on-brane matter, as seen by an on-brane observer in the Jordan frame, is not exotic and does not violate the Weak Energy Condition. The presence of the effective geometric stress energy in addition to on-brane matter is largely responsible for creating this intriguing possibility. Thus, if such wormholes are ever found to exist in the Universe, they would clearly provide pointers towards the existence of a warped extra dimension as proposed in the two-brane model of Randall and Sundrum.

  2. Non-SM Exotic Higgs: Beyond SM and MSSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacaprara Stefano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A review of the searches for exotic Higgs boson beyond standard model and minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM, from experiments at the Tevatron and LHC, is presented. Several different models have been considered, including extensions to standard model with fourth generation of fermions, fermiophobic Higgs, next-to-MSSM models, seesaw type-II, and rare decay of Higgs boson to hidden sector. For next-to- MSSM models several final states have been considered, including light pseudo-scalar Higgs decay into taus, muons, and photons, as well as charged Higgs boson. The searches has been performed with re-interpretation of results from standard model Higgs search as well as on new signatures.

  3. Nuclear-structure studies of exotic nuclei with MINIBALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, P. A.; Cederkall, J.; Reiter, P.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy has been established at ISOLDE for nuclear-structure and nuclear-reaction studies with reaccelerated radioactive ion beams provided by the REX-ISOLDE facility. The MINIBALL spectrometer comprises 24 six-fold segmented, encapsulated high-purity germanium crystals. It was specially designed for highest γ-ray detection efficiency which is advantageous for low-intensity radioactive ion beams. The MINIBALL array has been used in numerous Coulomb-excitation and transfer-reaction experiments with exotic ion beams of energies up to 3 MeV A-1. The physics case covers a wide range of topics which are addressed with beams ranging from neutron-rich magnesium isotopes up to heavy radium isotopes. In the future the HIE-ISOLDE will allow the in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy program to proceed with higher secondary-beam intensity, higher beam energy and better beam quality.

  4. A new perspective on trait differences between native and invasive exotic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, A Joshua; James, Jeremy J; Monaco, Thomas A; Sheley, Roger L

    2014-02-01

    Functional differences between native and exotic species potentially constitute one factor responsible for plant invasion. Differences in trait values between native and exotic invasive species, however, should not be considered fixed and may depend on the context of the comparison. Furthermore, the magnitude of difference between native and exotic species necessary to trigger invasion is unknown. We propose a criterion that differences in trait values between a native and exotic invasive species must be greater than differences between co-occurring natives for this difference to be ecologically meaningful and a contributing factor to plant invasion. We used a meta-analysis to quantify the difference between native and exotic invasive species for various traits examined in previous studies and compared this value to differences among native species reported in the same studies. The effect size between native and exotic invasive species was similar to the effect size between co-occurring natives except for studies conducted in the field; in most instances, our criterion was not met although overall differences between native and exotic invasive species were slightly larger than differences between natives. Consequently, trait differences may be important in certain contexts, but other mechanisms of invasion are likely more important in most cases. We suggest that using trait values as predictors of invasion will be challenging.

  5. Cross-attraction between an exotic and a native pine bark beetle: a novel invasion mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Lu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Aside from the ecological impacts, invasive species fascinate ecologists because of the unique opportunities that invasives offer in the study of community ecology. Some hypotheses have been proposed to illustrate the mechanisms that allow exotics to become invasive. However, positive interactions between exotic and native insects are rarely utilized to explain invasiveness of pests.Here, we present information on a recently formed association between a native and an exotic bark beetle on their shared host, Pinus tabuliformis, in China. In field examinations, we found that 35-40% of P. tabuliformis attacked by an exotic bark beetle, Dendroctonus valens, were also attacked by a native pine bark beetle, Hylastes parallelus. In the laboratory, we found that the antennal and walking responses of H. parallelus to host- and beetle-produced compounds were similar to those of the exotic D. valens in China. In addition, D. valens was attracted to volatiles produced by the native H. parallelus.We report, for the first time, facilitation between an exotic and a native bark beetle seems to involve overlap in the use of host attractants and pheromones, which is cross-attraction. The concept of this interspecific facilitation could be explored as a novel invasive mechanism which helps explain invasiveness of not only exotic bark beetles but also other introduced pests in principle. The results reported here also have particularly important implications for risk assessments and management strategies for invasive species.

  6. Exotic Dance in Baltimore: From Entry to STI/HIV Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilleston, Pamela S; Reuben, Jacqueline; Sherman, Susan G

    2015-01-01

    Research has documented health risks associated with sex work, but few U.S. studies have focused on the exotic dance industry. We undertook this study to describe the factors that influenced women's entry into exotic dance and explored the relation of these forces to their subsequent sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV risk trajectory. Qualitative interviews (N = 25) were conducted with female exotic dancers from June through August 2009. Data were analyzed through Atlas-ti using an inductive approach. Economic vulnerability was the primary force behind women's initiation into the profession. Drug use, physical abuse, and enjoyment of dancing were often concurrent with economic need and provided a further push toward exotic dance. Social networks facilitated entry by normalizing the profession and presenting it as a solution to financial hardship. Characteristics of exotic dance clubs, such as immediate hire and daily pay, attracted women in a state of financial vulnerability. Women's motivations for dancing, including economic vulnerability and drug use practices, shaped their STI/HIV risk once immersed in the club environment, with social networks often facilitating sexual risk behavior. Understanding the factors that drive women to exotic dance and influence risk behavior in the club may assist in the development of targeted harm reduction interventions for exotic dancers.

  7. Native weeds and exotic plants: Relationships to disturbance in mixed-grass prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Disturbance frequently is implicated in the spread of invasive exotic plants. Disturbances may be broadly categorized as endogenous (e.g., digging by fossorial animals) or exogenous (e.g., construction and maintenance of roads and trails), just as weedy species may be native or exotic in origin. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare exotic and native weedy plant occurrence in and near three classes of disturbance -digging by prairie dogs (an endogenous disturbance to which native plants have had the opportunity to adapt), paved or gravel roads (an exogenous disturbance without natural precedent), and constructed trails (an exogenous disturbance with a natural precedent in trails created by movement of large mammals) - in three geographically separate national park units. I used plant survey data from the North and South Units of Theodore Roosevelt National Park and Wind Cave National Park in the northern mixed-grass prairie of western North and South Dakota, USA, to characterize the distribution of weedy native and exotic plants with respect to the three disturbance classes as well as areas adjacent to them. There were differences both in the susceptibility of the disturbance classes to invasion and in the distributions of native weeds and exotic species among the disturbance classes. Both exotic and native weedy species richness were greatest in prairie dog towns and community composition there differed most from undisturbed areas. Exotic species were more likely to thrive near roadways, where native weedy species were infrequently encountered. Exotic species were more likely to have spread beyond the disturbed areas into native prairie than were weedy native species. The response of individual exotic plant species to the three types of disturbance was less consistent than that of native weedy species across the three park units.

  8. Vermicomposting of Solid Waste Using Local and Exotic Earthworms: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Krishan; Ajit, Kumar; Arthanareeswari, M; Kamaraj, P

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the decomposition efficiency of earthworms, local (L.mauritii) as well as exotic (Eisenia foetida) in vermicomposting of garden litter in SRM University campus. The vermicompost produced through vermicomposting of garden litter mixed with cow dung in the ratio of 3:1 by using local and exotic earthworms (Eisenia foetida) was rich in ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, available phosphorus, total potassium and TKN, and there was a reduction in total organic carbon and carbon to nitrogen ratio. The study reveals that the decomposition efficiency of exotic earthworms is better compared to local earthworms.

  9. Thiamin, riboflavin, and alpha-tocopherol content of exotic meats and loss due to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakritz, L; Fox, J B; Thayer, D W

    1998-12-01

    Changes in thiamin, riboflavin, and alpha-tocopherol concentrations due to gamma irradiation were followed in alligator, caiman, bison, and ostrich (exotic) meats. The proximate composition showed that the exotic meats generally had lower fat content than domestic animal meats and that the thiamin content of the reptiles was lower. The changes in the vitamins due to irradiation were similar to those previously observed for domestic species. The results indicate that the loss of vitamins in these species is negligible insofar as the American diet is concerned, and that the concept of "chemiclearance" is applicable to exotic meats.

  10. Fitness dynamics within a poplar hybrid zone: II. Impact of exotic sex on native poplars in an urban jungle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Amanda D; MacQuarrie, Chris Jk; Gros-Louis, Marie-Claude; Simpson, J Dale; Lamarche, Josyanne; Beardmore, Tannis; Thompson, Stacey L; Tanguay, Philippe; Isabel, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    Trees bearing novel or exotic gene components are poised to contribute to the bioeconomy for a variety of purposes such as bioenergy production, phytoremediation, and carbon sequestration within the forestry sector, but sustainable release of trees with novel traits in large-scale plantations requires the quantification of risks posed to native tree populations. Over the last century, exotic hybrid poplars produced through artificial crosses were planted throughout eastern Canada as ornamentals or windbreaks and these exotics provide a proxy by which to examine the fitness of exotic poplar traits within the natural environment to assess risk of exotic gene escape, establishment, and spread into native gene pools. We assessed postzygotic fitness traits of native and exotic poplars within a naturally regenerated stand in eastern Canada (Quebec City, QC). Pure natives (P. balsamifera and P. deltoides spp. deltoides), native hybrids (P. deltoides × P. balsamifera), and exotic hybrids (trees bearing Populus nigra and P. maximowiczii genetic components) were screened for reproductive biomass, yield, seed germination, and fungal disease susceptibility. Exotic hybrids expressed fitness traits intermediate to pure species and were not significantly different from native hybrids. They formed fully viable seed and backcrossed predominantly with P. balsamifera. These data show that exotic hybrids were not unfit and were capable of establishing and competing within the native stand. Future research will seek to examine the impact of exotic gene regions on associated biotic communities to fully quantify the risk exotic poplars pose to native poplar forests.

  11. Campylobacteriosis in returning travellers and potential secondary transmission of exotic strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mughini-Gras, L; Smid, J H; Wagenaar, J. A.; de Boer, A.; Havelaar, A H; Friesema, I H M; French, N P; Graziani, C; Busani, L; Van Pelt, W

    Multilocus sequence types (STs) were determined for 232 and 737 Campylobacter jejuni/coli isolates from Dutch travellers and domestically acquired cases, respectively. Putative risk factors for travel-related campylobacteriosis, and for domestically acquired campylobacteriosis caused by exotic STs

  12. Preliminary results on observation of genetic relations among the exotic cosmic-ray phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, S.

    1984-01-01

    In order to see the genetic hypothesis on the exotic interactions, a systematic study is made for the Chiron-type families on their secondary interactions in the emulsion chamber, and the results are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  13. White dwarfs as a source of constraints on exotic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Malec, B

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review main ideas underlying the constraints on exotic physics coming from Astrophysics already used by the others. Next we present a new bound coming from the White Dwarf cooling. Such stringent bound is possible due to accurate measurements offered by astro-seismology. Specifically we consider the G117-B15A pulsating white dwarf (ZZ Ceti star) for which the speed of the period increase has been accurately measured for its fundamental oscillation mode. It has been claimed that this mode detected in G117-B15A is perhaps the most stable oscillation ever recorded in the optical band. Then we review our result concerning the bounds on compactification scale in the theory with large extra dimensions according to Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (1998). Because an additional channel of energy loss (Kaluza-Klein gravitons) would speed up the cooling rate, one is able to use the aforementioned stability to derive a bound on compactification scale. We find the lower bound on compactificatio...

  14. Duality, exchange-degeneracy breaking, and exotic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, G.R.; Haridas, P.

    1979-01-01

    We study the connection between exchange-degeneracy breaking and multiquark states within the framework of a highly constrained dual approach. We show that M 4 (baryonium) states emerge at the daughter trajectory level as a consequence of small exchange-degeneracy breaking in the meson-meson system (approx.delta) and larger exchange-degeneracy breaking of the baryon trajectories in the meson-baryon system (approx.epsilon). The M 4 states are coupled weakly to external mesons in proportion to the breaking parameter delta. Assuming M 4 couplings to B-barB channels are strong, as determined by duality with normal mesons in the B-barB system, consistency requires epsilon approx. √delta-bar, thereby relating the larger breaking of baryon trajectories to the violation of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-type rule for M 4 . It is shown that exotic baryon states, B 5 , also emerge from this scheme at the daughter level and that dibaryons will appear at the second daughter level

  15. Rotating neutron stars with exotic cores: masses, radii, stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.; Fortin, M.; Zdunik, L. [Polish Academy of Sciences, N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    A set of theoretical mass-radius relations for rigidly rotating neutron stars with exotic cores, obtained in various theories of dense matter, is reviewed. Two basic observational constraints are used: the largest measured rotation frequency (716Hz) and the maximum measured mass (2M {sub CircleDot}). The present status of measuring the radii of neutron stars is described. The theory of rigidly rotating stars in general relativity is reviewed and limitations of the slow rotation approximation are pointed out. Mass-radius relations for rotating neutron stars with hyperon and quark cores are illustrated using several models. Problems related to the non-uniqueness of the crust-core matching are mentioned. Limits on rigid rotation resulting from the mass-shedding instability and the instability with respect to the axisymmetric perturbations are summarized. The problem of instabilities and of the back-bending phenomenon are discussed in detail. Metastability and instability of a neutron star core in the case of a first-order phase transition, both between pure phases, and into a mixed-phase state, are reviewed. The case of two disjoint families (branches) of rotating neutron stars is discussed and generic features of neutron-star families and of core-quakes triggered by the instabilities are considered. (orig.)

  16. Contamination of the Arctic by exotic air toxics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.; Landers, D.

    1991-01-01

    Various kinds of atmospheric pollutants are commonly known to occur in arctic environments. These include organic contaminants, pollutants associated with fossil fuel combustion, smelting, industrial development, and radionuclides. Recently, additional concern has arisen from studies suggesting that at least some atmospheric contaminants may be susceptible to poleward redistribution as a result of their physical and chemical properties. Thus, contamination of the arctic may be exacerbated by the tendency of selected contaminants produced at lower latitudes to be transported to polar regions and incorporated into high latitude food chains. Although awareness of exotic contaminants in high latitude food chains is not new, regional baseline data are needed to document the spatial extent and magnitude of this potentially serious problem. The US Arctic is little studied in this regard relative to several other circumpolar nations (e.g., Canada, Sweden); over the next year the authors will be designing a regional survey to begin remedying this information gap. A major focus of this activity will be to ensure compatibility with both ongoing international studies of arctic contamination, and the USEPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. Issues related to sampling design will be outlined and discussed

  17. Search for signatures with top, bottom, tau and exotics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrea Favareto; Luigi Longo

    2016-01-01

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics is a sensational success, especially since the discov- ery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson. However, there are still several open questions that the Standard Model doesnâ??t address, like the nature of dark matter and dark energy, the matter-antimatter asym- metry, the neutrino oscillations, the inconsistency with the general relativity and the hierarchy problem. Theories Beyond the Standard Model (BSM), such as Supersymmetry, Little and Com- posite Higgs, Extra-Dimensions, Extended Gauge models, Technicolor, Left-Right symmetric models, and many other BSM scenarios are trying to answer these questions. In these proceed- ings we present the most recent results for searches Beyond the Standard Model at the LHC by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, focusing on signatures with top, bottom, tau and exotics. The data are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The non-observation of a signal permits to set limits at the 95pct confidence level on the production cross sect...

  18. Generation of Exotic Quantum States of a Cold Atomic Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stefan Lund

    Over the last decades quantum effects have become more and more controllable, leading to the implementations of various quantum information protocols. These protocols are all based on utilizing quantum correlation. In this thesis we consider how states of an atomic ensemble with such correlations...... — a nanofiber based light-atom interface. Using a dual-frequency probing method we measure and prepare an ensemble with a sub-Poissonian atom number distribution. This is a first step towards the implementation of more exotic quantum states.......Over the last decades quantum effects have become more and more controllable, leading to the implementations of various quantum information protocols. These protocols are all based on utilizing quantum correlation. In this thesis we consider how states of an atomic ensemble with such correlations...... can be created and characterized. First we consider a spin-squeezed state. This state is generated by performing quantum non-demolition measurements of the atomic population difference. We show a spectroscopically relevant noise reduction of -1.7dB, the ensemble is in a many-body entangled state...

  19. Unexpected high-energy γ emission from decaying exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gottardo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The N=52 Ga83 β decay was studied at ALTO. The radioactive 83Ga beam was produced through the ISOL photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ-ray emission following β decay. While β-delayed neutron emission has been measured to be 56–85% of the decay path, in this experiment an unexpected high-energy 5–9 MeV γ-ray yield of 16(4% was observed, coming from states several MeVs above the neutron separation threshold. This result is compared with cutting-edge QRPA calculations, which show that when neutrons deeply bound in the core of the nucleus decay into protons via a Gamow–Teller transition, they give rise to a dipolar oscillation of nuclear matter in the nucleus. This leads to large electromagnetic transition probabilities which can compete with neutron emission, thus affecting the β-decay path. This process is enhanced by an excess of neutrons on the nuclear surface and may thus be a common feature for very neutron-rich isotopes, challenging the present understanding of decay properties of exotic nuclei.

  20. Elastic scattering and reactions of light exotic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, N.; Alamanos, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.

    2009-10-01

    The present work provides a literature survey of elastic scattering of exotic nuclei from 6He to 17F. It presents a set of definitions that allow different analyses to be put into a common language. A calculational approach is proposed that yields consistent results across different beams and targets so that conclusions concerning the influence of virtual and real breakup as well as transfer couplings on the elastic scattering may be drawn. Calculations of elastic scattering around the Coulomb barrier are emphasised, employing a Pb target whose large Z allows the interplay between nuclear and Coulomb forces to be exploited to maximise possible effects arising from proton or neutron haloes or skins. A series of test calculations is performed and where possible compared to data, demonstrating that there are instances where coupling to transfer channels can have a large effect on the elastic scattering angular distributions. By careful choice of target/beam combination, different aspects of the coupling effects may be emphasised.

  1. Experiments with relativistic exotic nuclei at the FRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissel, H.

    1994-11-01

    The concept and experimental programme of the secondary nuclear beam facility BRENDA at GSI is presented. The central part of BRENDA is the magnetic spectrometer FRS providing spatially separated monoisotopic exotic beams of all elements up to uranium. The FRS as a versatile magnetic spectrometer for experiments with heavy ions in the energy range of (0.1-2) A.GeV has been used to study peripheral nuclear collisions from oxygen up to uranium projectiles. In the uranium experiments we discovered that projectile fission is a powerful tool to investigate new neutron-rich fission fragments. In the medium mass region we have identified the doubly magic nucleus 100 Sn and measured its half-life. Light halo nuclei have been studied in kinematically complete experiments with the FRS in combination with the dipole magnet ALADIN, and the neutron detector LAND. The FRS combined with the storage and cooler ring ESR offers new precision experiments, e.g., direct mass measurements, decay studies of highly-charged nuclei, or nuclear structure studies in inverse kinematics. (orig.)

  2. Synthesis of Exotic Soaps in the Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanstiel, Otto, IV; Dueno, Eric; Xianghong Wang, Queenie

    1998-05-01

    A variety of different triglyceride sources ranging from Vietnamese garlic oil to a local restaurant's grill sludge were saponified to generate a series of exotic soaps. Students did not quantify their results, but described their products in terms of color, texture and odor. Their results were compared with existing data on the triglyceride content for each source used (when possible). Soap texture seemed to be related to the degree of unsaturation present in the starting triglyceride. However, texture alterations due to occluded impurities could not be ruled out. In general, fats and oils high in saturated fats (butter) gave hard, chunky, and waxlike soaps, while those high in unsaturated fats gave flaky and easily crumbled soaps (olive, corn, peanut and sunflower oils). Soap color was not consistent with triglyceride unsaturation levels during the time frame studied. Odor changes were dramatic and were explained in terms of a change in chemical structure (i.e. conversion from an ester to a carboxylate salt). In general, the experiment was well received by students and stressed the importance of making precise qualitative observations during the experiment.

  3. Exotic light nuclei and nuclei in the lead region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppelier, N.A.F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for modifying, or renormalizing, a truncated nuclear hamiltonian such that the wave functions obtained by diagonalizing this modified or effective hamiltoniandescribe the nucleus as well as possible: deriving the hamiltonian directly from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction between free nucleons; parametrizing the hamiltonian in terms of a number of parameters and determining these parameters from a least-squares fit of calculated properties to experimental data; approximating the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction between two nucleons in a nucleus by a simple analytic expression. An effective hamiltonian derived following the second method is applied in a theoretical study of exotic nuclei in the region of Z=2-9 and A=4-30 and the problem of the neutron halo in 11 Li is discussed. Results of shell-model calculations of 20i Pb and nuclei in its neighbourhood are presented in which an effective hamiltonian was employed derived with the last method. The quenching of M1 strength in 208 Pb, and the spectroscopic factors measured in proton knock-out reactions could be described quite satisfactory. Finally, a method is presented for deriving the effective hamiltonian directly from the realistic NN interaction with algebraic techniques. (H.W.). 114 refs.; 34 figs.; 12 tabs.; schemes

  4. Use of seeded exotic grasslands by wintering birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Andrew D.; O'Connell, Timothy J.; Hickman, Karen R.; Leslie,, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread population declines of North American grassland birds, effects of anthropogenic disturbance of wintering habitat of this guild remain poorly understood. We compared avian abundance and habitat structure in fields planted by the exotic grass Old World bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum; OWB) to that in native mixed-grass prairie. During winters of 2007-2008 and 2008-2009, we conducted bird and vegetation surveys in six native grass and six OWB fields in Garfield, Grant, and Alfalfa counties, Oklahoma. We recorded 24 species of wintering birds in native fields and 14 species in OWB monocultures. While vegetation structure was similar between field types, abundance of short-eared owls (Asio flammeus), northern harriers (Circus cyaneus) and Smith's longspurs (Calcarius pictus) was higher in OWB fields during at least one year. The use of OWB fields by multiple species occupying different trophic positions suggested that vegetation structure of OWB can meet habitat requirements of some wintering birds, but there is insufficient evidence to determine if it provides superior conditions to native grasses.

  5. On Emergent Physics, "Unparticles" and Exotic "Unmatter" States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldfain E.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergent physics refers to the formation and evolution of collective patterns in systems that are nonlinear and out-of-equilibrium. This type of large-scale behavior often de- velops as a result of simple interactions at the component level and involves a dynamic interplay between order and randomness. On account of its universality, there are credi- ble hints that emergence may play a leading role in the Tera-ElectronVolt (TeV sector of particle physics. Following this path, we examine the possibility of hypothetical high- energy states that have fractional number of quanta per state and consist of arbitrary mixtures of particles and antiparticles. These states are similar to “un-particles”, mass- less fields of non-integral scaling dimensions that were recently conjectured to emerge in the TeV sector of particle physics. They are also linked to “unmatter”, exotic clusters of matter and antimatter introduced few years ago in the context of Neutrosophy.

  6. Can extra dimensional effects allow wormholes without exotic matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan Kar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We explore the existence of Lorentzian wormholes in the context of an effective on-brane, scalar-tensor theory of gravity. In such theories, the timelike convergence condition, which is always violated for wormholes, has contributions, via the field equations, from on-brane matter as well as from an effective geometric stress energy generated by a bulk-induced radion field. It is shown that, for a class of wormholes, the required on-brane matter, as seen by an on-brane observer in the Jordan frame, is not exotic and does not violate the Weak Energy Condition. The presence of the effective geometric stress energy in addition to on-brane matter is largely responsible for creating this intriguing possibility. Thus, if such wormholes are ever found to exist in the Universe, they would clearly provide pointers towards the existence of a warped extra dimension as proposed in the two-brane model of Randall and Sundrum.

  7. Experimental Constraints of the Exotic Shearing of Space-Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jonathan William [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Holometer program is a search for rst experimental evidence that space-time has quantum structure. The detector consists of a pair of co-located 40-m power-recycled interferometers whose outputs are read out synchronously at 50 MHz, achieving sensitivity to spatiallycorrelated uctuations in dierential position on time scales shorter than the light-crossing time of the instruments. Unlike gravitational wave interferometers, which time-resolve transient geometrical disturbances in the spatial background, the Holometer is searching for a universal, stationary quantization noise of the background itself. This dissertation presents the nal results of the Holometer Phase I search, an experiment congured for sensitivity to exotic coherent shearing uctuations of space-time. Measurements of high-frequency cross-spectra of the interferometer signals obtain sensitivity to spatially-correlated eects far exceeding any previous measurement, in a broad frequency band extending to 7.6 MHz, twice the inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. This measurement is the statistical aggregation of 2.1 petabytes of 2-byte dierential position measurements obtained over a month-long exposure time. At 3 signicance, it places an upper limit on the coherence scale of spatial shear two orders of magnitude below the Planck length. The result demonstrates the viability of this novel spatially-correlated interferometric detection technique to reach unprecedented sensitivity to coherent deviations of space-time from classicality, opening the door for direct experimental tests of theories of relational quantum gravity.

  8. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-05-09

    The structure and chemical ordering of PtAu nanoclusters of 79, 135, and 201 atoms are studied via a combination of a basin hopping atom-exchange technique (to locate the lowest energy homotops at fixed composition), a symmetry orbit technique (to find the high symmetry isomers), and density functional theory local reoptimization (for determining the most stable homotop). The interatomic interactions between Pt and Au are derived from the empirical Gupta potential. The lowest energy structures show a marked tendency toward PtcoreAushell chemical ordering by enrichment of the more cohesive Pt in the core region and of Au in the shell region. We observe a preferential segregation of Pt atoms to (111) facets and Au atoms to (100) facets of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active sites. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. High spin exotic states and new method for pairing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molique, H.

    1996-01-01

    We present a new method called 'PSY-MB', initially developed in the framework of abstract group theory for the solution of the problem of strongly interacting multi-fermionic systems with particular to systems in an external rotating field. The validity of the new method (PSY-MB) is tested on model Hamiltonians. A detailed comparison between the obtained solutions and the exact ones is performed. The new method is used in the study of realistic nuclear Hamiltonians based on the Woods-Saxon potential within the cranking approximation to study the influence of residual monopole pairing interactions in the rare-earth mass region. In parallel with this new technique we present original results obtained with the Woods-Saxon mean-field and the self-consistent Hartree-Fock approximation in order to investigate such exotic effects as octupole deformations and hexadecapole C 4 -polarizing deformations in the framework of high-spin physics. By developing these three approaches in one single work we prepare the ground for the nuclear structure calculations of the new generation - where the residual two-body interactions are taken into account also in the weak pairing limit. (author)

  10. Dark matter and exotic neutrino interactions in direct detection searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,R. do Matão 1371, CEP. 05508-090, São Paulo (Brazil); Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Suchita [Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften,Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria); Gonzalez, Yuber F. Perez; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,R. do Matão 1371, CEP. 05508-090, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-04-12

    We investigate the effect of new physics interacting with both Dark Matter (DM) and neutrinos at DM direct detection experiments. Working within a simplified model formalism, we consider vector and scalar mediators to determine the scattering of DM as well as the modified scattering of solar neutrinos off nuclei. Using existing data from LUX as well as the expected sensitivity of LUX-ZEPLIN and DARWIN, we set limits on the couplings of the mediators to quarks, neutrinos and DM. Given the current limits, we also assess the true DM discovery potential of direct detection experiments under the presence of exotic neutrino interactions. In the case of a vector mediator, we show that the DM discovery reach of future experiments is affected for DM masses m{sub χ}≲10 GeV or DM scattering cross sections σ{sub χ}≲10{sup −47} cm{sup 2}. On the other hand, a scalar mediator will not affect the discovery reach appreciably.

  11. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach J Farris

    Full Text Available The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar's largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar's largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica. Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (mean=90 individuals consumed/year, the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans (mean=58 consumed/year, and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox (mean=31 consumed/year. Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are highest

  12. Housing is positively associated with invasive exotic plant species richness in New England, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavier-Pizarro, Gregorio I; Radeloff, Volker C; Stewart, Susan I; Huebner, Cynthia D; Keuler, Nicholas S

    2010-10-01

    Understanding the factors related to invasive exotic species distributions at broad spatial scales has important theoretical and management implications, because biological invasions are detrimental to many ecosystem functions and processes. Housing development facilitates invasions by disturbing land cover, introducing nonnative landscaping plants, and facilitating dispersal of propagules along roads. To evaluate relationships between housing and the distribution of invasive exotic plants, we asked (1) how strongly is housing associated with the spatial distribution of invasive exotic plants compared to other anthropogenic and environmental factors; (2) what type of housing pattern is related to the richness of invasive exotic plants; and (3) do invasive plants represent ecological traits associated with specific housing patterns? Using two types of regression analysis (best subset analysis and hierarchical partitioning analysis), we found that invasive exotic plant richness was equally or more strongly related to housing variables than to other human (e.g., mean income and roads) and environmental (e.g., topography and forest cover) variables at the county level across New England. Richness of invasive exotic plants was positively related to area of wildland-urban interface (WUI), low-density residential areas, change in number of housing units between 1940 and 2000, mean income, plant productivity (NDVI), and altitudinal range and rainfall; it was negatively related to forest area and connectivity. Plant life history traits were not strongly related to housing patterns. We expect the number of invasive exotic plants to increase as a result of future housing growth and suggest that housing development be considered a primary factor in plans to manage and monitor invasive exotic plant species.

  13. Exotic birds increase generalization and compensate for native bird decline in plant-frugivore assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Daniel; Martínez, Daniel; Stouffer, Daniel B; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2014-11-01

    Exotic species are thought to alter the structure of natural communities and disrupt ecosystem functioning through invasion. Nevertheless, exotic species may also provide ecological insurance when they contribute to maintain ecosystem functions after the decline of native species following anthropogenic disturbance. Here, this hypothesis is tested with the assemblage of frugivorous birds and fleshy-fruited plants of New Zealand, which has suffered strong historical declines in native birds while simultaneously gaining new frugivores introduced by European settlers. We studied the plant-frugivore assemblage from measures of fruit and bird abundances and fruit consumption in nine forest patches, and tested how this changed across a gradient of relative abundance of exotic birds. We then examined how each bird species' role in the assemblage (the proportion of fruits and the number of plant species consumed) varied with their relative abundance, body size and native/exotic status. The more abundant and, to a lesser extent, larger birds species consumed a higher proportion of fruits from more plant species. Exotic birds consumed fruits less selectively and more proportionate to the local availability than did native species. Interaction networks in which exotic birds had a stronger role as frugivores had higher generalization, higher nestedness and higher redundancy of plants. Exotic birds maintained frugivory when native birds became rarer, and diversified the local spectrum of frugivores for co-occurring native plants. These effects seemed related to the fact that species abundances, rather than trait-matching constraints, ultimately determined the patterns of interactions between birds and plants. By altering the structure of plant-frugivore assemblages, exotic birds likely enhance the stability of the community-wide seed dispersal in the face of continued anthropogenic impact. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  14. The United States Experience with the Exotic Cerambycid Anoplophora glabripennis: Detection, Quarantine, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Therese M. Poland; Rui-Tong Gao

    2000-01-01

    It is estimated that there are at least 4500 exotic (non-indigenous) organisms currently established in the United States(US) (US Congress 1993) and possibly as many as 50,000 (Pimentel et al. 2000). Of the many exotic organisms now in the US, more than 400 are insects that feed on trees and shrubs.(Haack and Byler 1993, Mattson et al. 1994, Niemela and Mattson 1996)....

  15. Health evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) emission from exotic wood products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeskov, L; Witterseh, T; Funch, L W

    2009-01-01

    analyses by climate chamber measurement (iroko, ramin, sheesham, merbau, and rubber tree). Samples of exotic wood (rubber tree and belalu) were further analyzed for emission of chemical compounds by migration into artificial saliva and for content of pesticides and allergenic natural rubber latex (NR latex...... evaluated toxicologically. Emission from the evaluated exotic wood was very limited. None of the products is likely, under our exposure conditions, to cause health problems in relation to indoor air....

  16. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  17. Ecosystem impacts of exotic annual invaders in the Genus Bromus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Matthew J.; Belnap, Jayne; Stark, John M.; Allen, Edith B.; Rau, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the impacts of exotic plant species on ecosystems is necessary to justify and guide efforts to limit their spread, restore natives, and plan for conservation. Invasive annual grasses such as Bromus tectorum, B. rubens, B. hordeaceus, and B. diandrus (hereafter collectively referred to as Bromus) transform the structure and function of ecosystems they dominate. Experiments that prove cause-and-effect impacts of Bromus are rare, yet inferences can be gleaned from the combination of Bromus-ecosystem associations, ecosystem condition before/after invasion, and an understanding of underlying mechanisms. Bromus typically establishes in bare soil patches and can eventually replace perennials such as woody species or bunchgrasses, creating a homogeneous annual cover. Plant productivity and cover are less stable across seasons and years when Bromus dominates, due to a greater response to annual climate variability. Bromus’ “flash” of growth followed by senescence early in the growing season, combined with shallow rooting and annual habit, may lead to incomplete use of deep soil water, reduced C sequestration, and accelerated nutrient cycling. Litter produced by Bromus alters nearly all aspects of ecosystems and notably increases wildfire occurrence. Where Bromus has become dominant, it can decrease soil stability by rendering soils bare for months following fire or episodic, pathogen-induced stand failure. Bromus-invaded communities have lower species diversity, and associated species tend to be generalists adapted to unstable and variable habitats. Changes in litter, fire, and soil properties appear to feedback to reinforce Bromus’ dominance in a pattern that portends desertification.

  18. Evaluation of an exotic maize population adapted to a locality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, W D; Johnson, E C

    1981-01-01

    An exotic Zea mays L. population ('Tuxpeno') was adapted to North Carolina conditions by first introducing genes for adaptability from two North Carolina varieties ([('Jarvis' X 'Indian Chief')'Tuxpeno']'Tuxpeno') including four generations of intermating, and then selecting for adaptability using maturity as the primary measure. The study evaluated selection for adaptability and the diversity available between adapted 'Tuxpeno' and the local varieties, 'Jarvis' and 'Indian Chief'. Analytical procedures were developed to quantify the diversity between populations and the complementation of local varieties by introduced germ plasms. The analyses utilized the specific effects available from the diallel mating design.Three replicate selections responded similarly under simple recurrent mass selection (1/10) for the earliest disease-free plants initially and additionally for plant types (primarily height) in the final generation. The 1/4 local germ plasm permitted rapid adaptation of 'Tuxpeno' gene pool to local conditions. The adapted 'Tuxpeno' populations yielded similarly to the local populations with an average heterosis for grain yield of 28% when crossed to the local populations used as source of genes for adaptability. The diversity found between adapted 'Tuxpeno' lines and these local varieties based on genes affecting grain yield was 1.5 to 2.5 times that measured between the local varieties ('Jarvis' and 'Indian Chief'). Diversity lost through intergradation with local material was a reasonable investment. Yield genes introduced from 'Tuxpeno' complemented local gene pools through nonadditive, primarily dominance-associated, gene effects. Reassortment of major gene blocks apparently occurred leading to significant divergence among replicate selections involving both additive-associated and dominance-associated gene effects.

  19. Exotic pediculosis and hair-loss syndrome in deer (Odocoileus hemionus) populations in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roug, Annette; Swift, Pamela; Puschner, Birgit; Gerstenberg, Greg; Mertins, James W; Johnson, Christine Kreuder; Torres, Steve; Mortensen, Jack; Woods, Leslie

    2016-07-01

    Infestation with nonnative, "exotic" lice was first noted in Washington black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in 1994 and has since then spread throughout the western United States. In California, infestation with the exotic louse Damalinia (Cervicola) sp. was first detected in black-tailed deer from northern California in 2004, and, in 2009, the exotic louse species Bovicola tibialis and Linognathus africanus were identified on mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus californicus) in central Sierra Nevada in association with a mortality event. Exotic lice have since been detected in various locations throughout the state. We describe the geographic distribution of these exotic lice within California, using data from 520 live-captured and 9 postmortem-sampled, free-ranging mule deer examined between 2009 and 2014. Data from live-captured deer were used to assess possible associations between louse infestation and host age, host sex, migratory behavior, season, and blood selenium and serum copper concentrations. Damalinia (Cervicola) sp. and B. tibialis lice were distinctively distributed geographically, with D. (Cervicola) sp. infesting herds in northern and central coastal California, B. tibialis occurring in the central coastal mountains and the Sierra Nevada, and L. africanus occurring only sporadically. Younger age classes and low selenium concentrations were significantly associated with exotic louse infestation, whereas no significant relationship was detected with serum copper levels. Our results show that exotic lice are widespread in California, and younger age classes with low blood selenium concentrations are more likely to be infested with lice than older deer. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Differences in sensitivity of native and exotic fish species to changes in river temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S.E.W. LEUVEN, A.J. HENDRIKS, M.A.J. HUIJBREGTS, H.J.R. LENDERS,J. MATTHEWS, G. VAN DER VELDE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effects that temperature changes in the Rhine river distributaries have on native and exotic fish diversity. Site-specific potentially affected fractions (PAFs of the regional fish species pool were derived using species sensitivity distributions (SSDs for water temperature. The number of fish species in the river distributaries has changed remarkably over the last century. The number of native rheophilous species declined up until 1980 due to anthropogenic disturbances such as commercial fishing, river regulation, migration barriers, habitat deterioration and water pollution. In spite of progress in river rehabilitation, the native rheophilous fish fauna has only partially recovered thus far. The total number of species has strongly increased due to the appearance of more exotic species. After the opening of the Rhine-Main-Danube waterway in 1992, many fish species originating from the Ponto-Caspian area colonized the Rhine basin. The yearly minimum and maximum river temperatures at Lobith have increased by circa 4 0C over the period 1908-2010. Exotic species show lower PAFs than native species at both ends of the temperature range. The interspecific variation in the temperature tolerance of exotic fish species was found to be large. Using temporal trends in river temperature allowed past predictions of PAFs to demonstrate that the increase in maximum river temperature negatively affected a higher percentage of native fish species than exotic species. Our results support the hypothesis that alterations of the river Rhine’s temperature regime caused by thermal pollution and global warming limit the full recovery of native fish fauna and facilitate the establishment of exotic species which thereby increases competition between native and exotic species. Thermal refuges are important for the survival of native fish species under extreme summer or winter temperature conditions [Current Zoology 57 (6: 852–862, 2011].

  1. The occurrence of an exotic bisexual Artemia species, Artemia franciscana, in two coastal salterns of Shandong Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bo; Sun, Shichun; Ma, Lin

    2004-10-01

    The alien halophilous Artemia species, Artemia franciscana, was found in Chengkou Saltern and Yangkou Saltern of Shandong Province, P.R. China. Although the indigenous parthenogenetic Artemia is detectable, the exotic species is dominant in both salterns. The cross-breeding tests between the exotic A. franciscana and 5 bisexual Artemia species were conducted. The results of hybridization and morphological observations on the exotic A. franciscana are briefly presented in this short communication.

  2. Exotic species and the structure of a plant-galling network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Santos de Araujo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gall-inducing insects are highly specialized herbivores and is expected that networks composed by gall-inducing insects and their host plants are also very specialized. However, presence of exotic species might reduce the interaction number for native species, which would lead to changes in the specialization of plant-galling networks. In this study, we use network metrics to describe, for the first time, the structure of a network of gall-inducing insects associated to ornamental host plants. We found that the plant-galling network has a low-connected structure and is more modular than expected by chance. Native insect herbivores were significantly more frequent on native host plant species, while exotic herbivores occurred mostly on exotic host plant species. On the other hand, the number of interactions between insect herbivores and native or exotic plant species did not vary. Our findings show that plant-galling networks are very specialized and structured independently of exotic species presence.

  3. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole moments for nuclear structure research on exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Neyens, G

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues in current nuclear physics research is to investigate the properties of so-called 'exotic nuclei' and of 'exotic nuclear structures'. Exotic nuclei are nuclei with a proton-to-neutron ratio that is very different from the proton-to-neutron ratio in stable nuclei (a technical term related to this ratio is the 'isospin'). We define exotic nuclear structures as excitation modes of nuclei that have a very different structure than the structure (or shape) of the nuclear ground state. By putting the nucleons in a nucleus to extreme conditions of isospin and excitation energy one can investigate details of one of the four basic forces in nature: the strong force which binds the nucleons together to form a bound nucleus. While the basic properties of the strong nucleon-nucleon interaction are known from investigating the properties of nuclei near the 'valley of stability', recent developments in the study of exotic nuclei have demonstrated that specific properties of the strong interaction, such...

  4. Isotopic niches of sympatric native and exotic fish species in a Neotropical floodplain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana S. Philippsen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the isotopic niches of two fish species, one exotic and one native. It was hypothesized that these species would show little or no isotopic niche overlap. This hypothesis was tested with the isotopic niche concept and the trophic Layman's metrics. A considerable isotopic niche overlap was observed between the species, mainly for the exotic that showed the greater percentage of overlapping, indicating an interspecific competition for food resources. Layman's metrics also showed this species probably exploits a more specific array of food resources when compared with the native species. The native species probably has the ability to exploit a wider array of resources, highlighted by the higher values given for the Layman's metrics. The juveniles and adults of native species showed minor overlapping between the isotopic niches. This indicates that they have probably adopted different foraging strategies, minimizing intraspecific competition. Evidences that the exotic species explores a narrower range of resources and that the native species has a greater isotopic niche and possibly suffer less intraspecific competition, indicates that the native species can tolerate the presence of the exotic species and promote survival and maintenance of its population even under possible competition effects imposed by the exotic species.

  5. Nematodes, exotic earthworms and nitrogen addition: interactions between global change factors lead to cancellation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, Jonathan R

    2017-07-01

    Photos from the experiment described in Shao et al. (): (a) the endogeic (i.e. earthworms that typically live in the soil, burrowing horizontally to acquire nutrients) earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus that was added to the plots; (b) P. corethrurus in a quiescence state in response to drought; (c) set-up of the control plots (i.e. no earthworms, ambient nitrogen) used in this experiment. [Colour figure can be viewed at wileyonlinelibrary.com] In Focus: Shao, Y., Zhang, W., Eisenhauer, N., Liu, T., Xiong, Y., Liang, C. & Fu, S. (2017) Nitrogen deposition cancels out exotic earthworm effects on plant-feeding nematode communities. Journal of Animal Ecology, 86, 708-717. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Shao et al. () explored how N addition and exotic earthworms interacted to impact on the plant-feeding nematode community. They demonstrate that exotic earthworm presence alone increased the abundance of less harmful plant-feeding nematodes and decreased the abundance of the more harmful plant-feeding nematodes. However, in plots receiving both exotic earthworms and N addition, such earthworm effects on the nematode community were negated. These findings pull focus on the need to simultaneously consider multiple global change factors (e.g. exotic species invasions and N deposition) when making predictions about how such factors might affect above- and below-ground interactions and thereby alter ecosystem function. © 2017 The Author. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  6. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.

    2005-01-01

    The High Energy Density and Exotic Acceleration working group took as our goal to reach beyond the community of plasma accelerator research with its applications to high energy physics, to promote exchange with other disciplines which are challenged by related and demanding beam physics issues. The scope of the group was to cover particle acceleration and beam transport that, unlike other groups at AAC, are not mediated by plasmas or by electromagnetic structures. At this Workshop, we saw an impressive advancement from years past in the area of Vacuum Acceleration, for example with the LEAP experiment at Stanford. And we saw an influx of exciting new beam physics topics involving particle propagation inside of solid-density plasmas or at extremely high charge density, particularly in the areas of laser acceleration of ions, and extreme beams for fusion energy research, including Heavy-ion Inertial Fusion beam physics. One example of the importance and extreme nature of beam physics in HED research is the requirement in the Fast Ignitor scheme of inertial fusion to heat a compressed DT fusion pellet to keV temperatures by injection of laser-driven electron or ion beams of giga-Amp current. Even in modest experiments presently being performed on the laser-acceleration of ions from solids, mega-amp currents of MeV electrons must be transported through solid foils, requiring almost complete return current neutralization, and giving rise to a wide variety of beam-plasma instabilities. As keynote talks our group promoted Ion Acceleration (plenary talk by A. MacKinnon), which historically has grown out of inertial fusion research, and HIF Accelerator Research (invited talk by A. Friedman), which will require impressive advancements in space-charge-limited ion beam physics and in understanding the generation and transport of neutralized ion beams. A unifying aspect of High Energy Density applications was the physics of particle beams inside of solids, which is proving to

  7. New results on the search for spin-exotic mesons with COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nerling, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The COMPASS fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS studies the structure and spectrum of hadrons. One important goal using hadron beams is the search for new states, in particlular spin-exotic mesons and glueballs. As a first input to the puzzle, COMPASS observed a significant $J^{PC}$ spin-exotic signal in the 2004 pilot run data (190\\,GeV/$c$ $\\pi^{-}$ beam, Pb target) in three charged pion final states consistent with the disputed $\\pi_1(1600)$. We started our hadron spectroscopy programme in 2008 by collecting very high statistics using a 190 GeV/$c$ negative pion beam scattered off a liquid hydrogen (proton) target. The current status and new results from the 2008 data on the search for the $\\pi_1(1600)$ resonance with exotic $J^{PC}=1^{-+}$ quantum numbers obtained from partial-wave analyses of the $\\rho\\pi$ and $\\eta'\\pi$ decay channels are presented.

  8. Presence of exotic birds in San Luis Potosi city, Mexican Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-Albores, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We recorded 12 exotic bird species in San Luis Potosi, Mexico and adjacent areas. Obtained data were collected during the period August 2012 to August 2013. From the total of recorded species, eight are confirmations (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus, Cairina moschata, Bubulcus ibis, Columba livia, Sturnus vulgaris, Turdus rufopalliatus, Quiscalus mexicanus and Passer domesticus and four are new records (Aratinga canicularis, Amazona oratrix, A. autumnalis and Cyanocorax yncas. Although not all exotic species represent a risk because of the lack of the necessary resources for the establishment of abundant viable populations, it is important to publicize their status in the region. Therefore, knowing the presence of exotic species in a new distribution area is important for monitoring its establishment and colonization, and defining management, control and eradication programs of these species, along with environmental education programs that would lead to a better understanding of impacts that these species can cause.

  9. Thermodynamics of "exotic" Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Paul K; Zhang, Baocheng

    2013-06-14

    A number of three-dimensional (3D) gravity models, such as 3D conformal gravity, admit "exotic" black hole solutions: the metric is the same as the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli metric of 3D Einstein gravity but with reversed roles for mass and angular momentum, and an entropy proportional to the length of the inner horizon instead of the event horizon. Here we show that the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli solutions of the exotic 3D Einstein gravity (with parity-odd action but Einstein field equations) are exotic black holes, and we investigate their thermodynamics. The first and second laws of black hole thermodynamics still apply, and the entropy still has a statistical interpretation.

  10. Introduced, Captive, Caged and Escaped Exotic and Native Bird Species in the Littoral Area of Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan -Jradi, G.; Ramadan -Jradi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Some introduced exotic bird species may cause damages to the ecosystem they are introduced to; others may have no effect or can be beneficial to humans and ecosystems.Whatever the case is, the exotic bird species remain an issue in Lebanon, especially that they are not given the appropriate priority at the national level. With the recent intentional or accidental introduction of exotic species,the problem is increasing and therefore necessitating comprehensive evaluation of the status and origin of these species in Lebanon.Since many of the introduced species are escapes from cages, it was necessary to also evaluate both status and origin of all caged birds in order to see whether they are introduced or native to the country. (author)

  11. Gastrointestinal parasites of exotic birds living in captivity in the state of Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Victor Fernando Santana; Bezerra, Taynar Lima; Andrade, Alex Fonseca de; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Faustino, Maria Aparecida da Glória; Alves, Leucio Câmara; Meira-Santos, Patrícia Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Brazil has a wide diversity of exotic birds that were brought to this country during the European colonization. These animals are kept in captivity and, in some cases, in inadequate facilities, which may facilitate the introduction of pathogens, including gastrointestinal parasites. The purpose of this study was to identify the main gastrointestinal parasites that affect exotic birds living in captivity in the state of Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil. Fecal samples (n = 362) from exotic birds were analyzed by direct examination and by the Willis-Mollay technique. Eggs of Amidostomum sp., Ascaridia sp., Capillarinae, Heterakis sp., Trichostrongylidae, and oocysts of coccidians were identified in nine different bird species. This is the first report in Brazil of infection by Ascaridia sp. and Heterakis sp. in Nymphicus hollandicus; by Trichostrongylidae in Serinus canaria and Streptopelia risoria.

  12. Anisotropic harmonic oscillator, non-commutative Landau problem and exotic Newton-Hooke symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Pedro D.; Gomis, Joaquim; Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the planar anisotropic harmonic oscillator with explicit rotational symmetry as a particle model with non-commutative coordinates. It includes the exotic Newton-Hooke particle and the non-commutative Landau problem as special, isotropic and maximally anisotropic, cases. The system is described by the same (2+1)-dimensional exotic Newton-Hooke symmetry as in the isotropic case, and develops three different phases depending on the values of the two central charges. The special cases of the exotic Newton-Hooke particle and non-commutative Landau problem are shown to be characterized by additional, so(3) or so(2,1) Lie symmetry, which reflects their peculiar spectral properties

  13. Use of exotic species in afforestation and facilitation for the establishment of biological invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Ricardo Fabricante

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to inventory the species used in landscaping the Campus of Agricultural Sciences of the Federal University of Paraíba, Areia, PB, Brazil and to rank them according to their origin and their invasive potential. Through walks throughout the study area (active search, we cataloged all the species used in local afforestation and classified them as native or exotic. Exotic plants were also classified as to their invasive potential. Altogether, we identified 76 species belonging to 67 genera and 25 families. Of these, only 26 species were native. The results of this study are worrisome because of the large number of exotic species used for planting at the study site (50 species, including known aggressive species: Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam., Azadirachta indica A. Juss. and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit.

  14. Exotic species enhance response diversity to land-use change but modify functional composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavert, Jamie R; Pattemore, David E; Gaskett, Anne C; Beggs, Jacqueline R; Bartomeus, Ignasi

    2017-08-16

    Two main mechanisms may buffer ecosystem functions despite biodiversity loss. First, multiple species could share similar ecological roles, thus providing functional redundancy. Second, species may respond differently to environmental change (response diversity). However, ecosystem function would be best protected when functionally redundant species also show response diversity. This linkage has not been studied directly, so we investigated whether native and exotic pollinator species with similar traits (functional redundancy) differed in abundance (response diversity) across an agricultural intensification gradient. Exotic pollinator species contributed most positive responses, which partially stabilized overall abundance of the pollinator community. However, although some functionally redundant species exhibited response diversity, this was not consistent across functional groups and aggregate abundances within each functional group were rarely stabilized. This shows functional redundancy and response diversity do not always operate in concert. Hence, despite exotic species becoming increasingly dominant in human-modified systems, they cannot replace the functional composition of native species. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Statistical model of exotic rotational correlations in emergent space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig; Kwon, Ohkyung; Richardson, Jonathan

    2017-06-06

    A statistical model is formulated to compute exotic rotational correlations that arise as inertial frames and causal structure emerge on large scales from entangled Planck scale quantum systems. Noncommutative quantum dynamics are represented by random transverse displacements that respect causal symmetry. Entanglement is represented by covariance of these displacements in Planck scale intervals defined by future null cones of events on an observer's world line. Light that propagates in a nonradial direction inherits a projected component of the exotic rotational correlation that accumulates as a random walk in phase. A calculation of the projection and accumulation leads to exact predictions for statistical properties of exotic Planck scale correlations in an interferometer of any configuration. The cross-covariance for two nearly co-located interferometers is shown to depart only slightly from the autocovariance. Specific examples are computed for configurations that approximate realistic experiments, and show that the model can be rigorously tested.

  16. Exotic Fish in Exotic Plantations: A Multi-Scale Approach to Understand Amphibian Occurrence in the Mediterranean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Joana; Sarmento, Pedro; Carretero, Miguel A; White, Piran C L

    2015-01-01

    Globally, amphibian populations are threatened by a diverse range of factors including habitat destruction and alteration. Forestry practices have been linked with low diversity and abundance of amphibians. The effect of exotic Eucalyptus spp. plantations on amphibian communities has been studied in a number of biodiversity hotspots, but little is known of its impact in the Mediterranean region. Here, we identify the environmental factors influencing the presence of six species of amphibians (the Caudata Pleurodeles waltl, Salamandra salamandra, Lissotriton boscai, Triturus marmoratus and the anurans Pelobates cultripes and Hyla arborea/meridionalis) occupying 88 ponds. The study was conducted in a Mediterranean landscape dominated by eucalypt plantations alternated with traditional use (agricultural, montados and native forest) at three different scales: local (pond), intermediate (400 metres radius buffer) and broad (1000 metres radius buffer). Using the Akaike Information Criterion for small samples (AICc), we selected the top-ranked models for estimating the probability of occurrence of each species at each spatial scale separately and across all three spatial scales, using a combination of covariates from the different magnitudes. Models with a combination of covariates at the different spatial scales had a stronger support than those at individual scales. The presence of predatory fish in a pond had a strong effect on Caudata presence. Permanent ponds were selected by Hyla arborea/meridionalis over temporary ponds. Species occurrence was not increased by a higher density of streams, but the density of ponds impacted negatively on Lissotriton boscai. The proximity of ponds occupied by their conspecifics had a positive effect on the occurrence of Lissotriton boscai and Pleurodeles waltl. Eucalypt plantations had a negative effect on the occurrence of the newt Lissotriton boscai and anurans Hyla arborea/meridionalis, but had a positive effect on the presence of

  17. Exotic Fish in Exotic Plantations: A Multi-Scale Approach to Understand Amphibian Occurrence in the Mediterranean Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Cruz

    Full Text Available Globally, amphibian populations are threatened by a diverse range of factors including habitat destruction and alteration. Forestry practices have been linked with low diversity and abundance of amphibians. The effect of exotic Eucalyptus spp. plantations on amphibian communities has been studied in a number of biodiversity hotspots, but little is known of its impact in the Mediterranean region. Here, we identify the environmental factors influencing the presence of six species of amphibians (the Caudata Pleurodeles waltl, Salamandra salamandra, Lissotriton boscai, Triturus marmoratus and the anurans Pelobates cultripes and Hyla arborea/meridionalis occupying 88 ponds. The study was conducted in a Mediterranean landscape dominated by eucalypt plantations alternated with traditional use (agricultural, montados and native forest at three different scales: local (pond, intermediate (400 metres radius buffer and broad (1000 metres radius buffer. Using the Akaike Information Criterion for small samples (AICc, we selected the top-ranked models for estimating the probability of occurrence of each species at each spatial scale separately and across all three spatial scales, using a combination of covariates from the different magnitudes. Models with a combination of covariates at the different spatial scales had a stronger support than those at individual scales. The presence of predatory fish in a pond had a strong effect on Caudata presence. Permanent ponds were selected by Hyla arborea/meridionalis over temporary ponds. Species occurrence was not increased by a higher density of streams, but the density of ponds impacted negatively on Lissotriton boscai. The proximity of ponds occupied by their conspecifics had a positive effect on the occurrence of Lissotriton boscai and Pleurodeles waltl. Eucalypt plantations had a negative effect on the occurrence of the newt Lissotriton boscai and anurans Hyla arborea/meridionalis, but had a positive effect on

  18. Effects of an exotic prey species on a native specialist: Eexample of the snail kite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattau, Christopher E.; Martin, J.; Kitchens, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite acknowledging that exotic species can exhibit tremendous influence over native populations, few case studies have clearly demonstrated the effects of exotic prey species on native predators. We examined the effects of the recently introduced island apple snail (Pomacea insularum) on the foraging behavior and energetics of the endangered snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) in Florida. We conducted time-activity budgets: (i) on kites foraging for native Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) in major wetland units within the kites' range that had not been invaded by the exotic island apple snail and (ii) on kites foraging for exotic apple snails in Lake Tohopekaliga, the only major wetland utilized by the snail kite that had suffered a serious invasion of P. insularum. When foraging for P. insularum, snail kites dropped a greater proportion of snails, and they experienced increased handling times and decreased consumption rates; however, kites foraging for P. insularum also spent a smaller proportion of the day in flight. Estimates of net daily energy balances between kites feeding on P. insularum versus P. paludosa were comparable for adults, but juveniles experienced energetic deficiencies when feeding on the exotic snail. Due to this discrepancy, we hypothesize that wetlands invaded by P. insularum, such as Lake Tohopekaliga, may function as ecological traps for the snail kite in Florida by attracting breeding adults but simultaneously depressing juvenile survival. This study highlights the conservation implications and importance of elucidating the effects that exotic species have on native specialists, especially those that are endangered, because subtle influences on behavior may have significant population consequences. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Effects of an exotic prey species on a native specialist: example of the snail kite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattau, Christopher E.; Martin, J.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite acknowledging that exotic species can exhibit tremendous influence over native populations, few case studies have clearly demonstrated the effects of exotic prey species on native predators. We examined the effects of the recently introduced island apple snail (Pomacea insularum) on the foraging behavior and energetics of the endangered snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) in Florida. We conducted time-activity budgets: (i) on kites foraging for native Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) in major wetland units within the kites' range that had not been invaded by the exotic island apple snail and (ii) on kites foraging for exotic apple snails in Lake Tohopekaliga, the only major wetland utilized by the snail kite that had suffered a serious invasion of P. insularum. When foraging for P. insularum, snail kites dropped a greater proportion of snails, and they experienced increased handling times and decreased consumption rates; however, kites foraging for P. insularum also spent a smaller proportion of the day in flight. Estimates of net daily energy balances between kites feeding on P. insularum versus P. paludosa were comparable for adults, but juveniles experienced energetic deficiencies when feeding on the exotic snail. Due to this discrepancy, we hypothesize that wetlands invaded by P. insularum, such as Lake Tohopekaliga, may function as ecological traps for the snail kite in Florida by attracting breeding adults but simultaneously depressing juvenile survival. This study highlights the conservation implications and importance of elucidating the effects that exotic species have on native specialists, especially those that are endangered, because subtle influences on behavior may have significant population consequences.

  20. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Zach J.; Golden, Christopher D.; Karpanty, Sarah; Murphy, Asia; Stauffer, Dean; Ratelolahy, Felix; Andrianjakarivelo, Vonjy; Holmes, Christopher M.; Kelly, Marcella J.

    2015-01-01

    The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting) affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar’s largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar’s largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana) occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica). Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (x¯ = 90 individuals consumed/year), the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans) (x¯ = 58 consumed/year), and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox) (x¯ = 31 consumed/year). Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are

  1. Exotic quantum holonomy and higher-order exceptional points in quantum kicked tops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atushi; Kim, Sang Wook; Cheon, Taksu

    2014-04-01

    The correspondence between exotic quantum holonomy, which occurs in families of Hermitian cycles, and exceptional points (EPs) for non-Hermitian quantum theory is examined in quantum kicked tops. Under a suitable condition, an explicit expression of the adiabatic parameter dependencies of quasienergies and stationary states, which exhibit anholonomies, is obtained. It is also shown that the quantum kicked tops with the complexified adiabatic parameter have a higher-order EP, which is broken into lower-order EPs with the application of small perturbations. The stability of exotic holonomy against such bifurcation is demonstrated.

  2. CARBONIFEROUS CORALS AND CHAETETIDS FROM EXOTIC LIMESTONE BLOCK OF THE CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICTOR OGAR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A chaetetid sponge and coral fauna from a Carboniferous exotic limestone block in the Lower Jurassic Esciorda olistostrome on the Bodrak River (Crimean Mountains are described for the first time. The Bodrak exotic block is composed of massive limestone. It contains the chaetetid Chaetetes (Boswellia sp., the tabulate coral Multithecopora sp., and poorly preserved rugose corals, including Dibunophyllum? sp., Cordibia? sp. and gen. et sp. indet. Only the fasciculate colonies of the rugose coral Lytvophyllum askynensis (Kossovaya, 2009 are confidently identified. The studied association of fossils is similar to that of the Donets Basin and the Urals and confirms the Lower Bashkirian age of the Bodrak limestone block. 

  3. Gardens and Stream Ecology: A case for the Exotic Plant in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Margetts

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Debate about the relative merits of native versus exotic flora in the landscape has been occurring in many countries, to the point that one author has suggested native plant enthusiasm has moved from ecological panacea to xenophobia. Much of the key landscape character in Europe is in fact based on non-indigenous flora; for example, the vines, olives and cypress, quintessential to the Tuscan landscape, are all exotic to that region. Because the flora changes are relatively recent and more noticeable in New Zealand, this debate is even more keenly argued here

  4. Exotic geophysical phenomena observed in an environmental neutron flux study using EAS PRISMA detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekseenko Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Some exotic geophysical events are observed by a global net of electron-neutron detectors (en-detectors developed in the framework of the PRISMA EAS project. Our en-detectors running both on the Earth's surface and underground are continuously measuring the environmental thermal neutron flux. Thermal neutrons are in equilibrium with media and are therefore sensitive to many geophysical phenomena, which are exotic for people studying ultra high-energy cosmic rays or carrying out low background experiments deep underground.

  5. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Miscellaneous Exotic Companion Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Angela M; Miwa, Yasutsugu

    2016-09-01

    Unusual mammalian species such as the hedgehog, sugar glider, and miniature pig are encountered with increasing frequency in exotic companion medicine. Disease of the oral cavity can occur in any species; although occasionally encountered in exotic mammalian species, it is rarely described in the literature. Anatomy and dentition vary significantly; diagnosis and treatment are often extrapolated from that known in other species. The best-documented disease of the oral cavity in this group of species is oral neoplasia in the hedgehog. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Using a botanical garden to assess factors influencing the colonization of exotic woody plants by phyllophagous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Natalia; Kenis, M

    2016-09-01

    The adoption of exotic plants by indigenous herbivores in the region of introduction can be influenced by numerous factors. A botanical garden in Western Siberia was used to test various hypotheses on the adaptation of indigenous phyllophagous insects to exotic plants invasions, focusing on two feeding guilds, external leaf chewers and leaf miners. A total of 150 indigenous and exotic woody plant species were surveyed for insect damage, abundance and species richness. First, exotic woody plants were much less damaged by chewers and leaf miners than native plants, and the leaf miners' species richness was much lower on exotic than native plants. Second, exotic woody plants having a congeneric species in the region of introduction were more damaged by chewers and hosted a more abundant and species-rich community of leaf miners than plants without native congeneric species. Third, damage by chewers significantly increased with the frequency of planting of exotic host plants outside the botanical garden, and leaf miners' abundance and species richness significantly increased with residence time in the garden. Finally, no significant relationship was found between insect damage or abundance and the origin of the exotic plants. Besides the ecological implications of the results, this study also illustrates the potential of botanical gardens to test ecological hypotheses on biological invasions and insect-plant interactions on a large set of plant species.

  7. Exotic, native and seeded species and soil biotic community response to post-fire seedings in northern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megan Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Post-fire seeding of native species is intended to reduce weed entry, yet few studies have addressed the impacts of seeding methods on the establishment and persistence of exotic annuals. In summers of 2010 and 2011, we investigated productivity of exotic annuals across rehabilitation seedings that were established on the Scooby Wildfire site in northern Utah. The site...

  8. Stocked exotic predators and their interaction with native galaxiids (Pisces: Galaxiidae) shape the food web structure in Tasmanian lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Nicolas; Amsinck, Susanne Lildal; Barmuta, Leon

    2015-01-01

    in the diet of the exotic predators was higher in turbid lakes, probably because galaxiids used more the open waters in these lakes, making them more vulnerable to predators. Zooplankton biomass varied substantially between the lakes, and the presence of exotic predators apparently increased the calanoids...

  9. Farmers' perceptions about exotic multipurpose fodder trees and constraints to their adoption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekoya, A.; Oosting, S.J.; Fernandez-Rivera, S.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Many organizations in Ethiopia have for many years promoted exotic multipurpose fodder trees (EMPFT) for livestock feed and soil improvement. Despite the apparent benefits, the number of farmers planting these trees was low. The objectives were to elucidate farmers¿ perceptions about their use

  10. Impacts of exotic forest pathogens on Mediterranean ecosystems: Four case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo Garbelotto; Marco Pautasso

    2011-01-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are hotspots of biodiversity. Because of a coincidence of high species richness and human presence, Mediterranean biodiversity is particularly threatened by processes such as habitat degradation, fragmentation and loss, pollution, climate change and introduction of invasive species. Invasive tree pathogens are among the problematic exotic...

  11. Are local filters blind to provenance? Ant seed predation suppresses exotic plants more than natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson; Nadia S. Icasatti; Jose L. Hierro; Benjamin J. Bird

    2014-01-01

    The question of whether species' origins influence invasion outcomes has been a point of substantial debate in invasion ecology. Theoretically, colonization outcomes can be predicted based on how species' traits interact with community filters, a process presumably blind to species' origins. Yet, exotic plant introductions commonly result in monospecific...

  12. Potential for nest site competition between native and exotic tree squirrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Edelman; John L. Koprowski; Sadie R. Bertelsen

    2009-01-01

    In communities where strong interspecific competition between native species is lacking, exotic and native species often exhibit intense resource competition resulting in decline of native populations. We examined the potential for interspecific competition for nest sites between co-occurring native Mt. Graham red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis...

  13. Exploring associations between international trade and environmental factors with establishment patterns of exotic Scolytinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo Marini; Robert A. Haack; Robert J. Rabaglia; Edoardo Petrucco Toffolo; Andrea Battisti; Massimo. Faccoli

    2011-01-01

    Although invasion of exotic ambrosia beetles (fungus feeders) and bark beetles (phloem feeders) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is considered a major threat to forest health worldwide, no studies have quantitatively investigated the anthropogenic and environmental factors shaping the biogeographical patterns of invasion by these insects across large spatial...

  14. Fusion of light exotic nuclei at near-barrier energies: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of inelastic excitation of exotic light projectiles (proton- as well as neutron- rich) 17F and 11Be on fusion with heavy target has been studied at near-barrier energies. The cal- culations have been performed in the coupled channels approach where, in addition to the normal coupling of the ground state of ...

  15. Exotic species and genetically modified organisms in aquaculture and enhanced fisheries: ICLARM's position

    OpenAIRE

    Pullin, R.S.V.

    1994-01-01

    This article contains a discussion paper on the use of exotic species and genetically modified organisms in aquaculture and enhanced fisheries, together with a summary of ICLARM's (International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management, Philippines) current position on this important topic.

  16. Southwestern Avian Community Organization in Exotic Tamarix: Current Patterns and Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. A. Walker

    2006-01-01

    Tamarisk (saltcedar: Tamarix), an invasive exotic tree native to the Eastern Hemisphere, is currently the dominant plant species in most southwestern riparian ecosystems at elevations below 1500 m. Tamarisk alters abiotic conditions and the floral composition of native southwestern riparian ecosystems and, in turn, affects native southwestern animal communities....

  17. Effect of parent and daughter deformation on half-life time in exotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Taking Coulomb and proximity potential as interacting barrier for post-scission region we calculated half-life time for different modes of exotic decay treating parent and fragments as spheres and these values are compared with experimental data. We studied the effect of deformation of parent and daughter on half-life time ...

  18. Static super-replicating strategies for a class of exotic options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Deelstra, G.; Dhaene, J.; Vanmaele, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate static super-replicating strategies for European-type call options written on a weighted sum of asset prices. This class of exotic options includes Asian options and basket options among others. We assume that there exists a market where the plain vanilla options on the

  19. Supersymmetric Exotic Decays of the 125 GeV Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinrui [Los Alamos; Liu, Tao [Hong Kong U. Sci. Tech.; Wang, Lian-Tao [Chicago U., KICP; Yu, Felix [Fermilab

    2014-06-04

    We reveal a set of novel decay topologies for the 125 GeV Higgs boson in supersymmetry which are initiated by its decay into a pair of neutralinos, and discuss their collider search strategies. This category of exotic Higgs decays are characterized by the collider signature: visible objects + $\\mbox{${\

  20. Toxicity and Treatment of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products Using Exotic Plants - A Laboratory Scale Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez Vargas, Carlos Andrés; Paredes, Diego; Cubillos, Janneth

    alternative systems. Constructed wetlands (CWs) have showed satisfactory results for PPCPs removal (Avila et al., 2013). The aim of the study was to assess the tolerance and removal capacity of Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Cis-MDJM, Galaxolide, Tonalide, Caffeine, Naproxen, Ketoprofen and Diclofenac, by exotic plants...

  1. Breeding bird use of and nesting success in exotic Russian olive in New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott H. Stoleson; Deborah M. Finch

    2001-01-01

    The exotic tree, Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), has invaded riparian zones throughout much of the western Unites States. Although promoted as a useful species for wildlife because of its abundant edible fruit, evidence for its value to breeding birds remains sparse. We compared relative rates of usage, nest success, and cowbird parasitism of birds breeding in...

  2. Exotic or not, leaf trait dissimilarity modulates the effect of dominant species on mixed litter decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Finerty, G. E.; de Bello, Francesco; Bílá, Karolína; Berg, M. P.; Dias, A. T. C.; Pezzatti, G. B.; Moretti, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 5 (2016), s. 1400-1409 ISSN 0022-0477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/12/1296 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : exotic species * invasion ecology * biodiversity effects on ecosystems Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.813, year: 2016

  3. Properties of Antiprotons and Antihydrogen, and the Study of Exotic Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Doser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study of exotic atoms, of antiprotons and of antihydrogen atoms provides many windows into the investigation of fundamental symmetries, of interactions between particles and nuclei, of nuclear physics and of atomic physics. This field appeared at CERN simultaneously with the first accelerators, and has advanced over the decades in parallel with improvements and advances in its infrastructure.

  4. Biotic resistance to exotic invasions: its role in forest ecosystems, confounding artifacts, and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriela C. Nunez-Mir; Andrew M. Liebhold; Qinfeng Guo; Eckehard G. Brockerhoff; Insu Jo; Kimberly Ordonez; Songlin Fei

    2017-01-01

    Biotic resistance, the ability of communities to resist exotic invasions, has long attracted interest in the research and management communities. However, inconsistencies exist in various biotic resistance studies and less is known about the current status and knowledge gaps of biotic resistance in forest ecosystems. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the...

  5. Impacts of exotic mangroves and mangrove control on tide pool fish assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. MacKenzie; Cailtin L. Kryss

    2013-01-01

    Fish were sampled from tide pools in Hawaii to determine how exotic mangroves Rhizophora mangle and the use of herbicides to chemically eradicate them are impacting tide pool fish assemblages. Ecological parameters were compared among mangrove-invaded, native vegetated, and non-vegetated tide pools before and after mangroves had been chemically...

  6. Evolution and population genetics of exotic and reemerging pathogens: traditional and novel tools and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.J. Grünwald; E.M. Goss

    2011-01-01

    Given human population growth and accelerated global trade, the rate of emergence of exotic plant pathogens is bound to increase. Understanding the processes that lead to the emergence of new pathogens can help manage emerging epidemics. Novel tools for analyzing population genetic variation can be used to infer the evolutionary history of populations or species,...

  7. Soil feedback of exotic savanna grass relates to pathogen absence and mycorrhizal selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van der W.H.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Brinkman, E.P.; Doodeman, G.T.A.; Kraaij, van der R.M.; Kamp, A.F.D.; Menting, F.B.J.; Veenendaal, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    Enemy release of exotic plants from soil pathogens has been tested by examining plant¿soil feedback effects in repetitive growth cycles. However, positive soil feedback may also be due to enhanced benefit from the local arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Few studies actually have tested pathogen

  8. Soil feedback of exotic savanna grass relates to pathogen absence and mycorrhizal selectivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, W.H.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Doodeman, G.T.A.; van der Kaaij, R.M.; Kamp, A.F.D.; Menting, F.B.J.; Veenendaal, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    Enemy release of exotic plants from soil pathogens has been tested by examining plant-soil feedback effects in repetitive growth cycles. However, positive soil feedback may also be due to enhanced benefit from the local arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Few studies actually have tested pathogen

  9. Status of exotic woody species in big cypress national preserve. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, L.H.

    1983-12-01

    The current status of exotic woody plants in Big Cypress National Preserve is documented. A map of the distribution of principal pest species, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Schinus terebinthifolius, and Casuarina sp., is presented. Prognoses of population increases of these problem species are determined utilizing the current distributions and assessing environmental conditions. Some potential problem species are also identified.

  10. Long-Term Effects of Exotic Tree Species ( Tectona grandis Linn. F ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long-Term Effects of Exotic Tree Species ( Tectona grandis Linn. F.) on the Status of Extractable Micronutrients in the ... The study therefore implied that Tectona grandis has an extractive property on micronutrient particularly on soils that are low in these nutrients. Nigerian Journal of Soil and Environmental Research Vol.

  11. Rodent seed predation as a biotic filter influencing exotic plant abundance and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. E. Pearson; J. L. Hierro; M. Chiuffo; D. Villarreal

    2014-01-01

    Biotic resistance is commonly invoked to explain why many exotic plants fail to thrive in introduced ranges, but the role of seed predation as an invasion filter is understudied. Abiotic conditions may also influence plant populations and can interact with consumers to determine plant distributions, but how these factors jointly influence invasions is poorly understood...

  12. Search for a light exotic particle in J/psi radiative decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M. B.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Calcaterra, A. C.; Cao, G. F.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales, C.; Motzko, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S. P.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Ulrich, M. U.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M. W.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A. Z.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.

    2012-01-01

    Using a data sample containing 1.06 x 10(8) psi' events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII electron-positron collider, we search for a light exotic particle X in the process psi' -> pi(+)pi-J/psi, J/psi -> gamma X, X -> mu(+)mu(-). This light particle X could be a Higgs-like boson

  13. Calibrations of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors and search for exotic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kumar, A; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Matteuzzi, D; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R; 10.1016/S0920-5632(03)02249-7

    2003-01-01

    We present the final results of the search for exotic massive particles in the cosmic radiation performed with the MACRO underground experiment. Magnetic monopoles and nuclearites flux upper limits obtained with the CR39 nuclear track subdetector, the scintillation and streamer tube subdetectors are given. Searches at high altitude with the SLIM experiment are in progress.

  14. Nonlinear instability of wormholes supported by exotic dust and a magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Sarbach, Olivier; Zannias, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Recently, spherically symmetric, static wormholes supported by exotic dust and a radial magnetic field have been derived and argued to be stable with respect to linear radial fluctuations. In this report we point out that these wormholes are unstable due to the formation of shell-crossing singularities when the nonlinearities of the theory are taken into account.

  15. The future of exotic plantation forestry in the tropics and southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exotic plantation forestry, particularly with Pinus and Eucalyptus species in the tropics and southern Hemisphere, has expanded dramatically during the course of the last Century. Success of these intensively managed plantations is largely attributed to the fact that trees have been separated from their natural enemies.

  16. Confirmation of the Z(4430)- resonance and other exotic meson results from the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN has recently confirmed the existence of the exotic Z(4430)- state first observed by the Belle experiment in 2008. Its quantum numbers have been measured and the resonant nature of this state has been demonstrated for the first time. As it is charged, the Z(4430)- cannot be classified as a conventional charmonium (ccbar) state, making it a candidate for an exotic resonance composed of four quarks (ccbar udbar). This talk will outline the history of the Z(4430)-, its possible interpretations and describe how the signature of this exotic state can be extracted from the large sample of B0 -> psi(2S) K+pi- decays that LHCb has collected during Run-1 of the LHC. I will also describe recent LHCb results that probe the nature of the exotic X(3872) particle and help to clarify our understanding of the f0(500) and f0(980) scalar mesons that have long thought to be four quark states.

  17. Fusion of light exotic nuclei at near-barrier energies: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of inelastic excitation of exotic light projectiles (proton- as well as neutron- rich) 17F and 11Be ... coupling of the ground state of the projectile to the continuum, inelastic excitation of the projectile to the bound ... P Banerjee et al that any coupling of the relative motion of the colliding nuclei to nuclear intrinsic excita-.

  18. Land uses, fire, and invasion: Exotic annual Bromus and human dimensions [Chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A. Pyke; Jeanne C. Chambers; Jeffrey L. Beck; Matthew L. Brooks; Brian A. Mealor

    2016-01-01

    Human land uses are the primary cause of the introduction and spread of exotic annual Bromus species. Initial introductions were likely linked to contaminated seeds used by homesteading farmers in the late 1880s and early 1900s. Transportation routes aided their spread. Unrestricted livestock grazing from the 1800s through the mid-1900s reduced native plant competitors...

  19. Exotic annual Bromus invasions: Comparisons among species and ecoregions in the western United States [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew L. Brooks; Cynthia S. Brown; Jeanne C. Chambers; Carla M. D' Antonio; Jon E. Keeley; Jayne Belnap

    2016-01-01

    Exotic annual Bromus species are widely recognized for their potential to invade, dominate, and alter the structure and function of ecosystems. In this chapter, we summarize the invasion potential, ecosystem threats, and management strategies for different Bromus species within each of five ecoregions of the western United States. We characterize invasion...

  20. Seeds of Myth: Exotic Disease Theory and Deconstructing the Australian Narrative of Indigenous Depopulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The theory that the rapid depopulation of Indigenous people post-colonisation was largely caused by European introduced or exotic disease to which Indigenous people had no immunity resonates through most narratives of the early years of colonisation. The question of whether this narrative is based on sound medical evidence or is better placed in…

  1. Different responses of congeneric consumers to an exotic food resource: Who gets the novel resource prize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette K. Ortega; Leigh F. Greenwood; Ragan M. Callaway; Dean E. Pearson

    2014-01-01

    Exotic species can provide abundant food resources for native consumers, but predicting which native species will respond positively remains a challenge. We studied the foraging behavior of blackcapped (Poecile atricapillus) andmountain (P. gambeli) chickadees in westernMontana to compare the degree to which these congeric and syntopic consumers exploited larvae of...

  2. Heterosis among populations of maize (Zea mays L.) with different levels of exotic germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossa, J; Gardner, C O; Mumm, R F

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen maize (Zea mays L.) populations including five adapted, five adapted x exotic, two composites of adapted and exotic, and one exotic selected for adaptability were crossed in a diallel mating system. The parents and 78 crosses and nine check hybrids were evaluated for grain yield and plant height in five environments. The Gardner-Eberhart model Analysis II indicated that additive and nonadditive gene effects accounted for 60 and 40% of the total variation among populations, respectively, for grain yield and 86% and 14% of the total variation, respectively, for plant height. Components of heterosis were significant in the combined analysis for both traits. Adapted Corn Belt populations tended to have higher performance in crosses and greater values of variety heterosis than 50% adapted populations. 'Nebraska Elite Composite', 'Corn Belt' x 'Mexican', and 'Corn Belt' x 'Brazilian' showed high mean yields in crosses, however, they were not among those with high estimates of variety heterosis. One exotic population ('Tuxpeno' x 'Antigua Grupo 2') and three adapted populations ['307 Composite', 'NB(S1)C-3', and 'NK(S1)C-3'] might be combined together to form a high-yielding population. It may be possible to synthesize two useful populations for reciprocal recurrent selection by grouping 'Tuxpeno' x 'Antiqua Grupo 2', 'NB(S1)C-3', and 'NS(FS)LFW-8' into one population and 'NK(S1)C-3', 'Krug'x'Tabloncillo', and '307 Composite' in the other one.

  3. Heterosis For Litter Traits In Native By Exotic Inbred Pig Crosses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inbred strains generated from native and exotic pigs were compared with their F1 and F2 backcross populations for a range of litter performance traits. Animals were intensively reared and at 81/2 months of age, the inbred genotypes from each strain were reciprocally mated to each other to generate F1 crossbred genotypes ...

  4. Effects of exotic amphipod invasions on fish diet in the Lower Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelleher, B.; Bergers, P.J.M.; Brink, van den F.W.B.; Giller, P.S.; Velde, van der G.; Vaate, bij de B.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the importance and effect of recent exotic species invasions on components of food webs of common Lower Rhine biotopes (breakwaters and channel-connected sandpits), the diets of two important macrozoobenthivores, perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) and eel (Anguilla anguilla (L.)) were compared

  5. Comparison of leaf decomposition and macroinvertebrate colonization between exotic and native trees in a freshwater ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, A.; Gonzalez-Munoz, N.; Castro-Diez, P.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important sources of energy in aquatic ecosystems is the allochthonous input of detritus. Replacement of native tree species by exotic ones affects the quality of detritus entering freshwater ecosystems. This replacement can alter nutrient cycles and community structure in aquatic

  6. Arthropods of native and exotic vegetation and their association with willow flycatchers and Wilson's warblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda S. DeLay; Deborah M. Finch; Sandra Brantley; Richard Fagerlund; Michael D. Means; Jeffrey F. Kelly

    1999-01-01

    We compared abundance of migrating Willow Flycatchers and Wilson's Warblers to the abundance of arthropods in exotic and native vegetation at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. We trapped arthropods using glue-boards in 1996 and 1997 in the same cottonwood, saltcedar, and willow habitats where we mist-netted birds during spring and fall migration. There...

  7. The emerald ash borer: a new exotic pest in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Eduard Jendak; Liu Houping; Keneth R. Marchant; Toby R. Petrice; Therese M. Poland; Hui Ye

    2002-01-01

    Yet another new exotic forest pest has been discovered in North America, and this time the infestation is centered in Michigan and Ontario. In May and June 2002, adults of an unidentified buprestid beetle were collected from ash (Fraxinus) trees in the Detroit area of southeastern Michigan.

  8. Effect of parent and daughter deformation on half-life time in exotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shi and Swiatecki [6] put forward a model for exotic decay studies that uses Coulomb and proximity potential as interacting barrier for post-scission region and uses simple power law for overlap region. These authors [7] studied the effect of deformation of parent, daughter and shell attenuation on half-life time treating ...

  9. Use of Large Surface MicroChannel Plates for the Tagging of Intermediate Energy Exotic Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, I.; Amorini, F.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, S.; De Filippo, E.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2011-01-01

    We show the properties of the tagging system for exotic beams coupled to the CHIMERA detector. In particular, the characteristics of a newly developed large surface MicroChannel Plate will be discussed. Timing and efficiency of this instrument have been investigated. Preliminary results of tests performed with radioactive beams and alpha sources are presented.

  10. Provenance variation in subalpine fir grown as an exotic tree species in Denmark and Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skúlason, Brynjar

    In Denmark and Iceland, there has been increasing interest in the use of subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) as an exotic species; in Denmark as a niche product for the Christmas tree market and in Iceland as the main Christmas tree species. A field test with 26 provenances of subalpine...

  11. Invasion of the turtles? : exotic turtles in the Netherland: a risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugter, R.J.F.; Ottburg, F.G.W.A.; Roessink, I.; Jansman, H.A.H.; Grift, van der E.A.; Griffioen, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors of this report assessed the risk of exotic turtles becoming invasive in the Netherlands. Main components of the risk are the large scale of introduction of discarded pets to Dutch nature and possible suitability of species to survive and reproduce successfully under present or future

  12. Housing is positively associated with invasive exotic plant species richness in New England, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio I. Gavier-Pizarro; Volker C. Radeloff; Susan I. Stewart; Cynthia D. Huebner; Nicholas S. Keuler

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the factors related to invasive exotic species distributions at broad spatial scales has important theoretical and management implications, because biological invasions are detrimental to many ecosystem functions and processes. Housing development facilitates invasions by disturbing land cover, introducing nonnative landscaping plants, and facilitating...

  13. Exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson at future e+e- colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Lian-Tao; Zhang, Hao

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of unexpected properties of the Higgs boson would offer an intriguing opportunity to shed light on some of the most profound puzzles in particle physics. Beyond Standard Model (BSM) decays of the Higgs boson could reveal new physics in a direct manner. Future electron-positron lepton colliders operating as Higgs factories, including CEPC, FCC-ee and ILC, with the advantages of a clean collider environment and large statistics, could greatly enhance sensitivity in searching for these BSM decays. In this work, we perform a general study of Higgs exotic decays at future e+e- lepton colliders, focusing on the Higgs decays with hadronic final states and/or missing energy, which are very challenging for the High-Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). We show that with simple selection cuts, (10-3-10-5) limits on the Higgs exotic decay branching fractions can be achieved using the leptonic decaying spectator Z boson in the associated production mode e+e-→ ZH. We further discuss the interplay between detector performance and Higgs exotic decays, and other possibilities of exotic decays. Our work is a first step in a comprehensive study of Higgs exotic decays at future lepton colliders, which is a key area of Higgs physics that deserves further investigation. Supported by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC (DE-AC02-07CH11359) with the U.S. Department of Energy, DOE (DE-SC0013642), IHEP(Y6515580U1), and IHEP Innovation (Y4545171Y2)

  14. Differential Impacts of Virus Diversity on Biomass Production of a Native and an Exotic Grass Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordecai, Erin A.; Hindenlang, Madeleine; Mitchell, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens are common and diverse in natural communities and have been implicated in the success of host invasions. Yet few studies have experimentally measured how pathogens impact native versus exotic hosts, particularly when individual hosts are simultaneously coinfected by diverse pathogens. To estimate effects of interactions among multiple pathogens within host individuals on both transmission of pathogens and fitness consequences for hosts, we conducted a greenhouse experiment using California grassland species: the native perennial grass Nassella (Stipa) pulchra, the exotic annual grass Bromus hordeaceus, and three virus species, Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV, Barley yellow dwarf virus-MAV, and Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV. In terms of virus transmission, the native host was less susceptible than the exotic host to MAV. Coinfection of PAV and MAV did not occur in any of the 157 co-inoculated native host plants. In the exotic host, PAV infection most strongly reduced root and shoot biomass, and coinfections that included PAV severely reduced biomass. Infection with single or multiple viruses did not affect biomass in the native host. However, in this species the most potentially pathogenic coinfections (PAV + MAV and PAV + MAV + RPV) did not occur. Together, these results suggest that interactions among multiple pathogens can have important consequences for host health, which may not be predictable from interactions between hosts and individual pathogens. This work addresses a key empirical gap in understanding the impact of multiple generalist pathogens on competing host species, with potential implications for population and community dynamics of native and exotic species. It also demonstrates how pathogens with relatively mild impacts independently can more substantially reduce host performance in coinfection. PMID:26230720

  15. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  16. Incorporating different proportions of exotic maize germplasm into two adapted populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Xavier dos Santos

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Maize breeders frequently wish to use exotic germplasm in their breeding programs without losing specific characteristics of their adapted material. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal proportions of exotic germplasm to incorporate into adapted populations (F2 = 50% exotic, BC1 = 25% exotic, BC2 = 12.5% exotic and BC3 = 6.25% exotic to form the initial foundation population and to determine the heterosis between adapted x exotics. We used six exotic populations of different origins and two adapted populations representing a Brazilian heterotic pattern. In 1993-94 and 1994-95, the parents, F1, F2, BC1, BC2, BC3 and four checks were evaluated in six environments in central Brazil using an 8 x 9 simple rectangular lattice design. Higher mean values for yield were obtained as the proportion of exotic germplasm decreased. Some backcrosses produced more than the adapted populations BR 105 (7.59 ton/ha and BR 106 (8.43 ton/ha. The best results were obtained when incorporating 6.25 or 12.5% of exotic genes. This trend was true for root lodging, stalk lodging and ear diseases but not for plant and ear height. The midparent heterosis for yield varied from -16.1 to 40.3%. Midparent heterosis with positive and negative values were also found for the other traits. The results indicate the potential of exotic germplasm for developing good hybrids. After choosing the best exotic source, some recurrent selection might be appropriate in order to adapt and improve the exotic populations.Os melhoristas de milho que utilizam germoplasmas exóticos nos programas de melhoramento têm a preocupação de não perder as características desejáveis dos materiais adaptados. Buscando atender esta demanda, o presente trabalho teve por objetivo determinar a proporção ideal de germoplasma exótico que deve ser incorporado em populações melhoradas (F2 = 50% exótico; RC1 = 25% exótico; RC2 = 12,5% exótico; RC3 = 6,25% exótico, para formar as popula

  17. Ultra-fast timing study of exotic neutron-rich Fe isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Olaizola, Bruno; Mach, Henryk

    The cornerstone of nuclear structure, as we know it from stable nuclei, is the existence of magic numbers. The most stable nuclei arise for completely occupied shells, closed shells, and give rise to the magic numbers. At the Valley of Stability their values are 8, 20, 28, 50, 82 and 126. The steady development of the production, separation and identication of exotic nuclei, together with the improvement of the detection techniques, makes it possible to experimentally explore nuclei further away from the Valley of Stability. These exotic nuclei with nucleon numbers supposed to be magic do not always have the properties one would expect. As extra nucleons are added (or removed) from stable nuclei, the single particle energies are modied and strong quadrupole correlations appear, which may neutralize the spherical meanfield shell gaps. The investigation of the evolution of shell structure far from stability has become a major subject in Nuclear Physics. Research in this field has strong implications also in nuc...

  18. Alpha Decay Half-Lives of Exotic Nuclei around Shell Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Z.; Gu, Q. F.; Dong, J. M.; Peng, B. B.

    In the framework of the generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) and improved Royer's formula with a set of new coefficients derived by N. D. Schubert et al. [Eur. Phys. J. A 42 (2009) 121], the favored and unfavored α-decay half-lives of exotic nuclei around closed shells Z = 82 and N = 126 are investigated. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is shown that our method can be used to study the α-decay half-lives of exotic nuclei around shell closures successfully and is helpful for future research on superheavy nuclei around the next proton and neutron shell closures. In addition, some α-decay half-lives for the cases where the experimental values are unavailable are predicted. We hope our predicted results are useful for future experiments.

  19. Dynamical self-consistent description of exotic structures in nuclear matter at subnuclear densities

    CERN Document Server

    de la Mota, Virginia; Figerou, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of exotic structures in nuclear matter at subnuclear densities within the framework of the dywan model. This approach, developed ab initio for the description of nuclear collisions, is a microscopic dynamical approach in which the numerical treatment makes use of wavelet representation techniques. Before tackling the effects of multi-particle correlations on the overall dynamics, we focused the present work on the study of cold matter within a pure mean field description. Starting from inhomogeneous initial conditions provided by an arrangement of nuclei located on an initial crystalline lattice, the exotic structures result from the dynamical self-consistent evolution. The nuclear system can freely self-organize, it can modify or even break the lattice structure and the initial symmetries of matter distribution. This approach goes beyond the Wigner-Seitz approximation and no assumption of final shapes of matter is made. In this framework, different effects, as the sensitivity of...

  20. Confirmation of the 1-+ meson exotics in the ηπ0 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G. S.; Adams, T.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Bishop, J. M.; Bodyagin, V. A.; Brown, D. S.; Cason, N. M.; Chung, S. U.; Cummings, J. P.; Demianov, A. I.; Danyo, K.; Dowd, J. P.; Eugenio, P.; Fan, X. L.; Gribushin, A. M.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hayek, M.; Hu, J.; Ivanov, E. I.; Joffe, D.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Kodolova, O. L.; Korotkikh, V. L.; Kostin, M. A.; Kuhn, J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lu, M.; Malinina, L. V.; Manak, J. J.; Nozar, M.; Olchanski, C.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pedlar, T. K.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Seth, K. K.; Shenhav, N.; Shen, X.; Shephard, W. D.; Sinev, N. B.; Stienike, D. L.; Suh, J. S.; Taegar, S. A.; Tomaradze, A.; Vardanyan, I. N.; Weygand, D. P.; White, D. B.; Willutzki, H. J.; Witkowski, M.; Yershov, A. A.; E852 Collaboration

    2007-11-01

    The exclusive reaction π- p → ηπ0 n, η →π+π-π0 at 18GeV / c has been studied with a partial wave analysis on a sample of 23 492 ηπ0 n events from BNL experiment E852. A mass-dependent fit is consistent with a resonant hypothesis for the P+ wave, thus providing evidence for a neutral exotic meson with JPC =1-+, a mass of 1257 ± 20 ± 25MeV /c2, and a width of 354 ± 64 ± 60MeV /c2. New interpretations of the meson exotics in neutral ηπ0 system observed in E852 and Crystal Barrel experiments are discussed.

  1. Confirmation of the 1{sup -+} meson exotics in the {eta}{pi}{sup 0} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, G.S. [Department of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Adams, T. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Bar-Yam, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States); Bishop, J.M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Bodyagin, V.A. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow 119899 (Russian Federation); Brown, D.S. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cason, N.M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Chung, S.U. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Cummings, J.P. [Department of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Demianov, A.I. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow 119899 (Russian Federation); Danyo, K. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Dowd, J.P. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States); Eugenio, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Fan, X.L. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Gribushin, A.M. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow 119899 (Russian Federation); Hackenburg, R.W. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hayek, M. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States); Hu, J. [Department of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Ivanov, E.I. [Department of Physics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)] (and others)

    2007-11-29

    The exclusive reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup 0}n, {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} at 18GeV/c has been studied with a partial wave analysis on a sample of 23 492 {eta}{pi}{sup 0}n events from BNL experiment E852. A mass-dependent fit is consistent with a resonant hypothesis for the P{sub +} wave, thus providing evidence for a neutral exotic meson with J{sup PC}=1{sup -+}, a mass of 1257{+-}20{+-}25MeV/c{sup 2}, and a width of 354{+-}64{+-}60MeV/c{sup 2}. New interpretations of the meson exotics in neutral {eta}{pi}{sup 0} system observed in E852 and Crystal Barrel experiments are discussed.

  2. Structure of exotic nuclei and superheavy elements in meson field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Khin Nyan

    2008-07-01

    In this work the nuclear structure of exotic nuclei and superheavy nuclei is studied in a relativistic framework. In the relativistic mean-field (RMF) approximation, the nucleons interact with each other through the exchange of various effective mesons (scalar, vector, isovector-vector). Ground state properties of exotic nuclei and superheavy nuclei are studied in the RMF theory with the three different parameter sets (ChiM,NL3,NL-Z2). Axial deformation of nuclei within two drip lines are performed with the parameter set (ChiM). The position of drip lines are investigated with three different parameter sets (ChiM,NL3,NL-Z2) and compared with the experimental drip line nuclei. In addition, the structure of hypernuclei are studied and for a certain isotope, hyperon halo nucleus is predicted. (orig.)

  3. Confirmation of the 1-+ meson exotics in the ηπ0 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, G.S.; Adams, T.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Bishop, J.M.; Bodyagin, V.A.; Brown, D.S.; Cason, N.M.; Chung, S.U.; Cummings, J.P.; Demianov, A.I.; Danyo, K.; Dowd, J.P.; Eugenio, P.; Fan, X.L.; Gribushin, A.M.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hayek, M.; Hu, J.; Ivanov, E.I.

    2007-01-01

    The exclusive reaction π - p→ηπ 0 n, η→π + π - π 0 at 18GeV/c has been studied with a partial wave analysis on a sample of 23 492 ηπ 0 n events from BNL experiment E852. A mass-dependent fit is consistent with a resonant hypothesis for the P + wave, thus providing evidence for a neutral exotic meson with J PC =1 -+ , a mass of 1257±20±25MeV/c 2 , and a width of 354±64±60MeV/c 2 . New interpretations of the meson exotics in neutral ηπ 0 system observed in E852 and Crystal Barrel experiments are discussed

  4. At the frontier of spacetime scalar-tensor theory, Bells inequality, Machs principle, exotic smoothness

    CERN Document Server

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    In this book, leading theorists present new contributions and reviews addressing longstanding challenges and ongoing progress in spacetime physics. In the anniversary year of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, developed 100 years ago, this collection reflects the subsequent and continuing fruitful development of spacetime theories. The volume is published in honour of Carl Brans on the occasion of his 80th birthday. Carl H. Brans, who also contributes personally, is a creative and independent researcher and one of the founders of the scalar-tensor theory, also known as Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory. In the present book, much space is devoted to scalar-tensor theories. Since the beginning of the 1990s, Brans has worked on new models of spacetime, collectively known as exotic smoothness, a field largely established by him. In this Festschrift, one finds an outstanding and unique collection of articles about exotic smoothness. Also featured are Bell's inequality and Mach's principle. Personal memories and hist...

  5. Exotic μτjj events from heavy ISS neutrinos at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Arganda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this letter we study new relevant phenomenological consequences of the right-handed heavy neutrinos with masses at the O(1TeV energy scale, working within the context of the Inverse Seesaw Model that includes three pairs of quasi-degenerate pseudo-Dirac heavy neutrinos. We propose a new exotic signal of these heavy neutrinos at the CERN Large Hadron Collider containing a muon, a tau lepton, and two jets in the final state, which is based on the interesting fact that this model can incorporate large Lepton Flavor Violation for specific choices of the relevant parameters, particularly, the neutrino Yukawa couplings. We will show here that an observable number of μτjj exotic events, without missing energy, can be produced at this ongoing run of the LHC.

  6. Exploring the potential nutraceutical values of durian (Durio zibethinus L.) - an exotic tropical fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lee-Hoon; Bhat, Rajeev

    2015-02-01

    This review focuses on providing informations on potential uses of durian, an exotic tropical fruit as a source of food, as well as a potential therapeutic agent. Apart from disseminating details on the traditional value, in this review we have focussed on the nutritional composition, presence of bioactive compounds, volatiles, antimicrobials, as well as on the toxicological effects of durian fruit consumption. Durian fruits are enjoyed for their unique taste and organoleptic qualities, but there is also a need to ensure that their potential is exploited for the international market. In addition, in the present socio-economic scenario, tapping the potential of exotic tropical fruit such as durian could benefit the health of consumers as well as support the local population who depend on farming for a livelihood. Overall, it is envisaged that identifying the nutraceutical potential of the edible and non-edible parts of durian fruits can benefit food and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental Status of Exotic Mesons and the GlueX Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Carman

    2006-10-22

    One of the unanswered and most fundamental questions in physics regards the nature of the confinement mechanism of quarks and gluons in QCD. Exotic hybrid mesons manifest gluonic degrees of freedom and their spectroscopy will provide the data necessary to test assumptions in lattice QCD and the specific phenomenology leading to confinement. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV. This talk represents an overview of the available data and what has been learned. In looking toward the future, the GlueX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory represents a new initiative that will perform detailed spectroscopy of the light-quark meson spectrum. This experiment and its capabilities will be reviewed.

  8. Exposure of Asian Elephants and Other Exotic Ungulates to Schmallenberg Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fieke M Molenaar

    Full Text Available Schmallenberg virus (SBV is an emerging Orthobunyavirus, first described in 2011 in cattle in Germany and subsequently spread throughout Europe, affecting mainly ruminant livestock through the induction of foetal malformations. To gain a better understanding of the spectrum of susceptible species and to assess the value of current SBV serological assays, screening of serum samples from exotic artiodactyls and perissodactyls collected at the Living Collections from the Zoological Society of London (Whipsnade and London Zoos and Chester Zoo was carried out. There was compelling evidence of SBV infection in both zoological collections. The competitive ELISA has proved to be applicable for the detection of SBV in exotic Bovidae, Cervidae, Suidae, Giraffidae and most notably in endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus, but unreliable for the screening of Camelidae, for which the plaque reduction neutralisation test was considered the assay of choice.

  9. Exposure of Asian Elephants and Other Exotic Ungulates to Schmallenberg Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Fieke M; La Rocca, S Anna; Khatri, Meenakshi; Lopez, Javier; Steinbach, Falko; Dastjerdi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an emerging Orthobunyavirus, first described in 2011 in cattle in Germany and subsequently spread throughout Europe, affecting mainly ruminant livestock through the induction of foetal malformations. To gain a better understanding of the spectrum of susceptible species and to assess the value of current SBV serological assays, screening of serum samples from exotic artiodactyls and perissodactyls collected at the Living Collections from the Zoological Society of London (Whipsnade and London Zoos) and Chester Zoo was carried out. There was compelling evidence of SBV infection in both zoological collections. The competitive ELISA has proved to be applicable for the detection of SBV in exotic Bovidae, Cervidae, Suidae, Giraffidae and most notably in endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), but unreliable for the screening of Camelidae, for which the plaque reduction neutralisation test was considered the assay of choice.

  10. How to obtain a cosmological constant from small exotic R4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, Torsten; Król, Jerzy

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we determine the cosmological constant as a topological invariant by applying certain techniques from low dimensional differential topology. We work with a small exotic R4 which is embedded into the standard R4. Any exotic R4 is a Riemannian smooth manifold with necessary non-vanishing curvature tensor. To determine the invariant part of such curvature we deal with a canonical construction of R4 where it appears as a part of the complex surface K 3 # CP(2) bar. Such R4's admit hyperbolic geometry. This fact simplifies significantly the calculations and enforces the rigidity of the expressions. In particular, we explain the smallness of the cosmological constant with a value consisting of a combination of (natural) topological invariant. Finally, the cosmological constant appears to be a topologically supported quantity.

  11. Widespread infestation of the exotic mealybug species, Phenacoccus solenopsis (Tinsley) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), on cotton in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrare, V S; Kranthi, S; Biradar, V K; Zade, N N; Sangode, V; Kakde, G; Shukla, R M; Shivare, D; Khadi, B M; Kranthi, K R

    2009-10-01

    A survey was conducted in 47 locations in nine cotton-growing states of India to identify the composition of mealybug species occurring on cotton. Results of the taxonomic study showed that two mealybug species, the solenopsis mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis (Tinsley), and the pink hibiscus mealybug, Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Green), were found to infest cotton plants from all nine cotton growing states of the country. However, P. solenopsis was found to be the predominant mealybug species, comprising 95% of the samples examined. P. solenopsis, which was hitherto not reported to occur in India, now appears to be widespread on cotton in almost all cotton-growing states of the country. P. solenopsis is an exotic species originated from the USA and was reported to damage cotton and crops of 14 families. This report discusses the implications of the introduction of this exotic polyphagous pest species and the necessary steps to mitigate its potential threat to agriculture in India.

  12. Experimental investigation of exotic clustering in 13B and 14C using the resonance scattering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, A.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Ferrera, F.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Marletta, S.; Marchetta, C.; Torresi, D.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Davinson, T.; Heinitz, S.; Laird, A. M.; Shotter, A. C.; Schumann, D.; Soic, N.; Tengblad, O.; Zadro, M.

    2018-02-01

    In order to investigate the existence of molecular and/or exotic cluster configurations in Boron and Carbon n-rich isotopes we undertook two experiments: the first experimental study of exotic 9Li+α cluster states in 13B using the resonance scattering method at TRIUMF (Canada), and, with the same technique, the measurement of 10Be+α scattering at LNS in Catania, where a 10Be radioactive beam was produced for the first time. In order to measure the excitation function in a wide energy range, the beams were stopped in a Helium-flooded chamber. In the case of 13B, the elastic excitation function shows the presence of various peaks in an excitation energy region never explored before. In the case of 14C, our exclusive measurement of elastic scattering data with a high intensity beam, sheds some light on the contradictory previously published results [1, 2].

  13. Exotic annual Bromus invasions: comparisons among species and ecoregions in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Keeley, Jon E.; Belnap, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Exotic annual Bromus species are widely recognized for their potential to invade, dominate, and alter the structure and function of ecosystems. In this chapter, we summarize the invasion potential, ecosystem threats, and management strategies for different Bromus species within each of five ecoregions of the western United States. We characterize invasion potential and threats in terms of ecosystem resistance to Bromus invasion and ecosystem resilience to disturbance with an emphasis on the importance of fi re regimes. We also explain how soil temperature and moisture regimes can be linked to patterns of resistance and resilience and provide a conceptual framework that can be used to evaluate the relative potential for invasion and ecological impact of the dominant exotic annual Bromus species in the western United States.

  14. Pricing Exotic Options under a High-Order Markovian Regime Switching Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Ki Ching

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the pricing of exotic options when the price dynamics of the underlying risky asset are governed by a discrete-time Markovian regime-switching process driven by an observable, high-order Markov model (HOMM. We assume that the market interest rate, the drift, and the volatility of the underlying risky asset's return switch over time according to the states of the HOMM, which are interpreted as the states of an economy. We will then employ the well-known tool in actuarial science, namely, the Esscher transform to determine an equivalent martingale measure for option valuation. Moreover, we will also investigate the impact of the high-order effect of the states of the economy on the prices of some path-dependent exotic options, such as Asian options, lookback options, and barrier options.

  15. Pair production of exotic particles at pp(p-barp) colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, G.V.; Pirogov, Yu.F.; Rudakov, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    A complete set of differential cross sections has been obtained in Born approximation for pair production of exotic particles with various spins J=0, 1/2, 1 and quantum numbers (colored and colorless) both in qq-bar and gg-collisions. The connection of the unitarity of vector boson processes with gauge invariance, factorization properties of non-Abelian gauge amplitudes and the presence of kinematic zeros is used. Besides, the problem of admissibility of massless limit for these processes is being discussed. The yield of exotic particle pairs at pp(p-barp) colliding beams in TeV energy range have been calculated and limits for the accessible mass range have been found

  16. Electric Chern-Simons term, enlarged exotic Galilei symmetry and noncommutative plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmo, Mariano A. del; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2006-01-01

    The extended exotic planar model for a charged particle is constructed. It includes a Chern-Simons-like term for a dynamical electric field, but produces usual equations of motion for the particle in background constant uniform electric and magnetic fields. The electric Chern-Simons term is responsible for the noncommutativity of the boost generators in the 10-dimensional enlarged exotic Galilei symmetry algebra of the extended system. The model admits two reduction schemes by the integrals of motion, one of which reproduces the usual formulation for the charged particle in external constant electric and magnetic fields with associated field-deformed Galilei symmetry, whose commuting boost generators are identified with the nonlocal in time Noether charges reduced on-shell. Another reduction scheme, in which electric field transmutes into the commuting space translation generators, extracts from the model a free particle on the noncommutative plane described by the twofold centrally extended Galilei group of the nonrelativistic anyons

  17. Geneva University: Searches for Exotic Physics with leptons with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 30 November  2011 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Searches for Exotic Physics with leptons with the ATLAS detector Dr Dominique Fortin, TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada With the large 5 fb-1 sample of pp collisions recorded in 2011, ATLAS has taken full advantage of the opportunity to explore new territory at the TeV scale. In this seminar, an overview of searches for new exotic particles is presented, with a special emphasis on signatures with leptons. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : Mrs Gabriella Pasztor

  18. EXA 2011 : Proceedings of the International Conference on Exotic Atoms and Related Topics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Olaf; Marton, Johann; Suzuki, Ken; Widmann, Eberhard; Zmeskal, Johann; EXA 2011

    2012-01-01

    Proceedings of the International Conference on Exotic Atoms and Related Topics (EXA 2011) held in Vienna, Austria, September 5-9, 2011 P. Bühler, O. Hartmann, J. Marton, K. Suzuki, E. Widmann and J. Zmeskal (Eds.) Now the research in exotic atoms has a remarkable history of more than 50 years. Enormous success in the understanding of fundamental interactions and symmetries resulted from the research on these tiny objects at the femtoscale. This volume contains research papers on recent achievements and future opportunities of this highly interdisciplinary field of atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. The Proceedings are structured according to the conference session topics: Kaon-Nucleus and Kaon-Nucleon Interactions, Antihydrogen and Fundamental Symmetries, Hadronphysics with Antiprotons, Future Facilities and Instrumentation, Low energy QCD. Reprint from Hyperfine Interactions vol. 209, 210 and 211

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal assemblages in native plant roots change in the presence of invasive exotic grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, C.V.; Belnap, J.; D'Antonio, C.; Firestone, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Plant invasions have the potential to significantly alter soil microbial communities, given their often considerable aboveground effects. We examined how plant invasions altered the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of native plant roots in a grassland site in California and one in Utah. In the California site, we used experimentally created plant communities composed of exotic (Avena barbata, Bromus hordeaceus) and native (Nassella pulchra, Lupinus bicolor) monocultures and mixtures. In the Utah semi-arid grassland, we took advantage of invasion by Bromus tectorum into long-term plots dominated by either of two native grasses, Hilaria jamesii or Stipa hymenoides. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots were characterized with PCR amplification of the ITS region, cloning, and sequencing. We saw a significant effect of the presence of exotic grasses on the diversity of mycorrhizal fungi colonizing native plant roots. In the three native grasses, richness of mycorrhizal fungi decreased; in the native forb at the California site, the number of fungal RFLP patterns increased in the presence of exotics. The exotic grasses also caused the composition of the mycorrhizal community in native roots to shift dramatically both in California, with turnover of Glomus spp., and Utah, with replacement of Glomus spp. by apparently non-mycorrhizal fungi. Invading plants may be able to influence the network of mycorrhizal fungi in soil that is available to natives through either earlier root activity or differential carbon provision compared to natives. Alteration of the soil microbial community by plant invasion can provide a mechanism for both successful invasion and the resulting effects of invaders on the ecosystem. ?? Springer 2006.

  20. Community-wide impact of an exotic aphid on introduced tall goldenrod

    OpenAIRE

    ANDO, YOSHINO; UTSUMI, SHUNSUKE; OHGUSHI, TAKAYUKI

    2011-01-01

    1. The aphid Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum Olive, which is specialised to the tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima L., in its native range, has become a dominant species on the introduced tall goldenrod in Japan. How this exotic aphid influenced arthropod communities on the introduced tall goldenrod in aphid-present (spring) and aphid-absent (autumn) seasons was examined, using an aphid removal experiment. 2. In spring, aphid presence increased ant abundance because aphid honeydew attracted forag...

  1. Harmful or useful? A case study of the exotic peregrine earthworm morphospecies Pontoscolex corethrurus

    OpenAIRE

    Taheri , shabnam; Pelosi , Céline; Dupont , Lise

    2018-01-01

    Exotic peregrine earthworms are often considered to cause environmental harm and to have a negative impact on native species, but, as ecosystem engineers, they enhance soil physical properties. Pontoscolex corethrurus is by far the most studied morphospecies and is also the most widespread in tropical areas. The term of morphospecies is used in this review because P. corethrurus may in fact constitute a complex of cryptic species. This earthworm is found in a wide range of habitats, from appa...

  2. Micropropagation of an Exotic Ornamental Plant, Calathea crotalifera, for Production of High Quality Plantlets

    OpenAIRE

    Efzueni Rozali, Shahril; Rashid, Kamaludin A.; Mat Taha, Rosna

    2014-01-01

    A successful protocol was established for micropropagation in two selected varieties of exotic ornamental plants, Calathea crotalifera. The effects of different sterilization techniques, explant type, and the combination and concentration of plant growth regulators on shoots induction were studied. The axillary shoot buds explants sprouted from rhizomes in soil free conditions showed high induction rate of shoots with lowest contamination percentage when treated with combination of 30% (v/v) ...

  3. Extraction of the pion-nucleon sigma-term from the spectrum of exotic baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, P.

    2004-01-01

    The pion-nucleon sigma-term is extracted on the basis of the soliton picture of the nucleon from the mass spectrum of usual and the recently observed exotic baryons, assuming that they have positive parity. The value found is consistent with that inferred by means of conventional methods from pion-nucleon scattering data. The study can also be considered as a phenomenological consistency check of the soliton picture of baryons. (orig.)

  4. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 3 Studies of Exotic and Standard Model Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, D.; Baer, H.; Bagger, J.; Balazs, C.; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, U.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, I.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Burke, D.; Burrows, P.; Butler, J.N.; Chakraborty, D.; Cheng, H.C.; Chertok, M.; Choi, S.Y.; Cinabro, D.; Corcella, G.; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, H.; Dawson, S.; Denner, A.; Derwent, P.; Diaz, M.A.; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, S.; Dixit, M.; Dixon, L.; Dobrescu, B.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, J.; Feng, J.L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.E.; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, D.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Gronberg, J.; Gunion, J.; Haber, H.E.; Han, T.; Hawkings, R.; Hearty, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Heusch, C.; Hewett, J.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, A.; Hollebeek, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, R.; Jaros, J.; Juste, A.; Kadyk, J.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, T.; Karlen, D.; Keller, L.; Koltick, D.; Kribs, G.; Kronfeld, A.; Leike, A.; Logan, H.E.; Lykken, J.; Macesanu, C.; Magill, S.; Marciano, W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, K.; Moenig, K.; Montgomery, H.E.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, S.; Murakami, B.; Murayama, H.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, M.; Orr, L.H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, M.E.; Plehn, T.; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, D.; Raubenheimer, T.; Repond, J.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, T.; Ronan, M.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, J.; Roth, M.; Rowson, P.; Schumm, B.; Seppala, L.; Seryi, A.; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, X.; Telnov, V.; Teubner, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, A.S.; van Bibber, K.; van Kooten, R.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, D.; Wagner, D.; Waite, A.; Walkowiak, W.; Weiglein, G.; Wells, J.D.; W. Wester, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, O.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 3 reviews the possible experiments on that can be done at a linear collider on strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking, exotic particles, and extra dimensions, and on the top quark, QCD, and two-photon physics. It also discusses the improved precision electroweak measurements that this collider will make available.

  5. Exotic quantum holonomy and higher-order exceptional points in quantum kicked tops

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Atushi; Kim, Sang Wook; Cheon, Taksu

    2014-01-01

    The correspondence between exotic quantum holonomy that occurs in families of Hermitian cycles, and exceptional points (EPs) for non-Hermitian quantum theory is examined in quantum kicked tops. Under a suitable condition, an explicit expressions of the adiabatic parameter dependencies of quasienergies and stationary states, which exhibit anholonomies, are obtained. It is also shown that the quantum kicked tops with the complexified adiabatic parameter have a higher order EP, which is broken i...

  6. Nuclear capture in the atomic cascade of kaonic, antiprotonic and sigma hyperonic exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.; Welsh, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Ratios of nuclear capture rates are shown to increase with increasing principal quantum number n for a given orbital quantum number l, in the high-n, high-l states most relevant to studies of the exotic hadronic atoms of heavy particles. This surprising behaviour, which is confirmed by optical-model calculations, is in contrast to similar capture ratios in pionic atoms at low atomic number. Plots of the relevant hydrogenic atom wave functions are shown to explain such effects. ((orig.))

  7. The exotic heat-trace asymptotics of a regular-singular operator revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Vertman, Boris

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the exotic properties of the heat-trace asymptotics for a regular-singular operator with general boundary conditions at the singular end, as observed by Falomir, Muschietti, Pisani and Seeley as well as by Kirsten, Loya and Park. We explain how their results alternatively follow from the general heat kernel construction by Mooers, a natural question that has not been addressed yet, as the latter work did not elaborate explicitly on the singular structure of the heat trace expansion...

  8. Winter swarming behavior by the exotic cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi Sars, 1885 in a Kentucky (USA) reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, John R.; Renicker, Thomas R.; Tausz, Claudia E.; Young, Jade L.; Thomason, Jennifer C.; Wolf, Zachary L.; Russell, Amber L.; Cherry, Mac A.; Scotese, Kyle C.; Koenig, Dawn T.

    2018-01-01

    We describe swarming behavior in the invasive cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi Sars, 1885 in a Kentucky, USA, reservoir during winter 2017. The taxon is a highly successful tropical invader and has spread throughout the lower latitude systems in the USA since its discovery in 1991. Other than a few isolated reports, the abundance of D. lumholtzi is often 10,000 organisms L-1) of sexually reproducing females of this exotic cladoceran at water column temperatures <10°C.

  9. An Asymmetrical Trade: Trade in the Exotic and Our Understanding of Axes and Early Neolithic Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Clare

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the idea that the movement of axes away from their source of procurement, such as those of Group VI, reflects in part an invisible trade in perishable goods. In particular, it hypothesises that the pattern of movement was stimulated in the early Neolithic by the dispersal of those exotic goods required to establish farming. The evidence for and the implications of this are explored, and it is suggested that in order to facilitate understanding of both the 'trade' in ston...

  10. A new genus and species of native exotic millipede in Australia (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mesibov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Taxidiotisoma portabile gen. n., sp. n. is described from scattered populations in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, Australia. Populations of T. portabile in Victoria, Tasmania and parts of New South Wales occur in urban, suburban and agricultural areas, with no collections of the species in natural habitats in the same district. Taxidiotisoma portabile is likely to be a native exotic species whose home range is in eastern New South Wales.

  11. [Exploration on an overview of history (from Chunqiu to Ming and Qing Dynasties) and species of Chinese exotic traditional medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Min-Ru; Wang, Tian-Tian; Lu, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Yu-Ying

    2017-05-01

    This paper collected and analyzed literatures about starting of traditional medicine and trading of different medicine from Chunqiu Zhanguo to Ming and Qing Dynasties, in order to preliminarily explore on an overview of specie of chinese exotic traditional medicine and trade of different country in different dynasty(from Chunqiu to Ming and Qing Dynasties), as well as the amount of exotic medicine over two thousand years. (remove repeating and doubtful species), find peculiarity of exotic medicine, sreen species that used to develop the Silk Route and establish quality standards.Finally, We get conclusions are as follows. First, primary,.prosperous and declining stages of development of exotic traditional medicine are Qin and Han, Song-Jin-Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties, respectively. Second, according to literature, the stage that has the most species of exotic medicine is song dynasty,approximately have 300. Removing repeating and doubtful species, the believable species are approximate 230 to 250. Meanwhile, the unknown species are approximate 30, which may be different name of one medicine or processed goods, now these medicines are named as "doubtful species". Third, the medicinal parts of exotic medicine are different from Chinese medicine of Han nation. The number of Resin, fruits and seeds kind are more than root and rhizomes kind,mineral medicines are more than animal. Fourth, the major producing area of exotic medicine is some countries and territories related to the Silk Route in the history. Ultimately, this paper preliminarily figure out basic information of exotic medicine of different dynasty in China,that provide reference for learning study and decision of industrial development. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  12. 2nd International School of Physics of Exotic Atoms "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Duclos, J; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Torelli, Gabriele; Exotic atoms : fundamental interactions and structure of matter

    1980-01-01

    The second course of the International School on the Physics of Exotic Atoms took place at the "Ettore Majorana" Center for Scien­ tific Culture, Erice, Sicily, during the period from March 25 to April 5, 1979. It was attended by 40 participants from 23 insti­ tutes in 8 countries. The purpose of the course was to review the various aspects of the physics of exotic atoms, with particular emphasis on the re­ sults obtained in the last two years, i.e., after the first course of the School (Erice, April 24-30, 1977). The course dealt with two main topics, A) Exotic atoms and fundamental interactions and B) Applications to the study of the structure of matter. One of the aims of the course was to offer an opportunity for the exchange of experiences between scientists working in the two fields. In view of this, the lectures in the morning discussed the more general arguments in a common session, whereas the more specialized topics were treated in the afternoon, in two parallel sections. Section A was or...

  13. Trophic niche partitioning between two native and two exotic carnivores in SW Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Santos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of exotic species is one of the most pervasive consequences of the increased human mobility. The most known negative effects are the decrease or extinction of natives. The common-genet, Genetta genetta, and the Egyptian mongoose, Herpestes ichneumon, were introduced in the Iberian Peninsula in the 15th and 19th centuries, respectively. The competitive exclusion principle defines that two ecologically similar species cannot coexist. Thus, some degree of partitioning has to occur in species realized niche, which can occur at the trophic level. To test this hypothesis of partitioning we compared the diet of these two exotic species with that of two native species (stone marten, Martes foina, and red fox, Vulpes vulpes. The results show a high degree of overlap (>45% between the diets of species similar in their feeding strategies (arboreal and ground feeding. Nonetheless, at the finer scale of prey consumed at the species level some differences are found between the native and exotic species. These results suggest that if coexistence is due to trophic niche partitioning it only occurs at the level of the consumed species. However, coexistence may also be due to a combination of different strategies (home-range size, time and space use that structured the different realized niches of each species.

  14. An artificial perch to help Snail Kites handle an exotic Apple Snail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pias, Kyle E.; Welch, Zach C.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, the Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) is a federally endangered species and restricted to the wetlands of south-central Florida where the current population numbers less than 1,500. The Snail Kite is an extreme dietary specialist, previously feeding almost exclusively on one species of snail, the Florida Apple Snail (Pomacea paludosa). Within the past decade, an exotic species of apple snail, the Island Apple Snail (Pomacea insularum), has become established on lakes in central Florida. Island Apple Snails are larger than the native Florida Apple Snails, and Snail Kites handle the exotic snails less efficiently. Juvenile Snail Kites, in particular, have lower daily energy balances while feeding on Island Apple Snails. An inexpensive, easy-to-construct platform was developed that would provide Snail Kites with a flat, stable surface on which to extract snails. The platform has the potential to reduce the difficulties Snail Kites experience when handling exotic snails, and may benefit the Snail Kite population as a whole. Initial observations indicate that Snail Kites use the platforms frequently, and snails extracted at the platforms are larger than snails extracted at other perches.

  15. Introduction to the nuclear structure studies of exotic nuclei by using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masaaki; Dote, Akinobu; Ohnishi, Akira; Matsumiya, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    This article is originally prepared as the course text for the practice of the AMD course of 'studies of the strangeness nuclei by using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) method' in the Summer School held at KEK and IPCR in 2006-8 for postgraduate as well as undergraduate students and to foster young physicists in the titled area. The fundamental principle and the formalism of the AMD method which have been commonly used in the nuclear physics are explained at first, and it is described how to extend the AMD method to the studies of exotic nuclei especially to hypernuclei. Then calculation procedure is explained in detail so that the readers can understand the structure of exotic nuclei as they follow the process by themselves. It is intended here that they will be able not only to become familiar with the research by using the AMD method but also to visually enjoy the structure of exotic nuclei and will have further interest in this field. (S. Funahashi)

  16. EVALUATION OF AGRONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC AND EXOTIC SOYBEAN GERMPLASM IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The collaboration and interchange of breeding materials between breeding programs worldwide is important and necessary to increase the amount of genetic diversity by incorporating unique exotic germplasm into existing domestic germplasm. The objective of this study was to measure and compare the agronomic performance of 15 soybean cultivars released by the Agricultural Institute Osijek (Croatia (OS-cultivars and 15 cultivars released by the University of Guelph (Canada (CA-cultivars in Croatia. Based on the comparison, parental combinations could be designed to introgress exotic germplasms from the CA-cultivars into Croatian. Agronomic performance was determined in field trials that were conducted at the experimental field of the Agricultural Institute Osijek during the period from 2002 to 2005. Quantitative traits were measured and analyzed for maturity, grain yield components, level and stability of grain yield, adaptability, lodging resistance and field tolerance to Peronospora manshurica. The results indicated higher agronomic performance of OS-cultivars compared to CA- cultivars. However, comparison of yield is only tentative because all but one OS cultivar were later maturing than the CA-cultivars. Among 15 tested CA-cultivars, five cultivars (OAC Millennium, OAC Champion, OAC Bayfield, OAC Auburn, OAC Wallace were identified as the most favorable for parental combinations in hybridization with OS-cultivars. The results of this study will enable strategic incorporation of diversity from exotic Canadian germplasm into the domestic Croatian germplasm to develop segregating populations from which new, genetically more diverse improved soybean line, could be released.

  17. Campylobacteriosis in returning travellers and potential secondary transmission of exotic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini-Gras, L; Smid, J H; Wagenaar, J A; DE Boer, A; Havelaar, A H; Friesema, I H M; French, N P; Graziani, C; Busani, L; Van Pelt, W

    2014-06-01

    Multilocus sequence types (STs) were determined for 232 and 737 Campylobacter jejuni/coli isolates from Dutch travellers and domestically acquired cases, respectively. Putative risk factors for travel-related campylobacteriosis, and for domestically acquired campylobacteriosis caused by exotic STs (putatively carried by returning travellers), were investigated. Travelling to Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Southern Europe significantly increased the risk of acquiring campylobacteriosis compared to travelling within Western Europe. Besides eating chicken, using antacids, and having chronic enteropathies, we identified eating vegetable salad outside Europe, drinking bottled water in high-risk destinations, and handling/eating undercooked pork as possible risk factors for travel-related campylobacteriosis. Factors associated with domestically acquired campylobacteriosis caused by exotic STs involved predominantly person-to-person contacts around popular holiday periods. We concluded that putative determinants of travel-related campylobacteriosis differ from those of domestically acquired infections and that returning travellers may carry several exotic strains that might subsequently spread to domestic populations even through limited person-to-person transmission.

  18. Water dispersal of vegetative bulbils of the invasive exotic Dioscorea oppositifolia L. in southern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J.R.; Gibson, D.J.; Middleton, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Riparian corridors promote dispersal of several species of exotic invasives worldwide. Dispersal plays a role in the colonization of exotic invasive species into new areas and this study was conducted to determine if the invasiveness of Dioscorea oppositifolia L. (Chinese yam) is facilitated by secondary dispersal of vegetative diaspores (bulbils) by water. Since seed production of this plant has not been observed in the United States, bulbils represent the only means of dispersal to new habitats. Dispersal was monitored by placing aquatic traps, tethered bulbils, and painted bulbil caches in a tributary of Drury Creek, Giant City State Park, Illinois. Results indicate that high-energy flow in the creek accelerated secondary dispersal of bulbils downstream and onto the floodplain. The longest recorded dispersal distance was 206.2 m downstream. Dispersal distance of tethered bulbils was not related to rainfall or flow velocity in the creek; however the total number of bulbils trapped was positively related to flow velocity. We conclude that secondary dispersal by water in streams can facilitate dispersal of vegetative bulbils of this exotic species.

  19. Shrubs as ecosystem engineers across an environmental gradient: effects on species richness and exotic plant invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhesselink, Andrew R; Magnoli, Susan M; Cushman, J Hall

    2014-08-01

    Ecosystem-engineering plants modify the physical environment and can increase species diversity and exotic species invasion. At the individual level, the effects of ecosystem engineers on other plants often become more positive in stressful environments. In this study, we investigated whether the community-level effects of ecosystem engineers also become stronger in more stressful environments. Using comparative and experimental approaches, we assessed the ability of a native shrub (Ericameria ericoides) to act as an ecosystem engineer across a stress gradient in a coastal dune in northern California, USA. We found increased coarse organic matter and lower wind speeds within shrub patches. Growth of a dominant invasive grass (Bromus diandrus) was facilitated both by aboveground shrub biomass and by growing in soil taken from shrub patches. Experimental removal of shrubs negatively affected species most associated with shrubs and positively affected species most often found outside of shrubs. Counter to the stress-gradient hypothesis, the effects of shrubs on the physical environment and individual plant growth did not increase across the established stress gradient at this site. At the community level, shrub patches increased beta diversity, and contained greater rarified richness and exotic plant cover than shrub-free patches. Shrub effects on rarified richness increased with environmental stress, but effects on exotic cover and beta diversity did not. Our study provides evidence for the community-level effects of shrubs as ecosystem engineers in this system, but shows that these effects do not necessarily become stronger in more stressful environments.

  20. Prevalence of Salmonella spp., and serovars isolated from captive exotic reptiles in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikillus, K H; Gartrell, B D; Motion, E

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in captive exotic reptile species in New Zealand, and identify the serovars isolated from this population. Cloacal swabs were obtained from 378 captive exotic reptiles, representing 24 species, residing in 25 collections throughout New Zealand between 2008 and 2009. Samples were cultured for Salmonella spp., and suspected colonies were serotyped by the Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR). Forty-three of the 378 (11.4%) reptiles sampled tested positive for Salmonella spp., with 95% CI for the estimated true prevalence being 12-25% in exotic reptiles in this study population. Lizards tested positive for Salmonella spp. more often than chelonians. Agamid lizards tested positive more often than any other family group, with 95% CI for the estimated true prevalence being 56-100%.. Six Salmonella serovars from subspecies I and two from subspecies II were isolated. The serovar most commonly isolated was S. Onderstepoort (30.2%), followed by S. Thompson (20.9%), S. Potsdam (14%), S. Wangata (14%), S. Infantis (11.6%) and S. Eastbourne (2.3%). All of the subspecies I serovars have been previously reported in both reptiles and humans in New Zealand, and include serovars previously associated with disease in humans. This study showed that Salmonella spp. were commonly carried by exotic reptiles in the study population in New Zealand. Several serovars of Salmonella spp. with known pathogenicity to humans were isolated, including S. Infantis, which is one of the most common serovars isolated from both humans and non-human sources in New Zealand. The limitations of this study included the bias engendered by the need for voluntary involvement in the study, and the non-random sampling design. Based on the serovars identified in this and previous studies, it is recommended native and exotic reptiles be segregated within collections, especially when native reptiles may be used for biodiversity restoration

  1. Comparative sensitivity of European native (Anodonta anatina) and exotic (Corbicula fluminea) bivalves to mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Machado, Jorge; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-12-01

    Pollution is believed to be an important factor modulating the competition between exotic invasive bivalves and their native competitors. Thus, the objective of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of the European native Anodonta anatina and the exotic invasive species Corbicula fluminea to mercury, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant of high concern. In laboratory acute bioassays, adult organisms of both species were exposed independently to mercury for 96 h (31-500 μg/L). The criteria indicative of toxicity were mortality and biomarkers of oxidative stress and damage, neurotoxicity, and energy production changes. Mercury induced mortality in A. anatina (72 h-LC10 and 72 h-LC50 of 14.0 μg/L and 49.6 μg/L, respectively) but not in C. fluminea. The ability of C. fluminea to maintaining the shell closed for considerable periods of time when exposed to high concentrations of mercury and the effective activation (up to 63 μg/L) of mechanisms against the oxidative stress caused by mercury may have contributed to its relatively low sensitivity. In the range of concentrations tested, mercury had no significant effects on the other parameters analysed in C. fluminea. Overall, the findings of the present study, suggest that in real scenarios of competition between C. fluminea and A. anatina populations, the presence of mercury may modulate the process, acting in favour of the exotic species because it is less sensitive to this environmental contaminant than the native bivalve. The results of the present study highlight the need of further investigation on the effects of mercury on the competition between exotic invasive species and their native competitors, especially the effects potentially induced by long-term exposure to low concentrations of this metal, the mechanisms involved in the tolerance to mercury-induced stress, and the potential post-exposure recovery of both exotic invasive and native bivalves. This knowledge is most important for

  2. Contrasting effects of land use intensity and exotic host plants on the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Walter Santos; Vieira, Marcos Costa; Lewinsohn, Thomas M; Almeida-Neto, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Human land use tends to decrease the diversity of native plant species and facilitate the invasion and establishment of exotic ones. Such changes in land use and plant community composition usually have negative impacts on the assemblages of native herbivorous insects. Highly specialized herbivores are expected to be especially sensitive to land use intensification and the presence of exotic plant species because they are neither capable of consuming alternative plant species of the native flora nor exotic plant species. Therefore, higher levels of land use intensity might reduce the proportion of highly specialized herbivores, which ultimately would lead to changes in the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks. This study investigates the community-wide effects of land use intensity on the degree of specialization of 72 plant-herbivore networks, including effects mediated by the increase in the proportion of exotic plant species. Contrary to our expectation, the net effect of land use intensity on network specialization was positive. However, this positive effect of land use intensity was partially canceled by an opposite effect of the proportion of exotic plant species on network specialization. When we analyzed networks composed exclusively of endophagous herbivores separately from those composed exclusively of exophagous herbivores, we found that only endophages showed a consistent change in network specialization at higher land use levels. Altogether, these results indicate that land use intensity is an important ecological driver of network specialization, by way of reducing the local host range of herbivore guilds with highly specialized feeding habits. However, because the effect of land use intensity is offset by an opposite effect owing to the proportion of exotic host species, the net effect of land use in a given herbivore assemblage will likely depend on the extent of the replacement of native host species with exotic ones.

  3. Biodiversity loss following the introduction of exotic competitors: does intraguild predation explain the decline of native lady beetles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Smith

    Full Text Available Exotic species are widely accepted as a leading cause of biodiversity decline. Lady beetles (Coccinellidae provide an important model to study how competitor introductions impact native communities since several native coccinellids have experienced declines that coincide with the establishment and spread of exotic coccinellids. This study tested the central hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic species has caused these declines. Using sentinel egg experiments, we quantified the extent of predation on previously-common (Hippodamia convergens and common (Coleomegilla maculata native coccinellid eggs versus exotic coccinellid (Harmonia axyridis eggs in three habitats: semi-natural grassland, alfalfa, and soybean. Following the experiments quantifying egg predation, we used video surveillance to determine the composition of the predator community attacking the eggs. The extent of predation varied across habitats, and egg species. Native coccinellids often sustained greater egg predation than H. axyridis. We found no evidence that exotic coccinellids consumed coccinellid eggs in the field. Harvestmen and slugs were responsible for the greatest proportion of attacks. This research challenges the widely-accepted hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic competitors explains the loss of native coccinellids. Although exotic coccinellids may not be a direct competitor, reduced egg predation could indirectly confer a competitive advantage to these species. A lower proportion of H. axyridis eggs removed by predators may have aided its expansion and population increase and could indirectly affect native species via exploitative or apparent competition. These results do not support the intraguild predation hypothesis for native coccinellid decline, but do bring to light the existence of complex interactions between coccinellids and the guild of generalist predators in coccinellid foraging habitats.

  4. Accounting for sampling patterns reverses the relative importance of trade and climate for the global sharing of exotic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen R.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.

    2017-01-01

    AimThe distributions of exotic species reflect patterns of human-mediated dispersal, species climatic tolerances and a suite of other biotic and abiotic factors. The relative importance of each of these factors will shape how the spread of exotic species is affected by ongoing economic globalization and climate change. However, patterns of trade may be correlated with variation in scientific sampling effort globally, potentially confounding studies that do not account for sampling patterns.LocationGlobal.Time periodMuseum records, generally from the 1800s up to 2015.Major taxa studiedPlant species exotic to the United States.MethodsWe used data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) to summarize the number of plant species with exotic occurrences in the United States that also occur in each other country world-wide. We assessed the relative importance of trade and climatic similarity for explaining variation in the number of shared species while evaluating several methods to account for variation in sampling effort among countries.ResultsAccounting for variation in sampling effort reversed the relative importance of trade and climate for explaining numbers of shared species. Trade was strongly correlated with numbers of shared U.S. exotic plants between the United States and other countries before, but not after, accounting for sampling variation among countries. Conversely, accounting for sampling effort strengthened the relationship between climatic similarity and species sharing. Using the number of records as a measure of sampling effort provided a straightforward approach for the analysis of occurrence data, whereas species richness estimators and rarefaction were less effective at removing sampling bias.Main conclusionsOur work provides support for broad-scale climatic limitation on the distributions of exotic species, illustrates the need to account for variation in sampling effort in large biodiversity databases, and highlights the

  5. Response of native soil microbial functions to the controlled mycorrhization of an exotic tree legume, Acacia holosericea in a Sahelian ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Bilgo, A.; Sangare, S. K.; Thioulouse, J.; Prin, Y.; Hien, V.; Galiana, A.; Baudoin, E.; Hafidi, M.; Ba, Amadou; Duponnois, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Fifty years of overexploitation have disturbed most forests within Sahelian areas. Exotic fast growing trees (i.e., Australian Acacia species) have subsequently been introduced for soil improvement and fuelwood production purposes. Additionally, rhizobial or mycorrhizal symbioses have sometimes been favored by means of controlled inoculations to increase the performance of these exotic trees in such arid and semiarid zones. Large-scale anthropogenic introduction of exotic plants could also th...

  6. The impact of an invasive exotic bush on the stopover ecology of migrant passerines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizaga, J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Migration is highly energy-demanding and birds often need to accumulate large fuel loads during this period. However, original habitat at stopover sites could be affected by invasive exotic plants outcompeting native vegetation. The impact of exotic plants on the stopover behavior of migrant bird species is poorly understood. As a general hypothesis, it can be supposed that habitat change due to the presence of exotic plants will affect migrants, having a negative impact on bird abundance, on avian community assemblage, and/or on fuel deposition rate. To test these predictions, we used data obtained in August 2011 at a ringing station in a coastal wetland in northern Iberia which contained both unaltered reedbeds (Phragmites spp. and areas where the reedbeds had been largely replaced by the invasive saltbush (Baccharis halimifolia. Passerines associated with reedbeds during the migration period were used as model species, with a particular focus on sedge warblers (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus. The saltbush promoted a noticeable change on bird assemblage, which became enriched by species typical of woodland habitats. Sedge warblers departed with a higher fuel load, showed a higher fuel deposition rate, and stayed for longer in the control zone than in the invaded zone. Invasive plants, such as saltbush, can impose radical changes on habitat, having a direct effect on the stopover strategies of migrants. The substitution of reedbeds by saltbushes in several coastal marshes in Atlantic Europe should be regarded as a problem with potential negative cons equences for the conservation of migrant bird species associated with this habitat.

  7. The Speed of Invasion: Rates of Spread for Thirteen Exotic Forest Insects and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Evans

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Invasive, exotic insects and diseases have a devastating effect on North American forests. The rate of spread, or range expansion, is one of the main determinants of an invasive organism’s impact, and can play a major role in structuring management response options. To better understand how exotic organisms have spread through our forests, this study employs a consistent, rigorous analytical framework to analyze a comprehensive geospatial database for the spread of seven exotic insects and six diseases. This study includes new data for six insects and two diseases in combination with five invasive species previously analyzed using the same technique. The quantile regression analysis of over 3000 records of infestation over the preceding century show that the rate of spread of invasive forest insects and diseases ranges from 4.2 km·year−1 to 57.0 km·year−1. The slowest disease spread was white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola at 7.4 km·year−1 while the most rapid disease spread was chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica at 31.3 km·year−1. The slowest insect spread was balsam woolly adelgid (Adelges piceae (4.2 km·year−1 while the fastest was emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis at 57.0 km·year−1. Species that can fly long distances or are vectored by flying insects have spread faster than those that are passively dispersed. This analysis highlights the difficulty of estimating spread rates from studies of individual dispersal or flight distances, but the estimated spread rates in this study are generally in line with previous estimates.

  8. Non-random co-occurrence of native and exotic plant species in Mediterranean grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, José M.; Martín-Forés, Irene; Acosta-Gallo, Belén; del Pozo, Alejandro; Ovalle, Carlos; Sánchez-Jardón, Laura; Castro, Isabel; Casado, Miguel A.

    2016-11-01

    Invasion by exotic species in Mediterranean grasslands has determined assembly patterns of native and introduced species, knowledge of which provides information on the ecological processes underlying these novel communities. We considered grasslands from Spain and Chile. For each country we considered the whole grassland community and we split species into two subsets: in Chile, species were classified as natives or colonizers (i.e. exotics); in Spain, species were classified as exclusives (present in Spain but not in Chile) or colonizers (Spanish natives and exotics into Chile). We used null models and co-occurrence indices calculated in each country for each one of 15 sites distributed along a precipitation gradient and subjected to similar silvopastoral exploitation. We compared values of species co-occurrence between countries and between species subsets (natives/colonizers in Chile; exclusives/colonizers in Spain) within each country and we characterised them according to climatic variables. We hypothesized that: a) the different coexistence time of the species in both regions should give rise to communities presenting a spatial pattern further from random in Spain than in Chile, b) the co-occurrence patterns in the grasslands are affected by mesoclimatic factors in both regions. The patterns of co-occurrence are similar in Spain and Chile, mostly showing a spatial pattern more segregated than expected by random. The colonizer species are more segregated in Spain than in Chile, possibly determined by the longer residence time of the species in the source area than in the invaded one. The segregation of species in Chile is related to water availability, being species less segregated in habitat with greater water deficit; in Spain no relationship with climatic variables was found. After an invasion process, our results suggest that the possible process of alteration of the original Chilean communities has not prevented the assembly between the native and

  9. Effects of an exotic plant invasion on native understory plants in a tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ayesha E

    2010-06-01

    The dry forests of southern India, which are endangered tropical ecosystems and among the world's most important tiger (Panthera tigris) habitats, are extensively invaded by exotic plants. Yet, experimental studies exploring the impacts of these invasions on native plants in these forests are scarce. Consequently, little is known about associated implications for the long-term conservation of tigers and other biodiversity in these habitats. I studied the impacts of the exotic plant Lantana camara on understory vegetation in a dry-forest tiger habitat in southern India. I compared the richness, composition, and abundance of tree seedlings, herbs, and shrubs and the abundance of grass among plots in which Lantana was cleared or left standing. These plots were distributed across two blocks-livestock free and livestock grazed. Removal of Lantana had an immediate positive effect on herb-shrub richness in the livestock-free block, but had no effect on that of tree seedlings in either livestock block. Tree-seedling and herb-shrub composition differed significantly between Lantana treatment and livestock block, and Lantana removal significantly decreased survival of tree seedlings. Nevertheless, the absence of trees, in any stage between seedling and adult, indicates that Lantana may stall tree regeneration. Lantana removal decreased the abundance of all understory strata, probably because forage plants beneath Lantana are less accessible to herbivores, and plants in Lantana-free open plots experienced greater herbivory. Reduced access to forage in invaded habitats could negatively affect ungulate populations and ultimately compromise the ability of these forests to sustain prey-dependent large carnivores. Additional research focused on understanding and mitigating threats posed by exotic plants may be crucial to the long-term protection of these forests as viable tiger habitats.

  10. Exotic Optical Fibers and Glasses: Innovative Material Processing Opportunities in Earth's Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozmuta, Ioana; Rasky, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Exotic optical fibers and glasses are the platform material for photonics applications, primarily due to their superior signal transmission (speed, low attenuation), with extending bandwidth deep into the infrared, exceeding that of silica fibers. Gravitational effects (convection sedimentation) have a direct impact on the phase diagram of these materials and influence melting properties, crystallization temperatures, and viscosity of the elemental mix during the manufacturing process. Such factors constitute limits to the yield, transmission quality, and strength and value of these fibers; they also constrain the range of applications. Manufacturing in a gravity-free environment such as the Earth's Orbit also helps with other aspects of the fabrication process (i.e., improved form factor of the manufacturing unit, sustainability). In this article, revolutionary developments in the field of photonics over the past decade merge with the paradigm shift in the privatization of government-owned capabilities supporting a more diverse infrastructure (parabolic, suborbital, orbital), reduced price, and increased frequency to access space and the microgravity environment. With the increased dependence on data (demand, bandwidth, efficiency), space and the microgravity environment provide opportunities for optimized performance of these exotic optical fibers and glasses underlying the development of enabling technologies to meet future data demand. Existing terrestrial markets (Internet, telecommunications, market transactions) and emerging space markets (on-orbit satellite servicing, space manufacturing, space resources, space communications, etc.) seem to converge, and this innovative material processing opportunity of exotic optical fibers and glasses might just be that "killer app": technologically competitive, economically viable, and with the ability to close the business case.

  11. Looking for a hidden sector in exotic Higgs boson decays with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Coccaro, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The nature of dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions in particle physics. Dark matter can be postulated to be part of a hidden sector whose interactions with the visible matter are not completely decoupled. The discovery of a fundamental scalar particle compatible with the Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model paves the way for looking for dark matter with novel methods. An overview of the searches looking for a hidden sector in exotic Higgs decays and for invisible decays of the Higgs boson within the ATLAS experiment is presented. Prospects for searches with LHC data at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are summarized.

  12. Exotic Meson Decay to {omega}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Lu; G.S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J.M. Bishop; V.A. Bodyagin; D.S. Brown; N.M. Cason; S.U. Chung; J.P. Cummings; K. Danyo; A.I. Demianov; S.P. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J.P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; X.L. Fan; A.M. Gribushin; R.W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; J. Hu; E.I. Ivanov; D. Joffe; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O.L. Kodolova; V.L. Korotkikh; M.A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; V.V. Lipaev; J.M. LoSecco; J.J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A.I. Ostrovidov; T.K. Pedlar; A.V. Popov; D.I. Ryabchikov; L.I. Sarycheva; K.K. Seth; N. Shenhav; X. Shen; W.D. Shephard; N.B. Sinev; D.L. Stienike; J.S. Suh; S.A. Taegar; A. Tomaradze; I.N. Vardanyan; D.P. Weygand; D.B. White; H.J. Willutzki; M. Witkowski; A.A. Yershov

    2004-05-01

    A partial-wave analysis of the mesons from the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}p has been performed. The data show b{sub 1}{pi} decay of the spin-exotic states {pi}{sub 1}(1600) and {pi}{sub 1}(2000). Three isovector 2{sup -+} states were seen in the {omega}{rho}{sup -} decay channel. In addition to the well known {pi}{sub 2}(1670), signals were also observed for {pi}{sub 2}(1880) and {pi}{sub 2}(1970).

  13. Economic and conservation implications of converting exotic forages to native warm-season grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P. Monroe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Intensive agriculture can have negative environmental consequences such as nonpoint source pollution and the simplification of biotic communities, and land sharing posits that conservation can be enhanced by integrating agricultural productivity and biodiversity on the same land. In the Southeastern United States, native warm-season grasses (NWSG may be a land sharing alternative to exotic forages currently in production because of greater livestock gains with lower fertilizer inputs, and habitat for grassland birds. However, uncertainty regarding costs and risk poses an important barrier to incorporating NWSG in livestock operations. We evaluated the economic and conservation implications of NWSG conversion among small, operational-scale pastures (6.8–10.5 ha during 2011–2012 at the Prairie Research Unit in Monroe Co., Mississippi (USA. We used partial budgets to compare the marginal rate of return (MRRe from converting exotic grass pastures to either a NWSG monoculture of Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans or a NWSG mix of Indiangrass, little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium, and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii. We similarly compared changes in productivity of dickcissels (Spiza americana, a grassland bird specializing in tall structure. Average daily gain (ADG of steers and revenue were consistently higher for NWSG treatments than exotic grass pasture, but ADG declined between years. Indiangrass pastures yielded consistently positive MRRe, indicating producers would receive 16–24% return on investment. Marginal rate of return was lower for mixed NWSG (−12 to 3%, driven by slightly lower livestock ADG and higher establishment costs than for Indiangrass. Sensitivity analyses indicated that MRRe also was influenced by cattle selling price. Conversely, mixed NWSG increased dickcissel productivity by a greater degree than Indiangrass per amount invested in NWSG conversion, suggesting a tradeoff between livestock and dickcissel production

  14. Methodology of Integration for Competitive Technical Intelligence with Blue Ocean Strategy: Application to an exotic fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela Rodríguez Salvador

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new methodology that integrates Competitive Technical Intelligence with Blue Ocean Strategy. We explore new business niches taking advantage of the synergy that both areas offer, developing a model based on cyclic interactions through a process developed in two stages: Understanding opportunity that arise from idea formulation to decision making and strategic development. The validity of our approach (first stage was observed in the evaluation of an exotic fruit, Anacardium Occidentale, in the South of the State of Veracruz, Mexico with the support of the university ITESM, Campus Monterrey. We identified critical factors for success, opportunities and threats. Results confirm the attractiveness of this crop.

  15. Prevalence of coccidiosis among village and exotic breed of chickens in Maiduguri, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jallailudeen Rabana Lawal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Coccidiosis is an important enteric parasitic disease of poultry associated with significant economic losses to poultry farmers worldwide. This survey was conducted from June 2014 through July 2015 with the main goal of investigating the prevalence and associated risk factors of coccidiosis among village and exotic breeds of chickens in Maiduguri, Northeastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 600 fecal samples from live and slaughtered birds comprising 284 young, 141, growers and 175 adult birds; 379 male and 221 female birds; 450 exotic and 150 local breeds of birds were randomly collected either as bird’s fresh droppings or cutting open an eviscerated intestine of slaughtered birds, while noting their age, sex, and breeds. Samples were analyzed using standard parasitological methods and techniques. Results: An overall prevalence rate of 31.8% (95% confidence interval: 28.07-35.52 was obtained. Higher prevalence rates were recorded in growing birds 58.9% (50.78-67.02, female birds 35.3% (29.00-41.60, exotic birds 42.4% (37.83- 46.97, and broiler birds 68.7% (61.28-76.12. Similarly, higher infection rates were also observed among birds sampled from Mairi ward 66.7% (56.03-77.37, intensive management system 46.5% (41.61-51.39, and constructed local cages 54.0% (46.02-61.98. The difference in prevalence of coccidiosis among age groups, breeds, among exotic breeds, sampling locations, husbandry management systems, and litter management systems was statistically significant (0.05 of infection rates was observed in sex. Conclusion: Coccidiosis is endemic in both commercial and backyard poultry farms in Maiduguri due to poor management practices encouraging Eimeria oocysts build-up. It is therefore, recommended that poultry farmers should practice strict biosecurity measures on their farms, creating awareness on the prevalence of coccidiosis, routine vaccination against coccidiosis and educating poultry farmers on the need for

  16. We, the others: construction of the exotic and consumption of brazilian fashion in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Krischke Leitão

    Full Text Available This article discusses the consumption of Brazilian products - especially fashion and clothing - in France as a way of consuming the exotic. Drawing on ten months of fieldwork in France, I engage data collected there with my experience from previous research carried out in Brazil. Firstly, this article discusses exoticism, a topic that invariably broaches a debate about identity and alterity. Then, some particularities of "consuming the other" in French discourses about Brazilian products are analyzed. Finally, I conclude that the construction of Brazilian fashion as exoticism is simultaneously situated in the French imaginary about the Brazilian other and in the very Brazilian production of garment fashion.

  17. Laser spectroscopy of exotic RI atoms in superfluid helium-OROCHI experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, T.; Matsuo, Y.; Hatakeyama, A.; Fujikake, K.; Matsuura, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Shimoda, T.

    2010-01-01

    We have been developing a new laser spectroscopic technique 'OROCHI,' which is based on the combination of superfluid helium as a stopper of radioactive isotope (RI) beam and in-situ laser spectroscopy of RI atoms, for determining spins and moments of exotic RIs. By using this unique technique, it is feasible to measure nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of extremely low yield RI (estimated as less than 1 pps). Recently, we have demonstrated that nuclear spins and moments are obtained from Zeeman and hyperfine splittings of stable Rb isotopes measured using this OROCHI technique. Details of this laser spectroscopy method in He II 'OROCHI' and the summary of our development are presented.

  18. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in the Exotic Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Megan A.; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regards to the animal’s temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency towards secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately impact wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that impact healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  19. The South African fruit fly action plan: area-wide suppression and exotic species surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, Brian N.; Venter, Jan-Hendrik

    2006-01-01

    Two species of tephritid fruit flies of economic importance, Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly, Ceratitis capitata [Wiedemann]) and Natal fruit fly (C. rosa Karsch) cause economic losses in the South African deciduous fruit industry of approximately US$3 million per annum. A third species, marula fruit fly, C. cosyra (Walker), causes damage to citrus and sub-tropical fruits in the north-eastern part of the country. In 1999 a sterile insect technique (SIT) programme against Medfly was initiated over 10,000 ha of table grapes with a goal of cost-effective, ecologically compatible suppression of Medfly. The SIT programme was extended to two other fruit production areas in 2004. Although results in all three SIT areas have been mixed, populations of wild Medflies, as well as associated pesticide usage and control costs, have been reduced since the start of sterile fly releases. Reasons for the partial degree of success and the relatively slow expansion of Medfly SIT to other areas include economic, operational and cultural factors, as well as certain fruit production practices. Before fruit fly-free areas can be created, deficiencies in the ability to mass-rear Natal fruit fly need to be overcome so that an SIT programme against this species can be initiated. Any fruit fly suppression or eradication campaign will be severely compromised by any introductions into South Africa of exotic fruit fly species. The risk of such introductions is increasing as trade with and travel to the country increases. A Plant Health Early Warning Systems Division has been initiated to formulate fruit fly detection and action plans. Melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae [Coquillett]), Asian fruit fly (B. invadens Drew, Tsurutu and White) and peach fruit fly (B. zonata [Saunders]), which are all well established in parts of Africa and/or Indian Ocean islands, have been identified as presenting the highest risk for entering and becoming established in South Africa. An exotic fruit fly surveillance

  20. Nuclear structure for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goegelein, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In this work the Skyrme Hartree-Fock and Relativistic Hartree--Fock approaches have been considered to describe the structure of nuclear systems ranging from finite nuclei, structures in the crust of neutron stars to homogeneous matter. Effects of pairing correlations and finite temperature are also taken into account. The numerical procedure in the cubic box is described for the Skyrme Hartree-Fock as well as the relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. And finally, results for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  1. Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone Agonists and Other Contraceptive Medications in Exotic Companion Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoemaker, Nico J

    2018-05-01

    The use of a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist slow-release implant (GnRH A-SRI) has become increasingly popular as an alternative for surgical contraception in many species. Although these implants have proven to be very effective in some species (eg, ferrets, rats, chicken, psittacines, and iguanas), they have been found less effective in other species (eg, male guinea pigs and rabbits, veiled chameleons, slider turtles, and leopard geckos). This review provides an overview of the available literature on the effects of GnRH A-SRIs in companion exotic animals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of coccidiosis among village and exotic breed of chickens in Maiduguri, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Jallailudeen Rabana; Jajere, Saleh Mohammed; Ibrahim, Umar Isa; Geidam, Yaqub Ahmed; Gulani, Isa Adamu; Musa, Gambo; Ibekwe, Benjamin U.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Coccidiosis is an important enteric parasitic disease of poultry associated with significant economic losses to poultry farmers worldwide. This survey was conducted from June 2014 through July 2015 with the main goal of investigating the prevalence and associated risk factors of coccidiosis among village and exotic breeds of chickens in Maiduguri, Northeastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 600 fecal samples from live and slaughtered birds comprising 284 young, 141, growers and 175 adult birds; 379 male and 221 female birds; 450 exotic and 150 local breeds of birds were randomly collected either as bird’s fresh droppings or cutting open an eviscerated intestine of slaughtered birds, while noting their age, sex, and breeds. Samples were analyzed using standard parasitological methods and techniques. Results: An overall prevalence rate of 31.8% (95% confidence interval: 28.07-35.52) was obtained. Higher prevalence rates were recorded in growing birds 58.9% (50.78-67.02), female birds 35.3% (29.00-41.60), exotic birds 42.4% (37.83-46.97), and broiler birds 68.7% (61.28-76.12). Similarly, higher infection rates were also observed among birds sampled from Mairi ward 66.7% (56.03-77.37), intensive management system 46.5% (41.61-51.39), and constructed local cages 54.0% (46.02-61.98). The difference in prevalence of coccidiosis among age groups, breeds, among exotic breeds, sampling sites, husbandry management systems, and litter management systems was statistically significant (0.05) of infection rates was observed in sex. Conclusion: Coccidiosis is endemic in both commercial and backyard poultry farms in Maiduguri due to poor management practices encouraging Eimeria oocysts build-up. It is therefore, recommended that poultry farmers should practice strict biosecurity measures on their farms, creating awareness on the prevalence of coccidiosis, routine vaccination against coccidiosis and educating poultry farmers on the need for maintaining good

  3. Exotic muon-to-positron conversion in nuclei: partial transition sum evaluation by using shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divari, P.C.; Vergados, J.D.; Kosmas, T.S.; Skouras, L.D.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the exotic (μ - ,e + ) conversion in 27 Al, 27 Al(μ - ,e + ) 27 Na is presented. The relevant operators are deduced assuming one-pion and two-pion modes in the framework of intermediate neutrino mixing models, paying special attention to the light neutrino case. The total rate is calculated by summing over partial transition strengths for all kinematically accessible final states derived with s-d shell model calculations employing the well-known Wildenthal realistic interaction

  4. The case for exotic beams at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The case is presented for modifying the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide beams of proton-rich exotic isotopes, that do not occur terrestrially. A program of nuclear structure studies for light- and medium-mass, nearly self-conjugate nuclei and for heavy, proton-rich, quasibound nuclei is outlined, as are studies of hydrogen-burning reactions that occur in nucleosynthetic processes. Such a scientific program will provide a unique future for nuclear physics research at ORNL consistent with the long standing tradition of this laboratory

  5. Winter swarming behavior by the exotic cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi Sars, 1885 in a Kentucky (USA) reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, John R.; Renicker, Thomas R.; Tausz, Claudia E.; Young, Jade L.; Thomason, Jennifer C.; Wolf, Zachary L.; Russell, Amber L.; Cherry, Mac A.; Scotese, Kyle C.; Koenig, Dawn T.

    2018-01-01

    We describe swarming behavior in the invasive cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi Sars, 1885 in a Kentucky, USA, reservoir during winter 2017. The taxon is a highly successful tropical invader and has spread throughout the lower latitude systems in the USA since its discovery in 1991. Other than a few isolated reports, the abundance of D. lumholtzi is often swarming behavior by this species. We document the occurrence of massive swarms (>10,000 organisms L-1) of sexually reproducing females of this exotic cladoceran at water column temperatures <10°C.

  6. FUSTIPEN—the France-U.S. Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papenbrock, Thomas [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-03-22

    FUSTIPEN, the France-U.S. Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei, was an international venue for theoretical research on the physics of nuclei during an era of particularly active experimental investigations of rare isotopes, see http://fustipen.ganil.fr/. It was dedicated to collaborative research between U.S.-based and French nuclear physicists, drawing on the complementary expertise in the two countries. The grant provided travel and local support for visits by U.S. nuclear physicists to GANIL, where the FUSTIPEN offices are located, and also supported collateral travel to other French research institutions.

  7. Characteristic Features of the Exotic Superconductors: Evidence for a Common Pairing Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandow, B.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a comprehensive examination of the exotic superconductors (the materials so-labelled by Uemura and co-workers), to determine as far as possible the true systematics among their many anomalous features. In the crystal-chemistry aspects as well as in the electronic properties, we find features which appear to be universal for these materials, and also features which are clearly not universal but which are common enough to be considered typical for these materials. A number of implications are presented. It appears that all of these materials are sharing some ''new'' pairing mechanism, usually in addition to the conventional phonon mechanism

  8. Phenotypic flexibility in exotic quinoa (chenopodium quinoa willd.) germplasm for seedling vigor and viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, H.; Basra, S.M.A.; Cheema, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Exotic quinoa genotypes were evaluated for seedling vigor, viability, heritability, and genotypic and phenotypic variations under lab. conditions. A total of 25 genotypes of quinoa underwent comparison. Distinct demarcation among these genotypes was observed for final germination percentage, mean germination time, time to 50% germination, germination index, root/shoot length and root:shoot ratio. Viable, vigorous genotypes and poorly performing genotypes were identified and grouped from the available exotic germplasm. This selection was made on the assumption that resistance to climatic adversities and better sustainability under poor storage conditions are issues of immense importance in post harvest handling of quinoa seed. For selection of vigorous quinoa genotypes, final germination percentage (more than 90%) and root (more than 3.5 cm) or shoot lengths (more than 4.0 cm) presented themselves as important associated traits, in addition to germination index (22 to 33) and seedling survival percentage (between 90-100%). However, final germination percentage and root length were demonstrated to be reliable and environment-proof traits for the crop. Exotic quinoa genotypes were evaluated for seedling vigor, viability, heritability, and genotypic and phenotypic variations under lab. conditions. A total of 25 genotypes of quinoa underwent comparison. Distinct demarcation among these genotypes was observed for final germination percentage, mean germination time, time to 50% germination, germination index, root/shoot length and root:shoot ratio. Viable, vigorous genotypes and poorly performing genotypes were identified and grouped from the available exotic germplasm. This selection was made on the assumption that resistance to climatic adversities and better sustainability under poor storage conditions are issues of immense importance in post harvest handling of quinoa seed. For selection of vigorous quinoa genotypes, final germination percentage (more than 90%) and

  9. Nuclear structure for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goegelein, Peter

    2007-07-01

    In this work the Skyrme Hartree-Fock and Relativistic Hartree--Fock approaches have been considered to describe the structure of nuclear systems ranging from finite nuclei, structures in the crust of neutron stars to homogeneous matter. Effects of pairing correlations and finite temperature are also taken into account. The numerical procedure in the cubic box is described for the Skyrme Hartree-Fock as well as the relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. And finally, results for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  10. The South African fruit fly action plan: area-wide suppression and exotic species surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Brian N., E-mail: barnesb@arc.agric.z [ARC Infruitec-Nietvoorbij Institute for Fruit, Vine and Wine, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Venter, Jan-Hendrik, E-mail: janhendrikv@nda.agric.z [Directorate Plant Health, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2006-07-01

    Two species of tephritid fruit flies of economic importance, Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly, Ceratitis capitata [Wiedemann]) and Natal fruit fly (C. rosa Karsch) cause economic losses in the South African deciduous fruit industry of approximately US$3 million per annum. A third species, marula fruit fly, C. cosyra (Walker), causes damage to citrus and sub-tropical fruits in the north-eastern part of the country. In 1999 a sterile insect technique (SIT) programme against Medfly was initiated over 10,000 ha of table grapes with a goal of cost-effective, ecologically compatible suppression of Medfly. The SIT programme was extended to two other fruit production areas in 2004. Although results in all three SIT areas have been mixed, populations of wild Medflies, as well as associated pesticide usage and control costs, have been reduced since the start of sterile fly releases. Reasons for the partial degree of success and the relatively slow expansion of Medfly SIT to other areas include economic, operational and cultural factors, as well as certain fruit production practices. Before fruit fly-free areas can be created, deficiencies in the ability to mass-rear Natal fruit fly need to be overcome so that an SIT programme against this species can be initiated. Any fruit fly suppression or eradication campaign will be severely compromised by any introductions into South Africa of exotic fruit fly species. The risk of such introductions is increasing as trade with and travel to the country increases. A Plant Health Early Warning Systems Division has been initiated to formulate fruit fly detection and action plans. Melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae [Coquillett]), Asian fruit fly (B. invadens Drew, Tsurutu and White) and peach fruit fly (B. zonata [Saunders]), which are all well established in parts of Africa and/or Indian Ocean islands, have been identified as presenting the highest risk for entering and becoming established in South Africa. An exotic fruit fly surveillance

  11. Constraints on Models for the Higgs Boson with Exotic Spin and Parity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Emily Hannah [Michigan State U.

    2016-01-01

    The production of a Higgs boson in association with a vector boson at the Tevatron offers a unique opportunity to study models for the Higgs boson with exotic spin J and parity P assignments. At the Tevatron the V H system is produced near threshold. Different JP assignments of the Higgs boson can be distinguished by examining the behavior of the cross section near threshold. The relatively low backgrounds at the Tevatron compared to the LHC put us in a unique position to study the direct decay of the Higgs boson to fermions. If the Higgs sector is more complex than predicted, studying the spin and parity of the Higgs boson in all decay modes is important. In this Thesis we will examine the WH → ℓνb¯b production and decay mode using 9.7 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment in an attempt to derive constraints on models containing exotic values for the spin and parity of the Higgs boson. In particular, we will examine models for a Higgs boson with JP = 0- and JP = 2+. We use a likelihood ratio to quantify the degree to which our data are incompatible with exotic JP predictions for a range of possible production rates. Assuming the production cross section times branching ratio of the signals in the models considered is equal to the standard model prediction, the WH → ℓνb¯b mode alone is unable to reject either exotic model considered. We will also discuss the combination of the ZH → ℓℓb¯b, WH → ℓνb¯b, and V H → ννb¯b production modes at the D0 experiment and with the CDF experiment. When combining all three production modes at the D0 experiment we reject the JP = 0- and JP = 2+ hypotheses at the 97.6% CL and at the 99.0% CL, respectively, when assuming the signal production cross section times branching ratio is equal to the standard model predicted value. When combining with the CDF experiment we reject the JP = 0- and JP = 2+ hypotheses with significances of 5.0 standard deviations and 4.9 standard deviations

  12. Photosynthetic 14Co2 incorporation in some exotic varieties of mulberry (Morus Spp.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarty, S.

    1993-01-01

    The rate of photosynthesis in five exotic varieties of mulberry viz., Moretti seringe, Morettiana, Ichinose, China white and and Goshyoerami was measured by using 14 CO 2 . Apparent photosynthetic efficiency was found to be significantly higher in the varieties Morettiana and lchinose, the former showed the highest chlorophyll. Photosynthates were more or less same in all varieties. Sucrose is synthesised in greater amount in all varieties except Moretti seringe. Greater amounts of glycine and serine were found in almost all varieties. Significant amount of malate and aspartate show that in mulberry, there might be an intermediate pathway between C 3 and C 4 . (author). 9 refs., 4 tabs

  13. Light exotic atoms in liquid and gaseous hydrogen and deuterium. Atom anti pp, theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markushin, V.E.

    1980-01-01

    Considered are the de-eXcitation, absorption and Stark mixing processes in light exotic atoms formed in liquid and gaseous hydrogen (deuteriUm) and presented is the new method of the cascade calculations. Atom anti pp is studied in detail, calculated are: the populations of atomic levels, the absorption probabilities, and the X-rays yields. The present-day experimental data are discussed and it is concluded that all of them (but one result), can be easily reconciled with each other and with the theory

  14. Native fauna on exotic trees: phylogenetic conservatism and geographic contingency in two lineages of phytophages on two lineages of trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, Martin M; Chao, Anne; Bailey, Richard I; Prinzing, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    The relative roles of evolutionary history and geographical and ecological contingency for community assembly remain unknown. Plant species, for instance, share more phytophages with closer relatives (phylogenetic conservatism), but for exotic plants introduced to another continent, this may be overlaid by geographically contingent evolution or immigration from locally abundant plant species (mass effects). We assessed within local forests to what extent exotic trees (Douglas-fir, red oak) recruit phytophages (Coleoptera, Heteroptera) from more closely or more distantly related native plants. We found that exotics shared more phytophages with natives from the same major plant lineage (angiosperms vs. gymnosperms) than with natives from the other lineage. This was particularly true for Heteroptera, and it emphasizes the role of host specialization in phylogenetic conservatism of host use. However, for Coleoptera on Douglas-fir, mass effects were important: immigration from beech increased with increasing beech abundance. Within a plant phylum, phylogenetic proximity of exotics and natives increased phytophage similarity, primarily in younger Coleoptera clades on angiosperms, emphasizing a role of past codiversification of hosts and phytophages. Overall, phylogenetic conservatism can shape the assembly of local phytophage communities on exotic trees. Whether it outweighs geographic contingency and mass effects depends on the interplay of phylogenetic scale, local abundance of native tree species, and the biology and evolutionary history of the phytophage taxon.

  15. Establishment Success of Coexisting Native and Exotic Trees Under an Experimental Gradient of Irradiance and Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Muñoz, Noelia; Castro-Díez, Pilar; Fierro-Brunnenmeister, Natalia

    2011-10-01

    The exotic trees Ailanthus altissima, Robinia pseudoacacia, Acer negundo and Elaeagnus angustifolia coexist with the native trees Fraxinus angustifolia and Ulmus minor in river banks of central Spain. Similarly, the exotic trees Acacia dealbata and Eucalyptus globulus co-occur with the natives Quercus pyrenaica and Pinus pinaster in Northwest Spain. We aimed to identify the environmental conditions that favour or hamper the establishment success of these species. In spring 2008, seeds of the studied species were sown under an experimental gradient of light (100, 65, 35, 7% of full sunlight) combined with three levels of soil moisture (mean soil water potential = -0.97, -1.52 and -1.77 MPa.). During the first growing season we monitored seed emergence and seedling survival. We found that the effect of light on the establishment success was stronger than the effect of soil moisture. Both exotic and native species of central Spain showed a good performance under high light, A. negundo being the most shade tolerant . Water shortage diminished E. angustifolia and A. altissima success. Among NW Spain species, A. dealbata and P. pinaster were found to be potential competitors for colonizing high-irradiance scenarios, while Q. pyrenaica and E. globulus were more successful under moderate shade. High soil moisture favoured E. globulus but not A. dealbata establishment. These results contribute to understand some of the factors controlling for spatial segregation between coexisting native and exotic tree species, and can help to take decisions orientated to the control and management of these exotic species.

  16. Exotic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balibar, S.

    1984-01-01

    UBe 13 hesitates, at low temperature, between two types of structure together antagonists and complementary: antiferromagnetism and superconductivity. Moreover, the last one seems a new kind of superconductivity. The alloy properties are recalled and debatable points are examined [fr

  17. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure; Les noyaux exotiques: un autre regard sur la structure nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw Univ., Institute of Theoretical Physics (Poland); Blumenfeld, Y.; Flocard, H.; Garcia Borge, M.J.; Nowacki, F.; Rombouts, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Marques, F.M.; Lacroix, D.; Dessagne, P.; Gaeggeler, H

    2002-07-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements.

  18. Novel multitrophic interactions among an exotic, generalist herbivore, its host plants and resident enemies in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Julie V; Mills, Nicholas J

    2016-12-01

    What happens when an exotic herbivore invades and encounters novel host plants and enemies? Here, we investigate the impacts of host plant quality and plant architecture on an exotic generalist herbivore, Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and its interactions with resident parasitoids in California. Using artificial diet and five plant species, we found significant effects of diet on the fitness of E. postvittana under laboratory conditions. In the field, based on a common garden experiment with host plants of nine species, we found that larval parasitism varied among plant species by a factor of 2.1 with a higher risk of parasitism on shorter than taller plants. Parasitism of egg masses varied by a factor of 4.7 among plant species with a higher risk of parasitism on taller than shorter plants. In the laboratory, the foraging time of a resident egg parasitoid on excised leaves varied among plant species, but did not correspond to observed egg parasitism rates on these same plants in the field. On leaves of Plantago lanceolata, the probability of egg parasitism decreased with trichome density. Overall, there was a significant effect of host plant on the intrinsic rate of increase of E. postvittana and on the extent of parasitism by resident parasitoids, but no correlation existed between these two effects. The recent decline of E. postvittana in California may be due to the low quality of some host plants and to the many resident enemies that readily attack it, perhaps due to its phylogenetic relatedness to resident tortricids.

  19. Observation of Exotic Meson Production in the Reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {eta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, E. I.; Stienike, D. L.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Adams, G. S.; Adams, T.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Bishop, J. M.; Bodyagin, V. A.; Brown, D. S.; Cason, N. M. (and others)

    2001-04-30

    An amplitude analysis of an exclusive sample of 5765 events from the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}{prime}{pi}{sup -}p at 18 GeV/c is described. The {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup -} production is dominated by natural parity exchange and by three partial waves: those with J{sup PC}=1{sup -+} , 2{sup ++} , and 4{sup ++} . A mass-dependent analysis of the partial-wave amplitudes indicates the production of the a{sub 2}(1320) meson as well as the a{sub 4}(2040) meson, observed for the first time decaying to {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup -} . The dominant, exotic (non-q{bar q}) 1{sup -+} partial wave is shown to be resonant with a mass of 1.597{+-}0.010{sup +0.045}{sub -0.010} GeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 0.340{+-}0.040{+-}0.050 GeV /c{sup 2} . This exotic state, the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) , is produced with a t dependence which is different from that of the a{sub 2}(1320) meson, indicating differences between the production mechanisms for the two states.

  20. Prediction and experimental determination of the solubility of exotic scales at high temperatures - Zinc sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    The presence of "exotic" scale such as Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) in HP/HT reservoirs has been identified. "Exotic" scale materials come as a new challenge in HP/HT reservoirs. This has led to the development of more advanced tools to predict their behavior...... at extreme conditions. The aim of this work is to include ZnS into the group of scale materials that can be modeled with the Extended UNIQUAC model. Solubility data for ZnS are scarce in the open literature. In order to improve the available data, we study the experimental behavior of ZnS solubility at high...... temperatures. The determination of the solubility of ZnS is carried out at temperatures up to 250°C. Zinc sulfide (99.99%) and ultra-pure water are placed in a vial in a reduced oxygen atmosphere. The sample is placed in a controlled bath and stirred until equilibrium is attained. The suspension is filtered...

  1. Exotic see-saw mechanism for neutrinos and leptogenesis in a Pati-Salam model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addazi, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di L’Aquila,67010 Coppito, AQ (Italy); LNGS, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso,67010 Assergi AQ (Italy); Bianchi, Massimo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata,I.N.F.N. Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata,Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1 00133 Roma (Italy); Ricciardi, Giulia [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Pancini”, Università di Napoli “Federico II”,Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); I.N.F.N. Sezione di Napoli,Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-02-04

    We discuss non-perturbative corrections to the neutrino sector, in the context of a D-brane Pati-Salam-like model, that can be obtained as a simple alternative to SO(10) GUT’s in theories with open and unoriented strings. In such D-brane models, exotic stringy instantons can correct the right-handed neutrino mass matrix in a calculable way, thus affecting mass hierarchies and modifying the see-saw mechanism to what we name exotic see-saw. For a wide range of parameters, a compact spectrum of right-handed neutrino masses can occur that gives rise to a predictive scenario for low energy observables. This model also provides a viable mechanism for Baryon Asymmetry in the Universe (BAU) through leptogenesis. Finally, a Majorana mass for the neutron is naturally predicted in the model, leading to potentially testable neutron-antineutron oscillations. Combined measurements in neutrino and neutron-antineutron sectors could provide precious informations on physics at the quantum gravity scale.

  2. Caustics of 1/r{sup n} binary gravitational lenses: from galactic haloes to exotic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozza, V.; Melchiorre, C., E-mail: valboz@physics.unisa.it, E-mail: cmelchiorre@unisa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the caustic topologies for binary gravitational lenses made up of two objects whose gravitational potential declines as 1/r{sup n}. With n<1 this corresponds to power-law dust distributions like the singular isothermal sphere. The n>1 regime can be obtained with some violations of the energy conditions, one famous example being the Ellis wormhole. Gravitational lensing provides a natural arena to distinguish and identify such exotic objects in our Universe. We find that there are still three topologies for caustics as in the standard Schwarzschild binary lens, with the main novelty coming from the secondary caustics of the close topology, which become huge at higher n. After drawing caustics by numerical methods, we derive a large amount of analytical formulae in all limits that are useful to provide deeper insight in the mathematics of the problem. Our study is useful to better understand the phenomenology of galaxy lensing in clusters as well as the distinct signatures of exotic matter in complex systems.

  3. Monitoring and eradication of exotic fruit flies in the Asia-Pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allwood, Allan; Vueti, Ema Tora

    2003-01-01

    Fruit flies (family Tephritidae) are very mobile and are capable of breaching quarantine barriers, resulting in authorities and horticultural industries having to conduct expensive eradication programs. During the last two decades, with improved air travel and large increases in traveller numbers, the numbers of incursions and outbreaks of exotic pest fruit flies, especially in the Pacific region, have increased, particularly those species belonging to the dorsalis complex. Quarantine surveillance or early warning systems for recording exotic fruit flies include border inspections, passenger profiling, detection trapping, host surveys, and emergency response capacity. Having these systems fully operational improves the prospects of recording new incursions or outbreaks before they have time to expand, but it is still essential to have the capacity to undertake an eradication response as quickly as possible. Eradication programs using protein bait application technique, male annihilation technique, and, in some cases, sterile insect technique have been recently used in Mauritius, Thailand, Philippines, Australia, Nauru, Cook Islands, and French Polynesia against a range of fruit fly species. (author)

  4. Plant and root endophyte assembly history: interactive effects on native and exotic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Benjamin A; Hawkes, Christine V; Fukami, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    Differences in the arrival timing of plants and soil biota may result in different plant communities through priority effects, potentially affecting the success of native vs. exotic plants, but experimental evidence is largely lacking. We conducted a greenhouse experiment to investigate whether the assembly history of plants and fungal root endophytes could interact to influence plant emergence and biomass. We introduced a grass species and eight fungal species from one of three land-use types (undisturbed, disturbed, or pasture sites in a Florida scrubland) in factorial combinations. We then introduced all plants and fungi from the other land-use types 2 weeks later. Plant emergence was monitored for 6 months, and final plant biomass and fungal species composition assessed. The emergence and growth of the exotic Melinis repens and the native Schizacharyium niveum were affected negatively when introduced early with their "home" fungi, but early introduction of a different plant species or fungi from a different site type eliminated these negative effects, providing evidence for interactive priority effects. Interactive effects of plant and fungal arrival history may be an overlooked determinant of plant community structure and may provide an effective management tool to inhibit biological invasion and aid ecosystem restoration.

  5. Genetic superiority of exotic clones over indigenous clones for quantitative and qualitative traits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.A.; Khatri, A.; Ahmad, M.; Siddiqui, N.A.; Dahar, M.H.; Khanzada, M.H.; Nizamani, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Seventeen exotic sugar cane clones along with two local checks (BL4 and L116) were planted for three consecutive years (1989-90 to 1991-92) and evaluated for cane yield, yield components (plant height, cane girth, stalks per stool, stool weight), fibre, sucrose and sugar yield. Two exotic clones AEC82-1026 and AEC86-329 proved to be significantly (p< 0.05) superior in cane yield (130.62 and 114.87 t/ha respectively) and sugar yield 18.10 and 19.33 t/ha respectively) to both checks, cane and sugar yield of BL4 were 100.73 and 12.69 t/ha and that of L116 were 74.19 11.03 t/ha respectively. Cane and sugar yields were positively (P<0.01) correlated with plant height, cane girth and weight per stool. These promising clones would be subjected to extensive studies for cane yield in different parts of Sindh province. (author)

  6. Compounding solutions for exotic and nondomesticated fauna in australia: an investigative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Alison; Bolitho, Richard; Gusti, Kane; Yim, Crystal; Testa, Chris; Hattingh, Laetitia

    2009-01-01

    Veterinarians face many challenges during routine administration of medication to animals. This study investigated the nature of the problems that veterinarians encounter in practice and assessed the potential benefit of pharmaceutical compounding interventions for exotic and nondomesticated fauna. The research was conducted at three large wildlife theme parks on the Gold Coast, Australia, using a multi-method design of qualitative techniques including semi-structured interviews accompanied by field note observations. Themes identified through the data analysis related to: the enthusiasm of veterinarians towards pharmaceutical compounding; medicated foods commonly being employed in practice; a lack of suitable commercially available medications; time constraint problems and incompatibilities between feeding and dosing intervals. A decisive factor identified in the uptake of compounding in veterinary care was the net cost of the compounding procedure when compared to the figurative "value" of the animal. In conlusion, the study found that pharmaceutical compounding would be able to deliver more effective solutions than current techniques employed for a majority of veterinary medication problems in the area of exotic and nondomesticated veterinary practice. Pharmacists therefore have opportunity to diversify their business model while providing an important service to the community.

  7. A versatile triple radiofrequency quadrupole system for cooling, mass separation and bunching of exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haettner, Emma; Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Czok, Ulrich; Dickel, Timo; Geissel, Hans; Kinsel, Wadim; Petrick, Martin; Schäfer, Thorsten; Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    The combination of in-flight separation with a gas-filled stopping cell has opened a new field for experiments with exotic nuclei. For instance, at the SHIP/SHIPTRAP facility at GSI in Darmstadt high-precision mass measurements of rare nuclei have been successfully performed. In order to extend the reach of SHIPTRAP to exotic nuclei that are produced together with high rates of unwanted reaction products, a novel compact radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) system has been developed. It implements ion cooling, identification and separation according to mass numbers and bunching capabilities. The system has a total length of one meter only and consists of an RFQ cooler, an RFQ mass filter and an RFQ buncher. A mass resolving power (FWHM) of 240 at a transmission efficiency of 90% has been achieved. The suppression of contaminants from neighboring masses by more than four orders of magnitude has been demonstrated at rates exceeding 106 ions/s. A longitudinal emittance of 0.45 eV μs has been achieved with the RFQ buncher, which will enable improved time-of-flight mass spectrometry downstream of the device. With this triple RFQ system the measurement of e.g. N= Z nuclides in the region up to tin will become possible at SHIPTRAP. The technology is also well suited for other rare-isotope facilities with experimental setups behind a stopping cell, such as the fragment separator FRS with the FRS Ion Catcher at GSI.

  8. Omorgus suberosus and Polynoncus bifurcatus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Trogidae in exotic and native environments of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César M. A. Correa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Trogidae beetles are important for the decomposition of organic material in ecosystems. In the Neotropical region, little is known about this family, except for their taxonomy. In this study, we report the presence of Omorgus suberosus (Fabricius, 1775 and Polynoncus bifurcatus (Vaurie, 1962 in exotic and native environments of Brazil, sampled with different baits. The beetles were captured in pastures with introduced grass (Brachiaria spp. and in patches of native forest (Brazilian savanna. We used pitfall traps baited with carrion and human feces every two weeks, from January to December 2011, and with carrion, cow dung, human feces and pig manure at the beginning of the rainy season (October 2011. Over the course of one year, 24 individuals of O. suberosus were captured, 16 in the exotic and eight in the native environment, respectively. In the sampling performed at the beginning of the rainy season, 32 individuals of O. suberosus and seven of P. bifurcatus were obtained. Omorgus suberosus specimens were sampled in both environments, suggesting a possible tolerance to anthropogenic environments, as in the case of introduced grasses. Polynoncus bifurcatus individuals were captured only in native environments, which may indicate a strong relationship with more heterogeneous and/or relatively preserved habitats. We discuss such relationships in light of published data and new information provided here.

  9. Phenomenology of U(1)F extension of inert-doublet model with exotic scalars and leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhargyal, Lobsang

    2018-02-01

    In this work we will extend the inert-doublet model (IDM) by adding a new U(1)F gauge symmetry to it, under which, a Z2 even scalar (φ 2) and Z2 odd right handed component of two exotic charged leptons (F_{eR}, F_{μ R}), are charged. We also add one Z2 even real scalar (φ 1) and one complex scalar (φ ), three neutral Majorana right handed fermions (N1, N2, N3), two left handed components of the exotic charged leptons (F_{eL}, F_{μ L}) as well as F_{τ } are all odd under the Z2, all of which are not charged under the U(1)F. With these new particles added to the IDM, we have a model which can give two scalar DM candidates, together they can explain the present DM relic density as well as the muon (g-2) anomaly simultaneously. Also in this model the neutrino masses are generated at one loop level. One of the most peculiar feature of this model is that non-trivial solution to the axial gauge anomaly free conditions lead to the prediction of a stable very heavy partner to the electron (Fe), whose present collider limit (13 TeV LHC) on its mass should be around m_{Fe} ≥ few TeV.

  10. Timelike duality, M'-theory and an exotic form of the Englert solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneaux, Marc; Ranjbar, Arash

    2017-08-01

    Through timelike dualities, one can generate exotic versions of M-theory with different spacetime signatures. These are the M *-theory with signature (9 , 2 , -), the M'-theory, with signature (6 , 5 , +) and the theories with reversed signatures (1 , 10 , -), (2 , 9 , +) and (5 , 6 , -). In ( s, t, ±), s is the number of space directions, t the number of time directions, and ± refers to the sign of the kinetic term of the 3 form. The only irreducible pseudo-riemannian manifolds admitting absolute parallelism are, besides Lie groups, the seven-sphere S 7 ≡ SO(8) /SO(7) and its pseudo-riemannian version S 3,4 ≡ SO(4 , 4) /SO(3 , 4). [There is also the complexification SO(8,C)/SO(7,C) , but it is of dimension too high for our considerations.] The seven-sphere S 7 ≡ S 7,0 has been found to play an important role in 11-dimensional supergravity, both through the Freund-Rubin solution and the Englert solution that uses its remarkable parallelizability to turn on non trivial internal fluxes. The spacetime manifold is in both cases AdS 4 × S 7. We show that S 3,4 enjoys a similar role in M '-theory and construct the exotic form AdS 4 × S 3,4 of the Englert solution, with non zero internal fluxes turned on. There is no analogous solution in M ∗-theory.

  11. Evolving gene banks: improving diverse populations of crop and exotic germplasm with optimal contribution selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, W A; Li, L; Siddique, K H M; Henryon, M; Berg, P; Banks, R G; Kinghorn, B P

    2017-04-01

    We simulated pre-breeding in evolving gene banks - populations of exotic and crop types undergoing optimal contribution selection for long-term genetic gain and management of population genetic diversity. The founder population was based on crosses between elite crop varieties and exotic lines of field pea (Pisum sativum) from the primary genepool, and was subjected to 30 cycles of recurrent selection for an economic index composed of four traits with low heritability: black spot resistance, flowering time and stem strength (measured on single plants), and grain yield (measured on whole plots). We compared a small population with low selection pressure, a large population with high selection pressure, and a large population with moderate selection pressure. Single seed descent was compared with S0-derived recurrent selection. Optimal contribution selection achieved higher index and lower population coancestry than truncation selection, which reached a plateau in index improvement after 40 years in the large population with high selection pressure. With optimal contribution selection, index doubled in 38 years in the small population with low selection pressure and 27-28 years in the large population with moderate selection pressure. Single seed descent increased the rate of improvement in index per cycle but also increased cycle time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. Clams sensitivity towards As and Hg: A comprehensive assessment of native and exotic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Cátia; Freitas, Rosa; Antunes, Sara C; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina

    2016-03-01

    To assess the environmental impact of As and Hg, bioindicator organisms such as bivalves have been used. Nevertheless, few studies have assessed the impacts of As and Hg in Ruditapes decussatus and Ruditapes philippinarum, which are native and exotic species in Europe, respectively. The main goal of the present study was to assess elements' partitioning and detoxification strategies of R. decussatus and R. philippinarum. Both clams showed a higher capacity to bioconcentrate Hg (BCF 2.29-7.49), when compared to As (0.59-1.09). Furthermore, As accumulation in both species was similar in the soluble and insoluble fractions, while in both species the majority of Hg was found in the insoluble fraction. Clams exposed to As showed different detoxification strategies, since R. decussatus had higher ability to enhance antioxidant enzymes and metallothioneins in order to reduce toxicity, and R.philippinarum increased glutathione S-transferase Ω activity, that catalyzes monomethyl arsenate reduction, the rate-limiting reaction in arsenic biotransformation. When exposed to Hg, R. decussatus presented, higher synthesis of antioxidant enzymes and lower LPO, being able to better tolerate Hg than the exotic species R. philippinarum. Thus under relevant levels of As and Hg contamination our work evidenced the higher ability of R. decussatus to survive and inhabit coastal environments not heavily contaminated by Hg and As. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxygen-Free Biochemistry: The Putative CHN Foundation for Exotic Life in a Hydrocarbon World?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Kong-Peng; Norman, Lucy; Li, Yi-Liang

    2017-11-01

    Since Earth's biochemistry is carbon-based and water-borne, the main strategies for searching for life elsewhere are "follow the carbon" and "follow the water." Recently, however, there is a growing focus on the prospect that putative exotic life on other planets could rely on unearthly biochemistries. Here, we hypothesize a novel oxygen-free organic chemistry for supporting potential exotic biosystems, which is named CHN biochemistry. This oxygen-free CHN biochemistry starts from simple oxygen-free species (including hydrocarbons, hydrogen cyanide, and nitriles) and produces a range of functional macromolecules that may function in similar ways to terran macromolecules, such as sugars (cyanosugars), acids (cyanoacids), amino acids (amino cyanoacids), and nucleobases (cyanonucleobases). These CHN macromolecules could further interact with each other to generate higher "cyanoester" and "cyanoprotein" systems. In addition, theoretical calculations indicate that the energy changes of some reactions are consistent with their counterparts in Earth's biochemistry. The CHN biochemistry-based life would be applicable in habitats with a low bioavailability of oxygen, such as the alkane lakes of Titan and non-aquatic liquids on extrasolar bodies.

  14. Gravitational-wave signatures of exotic compact objects and of quantum corrections at the horizon scale

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Palenzuela, Carlos; Pani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational waves from binary coalescences provide one of the cleanest signatures of the nature of compact objects. It has been recently argued that the post-merger ringdown waveform of exotic ultracompact objects is initially identical to that of a black-hole, and that putative corrections at the horizon scale will appear as secondary pulses after the main burst of radiation. Here we extend this analysis in three important directions: (i)~we show that this result applies to a large class of exotic compact objects with a photon sphere for generic orbits in the test-particle limit; (ii)~we investigate the late-time ringdown in more detail, showing that it is universally characterized by a modulated and distorted train of "echoes" of the modes of vibration associated with the photon sphere; (iii)~we study for the first time equal-mass, head-on collisions of two ultracompact boson stars and compare their gravitational-wave signal to that produced by a pair of black-holes. If the initial objects are compact eno...

  15. Constraints on Exotic Dipole-Dipole Couplings between Electrons at the Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Ozeri, Roee; Kimball, Derek F Jackson

    2015-08-21

    New constraints on exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micrometer scale are established, based on a recent measurement of the magnetic interaction between two trapped 88Sr(+) ions. For light bosons (mass≤0.1  eV) we obtain a 90% confidence interval for an axial-vector-mediated interaction strength of |g(A)(e)g(A)(e)/4πℏc|≤1.2×10(-17). Assuming CPT invariance, this constraint is compared to that on anomalous electron-positron interactions, derived from positronium hyperfine spectroscopy. We find that the electron-electron constraint is 6 orders of magnitude more stringent than the electron-positron counterpart. Bounds on pseudoscalar-mediated interaction as well as on torsion gravity are also derived and compared with previous work performed at different length scales. Our constraints benefit from the high controllability of the experimental system which contained only two trapped particles. It therefore suggests a useful new platform for exotic particle searches, complementing other experimental efforts.

  16. Demographic changes following mechanical removal of exotic brown trout in an Intermountain West (USA), high-elevation stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, W. Carl; Budy, Phaedra E.; Thiede, Gary P.

    2015-01-01

    Exotic species present a great threat to native fish conservation; however, eradicating exotics is expensive and often impractical. Mechanical removal can be ineffective for eradication, but nonetheless may increase management effectiveness by identifying portions of a watershed that are strong sources of exotics. We used mechanical removal to understand processes driving exotic brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations in the Logan River, Utah. Our goals were to: (i) evaluate the demographic response of brown trout to mechanical removal, (ii) identify sources of brown trout recruitment at a watershed scale and (iii) evaluate whether mechanical removal can reduce brown trout densities. We removed brown trout from 2 km of the Logan River (4174 fish), and 5.6 km of Right Hand Fork (RHF, 15,245 fish), a low-elevation tributary, using single-pass electrofishing. We compared fish abundance and size distributions prior to, and after 2 years of mechanical removal. In the Logan River, immigration to the removal reach and high natural variability in fish abundances limited the response to mechanical removal. In contrast, mechanical removal in RHF resulted in a strong recruitment pulse, shifting the size distribution towards smaller fish. These results suggest that, before removal, density-dependent mortality or emigration of juvenile fish stabilised adult populations and may have provided a source of juveniles to the main stem. Overall, in sites demonstrating strong density-dependent population regulation, or near sources of exotics, short-term mechanical removal has limited effects on brown trout populations but may help identify factors governing populations and inform large-scale management of exotic species.

  17. Coverage of Native Plants Is Key Factor Influencing the Invasibility of Freshwater Ecosystems by Exotic Plants in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihao Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the biotic and abiotic factors that influence the susceptibility of a community to invasion is beneficial for the prediction and management of invasive species and the conservation of native biodiversity. However, the relationships between factors and invasibility of a community have not been fully confirmed, and the factors most associated with the susceptibility of a community to invasion have rarely been identified. In this study, we investigated the species richness patterns in aquatic exotic and native plants and the relationships of exotic species richness with habitat and water environment factors in 262 aquatic plant communities in China. A total of 11 exotic plant species were recorded in our field survey, and we found neither a negative nor a positive relationship between aquatic exotic and native plant species richness. The aquatic exotic plant species richness is negatively correlated with the relative coverage and biomass of native plants but positively correlated with the total nitrogen (TN, total phosphorus (TP, and chemical oxygen demand (COD concentrations in the water. The native plant species richness, native species’ relative coverage, and native species’ biomass were positively related to each other, whereas the TP, TN, and COD were also positively related to each other. The native plant species richness, native species’ relative coverage, and native species biomass were each negatively correlated with the TP, TN, and COD. In addition, biotic rather than abiotic predictors accounted for most of the variation in exotic plant richness. Our results suggest that improving the vegetation coverage and the biodiversity of native plants is the most effective approach for preventing alien plant invasions and minimizing their impacts on freshwater ecosystems.

  18. Coverage of Native Plants Is Key Factor Influencing the Invasibility of Freshwater Ecosystems by Exotic Plants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haihao; Wang, Ligong; Liu, Chunhua; Fan, Shufeng

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the biotic and abiotic factors that influence the susceptibility of a community to invasion is beneficial for the prediction and management of invasive species and the conservation of native biodiversity. However, the relationships between factors and invasibility of a community have not been fully confirmed, and the factors most associated with the susceptibility of a community to invasion have rarely been identified. In this study, we investigated the species richness patterns in aquatic exotic and native plants and the relationships of exotic species richness with habitat and water environment factors in 262 aquatic plant communities in China. A total of 11 exotic plant species were recorded in our field survey, and we found neither a negative nor a positive relationship between aquatic exotic and native plant species richness. The aquatic exotic plant species richness is negatively correlated with the relative coverage and biomass of native plants but positively correlated with the total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations in the water. The native plant species richness, native species' relative coverage, and native species' biomass were positively related to each other, whereas the TP, TN, and COD were also positively related to each other. The native plant species richness, native species' relative coverage, and native species biomass were each negatively correlated with the TP, TN, and COD. In addition, biotic rather than abiotic predictors accounted for most of the variation in exotic plant richness. Our results suggest that improving the vegetation coverage and the biodiversity of native plants is the most effective approach for preventing alien plant invasions and minimizing their impacts on freshwater ecosystems.

  19. Moluscos dulceacuícolas exóticos en Chile Exotic freshwater mollusks in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Letelier V.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Las especies de moluscos exóticas dulceacuícolas registradas en esta contribución, corresponden a ejemplares recolectados en humedales en acuarios comerciales o interceptados en barreras aduaneras, así como de referencias bibliográficas. Un total de 7 especies pertenecientes a 6 géneros fueron identificadas: Pomacea bridgesii; Helobia sp.; Thiara (Melanoides tuberculata; Melanoides maculata; Physa sp.; Physella venustula y Biomphalaria sp. Melanoides maculata fue recolectada en el río Lluta y clasificada como especie criptogénica. Los moluscos exóticos recolectados podrían tener éxito en su establecimiento si se considera la vulnerabilidad de los hábitats nativos debido al cambio en las condiciones climáticas globales o a las elevaciones térmicas producidas en el sector costero por los fenómenos de El Niño. En este sentido, las especies subtropicales observadas se podrían considerar como no endémicas y vectores potenciales de zoonosis parasitarias. Las principales vías de introducción de moluscos dulceacuícolas exóticos se derivaron del intercambio comercial, por lo cual, y frente a su incremento interregional, se hace necesario recopilar datos ecológicos y taxonómicos adecuados que permitan evaluar el riesgo de su establecimiento, así como servir de base para la aplicación de futuros tratamientos en bioseguridad.The exotic freshwater mollusk species we report here were collected in wetlands, commercial aquariums, or were given to us by government officials who intercepted some exotic species at customs offices. Other records came from the specialized literature. These species are Pomacea bridgesii; Helobia sp.; Thiara (Melanoides tuberculata; Melanoides maculata; Physa sp., Physella venustula and Biomphalaria sp. It is not clear how Melanoides maculata, found in the Río Lluta, reached Chile. The exotic species collected could expand their ranges in Chilean territory given global environmental and climate change or the

  20. LEAF LITTER BREAKDOWN RATES AND ASSOCIATED FAUNA OF NATIVE AND EXOTIC TREES USED IN NEOTROPICAL RIPARIA REFORESTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Gutiérrez Isaza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A signature of globalization is the prevalence of exotic trees along reforested urban and rural riparian zones in the Neotropics, but little is known about the instream processing of its leaf litter. In this study, leaf litter breakdown rates were measured during 35 days using mesh bags within a reference headwater stream for seven exotic and three native tree species commonly used in urban and rural reforestation. Artocarpus altilis, Schefflera actinophylla and Terminalia catappa scored the highest mass loss rates (>85 %; mean life: t50 85 %; vida media: t50

  1. Exotic weeds and fluctuating microclimate can constrain native plant regeneration in urban forest restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K J; Laughlin, Daniel C; Clarkson, Bruce D

    2017-06-01

    Restoring forest structure and composition is an important component of urban land management, but we lack clear understanding of the mechanisms driving restoration success. Here we studied two indicators of restoration success in temperate rainforests: native tree regeneration and epiphyte colonization. We hypothesized that ecosystem properties such as forest canopy openness, abundance of exotic herbaceous weeds, and the microclimate directly affect the density and diversity of native tree seedlings and epiphytes. Relationships between environmental conditions and the plant community were investigated in 27 restored urban forests spanning 3-70 years in age and in unrestored and remnant urban forests. We used structural equation modelling to determine the direct and indirect drivers of native tree regeneration and epiphyte colonization in the restored forests. Compared to remnant forest, unrestored forest had fewer native canopy tree species, significantly more light reaching the forest floor annually, and higher exotic weed cover. Additionally, epiphyte density was lower and native tree regeneration density was marginally lower in the unrestored forests. In restored forests, light availability was reduced to levels found in remnant forests within 20 years of restoration planting, followed shortly thereafter by declines in herbaceous exotic weeds and reduced fluctuation of relative humidity and soil temperatures. Contrary to expectations, canopy openness was only an indirect driver of tree regeneration and epiphyte colonization, but it directly regulated weed cover and microclimatic fluctuations, both of which directly drove the density and richness of regeneration and epiphyte colonization. Epiphyte density and diversity were also positively related to forest basal area, as large trees provide physical habitat for colonization. These results imply that ecosystem properties change predictably after initial restoration plantings, and that reaching critical

  2. Tritium release from EXOTIC-7 orthosilicate pebbles. Effect of burnup and contact with beryllium during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-03-01

    EXOTIC-7 was the first in-pile test with {sup 6}Li-enriched (50%) lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles and with DEMO representative Li-burnup. Post irradiation examinations of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} have been performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), mainly to investigate the tritium release kinetics as well as the effect of Li-burnup and/or contact with beryllium during irradiation. The release rate of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from pure Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} bed of capsule 28.1-1 is characterized by a broad main peak at about 400degC and by a smaller peak at about 800degC, and that from the mixed beds of capsule 28.2 and 26.2-1 shows again these two peaks, but most of the tritium is now released from the 800degC peak. This shift of release from low to high temperature may be due to the higher Li-burnup and/or due to contact with Be during irradiation. Due to the very difficult interpretation of the in-situ tritium release data, residence times have been estimated on the basis of the out-of-pile tests. The residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.1-1 irradiated at 10% Li-burnup agrees quite well with that of the same material irradiated at Li-burnup lower than 3% in the EXOTIC-6 experiment. In spite of the observed shift in the release peaks from low to high temperature, also the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 26.2-1 irradiated at 13% Li-burnup agrees quite well with the data from EXOTIC-6 experiment. On the other hand, the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.2 (Li-burnup 18%) is about a factor 1.7-3.8 higher than that for caps. 26.2-1. Based on these data on can conclude that up to 13% Li-burnup neither the contact with beryllium nor the Li-burnup have a detrimental effect on the tritium release of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, but at 18% Li-burnup the residence time is increased by about a factor three. (J.P.N.)

  3. Supersymmetric exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinrui; Liu, Tao; Wang, Lian-Tao; Yu, Felix

    2014-06-06

    We reveal a set of novel decay topologies for the 125 GeV Higgs boson in supersymmetry which are initiated by its decay into a pair of neutralinos, and discuss their collider search strategies. This category of exotic Higgs decays is characterized by the collider signature: visible objects+E_{T}, with E_{T} dominantly arising from escaping dark matter particles. Their benchmark arises naturally in the Peccei-Quinn symmetry limit of the minimal supersymmetric standard model singlet extensions, which is typified by the coexistence of three light particles: singletlike scalar h_{1} and pseudoscalar a_{1}, and singlinolike neutralino χ_{1}, all with masses of ≲10  GeV, and the generic suppression of the exotic decays of the 125 GeV Higgs boson h_{2}→h_{1}h_{1}, a_{1}a_{1} and χ_{1}χ_{1}, however. As an illustration, we study the decay topology: h_{2}→χ_{1}χ_{2}, where the binolike χ_{2} decays to h_{1}χ_{1} or a_{1}χ_{1}, and h_{1}/a_{1}→ff[over ¯], with ff[over ¯]=μ^{+}μ^{-}, bb[over ¯]. In the dimuon case (m_{h_{1}/a_{1}}∼1  GeV), a statistical sensitivity of S/sqrt[B]>6σ can be achieved easily at the 8 TeV LHC, assuming σ(pp→Wh_{2})/σ(pp→Wh_{SM})Br(h_{2}→μ^{+}μ^{-}χ_{1}χ_{1})=0.1. In the bb[over ¯] case (m_{h_{1}/a_{1}}∼45  GeV), 600  fb^{-1} data at the 14 TeV LHC can lead to a statistical sensitivity of S/sqrt[B]>5σ, assuming σ(pp→Zh_{2})/σ(pp→Zh_{SM})Br(h_{2}→bb[over ¯]χ_{1}χ_{1})=0.5. These exotic decays open a new avenue for exploring new physics couplings with the 125 GeV Higgs boson at colliders.

  4. Exotic spices in flux: Archaeobotanical material from medieval and early modern sites of the Czech lands (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preusz, M.; Kodýdková, K.; Kočár, Petr; Vaněček, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2015), s. 223-236 ISSN 1804-848X Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : exotic spices * luxury food * imports * New World * Asia * Europe * archaeobotany * macro-remains Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology https://www.iansa.eu/papers/IANSA-2015-02-preusz.pdf

  5. Enhancing early detection of exotic pests in agricultural and forest ecosystems using an urban-gradient framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Colunga-Garcia; Roger A. Magarey; Robert A. Haack; Stuart H. Gage; Jiaquo. Qi

    2010-01-01

    Urban areas are hubs of international transport and therefore are major gateways for exotic pests. Applying an urban gradient to analyze this pathway could provide insight into the ecological processes involved in human-mediated invasions. We defined an urban gradient for agricultural and forest ecosystems in the contiguous United States to (1) assess whether...

  6. Influences of disturbance and vegetation on abundance of native and exotic detritivores in a southwestern riparian forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Max Smith; Jeffrey F. Kelly; Deborah M. Finch

    2006-01-01

    Detritivores play important roles in energy and nutrient flow in riparian ecosystems. Endemic crickets (Gryllus alogus Rehn) and exotic isopods (Armadillidium vulagare Latreille and Porcellio laevi Latreille.) are abundant detritivores in riparian forest floors of central New Mexico. To determine how disturbance...

  7. Sensitivity of Lyme Borreliosis Spirochetes to Serum Complement of Regular Zoo Animals: Potential Reservoir Competence of Some Exotic Vertebrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichá, L.; Golovchenko, Maryna; Oliver, J. H., Jr.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rudenko, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2016), s. 13-19 ISSN 1530-3667 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278976 - ANTIGONE Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato * Lyme disease * serum complement * exotic animals * reservoir hosts * zoo Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.045, year: 2016

  8. International Workshop on Exotic Hadronic Atoms, Deeply Bound Kaonic Nuclear States and Antihydrogen : Present Results, Future Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E; Curceanu, C; Trento 2006; Trento06

    2006-01-01

    These are the miniproceedings of the workshop "Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges," which was held at the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Studies (ECT*), Trento (Italy), June 19-24, 2006. The document includes a short presentation of the topics, the list of participants, and a short contribution from each speaker.

  9. Do ungulates facilitate native and exotic plant spread? Seed dispersal by cattle, elk and deer in northeastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne M. Bartuszevige; Bryan A. Endress

    2008-01-01

    Large domestic and native ungulates have the potential to disperse large quantities of seeds throughout the landscape. Many studies have found that ungulates are capable of dispersing seeds but few quantify the relative importance of ungulate dispersal across the landscape. We investigated the potential for cattle, elk, and deer to disperse native and exotic plants in...

  10. The international trade in reptiles (Reptilia)--the cause of the transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) to Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Magdalena

    2010-05-11

    The problem of the unnatural transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) on reptiles (Reptilia) imported to Poland is presented. In the period from 2003 to 2007, 382 specimens of reptiles belonging to the following genera were investigated: Testudo, Iguana, Varanus, Gongylophis, Python, Spalerosophis, Psammophis. The reptiles most infested with ticks are imported to Poland from Ghana in Africa, and are the commonly bred terrarium reptiles: Varanus exanthematicus and Python regius. As a result of the investigations, the transfer of exotic ticks on reptiles to Poland was confirmed. There were 2104 specimens of the genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma. The following species were found: Amblyomma exornatum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma flavomaculatum (Lucas, 1846), Amblyomma latum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma nuttalli Donitz, 1909, Amblyomma quadricavum (Schulze, 1941), Amblyomma transversale (Lucas, 1844), Amblyomma varanense (Supino, 1897), Amblyomma sp. Koch, 1844, Hyalomma aegyptium (Linnaeus, 1758). All the species of ticks of genus Amblyomma revealed have been discovered in Poland for the first time. During the research, 13 cases of anomalies of morphological structure were confirmed in the ticks A. flavomaculatum, A. latum and H. aegyptium. The expanding phenomenon of the import of exotic reptiles in Poland and Central Europe is important for parasitological and epidemiological considerations, and therefore requires monitoring and wide-ranging prophylactic activities to prevent the inflow of exotic parasites to Poland. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of an exotic N2-fixing Acacia on composition and N status of a native Mediterranean community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Christine; Sutter, Rabea; Rascher, Katherine G.; Máguas, Cristina; Correia, Otilia; Werner, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen fixing plant species are among the most invasive species worldwide. However, field studies directly estimating the differential effect of native versus invasive exotic N2-fixing plants on plant communities are lacking. The exotic leguminous shrub Acacia longifolia invades coastal dunes across Portugal often co-existing with the native N2-fixer Stauracanthus spectabilis. Moreover, this co-existence with native species is possible due to a relatively low cover of Acacia species particularly in the south of Portugal where drought is intense. In this study we compare the impact of two different legume species (native and exotic) on the nitrogen status of a protected Mediterranean dune system. We document how presence of the exotic invader A. longifolia impacted community structure, soil properties and the foliar nitrogen concentrations and growth rates of native species. A. longifolia invaded areas had decreased biodiversity, fewer seedlings and altered soil properties (e.g., increased soil organic matter, NO3- and NH4+). A. longifolia presence was also associated with significant increases in foliar nitrogen content and δ15N of the endemic shrub Corema album while presence of the native legume Stauracanthus spectabilis had no discernible impact on C. album. Furthermore, a strong correlation between increased foliar nitrogen and enhanced growth rates in C. album indicate a facilitative effect of A. longifolia on this native shrub. We posit that the combination of nitrogen fixation, a rapid growth rate and production of a thick litter layer result in a very substantial impact of the invader in invaded ecosystems.

  12. Native and exotic insects and diseases in forest ecosystems in the Hoosier-Shawnee ecological assessment area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwight Scarbrough; Jennifer Juzwik

    2004-01-01

    Various native and exotic insects and diseases affect the forest ecosystems of the Hoosier-Shawnee Ecological Assessment Area. Defoliating insects have had the greatest effects in forests where oak species predominate. Increases in oak decline are expected with the imminent establishment of the European gypsy moth. Insects and pathogens of the pine forests are...

  13. Using long-term datasets to study exotic plant invasions on rangelands in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Morris; L. R. Morris; A. J. Leffler; C. D. Holifield Collins; A. D. Forman; M. A. Weltz; S. G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    Invasions by exotic species are generally described using a logistic growth curve divided into three phases: introduction, expansion and saturation. This model is constructed primarily from regional studies of plant invasions based on historical records and herbarium samples. The goal of this study is to compare invasion curves at the local scale to the logistic growth...

  14. Animal health risk of legally imported exotic animals into the Netherlands in the period 2013-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos-de Jong, de Clazien; Swanenburg, Manon; Tafro, Nedzib; Roon, van Annika; Stenvers, Olaf F.J.; Elbers, Armin R.W.

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide trade in exotic animals is a potential moderator for the global dispersion of infectious disease agents. Better insight into the pathogens that could be introduced by these trade flows can help to target surveillance efforts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the animal health risk

  15. Forestry-related pathways for the movement of exotic plant pests into and within the greater Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie Newton; Heike Meissner; Andrea. Lemay

    2011-01-01

    Forests of the Greater Caribbean Region (GCR) are important ecologically and economically. These unique ecosystems are under increasing pressure from exotic pests, which may cause extensive environmental damage and cost billions of dollars in control programs, lost production, and forest restoration.

  16. Using long-term datasets to study exotic plant invasions on rangelands in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasions by exotic species are generally described with a logistic growth curve divided into three phases: introduction, expansion and saturation. This model is constructed primarily from regional studies of plant invasions based on historical records and herbarium samples. The goal of this study w...

  17. Freight transportation and the potential for invasions of exotic insects in urban and periurban forests of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Colunga-Garcia; Robert A. Haack; Adesoji O. Adelaja

    2009-01-01

    Freight transportation is an important pathway for the introduction and dissemination of exotic forest insects (EFI). Identifying the final destination of imports is critical in determining the likelihood of EFI establishment. We analyzed the use of regional freight transport information to characterize risk of urban and periurban areas to EFI introductions. Specifc...

  18. Insect herbivory on native and exotic aquatic plants: phosphorus and nitrogen drive insect growth and nutrient release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grutters, B.M.C.; Gross, E.M.; Bakker, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication and globalisation facilitate the dominance of exotic plants in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Aquatic omnivores can provide biotic resistance to plant invasions, but little is known about whether obligate aquatic herbivores can do the same. Herbivores such as insects can decimate

  19. Pancreatitis associated with the helminth Serpinema microcephalus (Nematoda: Camallanidae) in exotic Red-Eared Slider Turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hidalgo-Vila, J.; Martínez-Silvestre, A.; Ribas, Alexis; Casanova, J. C.; Pérez-Santigosa, N.; Díaz-Paniagua, C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2011), s. 201-205 ISSN 0090-3558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : helminth * invasive exotic turtles * pancreatitis * reptiles Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.079, year: 2011 http://www.jwildlifedis.org/cgi/reprint/47/1/201

  20. Factors affecting the distribution and abundance of exotic earthworms in the Huron Mountain Club, Upper Peninsula, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey M. Shartell; Erik A. Lilleskov; Andrew J. Storer; Lynette R. Potvin; Karl J. Romanowicz

    2011-01-01

    Exotic earthworms are becoming established in previously earthworm-free areas of the Great Lakes region with the potential to alter forest ecosystems. Understanding the factors controlling their distribution and abundance across the landscape will aid in efforts to determine their consequences and potential forest management solutions.

  1. Impact of exotic earthworms on organic carbon sorption on mineral surfaces and soil carbon inventories in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy Lyttle; Kyungsoo Yoo; Cindy Hale; Anthony Aufdenkampe; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Kathryn Resner; Alex. Blum

    2015-01-01

    Exotic earthworms are invading forests in North America where native earthworms have been absent since the last glaciation. These earthworms bioturbate soils and may enhance physical interactions between minerals and organic matter (OM), thus affecting mineral sorption of carbon (C) which may affect C cycling. We quantitatively show how OM-mineral sorption and soil C...

  2. Application of fast solvent extraction processes to studies of exotic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierczinski, B.; Malmbeck, R.; Skarnemark, G.; Alstad, J.; Omtvedt, J.P.; Eberhardt, K.; Kratz, J.V.; Mendel, M.; Naehler, A.; Trautmann, N.; Wiehl, N.

    1998-01-01

    Fast solvent extraction is a chemical separation method, which can be applied to study exotic nuclides. Since about 1970 the SISAK technique, which is an on-line method based on multi-stage solvent extraction separations, has been successfully used to investigate the nuclear properties of β-decaying nuclides with half-lives down to about one second. During the last decade it has become possible to produce transactinide elements in high enough yields to investigate their chemical properties on a one-atom-at-a-time scale. For this purpose it was necessary to improve and change the detection part of the SISAK system in order to be capable to detect spontaneously fissioning and α-decaying nuclides in a flowing organic solution. This technique is based on liquid scintillation counting with pulse-shape discrimination and pile-up rejection. (author)

  3. On exotic hybrid meson production in {gamma}{sup *}{gamma} collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikin, I.V.; Teryaev, O.V. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation); Pire, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). CPHT; Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Universite de Liege (Belgium); Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). LPT; Wallon, S. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). LPT

    2006-07-15

    We present a theoretical study of exotic hybrid meson (J{sup PC}=1{sup -+}) production in photon-photon collisions where one of the photons is deeply virtual, including twist two and twist three contributions. We calculate the cross section of this process, which turns out to be large enough to imply sizeable counting rates in the present high luminosity electron-positron colliders. We emphasize the importance of the {pi}{eta} decay channel for the detection of the hybrid meson candidate {pi}{sub 1}(1400) and calculate the cross section and the angular distribution for {pi}{eta} pair production in the unpolarized case. This angular distribution is a useful tool for disentangling the hybrid meson signal from the background. Finally, we calculate the single spin asymmetry associated with one initial longitudinally polarized lepton. (orig.)

  4. First record in the Tropical Eastern Pacific of the exotic species Ficopomatus uschakovi (Polychaeta, Serpulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Bastida Zavala

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The exotic Indo-West-Pacific species, Ficopomatus uschakovi (Polychaeta, Serpulidae is recorded for the first time in the Tropical Eastern Pacific from two sites in La Encrucijada Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, a coastal lagoon in the Pacific south of Mexico. The means of dispersal of this serpulid species still remains unclear, as the nearest port (Puerto Chiapas is 70 km to the south, and there are no port installations or shrimp cultures in the lagoon. The record of this serpulid species, apparently widely distributed in this coastal lagoon, has implications regarding possible effects on the brackish-water ecosystem, since the invasion event very well may have occurred several years ago. It is recommended that an exhaustive study be carried out in the coastal lagoons of Chiapas to evaluate the real distribution and the effects of this invasive species on the ecosystem. A complete description, including photographs and drawings, is provided.

  5. Light Primordial Exotic Compact Objects as All Dark Matter arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Raidal, Martti; Vaskonen, Ville; Veermäe, Hardi

    The radiation emitted by horizonless exotic compact objects (ECOs), such as wormholes, 2-2-holes, fuzzballs, gravastars, boson stars, collapsed polymers, superspinars etc., is expected to be strongly suppressed when compared to the radiation of black holes. If large primordial curvature fluctuations collapse into such objects instead of black holes, they do not evaporate or evaporate much slower than black holes and could thus constitute all of the dark matter with masses below $M < 10^{-16}M_\\odot.$ We re-evaluate the relevant experimental constraints for light ECOs in this mass range and show that very large new parameter space down to ECO masses $M\\sim 10\\,{\\rm TeV}$ opens up for light primordial dark matter. A new dedicated experimental program is needed to test this mass range of primordial dark matter.

  6. First record in the Tropical Eastern Pacific of the exotic species Ficopomatus uschakovi (Polychaeta, Serpulidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida-Zavala, Rolando; García-Madrigal, Socorro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The exotic Indo-West-Pacific species, Ficopomatus uschakovi (Polychaeta, Serpulidae) is recorded for the first time in the Tropical Eastern Pacific from two sites in La Encrucijada Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, a coastal lagoon in the Pacific south of Mexico. The means of dispersal of this serpulid species still remains unclear, as the nearest port (Puerto Chiapas) is 70 km to the south, and there are no port installations or shrimp cultures in the lagoon. The record of this serpulid species, apparently widely distributed in this coastal lagoon, has implications regarding possible effects on the brackish-water ecosystem, since the invasion event very well may have occurred several years ago. It is recommended that an exhaustive study be carried out in the coastal lagoons of Chiapas to evaluate the real distribution and the effects of this invasive species on the ecosystem. A complete description, including photographs and drawings, is provided. PMID:23226707

  7. World-volume effective action of exotic five-brane in M-theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tetsuji [Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, Hiyoshi 4-1-1, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology,Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Sasaki, Shin [Department of Physics, Kitasato University,Sagamihara 252-0373 (Japan); Yata, Masaya [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore,2, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2016-02-25

    We study the world-volume effective action of an exotic five-brane, known as the M-theory 5{sup 3}-brane (M5{sup 3}-brane) in eleven dimensions. The supermultiplet of the world-volume theory is the N=(2,0) tensor multiplet in six dimensions. The world-volume action contains three Killing vectors k̂{sub Î}{sup M} (Î=1,2,3) associated with the U(1){sup 3} isometry. We find the effective T-duality rule for the eleven-dimensional backgrounds that transforms the M5-brane effective action to that of the M5{sup 3}-brane. We also show that our action provides the source term for the M5{sup 3}-brane geometry in eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  8. Evolution of ebola virus disease from exotic infection to global health priority, Liberia, mid-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arwady, M Allison; Bawo, Luke; Hunter, Jennifer C; Massaquoi, Moses; Matanock, Almea; Dahn, Bernice; Ayscue, Patrick; Nyenswah, Tolbert; Forrester, Joseph D; Hensley, Lisa E; Monroe, Benjamin; Schoepp, Randal J; Chen, Tai-Ho; Schaecher, Kurt E; George, Thomas; Rouse, Edward; Schafer, Ilana J; Pillai, Satish K; De Cock, Kevin M

    2015-04-01

    Over the span of a few weeks during July and August 2014, events in West Africa changed perceptions of Ebola virus disease (EVD) from an exotic tropical disease to a priority for global health security. We describe observations during that time of a field team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and personnel of the Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare. We outline the early epidemiology of EVD within Liberia, including the practical limitations on surveillance and the effect on the country's health care system, such as infections among health care workers. During this time, priorities included strengthening EVD surveillance; establishing safe settings for EVD patient care (and considering alternative isolation and care models when Ebola Treatment Units were overwhelmed); improving infection control practices; establishing an incident management system; and working with Liberian airport authorities to implement EVD screening of departing passengers.

  9. Search for exotics in the rare decay B → J/ψKKK at BABAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prencipe Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most intriguing puzzles in hadron spectroscopy are the numerous charmonium-like states observed in the last decade, including charged states that are manifestly exotic. Over the years, the experiment BABAR has extensively studied those in B meson decays, initial state radiation processes and two photon reactions. We report in this paper a new study on some of those states, performed using the entire data sample collected by BABAR in e+e− collisions, at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV/c2. The study of the process B → J/ψϕK will be presented, and the search for the resonant states X(4140 and X(4270 in their decays to J/ψϕ, will be highlighted.

  10. Collinear Laser Spectroscopy on exotic Ca isotopes towards new magic numbers N=32 and N=34

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084516

    For more than a century physicists have been trying to understand the striking particularities of the atomic nucleus. Although several questions remain open for stable nuclei, our current interest for exploring the properties of exotic species has revealed new and unexpected aspects of nuclear structure. The study of nuclei at extreme conditions is not only relevant for nuclear physics, it can also provide answers to questions related to astrophysical processes such as the origin of elements in the universe and the limits of existence for nuclear matter. Besides the complexity of the nuclear many-body problem, nuclear structure properties exhibit regular patterns at the so called “magic” numbers of nucleons. The understanding of these apparently simple structures has motivated the development of some of the most elegant models of nuclear physics. Up to now, most of these models have been successfully applied to describe the properties of nuclei in specific regions of the nuclear chart. Even though some mo...

  11. Relativistic exotic nuclei as projectile beams. New perspectives of studies on the properties of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissel, H.

    1997-03-01

    Examinations of the production cross-sections and the kinematics permitted refinement of model concepts of the peripheral reactions in exotic nuclei at energies from 100 to 1000 A MeV. Due to the strong selectivity and resolution achieved it was possible to discover a large number of novel isotopes at the fragment separator FRS, despite the relatively low projectile beam intensities of the SIS. The two twice magic nuclei found, Ni 78 and Sn 100, are particularly interesting, as they could not be measured so far with other experimental systems. Fission of relativistic uranium ions proved to be a particularly successful process yielding many medium-heavy, neutron-rich nuclei. Insight into the structure of light neutron halos could be improved. The superlarge spatial dimensions of the nuclear halos is discussed. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Looking for a hidden sector in exotic Higgs boson decays with the ATLAS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Coccaro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature of dark matter (DM is one of the most intriguing questions in particle physics. DM can be postulated to be part of a hidden sector whose interactions with the visible matter are not completely decoupled. The discovery of a fundamental scalar particle compatible with the Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model paves the way for looking for DM with novel methods. An overview of the searches looking for a hidden sector in exotic Higgs decays and for invisible decays of the Higgs boson within the ATLAS experiment is presented. Prospects for searches with Large Hadron Collider data at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are summarized.

  13. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  14. Biological observations for invasive and exotic insect species Anoplophora chinensis (Forster, 1771

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Hizal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, invasive and exotic insect species have been frequently found in Turkey. Anoplophora chinensis (Forster, 1771 was first recorded in Şile (Istanbul province county, Turkey, in June 2014 and later in Zeytinburnu (the garden of the Abdi Ipekçi Sports Complex and the surrounding in July in the same year. This study was conducted in these two counties in particular between June 2014 and July 2016 with the aims of making remarks on an earlier misidentification of Anoplophora species and determining the life cycle and the host plants in Istanbul, Turkey. It was noted that the record of A. glabripennis in Istanbul was a misidentification of A. chinensis. It took 1 year to complete its generation. The primary host plant of this insect was found to be Acer negundo.

  15. Time Crystal Platform: From Quasicrystal Structures in Time to Systems with Exotic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giergiel, Krzysztof; Miroszewski, Artur; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    Time crystals are quantum many-body systems that, due to interactions between particles, are able to spontaneously self-organize their motion in a periodic way in time by analogy with the formation of crystalline structures in space in condensed matter physics. In solid state physics properties of space crystals are often investigated with the help of external potentials that are spatially periodic and reflect various crystalline structures. A similar approach can be applied for time crystals, as periodically driven systems constitute counterparts of spatially periodic systems, but in the time domain. Here we show that condensed matter problems ranging from single particles in potentials of quasicrystal structure to many-body systems with exotic long-range interactions can be realized in the time domain with an appropriate periodic driving. Moreover, it is possible to create molecules where atoms are bound together due to destructive interference if the atomic scattering length is modulated in time.

  16. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  17. Failure under stress: the effect of the exotic herbivore Adelges tsugae on biomechanics of Tsuga canadensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, Nicole E; Gomez, Sara; Leisk, Gary G; Sherwood, Patrick; Preisser, Evan L; Bonello, Pierluigi; Orians, Colin M

    2014-03-01

    Exotic herbivores that lack a coevolutionary history with their host plants can benefit from poorly adapted host defences, potentially leading to rapid population growth of the herbivore and severe damage to its plant hosts. The hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is an exotic hemipteran that feeds on the long-lived conifer eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), causing rapid mortality of infested trees. While the mechanism of this mortality is unknown, evidence indicates that A. tsugae feeding causes a hypersensitive response and alters wood anatomy. This study investigated the effect of A. tsugae feeding on biomechanical properties at different spatial scales: needles, twigs and branches. Uninfested and A. tsugae-infested samples were collected from a common garden experiment as well as from naturally infested urban and rural field sites. Tension and flexure mechanical tests were used to quantify biomechanical properties of the different tissues. In tissues that showed a significant effect of herbivory, the potential contributions of lignin and tissue density on the results were quantified. Adelges tsugae infestation decreased the abscission strength, but not flexibility, of needles. A. tsugae feeding also decreased mechanical strength and flexibility in currently attacked twigs, but this effect disappeared in older, previously attacked branches. Lignin and twig tissue density contributed to differences in mechanical strength but were not affected by insect treatment. Decreased strength and flexibility in twigs, along with decreased needle strength, suggest that infested trees experience resource stress. Altered growth patterns and cell wall chemistry probably contribute to these mechanical effects. Consistent site effects emphasize the role of environmental variation in mechanical traits. The mechanical changes measured here may increase susceptibility to abiotic physical stressors in hemlocks colonized by A. tsugae. Thus, the interaction between herbivore and

  18. Incorporating climate change and exotic species into forecasts of riparian forest distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana H Ikeda

    Full Text Available We examined the impact climate change (CC will have on the availability of climatically suitable habitat for three native and one exotic riparian species. Due to its increasing prevalence in arid regions throughout the western US, we predicted that an exotic species, Tamarix, would have the greatest increase in suitable habitat relative to native counterparts under CC. We used an ecological niche model to predict range shifts of Populus fremontii, Salix gooddingii, Salix exigua and Tamarix, from present day to 2080s, under five general circulation models and one climate change scenario (A1B. Four major findings emerged. 1 Contrary to our original hypothesis, P. fremontii is projected to have the greatest increase in suitable habitat under CC, followed closely by Tamarix. 2 Of the native species, S. gooddingii and S. exigua showed the greatest loss in predicted suitable habitat due to CC. 3 Nearly 80 percent of future P. fremontii and Salix habitat is predicted to be affected by either CC or Tamarix by the 2080s. 4 By the 2080s, 20 percent of S. gooddingii habitat is projected to be affected by both Tamarix and CC concurrently, followed by S. exigua (19 percent and P. fremontii (13 percent. In summary, while climate change alone will negatively impact both native willow species, Tamarix is likely to affect a larger portion of all three native species' distributions. We discuss these and other results in the context of prioritizing restoration and conservation efforts to optimize future productivity and biodiversity. As we are accounting for only direct effects of CC and Tamarix on native habitat, we present a possible hierarchy of effects- from the direct to the indirect- and discuss the potential for the indirect to outweigh the direct effects. Our results highlight the need to account for simultaneous challenges in the face of CC.

  19. Ecosystem response to removal of exotic riparian shrubs and a transition to upland vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lindsay V.; Cooper, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding plant community change over time is essential for managing important ecosystems such as riparian areas. This study analyzed historic vegetation using soil seed banks and the effects of riparian shrub removal treatments and channel incision on ecosystem and plant community dynamics in Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona. We focused on how seeds, nutrients, and ground water influence the floristic composition of post-treatment vegetation and addressed three questions: (1) How does pre-treatment soil seed bank composition reflect post-treatment vegetation composition? (2) How does shrub removal affect post-treatment riparian vegetation composition, seed rain inputs, and ground water dynamics? and (3) Is available soil nitrogen increased near dead Russian olive plants following removal and does this influence post-treatment vegetation? We analyzed seed bank composition across the study area, analyzed differences in vegetation, ground water levels, and seed rain between control, cut-stump and whole-plant removal areas, and compared soil nitrogen and vegetation near removed Russian olive to areas lacking Russian olive. The soil seed bank contained more riparian plants, more native and fewer exotic plants than the extant vegetation. Both shrub removal methods decreased exotic plant cover, decreased tamarisk and Russian olive seed inputs, and increased native plant cover after 2 years. Neither method increased ground water levels. Soil near dead Russian olive trees indicated a short-term increase in soil nitrogen following plant removal but did not influence vegetation composition compared to areas without Russian olive. Following tamarisk and Russian olive removal, our study sites were colonized by upland plant species. Many western North American rivers have tamarisk and Russian olive on floodplains abandoned by channel incision, river regulation or both. Our results are widely applicable to sites where drying has occurred and vegetation

  20. Diet Switching by Mammalian Herbivores in Response to Exotic Grass Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bremm

    Full Text Available Invasion by exotic grasses is a severe threat to the integrity of grassland ecosystems all over the world. Because grasslands are typically grazed by livestock and wildlife, the invasion is a community process modulated by herbivory. We hypothesized that the invasion of native South American grasslands by Eragrostis plana Nees, an exotic tussock-forming grass from Africa, could be deterred by grazing if grazers switched dietary preferences and included the invasive grass as a large proportion of their diets. Bos taurus (heifers and Ovis aries (ewes grazed plots with varying degrees of invasion by E. plana in a replicated manipulative experiment. Animal positions and species grazed were observed every minute in 45-min grazing session. Proportion of bites and steps in and out of E. plana tussocks were measured and used to calculate several indices of selectivity. Both heifers and ewes exhibited increasing probability of grazing E. plana as the proportion of area covered by tussocks increased, but they behaved differently. In agreement with expectations based on the allometry of dietary preferences and morphology, ewes consumed a low proportion of E. plana, except in areas that had more than 90% E. plana cover. Heifers consumed proportionally more E. plana than ewes. Contrary to our hypothesis, herbivores did not exhibit dietary switching towards the invasive grass. Moreover, they exhibited avoidance of the invasive grass and preference for short-statured native species, both of which should tend to enhance invasion. Unless invasive plants are highly palatable to livestock, the effect of grazing to deter the invasion is limited, due to the inherent avoidance of the invasive grass by the main grazers in the ecosystem, particularly sheep.