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Sample records for exostoses multiple hereditary

  1. Hereditary multiple exostoses of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fiky, Tarek A M; Chow, Wang; Li, Yun Hoi; To, Michael

    2009-08-01

    To assess the radiographic features of 36 hips with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Hip parameters of 12 males and 6 females (36 hips) aged 2 to 28 years with HME were assessed using anteroposterior radiographs. The recorded features included the sites of osteochondromas, the femoral head/neck ratio, the Reimer's migration percentage, Sharp's acetabular angle, the centre edge angle, the femoral neck-shaft angle, and degenerative changes. 15 of the 18 patients were asymptomatic; 3 complained of pain (2 underwent excision or bone biopsy); no lesion was malignant. Osteochondromas were most commonly located in the femur followed by the ilium; only one was intra-articular. 32 hips had coxa valga; 26 had an abnormal Reimer's migration percentage; 17 had an abnormal Sharp's acetabular angle; 12 had an abnormal centre edge angle; 32 had an abnormal femoral neck-shaft angle; and 6 had degenerative changes. Acetabular and femoral dysplasia as well as subluxation are common in patients with HME. Borderline subluxated hips and those with marked coxa valga and/or acetabular dysplasia should be closely monitored to determine the need for surgery in the future. Subluxated hips should be operated on early, particularly in children and symptomatic adults.

  2. The hip in hereditary multiple exostoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D E; Benson, M K; Hosney, G A

    2001-09-01

    We defined the characteristics of dysplasia and coxa valga in hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) by radiological analysis of 24 hips in 12 patients. The degree and effect of the 'osteochondroma load' around the hip were quantified. We investigated the pathology of the labrum and the incidence of osteoarthritis and of malignant change in these patients. Coxa valga and dysplasia were common with a median neck-shaft angle of 156 degrees, a median centre-edge angle of 23 degrees and Sharp's acetabular angle of 44 degrees. There was overgrowth of the femoral neck with a significantly greater ratio of the neck/shaft diameter in HME than in the control hips (p coxa valga (p coxa valga. No correlation was found between dysplasia and coxa valga. These data suggest that HME may cause anomalies of the hip as a reflection of a generalised inherited defect, but also support the theory that osteochondromas may themselves precipitate some of the characteristic features of HME around the hip.

  3. Hereditary multiple exostoses of the ribs: an unusual cause of hemothorax and pericardial effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Robert A; Rowe, Dorothy H; Arkovitz, Marc S

    2005-07-01

    A 6-year-old girl with hereditary multiple exostoses presented with spontaneous hemothorax and pericardial effusion. Chest computed tomographic scan showed left-sided costal exostoses protruding into the left side of the chest. She underwent successful thoracoscopic resection of 3 left rib exostoses and made a full recovery. This report illustrates this rare clinical scenario and reviews the previously published reports of this complication of costal exostoses.

  4. Hereditary multiple exostoses: from genetics to clinical syndrome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Hul, Wim van; Wuyts, Wim; Willems, P.J.; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To give an overview of genetic, clinical and radiological aspects in two families over four generations with known hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Methods and material: After linkage analysis in both families to localize the defective gene, mutation analysis was performed in these genes to identify the underlying mutation. In the 31 affected individuals, location, number and morphology and evolution of exostosis, evolution of remodeling defects at the metaphysis, and the extent of possible complications were evaluated on clinical and imaging (plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) data over a lifetime period. Results and conclusions: Both families demonstrate the gene defect in the same EXT-2 gene locus on chromosome 11p. Exostoses are preferentially located in the lower extremity (hip, knee and lower leg), humerus, and forearm. Any other bone may be involved, except for the calvaria of the skull and the mandible. Exostoses are rather sessile than pedunculated. Exostosis is rarely present at birth but develops gradually and may persist to grow slowly after closure of the growth plates. Preferential expression of the remodeling defect was seen in the hip, distal femur (trumpet-shaped metaphysis) and forearm (shortening of the ulna with secondary bowing of the radius and development of a pseudo-Madelung deformity). These radiological manifestations start at the age of 4-5 years and become more obvious as the enchondral bone formation progresses with age. Reported complications in these families consist of local entrapment phenomenons (vessel, tendon, nerve), frictional bursitis, and sarcomatous transformation. MRI was able to suggest these complications and is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of symptomatic exostoses.

  5. Total hip and knee arthroplasty in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesfin, Addisu; Goddard, Maria S; Tuakli-Wosornu, Yetsa A; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2012-12-01

    To the authors' knowledge, few reports have been published in the English literature of using total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of hereditary multiple exostoses. This article describes 2 patients with hereditary multiple exostoses, 1 treated with total hip arthroplasty and 1 treated with total knee arthroplasty. Bony deformities make arthroplasty uniquely challenging in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty. An expanded metaphysis of the proximal femur, coxa valga deformity, and the presence of hardware from previous reconstructive surgeries can make total hip arthroplasty technically difficult. Substantial bony deformity of the distal femur, valgus deformity of the knee, and sizing issues that necessitate custom implants can make total knee arthroplasty difficult. The most common bony deformities in hereditary multiple exostoses are short stature, limb-length discrepancy, valgus deformity at the knee and ankle, and asymmetry of the pectoral and pelvic girdles. Most reported surgical treatments for patients with hereditary multiple exostoses focus on the pediatric population or the management of malignant transformation of exostoses. Studies that specifically address the conditions associated with knee deformities focus on extra-articular deformity correction rather than arthroplasty.When arthroplasty is necessary in this patient population, an understanding of the commonly occurring deformities can help with preoperative planning and surgical management. All painful lesions must be evaluated for malignant transformation. Bone scans can be useful during workup. All specimens should be sent for pathologic evaluation. Such patients are challenging because of the distorted hip anatomy and valgus knee deformity. The current 2 cases illustrate specific challenges that can be anticipated and underscore key principles for arthroplasty in the management of hereditary multiple exostoses. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Hereditary multiple exostoses in a 15-year-old boy: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-06

    Sep 6, 2016 ... cause major physical handicap and may be resected. Key words: Hereditary, Multiple,. Exostoses, Deformity. Introduction. Osteochondroma, the most common bone tumour seen in children, is a developmental lesion rather than a true neoplasm and constitutes 20%–50% of all benign bone tumours.1 It is a ...

  7. Hereditary multiple exostoses in a 15-year-old boy: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME) is a rare bone disease, usually associated with deformity and pressure symptoms. It is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of benign tumours growing outward from the metaphyses of long bones and can lead to considerable psychosocial ...

  8. Surgical hip dislocation according to Ganz for excision of osteochondromas in patients with multiple hereditary exostoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorel, J. C.; Façee Schaeffer, M.; Homan, A. S.; Scholtes, V. A B; Kempen, D. H R; Ham, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We report a prospective cohort study of the midterm results of surgical dislocation of the hip (according to Ganz) to perform resection of osteochondromas involving the femoral neck in patients with multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE). Methods Hip range of movement (ROM) was assessed pre-and

  9. The impact of hereditary multiple exostoses on quality of life, satisfaction, global health status, and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Ragone, Vincenza; Caldarini, Camilla; Serra, Nicola; Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Facchini, Renato Mario

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate quality of life (QOL), global health status, pain, and level of satisfaction in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME), and to correlate the association between the severity of diseases and age, sex, number of surgical procedures, and number of exostoses. The data of 50 patients with HME were retrospectively evaluated and recorded. QOL was evaluated with the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) questionnaire, the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q-SF); intensity of pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS). The association of age, gender, pain, quality of life, number of exostoses, and number of surgical procedures were evaluated and correlated. Mean number of exostoses in our patient's cohort resulted 18.12 ± 8.60, and every patient underwent to a mean of 5.62 ± 5.74 surgical procedures for the exostoses. Mean VAS resulted 5.16 ± 2.90. Considering SF-12, mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) component resulted, respectively, 45.36 ± 10.76 and 38.73 ± 11.09, while GHQ-12 and Q-LES-Q-SF were 15.48 ± 4.70 and 45.28 ± 9.55, respectively. We found a significant positive correlation between the number of exostoses and the number of surgical procedures (p life as measured by the MCS and PCS scores similar to the disability associated with osteoarthritis in the mental component and tumors or diabetes as regards the physical component. Moreover, we found no difference in patients' quality of life as regards number of exostoses, age, and surgical procedure, but we found that women have a worse response as regards the psychological side than men.

  10. Developmental pattern of the hip in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Park, Kwang-Won; Oh, Chang-Seon; Ahn, Yeong-Seub; Kang, Qing-Lin; Jung, Sung-Taek; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Background Coxa valga is a common clinical feature of hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). The current study aimed to determine the unique developmental pattern of the hip in patients with HME and evaluate the factors that influence its progression. Methods Thirty patients (57 hips) with HME were divided into two groups according to the Hilgenreiner epiphyseal angle (HEA). Twenty-two patients (44 hips) including 13 men and 9 women were assigned to group 1 (HEA

  11. Hereditary Multiple Exostoses: a review of clinical appearance and metabolic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, Giovanni; Ristori, Gabriele; Scoccianti, Guido; Tamburini, Angela; Capanna, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) is an inherited genetic condition characterized by the presence of multiple exostoses (osteochondromas). MHE is a relatively rare autosomal dominant disorder, mainly caused by loss of function mutations in two genes: exostosin-1 (EXT1) and exostosin-2 (EXT2). These genes are linked to heparan sulfate (HS) synthesis, but the specific molecular mechanism leading to the disruption of the cartilage structure and the consequent exostoses formation is still not resolved. The aim of this paper is to encounter the main aspects of HME reviewing the literature, in order to improve clinical features and evolution, and the metabolic-pathogenetic mechanisms underlying. Although MHE may be asymptomatic, a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations is found in paediatric patients with this disorder. Pain is experienced by the majority of patients, even restricted motion of the joint is often encountered. Sometimes exostoses can interfere with normal development of the growth plate, giving rise to limb deformities, low stature and scoliosis. Other many neurovascular and associated disorders can lead to surgery. The most feared complication is the malignant transformation of an existing osteochondroma into a secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma, during adulthood. The therapeutic approach to HME is substantially surgical, whereas the medical one is still at an experimental level. In conclusion, HME is a complex disease where the paediatrician, the geneticist and the orthopaedic surgeon play an interchangeable role in diagnosis, research and therapy. We are waiting for new studies able to explain better the role of HS in signal transduction, because it plays a role in other bone and cartilage diseases (in particular malignant degeneration) as well as in skeletal embryology.

  12. Developmental pattern of the hip in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Park, Kwang-Won; Oh, Chang-Seon; Ahn, Yeong-Seub; Kang, Qing-Lin; Jung, Sung-Taek; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2015-03-15

    Coxa valga is a common clinical feature of hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). The current study aimed to determine the unique developmental pattern of the hip in patients with HME and evaluate the factors that influence its progression. Thirty patients (57 hips) with HME were divided into two groups according to the Hilgenreiner epiphyseal angle (HEA). Twenty-two patients (44 hips) including 13 men and 9 women were assigned to group 1 (HEA coxa valga and 27 (47.4%) hips had abnormal MP (42.1% were borderline and 5.3% were subluxated). There was a significant difference in the HEA and NSA between the groups (p coxa valga deformity with close follow-up.

  13. [Double mutant alleles in the EXT1 gene not previously reported in a teenager with hereditary multiple exostoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Cozar, Mónica; Grinberg, Daniel; Balcells, Susana; Asteggiano, Carla G; Martínez-Domenech, Gustavo; Bracho, Ana; Sánchez, Yanira; Stock, Frances; Delgado-Luengo, Wilmer; Zara-Chirinos, Carmen; Chacín, José Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary forms of multiple exostoses, now called EXT1/EXT2-CDG within Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, are the most common benign bone tumors in humans and clinical description consists of the formation of several cartilage-capped bone tumors, usually benign and localized in the juxta-epiphyseal region of long bones, although wide body dissemination in severe cases is not uncommon. Onset of the disease is variable ranging from 2-3 years up to 13-15 years with an estimated incidence ranging from 1/18,000 to 1/50,000 cases in European countries. We present a double mutant alleles in the EXT1 gene not previously reported in a teenager and her family with hereditary multiple exostoses.

  14. A mountain among molehills: removing an impinging large femoral neck osteochondroma in a man with hereditary multiple exostoses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Conall W R

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old man with a history of hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) presented with persistent right groin pain and reduced hip range of movement. Examination demonstrated a positive FADIR (flexion, adduction and internal rotation) test suggesting femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Investigations showed multiple sessile osteochondromata of the right femur with a dominant anterolateral femoral neck osteochondroma causing flexion block. The patient underwent an uncomplicated proximal femoral exostectomy. Six-week postoperative pain, range of movement and daily activity had greatly improved. This case highlights that even in the setting of multiple osteochondromata, excellent impingement relief can be achieved following selective proximal femoral exostectomy.

  15. Multiple hereditary exostoses and ischiofemoral impingement: a case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoong, Philip; Mansour, Ramy; Teh, James L. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    To assess whether there is a significant difference in the ischiofemoral space in patients with multiple hereditary exostoses affecting the proximal femora compared to normal patients. Ischiofemoral impingement is an increasingly recognized cause of hip and buttock pain. This causes narrowing of the ischiofemoral space resulting in an abnormal quadratus femoris muscle. We performed a retrospective search for individuals with MHE with proximal femoral involvement on pelvic MRI over a 7-year period (2006-2013). Suitable patients were age- and sex-matched with a control group. The minimum ischiofemoral space (MIFS) was recorded in each hip, as was the presence of edema and atrophy of quadratus femoris and concomitant hip osteoarthrosis. MRI features suggestive of ischiofemoral impingement were defined as MIFS less than 10 mm or an abnormal quadratus femoris muscle. Twenty-one hips in 11 individuals with MHE were included in the study. A total of 42 hips were analyzed. The mean age was 37 years (range, 13-72 years) and 55 % were male. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the MIHS in individuals with MHE (mean, 10.7 mm, range, 0-21 mm) compared to a control group (mean, 18.1 mm, range, 10.5-26.5 mm). MRI features suggestive of ischiofemoral impingement were seen in 13/21 (62 %) hips in the MHE group and 0/21 (0 %) in the control group. The reduced ischiofemoral space and associated quadratus femoris abnormalities in patients with MHE involving the proximal femora may account for hip/buttock symptoms in the absence of significant degenerative change. (orig.)

  16. Association of autism in two patients with hereditary multiple exostoses caused by novel deletion mutations of EXT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hung; Yamagata, Takanori; Mori, Masato; Momoi, Mariko Y

    2002-01-01

    Two boys from separate families presented with hereditary multiple exostoses (EXT) and autism associated with mental retardation. Their fathers both expressed a clinical phenotype of hereditary multiple exostoses milder than those of the patients and without the associated mental disorder. The EXT1 and EXT2 genes from lymphocytes of the affected individuals were analyzed by using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. A novel deletion mutation, 1742delTGT-G in exon 9 of EXT1, causing a frameshift was detected in one boy and his father. Another novel deletion mutation, 2093delTT in exon 11 of EXT1, causing transcription termination was detected in the other affected boy and his father. EXT1 is expressed in the brain, and both EXT1 and EXT2 proteins are associated with glycosyltransferase activities required for the biosynthesis of heparan sulfate, which also has activity in the brain. The coincidental association of mental disorders in the boys was not completely excluded. However, these results suggest the involvement of EXT1 in the development of mental disorders, including mental retardation and autism.

  17. A 5-year-old boy with a large hereditary multiple exostoses lump grown into thoracic cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lijun; Lu, Qiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Han, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Multiple exostosis is associated with the autosomal dominant disorder and hereditary multiple exostoses (HMEs), are rarely growing around the ribs and the formation of a large lump into the thoracic cavity. It's generally agreed that when there are no symptoms present, a HME patient could either avoid any treatment or postpone the operation until adolescence. We present a 5-year-old boy with 4 cm × 3.5 cm HMEs lump invasion into the thoracic cavity, with symptoms of chest distress and right chest pain. This patient received video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and a the lump and 1 cm rib involved was resected. During a 2 years follow-up, the patient remained in good condition without recurrence and complications.

  18. Exostose múltipla hereditária com compressão medular Hereditary multiple exostosis with cervical cord compression: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jorge Facure

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores registram um caso raro de exostose múltipla hereditária em que ocorreu compressão medular pelo crescimento de massa cartilaginosa na luz do canal raqueano. A descompessão cirúrgica por laminectomia resultou em pronta regressão do quadro neurológico.A case of hereditary multiple exostoses successfully operated is reported. The patient, a 15 year-old white brazilian boy, was admitted with tetraplegia and Babinski's sign. Early diagnosis followed by prompt surgery may prevent permanent spinal cord damage.

  19. Genetic heterogeneity of multiple exostoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legeai-Mallet, L.; Munnich, A.; Le Merrer, M. [Inserm U393 Hopital des Enfants-Malades, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary multiple exostoses (EXT, MIM 133700) is an autosomal dominant bony disorder characterized by the formation of cartilage-capped juxta-epiphyseal prominences on the long bones. Three disease genes, mapping to chromosomes 8q24 and 11 have been recently localized, supporting genetic heterogeneity of this condition. We have refined the genetic mapping of the chromosome 19p locus using a series of six families unlinked to chromosomes 8 or 11. Several genes expressed during cartilage growth and located in this region have been tested as candidate genes, namely zinc finger proteins, protein kinases, JunD and JunB. Hitherto no major rearrangement of these genes has been detected in EXT families linked to chromosome 19p.

  20. Congenital multiple exostoses with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Aliyu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple exostoses are a rare disorder. It is estimated to occur in 1; 50,000 pregnancies. It presents within the first decade of life and it has an autosomal mode of inheritance; though it has been associated with a spontaneous mutation in 10% of cases. It is known as hereditary multiple exostoses, hereditary multiple osteochondromas, and to fit this diagnosis, there should be at two or more exostoses; usually, long bones of cartilaginous origin such as those of the extremities are mostly affected often sparing the face, these exostoses are osteochondromas arising close to the growth plate (metaphysis and epiphysis. This communication highlights the case of a 42-day-old female delivered at the 7th month gestational age to a nonconsanguineous family setting; she was admitted with the complaint of convulsions and poor suck; she was the second of a set of twin; the first twin was essentially healthy. There was no history of fever or difficulty of breathing. The delivery was at home and she was said to be small at birth, the birth weight was not measured, and cried poorly. On examination, she was wasted with a weight of 1.4 kg, and the length was 34 cm with an occipitofrontal circumference of 29 cm. The lower limbs were malformed with exostosis arising from both shins; she also had a ventricular septal defect.

  1. Multiple exostotic hypochondroplasia: Syndrome of combined hypochondroplasia and multiple exostoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, R.; Young, L.W.; Girdany, B.R.; Steele, M.W.

    1984-07-01

    This is a report of a family with major focus on the daughter who had short stature. The mother had hypochondroplasia and the father had multiple exostoses. The daughter's skeletal roentgenograms show features of both hypochondroplasia and multiple exostoses. The roentgenographic, clinical and genetic aspects of these skeletal dysplasias are reviewed and hypochrondroplasia is contrasted with achondroplasia. The genetic and counseling implications of the association of hypochondroplasia and multiple exostoses are discussed.

  2. Multiple Rib Exostoses in a Boy: A Rare CaseResulting in Surgery Secondary to Cosmetic Concerns

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    Seyed Hosein Fattahi Masoum

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A seven year-old boy with several painless masses on the ribs and shoulder was referred to our hospital. The masses were so prominent that they prevented the child’s sleep. Since the patient had been ridiculed by his friends due to the rib prominences, he had refused to attend school. After clinical and radiological evaluations, the masses were diagnosed as hereditary multiple exostoses of the shoulder and ribs. He underwent surgery for cosmetic reasons resulting in the patient’s return to a normal life.

  3. Refinement of the Multiple Exostoses Locus (EXT2) to a 3-cM Interval on Chromosome 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Wim; Ramlakhan, Sarvan; Van Hul, Wim; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Raskind, Wendy H.; Hofstede, Floris C.; Reyniers, Edwin; Wells, Dan E.; de Vries, Bert; Conrad, Ernest U.; Hill, April; Zalatayev, Dmitry; Weissenbach, Jean; Wagner, Michael J.; Bakker, Egbert; Halley, Dicky J. J.; Willems, Patrick J.

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary multiple exostoses (EXT) is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by the formation of multiple exostoses on the long bones. EXT is genetically heterogeneous, with at least three loci involved: one (EXT1) in the Langer-Giedion region on 8q23-q24, a second (EXT2) in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 11, and a third (EXT3) on chromosome 19p. In this study, linkage analysis in seven extended EXT families, all linked to the EXT2 locus, refined the localization of the EXT2 gene to a 3-cM region flanked by D11S1355 and D11S1361/D11S554. This implies that the EXT2 gene is located at the short arm of chromosome 11, in band 11p11-p12. The refined localization of EXT2 excludes a number of putative candidate genes located in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 11 and facilitates the process of isolating the EXT2 gene. PMID:7668264

  4. Hereditary multiple exostosis with secondary malignization: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, A.M.N.; Pitella, F.A.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Costa, P.L.A.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Sapienza, M.T.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Radiologia. Centro de Medicna Nuclear

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hereditary Multiple Exostosis (HME) or multiple osteochondromatosis is a skeletal development anomaly which is characterized by generalized exostoses in the bones, mainly in long bone metaphyses, appearing during childhood and adolescence. The transmission is autosomal dominant, its prevalence varies from 1/50,000 to 9/1,000,000 in Europe, and around 10% of cases show no family history. Case Report: Description of an HME case with two secondary malignization episodes. The data was taken from the patient's chart and from imaging exams from the hospital files. WASB, a 19-year-old male, hospitalized after being pre-diagnosed with HME and complaints of bone-consistent mass in the right gluteal region and a lump in the posterior region of the right leg, associated to multiple bone lumps all over the body. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed along with a bone scintillography with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP which showed multiple osteogenic lesions in the thorax, pelvic bones and long bones with periarticular prevalence in the lower limbs. The suspicion of malignancy in the right iliac area was raised due to the MRI result and to the higher intensity captured in the scintillography, confirming chondrosarcoma grade I of malignancy in the biopsy. The patient suffered interileo abdominalis amputation of the right lower limb with good evolution and control scintillography performed after 1 and 1,5 years. In the second controlling procedure, the patient complained about pain in the left knee, and a MRI suggested a new secondary malignization. The hypothesis of a head of left fibula osteochondroma with signs of aggressiveness was confirmed following surgery. Discussion: In HME, the exostoses grow along with the individual, ceasing with the epiphyseal fusion. The growth of these formations after skeletal maturation suggests activity of exostoses and, in most times, it is a sign of malignant transformation, which turns almost every time into

  5. Syringomyelia in hereditary multiple exostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Janet M; Modaff, Peggy; Iskandar, Bermans J; Pauli, Richard M

    2016-11-01

    We describe five children with Hereditary Multiple Exostosis (HME) who also had syringomyelia. Of these, four had a tethered cord/fibrolipoma. No spinal osteochondromas were found in these patients. All had antecedent neurological signs or symptoms that prompted spinal imaging with MRI. Of all patients with HME seen in the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinic from 1982 to present, 44% (17/39) of patients had signs or symptoms concerning for possible cord-related neurological findings. However, only 10 of 39 had spinal imaging. Assuming that all individuals with syringomyelia were identified, then 5/39 (13%) were in that way affected. This, of course, is a minimal estimate given that many were not imaged. The incidence of syringomyelia appears to be increased in this population, and seems to be unrelated to spinal osteochondromas. A low threshold for obtaining spinal MRI in patients with Hereditary Multiple Exostosis seems rational. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Intraosseous Atypical Chondroid Tumor or Chondrosarcoma Grade 1 in Patients with Multiple Osteochondromas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goud, Annemarie L.; Wuyts, Wim; Bessems, Johannes; Bramer, Jos; van der Woude, Henk Jan; Ham, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: The autosomal dominant condition multiple osteochondromas, formerly called multiple hereditary exostoses, is associated with a risk of malignant progression of osteochondroma into secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma. Most patients with multiple osteochondromas have exostosin-1 or

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary multiple osteochondromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topic: Benign Tumors Health Topic: Bone Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary multiple osteochondromas Educational Resources (6 links) Cleveland Clinic: ...

  8. Identification of a new mutation in an Iranian family with hereditary multiple osteochondromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbaroghli S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan Akbaroghli,1,* Maryam Balali,2,* Behnam Kamalidehghan,3,4 Siamak Saber,4 Omid Aryani,5 Goh Yong Meng,6 Massoud Houshmand4 1Mofid Children’s Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 2ENT and Head & Neck Research Center and Department, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS, 3Medical Genetics Department, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 4Medical Genetics Department, National Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, 5Department of Neuroscience, Iran Medical University, Tehran, Iran; 6Department of Veterinary Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM, Serdang, Malaysia *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Hereditary multiple osteochondromas (HMO, previously named hereditary multiple exostoses (HME, is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by the growth of multiple osteochondromas and is associated with bony deformity, skeletal growth reduction, nerve compression, restriction of joint motion, and premature osteoarthrosis. HMO is genetically heterogeneous, localized on at least three chromosomal loci including 8q24.1 (EXT1, 11p11-p13 (EXT2, and 19p (EXT3. The median age of diagnosis is 3 years; almost all affected individuals are diagnosed by age 12. The risk for malignant degeneration to osteochondrosarcoma increases with age, although the lifetime risk of malignant degeneration is low (~1%.Methods and results: This study was performed on an Iranian family with nine affected individuals from three consecutive generations. Here, the proband was an affected woman who received genetic counseling prior to pregnancy. All exons of the three genes were examined in the proband using polymerase chain reaction and sequencing methods (the last member of this family is a male with severe deformities and lesions, especially around his large joints. Exon 4 of EXT1 (c.1235 G>A was changed in affected

  9. Spinal cord stimulation for treatment of the pain associated with hereditary multiple osteochondromas

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    Mirpuri RG

    2015-08-01

    trialing multiple painful areas with a 16-contact lead in order to avoid multiple trials and placement. Keywords: Exostoses, bone neoplasms/pathology, hereditary exostoses/multiple, back pain/therapy, pain management, spinal cord stimulation, treatment outcome, chronic pain, case reports

  10. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Due to Ligamentum Flavum Hypertrophy in a Patient with Multiple Exostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Ižkbali Afsar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary multiple exostosis is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by multiple exostoses (osteochondromas usually affecting the metaphysical regions of long bones, usually of the lower extremity, and seldom occurring in the axial skeleton. In the literature, hereditary multiple exostosis cases that developed spinal canal stenosis due to spinal osteochondromas have been reported. Lumbar spinal stenosis may occur in a hereditary multiple exostosis patient due to ligamentum flavum hypertrophy, which is a hyperosteotic process that differs from exostosis. We discuss one such case, along with pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical features.

  11. A CASE OF PERSISTANT INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN A 7 YEARS OLD GIRL WITH MULTIPLE HEREDITARY EXOSTOSIS AND CRANIOSTENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Kuzenkova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article demonstrates a case of rare hereditary syndrome observation — with the multiple hereditary exostosis (MHE syndrome in a 7 years old girl. The article covers hereditary and clinical features and life prognosis of the syndrome.Key words: intracranial hypertension, multiple hereditary exostosis (MHE syndrome, craniostenosis, children.

  12. Bursa formation with scapular osteochondroma in hereditary multiple exostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceberut, Kadri; Korkmaz, Murat; Ergin, Ismail; Müslehiddinoglu, Ahmet

    2013-07-01

    Osteochondroma is the most common benign bone tumour present multiple hereditary exostosis (HME). Scapular osteochondroma associated with pain and bursitis is rarely reported in literature. Here, we describe a 49-year-old male with the diagnosis of HME who was admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery with a painful and rapidly enlarging mass behind the left scapula. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated a large bursa formation associated with chest wall mass. Pre-operatively, the mass was diagnosed as osteochondroma and resected. Pathological findings confirmed that mass was a large bursa formation due to scapular osteochondroma without any evidence of malignancy. Osteochondroma should be considered in differential diagnosis of chest wall tumours located at this specific site. We discuss this rare complication of HME and emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and differentiation from malignant transformation of osteochondroma.

  13. Hereditary Multiple Cerebral Cavernous Malformations Associated with Wilson Disease and Multiple Lipomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, Olga B; Okishev, Dmitry N; Ignatova, Tatyana M; Balashova, Maria S; Boulygina, Eugenia S

    2017-09-01

    We report on a patient with 2 Mendelian diseases-symptomatic multiple familial cerebral cavernous malformations (FCCMs) and Wilson disease. Genetic analysis revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes CCM2 and CCM3, associated with cavernous malformations, and homozygote mutation in the ATP7B gene, responsible for Wilson disease. FCCMs were symptomatic in 3 generations. The patient also had multiple lipomatosis, which is suggested to be a familial syndrome. In recent years there has been an increasing amount of publications linking FCCMs with other pathology, predominantly with extracranial and intracranial mesenchymal anomalies. The present study is the description of an unusual association between 2 independent hereditary diseases of confirmed genetic origin-a combination that has not been described previously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitochondria in neuroinflammation - Multiple sclerosis (MS), leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and LHON-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiela, David; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2017-06-28

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative disease, but its role as a driver in these processes is uncertain. Understanding the pathogenesis of inherited mitochondrial disorders may help us to uncover mechanisms involved during acquired mitochondrial dysfunction. We review the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis and discuss shared clinical and molecular features in both conditions. Targeting mitochondrial pathways involved in inflammation or apoptosis may be a possible therapeutic approach in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chondrosarcoma secondary to hereditary multiple exostosis treated by extended internal hemiplevectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademar Lopes

    Full Text Available The authors report on the case of a 28-year-old patient with extensive chondrosarcoma of the left ischium and pubis involving hip joint, skin, and soft tissue of the gluteal region, secondary to hereditary multiple exostosis submitted to an extended internal Enneking type II and Ill hemipelvectomy. No prosthesis or arthrodesis was used. A few years ago, patients with extensive tumors like this one were treated with interilioabdominal amputation, resulting in a loss of quality of Iife.Two years after the limb-preserving surgery, this patient was disease free, with good functional results, including bipedal ambulation with support.

  16. Hereditary melanoma: Update on syndromes and management: Genetics of familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soura, Efthymia; Eliades, Philip J; Shannon, Kristen; Stratigos, Alexander J; Tsao, Hensin

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is considered the most lethal skin cancer if it is not detected and treated during its early stages. About 10% of melanoma patients report a family history of melanoma; however, individuals with features of true hereditary melanoma (ie, unilateral lineage, multigenerational, multiple primary lesions, and early onset of disease) are in fact quite rare. Although many new loci have been implicated in hereditary melanoma, CDKN2A mutations remain the most common. Familial melanoma in the presence of multiple atypical nevi should raise suspicion for a germline CDKN2A mutation. These patients have a high risk of developing multiple primary melanomas and internal organ malignancies, especially pancreatic cancer; therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is necessary in many cases. The value of dermoscopic examination and total body photography performed at regular intervals has been suggested by a number of studies, and should therefore be considered for these patients and their first-degree relatives. In addition, genetic counseling with the possibility of testing can be a valuable adjunct for familial melanoma patients. This must be performed with care, however, and only by qualified individuals trained in cancer risk analysis. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hereditary Melanoma: Update on Syndromes and Management - Genetics of familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soura, E.; Eliades, P.; Shannon, K.; Stratigos, A.; Tsao, H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is considered the most lethal skin cancer if not detected and treated at its early stages. About 10% of melanoma patients report a family history of melanoma; however, individuals with features of true hereditary melanoma (i.e. unilateral lineage, multi-generational, multiple primary lesions, and early onset of disease) are in fact quite rare. Although many new loci have been implicated in hereditary melanoma, CDKN2A mutations remain the most common. Familial melanoma in the presence of multiple atypical nevi should raise suspicion for a germline CDKN2A mutation. Such patients have a high risk of developing multiple primary melanomas and internal organ malignancies especially pancreatic cancer; thus, a multidisciplinary approach is necessary in many cases. The value of dermoscopy examination and total body photography performed at regular intervals has been suggested by a number of studies, and should therefore be considered for these patients and their first degree relatives. In addition, genetic counseling with the possibility of testing can be a valuable adjunct for familial melanoma patients. But, this must be performed with care and only by qualified individuals trained in cancer risk analysis. PMID:26892650

  18. Successful operative management of an asymptomatic chest lesion in hereditary multiple exostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Hugh J S; Walker, Jenny; Davies, Geraint

    2013-09-01

    This report outlines the management of a large intrathoracic lesion found in a 2-year-old girl with hereditary multiple exostosis. The lesion arose from the right eighth rib and comprised two separate osteochondromata that had coalesced into a single lesion and caused significant deformity to the chest wall. Aside from the deformity, the lesions were asymptomatic. Further growth of the lesions could cause respiratory complications, worsening of the visible deformity and, being lesions of the axial skeleton, bear an increased risk of malignant change. The lesions and the attached eighth rib were removed operatively and the patient recovered without complications. We demonstrate a place for the operative management of asymptomatic lesions in anticipation of future difficulties or malignant changes.

  19. Differential cerebro spinal fluid proteome investigation of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aguanno, Simona; Barassi, Alessandra; Lupisella, Santina; d'eril, Gianlodovico Melzi; Del Boccio, Piero; Pieragostino, Damiana; Pallotti, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Liguori, Rocco; Avoni, Patrizia; Bernardini, Sergio; Gambi, Domenico; Urbani, Andrea; Federici, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disease leading to the loss of central vision and optic nerve atrophy. The existence of occasional cases of LHON patients developing a Multiple Sclerosis (MS)-like illness and the hypothesis that mtDNA variants may be involved in MS suggest the possibility of some common molecular mechanisms linking the two diseases. We have pursued a comparative proteomics approach on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from LHON and MS patients, as well as healthy donors by employing 2-DE gel separations coupled to MALDI-TOF-MS and nLC-MS/MS investigations. 7 protein spots showed significant differential distribution among the three groups. Both CSF of LHON or MS patients are characterized by lower level of transthyretin dimer adduct while a specific up regulation of Apo A-IV was detected in LHON CSF.

  20. Timing of forearm deformity correction in a child with multiple hereditary exostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Bryan G; Klifto, Christopher S; Chu, Alice

    2014-09-01

    Multiple hereditary exostosis (MHE) can cause progressive skeletal deformities (eg, ulnar shortening, bowing, radial head dislocation) in the upper extremity. Various procedures have been used to correct forearm deformity in children with MHE. The timing of these procedures, however, is controversial. An 11-year-old boy with known MHE presented 7 months after onset of left elbow pain and loss of flexion-extension to 40° to 120°. Radiographs showed a distal ulna osteochondroma, ulnar shortening, bowing, and radial head dislocation. Eighteen months after ulnar osteotomy, radial head reduction, and external fixation, he had motion from 0° to 135°. This case demonstrates that later stage MHE-induced forearm deformities can be successfully surgically corrected. Given possible recurrence during growth, there may be an indication for waiting until the patient is closer to skeletal maturity before proceeding with corrective forearm procedures.

  1. Bone mineral density in patients with multiple sclerosis, hereditary ataxia or hereditary spastic paraplegia after at least 10 years of disease - a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Cecilia Smith; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Brunborg, Cathrine; Tallaksen, Chantal; Eriksen, Erik Fink; Holmøy, Trygve; Moen, Stine Marit

    2016-12-05

    Although disability is considered the main cause of low bone mineral density (BMD) in multiple sclerosis (MS), other factors related to the disease process or treatment could also be involved. The aim of this study was to assess whether patients with MS are more likely to develop low BMD (osteopenia or osteoporosis) than patients with the non-inflammatory neurological diseases Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Hereditary Ataxia (HA). We performed a case control study comparing BMD (spine, hip and total body) and biochemical measures of bone metabolism in 91 MS patients and 77 patients with HSP or HA, matched for age, gender and disability. Both patient groups had lived with the disease for at least 10 years. In total 74.7% of the patients with MS and 75.3% of the patients with HSP or HA had osteopenia (-2.5 < T- score < -1.0) or osteoporosis (T- score ≤ -2.5) in one or more sites. Osteoporosis was more common in patients with MS than with HSP/HA (44.0 vs 20.8%, p =0.001). This difference was not significant after correction for confounders (p = 0.07), nor were any of the biochemical markers. Most patients with disabling neurological diseases like MS and HSP/HA develop osteopenia or osteoporosis. MS patients had osteoporosis more frequently than HA/HSP patients, though the difference was not significant after adjusting for confounders. Osteoporosis and bone health should be considered in all patients with both inflammatory and degenerative chronic neurological diseases.

  2. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: the relationship to multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Rovira, Alex; Ciccarelli, Olga; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Filippi, Massimo; Frederiksen, Jette L; Giorgio, Antonio; Küker, Wilhelm; Lukas, Carsten; Rocca, Maria A; De Stefano, Nicola; Toosy, Ahmed; Yousry, Tarek; Palace, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary aim was to define MRI features of LMS and LHON, and to assess the proportions of individuals displaying features typical of MS. Secondarily, we investigated the effect of gender on the risk of developing white matter lesions in the context of LHON. A blinded standardised review of conventional brain MRIs of 30 patients with MS, 31 patients with LHON and 11 patients with LMS was conducted by three independent experts in the field. MS-like MRI features were assessed. All patients with LMS and 26% of patients with LHON had white matter lesions. Of these, all patients with LMS and 25% with LHON were found to have an MRI appearance typical of MS. Female patients with LHON had a significantly greater risk of having white matter lesions consistent with MS compared with male patients (relative risk 8.3). A blinded review of conventional brain MRIs shows that patients with LMS have a scan appearance indistinguishable from MS. Mitochondrial dysfunction could be a common pathophysiological pathway in the formation of white matter lesions. There appears to be a strong female influence on the radiological appearance as well as clinical development of MS in patients with LHON. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  4. [Buccal bony exostoses induced by free gingival grafts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, H; Slutzkey, S

    2011-01-01

    Buccal Bony Exostoses (BBE) is a local benign osseous overgrowth continuous with the facial aspect of the jaw. Post operative BBE may be the result of dermal grafts used to restore the buccal vestibulum, of connective tissue graft placement, and of Free Gingival Grafts (FGG) procedures. In 46 patients in whom 72 FGG procedures were performed by the senior author (HT) over the past 12 years, BBE was clinically and radiographically diagnosed. In one case the tumor was surgically removed. The etiology, pathogenesis and frequency of BBE following FGG procedures was reviewed and discussed. We suggest that the BBE may develop owing to periosteal surgical trauma during FGG procedures, and suggest that this phenomenon receives further attention.

  5. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R.C.; Berends, M.J.; Wu, Y.; Sijmons, R.H.; Hollema, H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Walle, H.E. de; Vries, E.G.F. de; Karrenbeld, A.; Buys, C.H.C.M.; Zee, A.G. van der; Hofstra, R.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. AIM: To analyse the value of family history,

  6. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R C; Berends, M J W; Wu, Y; Sijmons, R H; Hollema, H; Ligtenberg, M J L; de Walle, H E K; de Vries, E G E; Karrenbeld, A; Buys, C H C M; van der Zee, A G J; Hofstra, R M W; Kleibeuker, J H

    2006-01-01

    Background: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Aim: To analyse the value of family history,

  7. X-inactivation pattern in multiple tissues from two Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Elena; Vettori, Andrea; Valentino, Maria L; Molon, Annamaria; Mostacciuolo, Maria L; Howell, Neil; Carelli, Valerio

    2003-05-15

    The more frequent manifestation of ophthalmological abnormalities in males, relative to females, is an unexplained feature of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that suggests an X-linked modifying gene acting in concert with the pathogenic LHON mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. In addition, segregation analysis of the optic neuropathy in LHON pedigrees was compatible with the presence of a recessive-modifying gene on chromosome X. According to this two-locus model, females would be affected only if homozygous or if they were susceptible to skewed X-inactivation. Attempts both to localize the putative LHON-modifying gene by linkage analysis and to find an excess of skewed X-inactivation in affected females were unsuccessful, although the inactivation pattern was only studied in DNA isolated from blood cells. We had the opportunity to analyze a wide range of tissues at autopsy, including the optic nerves and the retina, from two LHON female patients. We found no evidence of skewed X-inactivation in the affected tissues, thus weakening further the hypothesized involvement of a specific X chromosome locus in the pathophysiological expression of LHON. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Audiological implications of earplugs used for the prevention of aural exostoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Jyoti; Reddy, Venkat M; Flanagan, Phillip M

    2012-03-01

    External auditory canal exostoses may be a preventable disease, so it is surprising that the regular use of water precautions is not greater among surfers. One reason for this is the impairment of hearing whilst wearing earplugs. The objective of this study is to establish the hearing impairment of commonly available earplugs used by surfers. Staff and patients with normal hearing were recruited to have pure tone audiometry performed multiple times, initially with no earplugs, and subsequently with earplugs. Three earplug types were tested which differed in their nature and material (prefabricated elastomer, custom-fitted silicone, and custom-fitted acrylic). Vented and non-vented forms of the earplugs were tested. 30 normal hearing ears were included. Two-tailed paired t-tests comparing hearing thresholds between different earplugs identified that the elastomer earplugs caused the least hearing impairment (p earplugs (p = 0.148), but the difference between vented and non-vented forms of other earplugs was statistically significant (silicone p = 0.010, acrylic p = 0.018). Prefabricated ear plugs produce less hearing impairment than other commonly available earplugs. A customised earplug made of hard material causes the greatest impairment of hearing. We therefore recommend that for aquatic sports where hearing is important, a soft prefabricated earplug is preferable.

  9. Orthodeoxia without Platypnea in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia in the Presence of a Cerebral Abscess and Multiple Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations: Unusual Complications and Transcatheter Endovascular Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salazar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare autosomal-dominant condition affecting visceral blood vessel development. Cerebral and most commonly pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are found in the majority of symptomatic patients. The most common complications include embolic strokes and cerebral abscesses, which have been attributed to abnormal vessel communications. Platypnea orthodeoxia is a rare condition that presents dyspnea and oxygen desaturation when adopting an upright position and is relieved on decubitus. The association between hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, and platypnea orthodeoxia has been described in medical literature; however, orthodeoxia as a single entity without platypnea has not been described yet, especially associated with complications of this hereditary condition. We present the case of a 38-year-old male with persistent headaches, in whom a cerebral lesion was detected. Orthostatic tachycardia and severe orthodeoxia without platypnea were evidenced during physical examination. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and underwent cerebral abscess drainage as well as transcatheter endovascular closure of multiple pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. For this reason, the concept of platypnea orthodeoxia syndrome needs further revision. Patients presenting refractory hypoxemia should warn physicians to initially evaluate their oxygen saturation measurements during standing and decubitus position, even though platypnea may not be present.

  10. Hereditary Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ...

  11. Hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena

    2008-10-01

    Persons carrying mutations for hereditary cancer syndromes are at high risk for the development of tumors at an early age, as well as the synchronous or metachronous development of multiple tumors of the corresponding tumor spectrum. The genetic causes of many hereditary cancer syndromes have already been identified. About 5% of all cancers are part of a hereditary cancer syndrome. Selective literature review, including evidence-based guidelines and recommendations. Clinical criteria are currently available according to which many hereditary cancer syndromes can be diagnosed or suspected and which point the way to further molecular genetic analysis. A physician can easily determine whether these criteria are met by directed questioning about the patient's personal and family medical history. The identification of the causative germ line mutation in the family allows confirmation of the diagnosis in the affected individual and opens up the option of predictive testing in healthy relatives. Mutation carriers for hereditary cancer syndromes need long-term medical surveillance in a specialized center. It is important that these persons should be identified in the primary care setting and then referred for genetic counseling if molecular genetic testing is to be performed in a targeted, rational manner.

  12. Hereditary multiple exostosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pachajoa Londoño, Harry Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    La exostosis múltiple hereditaria o osteocondromatosis hereditaria es una enfermedad genética autosómica dominante causada por mutaciones en genes que codifican la exostosina, EXT1 (8q24.1), EXT2 (11p11-p13) y EXT3 (19p). Se caracteriza por presentar múltiples proyecciones de hueso cubiertas por cartílago, principalmente en las metáfisis de los huesos largos como el brazo y el antebrazo, aunque también pueden involucrar a huesos de la cintura escapular, pélvica y ...

  13. Prise en charge et surveillance d'une exostose solitaire du fémur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'exostose solitaire est une affection bénigne touchant l'enfant et les adultes. Son diagnostic est clinique, aidé par les examens radiologiques. Le traitement est chirurgical et consiste en son exérèse afin d'éviter les complications de compression vasculaire, ou de dégénérescence sarcomateuse. Nous rapportons ici le cas ...

  14. Hereditary hyperbilirubinemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism involve four autosomal recessive syndromes: Gilbert, Crigler- Najjar, Dubin-Johnson and Rotor, among which the first two are characterized by unconjugated and the second two by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert syndrome occurs in 2%-10% of general population, while others are rare. Except for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, hereditary hyperbilirubinemias belong to benign disorders and thus no treatment is required.

  15. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims of this re...... of this report is to emphasize the importance of awareness concerning HAE, which does not respond to traditional anti-allergic therapy, and remind physicians to test for functional C1-INH deficiency....

  16. Multiple-gene panel analysis in a case series of 255 women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedaldi, Gianluca; Tebaldi, Michela; Zampiga, Valentina; Danesi, Rita; Arcangeli, Valentina; Ravegnani, Mila; Cangini, Ilaria; Pirini, Francesca; Petracci, Elisabetta; Rocca, Andrea; Falcini, Fabio; Amadori, Dino; Calistri, Daniele

    2017-07-18

    As new genes predisposing to breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) are constantly emerging, the use of panels of genes analyzed by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is increasing in clinical diagnostics. The identification of a large number of new germline mutations allows for deeper knowledge of cancer predisposition, although raising many questions about patient management.BC and OC patients recruited by our counseling service between 2012-2015 were included in this study. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and a panel of 94 genes involved in hereditary tumors was analyzed by NGS. Patient clinical features of BC and OC and cancer family history were collected and compared to the patient genetic profile.A total of 255 women were analyzed, 57 of whom had a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 genes, and 17 carried pathogenic mutations in other genes, such as PALB2, ATM, BRIP1, RAD51D, MSH6, PPM1D, RECQL4, ERCC3, TSC2, SLX4 and other Fanconi anemia genes.Patients with a pathogenic mutation in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 showed no significant difference from the BRCA1/2-mutated carriers with respect to age at diagnosis and clinical features, suggesting that mutations in other genes could pose a high risk of cancer development.These patients had a much higher percentage of bilateral breast cancer (BBC) and a lower rate of OC than BRCA-mutated patients and patients with no pathogenic mutations: as a consequence, the surveillance protocol should be customized to the patient genetic characteristics.

  17. Next-generation sequencing for the diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer using genomic capture targeting multiple candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castéra, Laurent; Krieger, Sophie; Rousselin, Antoine; Legros, Angélina; Baumann, Jean-Jacques; Bruet, Olivia; Brault, Baptiste; Fouillet, Robin; Goardon, Nicolas; Letac, Olivier; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Tinat, Julie; Bera, Odile; Dugast, Catherine; Berthet, Pascaline; Polycarpe, Florence; Layet, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnes; Frébourg, Thierry; Vaur, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), we developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based screening based on the capture of a panel of genes involved, or suspected to be involved in HBOC, on pooling of indexed DNA and on paired-end sequencing in an Illumina GAIIx platform, followed by confirmation by Sanger sequencing or MLPA/QMPSF. The bioinformatic pipeline included CASAVA, NextGENe, CNVseq and Alamut-HT. We validated this procedure by the analysis of 59 patients' DNAs harbouring SNVs, indels or large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 or BRCA2. We also conducted a blind study in 168 patients comparing NGS versus Sanger sequencing or MLPA analyses of BRCA1 and BRCA2. All mutations detected by conventional procedures were detected by NGS. We then screened, using three different versions of the capture set, a large series of 708 consecutive patients. We detected in these patients 69 germline deleterious alterations within BRCA1 and BRCA2, and 4 TP53 mutations in 468 patients also tested for this gene. We also found 36 variations inducing either a premature codon stop or a splicing defect among other genes: 5/708 in CHEK2, 3/708 in RAD51C, 1/708 in RAD50, 7/708 in PALB2, 3/708 in MRE11A, 5/708 in ATM, 3/708 in NBS1, 1/708 in CDH1, 3/468 in MSH2, 2/468 in PMS2, 1/708 in BARD1, 1/468 in PMS1 and 1/468 in MLH3. These results demonstrate the efficiency of NGS in performing molecular diagnosis of HBOC. Detection of mutations within other genes than BRCA1 and BRCA2 highlights the genetic heterogeneity of HBOC.

  18. Hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is the most commonly identified autosomal recessive genetic disorder in the white population, characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption and secondary abnormal accumulation in parenchymal organs, not infrequently accompanied by functional impairment. This entity is associated with mutations of the HFE gene (located on the short arm of chromosome 6 at location 6p22.2; closely linked to the HLA-A3 locus, which encodes the HFE protein, a membrane protein thought to regulate iron absorption by affecting the interaction between transferrin receptor and transferrin.

  19. Hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. In severe cases, the disorder may present in early childhood, but in some cases it may go unnoticed until later in adult life. We present a 32-year-old male who presented with anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, and gallstones. Seven of his family members had similar illness in the past. The Mother died of similar illness at the age of 40. The Blood film showed spherocytosis and reticulocytosis. There was increased osmotic fragility and a negative direct coomb′s test. He was given folic acid supplements and was advised for splenectomy and cholecystectomy. This case is reported due to its rarity in Indian population.

  20. Behavior-induced auditory exostoses in imperial Roman society: evidence from coeval urban and rural communities near Rome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, G; Sperduti, A; Passarello, P

    1991-07-01

    Presence and features of auditory exostoses were investigated in two cranial samples of Roman imperial age (1st-3rd century A.D.). The skeletal material comes from the necropolises of Portus (Isola Sacra) and Lucus Feroniae (Via Capenate), two towns along the Tevere River, in close relation with the social and economic life of Rome. Deep-rooted differences between the human communities represented by the skeletal samples (83 and 71 individuals, respectively, in this study) are documented both historically and archaeologically. The results show lack of exostoses in the female sex, a negligible incidence among the males of Lucus Feroniae, but a high frequency in the male sample from Isola Sacra (31.3%). Auditory exostoses are commonly recognised as localized hyperplastic growths of predominantly acquired origin. Features of the exostoses found in the male crania from Isola Sacra (particularly in relation to the age at death of the affected individuals) support this view. Furthermore, several clinical and anthropological studies have pointed out close links between the occurrence of auditory exostoses and prolonged cold water exposure, generally due to the practice of aquatic sports, or to working activities involving water contact or diving. In this perspective, the differences observed between the two Roman populations and between the sexes (in Isola Sacra) appear to result from different social habits: the middle class population of Portus habitually used thermal baths, whereas it is probable that thermae were seldom frequented (if at all) by the Lucus Feroniae population represented in the necropolis (mostly composed by slaves or freedmen farm laborers).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Contribution of bioanthropology to the reconstruction of prehistoric productive processes. The external auditory exostoses in the prehispanic population of Gran Canaria

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco Vázquez, Javier; Martín Rodríguez, Ernesto; González Reimers, Emilio; Arnay de la Rosa, Matilde; Betancor Rodríguez, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is an approach to the role of bioanthropological studies in the reconstruction of the productive processes of past societies. This objective is obtained starting from the survey and valuation of the prevalence of bone exostoses in the auditory canal among the prehistoric inhabitants of Gran Canaria. The auditory exostose is a bone wound well documented through clinical and experimental studies, closely related to the exposure of the auditory canal to cold water. The esti...

  2. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  3. External auditory exostoses and hearing loss in the Shanidar 1 Neandertal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkaus, Erik; Villotte, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene Shanidar 1 older adult male Neandertal is known for the crushing fracture of his left orbit with a probable reduction in vision, the loss of his right forearm and hand, and evidence of an abnormal gait, as well as probable diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. He also exhibits advanced external auditory exostoses in his left auditory meatus and larger ones with complete bridging across the porus in the right meatus (both Grade 3). These growths indicate at least unilateral conductive hearing (CHL) loss, a serious sensory deprivation for a Pleistocene hunter-gatherer. This condition joins the meatal atresia of the Middle Pleistocene Atapuerca-SH Cr.4 in providing evidence of survival with conductive hearing loss (and hence serious sensory deprivation) among these Pleistocene humans. The presence of CHL in these fossils thereby reinforces the paleobiological and archeological evidence for supporting social matrices among these Pleistocene foraging peoples.

  4. External auditory exostoses and hearing loss in the Shanidar 1 Neandertal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Trinkaus

    Full Text Available The Late Pleistocene Shanidar 1 older adult male Neandertal is known for the crushing fracture of his left orbit with a probable reduction in vision, the loss of his right forearm and hand, and evidence of an abnormal gait, as well as probable diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. He also exhibits advanced external auditory exostoses in his left auditory meatus and larger ones with complete bridging across the porus in the right meatus (both Grade 3. These growths indicate at least unilateral conductive hearing (CHL loss, a serious sensory deprivation for a Pleistocene hunter-gatherer. This condition joins the meatal atresia of the Middle Pleistocene Atapuerca-SH Cr.4 in providing evidence of survival with conductive hearing loss (and hence serious sensory deprivation among these Pleistocene humans. The presence of CHL in these fossils thereby reinforces the paleobiological and archeological evidence for supporting social matrices among these Pleistocene foraging peoples.

  5. Simultaneous screening of multiple mutations by invader assay improves molecular diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss: a multicenter study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichi Usami

    Full Text Available Although etiological studies have shown genetic disorders to be a common cause of congenital/early-onset sensorineural hearing loss, there have been no detailed multicenter studies based on genetic testing. In the present report, 264 Japanese patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss from 33 ENT departments nationwide participated. For these patients, we first applied the Invader assay for screening 47 known mutations of 13 known deafness genes, followed by direct sequencing as necessary. A total of 78 (29.5% subjects had at least one deafness gene mutation. Mutations were more frequently found in the patients with congenital or early-onset hearing loss, i.e., in those with an awareness age of 0-6 years, mutations were significantly higher (41.8% than in patients with an older age of awareness (16.0%. Among the 13 genes, mutations in GJB2 and SLC26A4 were mainly found in congenital or early-onset patients, in contrast with mitochondrial mutations (12S rRNA m.1555A>G, tRNA(Leu(UUR m.3243A>G, which were predominantly found in older-onset patients. The present method of simultaneous screening of multiple deafness mutations by Invader assay followed by direct sequencing will enable us to detect deafness mutations in an efficient and practical manner for clinical use.

  6. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  7. Chondrosarcoma in Hereditary Multiple Exostosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-06

    Apr 6, 1974 ... As the swelling could not be reduced by conservative measures, the limb was amputated 2 months later. From ... need for a critical evaluation of present-day concepts of this condition. Department of Orthopaedic ..... in the region around the hip or the shoulder. Other. Total. 32. Pelvis and proximal femur (14).

  8. [Hereditary ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikán, M; Foretová, L; Cibula, D; Kotlas, J; Pohlreich, P

    2006-05-01

    This article reviews the topic of hereditary ovarian cancer, describes persons at risk of hereditary disposition to cancer and gives instructions for genetic counselling and molecular analysis, including contacts to specialized centres in the Czech Republic. Review. Institute of Biochemistry and Experimental Oncology, Charles University in Prague. Hereditary ovarian cancer occurs in three autosomal dominant syndromes: appropriate hereditary ovarian cancer (HOC), hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and hereditary non-poliposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Physician in practice or specialist at the clinic should focus interest on patients form families with frequent occurrence of breast and/or ovarian cancer, patients with early onset disease or tumour duplicity (breast and ovarian cancer). Hereditary disposition to ovarian (and breast) cancer could be assessed by molecular genetic analysis of two main susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, or other genes in families with diverse tumours. Molecular genetic analysis should be in any cases indicated by experienced clinical genetic. In the Czech Republic, the consensus of genetic and clinical care of risk patients was published and specialized centres for families with hereditary predisposition were settled in Prague and Brno. Persons with hereditary susceptibility to cancer constitute noted group where painstaking dispensarisation and preventive care may prevent malignancy or detect it in the early stage.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary angioedema Health Topic: Vascular Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary ...

  10. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  11. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  13. Hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fructosemia; Fructose intolerance; Fructose aldolase B-deficiency; Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase deficiency ... substances build up in the liver. Hereditary fructose intolerance is inherited, which means it can be passed ...

  14. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer: Cutaneous lesions & atypical fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Bortoletto

    2017-07-01

    Precis: 27-year-old woman with multiple cutaneous lesions is found to have uterine leiomyomas and undergoes robotic myomectomy. Genetic testing of uterine leiomyomas reveals mutation in fumarate hydratase, etiologic in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC.

  15. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  16. [Hereditary kidney diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-qin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Hong-wen

    2013-04-18

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  17. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  18. Hereditary gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous and highly prevalent disease, being the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer associated death worldwide. Most cases are sporadic and familial clustering is observed in about 10% of the cases. Hereditary gastric cancer accounts for a very low percentage of cases (1-3%) and a single hereditary syndrome - Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC) - has been characterised. Among families that fulfil the clinical criteria for HDGC, about 40% carry CDH1 germline mutations, the genetic cause of the others being unknown. The management options for CDH1 asymptomatic germline carriers are intensive endoscopic surveillance and prophylactic gastrectomy. In this chapter we review the pathophysiology and clinicopathological features of HDGC and discuss issues related with genetic testing and management of family members.

  19. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aróstegui, Juan I

    2011-01-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases encompass different rare clinical entities characterized by recurrent acute inflammatory episodes secondary to a dysregulated inflammatory process. Since their first clinical descriptions, the Mendelian hereditary nature of some of them became evident, with their genetic and molecular basis being recently elucidated. There are disease-causing mutations in genes encoding for different proteins involved in the innate immune response and inflammation. Herein, we will introduce the reader to an updated review of the main clinical, physiopathological and therapeutic features of the different hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting

  1. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  2. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history of r...

  3. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  4. Hereditary Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Lakshmi; Jim, Belinda

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary kidney disease comprises approximately 10% of adults and nearly all children who require renal replacement therapy. Technologic advances have improved our ability to perform genetic diagnosis and enhanced our understanding of renal and syndromic diseases. In this article, we review the genetics of renal diseases, including common monogenic diseases such as polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Fabry disease, as well as complex disorders such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. We provide the nephrologist with a general strategy to approach hereditary disorders, which includes a discussion of commonly used genetic tests, a guide to genetic counseling, and reproductive options such as prenatal diagnosis or pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for at-risk couples. Finally, we review pregnancy outcomes in certain renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  6. Hereditary neuropathies: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2016-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease represents the most common form with an average prevalence ranging from 1/2500 to 1/1200, depending on the studies. To date and with the advances of the latest generation sequencing, more than 80 genes have been identified. Although the common clinical phenotype comprises a progressive distal muscle weakness and sensory loss, foot deformities and decreased or absent tendon reflexes, clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes exhibit great variability. Moreover, atypical phenotypes are arising, overlapping with spastic paraplegia, hereditary sensory neuropathies or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The causative genes are involved in various biological processes such as myelin development and maintenance, biosynthesis and degradation of proteins, neuronal structural maintenance, axonal transport, endocytosis, membrane dynamics, ion-channel function and the mitochondrial network. An accurate genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counselling and treatment options. Therapeutic advances, particularly small interfering RNA therapy, are encouraging in hereditary transthyretin amyloid neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Hereditary Lymphedema of the Leg – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Heinig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but experienced multiple erysipelas during his life. After diagnostic procedures to exclude other causes of leg swelling, the diagnosis of hereditary lymphedema of the leg, stage III was confirmed. We initialized complex decongestive therapy. During two weeks of intensive treatment, the circumference of the left leg could be reduced by 10 cm. This case illustrates the "natural course" hereditary lymphedema. But it raises the hope that even after decades of ignorance, the patients benefits from complex decongestive treatment. Therapeutic nihilism is unnecessary and poses lymphedema patients to risks of infection and secondary malignancies like Stewart-Trewes syndrome.

  8. Relapsing Acute Axonal Neuropathy in Hereditary Fructose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitre, Anna; Maw, Anna; Ramaswami, Uma; Morley, Sarah L

    2016-11-01

    A severe neurological abnormality has not been previously described in individuals with hereditary fructose intolerance, which typically presents early in childhood with severe metabolic acidosis and hypoglycemia. We describe a boy who by age five years had required multiple admissions to the pediatric intensive care unit for an aggressive and atypical, relapsing and remitting neuropathy with features of acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN). It was later discovered that he also had undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance, and the severity and frequency of his neurological episodes diminished following an exclusion diet. His asymptomatic younger brother was diagnosed with hereditary fructose intolerance on screening. He is on a fructose-free diet and has not developed neurological symptoms. Ongoing low-level exposure to fructose prior to diagnosis may have contributed to our patient's neurological dysfunction. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent neurological complications of hereditary fructose intolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. HFE-Associated Hereditary Haemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eijkelkamp, Emmeke J; Yapp, Thomas R; Powell, Lawrie W

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism. Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996 and two candidate mutations; the C282Y mutation has been shown to be responsible for the majority of the hereditary hemochromatosis cases worldwide. The gene discovery has led ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hyperekplexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neuromuscular Disorders Health Topic: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary hyperekplexia Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ability ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  13. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Bannon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA, dyskeratosis congenita (DC, Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA, and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS, hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes.

  14. Canine hereditary ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urkasemsin, Ganokon; Olby, Natasha J

    2014-11-01

    The hereditary ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause a progressive (or episodic) cerebellar ataxia. A large number of different disorders have been described in different breeds of purebred dog, and in some instances, more than one disorder occurs in a single breed, creating a confusing clinical picture. The mutations associated with these disorders are being described at a rapid rate, potentially changing our ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat affected dogs. A breed-related neurodegenerative process should be suspected in any pure bred dog with slowly progressive, symmetric signs of ataxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  16. HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, EJ; Yapp, TR; Powell, LW

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis

  17. EAMJ Oct Hereditary.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HEREDITARY GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS: REPORT OF FAMILY CASE SERIES. E. G. WAGAIYU, R. N. NG'ANG'A and A. M. KEMOLI. SUMMARY. Hereditary gingival hyperplasia (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by hyperplastic, dense fibrous connective tissue with acanthotic gingival epithelium. A family presented.

  18. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a patient with hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B (MEN2B) syndrome with "highest risk" RET mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennaceur-Griscelli, A; Hadoux, J; Féraud, O; Opolon, P; Divers, D; Gobbo, E; Schlumberger, M; Griscelli, F; Turhan, A G

    2017-08-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B (MEN2B) is a cancer-predisposing syndrome that affects patients with germline RET mutations. The clinical spectrum of the syndrome includes medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and pheochromocytoma. Currently, there is no satisfactory model recapitulating all the features of the disease especially at the level of stem cells. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient with RET mutation at codon 918 who developed pheochromocytoma and MTC. These iPSC had normal karyotype, harboured the RET(M918T) mutation and expressed pluripotency hallmarks. A comprehensive pathological assessment of teratoma was performed after injection in immunodeficient mice. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nuclear matrix proteins and hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjakste, N; Sjakste, T

    2005-03-01

    The review summarizes literature data on alterations of structure or expression of different nuclear matrix proteins in hereditary syndromes. From the point of view of involvement of nuclear matrix proteins in etiology and pathogenesis of the disease hereditary pathologies can be classified in pathologies with pathogenesis associated with defects of nuclear matrix proteins and pathologies associated to changes of the nuclear matrix protein spectrum. The first group includes laminopathies, hereditary diseases with abnormal nuclear-matrix associated proteins and triplet extension diseases associated with accumulation of abnormal proteins in the nuclear matrix. Laminopathies are hereditary diseases coupled to structural defects of the nuclear lamina. These diseases include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with conduction system disease, familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorder type 2, CMT2), mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD), Hutchison Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGS), Greenberg Skeletal Dysplasia, and Pelger-Huet anomaly (PHA). Most of them are due to mutations in the lamin A/C gene, one - to mutations in emerin gene, some are associated with mutations in Lamin B receptor gene. In Werner's, Bloom's, Cockayne's syndromes, Fanconi anemia, multiple carboxylase deficiency mutations in nuclear matrix protein or enzyme gene lead to deficient DNA repair, abnormal regulation of cell growth and differentiation or other specific metabolic functions. Proteins with a long polyglutamic tract synthesized in the cells of patients with dentato-rubral and pallido-luysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy and Huntington disease interfere with transcription on the nuclear matrix. Down's syndrome is a representative of the group of diseases with altered nuclear matrix protein spectrum.

  20. Fasciculations in human hereditary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Aliyev, Rahim

    2015-06-01

    Fasciculations are a manifestation of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability in addition to myokymia, neuromyotonia, cramps, or tetany. Fasciculations occur in hereditary and non-hereditary diseases. Among the hereditary diseases, fasciculations are most frequently reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Among the non-hereditary diseases, fasciculations occur most frequently in peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes (Isaac's syndrome, voltage-gated potassium channelopathy, cramp fasciculation syndrome, Morvan syndrome). If the cause of fasciculations remains unknown, they are called benign. Systematically reviewing the literature about fasciculations in hereditary disease shows that fasciculations can be a phenotypic feature in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA), GM2-gangliosidosis, triple-A syndrome, or hereditary neuropathy. Additionally, fasciculations have been reported in familial amyloidosis, spinocerebellar ataxias, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, central nervous system disease due to L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) mutations, Fabry's disease, or Gerstmann-Sträussler disease. Rarely, fasciculations may be a phenotypic feature in patients with mitochondrial disorders or other myopathies. Fasciculations are part of the phenotype in much more genetic disorders than commonly assumed. Fasciculations not only occur in motor neuron disease, but also in hereditary neuropathy, spinocerebellar ataxia, GM2-gangliosidosis, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, Fabry's disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler disease, mitochondrial disorders, or muscular dystrophies.

  1. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  2. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  4. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  5. Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nagornaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary fructose intolerance, the prevalence of which is 1 : 20,000 population, is diagnosed much less frequently than is found in child and adult populations. Presented pathology is caused by a deficiency in ferment aldolase B and block of fructose transformation in the gastrointestinal tract with the accumulation of unprocessed fructose in the intestine, manifesting by characteristic symptom and numerous biochemical changes in the body. The disease is asymptomatic until a person begins to use fructose, sucrose or sorbitol. This article describes the fructose metabolism, genetic aspects of the discussing disease, the diversity of its clinical manifestations. The authors presented modern diagnostic criteria and international approaches to diet therapy.

  6. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...

  7. Non-recurrent SEPT9 duplications cause hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collie, A.M.; Landsverk, M.L.; Ruzzo, E.; Mefford, H.C.; Buysse, K.; Adkins, J.R.; Knutzen, D.M.; Barnett, K.; Brown Jr., R.H.; Parry, G.J.; Yum, S.W.; Simpson, D.A.; Olney, R.K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Eichler, E.E.; Chance, P.F.; Hannibal, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic copy number variants have been shown to be responsible for multiple genetic diseases. Recently, a duplication in septin 9 (SEPT9) was shown to be causal for hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA), an episodic peripheral neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance. This

  8. Contribution of bioanthropology to the reconstruction of prehistoric productive processes. The external auditory exostoses in the prehispanic population of Gran Canaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco Vázquez, Javier

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is an approach to the role of bioanthropological studies in the reconstruction of the productive processes of past societies. This objective is obtained starting from the survey and valuation of the prevalence of bone exostoses in the auditory canal among the prehistoric inhabitants of Gran Canaria. The auditory exostose is a bone wound well documented through clinical and experimental studies, closely related to the exposure of the auditory canal to cold water. The estimation of this bone anomaly among the analysed population, leads to the definition of outstanding territorial variations in the economic strategies of these human groups.

    En el presente trabajo se pretende abordar el papel de los estudios bioantropológicos en la reconstrucción de los procesos productivos de las sociedades del pasado. Esta finalidad es perseguida a partir del examen y valoración de la prevalencia de exostosis óseas en el canal auditivo en la población prehistórica de Gran Canaria. Las exostosis auditivas constituyen una lesión ósea, bien documentada en trabajos experimentales y clínicos, estrechamente relacionada con la exposición del canal auditivo al agua fría. La estimación de esta anormalidad ósea en el conjunto poblacional analizado permite la definición de importantes variaciones territoriales en las estrategias económicas emprendidas por estos grupos humanos.

  9. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer in families referred for fumarate hydratase germline mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, D. L.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Badeloe, S.; Breuning, M. H.; Simon, M. E. H.; van Spaendonck, K. Y.; Aalfs, C. M.; Post, J. G.; Shanley, S.; Krapels, I. P. C.; Hoefsloot, L. H.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; Starink, T. M.; Bayley, J-P; Frank, J.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Menko, F. H.

    Heterozygous fumarate hydratase (FH) germline mutations cause hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple cutaneous piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer. The main objective of our study was to

  10. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  11. [Ataxias and hereditary spastic paraplegias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüle, R; Schöls, L

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias are genetic disorders with age-dependent nearly complete penetrance. The mostly monogenetic etiology allows one to establish the diagnosis, study pathogenesis and to develop new causative therapeutic approaches for these diseases. Both the causative genes as well as the clinical presentation overlap considerably between hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias. This strongly argues towards a united classification for these two groups of diseases. Next generation sequencing technologies have greatly expanded the number of genes known to be causative for hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias and allow simultaneous time- and cost-effective diagnostic testing of > 200 genes. However, repeat expansions and large genomic deletions must be considered separately. Here, we suggest a pragmatic algorithm for genetic testing in hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias that we have developed in our specialized outpatient clinics. Detailed phenotyping remains crucial to interpret the multitude of genetic variants discovered by high throughput sequencing techniques. Despite recent technical advances, a substantial proportion of ataxia and spastic paraplegia families are still without a molecular diagnosis. Beside new and so far undetected ataxia and spasticity genes, unusual mutation types including noncoding variants and polygenic inheritance patterns may contribute. Because of these clinical, genetic, and technological challenges, patients with hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias should be referred to specialized centers offering research and clinical studies. This will also help to recruit representative patient cohorts for upcoming interventional trials.

  12. Pathology of hereditary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Groep, Petra; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounting for about 5% of all breast cancers. Other genes that include CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, STK11/LKB1, CDH1, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1 and PALB2 have been described to be high or moderate penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes, all contributing to the hereditary breast cancer spe...

  13. Pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up and management of balance impairments and falls in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonnekes, J.H.; Lith, B.J.H. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Balance impairments are common in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia and are among the most debilitating symptoms, as they frequently result in falls and fall-related injuries. Several features of hereditary spastic paraplegia contribute to balance impairments and multiple

  14. Hereditary ovarian cancer: beyond the usual suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2012-02-01

    In the past, hereditary ovarian carcinoma was attributed almost entirely to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, with a much smaller contribution from mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Recently, three new ovarian cancer susceptibility genes have been identified: RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1. In addition, germline mutations in women with ovarian carcinoma have been recently identified in many of the previously identified breast cancer genes in the Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway. While mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 are each individually rare, together they make up a significant proportion of cases. With at least 16 genes implicated in hereditary ovarian cancer to date, comprehensive testing for ovarian cancer risk will require assessment of many genes. As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the practice of evaluating cancer susceptibility one gene at a time is rapidly becoming obsolete. New advances in genomic technologies will likely accelerate the discovery of additional cancer susceptibility genes and increase the feasibility of comprehensive evaluation of multiple genes simultaneously at low cost. Improved recognition of inherited risk will identify individuals who are candidates for targeted prevention. In addition, identifying inherited mutations in a variety of FA-BRCA pathway genes may aid in identifying individuals who will selectively benefit from PARP inhibitors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Hereditary Kidney Cancer Syndromes and Surgical Management of the Small Renal Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kevin A; Syed, Jamil S; Shuch, Brian

    2017-05-01

    The management of patients with hereditary kidney cancers presents unique challenges to clinicians. In addition to an earlier age of onset compared with patients with sporadic kidney cancer, those with hereditary kidney cancer syndromes often present with bilateral and/or multifocal renal tumors and are at risk for multiple de novo lesions. This population of patients may also present with extrarenal manifestations, which adds an additional layer of complexity. Physicians who manage these patients should be familiar with the underlying clinical characteristics of each hereditary kidney cancer syndrome and the suggested surgical approaches and recommendations of genetic testing for at-risk individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304810789

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  17. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several genes, including HAMP , HFE , HFE2 , SLC40A1 , and TFR2 , can cause hereditary hemochromatosis . Type 1 hemochromatosis results ... the HFE2 or HAMP gene. Mutations in the TFR2 gene cause type 3 hemochromatosis, and mutations in ...

  18. Genetics of Hereditary Angioedema Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, Anastasios E; Speletas, Matthaios

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary genetic research has provided evidences that angioedema represents a diverse family of disorders related to kinin metabolism, with a much greater genetic complexity than was initially considered. Convincing data have also recently been published indicating that the clinical heterogeneity of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (classified as C1-INH-HAE) could be attributed at least in part, either to the type of SERPING1 mutations or to mutations in genes encoding for enzymes involved in the metabolism and function of bradykinin. Alterations detected in at least one more gene (F12) are nowadays considered responsible for 25 % of cases of hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (type III hereditary angioedema (HAE), nlC1-INH-HAE). Interesting data derived from genetic approaches of non-hereditary angioedemas indicate that other immune pathways might be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAE. More than 125 years after the recognition of the hereditary nature of HAE by Osler, the heterogeneity of clinical expressions, the genetics of this disorder, and the genotype-phenotype relationships, still presents a challenge that will be discussed in this review. Large scale, in-depth genetic studies are expected not only to answer these emerging questions but also to further elucidate many of the unmet aspects of angioedema pathogenesis. Uncovering genetic biomarkers affecting the severity of the disease and/or the effectiveness of the various treatment modalities might lead to the prevention of attacks and the optimization of C1-INH-HAE management that is expected to provide a valuable benefit to the sufferers of angioedema.

  19. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  20. Hereditary ovarian cancer: not only BRCA 1 and 2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toss, Angela; Tomasello, Chiara; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Contu, Giannina; Grandi, Giovanni; Cagnacci, Angelo; Schilder, Russell J; Cortesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65-85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR) genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  1. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  2. Non-hereditary cherubism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Babita; Shashikiran, ND; Singla, Shilpy; Kasetty, Sowmya

    2014-01-01

    Cherubism is a self-limiting non-neoplastic autosomal dominant fibro-osseous disorder of the jaw usually found in children between 2-5 years of age. It occurs predominantly in boys and is characterized clinically by bilateral swelling of cheeks due to bony enlargement of the jaw that gives the patient a typical cherubic look. Cherubism may occur as solitary cases or in many members of family, often in multiple lesions. Radiographically the lesions appear as multilocular bilateral radiolucent areas. The present case report describes a 13-year-old female cherubic child with progressive swelling of cheeks. PMID:24959043

  3. Hereditary aspects of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    McLellan, D. L.; Norman, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current literature on the hereditary aspects of prostate cancer and to evaluate the importance of family history in history taking and screening for prostate cancer. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for articles in English or French published between Jan. 1, 1956, and Oct. 31, 1994, with the use of MeSH headings "prostatic neoplasms," "genetics" and "chromosomes." Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of articles found during the search. STUDY SELE...

  4. [Hereditary carcinoma: pathogenesis and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungck, M

    2000-01-01

    Effective prevention of cancer in patients with a hereditary disposition to malignant tumours was made possible by intensive prevention programs and molecular diagnosis. Taken hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as an example this article deals with the pathogenesis and molecular diagnosis in hereditary dispositions to cancer. HNPCC is inherited in an autosomal-dominant fashion and caused by germline mutations in genes responsible for detection an removal of DNA-basepair-mismatches (DNA-mismatch-repair-genes). The error rate in DNA replication is reduced thousandfold by these genes. A defective DNA-mismatch-repair results in tumours if the increased mutation rate causes alterations of tumour-suppressor- or oncogenes. HNPCC patients develop colorectal cancer but also tumours of the renal pelvis, the ureter, the small bowel, the endometrium and less often in other organs. The clinical presentation of these tumours may be characteristic, the clinical diagnosis may be guided by different clinical criteria catalogues. The suspicion is proven by the identification of a germline mutation in DNA-mismatch-repair-genes. This laborious diagnostic procedure is often preceded by prescreening procedures as the detection of microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical tests. Once the germline mutation is identified in a affected family member, the first degree relatives may be tested for this mutation. If they have inherited the mutation, they harbour a extremely high risk for developing cancer and therefore may be included in prevention programs. This so called predictive testing must be preceded by genetic counseling.

  5. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does how...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  6. Oncologic Management of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub, George; Nagalla, Srikanth; Aklilu, Mebea

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in females and the third most common cancer diagnosed in males. Familial CRC comprises ~20 to 30% of all CRC cases. Lynch syndrome (LS), previously called hereditary nonpolyposis CRC (HNPCC), is the most common of the hereditary CRC syndromes. In this review, the oncological management of hereditary colorectal cancer from the medical oncologist perspective is discussed with special emphasis on Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is character...

  7. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects......, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3......) families with diagnoses of both DGC and LBC (one diagnosis before the age of 50). Additionally, CDH1 testing could be considered in patients with bilateral or familial LBC before the age of 50, patients with DGC and cleft lip/palate, and those with precursor lesions for signet ring cell carcinoma. Given...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome Health Topic: Arteriovenous Malformations Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National ...

  9. SEOM clinical guidelines for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña, Begoña; Lastra, Enrique; Llort, Gemma; Brunet, Joan; Isla, Dolores

    2011-08-01

    Research in genetics has facilitated the identification of highly penetrant genes responsible for a large number of diseases. In the oncology field, genetic counselling and gene testing are focused on the two most common syndromes in familial cancer: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch syndrome (LS). The objective of this guideline in hereditary cancer is to summarise the current state of knowledge and make recommendations in the areas of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of hereditary cancer.

  10. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; ZHANG, ZHEN-HAI; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level.

  11. Afrimedic Vol. 4, No. 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vera

    shoulder blades are commonly affected. Face and skull ... occasional damage to nerves, arteries and muscles, hence, the presence of pain. ... colour of overlying or surrounding skin. No differential warmth or lymphadenopathy. No loss of distal neurovascular function. A diagnosis of hereditary multiple exostoses was made.

  12. Ulno-volar bayonet hand: Its differential diagnosis from Madelung's deformity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, F.

    1981-04-01

    The ulno-volar bayonet hand related to the mostly hereditary multiple exostoses is compared to Madelung's forearm deformity under clinical and roentgenological view in differential diagnosis. The ulno-volar bayonet hand is considerably more seldom, basing upon dysplasia of the lower part of the ulna, less inconvenient in function, and hardly tending to the development of early arthrosis.

  13. Genetics and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Boland, C Richard

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer affecting men and women in the United States. Approximately one-third of CRCs are diagnosed in individuals who have family members also affected with the disease. Although the vast majority of colorectal neoplasms develop as a consequence of somatic genomic alterations arising in individual cells, approximately 5% of all CRCs arise in the setting of germline mutations in genes involved in key cellular processes. To date, multiple genes have been implicated in single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes, many of which are associated with increased risk for CRC, as well as other tumor types. This review outlines the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of the hereditary cancer syndromes known to be associated with increased risk for CRC and delineates strategies for implementing genetic risk assessments in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia: A Primer for Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Kathleen M; Barkley, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare, autosomal dominant genetic disease that causes abnormal growth of blood vessels and, subsequently, life-threatening arteriovenous malformations in vital organs. Epistaxis may be one of the initial clues that a patient has more serious, generalized arteriovenous malformations. Recommended treatment involves careful evaluation to determine the severity and risk of spontaneous rupture of the malformations and the management of various signs and symptoms. The disease remains undiagnosed in many patients, and health care providers may miss the diagnosis until catastrophic events happen in multiple family members. Prompt recognition of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and early intervention can halt the dangerous course of the disease. Critical care nurses can assist with early diagnosis within families with this genetic disease, thus preventing early death and disability. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  15. [Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, S F

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian carcinomas are frequently caused by germline mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/2 syndromes) and are often less associated with other hereditary syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni and Peutz-Jeghers. The BRCA1/2 proteins have a special role in DNA repair. Therefore, loss of function due to mutation causes an accumulation of mutations in other genes and subsequent tumorigenesis at an early age. BRCA1/2 mutations are irregularly distributed over the length of the genes without hot spots, although special mutations are known. Breast and ovarian cancer occur far more frequently in women with BRCA1/2 germline mutations compared with the general population. Breast cancer occurs increasingly from the age of 30, ovarian cancer in BRCA1 syndrome from the age of 40 and BRCA2 from the age of 50. Suspicion of a BRCA syndrome should be prompted in the case of clustering of breast cancer in 1st degree relatives, in particular at a young age, if breast and ovarian cancer have occurred, and if cases of male breast cancer are known. Breast carcinomas with medullary differentiation seem to predominate in BRCA syndromes, but other carcinoma types may also occur. BRCA germline mutations seem to occur frequently in triple-negative breast carcinomas, whereas an association with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is rare. Ovarian carcinomas in BRCA syndromes are usually high-grade serous, mucinous carcinomas and borderline tumors are unusual. Pathology plays a special role within the multidisciplinary team in the recognition of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes.

  16. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....... affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing...

  17. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  18. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this system...

  19. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  20. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  1. Novel germline c-MET mutation in a family with hereditary papillary renal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V O

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary papillary renal carcinoma (HPRC) is a highly penetrant hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by germline missense mutations in the c-MET proto-oncogene. HPRC is clinically characterized by multiple bilateral papillary renal-cell carcinomas. Here we report a family with a novel missense...... mutation in c-MET. The original pathology report of four primary kidney cancers (1988-1997) revealed renal-cell carcinoma. A revised report described multiple adenomas and papillary renal-cell carcinomas with focal clear cells and a mixture of type 1 and type 2 pattern, emphasizing the importance...

  2. [Frequency of hereditary neurologic diseases. A clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M; Baldini, S; Voltolin, G; Norat, M; Bottacchi, E

    1993-09-01

    in older age group. Although the frequency of the single neurologic monogenic disease is low (with the exception of essential tremor), their overall prevalence is higher than the prevalence of multiple sclerosis or the peripheral neuropathies. All age-groups are involved. We separated three groups of diseases: 1) two relatively benign diseases, essential tremor and the HSMN, affecting half of our patients; 2) five severe and more common diseases (Huntington's chorea, progressive muscular dystrophy limb-girdle type, neurofibromatosis type I, spinocerebellar ataxia, hereditary spastic paraplegia), affecting 1/4 of patients; and 3) a group of rare, mostly severe diseases, affecting the remaining 1/4 of patients.

  3. Practice Bulletin No 182: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by multiple family members with breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or both. Based on the contemporary understanding of the origins and management of ovarian cancer and for simplicity in this document, ovarian cancer also refers to fallopian tube cancer and primary peritoneal cancer. Clinical genetic testing for gene mutations allows more precise identification of those women who are at an increased risk of inherited breast cancer and ovarian cancer. For these individuals, screening and prevention strategies can be instituted to reduce their risks. Obstetrician-gynecologists play an important role in the identification and management of women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. If an obstetrician-gynecologist or other gynecologic care provider does not have the necessary knowledge or expertise in cancer genetics to counsel a patient appropriately, referral to a genetic counselor, gynecologic or medical oncologist, or other genetics specialist should be considered (1). More genes are being discovered that impart varying risks of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other types of cancer, and new technologies are being developed for genetic testing. This Practice Bulletin focuses on the primary genetic mutations associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, BRCA1 and BRCA2, but also will briefly discuss some of the other genes that have been implicated.

  4. Pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up and management of balance impairments and falls in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    OpenAIRE

    Nonnekes, J.H.; Lith, B.J.H. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Balance impairments are common in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia and are among the most debilitating symptoms, as they frequently result in falls and fall-related injuries. Several features of hereditary spastic paraplegia contribute to balance impairments and multiple treatment options exist. However, an overview of these underlying mechanisms and their treatment is currently lacking. METHODS: This paper reviews the pathophysiology, diagnostic workup, and managemen...

  5. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...

  6. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, Carole; Leach, Brandie H; Burke, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer and cancer deaths in the Western world. Approximately 5-10% of CRC are hereditary, due to a defined genetic cause. Individuals and families affected with a hereditary CRC syndrome exhibit benign and malignant extra-intestinal tumors, require aggressive cancer screening and benefit from management by a multi-disciplinary team of professionals. The clinical manifestations, genetic causes and current management of patients with hereditary colon cancer syndrome is provided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Phenotypic heterogeneity of hereditary gynecologic cancers: a report from the Creighton hereditary cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie; Stacy, Mark; Watson, Patrice

    2013-12-01

    To determine the validity of observations suggesting a significant dichotomy of gynecologic cancers determined by linkage to specific genetic defects associated with two major autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndromes; the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for female carriers of germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, associated with the Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, and in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6, associated with Lynch syndrome, who were registered with invasive uterine, ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancers between January 1, 1959 and December 31, 2010. From 217 such cases, a total of 174 subjects, consisting of 95 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and 79 carriers of mutations in MMR genes, were identified who had current signed Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act forms and complete primary diagnostic pathology reports and clinical records. Data meticulously extracted from these cases were categorized and statistically analyzed. There were highly significant differences between carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and carriers of MMR gene mutations in the proportion of serous carcinomas compared with endometrioid carcinomas of the uterus, including cervix and endometium (p cancers (p cancer, and endometrioid carcinoma was found in two of four MMR gene mutation carriers with fallopian tube cancers. All other fallopian tube cancers were serous carcinomas. Seven BRCA1 and one BRCA2 mutation carriers were diagnosed with primary peritoneal serous carcinoma; no peritoneal carcinomas were registered in MMR gene mutation carriers. Nine of 14 gynecologic cancers with associated endometriosis in mutation carriers were endometrioid or endometrioid mixed carcinomas compared with just three of other histologic types. Primary breast cancers, that characterize the HBOC syndrome, were much more frequent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers; while multiple gynecologic cancers and

  8. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paulo C. J. L.; Krieger, Jose E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV), hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) and ferroportin (SLC40A1) have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp) should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment. PMID:22408404

  9. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. J. L. Santos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV, hepcidin (HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2 and ferroportin (SLC40A1 have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  11. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalady, Matthew F.; Heald, Brandie

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes. PMID:26664327

  12. How we manage persons with hereditary angioedema

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Christiansen, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema ( HAE ) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder clinically characterized by recurrent attacks of subcutaneous and mucosal swelling that can result in significant morbidity and even mortality...

  13. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  14. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  15. [Sudden blindness: consider Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schieving, J.H.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hol, F.A.; Stroink, H.

    2008-01-01

    In 3 young male patients, aged 10, 19 and 21 years respectively, sequential, severe, painless bilateral visual loss occurred. Ophthalmological examination revealed no other abnormalities and this delayed the diagnosis Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a mitochondrial genetic

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have an increased risk for pregnancy loss (miscarriage) or stillbirth. Related Information What does it mean ... Meer J. High long-term absolute risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with hereditary deficiencies of ...

  17. The Genetics Of Blood Disorders: Hereditary Hemoglobinopathies.

    OpenAIRE

    Sonati M.F.; Costa F.F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To summarize recently published data on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of sickle cell diseases and β-Thalassemias, the most relevant hereditary hemoglobinopathies in the global population. Sources: Searches were run on the MEDLINE and SCIELO databases, limited to the period from 2003 to May 2008, using the terms hereditary hemoglobinopathies, sickle cell diseases and β-thalassemia. Two books and two chapters were also included. Summary of the findings: More than 2,000...

  18. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  19. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoş Tiberius; Iacobini Andra Evelin

    2016-01-01

    Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is...

  20. HEREDITARY CHARACTERISTICS BRCA1 5382INSC/СHEK2/BLM-ASSOCIATED BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. М. Bit-Sava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hereditary breast cancer (HBC occurs in 5–10 % of all cases of breast cancer. The mutations in the genes of high penetrance – BRCA1, BRCA2 is mainly the reason HBC. In the study presented the features of HBC (age of onset of the disease, cancer family history, primary tumor process multiple character. Depending on the presence of mutations BRCA1 5382insC, BLM, CHEK2 carried out a comparative analysis of the occurrence of hereditary characteristics in breast cancer patients.

  1. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  2. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  3. Pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up and management of balance impairments and falls in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnekes, Jorik; van Lith, Bas; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Geurts, Alexander C H

    2017-05-16

    Balance impairments are common in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia and are among the most debilitating symptoms, as they frequently result in falls and fall-related injuries. Several features of hereditary spastic paraplegia contribute to balance impairments and multiple treatment options exist. However, an overview of these underlying mechanisms and their treatment is currently lacking. This paper reviews the pathophysiology, diagnostic workup, and management of balance impairments in hereditary spastic paraplegia. Recommendations are based on scientific evidence, when available, and otherwise reflect practice-based evidence supported by clinical experience. Through diligent history-taking and clinical examination, followed by multidisciplinary treatment tailored to the identified underlying mechanisms, balance capacities can be improved in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia and at least a proportion of falls can be prevented.

  4. Value of whole body MRI and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the diagnosis, follow-up and evaluation of disease activity and extent in multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutoit, Julie C., E-mail: Julie.Dutoit@UGent.be; Vanderkerken, Matthias A., E-mail: Matthias.Vanderkerken@UGent.be; Verstraete, Koenraad L., E-mail: Koenraad.Verstraete@UGent.be

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the significance of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and whole body MRI (WB-MRI) in the diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of therapy for patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and multiple myeloma (MM). Materials and methods: The retrospective study includes 219 patients providing 463 WB-MRI and DCE-MRI investigations for the subgroups MGUS (n = 70), MM active disease (n = 126; this includes 70 patients with new diagnosis of MM, according to the International Staging System (ISS): 41.4% ISS stage I, 20.0% ISS stage II, 7.1% ISS stage III, 31.4% insufficient for staging; and 56 patients with ‘(re-)active disease’: 16.07% relapse, 32.14% progressive disease and 51.79% stable disease) and MM remission (n = 23; 60.87% complete remission, 17.39% very good partial remission and 21.74% partial remission). Investigations of patients with hereditary multiple exostoses (n = 5), neurofibromatosis (n = 7) and healthy persons (n = 9) were added as control subjects (n = 21). WB-MRI evaluation was done by evaluating thirteen skeletal regions, providing a ‘skeletal score’. DCE-MRI images of the spine, were analyzed with regions-of-interest and time-intensity-curves (TIC). Results: All TIC parameters can significantly differentiate between the predefined subgroups (p < 0.001). One hundred days after autologous stem cell transplantation a 75% decrease of the slope wash-in value (p < 0.001) can be seen. A cubic regression trend between ‘skeletal score’ and slope wash-in (adj.R{sup 2} = 0.412) could demonstrate a significant increase bone marrow perfusion if MM affects more than 10 skeletal regions (p < 0.001), associated with a poorer prognosis (p < 0.001). Conclusion: DCE-MRI evaluation of the spine is useful for diagnosis of MM, follow-up after stem cell transplantation and evaluation of disease activity. A combined evaluation with WB-MRI and DCE-MRI provides additional micro-vascular information on the

  5. Late-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Margaret L; Hashemi, Nafiseh; Foroozan, Rod; Lee, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    While Leber hereditary optic neuropathy typically causes bilateral visual loss in the second through fourth decades, we highlight visual loss from Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in older patients to characterize the clinical features of this cohort. Retrospective case series. Patients seen between January 2003 and July 2012 at Baylor College of Medicine and between April 2010 and July 2012 at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. Patients with visual loss from genetically confirmed Leber hereditary optic neuropathy were identified via retrospective chart review. Clinical courses of patients. Five patients with visual loss from genetically confirmed Leber hereditary optic neuropathy were greater than 60 years of age at the time of visual loss (range 62-70 years, mean 66.4 ± 3.0). This series reinforces the importance of including Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in the differential diagnosis of patients of any age with optic neuropathy. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuropathy, type V Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects nerve cells ...

  7. The Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer Study: Review and Future Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won

    2013-01-01

    .... In 2007, the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) Study was established to obtain evidence for the accurate risk assessment and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in Korea...

  8. [Quality control of DNA testing in hereditary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van den; Scheffer, H.

    2001-01-01

    The laboratories performing diagnostic studies regarding hereditary diseases and the specialists providing hereditary counselling are housed in clinical genetic centres. The laboratories are subject to the Special Medical Performances Act and have had licenses from the Ministry. The DNA diagnostic

  9. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder that may be associated with or without resistant to parathyroid hormone (pseudohypoparathyroidism. It is commonly characterized by a constellation of physical features of short stature, round face, short neck, and small metacarpals and metatarsals, mild mental retardation, osteoporosis, subcutaneous calcification, and sometimes olfactory and hearing functional defect. Hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia are the most important manifestations of the case. We report a clinical case of siblings with AHO with reduced Gs-alpha activity and we discuss their clinical features with oral manifestations, radiographic findings, laboratory tests along with treatment.

  10. Therapeutic Strategies for Hereditary Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2016-08-01

    The study of hereditary forms of kidney cancer has vastly increased our understanding of metabolic and genetic pathways involved in the development of both inherited and sporadic kidney cancers. The recognition that diverse molecular events drive different forms of kidney cancers has led to the preclinical and clinical development of specific pathway-directed strategies tailored to treat distinct subgroups of kidney cancer. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of several different types of hereditary renal cancers, review their clinical characteristics, and summarize the treatment strategies for the management of these cancers.

  11. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a common inherited hemolytic anemia due to red cell membrane defects. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is a compensatory response to insufficient bone marrow blood cell production. The preferred sites of extramedullary hematopoietic involvement are the spleen, liver and lymph nodes; but in HS, the posterior paravertebral mediastinum is also commonly involved. We report a case of a 50-year-old male who presented to us in respiratory distress and with bilateral paravertebral posterior mediastinal masses, which on trucut biopsy were found to be extra-hematopoietic masses; and the patient was found to have hereditary spherocytosis.

  12. [Recurrent urinary lithiasis revealing hereditary xanthinuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlous, Afef; Gasmi, Manef; Mohsni, Amira; Abdelmoula, Jaouida

    2007-09-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria, due to a purine metabolism disorder, is a rare cause of urinary lithiasis in children. We report the case of a child aged 3 and a half years, who presented recurrent urinary lithiasis that led to destruction of the right kidney. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the calculus concluded that it was composed of 100% xanthine. Laboratory tests showed hypouricemia and hypouricosuria with elevated urinary excretion of oxypurines. These findings led to a diagnosis of hereditary xanthinuria. Early diagnosis of this rare disease is essential to avoid its complications. Metabolic causes must be sought in children with lithiasis.

  13. Multiple osteochondromas of the antlers and cranium in a free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Kierdorf

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of multiple osteochondromas affecting the antlers and the left zygomatic bone of a free-ranging adult white-tailed buck (Odocoileus virginianus from Georgia, USA. Along with a few postcranial bones, the antlered cranium of the individual was found in a severely weathered condition and devoid of any soft tissue. The antlers exhibited five pedunculated exostoses that were composed of cancellous bone and, in their peripheral portions, also mineralized cartilage. The largest of the exostoses, located on the right antler, had a maximum circumference of 55 cm. The exostosis arising from the zygomatic bone was broad-based and much smaller than the exophytic outgrowths on the antlers. Diagnosis of the exostoses as osteochondromas was based on their overall morphology, the normal bone structure in their stalk regions, and the continuity of their spongiosa and cortex with the respective components of the parent bones. Antleromas, i.e., pathological outgrowths developing on antlers as a result of insufficient androgen production, were excluded in the differential diagnosis, based on (1 the apparent maturity and, except for the tumors, normal shape of the antlers and (2 the fact that exostosis formation had also affected the zygomatic bone. Previously only a single case of solitary osteochondroma of an antler has been described in the scientific literature. The case presented here is the first report of multiple osteochondromas in a deer. As antlers are regularly collected as trophies, and huge numbers of them are critically inspected each year, the fact that thus far only two cases of antler osteochondromas have been reported suggests that these tumors are very rare.

  14. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  15. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  16. [Preventive resection of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancers are rare, accounting for at most 1-3% of gastric cancers. It can be caused by a mutation in the tumour-suppressor gene CDH1. A healthy person carrying a CDH1 mutation has a cumulative risk of developing gastric cancer of 70-80%. In most cases, gastric cancer is

  17. Hereditary spherocytosis. | Hassan | Annals of African Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. Although a positive family history of spherocytosis increases the risk for this disorder, it may be sporadic in some cases. In severe cases the ...

  18. Presumed hereditary retinal degenerations: Ibadan experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a hereditary retinal degenerative condition with no known treatment. Associated ocular conditions, such as cataract and glaucoma, when present further worsen vision, but these conditions are often treatable. There are, however, no known reports of cataract or glaucoma surgery in ...

  19. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and

  20. Hereditary spectrin deficiency in Golden Retriever dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slappendel, Robbert J.; van Zwieten, Rob; van Leeuwen, Martin; Schneijdenberg, Chris T. W. M.

    2005-01-01

    Spectrin deficiency with increased erythrocyte osmotic fragility (OF) is a hallmark of hereditary spherocytosis, which is the most common congenital hemolytic anemia in humans of northern European ancestry. A radioimmunoassay revealed that erythrocyte spectrin concentration was 50-65% of normal in 5

  1. Demyelinating polyneuropathy in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (G11778A mtDNA) and a severe demyelinating neuropathy, for which no other cause except his mitochondrial disorder could be found. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system of patients with LHON, in particular with a 11778 mtDNA, is

  2. Hereditary spherocytosis presenting as indolent leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolent leg ulcertation, which is the rarest manifestation of hereditary spherocytosis, started at the age of 5 years affecting a 15-year-old boy and his mother is reported. Review of literature showed very few reports from India and abroad. The response to oral folic acid was excellent

  3. Reduced life expectancy seen in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans DGR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available D Gareth R Evans,1 Sarah Louise Ingham21Genetic Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK; 2Centre for Health Informatics, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAbstract: There are several hereditary diseases that are a predisposition to early-onset tumors. These include syndromic conditions like neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel–Lindau syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia, and familial adenomatous polyposis; and conditions which are usually not possible to diagnose clinically in a single individual, such as Lynch syndrome and BRCA1/2. Understanding of the mortality in hereditary cancer predisposing diseases is important for developing effective disease treatment programs. A number of studies have been undertaken to investigate the genetic predictors, prevalence and incidence, and treatment outcomes of these diseases; however, the majority examine only the most common of these diseases (eg, neurofibromatosis or BRCA, or look into postoperative survival. The mortality of individuals who are diagnosed with one of these hereditary diseases remains an area for investigation. This review is the first to attempt identification of studies investigating life expectancy in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors.Keywords: mortality, survival, life expectancy, early-onset, tumors

  4. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah A. Bannon; Courtney D. DiNardo

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA), dysker...

  5. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: Clinical and Genetic Hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Paulo Victor Sgobbi; de Rezende Pinto, Wladimir Bocca Vieira; de Rezende Batistella, Gabriel Novaes; Bortholin, Thiago; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia comprises a wide and heterogeneous group of inherited neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders resulting from primary retrograde dysfunction of the long descending fibers of the corticospinal tract. Although spastic paraparesis and urinary dysfunction represent the most common clinical presentation, a complex group of different neurological and systemic compromise has been recognized recently and a growing number of new genetic subtypes were described in the last decade. Clinical characterization of individual and familial history represents the main step during diagnostic workup; however, frequently, few and unspecific data allows a low rate of definite diagnosis based solely in clinical and neuroimaging basis. Likewise, a wide group of neurological acquired and inherited disorders should be included in the differential diagnosis and properly excluded after a complete laboratorial, neuroimaging, and genetic evaluation. The aim of this review article is to provide an extensive overview regarding the main clinical and genetic features of the classical and recently described subtypes of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP).

  6. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  7. [Hereditary angioedema: strange cause of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Lozano, Nereo Guillermo; Meza-Cardona, Javier; González-Fernández, Coty; Pineda-Figueroa, Laura; de Ariño-Suárez, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an episodic swelling disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance characterized by sudden attacks of peripheral swelling. Patients also commonly have episodic swelling of the wall of hollow viscera, including the bowel. We present a 33-year-old previously healthy male with a complaint of acute-onset intense abdominal pain localized in the epigastrium. Pain irradiated to the right lower quadrant and was associated with five episodes of vomiting. Computed tomography showed thickening of the duodenal wall with liquid in the subphrenic space. Complementary laboratory tests showed low C4 complement levels (5.5 mg/dl) and 30% complement C1 inhibitor activity. Hereditary angioedema is caused by a deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) in complement C1 inhibitor. Abdominal associated with angioedema may manifest as severe acute-onset abdominal pain or as moderately severe chronic recurrent abdominal pain. Two medications are currently FDA-approved for the treatment of these patients.

  8. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...... project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills...... improved it for 64%. During pregnancies, 38% of women had more attacks, but 30% had fewer attacks. Vaginal delivery was usually uncomplicated. Attacks occurred within 48 hours in only 6% of cases. Those more severely affected during menses had more symptoms during pregnancies, suggesting a hormone...

  9. [Asymptomatic classical hereditary xanthinuria type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Renata; Nir, Vered; Kassem, Eiass; Klein-Kremer, Adi

    2012-06-01

    We report on a girl who was diagnosed with classical hereditary xanthinuria due to an incidental finding of extremely low Levels of uric acid in the blood. The girl is compLetely asymptomatic. Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disease that usually causes early urolithiasis but may cause rheumatoid arthritis-like disease and even be associated with defects in the formation of bone, hair and teeth. In Israel it has mostly been described in patients of Bedouin origin. Throughout the world, only about 150 cases have been described; about two thirds of these patients were asymptomatic. Since the clinical presentation and age of symptom appearance are diverse, the case raises questions as to the required follow-up of these patients and as to whether a low oxalate diet should be initiated.

  10. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Jernej Brecelj; Gordana Logar-Car; Henrik Peče

    2002-01-01

    Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B) activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in inf...

  11. [Hereditary xanthinuria. A clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessano, B; Davì, S; La Brocca, A; Leone, L

    1989-05-01

    A case of hereditary xanthinuria in a 68-year-old man with congestive heart failure and alcoholic liver disease is presented. Urolithiasis and muscular symptoms were absent, and the metabolic error was revealed by hypouricemia, hypouricosuria and excess of xanthine and hypoxanthine excretion in urine. Xanthine oxidase (EC 1.2.3.2) activity in liver tissue was absent, confirming the diagnosis of xanthinuria.

  12. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Medical Management of Hereditary Optic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  14. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLa Morgia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases of the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e. the maternally inherited Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA. They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone. Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising venue that still needs to be validated.

  15. The educational needs and professional roles of Canadian physicians and nurses regarding genetic testing and adult onset hereditary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L; Blaine, Sean; Carroll, June C; Esplen, Mary Jane; Evans, Jane; Nicolson Klimek, Mary Lou; Meschino, Wendy; Ritvo, Paul

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the knowledge, professional involvement and confidence of Canadian nurses and physicians in providing genetic services for adult onset hereditary disease. 1,425 physicians and 1,425 nurses received a mailed questionnaire with reminders. The response rates were 50% (n = 543) and 79% (n = 975), respectively. Forty-eight percent of physicians and 31% of nurses lacked formal education in genetics. Respondents reported being involved in caring for people at risk for adult onset hereditary disease. Their levels of confidence that they could perform tasks, such as counselling about predictive genetic tests, however, were lower than their levels of expectation that it would be important for them to provide these services. The expected roles and educational needs of Canadian nurses and physicians have broad areas of overlap suggesting the possibility of combined professional education programs and multiple ways of organizing teams to provide genetic services to people at risk for adult onset hereditary disease. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Hereditary Risk Evaluation for Borderline Ovarian Tumors Based on Immunohistochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Min; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Borderline ovarian tumors (BOT) are premalignant lesions. Approximately 10% of all epithelial ovarian cancers are known to be hereditary with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) accounting for approximately 90% of cases; the remaining 10% are attributable to Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). The aim of our study is to estimate this risk based on screening immunohistochemistry (IHC). Methods Thirty-four patients diagnosed with B...

  17. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A; Haridy, Nourelhoda A; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P; Korlipara, L V Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Lewis, Patrick A; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic...

  18. HEREDITARY COLORECTAL CANCER REGISTRY: A CLEVELAND CLINIC FOUNDATION EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Church, MBCHB

    2017-07-01

    SUMMARY: the Cleveland Clinic approach to hereditary colorectal cancer is described. This is multidisciplinary, involving several specialties and both genetic counseling and mental health services within the registry.

  19. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion...

  20. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moodley, A; Bhola, S; Omar, F; Mogambery, J

    2014-01-01

    .... Individuals with the mutation for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a mitochondrial disorder, are usually asymptomatic but develop visual loss when exposed to external triggers such as smoking...

  1. Routine use of gene panel testing in hereditary breast cancer should be performed with caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marcke, Cedric; De Leener, Anne; Berlière, Martine; Vikkula, Miikka; Duhoux, Francois P

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer occurring in women. Ten percent of these cancers are considered hereditary. Among them, 30% are attributed to germline mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Other genes of lower penetrance are also known, explaining together up to 40% of the hereditary risk of breast cancer. New techniques, such as next-generation sequencing, allow the simultaneous analysis of multiple genes in a cost-effective way. As a logical consequence, gene panel testing is entering clinical practice with the promise of personalized care. We however advocate that gene panel testing is not ready for non-specialist clinical use, as it generates many variants of unknown significance and includes more genes than are presently considered clinically useful. We hereby review the data for each gene that can change the risk management of patients carrying a pathogenic variant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic screening of EXT1 and EXT2 in Cypriot families with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pagon, M. P. Adam, H. H. Ardinger, T. D. Bird, C. R. Dolan, C. T.. Fong, R. J. H. Smith and K. Stephens). University of Washington,. Seattle. Xu L., Xia J., Jiang H., Zhou J., Li H., Wang D. et al. 1999 Mutation analysis of hereditary multiple exostoses in the Chinese. Hum. Genet. 105, 45–50. Received 8 October 2014, in final ...

  3. The Contribution of Genotype to Heterotopic Ossification after Orthopaedic Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    initial  considerations in the high incidence of HO in the combat amputee population was the potential  prevalence  of occult head injury incurred by the...Haque S, Ahmad M, et al. Novel mutations in the EXT1 gene in two consanguineous families affected with multiple hereditary exostoses (familial

  4. [Genetic testing in hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzsiev, Kinga; Balikó, László; Komlósi, Katalin; Lőcsei-Fekete, Anett; Csábi, Györgyi; Bene, Judit; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Béla

    2015-01-18

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia is the overall term for clinically and genetically diverse disorders characterized with progressive and variable severe lower extremity spasticity. The most common causes of autosomal dominantly inherited hereditary spastic paraplegias are different mutations of the spastin gene with variable incidence in different ethnic groups, ranging between 15-40%. Mutations in the spastin gene lead to loss of spastins function, causing progressive neuronal failure, which results in axon degeneration finally. The molecular testing of spastin gene is available in the institution of the authors since January, 2014. The experience gained with the examination of the first eleven patients is described in this article. After polymerase chain reaction, Sanger sequencing was performed to examine the 17 exons of the spastin gene. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect greater rearrangements in the spastin gene. Eight of the patients were examined in the genetic counseling clinic of the authors and after detailed phenotype assessment spastin gene testing was obtained. The other three patients were referred to the laboratory from different outpatient clinics. Out of the 11 examined patients, four different pathogenic mutations were found in 5 patients. The first Hungarian data, gained with the examination of spastin gene are presented in this article. The five patients, in whom mutations were detected, represent 45.5% of all tested patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia, which is similar to those published in the international literature. Molecular testing and subsequent detailed genotype-phenotype correlations of the Hungarian patients may serve valuable new information about the disease, which later on may influence our therapeutic possibilities and decisions.

  5. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  6. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, M E; Curtis, A; Williams, O; Marchuk, D; Bhattacharya, S S; Burn, J

    1994-01-01

    A locus causing hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) has recently been mapped to 9q34 in four families and designated HHT1. In this paper, the results of a linkage study showing genetic heterogeneity in four families in whom HHT is segregating are reported. All the previously reported 9q34 linked families contain at least one affected member with a symptomatic pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. We postulate that clinical heterogeneity may also be a feature of HHT with a significantly higher predisposition to symptomatic PAVMs associated with the HHT1 linked families. PMID:7891373

  7. Hereditary xanthinuria. Evidence for enhanced hypoxanthine salvage.

    OpenAIRE

    Mateos, F A; Puig, J G; Jiménez, M L; Fox, I H

    1987-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that there is an enhanced rate of hypoxanthine salvage in two siblings with hereditary xanthinuria. We radiolabeled the adenine nucleotide pool with [8-14C]adenine and examined purine nucleotide degradation after intravenous fructose. The cumulative excretion of radioactivity during a 5-d period was 9.7% and 9.1% of infused radioactivity in the enzyme-deficient patients and 6.0 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- SE) in four normal subjects. Fructose infusion increased urinary radioac...

  8. Asymptomatic hereditary xanthinuria: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, A; Murakami, E; Hiwada, K; Sato, Y; Kawachi, M; Kono, N

    1990-01-01

    A 22-year-old man with hereditary xanthinuria is reported. A biochemical study of the patient showed elevated serum levels of xanthine and hypoxanthine with concomitant increases in urinary excretion of xanthine and hypoxanthine. The xanthine oxidase activity in the duodenal mucosa of the patient was about 1.5% of normal value. Urinary excretion of xanthine and hypoxanthine of his parents and his eldest brother were significantly higher than the corresponding normal values, but the values were much less than those of the patient. The results suggested that the patient was homozygote, and his parents and his eldest brother were heterozygotes.

  9. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia and severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Halawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucoepithelial disruption of the skin, hair and mucous membranes. It results from defective gap junction formation and leads to non-scarring alopecia, mucosal erythema, perineal erythematous intertrigo, involvement of the conjunctival mucosa, and pulmonary disease. We present a case of severe respiratory distress in an initially healthy full term infant born to a mother with HMD. This infant later developed signs and symptoms of HMD. A high index of suspicion for pulmonary infection with atypical organism is essential in infants with a family history of HMD who present with respiratory distress.

  10. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, Chantal; Bleiker, Eveline; Aaronson, Neil; Vriends, Annette; Ausems, Margreet; Jansweijer, Maaike; Wagner, Anja; Sijmons, Rolf; van den Ouweland, Ans; van der Luijt, Rob; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Ruijs, Marielle; Verhoef, Senno

    2009-01-01

    The use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

  11. Cerebral abscesses among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Tørring, P M; Nissen, H

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess....

  12. Learning Hereditary and Reductive Prolog Programs from Entailment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shahid; Rao, M. R. K. Krishna

    In this paper we study exact learning of Prolog programs from entailment and present an algorithm to learn two rich classes of Prolog programs namely hereditary and reductive Prolog programs. These classes contain standard Prolog programs with and without recursion like append, merge, split, delete, member, prefix, suffix, length, add, etc. Additionally our algorithm learns the hereditary Prolog programs in polynomial time.

  13. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  14. Methylation profiles of hereditary and sporadic ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Guus M.; Suijkerbuijk, Karijn P. M.; Bart, Joost; Vooijs, Marc; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    Aims: Tumour suppressor gene silencing through promoter hypermethylation plays an important role in oncogenesis. Carcinogenesis of hereditary cancers usually differs from that of their sporadic counterparts, but methylation has hardly been studied in hereditary ovarian cancer. The aim of this study

  15. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....... (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers...

  16. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  17. Genetics of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedeker, Carsten C; Hensen, Erik F; Neumann, Hartmut P H; Maier, Wolfgang; van Nederveen, Francien H; Suárez, Carlos; Kunst, Henricus P; Rodrigo, Juan P; Takes, Robert P; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to give an overview on hereditary syndromes associated with head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGs). Our methods were the review and discussion of the pertinent literature. About one third of all patients with HNPGs are carriers of germline mutations. Hereditary HNPGs have been described in association with mutations of 10 different genes. Mutations of the genes succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD), succinate dehydrogenase complex assembly factor 2 gene (SDHAF2), succinate dehydrogenase subunit C (SDHC), and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) are the cause of paraganglioma syndromes (PGLs) 1, 2, 3, and 4. Succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA), von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), and transmembrane protein 127 (TMEM127) gene mutations also harbor the risk for HNPG development. HNPGs in patients with rearranged during transfection (RET), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), and MYC-associated factor X (MAX) gene mutations have been described very infrequently. All patients with HNPGs should be offered a molecular genetic screening. This screening may usually be restricted to mutations of the genes SDHD, SDHB, and SDHC. Certain clinical parameters can help to set up the order in which those genes should be tested. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Brecelj

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in infants or reduction of fructose and sucrose from the diet and results in improvement in the patient’s clinical status and liver disease.Results. This article presents a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance who was diagnosed 18 years ago on the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ljubljana Children’s Hospital. At that time oral fructose tolerance test was used to diagnose the disorder. When she was 17 we performed liver biopsy. The enzyme determination showed the absence of aldolase B activity.Conclusions. Only cooperation of different experts enables recognition of rare metabolic disorders which must be prompt to prevent further damage.

  20. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  1. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  2. Hereditary xanthinuria: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T S

    1993-05-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare disorder characterized by the replacement of uric acid by xanthine and hypoxanthine in urine. Two cases of classic hereditary xanthinuria in Taiwan are herein reported. Case 1: a 30-year-old woman was by chance found to have hypouricemia. Urine and plasma purines were checked through the use of high performance liquid chromatography. Urine excretion of uric acid was 0.029 mumol (0.005 mg)/mg creatinine (30 mumol/24 hr); xanthine 1.9 mumol/mg creatinine (1935 mumol/24 hr); and hypoxanthine 0.58 mumol/mg creatinine (587 mumol/24 hr). Plasma xanthine was 9.3 mumol/L; hypoxanthine 5.8 mumol/L; and uric acid 0.5 mumol/L (0.001 mg/dL). Case 2: a brother of case 1 had a previous history of urolithiasis. Urine excretion of uric acid was 0.15 mumol (0.025 mg)/mg creatinine (189 mumol/24 hr); xanthine 1.3 mumol/mg creatinine (1620 mumol/24 hr); and hypoxanthine 0.22 mumol/mg creatinine (276 mumol/24 hr).

  3. Hereditary xanthinuria. Evidence for enhanced hypoxanthine salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, F A; Puig, J G; Jiménez, M L; Fox, I H

    1987-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that there is an enhanced rate of hypoxanthine salvage in two siblings with hereditary xanthinuria. We radiolabeled the adenine nucleotide pool with [8-14C]adenine and examined purine nucleotide degradation after intravenous fructose. The cumulative excretion of radioactivity during a 5-d period was 9.7% and 9.1% of infused radioactivity in the enzyme-deficient patients and 6.0 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- SE) in four normal subjects. Fructose infusion increased urinary radioactivity to 7.96 and 9.16 X 10(6) cpm/g creatinine in both patients and to 4.73 +/- 0.69 X 10(6) cpm/g creatinine in controls. The infusion of fructose increased total urinary purine excretion to a mean of 487% from low-normal baseline values in the patients and to 398 +/- 86% in control subjects. In the enzyme-deficient patients, the infusion of fructose elicited an increase of plasma guanosine from undetectable values to 0.7 and 0.9 microM. With adjustments made for intestinal purine loss, these data support the hypothesis that there is enhanced hypoxanthine salvage in hereditary xanthinuria. Degradation of guanine nucleotides to xanthine bypasses the hypoxanthine salvage pathway and may explain the predominance of this urinary purine compound in xanthinuria.

  4. Practice Bulletin No. 182 Summary: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by multiple family members with breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or both. Based on the contemporary understanding of the origins and management of ovarian cancer and for simplicity in this document, ovarian cancer also refers to fallopian tube cancer and primary peritoneal cancer. Clinical genetic testing for gene mutations allows more precise identification of those women who are at an increased risk of inherited breast cancer and ovarian cancer. For these individuals, screening and prevention strategies can be instituted to reduce their risks. Obstetrician-gynecologists play an important role in the identification and management of women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. If an obstetrician-gynecologist or other gynecologic care provider does not have the necessary knowledge or expertise in cancer genetics to counsel a patient appropriately, referral to a genetic counselor, gynecologic or medical oncologist, or other genetics specialist should be considered (1). More genes are being discovered that impart varying risks of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other types of cancer, and new technologies are being developed for genetic testing. This Practice Bulletin focuses on the primary genetic mutations associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, BRCA1 and BRCA2, but also will briefly discuss some of the other genes that have been implicated.

  5. Gait evolution in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Turcot, Katia; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Lascombes, Pierre; De Coulon, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    The degree of disability in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia has been reported variable even in members of the same family (same gene mutation). Moreover, it has been established that patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia should be treated differently from cerebral palsy patients due to the progressive nature of this disease. However, the gait evolution of hereditary spastic paraplegia showing onset symptoms at an early age has been described as stable. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the walking ability and the influence of treatments on gait evolution in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Clinical gait analyses were performed in six hereditary spastic paraplegia patients from the same family with a follow-up of 4-15 years. Based on the gait deviation index, results showed a large variation of walking ability in these patients and no statistical difference between the first and last examination. In fact, three patients have improved their gait (from childhood to adolescence) whereas three patients worsened their gait. Gait alterations in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous. Gait evolution in hereditary spastic paraplegia with early symptoms had a tendency to improve gait until adolescence with adapted treatments and to decline in the adulthood. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Committee opinion no. 634: Hereditary cancer syndromes and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A hereditary cancer syndrome is a genetic predisposition to certain types of cancer, often with onset at an early age, caused by inherited mutations in one or more genes. Cases of cancer commonly encountered by obstetrician-gynecologists or other obstetric-gynecologic providers--such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and endometrial cancer--are features of specific hereditary cancer syndromes. The most common hereditary cancer syndromes related to gynecologic cancer include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. A hereditary cancer risk assessment is the key to identifying patients and families who may be at increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. Screening should include, at minimum, a personal cancer history and a first- and second-degree relative cancer history that includes a description of the type of primary cancer, the age of onset, and the lineage (paternal versus maternal) of the family member. In addition, a patient's ethnic background can influence her genetic risk. If a hereditary cancer risk assessment suggests an increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome, referral to a specialist in cancer genetics or a health care provider with expertise in genetics is recommended for expanded gathering of family history information, risk assessment, education, and counseling, which may lead to genetic testing.

  7. Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Kooshyar, Mohammad Mahdi; Roudbar, Zahra; Mahdavi, Morteza; Doosti, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The incidence of colorectal cancer has increased in Iran in the past three decades and is now considered as a serious problem for our society. This cancer has two types hereditary and non-hereditary, 80% of cases being the latter. Considering that the relationship between SNPs with diseases is a concern, many researchers believed that they offer valuable markers for identifying genes responsible for susceptibility to common diseases. In some cases, they are direct causes of human disease. One SNP can increase risk of cancer, but when considering the rate of overlap and frequency of DNA repair pathways, it might be expected that SNP alone cannot affect the final result of cancer, although several SNPs together can exert a significant influence. Therefore identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are: MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, APC, MUTYH, SMAD7, STK11, XRCC3, DNMT1, MTHFR, Exo1, XRCC1 and VDR. Presence of SNPs in these genes decreases or increases risk of colorectal cancer. In this article we reviewed the Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary of colorectal cancer that recently were reported from candidate gene y, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. As with other cancers, colorectal cancer is associated with SNPs in gene loci. Generally, by exploring SNPs, it is feasible to predict the risk of developing colorectal cancer and thus establishing proper preventive measures. SNPs of genes associated with colorectal cancer can be used as a marker SNP panel as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  8. [The broad phenotypic spectrum of SCA-3: hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio A; González-Morón, Dolores; Arakaki, Tomoko; Garreto, Nélida; Kauffman, Marcelo A

    2013-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is the most frequent dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia. A marked phenotypic variability is a characteristic of this disorder that could involve non-cerebellar presentations. Based on several case reports describing pyramidal dysfunction as the main symptom at onset, a clinical form resembling hereditary spastic paraplegia has been proposed. We report here two further cases of MJD patients whose initial clinical presentation suggested hereditary spastic paraplegia, and a summary of the main findings of previously similar published reports. Our findings lent support to the proposal of a MJD subtype distinguished by a marked pyramidal dysfunction at onset, simulating a clinical picture of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  10. Multiplication rate of amoebae related to the cultivation temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopina, V.A.

    1976-10-01

    The cultivation temperature-dependent rate of multiplication in amoebae was studied using three strains of Amoeba proteus and another amoeba strain of unknown specific and generic position. The multiplication rates are characterized by optima that vary with strains. The temperature-induced changes in the multiplication rate of a given strain are non-hereditary; they are common modifications. Hereditary interstrain differences in the multiplication rate have also been shown at constant temperatures. The range of modificational changes with increase or decrease of cultivation temperature appears to be greater than interstrain differences in multiplication rate.

  11. Molecular aspects of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreau, Anne; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive lower limbs spasticity and weakness. What was first thought to be a small group of rare Mendelian disorder has now become a large group that includes many complex syndromes. While large families with defined modes of inheritance were used for the initial HSP gene discovery, new sequencing technologies have recently allowed the study of small families, with the identification of many new disease causative genes. These discoveries are slowly leading to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP with the identification of precise disease pathways. These insights may lead to new therapeutic strategies for what is a group of largely untreatable diseases. This review looks at the key players involved in HSP and where they act in their specific pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  13. Genetics of hereditary large vessel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of hereditary large vessel diseases such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) have not only identified responsible genes but also provided better understanding of the pathophysiology and revealed possible new therapeutic targets. Genes identified for these diseases include FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SMAD3, TGFB2, TGFB3, SKI, EFEMP2, COL3A1, FLNA, ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK and SLC2A10, as well as others. Their dysfunction disrupts the function of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways, as well as that of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle contractile apparatus, resulting in progression of structural damage to large vessels, including aortic aneurysms and dissections. Notably, it has been shown that the TGF-β signaling pathway has a key role in the pathogenesis of MFS and related disorders, which may be important for development of strategies for medical and surgical treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  14. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    . Skin from 12 individuals who served as controls and skin from 14 close relatives of the patients was negative for amyloid. Punch biopsy of the skin is a simple procedure which is of value for the diagnosis of HCCA, even before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This method might also be of use......Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  15. [Hereditary ichthyosis: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Almendra, Nadia; Aranibar Duran, Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary ichthyoses are a group of genetic disorders of cornification, which are characterised by hyperkeratosis and scaling. The new classification identifies 36 types of ichthyosis, which are subdivided according to their frequency, pattern of inheritance and extracutaneous involvement. The diagnosis is mainly based on clinical features, since genetic studies are not available in our setting. Treatment is symptomatic and management should be performed by a multidisciplinary team. In this article, the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of different types of ichthyosis are reviewed, taking into account the nomenclature and modifications presented in the new classification. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wu Chang

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disease that primarily affects the optic nerve, causing bilateral vision loss in juveniles and young adults. A 12-year-old boy had complained of blurred vision in both eyes for more than 1 year. His best-corrected visual acuity was 0.08 in the right eye and 0.1 in the left. Ophthalmologic examination showed bilateral optic disc hyperemia and margin blurring, peripapillary telangiectasis, and a relative afferent pupil defect in his right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed no stain or leakage around the optic disc in the late phase. Visual field analysis showed central scotoma in the left eye and a near-total defect in the right. Upon examination of the patient's mitochondrial DNA, a point mutation at nucleotide position 11778 was found, and the diagnosis of LHON was confirmed. Coenzyme Q10 was used to treat the patient.

  17. Pulmonary vascular complications of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circo, Sebastian; Gossage, James R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the latest advances and recommendations in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary vascular complications associated with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary hypertension associated with high output cardiac failure or liver vascular malformations, haemoptysis, haemothorax and thromboembolic disease. Transthoracic contrast echocardiography has been validated as a screening tool for PAVM in patients with suspected HHT. Advancements in genetic testing support its use in family members at risk as a cost-effective measure. Therapy with bevacizumab in patients with high output cardiac failure and severe liver AVMs showed promising results. PAH tends to be more aggressive in HHT type 2 patients. Patients suffering from this elusive disease should be referred to HHT specialized centres to ensure a standardized and timely approach to diagnosis and management.

  18. Surgical treatment of gastrointestinal hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Min-Hsuan; Chen, Chiung-Nien

    2016-04-01

    A 48-year-old man with a history of gastrointestinal bleeding from Osler-Weber-Rendu disease presented with recurrent hematemesis and tarry stool. He received repeated endoscopic therapy, but profound component therapy was still needed. Because repeated gastrointestinal bleeding was caused by same bleeder, tattoo-assisted laparoscopic gastric wedge resection was carried out. The pathology showed vascular abnormalities that involved gastric mucosal and submucosal layers. After surgery, the blood transfusion for the patient is not seen. Osler-Weber-Rendu is a hereditary disease characterized by vascular abnormalities of the nose, skin, lung, brain, and gastrointestinal tract. Management of gastrointestinal bleeding requires medical treatment first, and there are rare reports of surgical treatment. Our pathology findings showed a transmucosal vessel lesion, which had poor response to endoscopic treatment. Surgical intervention may be considered in the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding refractory to endoscopic therapy.

  19. [Hereditary porphyrias and heme related disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puy, Hervé; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-charles

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary porphyrias comprise a group of eight metabolic disorders of the haem biosynthesis pathway, characterised by acute neurovisceral symptoms and/or skin lesions. Each porphyria is caused by abnormal functioning of a particular enzymatic step, resulting in specific accumulation of heme precursors. Seven porphyrias are due to a partial enzyme deficiency, while a gain-of-function mechanism has recently been identify in a novel porphyria. Acute porphyrias present with severe abdominal pain, nausea, constipation and confusion, and are sometimes complicated by seizures and severe neurological disorders, which may be life-threatening. Cutaneous porphyrias can also be present, with either acute painful photosensitivity or skin fragility and blisters. Rare recessive porphyrias usually manifest in early childhood with either severe chronic neurological symptoms or chronic haemolysis and severe cutaneous photosensitivity. Porphyrias are still under-diagnosed, but recent advances in the pathogenesis and genetics of human porphyrias are leading to better care of these patients and their families.

  20. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  1. [Hereditary spastic paraplegia: up to date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSP genetic loci are designated SPG1-72 in order of their discovery. In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). We have identified novel mutations in the C12orf65 gene and the LYST gene in several Japanese families with autosomal recessive HSP. JASPAC will facilitate gene discovery and mechanistic understanding of HSP. The future challenge will be the establishment of treatment of HSP.

  2. Recurrent IVF failure and hereditary thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdarian, Leila; Najmi, Zahra; Aleyasin, Ashraf; Aghahosseini, Marzieh; Rashidi, Mandana; Asadollah, Sara

    2014-07-01

    The largest percentage of failed invitro fertilization (IVF (cycles, are due to lack of implantation. As hereditary thrombophilia can cause in placentation failure, it may have a role in recurrent IVF failure. Aim of this case-control study was to determine whether hereditary thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failures. Case group comprised 96 infertile women, with a history of recurrent IVF failure. Control group was comprised of 95 healthy women with proven fertility who had conceived spontaneously. All participants were assessed for the presence of inherited thrombophilias including: factor V Leiden, methilen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation, prothrombin mutation, homocystein level, protein S and C deficiency, antithrombin III (AT-III) deficiency and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mutation. Presence of thrombophilia was compared between groups. Having at least one thrombophilia known as a risk factor for recurrent IVF failure (95% CI=1.74-5.70, OR=3.15, p=0.00). Mutation of factor V Leiden (95% CI=1.26-10.27, OR=3.06, P=0.01) and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation (95% CI=1.55-97.86, OR=12.33, p=0.05) were also risk factors for recurrent IVF failure. However, we could not find significant difference in other inherited thrombophilia's. Inherited thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failure compared with healthy women. Having at least one thrombophilia, mutation of factor V Leiden and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation were risk factors for recurrent IVF failure.

  3. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  4. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: More than an upper motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, L; Fenu, S; Stevanin, G; Durr, A

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of rare inherited neurological diseases characterized by extreme heterogeneity in both their clinical manifestations and genetic backgrounds. Based on symptoms, HSPs can be divided into pure forms, presenting with pyramidal signs leading to lower-limb spasticity, and complex forms, when additional neurological or extraneurological symptoms are detected. The clinical diversity of HSPs partially reflects their underlying genetic backgrounds. To date, 76 loci and 58 corresponding genes [spastic paraplegia genes (SPGs)] have been linked to HSPs. The genetic diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that causative mutations of HSP can be inherited through all possible modes of transmission (autosomal-dominant and -recessive, X-linked, maternal), with some genes showing multiple inheritance patterns. The pathogenic mutations of SPGs primarily lead to progressive degeneration of the upper motor neurons (UMNs) comprising corticospinal tracts. However, it is possible to observe lower-limb muscle atrophy and fasciculations on clinical examination that are clear signs of lower motor neuron (LMN) involvement. The purpose of this review is to classify HSPs based on their degree of motor neuron involvement, distinguishing forms in which only UMNs are affected from those involving both UMN and LMN degeneration, and to describe their differential diagnosis from diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome associated renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamane, Shraddha; Desai, Sangeeta; Menon, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is a recently described entity with unknown exact prevalence. The affected individuals are predisposed to have multiple leiomyomas and renal cancer due to germline mutation in fumarate hydratase gene on chromosome 1. The knowledge of this rare tumour is essential for early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy, since they have a grave prognosis. Herein, we present the first case from India of HLRCC in a 42 year old lady who presented with a renal mass and metastasis with consequent fulminant course of disease. We discuss the detailed histomorphologic features and iunique immunohistochemical signature of this unusual renal tumour with discussion of differential diagnosis.

  6. Genotype–phenotype correlations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tońska, Katarzyna; Kodroń, Agata; Bartnik, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), acute or subacute vision loss due to retinal ganglion cell death which in the long run leads to optic nerve atrophy is one of the most widely studied maternally inherited diseases caused...

  7. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as zidovudine and stavudine have known mitochondrial toxicity and can cause mitochondrial myopathies, neuropathies, hyperlactataemia, and can induce mitochondrial genetic disorders. Individuals with the mutation for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), ...

  8. Allelic variants of hereditary prions: The bimodularity principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhodeyev, Oleg N; Tarasov, Oleg V; Bondarev, Stanislav A

    2017-01-02

    Modern biology requires modern genetic concepts equally valid for all discovered mechanisms of inheritance, either "canonical" (mediated by DNA sequences) or epigenetic. Applying basic genetic terms such as "gene" and "allele" to protein hereditary factors is one of the necessary steps toward these concepts. The basic idea that different variants of the same prion protein can be considered as alleles has been previously proposed by Chernoff and Tuite. In this paper, the notion of prion allele is further developed. We propose the idea that any prion allele is a bimodular hereditary system that depends on a certain DNA sequence (DNA determinant) and a certain epigenetic mark (epigenetic determinant). Alteration of any of these 2 determinants may lead to establishment of a new prion allele. The bimodularity principle is valid not only for hereditary prions; it seems to be universal for any epigenetic hereditary factor.

  9. Identification of a hereditary system with distributed delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha

    1985-01-01

    We study the identification problem that arises in a linear hereditary system with distributed delay. This involves estimating an infinite-dimensional parameter and we use the method of sieves, proposed by Grenander, to solve this problem.

  10. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Zafar; Rydning, Siri L.; Wedding, Iselin M.; Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstr?m, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%)...

  11. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  12. Hereditary spherocytic anemia with deletion of the short arm of chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Yoich [Osaka Medical Center and Research Inst. for Maternal and Child Health, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-11

    We describe a 30-month-old boy with multiple anomalies and mental retardation with hereditary spherocytic anemia. His karyotype was 46,XYdel(8)(p11.23p21.1). Genes for ankyrin and glutathione reductase (GSR) were localized to chromosome areas 8p11.2 and 8p21.1, respectively. Six patients with spherocytic anemia and interstitial deletion of 8p- have been reported. In these patients, severe mental retardation and multiple anomalies are common findings. This is a new contiguous gene syndrome. Lux established that ankyrin deficiency and associated deficiencies of spectrin and protein 4.2 were responsible for spherocytosis in this syndrome. We reviewed the manifestations of this syndrome. Patients with spherocytic anemia and multiple congenital anomalies should be investigated by high-resolution chromosomal means to differentiate this syndrome. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. [Hereditary factors in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliers, E A; Franke, B; Buitelaar, J K

    2005-07-30

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by concentration problems, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Disturbances in dopamine and/or noradrenalin neurotransmission are probably the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ADHD. Around 80% of variants of the phenotype can be ascribed to hereditary factors. There are various chromosomal loci containing ADHD genes. They partially overlap the loci found in linkage studies on dyslexia and autism. It seems likely that a number of genetic variants, each with a small effect size, in combination with gene-environment interactions predispose to ADHD. There is a high degree of phenotypical heterogeneity among people with ADHD. Finding endophenotypes may improve the power of genetic studies. Endophenotypes are specific expressions of the underlying pathophysiology, intermediate between gene and phenotype. Neuro-imaging studies in children with ADHD have indicated abnormalities in frontostriatal, temporal and cerebellar volume. Unaffected brothers and sisters show the same cerebral abnormalities, but not the cerebellar abnormalities. These brain abnormalities together with specific neuropsychological features could be ADHD endophenotypes.

  14. Automated reticulocyte parameters for hereditary spherocytosis screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Elena; Pradier, Olivier; Cotton, Frédéric; Gulbis, Béatrice

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is based on several screening and confirmatory tests; our algorithm includes clinical features, red blood cell morphology analysis and cryohaemolysis test, and, in case of positive screening, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a diagnostic test. Using the UniCel DxH800 (Beckman Coulter) haematology analyser, we investigated automated reticulocyte parameters as HS screening tool, i.e. mean reticulocyte volume (MRV), immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and mean sphered cell volume (MSCV). A total of 410 samples were screened. Gel electrophoresis was applied to 159 samples that were positive for the screening tests. A total of 48 patients were diagnosed as HS, and seven were diagnosed as acquired autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA). Some other 31 anaemic conditions were also studied. From the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, both delta (mean cell volume (MCV)-MSCV) and MRV presented an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. At the diagnostic cut-off of 100 % sensitivity, MRV showed the best specificity of 88 % and a positive likelihood ratio of 8.7. The parameters IRF, MRV and MSCV discriminated HS not only from controls and other tested pathologies but also from AIHA contrary to the cryohaemolysis test. In conclusion, automated reticulocyte parameters might be helpful for haemolytic anaemia diagnostic orientation even for general laboratories. In combination with cryohaemolysis, they ensure an effective and time-saving screening for HS for more specialised laboratories.

  15. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  16. Pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Christiansen, Sandra C

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) was first described in the 19th century. Over the past 50 years, many details of the pathophysiology and molecular biology of HAE have been elucidated. Two types of HAE, type I and type II, result from mutations in the gene for the broad-spectrum protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor (C1INH). Type I HAE is characterized by low antigenic and functional C1INH levels and type II HAE has normal antigenic but low functional C1INH levels. Type III HAE, by contrast, has normal antigenic and functional C1INH levels. In some families, type III HAE has been linked to mutations in Hageman factor. C1INH is the primary inhibitor of the complement proteases C1r and C1s as well as the contact system proteases activated Hageman factor (coagulation factor XIIa and XIIf) and plasma kallikrein. It is also an inhibitor of plasmin and coagulation factor XIa. The primary mediator of swelling in HAE has now been unequivocally shown to be bradykinin, generated from activation of the plasma contact system. The knowledge gained concerning the underlying mechanisms of the different types of HAE allow the clinician to approach the laboratory diagnosis with confidence and provides opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. Consanguinity and hereditary hearing loss in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Giorgia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Abdulhadi, Khalid; Vuckovic, Dragana; Vozzi, Diego; Khalifa Alkowari, Moza; Gasparini, Paolo; Badii, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Qatar is a sovereign state located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula in the Persian Gulf. Its native population consists of 3 major subgroups: people of Arabian origin or Bedouins, those from an Eastern or Persian ancestry and individuals with African admixture. Historically, all types of consanguineous marriages have been and still are common in the Qatari population, particularly among first and double-first cousins. Thus, there is a higher risk for most inherited diseases including hereditary hearing loss (HHL). In particular, a hearing loss prevalence of 5.2% has been reported in Qatar, with parental consanguinity being more common among affected individuals as compared with unaffected ones. Our recent molecular results confirm a high homogeneity and level of inbreeding in Qatari HHL patients. Among all HHL genes, GJB2, the major player worldwide, accounts for a minor proportion of cases and at least 3 additional genes have been found to be mutated in Qatari patients. Interestingly, one gene, BDP1, has been described to cause HHL only in this country. These results point towards an unexpected level of genetic heterogeneity despite the high level of inbreeding. This review provides an up-to-date picture of HHL in Qatar and of the impact of consanguinity on this disease. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer and Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lesley; Mutch, David G

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome in a majority of families and 14% of epithelial ovarian cancer cases. Despite next-generation sequencing, other identified genes (Lynch Syndrome, RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1) account for only a small proportion of cases. The risk of ovarian cancer by age 70 is approximately 40% for BRCA1 and 18% for BRCA2. Most of these cancers are high-grade serous cancers that predominantly arise in the fimbriae of the fallopian tube. Ovarian screening does not improve outcomes, so women at high risk are recommended to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy around the age of 40, followed by hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Specimens should be carefully examined for occult malignancy. Mutation carriers may benefit from newly developed poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors. Genetic testing should only be performed after careful counseling, particularly if testing involves the testing of panels of genes that may identify unsuspected disease predisposition or confusing variants of uncertain significance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Modern diagnostic approach to hereditary xanthinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraz, Martin; Hurba, Olha; Bartl, Josef; Dolezel, Zdenek; Marinaki, Anthony; Fairbanks, Lynette; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria (HX) is a rare inherited disorder caused by a deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase (XDH/XO). Missing XDH/XO activity leads to undetectable levels of uric acid excessively replaced by xanthine in serum/urine. The allopurinol loading test has been traditionally used to differentiate between HX types I and II. Final confirmation of HX has been based on the biopsy finding of the absent XDH/XO activity in the small intestine or liver. We present the clinical, biochemical, ultrasound and molecular genetics findings in three new patients with HX and suggest a simple three-step approach to be used for diagnosis, typing and confirmation of HX. In the first step, the diagnosis of HX is determined by extremely low serum/urinary uric acid excessively replaced by xanthine. Second, HX is typed using urinary metabolomics. Finally, the results are confirmed by molecular genetics. We advocate for this safe and non-invasive diagnostic algorithm instead of the traditional allopurinol loading test and intestinal or liver biopsy used in the past.

  20. The aqueous layers within the myelin sheath modulate the membrane properties of simulated hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanova, D I; Krustev, S M; Daskalova, M

    2011-03-01

    To expand our studies on the mechanisms underlying the clinical decline of the nerve excitability properties in patients with hereditary demyelinating neuropathies, the contribution of myelin sheath aqueous layers on multiple membrane properties of simulated fiber demyelinations is investigated. Three progressively greater degrees of internodal systematic demyelinations (two mild and one severe termed as ISD1, ISD2 and ISD3, respectively) without/with aqueous layers are simulated using our previous multi-layered model of human motor nerve fiber. The calculated multiple membrane excitability properties are as follows: potentials (intracellular action, electrotonic), strength-duration time constants, rheobasic currents and recovery cycles. They reflect the propagating, accommodative and adaptive processes in the fibers. The results show that all membrane properties, except for the strength-duration time constants and refractoriness, worsen when the myelin lamellae and their corresponding aqueous layers are uniformly reduced along the fiber length. The effect of the aqueous layers is significantly higher on the accommodative and adaptive processes than on the propagating processes in the fibers. Our multi-layered model better approximated some of the functional deficits documented for axons of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. The study provides new and important information on the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. © Imperial College Press

  1. Hereditary Spherocytosis and Hereditary Elliptocytosis: Aberrant Protein Sorting during Erythroblast Enucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomao, Marcela; Chen, Ke; Villalobos, Jonathan; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2010-02-08

    During erythroblast enucleation, membrane proteins distribute between extruded nuclei and reticulocytes. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), deficiencies of membrane proteins, in addition to those encoded by the mutant gene, occur. Elliptocytes, resulting from protein 4.1R gene mutations, lack not only 4.1R but also glycophorin C, which links the cytoskeleton and bilayer. In HS resulting from ankyrin-1 mutations, band 3, Rh-associated antigen, and glycophorin A are deficient. The current study was undertaken to explore whether aberrant protein sorting, during enucleation, creates these membrane-spanning protein deficiencies. We found that although glycophorin C sorts to reticulocytes normally, it distributes to nuclei in 4.1R-deficient HE cells. Further, glycophorin A and Rh-associated antigen, which normally partition predominantly to reticulocytes, distribute to both nuclei and reticulocytes in an ankyrin-1-deficient murine model of HS. We conclude that aberrant protein sorting is one mechanistic basis for protein deficiencies in HE and HS.

  2. Risk factors for cancer in hereditary pancreatitis. International Hereditary Pancreatitis Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P; Whitcomb, D C

    2000-05-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare form of pancreatitis, accounting for approximately 1% of all types of pancreatitis. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, with incomplete penetrance. The genetic defect is believed to be caused by mutations in the trypsinogen gene. Patients who inherit the disorder suffer from a form of pancreatitis that resembles other types of pancreatitis, but the age of onset is much earlier. Sixteen biopsy-proven pancreatic cancers have developed in a cohort of 412 patients with a median follow-up period of 18 years (interquartile range, 7 to 30 years) since the onset of symptoms. Compared with the background population, the risk of pancreatic cancer is approximately 50 to 60 times greater than expected. Smoking appears to be an additional risk factor in these patients: Smoking increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer and lowers the age of onset by approximately 20 years. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are urged to avoid smoking because it greatly increases the risk of pancreatic cancer and to avoid alcohol, a known risk factor for all forms of pancreatitis.

  3. Screening for hemosiderosis in patients receiving multiple red blood cell transfusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, Adriaan D; van Beers, E J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314670793; de Vooght, K M K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817961; Schutgens, R E G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258752084

    2017-01-01

    Background: The dramatic impact of hemosiderosis on survival in chronically transfused patients with hereditary anemia is well known. We evaluated whether patients receiving multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are adequately screened for hemosiderosis. Methods: We retrospectively assessed

  4. Deciphering the genetics of hereditary non-syndromic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Eli; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Sellick, Gabrielle S; Kemp, Zoe; Webb, Emily; Spain, Sarah; Sullivan, Kate; Barclay, Ella; Lubbe, Steven; Jaeger, Emma; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Broderick, Peter; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Lucassen, Anneke; Bishop, D Timothy; Evans, D Gareth; Maher, Eamonn R; Steinke, Verena; Rahner, Nils; Schackert, Hans K; Goecke, Timm O; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Propping, Peter; Van Wezel, Tom; Wijnen, Juul; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Thomas, Huw; Houlston, Richard S; Tomlinson, Ian

    2008-12-01

    Previously we have localized to chromosome 3q21-q24, a predisposition locus for colorectal cancer (CRC), through a genome-wide linkage screen (GWLS) of 69 families without familial adenomatous polyposis or hereditary non-polyposis CRC. To further investigate Mendelian susceptibility to CRC, we extended our screen to include a further GWLS of an additional 34 CRC families. We also searched for a disease gene at 3q21-q24 by linkage disequilibrium mapping in 620 familial CRC cases and 960 controls by genotyping 1676 tagging SNPs and sequencing 30 candidate genes from the region. Linkage analysis was conducted using the Affymetrix 10K SNP array. Data from both GWLSs were pooled and multipoint linkage statistics computed. The maximum NPL score (3.01; P=0.0013) across all families was at 3q22, maximal evidence for linkage coming from families segregating rectal CRC. The same genomic position also yielded the highest multipoint heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score under a dominant model (HLOD=2.79; P=0.00034), with an estimated 43% of families linked. In the case-control analysis, the strongest association was obtained at rs698675 (P=0.0029), but this was not significant after adjusting for multiple testing. Analysis of candidate gene mapping to the region of maximal linkage on 3q22 failed to identify a causal mutation. There was no evidence for linkage to the previously reported 9q CRC locus (NPL=0.95, P=0.23; HLOD(dominant)=0.40, HLOD(recessive)=0.20). Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that variation at 3q22 contributes to the risk of CRC, but this is unlikely to be mediated through a restricted set of alleles.

  5. [Significance of ophthalmological imaging in common hereditary retinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, K; Kernt, M; Reznicek, L

    2013-03-01

    Over the past years, a significant progress in genetic, functional and imaging diagnostics in hereditary retinal diseases has been made. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) as well as fundus autofluorescence (FAF) allow for high-resolution, non-invasive imaging - from various perspectives - of retinal and choroidal layers of the posterior fundus. Both techniques have gained more and more significance in the diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. Of all patients presented in this review, extensive family history was taken and a clinical ophthalmological examination performed. OCT scans as well as FAF images were acquired and compared to results of other functional and molecular genetic tests in the context of each disease. The presented cases in this review addressing hereditary retinal diseases (Best's disease, Stargardt's disease, cone-rod dystrophy, retinitis pigmentosa, achromatopsia, and X-linked retinoschisis) show the significance of ophthalmic imaging (OCT + FAF) for a targeted diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. The described imaging techniques (OCT + FAF) are becoming more and more important in the diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. Due to increasing availability of the devices, earlier detection of typical morphological changes not seen in clinical fundoscopy is feasible. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Childhood-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majander, Anna; Bowman, Richard; Poulton, Joanna; Antcliff, Richard J; Reddy, M Ashwin; Michaelides, Michel; Webster, Andrew R; Chinnery, Patrick F; Votruba, Marcela; Moore, Anthony T; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    The onset of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is relatively rare in childhood. This study describes the clinical and molecular genetic features observed in this specific LHON subgroup. Our retrospective study consisted of a UK paediatric LHON cohort of 27 patients and 69 additional cases identified from a systematic review of the literature. Patients were included if visual loss occurred at the age of 12 years or younger with a confirmed pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutation: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A or m.14484T>C. In the UK paediatric LHON cohort, three patterns of visual loss and progression were observed: (1) classical acute (17/27, 63%); (2) slowly progressive (4/27, 15%); and (3) insidious or subclinical (6/27, 22%). Diagnostic delays of 3-15 years occurred in children with an insidious mode of onset. Spontaneous visual recovery was more common in patients carrying the m.3460G>A and m.14484T>C mutations compared with the m.11778G>A mutation. Based a meta-analysis of 67 patients with available visual acuity data, 26 (39%) patients achieved a final best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ≥0.5 Snellen decimal in at least one eye, whereas 13 (19%) patients had a final BCVA <0.05 in their better seeing eye. Although childhood-onset LHON carries a relatively better visual prognosis, approximately 1 in 5 patients will remain within the visual acuity criteria for legal blindness in the UK. The clinical presentation can be insidious and LHON should be considered in the differential diagnosis when faced with a child with unexplained subnormal vision and optic disc pallor. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis and growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, S K; Gidvani, V K; Rettig, K R

    2001-01-01

    To describe two patients with hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) and growth hormone deficiency and to review the literature on HGF and related endocrine abnormalities. We present case reports of two patients (first cousins)-an 8-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy-with an existing diagnosis of HGF, who were assessed because of presumed growth failure. Both patients underwent growth hormone stimulation testing and more in-depth endocrine evaluation, including measurement of morning cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and prolactin levels as well as thyroid function tests. An ACTH stimulation test was also performed. Radiologic evaluation included assessment of bone age and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. In addition to HGF, both patients had short stature, subnormal growth velocity, and delayed bone age but no abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Serum prolactin levels and results of thyroid function tests were normal. Subnormal growth hormone response was noted during hypoglycemia and pharmacologic stimuli with clonidine and levodopa. The female patient, who also had recurrent hypoglycemic episodes, had a suboptimal cortisol and ACTH response during hypoglycemia. On the ACTH stimulation test, she showed an inadequate cortisol response at 30 minutes but a normal response at 60 minutes. The male patient had normal morning cortisol and ACTH levels plus a normal response to ACTH stimulation. Both patients are responding well to treatment with growth hormone. The girl is also receiving cortisol replacement and has had no further episodes of hypoglycemia. Although HGF has been described as an isolated finding, it can occur as part of a syndrome, including infrequent endocrine abnormalities such as growth hormone insufficiency. The cause of the growth hormone deficiency remains unclear in these two patients. We believe that patients with HGF should be monitored carefully for a prolonged period for growth as well as other

  8. Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Transferrin Receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juxing

    2011-01-01

    Background Multicellular organisms regulate the uptake of calories, trace elements, and other nutrients by complex feedback mechanisms. In the case of iron, the body senses internal iron stores, iron requirements for hematopoiesis, and inflammatory status, and regulates iron uptake by modulating the uptake of dietary iron from the intestine. Both the liver and the intestine participate in the coordination of iron uptake and distribution in the body. The liver senses inflammatory signals and iron status of the organism and secretes a peptide hormone, hepcidin. Under high iron or inflammatory conditions hepcidin levels increase. Hepcidin binds to the iron transport protein, ferroportin (FPN), promoting FPN internalization and degradation. Decreased FPN levels reduce iron efflux out of intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages into the circulation. Derangements in iron metabolism result in either the abnormal accumulation of iron in the body, or in anemias. The identification of the mutations that cause the iron overload disease, hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), or iron-refractory iron-deficiencey anemia has revealed many of the proteins used to regulate iron uptake. Scope of the review In this review we discuss recent data concerning the regulation of iron homeostasis in the body by the liver and how transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) affects this process. Major conclusions TfR2 plays a key role in regulating iron homeostasis in the body. General significance The regulation of iron homeostasis is important. One third of the people in the world are anemic. HH is the most common inherited disease in people of Northern European origin and can lead to severe health complications if left untreated. PMID:21864651

  9. Optimal management of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neetika Garg,1 Monica Khunger,2 Arjun Gupta,3 Nilay Kumar4 1Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India; 3Department of Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, also known by the eponym Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome, is a group of related disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations (AVM in the skin, mucous membranes, and/or internal organs such as brain, lungs, and liver. Its prevalence is currently estimated at one in 5,000 to 8,000. Most cases are due to mutations in the endoglin (HHT1 or ACVRLK1 (HHT2 genes. Telangiectasias in nasal and gastrointestinal mucosa generally present with recurrent/chronic bleeding and iron deficiency anemia. Larger AVMs occur in lungs (~40%–60% of affected individuals, liver (~40%–70%, brain (~10%, and spine (~1%. Due to the devastating and potentially fatal complications of some of these lesions (for example, strokes and brain abscesses with pulmonary AVMs, presymptomatic screening and treatment are of utmost importance. However, due to the rarity of this condition, many providers lack an appreciation for the whole gamut of its manifestations and complications, age-dependent penetrance, and marked intrafamilial variation. As a result, HHT remains frequently underdiagnosed and many families do not receive the appropriate screening and treatments. This article provides an overview of the clinical features of HHT, discusses the clinical and genetic diagnostic strategies, and presents an up-to-date review of literature and detailed considerations regarding screening for visceral AVMs, preventive modalities, and treatment options. Keywords: arteriovenous

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis (abbreviated POIKTMP ), is a disorder that affects many ...

  11. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  12. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  13. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravochuck, Sara E; Church, James M

    2017-12-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is defined by family history, and Lynch syndrome (LS) is defined genetically. However, universal tumour testing is now increasingly used to screen for patients with defective mismatch repair. This mixing of the results of family history, tumour testing and germline testing produces multiple permutations and combinations that can foster confusion. We wanted to clarify hereditary colorectal cancer using the three dimensions of classification: family history, tumour testing and germline testing. Family history (Amsterdam I or II criteria versus not Amsterdam criteria) was used to define patients and families with HNPCC. Tumour testing and germline testing were then performed to sub-classify patients and families. The permutations of these classifications are applied to our registry. There were 234 HNPCC families: 129 had LS of which 55 were three-dimensional Lynch (family history, tumour testing and germline testing), 66 were two-dimensional Lynch and eight were one-dimensional Lynch. A total of 10 families had tumour Lynch (tumours with microsatellite instability or loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein but an Amsterdam-negative family and negative germline testing), five were Lynch like (Amsterdam-positive family, tumours with microsatellite instability or loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein on immunohistochemistry but negative germline testing), 26 were familial colorectal cancer type X and 95 were HNPCC. Hereditary colorectal cancer can be confusing. Sorting families in three dimensions can clarify the confusion and may direct further testing and, ultimately, surveillance. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  14. Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia in Portugal: a population-based prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Paula; Ruano, Luis; Loureiro, José L; Cruz, Vitor T; Barros, José; Tuna, Assunção; Barbot, Clara; Guimarães, João; Alonso, Isabel; Silveira, Isabel; Sequeiros, Jorge; Marques Neves, José; Serrano, Pedro; Silva, M Carolina

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiological data on hereditary cerebellar ataxia (HCA) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are scarce. To present the prevalence and distribution of HCA and HSP in Portugal. Population-based, nationwide, systematic survey, from January 1, 1994, through April 15, 2004, in Portugal. Multiple sources of information were used (review of clinical files, active collaboration of neurologists and geneticists, and investigation of affected families), but the main source was active collaboration of general practitioners. Patients were examined by the same team of neurologists, using homogeneous inclusion criteria. The clinical data were registered, and all families were genetically tested. Overall, 1336 patients from a population of 10,322 million were diagnosed as having HCA or HSP, a prevalence of 12.9 per 100,000 population. Hereditary cerebellar ataxia was more prevalent (prevalence, 8.9 per 100,000 population; 5.6 for dominant and 3.3 for recessive ataxias) than HSP (prevalence, 4.1 per 100,000 population; 2.4 for dominant and 1.6 for recessive). Machado-Joseph disease (spinocerebellar ataxia type 3) (prevalence, 3.1 per 100,000 population), Friedreich ataxia (prevalence, 1.0 per 100,000 population), and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (prevalence, 0.4 per 100,000 population) were the most frequent HCAs. Spastic paraplegia types 4 (prevalence, 0.91 per 100,000 population), 3 (prevalence, 0.14 per 100,000 population), and 11 (prevalence, 0.26 per 100,000 population) were the most prevalent HSPs. This population-based survey covered all the Portuguese territory and mobilized most general practitioners and health centers. To our best knowledge, this survey was the largest ever performed for HCA and HSP. Prevalence of autosomal dominant ataxias was high, particularly for Machado-Joseph disease (spinocerebellar ataxia type 3). The genetic cause has not been identified in 39.7% of the patients studied.

  15. Hereditary predisposition to ovarian cancer, looking beyond BRCA1/BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minion, Lindsey E; Dolinsky, Jill S; Chase, Dana M; Dunlop, Charles L; Chao, Elizabeth C; Monk, Bradley J

    2015-04-01

    Genetic predisposition to ovarian cancer is well documented. With the advent of next generation sequencing, hereditary panel testing provides an efficient method for evaluating multiple genes simultaneously. Therefore, we sought to investigate the contribution of 19 genes identified in the literature as increasing the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in a BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative population of patients with a personal history of breast and/or ovarian cancer by means of a hereditary cancer panel. Subjects were referred for multi-gene panel testing between February 2012 and March 2014. Clinical data was ascertained from requisition forms. The incidence of pathogenic mutations (including likely pathogenic), and variant of unknown significance were then calculated for each gene and/or patient cohort. In this cohort of 911 subjects, panel testing identified 67 mutations. With 7.4% of subjects harboring a mutation on this multi-gene panel, the diagnostic yield was increased, compared to testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations alone. In the ovarian cancer probands, the most frequently mutated genes were BRIP1 (n=8; 1.72%) and MSH6 (n=6; 1.29%). In the breast cancer probands, mutations were most commonly observed in CHEK2 (n=9; 2.54%), ATM (n=3; 0.85%), and TP53 (n=3; 0.85%). Although further studies are needed to clarify the exact management of patients with a mutation in each gene, this study highlights information that can be captured with panel testing and provides support for incorporation of panel testing into clinical practice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. High prevalence of hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in central Norway: from clinical observation to evidence.

    OpenAIRE

    von Krogh A S; Quist-Paulsen P; Waage A; Langseth Ø O; Thorstensen K; Brudevold R; Tjønnfjord G E; Largiadèr C R; Lämmle B; Kremer Hovinga J A

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The population prevalence of hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is unknown. We studied the prevalence of hereditary TTP and population frequencies of two ADAMTS 13 mutations. A high frequency of hereditary TTP related to ADAMTS 13 mutation c.4143_4144dupA was found. Vicinity of ABO blood group and ADAMTS 13 loci may facilitate screening of ADAMTS 13 mutations. Background Hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused by ADAMTS 13 mutations is a rare b...

  17. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Luciano Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody) is a well established serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  18. Hereditary stomatocytosis: First case report from Valley of Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Rasool

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomatocytes are erythrocytes with a central slit or mouth-shaped (stoma area of central pallor when examined on dried smears. In wet preparations, they are uniconcave rather than biconcave, giving them a bowllike appearance. In vitro, stomatocytes are produced by drugs that intercalate into the inner half of the lipid bilayer, thereby expanding the inner lipid surface area relative to that of the outer half of the bilayer. Hereditary stomatocytosis (also known as hereditary hydrocytosis, or overhydrated stomatocytosis refers to a heterogeneous group of autosomal dominant hemolytic anemias caused by altered sodium permeability of the red cell membrane. We present the first case report of hereditary stomatocytosis in a 10-year-old male from the valley of Kashmir. Only eight families with this condition have been described worldwide.

  19. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  20. [Hereditary hemachromatosis: clinical case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ricardo; Tagle, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Hemachromatosis is a hereditary condition, producing progressive iron overload as a result of the mutation in proteins that regulate intestinal iron absorption. It is a systemic disease with several manifestations including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, joint disease and a proportion of asymptomatic patients. When it is diagnosed and treatment with phlebotomies is initiated before any organ damage is developed, the prognosis is very good, with normal survival free of manifestations. This condition is common in European populations. We report the case of a Peruvian patient of European ancestry who is asymptomatic, but has high levels of aminotransferases and elevated iron markers. Genetic testing confirmed the patient's diagnosis of hereditary hemachromatosis.

  1. [Efficiency of color vision tests in hereditary dyschromatopsia: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luciene Chaves; Urbano, Lúcia Carvalho de Ventura

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe two cases of hereditary dyschromatopsia and discuss the efficiency of the color vision tests. The patients were disapproved in different federal public examinations because Ishihara's test diagnosed hereditary dyschromatopsia. Ophthalmological evaluation was normal. No symptoms related to dyschromatopsia were presented. Panels D15 and Roth D 28 were normal. Desaturated D 15 showed deuteranomaly in case one. In the second case the comparative color vision tests showed nonspecific disorder. The diagnosis of dyschromatopsia is complex. The authors recommend comparative color vision tests to complement the Ishihara test for a better understanding of the color deficiency.

  2. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert [Helsingfors, FI; Vogelstein, Bert [Baltimore, MD; Kinzler, Kenneth W [Baltimore, MD

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  3. Founder and recurrent CDH1 mutations in families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurah, Pardeep; MacMillan, Andrée; Boyd, Niki; Senz, Janine; De Luca, Alessandro; Chun, Nicki; Suriano, Gianpaolo; Zaor, Sonya; Van Manen, Lori; Gilpin, Cathy; Nikkel, Sarah; Connolly-Wilson, Mary; Weissman, Scott; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sebold, Courtney; Greenstein, Robert; Stroop, Jennifer; Yim, Dwight; Panzini, Benoit; McKinnon, Wendy; Greenblatt, Marc; Wirtzfeld, Debrah; Fontaine, Daniel; Coit, Daniel; Yoon, Sam; Chung, Daniel; Lauwers, Gregory; Pizzuti, Antonio; Vaccaro, Carlos; Redal, Maria Ana; Oliveira, Carla; Tischkowitz, Marc; Olschwang, Sylviane; Gallinger, Steven; Lynch, Henry; Green, Jane; Ford, James; Pharoah, Paul; Fernandez, Bridget; Huntsman, David

    2007-06-06

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is caused by germline mutations in the epithelial cadherin (CDH1) gene and is characterized by an increased risk for diffuse gastric cancer and lobular breast cancer. To determine whether recurring germline CDH1 mutations occurred due to independent mutational events or common ancestry. Thirty-eight families diagnosed clinically with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer were accrued between November 2004 and January 2006 and were analyzed for CDH1 mutations as part of an ongoing study at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Twenty-six families had at least 2 gastric cancer cases with 1 case of diffuse gastric cancer in a person younger than 50 years; 12 families had either a single case of diffuse gastric cancer diagnosed in a person younger than 35 years or multiple cases of diffuse gastric cancer diagnosed in persons older than 50 years. Classification of family members as carriers or noncarriers of CDH1 mutations. Haplotype analysis to assess recurring mutations for common ancestry was performed on 7 families from this study and 7 previously reported families with the same mutations. Thirteen mutations (6 novel) were identified in 15 of the 38 families (40% detection rate). The 1137G>A splicing mutation and the 1901C>T (A634V) missense/splicing mutation occurred on common haplotypes in 2 families but on different haplotypes in a third family. The 2195G>A (R732Q) missense/splicing mutation occurred in 2 families on different haplotypes. The 2064-2065delTG mutation occurred on a common haplotype in 2 families. Two families from this study plus 2 additional families carrying the novel 2398delC mutation shared a common haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. All 4 families originate from the southeast coast of Newfoundland. Due to concentrations of lobular breast cancer cases, 2 branches of this family had been diagnosed as having hereditary breast cancer and were tested for BRCA mutations. Within these 4 families, the cumulative risk

  4. Clinical features of pure hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Qian-qian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical features and diagnostic methods of patients with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. Methods Patients diagnosed with pure HSP from October 2006 to February 2013 admitted to Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University were included. The patients were assessed by the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale and the clinical features were reviewed. Results Thirty-three HSP patients (21 men and 12 women were included in the study. Thirteen patients (39.39% had family history of HSP and the most common genetic mode of the familial cases were autosomal dominant inheritance (11/13. The mean age of onset were (20.35 ± 15.55 years and the mean disease duration were (12.77 ± 9.83 years. All of the included patients presented with signs of impairment of the pyramidal tract such as increased muscular tone, tendon hyperreflexia and positive Babinski's sign of the lower limbs. Impairment of the pyramidal tract also presented in the upper limbs in some patients. Scissors gait appeared in 29 patients and feet deformity in 5 patients. Atrophy of thoracic cord on MRI were presented in 5 patients while 2 patients complicated with peripheral nerve damage. Four patients had a novel exon 10-17 deletion in SPG4 gene. There were no differences in onset age, disease duration and mean score of the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale between male and female patients as well as between patients with and without family history (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion The onset age of pure HSP is variational and males are more common than females. The most common inheritance mode is autosomal dominant and most of the cases are characterized by impairment of the pyramidal tract of the lower limbs and occasionally bladder dysfunction and peripheral nerve damage. Gender and family history do not affect the clinical features. Clinical features, family history and spinal cord MRI will assist the correct diagnosis, and making a definite

  5. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53).

  6. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar T

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social issues relevant to the given population in running the Hereditary Cancer Clinic.

  7. Sulindac treatment in hereditary non-pollyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, Fleur E. M.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; van der Sluis, Tineke; Ek, Wytske Boersma-van; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, e.g. sulindac have been extensively studied for chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis, but not in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We evaluated these effects in HNPCC using surrogate end-points for cancer risk. In a randomised

  8. Benefits and risks of danazol in hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Konrad; Bygum, Anette; Hardt, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1 inhibitor deficiency is clinically characterized by relapsing skin swellings, abdominal pain attacks, and life-threatening upper airway obstruction. Treatment with androgens prevents attacks for those with this condition. OBJECTIVE: To examine the...

  9. Dementia with non-hereditary cystatin C angiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Jóhannesson, G

    1989-01-01

    Brain biopsies from two patients with non-hereditary cerebral hemorrhages and eighty autopsied cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia are presented. The biopsied cases, both males aged 64 and 59, had a sudden onset of cerebral hemorrhage, mild progressive dementia and cystatin C cerebral...

  10. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  11. REVIEW ARTICLE Therapeutic avenues for hereditary forms of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chitra

    Key words: retinal disease; retinitis pigmentosa; gene therapy; retinoid; clinical trial; stem cell; cell therapy. Abstract. Hereditary retinal diseases, known as retinal degenerations or dystrophies, are a large group of inherited eye disorders resulting in irreversible visual loss and blindness. They develop due to mutations in one ...

  12. Guidelines for the genetic diagnosis of hereditary recurrent fevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinar, Y; Obici, L; Aksentijevich, I

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary recurrent fevers (HRFs) are a group of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases characterised by recurrent bouts of fever and serosal inflammation that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes important for the regulation of innate immunity. Discovery of the molecular defects responsible ...

  13. Study of glycolytic intermediates in hereditary elliptocytosis with thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavri Roshan

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic intermediates like ATP, DPG and GSH have been studied in a family with. hereditary elliptocytosis and thalassemia. Results indicate a fall in ATP with a concomitant rise in DPG in the Patient. Findings are discussed in relation to other data.

  14. Report of hereditary gingival fibromatosis in two Nigerian siblings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare condition with a prevalence of 1:750,000, and can present as an isolated disorder or more rarely as a syndrome component. It is characterised by a slow and progressive enlargement of both maxillary and mandibular 28rganiza with varying severity between ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and eventual paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). The spasticity and paraplegia result from degeneration (atrophy) of motor neurons , which are specialized nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control muscle movement. Hereditary ...

  16. Mitochondrial processes are impaired in hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, I.; Novershtern, N.; Itzhaki, Z.; Becker-Cohen, M.; Sadeh, M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Friedman, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. To elucidate the pathological mechanisms leading

  17. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  18. Managing oral bleeding in children with hereditary bleeding disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevention of traumatic and infective dental conditions is an important part of oral health care in individuals with hereditary bleeding disorders. This would reduce the need for treatment and should reduce the number of emergency visits. Key words: Haemophilia, von Willebrand disease, gingival bleeding, dental ...

  19. Progressive cerebellar atrophy: hereditary ataxias and disorders with spinocerebellar degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, N.I.; Koenig, M.; Dulac, O.L.M.; Sarnat, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias with onset in childhood are a group of heterogeneous disorders, usually with autosomal recessive inheritance. In many of them, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows cerebellar atrophy. The most prominent exception to this is Friedreich's ataxia, where MRI shows normal

  20. RECRUITMENT OF PATIENTS WITH HEREDITARY HAEMOCHROMATOSIS AS BLOOD DONORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Cukjati

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary haemochromatosis is the most common inherited disorder in white persons with prevalence of about 1 in 200. Therapeutic phlebotomy is an effective treatment for the disease and prevents its sequele. In addition to their altruism, patients with hereditary haemochromatosis have also medical and monetary incentives for blood donation. Current guidelines do not allow haemochromatosis patients to donate blood. About two thirds of patients are eligible as blood donors and about two thirds of therapeutically drawn blood is suitable for transfusion. Therapeutically drawn blood could increase the blood supply by 1.5 to 30%.Conclusions. The number of states that already accept patients with hereditary haemochromatosis as blood donors is increasing. To avoid monetary incentives they offer free phlebotomies for all patients with hereditary haemochromatosis. There have been no reports about higher incidence of transfusion reactions. In Slovenia the number of therapeutic phlebotomy is increasing. We should evaluate the possibilities for recruitment of haemochromatosis patients as blood donors also in our country. It is necessary to modify regulatory restrictions and to ensure that there is no other incentives than altruism for blood donation.

  1. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Kirkman; P. Yu-Wai-Man (Patrick); A. Korsten (Alex); M. Leonhardt (Miriam); K. Dimitriadis (Konstantin); I.F.M. de Coo (René); T. Klopstock (Thomas); P.F. Chinnery

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to

  2. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  3. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  4. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis: report of family case series ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hereditary gingival hyperplasia (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by hyperplastic, dense fibrous connective tissue with acanthotic gingival epithelium. A family presented at the School of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi with a complaint that some of the children developed swollen gums very early in life and that ...

  5. Hereditary primary open angle glaucoma: case study of a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To present a case of hereditary primary open angle glaucoma in a Nigerian family. Method: Six members of an Ibo family from Delta State, Nigeria were interviewed and examined by the authors. Information on age, gender, tribe, history of blindness, eye disease and other medical conditions was recorded.

  6. Hereditary atypical retinitis pigmentosa: case report | Omoti | Annals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report presents four generations of hereditary atypical (pericentric) retinitis pigmentosa in an Itsekiri family of Warri, Delta state of Nigeria. The patients presented with nyctalopia, waxy disc pallor, arteriolar attenuation, pigment deposits around the optic nerve and visual field loss. The cases were typically mild with ...

  7. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...

  8. Mutations in TITF-1 are associated with benign hereditary chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Breedveld (Guido); A. Guala (Andrea); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.K. Percy; L.S. Dure; P. Harper; W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); L.P. Lazarou; H. van der Linde; B.B.A. de Vries (Bert); M. Joosse (Marijke); M.E. MacDonald; H. Krude; A. Grüters (Annette); J.W.F. van Dongen (Jeroen); C. Danesino (Cesare); P. Heutink (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBenign hereditary chorea (BHC) (MIM 118700) is an autosomal dominant movement disorder. The early onset of symptoms (usually before the age of 5 years) and the observation that in some BHC families the symptoms tend to decrease in adulthood suggests that the disorder

  9. Mutations in TITF-1 are associated with benign hereditary chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, GJ; van Dongen, JWF; Danesino, C; Guala, A; Percy, AK; Dure, LS; Harper, P; Lazarou, LP; van der Linde, H; Joosse, M; Gruters, A; MacDonald, ME; de Vries, BBA; Arts, WFM; Oostra, BA; Krude, H; Heutink, P

    2002-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) (MIM 118700) is an autosomal dominant movement disorder. The early onset of symptoms (usually before the age of 5 years) and the observation that in some BHC families the symptoms tend to decrease in adulthood suggests that the disorder results from a developmental

  10. Mutations in TITF-1 are associated with benign hereditary chorea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, G.J.; Dongen, J.W. van; Danesino, C.; Guala, A.; Percy, A.K.; Dure, L.S.; Harper, P.; Lazarou, L.P.; Linde, H. van der; Joosse, M.; Gruters, A.; MacDonald, M.E.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Arts, P.J.W.; Oostra, B.A.; Krude, H.; Heutink, P.

    2002-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) (MIM 118700) is an autosomal dominant movement disorder. The early onset of symptoms (usually before the age of 5 years) and the observation that in some BHC families the symptoms tend to decrease in adulthood suggests that the disorder results from a developmental

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA typically get open sores (ulcers) on their feet or hands or infections of the soft tissue of the fingertips (whitlows) that are slow to heal. Because affected ... of these sores, they may not seek immediate treatment. Without treatment, ...

  12. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199

  13. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    2012-01-01

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199

  14. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, R. J.; Tijmes, N. T.; Cobben, J. M.; Bolhuis, P. A.; van Nesselrooij, B. P.; Houtman, W. A.; de Kok-Nazaruk, M. M.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between

  15. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is an important cause of progressive painless visual loss among young male patients. OBJECTIVE: To report on a case of a young patient with a clinical and neurophysiological condition suggestive of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, confirmed by genetic testing. CASE REPORT: We describe a 17-year-old male with progressive bilateral visual loss. Two maternal uncles had had similar patterns of visual loss. The patient had a history of smoking and alcohol abuse. Neuro-ophthalmological examination revealed visual acuity of 20/800 in both eyes, with decreased direct and consensual pupillary light reflexes. Fundus examination demonstrated pale optic discs. The visual evoked potential test showed signs of conduction disturbances in both optic nerves and campimetric study showed complete visual loss in all fields of both eyes. A diagnosis of bilateral optic neuropathy with a clinical suspicion of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy was made. A blood sample was submitted to genetic analysis in relation to the principal mutations of this disorder, and homoplasmic mutation in 11778 was detected, thereby confirming the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  16. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, RJ; Tijmes, NT; Cobben, JM; Bolhuis, PA; vanNesselrooij, BPM; Houtman, WA; deKokNazaruk, MM; BleekerWagemakers, EM

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between

  17. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three

  18. Hereditary hemochromatosis: genetic complexity and new diagnostic approaches.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, D.W.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Bergmans, J.; Marx, J.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996, several novel gene defects have been detected, explaining the mechanism and diversity of iron-overload diseases. At least 4 main types of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) have been identified. Surprisingly, genes involved in HH encode for

  19. [Intrathecal baclofen in hereditary spastic paraparesis: benefits and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecq, V; Muller, F; Joseph, P-A; Cuny, E; Mazaux, J-M; Barat, M

    2007-10-01

    Chronic intrathecal delivery of baclofen has been introduced for treatment of severe spinal spasticity. Very little is known about this treatment in hereditary spastic paraparesis. Here we review the benefits and limitations of pump implantation for baclofen delivery in this population. Consecutive patients presenting with hereditary spastic paraparesis were assessed for spasticity (Ashworth and Penn scores), muscular strength and walking (speed, comfort and perimeter length). The effect of intrathecal delivery of baclofen was judged after progressive bolus injections or chronic administration by electrical syringe. The pump implantation was proposed when spasticity scores decreased by 2 or more points, with muscular strength preserved and walking area increased. We investigated 6 patients (3 males; mean age 48 years) with hereditary spastic paraparesis. The mean follow-up was 19 years; for 4 patients who received pump implantation, the mean follow-up was 6.2 years. The mean baclofen daily dose was 75 mug. Satisfaction was high for patients who received implantation early instead of waiting for the natural course of the disease. Some patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis have good functional improvement with chronic intrathecal delivery of baclofen if walking is still possible. Despite the natural history of the disease, functional results are stable during the first 5 years of treatment. The data indicate a possible compromise between decreased spasticity and muscular strengthening with the treatment.

  20. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  1. Multi-gene panel testing for hereditary cancer predisposition in unsolved high-risk breast and ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Beth; Adams, Sophie B; Sittler, Taylor; van den Akker, Jeroen; Chan, Salina; Leitner, Ofri; Ryan, Lauren; Gil, Elad; van 't Veer, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Many women with an elevated risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer have previously tested negative for pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Among them, a subset has hereditary susceptibility to cancer and requires further testing. We sought to identify specific groups who remain at high risk and evaluate whether they should be offered multi-gene panel testing. We tested 300 women on a multi-gene panel who were previously enrolled in a long-term study at UCSF. As part of their long-term care, all previously tested negative for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 either by limited or comprehensive sequencing. Additionally, they met one of the following criteria: (i) personal history of bilateral breast cancer, (ii) personal history of breast cancer and a first or second degree relative with ovarian cancer, and (iii) personal history of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal carcinoma. Across the three groups, 26 women (9%) had a total of 28 pathogenic mutations associated with hereditary cancer susceptibility, and 23 women (8%) had mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2. Ashkenazi Jewish and Hispanic women had elevated pathogenic mutation rates. In addition, two women harbored pathogenic mutations in more than one hereditary predisposition gene. Among women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancer who have previously tested negative for pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, we identified three groups of women who should be considered for subsequent multi-gene panel testing. The identification of women with multiple pathogenic mutations has important implications for family testing.

  2. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  3. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  4. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-08-07

    To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level. MSI was detected in the specimens from 20 cases with HNPCC, 20 cases with ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and 20 cases with sporadic colorectal cancer by means of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism. The positive rate of MSI was 85% (17/20) in HNPCC group, 40% (8/20) in ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer group and 10% (2/20) in the sporadic colorectal cancer group respectively. The differences were significant. The mean ages of the three groups were 43.6, 52.2, and 61.8 years respectively, which increased gradually. The incidence of right hemicolon cancer was 64.7%, 37.5%, and 0% respectively, which decreased gradually and had significant difference. The expression ratio of BAT26 and BAT25 was 94.1% respectively, which was highest in the 5 gene sites studied. The incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was 70.6% in HNPCC group among high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), which was higher than the other two groups, which had 50% and 50% respectively. The incidence of MSI-H is higher in HNPCC group. The detection of MSI is simple and economical and has high correlation with the clinicopathologic feature of HNPCC and can be used as a screening method to detect the germ line mutation of the mismatch repair gene.

  5. Genetic testing for hereditary cancer predisposition: BRCA1/2, Lynch syndrome, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M J; Obeid, E I; Schwartz, S C; Mantia-Smaldone, G; Forman, A D; Daly, M B

    2016-03-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists and gynecologic oncologists serve an integral role in the care of women at increased hereditary risk of cancer. Their contribution includes initial identification of high risk patients, screening procedures like bimanual exam, trans-vaginal ultrasound and endometrial biopsy, prophylaxis via TAH and/or BSO, and chemoprevention. Further, gynecologists also serve a central role in the management of the secondary repercussions of efforts to mitigate increased cancer risks, including vasomotor symptoms, sexual function, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and mental health. The past several years has seen multiple new high and moderate penetrance genes introduced into the clinical care of women at increased risk of gynecologic malignancy. Awareness of these new genes and the availability of new multi-gene panel tests is critical for providers on the front-line of women's health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic testing for hereditary cancer predisposition: BRCA1/2, Lynch syndrome, and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, MJ; Obeid, EI; Schwartz, SC; Mantia-Smaldone, G; Forman, AD; Daly, MB

    2016-01-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists and gynecologic oncologists serve an integral role in the care of women at increased hereditary risk of cancer. Their contribution includes initial identification of high risk patients, screening procedures like bimanual exam, trans-vaginal ultrasound and endometrial biopsy, prophylaxis via TAH and/or BSO, and chemoprevention. Further, gynecologists also serve a central role in the management of the secondary repercussions of efforts to mitigate increased cancer risks, including vasomotor symptoms, sexual function, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and mental health. The past several years has seen multiple new high and moderate penetrance genes introduced into the clinical care of women at increased risk of gynecologic malignancy. Awareness of these new genes and the availability of new multigene panel tests is critical for providers on the front-line of women’s health. PMID:26812021

  7. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: An update and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Viral M; Handler, Marc Z; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that predisposes individuals to multiple cutaneous leiomyomas, renal cell carcinomas, and in women, uterine leiomyomas. Also known as Reed syndrome, it is caused by a germline heterozygous mutation of the fumarate hydratase tumor suppressor gene. HLRCC is associated with significant morbidity because of pain from cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, the cutaneous pain often of unique character. Although genetic testing is currently considered the criterion standard to diagnose HLRCC, newer immunohistochemistry markers may provide rapid and cost effective alternatives to genetic testing. Because of the potentially aggressive nature of renal cell carcinomas that develop as early as in childhood, close annual cancer surveillance is desirable in individuals with HLRCC. In this review, we offer an update and an approach to the diagnosis, management, and renal cancer surveillance in HLRCC. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. New treatments addressing the pathophysiology of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alvin E

    2008-04-14

    Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a deficiency of C1-inhibitor. The condition is the result of a defect in the gene controlling the synthesis of C1-inhibitor, which regulates the activity of a number of plasma cascade systems. Although the prevalence of hereditary angioedema is low - between 1:10,000 to 1:50,000 - the condition can result in considerable pain, debilitation, reduced quality of life, and even death in those afflicted. Hereditary angioedema presents clinically as cutaneous swelling of the extremities, face, genitals, and trunk, or painful swelling of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Angioedema of the upper airways is extremely serious and has resulted in death by asphyxiation.Subnormal levels of C1-inhibitor are associated with the inappropriate activation of a number of pathways - including, in particular, the complement and contact systems, and to some extent, the fibrinolysis and coagulation systems.Current findings indicate bradykinin, a product of contact system activation, as the primary mediator of angioedema in patients with C1-inhibitor deficiency. However, other systems may play a role in bradykinin's rapid and excessive generation by depleting available levels of C1-inhibitor.There are currently no effective therapies in the United States to treat acute attacks of hereditary angioedema, and currently available agents used to treat hereditary angioedema prophylactically are suboptimal. Five new agents are, however, in Phase III development. Three of these agents replace C1-inhibitor, directly addressing the underlying cause of hereditary angioedema and re-establishing regulatory control of all pathways and proteases involved in its pathogenesis. These agents include a nano-filtered C1-inhibitor replacement therapy, a pasteurized C1-inhibitor, and a recombinant C1-inhibitor isolated from the milk of transgenic rabbits. All C1-inhibitors are being investigated for acute angioedema attacks; the nano-filtered C1

  9. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, DD; Went, LN; Bruyn, GW; Scholte, HR; Hofstra, RMW; Bolhuis, PA; vanOost, BA

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA

  10. Gene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Ingrid; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-03-21

    Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is explained only in part by mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Most families with an apparent familial clustering of breast cancer who are investigated through Australia's network of genetic services and familial cancer centres do not have mutations in either of these genes. More recently, additional breast cancer predisposition genes, such as PALB2, have been identified. New genetic technology allows a panel of multiple genes to be tested for mutations in a single test. This enables more women and their families to have risk assessment and risk management, in a preventive approach to predictable breast cancer. Predictive testing for a known family-specific mutation in a breast cancer predisposition gene provides personalised risk assessment and evidence-based risk management. Breast cancer predisposition gene panel tests have a greater diagnostic yield than conventional testing of only the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The clinical validity and utility of some of the putative breast cancer predisposition genes is not yet clear. Ethical issues warrant consideration, as multiple gene panel testing has the potential to identify secondary findings not originally sought by the test requested. Multiple gene panel tests may provide an affordable and effective way to investigate the heritability of breast cancer.

  11. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Restores the Virulence of Plague Vaccine Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C.; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv−/−) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv−/− mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv−/− mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines. PMID:22896664

  12. Novel EXOSC3 mutation causes complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Ayelet; Lerer, Israela; Cohen, Rony; Kornreich, Liora; Shuper, Avinoam; Gamliel, Moria; Zimerman, Bat-El; Korabi, Isam; Meiner, Vardiella; Straussberg, Rachel; Lossos, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    We describe two pairs of siblings from a consanguineous family manifesting autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by a novel mutation in the EXOSC3 gene, previously reported in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1. Clinical findings included delayed motor milestones, early-onset spastic paraplegia, variable cognitive disability, and cerebellar signs. Cerebral imaging demonstrated enlarged cisterna magna and mild hypoplasia and atrophy of the lower vermis with a normal pons. Genetic analysis using homozygosity mapping followed by whole exome sequencing identified homozygous c.571G>T; p.G191C mutation in the EXOSC3 gene. We suggest that EXOSC3 mutations may present not only as pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1, but also as a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia without pontine hypoplasia or atrophy.

  13. Working the endless puzzle of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Francesco; Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Sfriso, Paolo; Fioretti, Maria; Costa, Luisa; Vitale, Antonio; Atteno, Mariangela; Galeazzi, Mauro; Muscari, Isabella; Magnotti, Flora; Frediani, Bruno; Punzi, Leonardo; Rigante, Donato

    2014-05-01

    Hereditary autoinflammatory disorders encompass manifold dysfunctions of innate immunity caused by mutations in genes coding for the main characters of the inflammatory scene: most of these conditions have an early onset, ranging from the first days of life to the first decades, and include hereditary periodic fevers, NLRP-related diseases, granulomatous and pyogenic syndromes, which are basically characterized by upturned inflammasome activity and overproduction of bioactive interleukin (IL)-1β and other proinflammatory cytokines. The discovery of a causative link between autoinflammation and IL-1β release has improved our understanding of the intimate mechanisms of innate immunity, and has likewise led to the identification of extraordinary treatments for many of these disorders.

  14. Management of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. The Asian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Kwong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations are the most common high penetrant genes associated with an increased lifetime risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC. Although genetic testing is standard of care in Western developed countries, there are still variations in availability of genetic testing and risk assessment for HBOC in Asia. Depending on the countries, there are variations in the clinical strategies and cancer management. The Asian BRCA Consortium has grouped together 14 Asian countries and reviewed genetic counselling/testing uptake rates and clinical management options in these countries. Moreover economic factors, healthcare and legal frameworks, and cultural issues affecting the genetic service availability in Asia were discussed. Mutation spectrum, and VUS rates and the increase use of NGS gene panel testing poses more decisional issues in the clinical management of Hereditary Breast cancer in Asia. These will be discussed. Keywords: BRCA1/BRCA2, germline, HBOC, Asia BRCA Consortium, NGS

  15. The role of the complement system in hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Veszeli, Nóra; Varga, Lilian; Prohászka, Zoltán; Farkas, Henriette

    2017-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening disorder, characterized by acute, recurring, and self-limiting edematous episodes of the face, extremities, trunk, genitals, upper airways, or the gastrointestinal tract. HAE may be caused by the deficiency of C1-inhibitor (C1-INH-HAE) but another type of the disease, hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH function (nC1-INH-HAE) was also described. The patient population is quite heterogeneous as regards the location, frequency, and severity of edematous attacks, presenting large intra- and inter-individual variation. Here, we review the role of the complement system in the pathomechanism of HAE and also present an overview on the complement parameters having an importance in the diagnosis or in predicting the severity of HAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF HEREDITARY OVARIAN CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Kotiv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most established risk factors for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. The purpose of the study was to analyze BRCA1/2 testing in ovarian cancer patients. Materials and methods. We analyzed 222 patients with ovarian cancer (OC who underwent genetic testing. Results. Recurrent Slavic mutations in these genes were detected in 60/222 (27% patients.104 patients lacked any clinical signs of hereditary form of the disease, however BRCA1/2 genetic defects were identified among 11 (11% of these women. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas were characterized by more advanced stage at diagnosis and predominance of high-grade serous histological tumor subtype. Conclusion. These results emphasize the need for BRCA1/2 testing for all patients with OC. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas have clinical and pathological cgaracteristics, which should be considered while planning therapy. 

  17. [An aged case of hereditary xanthinuria with xanthine urinary calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, K; Matsuo, T; Nakao, K

    1991-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with hereditary xanthinuria and xanthine stones is reported. She has a family history of consanguineous parents and a past history of right side nephrectomy due to a xanthine renal stone and vesicolithotomy of 3 bladder stones approximately 5 X 4 X 4 cm in size at the age of 58 and 71, respectively. Her young brother exhibited a slightly elevated urinary excretion of oxypurines. Laboratory examination showed a low serum level (0.3 mg/dl) and urinary excretion (1.56 mg/day) of uric acid, and high plasma and urine levels of oxypurines. No xanthine oxidase activity was detectably in duodenal mucosa by biopsy specimen obtained by duodenofiberscopy. Now she has another stone approximately 5 X 4 X 4 cm in her bladder. There have been are few elderly cases of hereditary xanthinuria with recurrent giant urolithiasis.

  18. Could Ossification of the Achilles Tendon Have a Hereditary Component?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawki Cortbaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ossification of the Achilles tendon (OTA is an unusual clinical condition. It is characterized by the presence of an ossified mass within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the Achilles tendon. The etiology of the ossification of the Achilles tendon is unknown. Review of the literature suggests that its etiology is multifactorial. The major contributing factors are trauma and surgery with other minor causes such as systemic diseases, metabolic conditions, and infections. To our knowledge, no previous reports suggest any genetic/hereditary predisposition in OAT. We report 3 siblings who have OAT with no history of any of the aforementioned predisposing factors. Could OAT have a hereditary component as one of its etiologies?

  19. Alteration of the erythrocyte membrane skeletal ultrastructure in hereditary spherocytosis, hereditary elliptocytosis, and pyropoikilocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S C; Derick, L H; Agre, P; Palek, J

    1990-07-01

    The membrane skeleton of normal erythrocytes is largely organized into a hexagonal lattice of junctional complexes (JC) crosslinked by spectrin tetramers, and occasional double tetramers and hexamers. To explore possible skeletal alterations in hereditary spherocytosis (HS), elliptocytosis (HE), and pyropoikilocytosis (HPP), we have studied the ultrastructure of the spread membrane skeletons from a subpopulation of HS patients with a partial spectrin deficiency ranging from 43% to 86% of normal levels, and in patients with HPP who, in addition to a mild spectrin deficiency, also carried a mutant spectrin that was dysfunctional, thus reducing the ability of spectrin dimers to assemble into tetramers. Membrane skeletons derived from Triton-treated erythrocyte ghosts were examined by negative staining electron microscopy. HS membrane skeletons contained structural elements, consisting of JC and spectrin filaments similar to the normal skeleton. However, less spectrin filaments interconnected the JC, and the decrease of spectrin filaments attached to JC appeared to correlate with the severity of spectrin deficiency. Only in severe HS associated with severe spectrin deficiency was the loss of spectrin sufficient enough to disrupt the overall skeletal architecture. In contrast, membrane skeletons prepared from red blood cells (RBCs) of subjects with HPP were strikingly different from HS RBCs with a comparable degree of spectrin deficiency. Although HPP RBCs were only mildly deficient in spectrin, their skeletal lattice was grossly disrupted, in contrast to only mild ultrastructural abnormalities of HS membrane skeletons with a nearly identical degree of spectrin deficiency. Skeletons from patients with common mild HE or asymptomatic carriers, carrying the mutant spectrin but having normal spectrin content, exhibited a moderate disruption of the skeletal lattice. We propose that the above differences in skeletal ultrastructure may underlie differences in the biomechanical

  20. Hereditary Renal Cystic Disorders: Imaging of the Kidneys and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Trout, Andrew T; Smith, Ethan A; Towbin, Alexander J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the hereditary renal cystic diseases that can manifest in children and adults, with specific attention to pathogenesis and imaging features. Various common and uncommon hereditary renal cystic diseases are reviewed in terms of their underlying etiology, including the involved genetic mutations and the affected proteins and cellular structures. Focus is placed on the morphologic findings in each condition and the features that distinguish one disorder from another. The two most common categories of hereditary renal cystic disease are (a) the ciliopathic disorders, which are related to mutations affecting the primary cilia (called "ciliopathies"), and (b) the phakomatoses. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, and the "medullary cystic disease complex" are all ciliopathies but have different phenotypes. Tuberous sclerosis complex and the associated "contiguous gene syndrome," as well as von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, are phakomatoses that can manifest with cystic renal lesions but have uniquely different extrarenal manifestations. Finally, DICER1 mutations can manifest with renal cystic lesions (typically, cystic nephromas) in patients predisposed to other malignancies in the chest, ovaries, and thyroid. Although some overlap exists in the appearance of the renal cysts associated with each of these diseases, there are clear morphologic differences (eg, cyst size, location, and complexity) that are emphasized in this review. To improve patient outcomes, it is important for the radiologist to recognize the various hereditary renal cystic diseases so that a correct diagnosis is assigned and so that the patient is adequately evaluated and followed up. ©RSNA, 2017.

  1. Blood pressure follows the kidney: Perinatal influences on hereditary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Koeners, Maarten P; Braam, Branko; Joles, Jaap A

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data strongly suggest that cardiovascular diseases can originate from an aberrant environment during fetal development, a phenomenon referred to as perinatal programming. This review will focus on the role of the kidneys in determining blood pressure, and how (re)programming the renal development can persistently ameliorate hereditary hypertension. By combining physiologic and genomic studies we have discovered some candidate pathways suited for (re)programmin...

  2. HEREDITARY INTRAVENTRICULAR CONDUCTION DISORDERS IN THE FAMILY FROM KRASNOYARSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Chernova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedigree of the family from Krasnoyarsk city with hereditary disorders of intracardiac conduction was studied. The diagnosis of each family member was verified by electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography , bicycle ergometry , ECG Holter monitoring. The family 10-year follow-up showed familial aggregation of intracardiac conduction disorders in grandson, niece, son of the proband niece, ie, in the III-degree relatives. Family history of III-degree relatives with intracardiac conduction disorders and discordant pathology is identified.

  3. Hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by the PLP1 'rumpshaker mutation'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Giraud, Geneviève; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower limbs. Mutations in PLP1 on the X chromosome cause spastic paraplegia type 2 (SPG2) or the allelic....... No definite symptoms in the female carriers could be ascribed to the mutation. These data suggest the pathology to be an underlying dysmyelinating disorder in combination with a central axonal degeneration....

  4. The diagnostic quandary of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia vs. CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J B; Ben-Aviv, D; Covello, S P

    2001-10-01

    The distribution and clinical appearance of the telangiectasia in the CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) are very similar. Several previously reported cases of the CREST syndrome simulating HHT illustrate this diagnostic quandary. We report a patient who met the diagnostic criteria for both the CREST syndrome and HHT, and discuss the distinguishing features of the two diseases, including the distinctive histopathological findings of telangiectasia in HHT.

  5. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. © International & American Associations for

  6. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with a thin corpus callosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaram, Sivaraman; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India); Raghavendra, Seetharam; Singh, Atampreet; Nair, Muraleedharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report a 15-year-old boy with autosomal recessive complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with a thin corpus callosum (HSP-TCC). The involvement of the corpus callosum was characteristic with the genu and body predominantly affected with relative sparing of the splenium. HSP-TCC is being increasingly recognized over a wider geographical area than earlier believed. We now report a case of HSP-TCC from the Indian subcontinent. (orig.)

  7. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hereditary myopathies with early respiratory insufficiency in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Milone, Margherita

    2017-11-01

    Hereditary myopathies with early respiratory insufficiency as a predominant feature of the clinical phenotype are uncommon and underestimated in adults. We reviewed the clinical and laboratory data of patients with hereditary myopathies who demonstrated early respiratory insufficiency before the need for ambulatory assistance. Only patients with disease-causing mutations or a specific histopathological diagnosis were included. Patients with cardiomyopathy were excluded. We identified 22 patients; half had isolated respiratory symptoms at onset. The diagnosis of the myopathy was often delayed, resulting in delayed ventilatory support. The most common myopathies were adult-onset Pompe disease, myofibrillar myopathy, multi-minicore disease, and myotonic dystrophy type 1. Single cases of laminopathy, MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike events), centronuclear myopathy, and cytoplasmic body myopathy were identified. We highlighted the most common hereditary myopathies associated with early respiratory insufficiency as the predominant clinical feature, and underscored the importance of a timely diagnosis for patient care. Muscle Nerve 56: 881-886, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hereditary intraosseous vascular malformation of the craniofacial region: an apparently novel disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargel, Ibrahim; Cil, Barbaros E; Er, Nuray; Ruacan, Sevket; Akarsu, A Nurten; Erk, Yucel

    2002-04-15

    . Homozygosity mapping excluded the following loci and/or genes: multiple cutaneous venous malformation (VMCM1; gene, TIE2) on chromosome 9p21; venous malformation with glomus cells (VMGLOM) on chromosome 1p22-p21; hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 1 (HHT1; gene, endoglin) and type 2 (HHT2; gene, activin) on chromosomes 9q34.1 and 12q11-q14, respectively; and cerebral cavernous malformation type 1 (CCM1; gene, KRIT1), type 2 (CCM2), and type 3 (CCM3) on chromosomes 7q11.2-q21, 7p15-p13, and 3q35.2-q27, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is a new disorder, which we call hereditary intraosseous vascular malformation of the craniofacial region. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, T; Soumittra, N; Vidubala, E; Sridevi, V; Mahajan, V; Ramanan, SG; Vijaya, S

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social...

  11. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) and microsatellite instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M; Burgart, Lawrence J; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hiatt, Robert A; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Vasen, Hans F A; Hawk, Ernest T; Barrett, J Carl; Freedman, Andrew N; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI...

  12. Review: molecular genetics and pathology of hereditary small vessel diseases of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y; Craggs, L; Baumann, M; Kalimo, H; Kalaria, R N

    2011-02-01

    Advances in molecular genetics have enabled identification of several monogenic conditions involving small vessels predisposing to ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes and diffuse white matter disease. With emphasis on cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), we review the molecular pathogenesis of recently characterized disorders including cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy (RVCL) and the Collagen type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1)-related disorders. CADASIL remains the most common hereditary small vessel disease (SVD) caused by >190 different mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, which encodes a cell-signalling receptor. Mutant NOTCH3 instigates degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells in small arteries and arterioles leading to recurrent lacunar infarcts. Mutations in the serine protease HTRA1 gene are associated with CARASIL. Aberrant HTRA1 activity results in increased transforming growth factor-β signalling provoking multiple actions including vascular fibrosis and extracellular matrix synthesis. The RVCL disorders characterized by profound retinopathy are associated with mutations in TREX1, which encodes an abundant 3'-5' DNA-specific exonuclease. TREX1 mutations lead to detrimental gain-of-function or insufficient quantities of enzyme. The COL4A1-related disorders are highly variable comprising four major phenotypes with overlapping systemic and central nervous system features including SVD with cerebral haemorrhages in children and adults. Mutant COL4A1 likely disrupts the extracellular matrix resulting in fragile vessel walls. The hereditary SVDs albeit with variable phenotypes demonstrate how effects of different defective genes converge to produce the characteristic arteriopathy and microvascular disintegration leading to vascular cognitive impairment. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and

  13. [Hereditary thyroid carcinoma and its molecular diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořáková, Sárka; Václavíková, Eliška; Sýkorová, Vlasta; Hálková, Tereza; Bendlová, Běla

    2014-04-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system and its incidence is still growing. The majority of thyroid tumors occur in sporadic form, however, some are inherited in families. The carcinomas can be divided into two groups according to the types of thyroid cells. Medullary thyroid carcinoma is derived from parafollicular C-cells. 20 - 25% of medullary thyroid carcinomas are inherited in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndromes. Genetic causes are activated by germ-line mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, which are transmitted autosomal, dominantly. At present the routine genetic screening and presymptomatic treatment (i.e. prophylactic total thyreoidectomy) on the basis of genotype-phenotype correlation has already been developed. The second group consists of carcinomas derived from follicular cells of thyroid that can be divided into differentiated (papillary and follicular) and nondifferentiated (anaplastic and poorly differentiated) ones. Also in this group 5-15% of carcinomas are cases of different familial syndromes (Gardner, Cowden, Werner syndromes and Carney complex) or only simple familial papillary thyroid carcinoma. Although the genetic basis of inherited cancer syndromes are mostly known (APC, PTEN, PRKAR1α and WRN genes), the cause of nonsyndromic familial papillary thyroid carcinoma is still under investigation, several predisposition genetic loci are recognized.

  14. Sporadic diffuse segmental interstitial cell of Cajal hyperplasia harbouring two gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST mimicking hereditary GIST syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Costa Neves

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We describe a diffuse form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia harbouring multifocal GISTs, mimicking diffuse ICC hyperplasia in hereditary GIST syndromes. Detection of somatic c-KIT exon 11 mutation ruled out a hereditary disorder.

  15. Evaluation of Patients and Families With Concern for Predispositions to Hematologic Malignancies Within the Hereditary Hematologic Malignancy Clinic (HHMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNardo, Courtney D; Bannon, Sarah A; Routbort, Mark; Franklin, Anna; Mork, Maureen; Armanios, Mary; Mace, Emily M; Orange, Jordan S; Jeff-Eke, Meselle; Churpek, Jane E; Takahashi, Koichi; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kornblau, Steve; Bertuch, Alison; Cheung, Hannah; Bhalla, Kapil; Futreal, Andrew; Godley, Lucy A; Patel, Keyur P

    2016-07-01

    Although multiple predispositions to hematologic malignancies exist, evaluations for hereditary cancer syndromes (HCS) are underperformed by most hematologist/oncologists. Criteria for initiating HCS evaluation are poorly defined, and results of genetic testing for hereditary hematologic malignancies have not been systematically reported. From April 2014 to August 2015, 67 patients were referred to the Hereditary Hematologic Malignancy Clinic (HHMC). Referral reasons included (1) bone marrow failure or myelodysplastic syndrome in patients ≤ 50 years, (2) evaluation for germ-line inheritance of identified RUNX1, GATA2, or CEBPA mutations on targeted next-generation sequencing panels, and (3) strong personal and/or family history of malignancy. Cultured skin fibroblasts were utilized for germ-line DNA in all patients with hematologic malignancy. Eight patients (12%) were clinically diagnosed with a HCS: 4 patients with RUNX1-related familial platelet disorder (FPD)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 1 patient each with dyskeratosis congenita, Fanconi anemia, germ-line DDX41, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Two patients with concern for FPD/AML and LFS, respectively, had RUNX1 and TP53 variants of unknown significance. Additionally, 4 patients with prior HCS diagnosis (1 LFS, 3 FPD/AML) were referred for further evaluation and surveillance. In this HHMC-referred hematologic malignancy cohort, HCS was confirmed in 12 patients (18%). HCS identification provides insight for improved and individualized treatment, as well as screening/surveillance opportunities for family members. The HHMC has facilitated HCS diagnosis; with increased clinical awareness of hematologic malignancy predisposition syndromes, more patients who may benefit from evaluation can be identified. Mutation panels intended for prognostication may provide increased clinical suspicion for germ-line testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Atypical Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: 18 Year Interval Between Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohden, Kaitlyn L; Tang, Peter H; Lilley, Chrystia C; Lee, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy developed profound loss of vision in his right eye and was found to have a 11778 mitochondrial point mutation consistent with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). He maintained 20/20 vision in the left eye for 18 years until age 23, when he experienced loss of vision in that eye. This 18 year interval between eye involvement in LHON is the longest reported to date and reinforces the variability in presentation and progression seen in this disease.

  17. Differentiating Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy from Normal-Tension Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Fernanda Maria Silveira; de Vasconcellos, José Paulo Cabral; de Melo, Mônica Barbosa; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia; Moura, Frederico Castelo

    2017-04-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by thinning of neuroretinal rim, enlarged cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) and visual field damage. Although raised intraocular pressure is main risk factor for development of glaucoma, it can occur with consistently normal measurements in the intraocular pressure as normal tension glaucoma (NTG). Enlargement of CDR is a classical sign of glaucoma, but it can also result from non-glaucomatous optic neuropathies such as Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). We describe a case of LHON with increased CDR, discuss its differential diagnosis with NTG and highlight the reasons for misdiagnoses between these two entities.

  18. Hereditary spastic paraplegias: membrane traffic and the motor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Craig; O'Kane, Cahir J; Reid, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary movement is a fundamental way in which animals respond to, and interact with, their environment. In mammals, the main CNS pathway controlling voluntary movement is the corticospinal tract, which encompasses connections between the cerebral motor cortex and the spinal cord. Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of genetic disorders that lead to a length-dependent, distal axonopathy of fibres of the corticospinal tract, causing lower limb spasticity and weakness. Recent work aimed at elucidating the molecular cell biology underlying the HSPs has revealed the importance of basic cellular processes — especially membrane trafficking and organelle morphogenesis and distribution— in axonal maintenance and degeneration.

  19. Synthetic dural graft septoplasty in epistaxis from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckhardt B, Wilfred; Guerra, Claudia Patricia

    2013-07-01

    It is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder, which has a variety of clinical manifestations, with epistaxis being one of the most common. Many treatment options exist for epistaxis, but with no consensus on which is the method of choice. We describe the case of a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) secondary epistaxis with septoplasty managed with synthetic hard graft, which improved intensity and frequency of bleeding episodes. This technique is a variant of the septodermoplasty described by several authors, but the use of synthetic dura can help in obtaining better results and avoid taking skin grafts from other sites different from the surgical site.

  20. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Bringing the Lab to the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Nailyn; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first clinically characterized mitochondrial disorder. Since its first description in 1871, much has been discovered regarding the genetics and pathophysiology of the disease. This has enabled the development of in vitro cell and animal models that can be used to try to determine not only the effects of the genetic mutation upon the clinical phenotype but to also test potential novel therapies. Treatments for LHON have ranged from vitamins and minerals to immunosuppressants and, more recently, targeted gene therapy. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical features of LHON with a focus on translational research.

  1. Hereditary properties of Amenability modulo an ideal of Banach algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Rahimi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate some hereditary properties of amenability modulo an ideal of Banach algebras. We show thatif $(e_{\\alpha}_{\\alpha}$ is a bounded approximate identity modulo $I$ of a Banach algebra $A$ and $X$ is a neo-unital modulo $I$, then $(e_{\\alpha}_{\\alpha}$ is a bounded approximate identity for $X$. Moreover we show that amenability modulo an ideal of a Banach algebra $A$ can be only considered by the neo-unital modulo $I$ Banach algebra over $A$

  2. An ABC of the Warning Signs of Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Ferraroni, Natasha; Olivares, Maria Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) with C1 inhibitor deficiency is a genetic disorder that clinically manifests with attacks of angioedema in the subcutaneous and submucosal tissues, mainly in the extremities, abdomen, and upper airway. During attacks, vascular permeability is increased due to increased.......e., the so-called “ABC” of the warning signs of HAE. The letters represent the following: A = Angioedema, B = Bradykinin, C = C1 inhibitor, D = Distress factors, E = Epinephrine nonresponsive, F = Family history, and G = Glottis/Gastrointestinal edema. To avoid fatalities, medical staff and patients...

  3. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: a family affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jiasian; Kinnear, Ned; Douglass-Molloy, Hannah; Hennessey, Derek Barrry

    2017-01-25

    A 49-year-old woman with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, flank pain and a family history of hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome sought genetic testing. She was found to harbour a fumarate hydratase (FH) genetic mutation and a previously undetected renal tumour. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy, and remains well at follow-up. HLRCC syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease, with patients at increased risk for cutaneous leiomyomas, early-onset uterine leiomyomas and aggressive renal carcinoma. Although the syndrome may manifest life-threatening complications, outcomes may be improved by preventative family screening and surveillance, compelling early diagnosis. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana A. Janicijevic Petrovic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy is a neuro-ophthalmological entity characterized by acute or subacute bilateral, not simultaneous visual loss with centro cekal scotoma and occasional further visual improvement. This rare ophthalmological disease can be accompanied with dyschromatopsia. It is associated with a matrilineal inheritance pattern. Its diagnosis used to be solely clini¬cal, aided by imaging and neuro-physiological studies, until the advent of descriptions of mitochondrial biochemical abnormalities and genetic testing. We describe a case of 24 year old male with progressive painless deterioration of visual acuity and positive family history.

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: clinical principles and genetic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, John K

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) refers to inherited disorders in which spastic gait is either the only feature or is a major syndrome feature. There are more than 70 genetic types of HSP. Neuropathological studies, albeit limited to only a few genetic types of HSP, have identified axon degeneration involving the distal ends of the corticospinal tracts and fasciculus gracilis fibers. In this review, the author highlights the clinical and genetic features of HSP. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Moyamoya disease in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, A.; Woldenberg, R.; Miller, D.; Kalina, P.; Black, K.; Lane, E. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, New York University School of Medicine, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebral vasculopathy characterized by occlusion of the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery and proximal portions of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Patients develop an extensive collateral network of parenchymal, transdural and leptomeningeal vessels to supply the compromised brain. These collateral channels, also known as ``moyamoya vessels,`` may be seen in a number of disorders which lead to intracranial vascular occlusion. We report a case of MMD in a child with hereditary spherocytosis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 5 refs.

  7. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: new genes in confined pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; van Overeem Hansen, Thomas; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-09-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making.

  8. Predisposing genes in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huusko, P. (Pia)

    1999-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the two major genes predisposing individuals to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, were screened in Finnish and Turkish cancer families. Germline BRCA1 mutations were found in 7% (6/88) and BRCA2 mutations in 6% (5/88) of the Finnish families studied in Oulu. Two distinct BRCA1 (3745delT, 4216nt-2A→G) and three BRCA2 (999delTCAAA, 6503delTT, 9346nt-2A→G) mutations were identified, all of which are recurrently found in Finland....

  9. A case of hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G P Prashanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN -IV, also known as congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis, is a very rare condition that presents in infancy with anhidrosis, absence of pain sensation and self -mutilation. Developmental delay and mental retardation are usually present. Ultrastructural study of the peripheral nerves demonstrates loss of the unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers. We here report a 8 year -old boy with HSAN IV with typical clinical features where the diagnosis was supported by nerve biopsy findings. However, our case was unusual since mental development was normal.

  10. Hereditary kidney diseases: highlighting the importance of classical Mendelian phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo; Heidet, Laurence; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-12-01

    A Mendelian inheritance underlies a nonnegligible proportion of hereditary kidney diseases, suggesting that the encoded proteins are essential for maintenance of the renal function. The identification of genes involved in congenital anomalies of the kidney and in familial forms of nephrotic syndrome significantly increased our understanding of the renal development and kidney filtration barrier physiology. This review will focus on the classical phenotype and clinical heterogeneity observed in the monogenic forms of these disorders. In addition, the role of susceptibility genes in kidney diseases with a complex inheritance will also be discussed. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. [Xanthine oxidase deficiency (hereditary xanthinuria), molybdenum cofactor deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, S; Wada, Y

    1996-12-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, with xanthine oxidase deficiency. Patients often display renal symptoms because they excrete a large amounts of xanthine in urine. An high-fluid-intake, alow-purine-food, and alkalinization of urine are effective in the patients. Molybdenum cofactor is essential for xanthine oxidase, sulfite oxidase and aldehyde oxidase. Patients with molybdenum cofactor deficiency display severe neurological symptoms, such as severe convulsions. The patients increase urinary excretions of xanthine and sulfite. Treatments are ineffective for neurological symptoms.

  12. Descriptive Epidemiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics of Hereditary Prostate Cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Diem Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer.......A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer....

  13. Cuban epidemic optic neuropathy and its relationship to toxic and hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiesteban-Freixas, Rosaralis; Mendoza-Santiesteban, Carlos E; Columbie-Garbey, Yannara; Quevedo, Alina Gonzalez; Garcia, Alberto Gonzalez; Rodríguez, Ramón Cabal

    2010-07-01

    The similarities and differences between toxic/nutritional and hereditary optic neuropathy and the pathophysiologic mechanisms that they have in common are described. This is based on data from the epidemic suffered in Cuba in 1992, which affected the optic nerves of many individuals and the experience of the authors in dealing with various toxic optic neuropathies, as well as Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  14. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Jonker, Marianne A.; Tops, Carli M. J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.; de Die-Smulders, Christine E. M.; Moll, Annette C.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  15. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Dommering (Charlotte); L. Henneman (Lidewij); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.A. Jonker (Marianne); C. Tops (Carli); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); Mensenkamp, A.R. (Arjen R.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J.W. Redeker (Egbert); C. de Die-Smulders (Christine); A.C. Moll (Annette); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSince the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the

  16. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, C.J.; Henneman, L.; Hout, A.H. van der; Jonker, M.A.; Tops, C.M.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Luijt, R.B. van der; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Redeker, E.J.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Moll, A.C.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  17. Canine hereditary nephropathies : Molecular genetic studies in Norwegian Elkhounds and English Cocker Spaniels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary nephropathies have been described in a variety of dog breeds. The causative mutation has been identified in a minority of canine renal diseases, and these provide useful animal models to study in order to gain knowledge on human nephropathies. In this thesis, canine hereditary

  18. Estimation of EuroQol 5-Dimensions health status utility values in hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Bygum, Anette; Beusterien, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate health status utility (preference) weights for hereditary angioedema (HAE) during an attack and between attacks using data from the Hereditary Angioedema Burden of Illness Study in Europe (HAE-BOIS-Europe) survey. Utility measures quantitatively describe the net impact of a...

  19. Surveillance for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - A long-term study on 114 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappel, WHDTN; Nagengast, FM; Griffioen, G; Menko, FH; Taal, BG; Kleibeuker, JH; Vasen, HF

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have a 60 to 85 percent risk of developing colorectal cancer. In the Netherlands hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families are monitored in an intensive

  20. Methylation profiles of the BRCA1 promoter in hereditary and sporadic breast cancer among Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Da; Zhao, Yashuang; Xue, Weinan; Shan, Ming; Chen, Yanbo; Zhang, Youxue; Zhang, Guoqiang; Liu, Feng; Li, Dalin; Yang, Yanmei

    2012-09-01

    The development of breast cancer is a multistep process associated with complex changes in host gene expression patterns including inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. Critically, hereditary predisposition plays a significant role in cancer susceptibility. However, mutation of the BRCA1 gene is found only in the minority of hereditary breast cancer, which indicates that there might be alternative, novel mechanisms contributing to inactivation of the BRCA1 gene. Studies have shown that aberrant methylation of genomic DNA plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation may be an alternative mechanism for the inactivation of BRCA1 as an epigenetic modification of the genome and whether hereditary breast cancer has a different BRCA1 methylation phenotype pattern than sporadic breast cancer. The pattern of CpG island methylation within the promoter region of BRCA1 was assessed by bisulfite sequencing DNA from peripheral blood cells of 72 patients with hereditary predisposition but without BRCA1 mutations and 30 sporadic breast cancer controls. The overall methylation level in patients with hereditary predisposition was significantly lower than that in the sporadic control group. However, patients with hereditary predisposition showed a significantly higher methylation susceptibility for the sites -518 when compared to controls. These results suggest that there might be different BRCA1 promoter methylation levels and patterns in sporadic and hereditary breast cancer in peripheral blood DNA. These findings may facilitate the early diagnosis of hereditary breast cancer.

  1. A MELAS-associated ND1 mutation causing leber hereditary optic neuropathy and spastic dystonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hendrickx, A.; Bettink-Remeijer, M.W.; Maat-Kievit, A.; Schoonderwoerd, K.C.; Sluiter, W.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Hintzen, R.Q.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation that is associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) within the same family affected by spastic dystonia. DESIGN: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by isolated central visual loss. Of patients with LHON, 95%

  2. Hereditary xanthinuria: report on three patients and short review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayha, R A; Salti, I S; Arnaout, A; Khatchadurian, A; Uthman, S M

    1977-01-01

    Three patients with hereditary xanthinuria are presented and the pertinent literature is reviewed. In two siblings the disease has been asymptomatic; in the third urolithiasis has developed. Xanthine stone formation is the clinical hallmark of the disease. Hereditary xanthinuria seems to be relatively prevalent in Lebanon.

  3. An individual with both MUTYH-associated polyposis and Lynch syndrome identified by multi-gene hereditary cancer panel testing: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A Cohen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of next-generation sequencing technology to interrogate multiple genes simultaneously is being utilized more frequently in hereditary cancer testing. While this has benefits of reducing cost and allowing clinicians to cast a wide net in the elucidation of their patient’s cancer, panel testing has the potential to reveal unexpected information. We report on a proband with pathogenic variants resulting in two different hereditary colon cancer syndromes.A 39-year-old male with a history of colon cancer, more than 20 colon polyps and a family history of colon cancer presented for genetic counseling. Testing with a 7-gene high-risk hereditary colon cancer panel identified a homozygous pathogenic variant, c.1187G>A (p.Gly396Asp in MUTYH, and a likely pathogenic duplication of exon 7 in MSH2. Since this test result, the proband’s mother was diagnosed with colon cancer; subsequent genetic testing confirmed she also carries the likely pathogenic duplication in the MSH2 gene.Although the cancer risk in individuals who carry multiple pathogenic variants has not been established for combined biallelic MUTYH-associated polyposis and Lynch syndrome, the identification of multiple pathogenic variants does allow for screening for cancers associated with both syndromes and has implications for cancer risk for family members. In particular, this has significant impact on those who test negative for a known familial pathogenic variant, yet could be still be at risk for cancer due to a second pathogenic variant in a family. More information is needed on the frequency of occurrence of multiple pathogenic variants, as well as the phenotypic spectrum when multiple pathogenic variants are present.

  4. Coexistence of Factor VII Deficiency and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia in Two Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortensia De la Corte-Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of two patients aged 12 years and 7 years who were referred to our hospital for factor VII deficiency inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, who had suffered from previous multiple joint haemarthroses. They presented with fine motor symptoms and difficulty in walking. During physical examination we observed neurological symptoms (general hypotonia, muscular hypotrophy, exaggerated tendon reflexes, pes cavus, and spastic gait. Given that the symptoms were not justified by the deficiency of coagulation factor VII and on suspicion of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP, tests were carried out. Findings from the tests confirmed the diagnosis of HSP (axonal degeneration of the central motor pathway and pyramidal tracts, further complicated by mixed neuropathy. This disease was also inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern with no direct genetic association with factor VII deficiency. Neurological symptoms had gone unnoticed due to a history of multiple joint haemarthrosis; musculoskeletal examination led to a satisfactory differential diagnosis. Haematological prophylaxis was commenced with rFVIIa at 30 mcg/kg, three days per week. A rehabilitation programme was prescribed so that the patient could remain independent for as long as possible, based on orthosis, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. Response to treatment is currently satisfactory and no new bleeding has presented. As far as we are aware, the coexistence of these two diseases (factor VII deficiency and HSP has not been previously reported in the literature.

  5. Familial Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor with Germline KIT Mutations Accompanying Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekido, Yuki; Ohigashi, Seiji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Naoki; Suzuki, Koyu; Hirota, Seiichi

    2017-03-01

    Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare disease with germline mutations in the c-kit gene (KIT) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha gene (PDGFRA). We had encountered multiple GISTs in the stomach and small intestine during a screening of ovarian cancer for a woman with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) with breast cancer susceptibility gene II (BRCA2) mutations. The aim of this study was to examine this case in detail. A 65-year-old woman diagnosed with HBOC harboring BRCA2 mutations was found to have multiple tumors in the stomach and small intestine by abdominal screening. All tumors were resected, and KIT gene mutations (p.Trp557Leu and p.Lys558Glu) in exon 11 were detected in all tumors and peripheral blood leukocytes. The patient was diagnosed with familial GIST. This was an extremely rare case in which familial GIST with germline KIT gene mutations co-existed with HBOC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of Health Economic Studies Conducted for Hereditary Haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Barbara; Neil, Amanda; Sanderson, Kristy; Si, Lei; Yee, Kwang Chien; Palmer, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) is a common genetic condition amongst people of northern European heritage. HH is associated with increased iron absorption leading to parenchymal organ damage and multiple arthropathies. Early diagnosis and treatment prevents complications. Population screening may increase early diagnosis, but no programmes have been introduced internationally: a paucity of health economic data is often cited as a barrier. To conduct a systematic review of all health economic studies in HH. Studies were identified through electronic searching of economic/biomedical databases. Any study on HH with original economic component was included. Study quality was formally assessed. Health economic data were extracted and analysed through narrative synthesis. Thirty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of papers reported on costs or cost effectiveness of screening programmes. Whilst most concluded screening was cost effective compared with no screening, methodological flaws limit the quality of these findings. Assumptions regarding clinical penetrance, effectiveness of screening, health-state utility values (HSUVs), exclusion of early symptomatology (such as fatigue, lethargy and multiple arthropathies) and quantification of costs associated with HH were identified as key limitations. Treatment studies concluded therapeutic venepuncture was the most cost-effective intervention. There is a paucity of high-quality health economic studies relating to HH. The development of a comprehensive HH cost-effectiveness model utilising HSUVs is required to determine whether screening is worthwhile.

  7. Hereditary angioedema: beyond international consensus - circa December 2010 - The Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Dr. David McCourtie Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema was published earlier this year in this Journal (Bowen et al. Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2010, 6:24 - http://www.aacijournal.com/content/6/1/24. Since that publication, there have been multiple phase III clinical trials published on either prophylaxis or therapy of hereditary angioedema and some of these products have changed approval status in various countries. This manuscript was prepared to review and update the management of hereditary angioedema. Objective To review approaches for the diagnosis and management of hereditary angioedema (HAE circa December 2010 and present thoughts on moving from HAE management from international evidence-based consensus to facilitate more local health unit considerations balancing costs, efficacies of treatments, and risk benefits. Thoughts will reflect Canadian and international experiences. Methods PubMed searches including hereditary angioedema and diagnosis, therapy, management and consensus were reviewed as well as press releases from various pharmaceutical companies to early December 2010. Results The 2010 International Consensus Algorithms for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema is reviewed in light of the newly published phase III Clinical trials for prevention and therapy of HAE. Management approaches and models are discussed. Conclusions Consensus approach and double-blind placebo controlled trials are only interim guides to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase IV clinical trials, meta analyses, data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, safety, and head-to-head clinical trials investigating superiority or non-inferiority comparisons of available approaches. Since not all therapeutic products are available in all jurisdictions

  8. Genetics of human isolated hereditary hair loss disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, S; Khan, S; Ahmad, W

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary hair loss in human is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders. It is characterized by sparse to complete absence of hair on the scalp and other parts of the body. In few cases tightly curled twisted wooly hair (WH) on the scalp has been reported as well. The hair loss disorders, including both syndromic and non-syndromic (isolated) forms, segregate either in autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern. To date, seven autosomal dominant and equal numbers of autosomal recessive isolated forms of hair loss disorders have been characterized. Genes responsible for causing most of these disorders have been identified. In this review, we have provided an update on clinical and genetic aspects of isolated hereditary hair loss disorders manifesting with hypotrichosis and/or WHs. Because most of the recessive genes have been mapped using consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, therefore emphasis is given to mutations identified in these families. OMIM nomenclature has been followed to indicate different forms of hair loss disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zafar; Rydning, Siri L; Wedding, Iselin M; Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H; Henriksen, Sandra P; Tallaksen, Chantal M E; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%) and variants of uncertain significance in ten probands (10%). Together these accounted for 30 probands (29%) and involved 18 different genes. Among several interesting findings, dominantly inherited KIF1A variants, p.(Val8Met) and p.(Ile27Thr) segregated in two independent families, both presenting with a pure spastic paraplegia phenotype. Two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly4230Ser) and p.(Leu4221Val) were found in SACS in one consanguineous family, presenting with spastic ataxia and isolated cerebellar atrophy. The average disease duration in probands with pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants was 31 years, ranging from 4 to 51 years. In conclusion, this study confirmed and expanded the clinical phenotypes associated with known disease genes. The results demonstrate that gene panel sequencing and similar sequencing approaches can serve as efficient diagnostic tools for different heterogeneous disorders. Early use of such strategies may help to reduce both costs and time of the diagnostic process.

  10. New genetic causes for complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Paulo Victor Sgobbi de; Bortholin, Thiago; Dias, Renan Braido; Chieia, Marco Antônio Troccoli; Burlin, Stênio; Naylor, Fernando George Monteiro; Pinto, Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle

    2017-08-15

    Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) represents a complex and heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that share a common clinical feature of weakness and lower limb spasticity that can occur alone or in combination with a constellation of other neurological or systemic signs and symptoms. Although the core clinical feature of weakness and lower limb spasticity is virtually universal, the genetic heterogeneity is almost uncountable with more than 70 genetic forms described so far. We performed review of medical records from twenty-one patients from seventeen Brazilian families with complex phenotype of HSP. All cases have previously negative mutations in SPG11/KIAA1840 and SPG7 gene and were evaluated by whole-exome sequencing. An extensive description of systemic and neurological signs has been described. Whole-exome sequencing was unremarkable in eight patients and established a definite genetic diagnosis in thirteen patients of twelve non-related families. Mutations were found in genes previously implicated in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Hereditary Neuropathy, Spastic Ataxias, Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation, Glycogen Metabolism, Congenital Lipodystrophy and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases disorders. We report thirteen new genetically-proven cases of complex HSP, expanding the clinical spectrum of presentations of HSP, providing new pathophysiological mechanisms and disclosing new potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pediatric hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema (HAE resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (C1-INH is a rare, life-threatening disorder. It is characterized by attacks of angioedema involving the skin and/or the mucosa of the upper airways, as well as the intestinal mucosa. In approximately 50 per cent of cases, clinical manifestations may appear during childhood. The complex management of HAE in pediatric patients is in many respects different from the management of adults. Establishing the diagnosis early, preferably before the onset of clinical symptoms, is essential in cases with a positive family history. Complement studies usually afford accurate diagnosis, whereas molecular genetics tests may prove helpful in uncertain cases. Appropriate therapy, supported by counselling, suitable modification of lifestyle, and avoidance of triggering factors (which primarily include mechanical trauma, mental stress and airway infections in children may spare the patient unnecessary surgery and may prevent mortality. Prompt control of edematous attacks, short-term prophylaxis and intermittent therapy are recommended as the primary means for the management of pediatric cases. Medicinal products currently used for the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema include antifibrinolytics, attenuated androgens, and C1-INH replacement therapy. Current guidelines favour antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis because of their favorable safety profile but efficacy may be lacking. Attenuated androgens administered in the lowest effective dose are another option. C1-INH replacement therapy is also an effective and safe agent for children. Regular monitoring and follow-up of patients are necessary.

  12. Hyper-IgD syndrome and hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vicentini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are a group of systemic disorders characterized by recurrent attacks of systemic inflammation (autoinflammation without infectious or autoimmune cause. The hyper-IgD syndrome (HIDS is a rare autosomal recessive inflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent fever, increased serum IgD (normal value < 100 U/ml and generalized inflammation (lymphadenopathy, arthralgias/arthritis, abdominal complaints, skin rash, and headache. The attacks persist during the entire life although frequency and severity tend to diminish with age. HIDS is caused by specific mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, resulting in depressed enzymatic activity. At present the therapy for the syndrome is only supportive. Other than HIDS, other hereditary systemic inflammatory disorders have been described: the Familial Mediterranean Fever, the tumour necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS, a disease related to the mutations of one of the TNF receptors, the Familial Cold Urticaria and the Muckle-Wells syndrome. The differential diagnosis with other causes of periodic fever is crucial for assessing appropriate management and treatment.

  13. Lateral medullary syndrome in a boy with hereditary dysfibrinogenemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibe, Tetsuya; Ikeya, Manae; Yokochi, Kenji; Okumura, Nobuo

    2012-11-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with sudden onset of nausea, vomiting and unsteady gait after a bread-eating game, which possibly caused neck hyperextension. Neurological examination revealed hemisensory loss of pain and temperature sensation in the right trunk and limbs along with left Horner's syndrome, suggesting lateral medullary syndrome (LMS). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain revealed infarction at the left lateral medulla. MR angiography showed no sign of arterial dissection and no occlusion or stenosis of the intracranial, basilar or vertebral arteries or their branches. No evidence of cardioemboli or systemic inflammation was apparent. Repeated blood examination revealed low activity of fibrinogen. Genetic testing confirmed the presence of hereditary dysfibrinogenemia with a mutation in the FGB gene (BβGly15Cys). This fibrinogen variant has previously been found in Japanese patients with atherosclerosis obliterans or no symptoms. Under conservative treatment without anticoagulation and aspirin, the patient made a good recovery within a few months. We presume that microthrombosis may have been deposited within the vertebral system as a result of extension and rotation of the neck during sports activity, with a contribution from hereditary dysfibrinogenemia. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Coexistence of Gilbert syndrome with hereditary haemolytic anaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawa, Katarzyna; Adamowicz-Salach, Anna; Matysiak, Michal; Trzemecka, Anna; Burzynska, Beata

    2012-07-01

    Gilbert syndrome is an inherited disease characterised by mild unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia caused by mutations in UGT1A1 gene which lead to decreased activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1. The most frequent genetic defect is a homozygous TA dinucleotide insertion in the regulatory TATA box in the UGT1A1 gene promoter. 182 Polish healthy individuals and 256 patients with different types of hereditary haemolytic anaemias were examined for the A(TA)(n)TAA motif. PCR was performed using sense primer labelled by 6-Fam and capillary electrophoresis was carried out in an ABI 3730 DNA analyser. The frequency of the (TA)(7)/(TA)(7) genotype in the control group was estimated at 18.13%, (TA)(6)/(TA)(7) at 45.05% and (TA)(6)/(TA)(6) at 36.26%. There was a statistically significant difference in the (TA)(6)/(TA)(6) genotype distribution between healthy individuals and patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (p=0.041). Additionally, uncommon genotypes, (TA)(5)/(TA)(6), (TA)(5)/(TA)(7) and (TA)(7)/(TA)(8) of the promoter polymorphism, were discovered. Genotyping of the UGT1A1 gene showed distinct distribution of the common A(TA)(n)TAA polymorphism relative to other European populations. Because of a greater risk of hyperbilirubinaemia due to hereditary haemolytic anaemia, the diagnosis of Gilbert syndrome in this group of patients is very important.

  15. Hereditary apolipoprotein AI-associated renal amyloidosis: A diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samillán-Sosa, Kelly Del Rocío; Sención-Martínez, Gloria; Lopes-Martín, Vanessa; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; Solé, Manel; Arostegui, Jose Luis; Mesa, Jose; García-Díaz, Juan de Dios; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego; Martínez-Miguel, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary renal amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant condition with considerable overlap with other amyloidosis types. Differential diagnosis is complicated, but is relevant for prognosis and treatment. We describe a patient with nephrotic syndrome and progressive renal failure, who had a mother with renal amiloidosis. Renal biopsy revealed amyloid deposits in glomerular space, with absence of light chains and protein AA. We suspected amyloidosis with fibrinogen A alpha chain deposits, which is the most frequent cause of hereditary amyloidosis in Europe, with a glomerular preferential affectation. However, the genetic study showed a novel mutation in apolipoprotein AI. On reviewing the biopsy of the patient's mother similar glomerular deposits were found, but there were significant deposits in the renal medulla as well, which is typical in APO AI amyloidosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Apo AI amyloidosis is characterized by slowly progressive renal disease and end-stage renal disease occurs aproximately 3 to 15 years from initial diagnosis. Renal transplantation offers an acceptable graft survival and in these patients with hepatorenal involvement simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation could be considered. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Towards a dietary prevention of hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A

    2005-03-01

    Inheritance of a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 confers a high lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. Variation in penetrance between individuals suggests that factors other than the gene mutation itself may influence the risk of cancer in susceptible women. Several risk factors have been identified which implicate estrogen-induced growth stimulation as a probable contributor to breast cancer pre-disposition. The protein products of both of these genes appear to help preserve genomic integrity via their participation in the DNA damage response and repair pathways. To date, the evidence for a cancer-protective role of dietary nutrients, for the most part those with antioxidant properties, has been based on women without any known genetic pre-disposition and it is important to identify and evaluate dietary factors which may modify the risk of cancer in BRCA carriers. Here we propose that diet modification may modulate the risk of hereditary breast cancer by decreasing DNA damage (possibly linked to estrogen exposure) or by enhancing DNA repair. The prevention of hereditary breast cancer through diet is an attractive complement to current management strategies and deserves exploration.

  17. [Genetic coherence between hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerde, Kristian Varden; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn

    2014-02-11

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has traditionally been considered purely as a motor condition with a progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons, and without cognitive or behavioural impairment. In 2011 a new genetic mutation that may cause both ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was detected. In light of this discovery, the article describes genetic and clinical characteristics of ALS and frontotemporal dementia. The article is based on a literature search in PubMed. Up to 50% of ALS patients develop some cognitive impairment, while 3-15% develop frontotemporal dementia. The recently discovered C9ORF72 mutation accounts for 20-50% of hereditary ALS and possibly up to 25% of sporadic cases. The mutation is the most common cause of ALS. Patients with C9ORF72 mutation are characterised by earlier disease onset, reduced survival after diagnosis, more frequent cognitive and behavioural dysfunction, and familial disposition for ALS and frontotemporal dementia. Cognitive and behavioural changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are common, and can appear along a clinical continuum with development of frontotemporal dementia over time. Detection of the C9ORF72 mutation poses a challenge to our knowledge and management of patients with both hereditary and sporadic ALS.

  18. Hereditary ovarian cancer and two-compartment tumor metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Balliet, Renee M.; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene are commonly found in hereditary ovarian cancers. Here, we used a co-culture approach to study the metabolic effects of BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells on adjacent tumor-associated stromal fibroblasts. Our results directly show that BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells produce large amounts of hydrogen peroxide, which can be abolished either by administration of simple antioxidants (N-acetyl-cysteine; NAC) or by replacement of the BRCA1 gene. Thus, the BRCA1 gene normally suppresses tumor growth by functioning as an antioxidant. Importantly, hydrogen peroxide produced by BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells induces oxidative stress and catabolic processes in adjacent stromal fibroblasts, such as autophagy, mitophagy and glycolysis, via stromal NFκB activation. Catabolism in stromal fibroblasts was also accompanied by the upregulation of MCT4 and a loss of Cav-1 expression, which are established markers of a lethal tumor microenvironment. In summary, loss of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene induces hydrogen peroxide production, which then leads to metabolic reprogramming of the tumor stroma, driving stromal-epithelial metabolic coupling. Our results suggest that new cancer prevention trials with antioxidants are clearly warranted in patients that harbor hereditary/familial BRCA1 mutations. PMID:23047606

  19. Association of celiac disease and hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency. Screening patients with hereditary angioedema for celiac disease: is it worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Kelemen, Zsuzsanna; Czaller, Ibolya; Molnár, Katalin; Füst, George; Varga, Lilian; Rajczy, Katalin; Szabó, Zsófia; Miklós, Kata; Bors, András; Farkas, Henriette

    2011-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency is a life-threatening condition, which manifests as edematous attacks involving subcutaneous tissues and/or the upper airway/gastrointestinal mucosa. Celiac disease is a gluten-sensitive small intestinal disorder that can lead to severe villous atrophy, malabsorption, and malignancy. Both hereditary angioedema and celiac disease may present with abdominal symptoms. Our aim was to study the occurrence of celiac disease in the hereditary angioedema population, as well as to analyze the clinical course of cases with both diseases. One hundred and twenty-eight patients with hereditary angioedema were screened for celiac disease, using serological methods [antiendomysial antibodies-immunoglobulin A (IgA), antiendomysial antibodies-IgG and tissue transglutaminase-IgA, tissue transglutaminase-IgG]. Clinical data of a child with hereditary angioedema and celiac disease diagnosed earlier were added to the dataset to be analyzed. Thus, the total number of patients was 129, comprising 107 adults and 22 pediatric patients. In patients with celiac disease, molecular genetics analysis (human leukocyte antigen-DQA1, human leukocyte antigen-DQB1) was carried out along with the introduction of a gluten-free diet and regular follow-up. Four out of the 22 children were diagnosed with celiac disease in our hereditary angioedema population. The prevalence of celiac disease among our pediatric patients with hereditary angioedema (22 children) was higher than in the general population (18.1 vs. 1.2%). Switching from the wheat starch-containing tranexamic acid product to danazol and introducing a gluten-free diet mitigated abdominal symptoms of hereditary angioedema. Similarities between the symptoms of hereditary angioedema and celiac disease may cause difficulties in differential diagnosis, as well as in choosing the appropriate therapy. In our opinion, screening hereditary angioedema patients for celiac disease is warranted if

  20. A recurrent WARS mutation is a novel cause of autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Soong, Bing-Wen; Mademan, Inès; Huang, Yen-Hua; Liu, Chia-Rung; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Wu, Hung-Ta; Liu, Tze-Tze; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Tseng, Yen-Ting; Lin, Kon-Ping; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L; Chan, Chih-Chiang; De Jonghe, Peter; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Liao, Yi-Chu; Züchner, Stephan; Baets, Jonathan; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2017-05-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies characterized by distal limb muscle weakness and atrophy. Although at least 15 genes have been implicated in distal hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetic causes remain elusive in many families. To identify an additional causal gene for distal hereditary motor neuropathy, we performed exome sequencing for two affected individuals and two unaffected members in a Taiwanese family with an autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy in which mutations in common distal hereditary motor neuropathy-implicated genes had been excluded. The exome sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.770A > G (p.His257Arg), in the cytoplasmic tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) gene (WARS) that co-segregates with the neuropathy in the family. Further analyses of WARS in an additional 79 Taiwanese pedigrees with inherited neuropathies and 163 index cases from Australian, European, and Korean distal hereditary motor neuropathy families identified the same mutation in another Taiwanese distal hereditary motor neuropathy pedigree with different ancestries and one additional Belgian distal hereditary motor neuropathy family of Caucasian origin. Cell transfection studies demonstrated a dominant-negative effect of the p.His257Arg mutation on aminoacylation activity of TrpRS, which subsequently compromised protein synthesis and reduced cell viability. His257Arg TrpRS also inhibited neurite outgrowth and led to neurite degeneration in the neuronal cell lines and rat motor neurons. Further in vitro analyses showed that the WARS mutation could potentiate the angiostatic activities of TrpRS by enhancing its interaction with vascular endothelial-cadherin. Taken together, these findings establish WARS as a gene whose mutations may cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy and alter canonical and non-canonical functions of TrpRS. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  1. [Application of whole exome sequencing in the diagnosis of hereditary neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinsky, V V; Korneeva, V A; Shatalov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) is a promising method in human genetics. Because the majority of pathogenic mutations that lead to the development of diseases are localized in exons and splice sites, WES could become a major tool for the diagnosis of diseases with a complex hereditary nature. This tool appears to be particularly useful for hereditary neurological diseases, such as autism spectrum disorders, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and others. In our review, we discuss the clinical application of WES, with special emphasis on the diagnosis of hereditary neurological diseases.

  2. Renal AA amyloidosis in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Helal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary complete C4 deficiency has until now been reported in 30 cases only. A disturbed clearance of immune- complexes probably predisposes these individuals to systemic lupus erythematosus, other immune- complex diseases and recurrent microbial infections. We present here a 20- year- old female with hereditary complete C4 deficiency. Renal biopsy demonstrated renal AA amyloidosis. This unique case further substantiates that deficiency of classical pathway components predisposes to the development of recurrent microbial infections and that the patients may develop AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, in clinical practice, the nephrotic syndrome occurring in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency should lead to the suspicion of renal AA amyloidosis.

  3. Machado-Joseph disease versus hereditary spastic paraplegia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teive Hélio A. Ghizoni

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease (MJD is the most common autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia and presents great phenotypic variability. MJD presenting with spastic paraparesis was recently described in Japanese patients. We report the case of 41-year-old woman with the phenotype of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. Her father died at the age of 56 years due to an undiagnosed progressive neurological disease that presented parkinsonism. She had an expanded allele with 66 CAG repeats and a normal allele with 22 repeats in the gene of MJD. MJD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of autosomal dominant complicated HSP. A patient with the phenotype of complicated HSP and relatives with other clinical features of a neurodegenerative disease should raise the suspicion of MJD.

  4. [Molecular genetics and gene analysis of hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder which is characterized by spasticity of the leg. HSP is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Mutations were detected in about 60% of autosomal dominant HSP patients. SPG4 is the most common form of autosomal dominant HSP worldwide. In autosomal recessive HSP patients, we detected mutations in about 40% using exome sequencing. Causes of autosomal recessive HSP are more heterogeneous than those of autosomal dominant HSP. We have to consider leukodystrophies/leukoencephalopathies, motor neuron diseases, spinocerebellar degenerations, or various metabolic diseases as differential diagnosis of complicated HSP. X-linked HSP or HSP with mitochondorial inheritance are rare. Further work on familial patients would lead to identify novel causative genes, which helps to understand pathophysiology of HSP and the nature of corticospinal tract and establish disease modifying therapy. Mutation detection rate for sporadic HSP is low at the moment, and molecular delineation of sporadic HSP is expected in the future.

  5. Clinical features and management of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Ingrid; Servelhere, Katiane R; Martinez, Alberto R M; D'Abreu, Anelyssa; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; França-Jr, Marcondes C

    2014-03-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of genetically-determined disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of lower limbs. An apparently sporadic case of adult-onset spastic paraplegia is a frequent clinical problem and a significant proportion of cases are likely to be of genetic origin. HSP is clinically divided into pure and complicated forms. The later present with a wide range of additional neurological and systemic features. To date, there are up to 60 genetic subtypes described. All modes of monogenic inheritance have been described: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked and mitochondrial traits. Recent advances point to abnormal axonal transport as a key mechanism leading to the degeneration of the long motor neuron axons in the central nervous system in HSP. In this review we aim to address recent advances in the field, placing emphasis on key diagnostic features that will help practicing neurologists to identify and manage these conditions.

  6. Role of gene defect in hereditary ALS clarified

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J.

    1993-08-20

    Earlier research on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) had identified the gene responsible for the hereditary form of the disease. The gene encoded superoxide dismutase (SOD), an enzyme widely studied. This stimulated hopes that the knowledge accumulated on SOD would lead to a better understanding of what brings about the neuronal generation in patients who have the mutant gene - and perhaps also in the larger number who have the nonhereditary form of the disease. Researchers have now found that mutations in the SOD gene disrupt the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, reducing its stability and activity. This could lead to damage of neurons by superoxide radicals. Many questions abouts SOD's role in ALS remain to be answered.

  7. Depressive symptoms associated with hereditary Alzheimer's disease: a case description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Mónica Yicette Sánchez; Vargas, Paula Alejandra Osorio; Ramos, Lucero Rengifo; Velandia, Rafael Alarcón

    The authors describe a family group studied by the Centro de Biología Molecular y Biotecnología, and the Clínica de la Memoria, las Demencias y el Envejecimiento (Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Colombia), and evaluate the association of depressive symptoms with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This family presented a hereditary pattern for AD characterized by an early onset of dementia symptoms, a long preclinical depressive course, and, once the first symptoms of dementia appeared, a rapid progression to severe cognitive function impairment. The authors found a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in this family and propose that the symptoms could be an important risk factor for developing AD in the presence of other risk factors such as the APOE E4 allele.

  8. Hereditary ectodermal dysplasia: Report of 11 patients from a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Vaidya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Ectodermal Dysplasia is an inherited disorder commonly involving skin, teeth, hair, and nails. We have observed ectodermal dysplasia (EDs in 11 individuals over two generations in one family. Smooth, dry, thin skin was seen in most affected individuals. All had fine, slow-growing scalp hair and body hair and some had sparse eyebrows and short eyelashes. Nearly all showed decrease in sweating. Severe teeth abnormalities were seen in all patients and fingernail abnormalities were not so severe but toenail abnormalities were seen in all patients. No other abnormalities were seen in affected individuals in this family. It is very rare to find such a large family having ectodermal dysplasia.

  9. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability......, but show few gross genomic alterations. We characterized expression of the Wnt signaling pathway markers β-catenin, E-cadherin, TCF-4, and PTEN using immunohistochemical staining in colorectal cancers from individuals with HNPCC. Reduced membranous staining for β-catenin was found in 64% and for E......% of the tumors. In summary, altered expression of target molecules in the Wnt signaling pathway was demonstrated in the vast majority of the HNPCC-associated tumors, which support deranged Wnt-signaling as a central tumorigenic mechanism also in MMR defective colorectal cancer....

  10. National mutation study among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, P M; Brusgaard, K; Ousager, L B

    2014-01-01

    carry mutations in the ENG, ACVRL1 or SMAD4 genes. Here, we report on the genetic heterogeneity in the Danish national HHT population and address the prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). Probands of 107 apparently unrelated families received genetic testing, including sequencing....... Large deletions were identified in ENG and ACVRL1. The prevalence of PAVM was 52.3% in patients with an ENG mutation and 12.9% in the ACVRL1 mutation carriers. We diagnosed 80% of the patients clinically, fulfilling the Curaçao criteria, and those remaining were diagnosed by genetic testing......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominantly inherited vascular disease characterized by the presence of mucocutaneous telangiectasia and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). The clinical diagnosis of HHT is based on the Curaçao criteria. About 85% of HHT patients...

  11. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brady, A P

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition whose effects are mediated through deficient blood vessel formation and regeneration, with multisystem involvement. Patients are usually aware of resulting skin telangiectasia and epistaxis, but are also exposed to dangers posed by occult vascular malformations in other organs. About 15-35% of HHT patients have pulmonary AVMs (PAVMs), 10% have cerebral AVMs (CAVMs), 25-33% suffer significant GI blood loss from GI tract telangiectasia, and an unknown but high percentage have liver involvement. In total, 10% of affected individuals die prematurely or suffer major disability from HHT, largely because of bleeding from CAVMs and PAVMs, or paradoxical embolization through PAVMs. Screening for and early intervention to treat occult PAVMs and CAVMs can largely eliminate these risks, and should be undertaken in a specialist centre. The National HHT Center in The Mercy University Hospital in Cork is the referral centre for HHT screening in Ireland.

  12. Motor activation in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, KH; Nielsen, JE; Krabbe, Katja

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of motor cortical functional reorganisation in patients with SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia by exploring cortical motor activation related to movements of clinically affected (lower) and unaffected (upper) limbs. METHODS......) and between-group comparisons of movement vs. rest (group x behavioural state interaction) were performed using a random effects approach and statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). RESULTS: Patterns of motor activation were generally comparable between groups during both tasks, although patients had...... a tendency towards more widespread activation in sensorimotor cortical and cerebellar regions. Statistically significant differences were restricted to the ankle movement response, however, where patients showed significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in the right and left primary motor cortices...

  13. Dementia with non-hereditary cystatin C angiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Jóhannesson, G

    1989-01-01

    Brain biopsies from two patients with non-hereditary cerebral hemorrhages and eighty autopsied cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia are presented. The biopsied cases, both males aged 64 and 59, had a sudden onset of cerebral hemorrhage, mild progressive dementia and cystatin C cerebral...... amyloid angiopathy. Of the autopsied cases 59 had senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy was also found in 36 of them. Both senile plaques and the blood vessel amyloid stained positively with beta-protein antibodies, and five of them also showed a positive reaction to cystatin C antibodies....... These cystatin C positive cases were three males aged 76, 80 and 83, and one female 93 years old and the fifth case was a female aged 47 with Down's syndrome....

  14. ENG mutational mosaicism in a family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, Anette D; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by mutations in ENG, ACVRL1, or SMAD4. Around 90% of HHT patients present with a heterozygous pathogenic genetic variation. Almost all cases of HHT have a family history. Very few cases are de......, and the flanking sequences of the genes were sequenced by NGS. RESULTS: The proband had clinical HHT fulfilling the Curaçao criteria and genetic testing identified a frameshift mutation in ENG. The mother of the proband, also with clinical HHT, was found negative when analyzing DNA from blood for the familial...... mutation using Sanger sequencing. Analyzing her DNA by NGS HHT panel sequencing when extracted from both peripheral blood leukocytes, and cheek swabs, identified the familial ENG mutation at low levels. CONCLUSION: We provide evidence of ENG mutational mosaicism in an individual presenting with clinical...

  15. [Gene therapy for hereditary ophthalmological diseases: Advances and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Óscar Francisco; Astorga-Carballo, Aline; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new therapeutic strategy that could provide a novel and more effective way of targeting hereditary ophthalmological diseases. The eye is easily accessible, highly compartmentalized, and an immune-privileged organ that gives advantages as an ideal gene therapy target. Recently, important advances in the availability of various intraocular vector delivery routes and viral vectors that are able to efficiently transduce specific ocular cell types have been described. Gene therapy has advanced in some retinal inherited dystrophies; in this way, preliminary success is now being reported for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This review will provide an update in the field of gene therapy for the treatment of ocular inherited diseases.

  16. Hereditary fructose intolerance and celiac disease: a novel genetic association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, Carolina; Gennarelli, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Tortora, Raffaella; Salvatore, Francesco; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2006-05-01

    Celiac disease (CD) has been associated with several genetic disorders, but has not been associated with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). We identified CD in 4 female patients affected by HFI from among 38 Italian HFI patients. Three of these patients were children in whom the CD-associated signs were hypertransaminasemia, failure to thrive, low weight, and short stature, whereas the adult patient had protracted diarrhea notwithstanding a fructose-free diet. The incidence of CD in our group of HFI patients was higher (>10%) than in the general population (1%-3%) (P<.02). The possibility of an association between these 2 gastrointestinal disorders is important, particularly in the management of HFI patients with persisting symptoms.

  17. Sepsis and siderosis, Yersinia enterocolitica and hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, Phoebe A; Woods, Marion L

    2017-01-04

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with sepsis, relative bradycardia, CT evidence of numerous small liver abscesses and 'skin bronzing' consistent with hereditary haemochromatosis (HH). Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 infection was confirmed by serology specimens taken 10 days apart. Iron overload was detected, and homozygous C282Y gene mutation confirmed HH. Liver biopsy revealed grade IV siderosis with micronodular cirrhosis. Haemochromatosis is a common, inherited disorder leading to iron overload that can produce end-organ damage from excess iron deposition. Haemochromatosis diagnosis allowed aggressive medical management with phlebotomy achieving normalisation of iron stores. Screening for complications of cirrhosis was started that included hepatoma surveillance. Iron overload states are known to increase patient susceptibility to infections caused by lower virulence bacteria lacking sophisticated iron metabolism pathways, for example, Yersinia enterocolitica Although these serious disseminated infections are rare, they may serve as markers for occult iron overload and should prompt haemochromatosis screening. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Safety and Usage of C1-Inhibitor in Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedl, Marc A; Bygum, Anette; Lumry, William

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The plasma-derived, highly purified, nanofiltered C1-inhibitor concentrate (Berinert; "pnfC1-INH") is approved in the United States for treating hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and in many European countries for attack treatment and short-term prophylaxis. OBJECTIVE: The objective...... of this study was to describe safety and usage patterns of pnfC1-INH. METHODS: A multicenter, observational, registry was conducted between 2010 and 2014 at 30 United States and 7 European sites to obtain both prospective (occurring after enrollment) and retrospective (occurring before enrollment) safety...... and usage data on subjects receiving pnfC1-INH for any reason. RESULTS: Of 343 enrolled patients, 318 received 1 or more doses of pnfC1-INH for HAE attacks (11,848 infusions) or for prophylaxis (3142 infusions), comprising the safety population. Median dosages per infusion were 10.8 IU/kg (attack treatment...

  19. Hereditary angio-oedema in Denmark: a nationwide survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Hereditary angio-oedema (HAE) is a rare disease caused by deficiency of complement C1 inhibitor (C1 inhibitor). The diagnosis is challenging as the disease can have a variety of clinical manifestations. In 2001 a national HAE comprehensive care centre was established and a search...... for these patients was initiated. Objectives To identify and characterize all patients with HAE in Denmark and increase awareness of the disease. Methods Patients were recruited from hospital departments, dermatologists in private practice, Centres for Rare Diseases, the Danish patient organization and the national...... reference laboratory. Family interviews were conducted and medical records were evaluated. Information was spread through lectures, articles in popular magazines and via television. National guidelines for diagnosis and treatment were published. Results Eighty-two patients were identified. The mean...

  20. Clinical features and management of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Faber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is a group of genetically-determined disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of lower limbs. An apparently sporadic case of adult-onset spastic paraplegia is a frequent clinical problem and a significant proportion of cases are likely to be of genetic origin. HSP is clinically divided into pure and complicated forms. The later present with a wide range of additional neurological and systemic features. To date, there are up to 60 genetic subtypes described. All modes of monogenic inheritance have been described: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked and mitochondrial traits. Recent advances point to abnormal axonal transport as a key mechanism leading to the degeneration of the long motor neuron axons in the central nervous system in HSP. In this review we aim to address recent advances in the field, placing emphasis on key diagnostic features that will help practicing neurologists to identify and manage these conditions.

  1. Hereditary breast cancer: the era of new susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolou, Paraskevi; Fostira, Florentia

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%-10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  2. Hereditary Breast Cancer: The Era of New Susceptibility Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Apostolou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%–10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  3. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability......, but show few gross genomic alterations. We characterized expression of the Wnt signaling pathway markers ß-catenin, E-cadherin, TCF-4, and PTEN using immunohistochemical staining in colorectal cancers from individuals with HNPCC. Reduced membranous staining for ß-catenin was found in 64% and for E......% of the tumors. In summary, altered expression of target molecules in the Wnt signaling pathway was demonstrated in the vast majority of the HNPCC-associated tumors, which support deranged Wnt-signaling as a central tumorigenic mechanism also in MMR defective colorectal cancer....

  4. Prophylactic total gastrectomy in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Linda; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene are the predisposing cause of gastric cancer in most families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). The lifetime risk of cancer in mutation positive members is more than 80 % and prophylactic total gastrectomy is recommended. Not all...... mutations in the CDH1 gene are however pathogenic and it is important to classify mutations before this major operation is performed. Probands from two Danish families with gastric cancer and a history suggesting HDGC were screened for CDH1 gene mutations. Two novel CDH1 gene mutations were identified....... Hospital stay was 6-8 days and there were no complications. Small foci of diffuse gastric cancer were found in all patients-intramucosal in six and advanced in one. Preoperative endoscopic biopsies had revealed a microscopic cancer focus in two of the patients. Our data confirmed the pathogenic nature...

  5. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Moodley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy in HIV-infected patients results from the HIV infection itself, post-infectious auto-immune disease, opportunistic infections and drugs. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs such as zidovudine and stavudine have known mitochondrial toxicity and can cause mitochondrial myopathies, neuropathies, hyperlactataemia, and can induce mitochondrial genetic disorders. Individuals with the mutation for Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON, a mitochondrial disorder, are usually asymptomatic but develop visual loss when exposed to external triggers such as smoking. We report on two HIV-infected patients with LHON mutations (m.14484T>C and m.11778G>A who developed profound visual loss with antiretroviral therapy. We postulate that the phenotypic expression of LHON in these genetically predisposed individuals was triggered by NRTI drugs lamivudine and tenofovir when used in combination, despite their relatively weak mitochondrial toxic effects. 

  6. Hereditary angioedema: what the gastroenterologist needs to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available M Aamir Ali, Marie L Borum Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Up to 93% of patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE experience recurrent abdominal pain. Many of these patients, who often present to emergency departments, primary care physicians, general surgeons, or gastroenterologists, are misdiagnosed for years and undergo unnecessary testing and surgical procedures. Making the diagnosis of HAE can be challenging because symptoms and attack locations are often inconsistent from one episode to the next. Abdominal attacks are common and can occur without other attack locations. An early, accurate diagnosis is central to managing HAE. Unexplained abdominal pain, particularly when accompanied by swelling of the face and extremities, suggests the diagnosis of HAE. A family history and radiologic imaging demonstrating edematous bowel also support an HAE diagnosis. Once HAE is suspected, C4 and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH laboratory studies are usually diagnostic. Patients with HAE may benefit from recently approved specific treatments, including plasma-derived C1-INH or recombinant C1-INH, a bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, or a kallikrein inhibitor as first-line therapy and solvent/detergent-treated or fresh frozen plasma as second-line therapy for acute episodes. Short-term or long-term prophylaxis with nanofiltered C1-INH or attenuated androgens will prevent or reduce the frequency and severity of episodes. Gastroenterologists can play a critical role in identifying and treating patients with HAE, and should have a high index of suspicion when encountering patients with recurrent, unexplained bouts of abdominal pain. Given the high rate of abdominal attacks in HAE, it is important for gastroenterologists to appropriately diagnose and promptly recognize and treat HAE, or refer patients with HAE to an allergist. Keywords: hereditary angioedema, abdominal pain, diagnosis

  7. Diagnosis and management of hereditary angioedema: an emergency medicine perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moellman, Joseph J; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2012-08-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare and often debilitating condition associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in the absence of appropriate intervention. An underlying deficiency in functional C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) protein induces a vulnerability to unchecked activation of the complement, contact, and coagulation/fibrinolytic systems. The clinical consequence is a pattern of recurring attacks of non-pitting, non-pruritic edema, the urgency of which varies by the affected site. Laryngeal edema can escalate rapidly to asphyxiation, and severe cases of abdominal swelling can lead to hypovolemic shock. This report reviews the emergency diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema and the impact of recently introduced treatments on treatment in the United States. Until recently, emergency physicians in the United States were hindered by the lack of rapidly effective treatment options for HAE attacks. In this article, general clinical and laboratory diagnostic procedures are reviewed against the backdrop of two case studies: one patient presenting with a known history of HAE and one with previously undiagnosed HAE. In many countries outside the United States, plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate has for decades been the first-line treatment for acute attacks. The end of 2009 ushered in a new era in the pharmacologic management of HAE attacks in the United States with the approval of two new treatment options for acute treatment: a plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate and a kallikrein inhibitor. With access to targeted and effective treatments, emergency physicians are now better equipped for successful and rapid intervention in urgent HAE cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hereditary interstitial lung diseases manifesting in early childhood in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Takuma; Cho, Kazutoshi; Hayasaka, Itaru; Morioka, Keita; Kaneshi, Yosuke; Furuta, Itsuko; Yamada, Masafumi; Ariga, Tadashi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2014-11-01

    Genetic variations associated with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) have not been extensively studied in Japanese infants. Forty-three infants with unexplained lung dysfunction were studied. All 43, 22, and 17 infants underwent analyses of surfactant protein (SP)-C gene (SFTPC) and ATP-binding cassette A3 gene (ABCA3), SP-B gene (SFTPB), and SP-B western blotting, respectively. Two and four underwent assessment of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-stimulating phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (pSTAT-5) and analyses of FOXF1 gene (FOXF1), respectively. ILD were diagnosed clinically in nine infants: four, three, and two had interstitial pneumonitis, hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP), and alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV), respectively. Genetic variations considered responsible were detected in six (67%) of the nine infants with ILD: three with hPAP (SFTPC p.Leu45Arg and p.Gln145fs, and ABCA3 p.Arg1583Trp/p.Val1495CysfsX21), two with interstitial pneumonitis (SFTPC p.Lys63Glu and p.Ser72Asn/p.Gly100Ala), and one with ACD/MPV (FOXF1 p.Leu300ArgfsX79). None showed SFTPB mutations or defects in pSTAT-5. The 17 bronchoalveolar lavage or tracheal aspirates contained enough SP-B protein. The SP-C abnormality was most prevalent, and SP-B deficiency was rare in Japanese infants with hereditary ILD.

  9. Laparoscopic splenectomy for hereditary spherocytosis-preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogulski, Robert; Adamowicz-Salach, Anna; Matysiak, Michał; Piotrowski, Dariusz; Gogolewski, Michał; Piotrowska, Anna; Roik, Danuta; Kamiński, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Splenectomy is considered standard surgical therapy in hereditary spherocytosis. The procedure is indicated in patients with severe anemia, recurrent hemolytic, and aplastic crises. The aim of the study was to assess treatment outcomes in patients with hereditary spherocytosis who underwent total or partial laparoscopic splenectomy. Fifteen patients aged 4-17 yr underwent laparoscopic splenectomy from 2009 to 2012. Partial and total splenectomies were performed (five and 10 children, respectively). Hematologic parameters, liver function tests, and splenic volume before and after the surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Total follow-up was 1-30 months. Hospitalization and operating time were similar in both groups. In partial splenectomy group, branches of splenic arteries gave better blood supply than short gastric vessels. In both groups, hematologic parameters were improved. Postoperative markedly elevated platelet count was maintained up to 6 months, and after that, platelet count gradually decreased to normal values. Bilirubin level was decreased in early postoperative period; however, it increased later to achieve levels lower than in preoperative period. No severe general infections were observed in both groups. Laboratory parameters (hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations and RBC) after the surgery improved in all patients, and the effect was maintained during 12 months of follow-up. Platelet count increased significantly after the surgery and was maintained at high levels during the next 6 months. However, it returned to preoperative levels within a year after the surgery. Our study showed that partial splenectomy was not inferior to total splenectomy. However, full assessment requires longer follow-up and larger group of patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with bilateral pulmonary vascular malformations: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončarević Olivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that occurs due to vascular dysplasia associated with the disorder in the signaling pathway of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β. The clinical consequence is a disorder of blood vessels in multiple organ systems with the existence of telangiectasia which causes dilation of capillaries and veins, are present from birth and are localized on the skin and mucosa of the mouth, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tract. They can make a rupture with consequent serious bleeding that can end up with fatal outcome. Since there is a disruption of blood vessels of more than one organic system, the diagnosis is very complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Case report. We reported a 40-year-old female patient with a long-time evolution of problems, who was diagnosed and treated at the Clinic for Lung Diseases of the Military Medical Academy in Belgrade, Serbia, because of bilaterally pulmonary arteriovenous malformations associated with HHT. Embolization was performed in two acts, followed with normalization of clinical, radiological and functional findings with the cessation of hemoptysis, effort intolerance with a significant improvement of the quality of life. Conclusion. HHT is a rare dominant inherited multisystem disease that requires multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment. Embolization is the method of choice in the treatment of arteriovenous malformations with minor adverse effects and very satisfying therapeutic effect.

  11. A hereditary disposition for bovine peripheral nerve sheath tumors in Danish Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Anette B; Agerholm, Jørgen S; Christensen, Knud; Jensen, Henrik E; Leifsson, Páll S; Bendixen, Christian; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Fredholm, Merete

    2014-12-10

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) are frequently found in Danish cattle at slaughter. Bovine PNSTs share several gross and histopathological characteristics with the PNSTs in humans with heritable neurofibromatosis syndromes. The aim of the present study was to investigate a possible hereditary disposition to PNSTs in dairy cattle by statistical analysis performed on data from 567 cattle with PNSTs. Furthermore, a preliminary genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed on DNA isolated from 28 affected and 28 non-affected Holstein cows to identify loci in the bovine genome involved in the development of PNSTs. PNSTs were significantly more common in the Danish Holstein breed than in other breeds with 0.49% of Danish Holsteins slaughtered during an eight-year-period having PNSTs. PNSTs also occurred significantly more frequently in the offspring of some specific Holstein sires. Examination of three generation pedigrees showed that these sires were genetically related through a widely used US Holstein sire. The PNSTs included in GWAS were histologically classified as neurofibroma-schwannoma (43%), schwannoma (36%) and neurofibroma (21%) and derived from Holstein cows with multiple PNSTs. A single SNP on chromosome 27 reached genome-wide significance. Gross and histological characteristics of bovine PNSTs are comparable to PNSTs in humans (schwannomatosis). Danish Holsteins are genetically disposed to develop PNSTs but the examined materials are insufficient to allow determination of the mode of inheritance.

  12. Hereditary cerebral haemorrhage with amyloidosis, Dutch type (HCHWA-D): clinicopathological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattendorff, A R; Frangione, B; Luyendijk, W; Bots, G T

    1995-01-01

    Clinical and neuropathological findings are reported in 63 patients with hereditary cerebral haemorrhage with amyloid angiopathy. Patients had mostly recurrent strokes, and at least 80% of these were haemorrhages. Almost a third of the patients died within a year of their first and only recorded haemorrhage, half of them within two weeks. This angiopathy was restricted to the cerebral and cerebellar cortex and its covering leptomeninges. As the most important consequence, haemorrhagic infarcts and haemorrhages occurred in the subcortical white matter--that is, the region most vulnerable to impaired cortical circulation. Further development of these subcortical lesions gives rise to the fatal haemorrhages seen at necropsy. In so far as dementia occurs this is likely to result from multiple microinfarcts or haemorrhages. In most cases preamyloid lesions or diffuse plaques and early plaques were seen. No other type of plaque or neurofibrillary degeneration was found. The plaques occur in conjunction with the angiopathy, but may not occur even when the angiopathy is severe. In one patient plaques were totally absent. Angiopathy and plaques may be the result of the same mutation, the expression of which is governed by tissue factors or phenotypic differences between individual subjects. Images PMID:7608669

  13. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC): renal cancer risk, surveillance and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R; Schmidt, Laura S; Middelton, Lindsay A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Tomlinson, Ian; Richard, Stéphane; Linehan, W Marston

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant condition in which susceptible individuals are at risk for the development of cutaneous leiomyomas, early onset multiple uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type 2 papillary renal cell cancer. HLRCC is caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene which inactivate the enzyme and alters the function of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. Issues surrounding surveillance and treatment for HLRCC-associated renal cell cancer were considered as part of a recent international symposium on HLRCC. The management protocol proposed in this article is based on a literature review and a consensus meeting. The lifetime renal cancer risk for FH mutation carriers is estimated to be 15 %. In view of the potential for early onset of RCC in HLRCC, periodic renal imaging and, when available, predictive testing for a FH mutation is recommended from 8 to 10 years of age. However, the small risk of renal cell cancer in the 10-20 years age range and the potential drawbacks of screening should be carefully discussed on an individual basis. Surveillance preferably consists of annual abdominal MRI. Treatment of renal tumours should be prompt and generally consist of wide-margin surgical excision and consideration of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The choice for systemic treatment in metastatic disease should, if possible, be part of a clinical trial. Screening procedures in HLRCC families should preferably be evaluated in large cohorts of families.

  14. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). Renal cancer risk, surveillance and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H.; Maher, Eamonn; Schmidt, Laura S.; Middelton, Lindsay A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Tomlinson, Ian; Richard, Stéphane; Linehan, W. Marston

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant condition in which susceptible individuals are at risk for the development of cutaneous leiomyomas, early onset multiple uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type 2 papillary renal cell cancer. HLRCC is caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene, which inactivates the enzyme and alters the function of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA/ Krebs) cycle. Issues surrounding surveillance and treatment for HLRCC-associated renal cell cancer were considered as part of a recent international symposium on HLRCC. The management protocol proposed in this article is based on a literature review and a consensus meeting. The estimated lifetime renal cancer risk for FH mutation carriers is estimated to be 15%. In view of the potential for early onset of RCC in HLRCC, periodic renal imaging and, when available, predictive testing for a FH mutation is recommended from 8 to 10 years of age. However, the small risk of renal cell cancer in the 10-20 years age range and the potential drawbacks of screening should be carefully discussed on an individual basis. Surveillance preferably consists of annual abdominal MRI. Treatment of renal tumours should be prompt and generally consist of wide-margin surgical excision and consideration of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The choice for systemic treatment in metastatic disease should, if possible, be part of a clinical trial. Screening procedures in HLRCC families should preferably be evaluated in large cohorts of families. PMID:25012257

  15. Familial gastric cancer: detection of a hereditary cause helps to understand its etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelaar Ingrid P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Worldwide, gastric cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer, with a high morbidity and mortality. Several environmental factors predispose to the development of gastric cancer, such as Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and smoking. Familial clustering of gastric cancer is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of gastric cancer cases arise in the setting of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC. In families with HDGC, gastric cancer presents at relatively young age. Germline mutations in the CDH1 gene are the major cause of HDGC and are identified in approximately 25-50% of families which fulfill strict criteria. Prophylactic gastrectomy is the only option to prevent gastric cancer in individuals with a CDH1 mutation. However, in the majority of families with multiple cases of gastric cancer no germline genetic abnormality can be identified and therefore preventive measures are not available, except for general lifestyle advice. Future research should focus on identifying new genetic predisposing factors for all types of familial gastric cancer.

  16. A family with hereditary hemochromatosis carrying HFE gene splice site mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NING Huibin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate a new type of HFE gene mutation in a family with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. MethodsThe analysis of HFE gene was performed for one patient with a confirmed diagnosis of HH and five relatives. Blood genomic DNA was extracted and PCR multiplication was performed for the exon and intron splice sequences of related HFE, HJV, HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes. After agarose gel electrophoresis and purification, bi-directional direct sequencing was performed to detect mutation sites. ResultsThe proband had abnormal liver function and increases in serum iron, total iron binding capacity, serum ferritin, and transferrin saturation, as well as T→C homozygous mutation in the fourth base of intron 2 in the intervening sequence of the exon EXON2 of HFE gene (IVs 2+4T→C, C/C homozygous, splicing, abnormal. There were no abnormalities in HJV, HAMP, TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes. The proband′s son had the same homozygous mutation, three relatives had heterozygous mutations, and one relative had no abnormal mutations. ConclusionGene detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of hemochromatosis, and IVs 2+4T→C mutation may be a new pathogenic mutation for HH in China.

  17. The impact of hereditary cancer gene panels on clinical care and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Volkan; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-11-01

    Mutations in hereditary cancer syndromes account for a modest fraction of all cancers; however, identifying patients with these germline mutations offers tremendous health benefits to both patients and their family members. There are about 60 genes that confer a high lifetime risk of specific cancers, and this information can be used to tailor prevention, surveillance, and treatment. With advances in next-generation sequencing technologies and the elimination of gene patents for evaluating genetic information, we are now able to analyze multiple genes simultaneously, leading to the widespread clinical use of gene panels for germline cancer testing. Over the last 4 years since these panels were introduced, we have learned about the diagnostic yield of testing, the expanded phenotypes of the patients with mutations, and the clinical utility of genetic testing in patients with cancer and/or without cancer but with a family history of cancer. We have also experienced challenges including the large number of variants of unknown significance (VUSs), identification of somatic mutations and need to differentiate these from germline mutations, technical issues with particular genes and mutations, insurance coverage and reimbursement issues, lack of access to data, and lack of clinical management guidelines for newer and, especially, moderate and low-penetrance genes. The lessons learned from cancer genetic testing panels are applicable to other clinical areas as well and highlight the problems to be solved as we advance genomic medicine. © 2017 Okur and Chung; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Retinal nerve fibre layer loss in hereditary spastic paraplegias is restricted to complex phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiethoff Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduction of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL thickness was shown as part of the neurodegenerative process in a range of different neurodegenerative pathologies including Alzheimer′s disease (AD, idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA and multiple system atrophy (MSA. To further clarify the specificity of RNFL thinning as a potential marker of neurodegenerative diseases we investigated RNFL thickness in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP, an axonal, length-dependent neurodegenerative pathology of the upper motor neurons. Methods Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT was performed in 28 HSP patients (clinically: pure HSP = 22, complicated HSP = 6; genetic subtypes: SPG4 = 13, SPG5 = 1, SPG7 = 3, genetically unclassified: 11 to quantify peripapillary RNFL thickness. Standardized examination assessed duration of disease, dependency on assistive walking aids and severity of symptoms quantified with Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale (SPRS. Results HSP patients demonstrated no significant thinning of global RNFL (pglobal = 0.61. Subgroup analysis revealed significant reduction in temporal and temporal inferior sectors for patients with complex (p Conclusion Clinically pure HSP patients feature no significant reduction in RNFL, whereas complex phenotypes display an abnormal thinning of temporal and temporal inferior RNFL. Our data indicate that RNFL thinning does not occur unspecifically in all neurodegenerative diseases but is in HSP restricted to subtypes with multisystemic degeneration.

  19. Outcome of genetic evaluation of patients with kidney cancer referred for suspected hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelly L; Alanee, Shaheen; Glogowski, Emily A; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Klein, Robert; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    suggest that in kidney cancer patients evaluated for hereditary cancer syndromes, young age is associated with diagnosis of RCC syndromes, whereas syndromic manifestations and multiple primaries are found in Lynch syndrome. These results, along with clinical awareness, may be useful for practicing urologists to select patients with kidney cancer to refer for genetic counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases: Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-12-27

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments, describes the basis of human genetic diversity, and addresses the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants. Rare variants with large effect sizes are responsible for single-gene disorders, whereas complex polygenic diseases are typically due to multiple genetic variants, each exerting a modest effect size. To illustrate the clinical implications of genetic variants with large effect sizes, 3 common forms of hereditary cardiomyopathies are discussed as prototypic examples of single-gene disorders, including their genetics, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment. The genetic basis of complex traits is discussed in a separate paper. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Loss of β-catenin induces multifocal periosteal chondroma-like masses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, Leslie; Saunders, Cheri; Guttenberg, Marta; Candela, Maria Elena; Ohta, Yoichi; Yasuhara, Rika; Kondo, Naoki; Sgariglia, Federica; Asai, Shuji; Zhang, Xianrong; Qin, Ling; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Chen, Di; Yamamoto, Masato; Toyosawa, Satoru; Dormans, John P; Esko, Jeffrey D; Yamaguchi, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-03-01

    Osteochondromas and enchondromas are the most common tumors affecting the skeleton. Osteochondromas can occur as multiple lesions, such as those in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses. Unexpectedly, while studying the role of β-catenin in cartilage development, we found that its conditional deletion induces ectopic chondroma-like cartilage formation in mice. Postnatal ablation of β-catenin in cartilage induced lateral outgrowth of the growth plate within 2 weeks after ablation. The chondroma-like masses were present in the flanking periosteum by 5 weeks and persisted for more than 6 months after β-catenin ablation. These long-lasting ectopic masses rarely contained apoptotic cells. In good correlation, transplants of β-catenin-deficient chondrocytes into athymic mice persisted for a longer period of time and resisted replacement by bone compared to control wild-type chondrocytes. In contrast, a β-catenin signaling stimulator increased cell death in control chondrocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the amount of detectable β-catenin in cartilage cells of osteochondromas obtained from hereditary multiple exostoses patients was much lower than that in hypertrophic chondrocytes in normal human growth plates. The findings in our study indicate that loss of β-catenin expression in chondrocytes induces periosteal chondroma-like masses and may be linked to, and cause, the persistence of cartilage caps in osteochondromas. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multiple pregnancy affect fetal growth? Are tests for genetic disorders as accurate in multiple pregnancies? How can multiple pregnancy affect delivery? Can multiple pregnancy affect my risk of postpartum depression? Can I breastfeed if I have multiples? Glossary ...

  3. Approach to genetic analysis in the diagnosis of hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Vesely, R.; Myrdal, U.; Yoshimura, K.; Duys, P.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation. Seven subtypes have been described, caused by mutations in four different genes. Apart from a common phenotype of lifelong recurrent inflammatory attacks, all subtypes have distinct

  4. A web resource on DNA tests for canine and feline hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, Jeffrey; Raj, Karthik; Yuhnke, Scott; Bell, Jerold; Fretwell, Neale; Hedhammar, Ake; Wade, Claire; Giger, Urs

    2013-08-01

    Following the first identification of a disease-causing mutation in dogs in 1989 and the more recent completion of canine and feline genome sequences, much progress has been made in the molecular characterization of hereditary diseases in dogs and cats. To increase access to information on diagnosing hereditary diseases in dogs and cats, a web application has been developed to collect, organize and display information on available DNA tests and other supporting information, including gene and chromosomal locations, mutations, primary research citations and disease descriptions. The DNA testing information can be accessed at the URL: http://research.vet.upenn.edu/WSAVA-LabSearch. There are currently 131 molecular genetic tests available for hereditary diseases in dogs and cats offered by 43 laboratories worldwide. This tool should provide clinicians, researchers, breeders and companion animal owners with a single comprehensive, up-to-date and readily searchable webpage for information on hereditary disease testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  6. Disease-modifying factors in hereditary angioedema: an RNA expression-based screening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    López-Lera, Alberto; Cabo, Fátima Sánchez; Garrido, Sofía; Dopazo, Ana; López-Trascasa, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema due to C1-Inhibitor deficiency (HAE types I and II) is a monogenic disease characterized by sudden, self-limited episodes of cutaneous and mucosal swelling due to local deregulation of vascular permeability...

  7. A long-term follow-up study of subtotal splenectomy in children with hereditary spherocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosman, Colin; Broens, P M A; Trzpis, M; Tamminga, R Y J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a heterogeneous hemolytic anemia treated with splenectomy in patients suffering from severe or moderate disease. Total splenectomy, however, renders patients vulnerable to overwhelming postsplenectomy infection despite preventive measures. Although

  8. Gilbert Syndrome with Concomitant Hereditary Spherocytosis Presenting with Moderate Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiso, Mitsuhiko; Yagi, Minami; Tanaka, Atsushi; Miura, Kotaro; Miura, Ryo; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Takamori, Yoriyuki; Nakahara, Sayuri; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Takikawa, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We experienced a case of a 19-year-old man with Gilbert syndrome with concomitant hereditary spherocytosis. The patient presented with moderate unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, and inherited etiology was strongly suspected. The diagnosis of Gilbert syndrome was confirmed by the genetic analysis of the UGT1A1 gene, demonstrating UGT1A1*28 and compound heterozygote UGT1A1*6. In addition, since the laboratory findings and imaging studies revealed lysemia as well as gallstone and splenomegaly, a diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis was made as a comorbidity. Both Gilbert syndrome and hereditary spherocytosis are hereditary diseases with a high frequency, and the hyperbilirubinemia may be exacerbated when these two diseases are concomitant.

  9. Hereditary Cancer: Example of a Public Health Approach to Ensure Population Health Benefits of Genetic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Cragun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the identification, prevention, and treatment of hereditary cancer as an important public health concern. Hereditary cancer research and educational outreach activities are used to illustrate how public health functions can help to achieve health benefits of genetic and genomic medicine. First, we evaluate genetic service delivery through triangulating patient and provider survey results which reveal variability among providers in hereditary cancer knowledge and genetic service provision. Second, we describe efforts we have made to assure competency among healthcare providers and to inform, educate and empower patients with regard to the rapidly evolving field of genomics and hereditary cancer. Lastly, key policy-issues raised by our experiences are discussed in the context of how they may help us to more effectively translate future genomic technologies into practice in order to attain population health benefits from genetic and genomic medicine.

  10. [Epidemiology of monogenic hereditary diseases in Rostov oblast: population dynamic factors determining the differentiation of the load of hereditary diseases in eight districts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, R A; Amelina, S S; Shokarev, R A; Val'kov, R A; Val'kova, T I; Vetrova, N V; Kriventsova, N V; El'chinova, G I; Petrova, N V; Khlebnikova, O V

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of the diversity of monogenic hereditary diseases in eight raions (districts) of Rostov oblast (region) of Russia (Tsimlyansk, Volgodonskoi, Tselina, Egorlykskaya, Millerovo, Tarasovskaya, Rodionovo-Nesvetaiskaya, and Matveevo-Kurgan raions) has been summarized. The total sample size was 320925 subjects. The spectrum of hereditary diseases detected in the eight districts comprises 187 diseases, including 99 autosomal dominant (AD), 72 autosomal recessive (AR), and 16 X-linked diseases. The mean prevalence rate of each disease in the total population has been calculated. Accumulation of individual diseases in different regions of Rostov oblast has been calculated; the disease accumulation has been compared with that in some populations of Russia examined earlier. Cluster analysis using the data on the frequencies of genes of hereditary diseases has shown the gene geographic position of the Rostov oblast population among the following ethnic populations of Russia: Russians (Kostroma, Kirov, and Rostov oblasts and Krasnodar krai), Chuvashes (Chuvashia), Adygeans (Adygea), Maris (Marii El), and Udmurts (Udmurtia).

  11. Multiple sclerosis; Multiple Sklerose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Kuehn, A.L.; Backens, M.; Papanagiotou, P. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Klinik, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Shariat, K. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Kostopoulos, P. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Neurologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of myelin with interspersed lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis and monitoring of white matter diseases. This article focuses on key findings in multiple sclerosis as detected by MRI. (orig.) [German] Die Multiple Sklerose (MS) ist die haeufigste chronisch-entzuendliche Erkrankung des Myelins mit eingesprengten Laesionen im Bereich der weissen Substanz des zentralen Nervensystems. Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) hat bei der Diagnosestellung und Verlaufskontrolle eine Schluesselrolle. Dieser Artikel befasst sich mit Hauptcharakteristika der MR-Bildbebung. (orig.)

  12. De novo REEP2 missense mutation in pure hereditary spastic paraplegia

    OpenAIRE

    Roda, Ricardo H.; Schindler, Alice B.; Blackstone, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Alterations in proteins that regulate endoplasmic reticulum morphology are common causes of hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG1?78, plus others). Mutations in the REEP1 gene that encodes an endoplasmic reticulum?shaping protein are well?known causes of SPG31, a common autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia. A closely?related gene, REEP2, is mutated in SPG72, with both autosomal and recessive inheritances. Here, we report a patient with a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia due to a de ...

  13. Genetic screening analysis of patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer from northern and northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira-Nunes, Caroline Aquino; Barros, Mariceli Baia Leão; do Nascimento Borges, Bárbara; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Lamarão, Leticia Martins; Ribeiro, Helem Ferreira; Bona, Amanda Braga; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Rey, Juan Antonio; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2014-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a hereditary autosomal inherited syndrome associated with CDH1 germline mutations. In Brazil, gastrointestinal tumors are among the most prevalent tumor types and constitute a serious public health problem, especially in the northern and northeastern regions. This study aimed to investigate germline mutations, methylation pattern and genomic rearrangements in the CDH1 gene and quantitative changes in the DNA of HDGC patients in northern a...

  14. HEREDITARY BLINDNESS: A GENEALOGICAL STUDY AMONG AL-GHARAHIR, A JORDAN VALLEY TRIBE

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, Mohanna Y.; El-Najjar, Mahmoud Y.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Hereditary diseases form an omnibus problem in Arab societies in general and in rural Arab societies in particular. Aim: Study of hereditary blindness and its relation to endogamous marriage among the Gharaghir tribe in the Jordan valley. Methodology: The researchers carried out a fieldwork among the Gharaghir tribe in Al-Sawalha (the northern valley region, Deir Alla, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan) using participant observation, and intensive focussed interviews, in addition to...

  15. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: the first publication (1947).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Peter J

    2003-04-08

    The first report of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was published in Dutch in 1947. The present paper makes it accessible in the English language. de Jong described two families, but only the cases from the first family may be considered to have had HNPP. Five persons from three generations had recurring peripheral neuropathies. de Jong hypothesized a hereditary disposition for the occurrence of neuropathies, but suggested a relationship with low vitamin B(1) levels.

  16. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary breast cancer: Role of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Couch, F.J.; Kant, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The common hereditary forms of breast cancer have been largely attributed to the inheritance of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. However, it is not yet clear what proportion of hereditary breast cancer is explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 or by some other unidentified susceptibility gene(s). We describe the proportion of hereditary breast cancer explained by BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a sample of North American hereditary breast cancers and assess the evidence for additional susceptibility genes that may confer hereditary breast or ovarian cancer risk. Twenty-three families were identified through two high-risk breast cancer research programs. Genetic analysis was undertaken to establish linkage between the breast or ovarian cancer cases and markers on chromosomes 17q (BRCA1) and 13q (BRCA2). Mutation analysis in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was also undertaken in all families. The pattern of hereditary cancer in 14 (61%) of the 23 families studied was attributed to BRCA1 by a combination of linkage and mutation analyses. No families were attributed to BRCA2. Five families (22%) provided evidence against linkage to both BRCA1 and BRCA2. No BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were detected in these five families. The BRCA1 or BRCA2 status of four families (17%) could not be determined. BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably explain the majority of hereditary breast cancer that exists in the North American population. However, one or more additional genes may yet be found that explain some proportion of hereditary breast cancer. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Management of hereditary gingival fibromatosis: A 2 years follow-up case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Dete, Gopal; Saimbi, Charanjeet Singh; Kumar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slow, progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of gingiva due to increase in sub-mucosal connective tissue component. This paper presents a case report of an 18-year-old female suffering from HGF with positive family history. Her 42-year-old mother also have enlargement of the gums. After through clinical examination of both the patients, routine blood investigation was advised. All the investigatio...

  18. High Prevalence of Hereditary Cancer Syndromes in Adolescents and Young Adults With Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Ying, Jun; Bannon, Sarah A; Lynch, Patrick M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Vilar, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Established guidelines recommend evaluation for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients younger than 50 years diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). This group has been well described in the literature; however, patients diagnosed as adolescents and young adults are not well represented in CRC studies. Here, we define the clinical profile, including the extent of hereditary cancer syndromes and family history of cancer, in patients diagnosed with CRC at age 35 or younger. We reviewed patients who underwent genetic counseling at our institution during 5 years (2009 to 2013). Data were collected regarding demographics, clinicopathologic information, tumor and genetic testing, and family history. Patients with an identified hereditary cancer syndrome were compared with those without a syndrome. Of the 193 patients with evaluable data, 35% had an identifiable hereditary cancer syndrome, including 23 with Lynch syndrome, 22 with mutation-negative Lynch syndrome, 16 with familial adenomatous polyposis, two with constitutional mismatch repair deficiency, two with biallelic MUTYH mutations, and one with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Patients without a hereditary syndrome more frequently presented with metastatic disease, whereas patients with a syndrome were more likely to present at earlier stages and to have a family history of cancer. Nevertheless, a substantial proportion of the hereditary syndromes (19%) were diagnosed in individuals with no family history of the disease. We conclude that patients diagnosed with CRC at age 35 years or younger should receive genetic counseling regardless of their family history and phenotype. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  20. Clinical features of MS associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy mtDNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Burke, Ailbhe; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Compston, D Alastair S; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2013-12-10

    To determine whether the association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) (known as "Harding disease") is a chance finding, or the 2 disorders are mechanistically linked. We performed a United Kingdom-wide prospective cohort study of prevalent cases of MS with LHON mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. The new cases were compared with published cases, enabling a comprehensive clinical description. We also performed a meta-analysis of studies screening patients with MS for LHON mtDNA mutations to find evidence of a genetic association. Twelve new patients were identified from 11 pedigrees, and 44 cases were identified in the literature. The combined cohort had the following characteristics: multiple episodes of visual loss, predominance for women, and lengthy time interval before the fellow eye is affected (average 1.66 years), which is very atypical of LHON; conversely, most patients presented without eye pain and had a poor visual prognosis, which is unusual for optic neuritis associated with MS. The number of UK cases of LHON-MS fell well within the range predicted by the chance occurrence of MS and the mtDNA mutations known to cause LHON. There was no association between LHON mtDNA mutations and MS in a meta-analysis of the published data. Although the co-occurrence of MS and LHON mtDNA mutations is likely to be due to chance, the resulting disorder has a distinct phenotype, implicating a mechanistic interaction. Patients with LHON-MS have a more aggressive course, and prognostication and treatment should be guarded.

  1. Radiological features of bilateral hereditary micro-epiphyseal dysplasia - a distinct entity in the skeletal dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostert, A.K. [Isala Clinics, Location Weezenlanden, Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Zwolle (Netherlands); Dijkstra, P.F. [Jan van Breemen Inst., Dept. of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Horn, J.R. van [Univ. Hospital Groningen, Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); Jansen, B.R.H. [Reinier de Graaf Hospital, Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Delft (Netherlands); Heutink, P. [Erasmus MCRotterdam, Dept. of Clinical Genetics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lindhout, D. [Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht, Dept. of Medical Genetics, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Aim: To prove that bilateral hereditary micro-epiphyseal dysplasia (BHMED), first described by Elsbach in 1959, is a distinct disorder radiologically as well as clinically, compared with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Material and Methods: We used the data of the revised pedigree with 84 family members, performed a medical history, physical examination and made a radiological evaluation for defining a clinical and radiological phenotype of BHMED family members. We used blood samples for genetic analysis. Results: Although there is a clear clinical picture of the dysplasia, the radiological signs are more reliable for making the diagnosis. Especially the typical deformity of the hip and knee joint are diagnostic for BHMED. By linkage analysis we excluded linkage with the three known MED-loci (EDM1, EDM2 and EDM3). Conclusion: BHMED is indeed an entity that is distinct from common multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), clinically, as well as radiologically and genetically. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Es sollte dargelegt werden, dass sich eine vererbliche, laterale Mikro-Epiphysendysplasie (BHMED), Erstbeschreibung durch Elsbach 1959, klinisch, radiologisch und genetisch von einer mutiplen Epiphysendysplasie (MED) unterscheidet. Material und Methode: Anhand der Daten eines ueberarbeiteten Stammbaumes mit 84 Familienmitgliedern wurde der medizinische Werdegang rekonstruiert. Es erfolgte eine physische Untersuchung der Familienmitglieder. Schliesslich wurde eine radiologische Auswertung durchgefuehrt, um einen klinischen und radiologischen Phaenotyp der von BHMED betroffenen Familienmitglieder zu definieren. Fuer eine genetische Analyse wurden Blutproben entnommen. Ergebnisse: Obwohl es ein deutliches klinisches Bild einer Dysplasie gibt, sind die radiologischen Kennzeichen fuer die Diagnose zuverlaessiger. Insbesondere die typische Deformation der Huefte und des Kniegelenks ist diagnostisch fuer BHMED. Durch Linkage-Analyse konnte eine Verbindung zu den drei bekannten

  2. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A; Haridy, Nourelhoda A; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P; Korlipara, L V Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Lewis, Patrick A; Houlden, Henry

    2016-07-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features, and are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked patterns. Genetic defects have been identified in over 40 different genes, with more than 70 loci in total. Complex recessive spastic paraplegias have in the past been frequently associated with mutations in SPG11 (spatacsin), ZFYVE26/SPG15, SPG7 (paraplegin) and a handful of other rare genes, but many cases remain genetically undefined. The overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders has been implied in a small number of reports, but not in larger disease series. This deficiency has been largely due to the lack of suitable high throughput techniques to investigate the genetic basis of disease, but the recent availability of next generation sequencing can facilitate the identification of disease-causing mutations even in extremely heterogeneous disorders. We investigated a series of 97 index cases with complex spastic paraplegia referred to a tertiary referral neurology centre in London for diagnosis or management. The mean age of onset was 16 years (range 3 to 39). The SPG11 gene was first analysed, revealing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in 30/97 (30.9%) of probands, the largest SPG11 series reported to date, and by far the most common cause of complex spastic paraplegia in the UK, with severe and progressive clinical features and other neurological manifestations, linked with magnetic resonance imaging defects. Given the high frequency of SPG11 mutations, we studied the autophagic response to starvation in eight affected SPG11 cases and control fibroblast cell lines, but in our restricted study we did not observe correlations between disease status and autophagic or lysosomal markers. In the remaining cases, next

  3. Study of serum hepcidin in hereditary hemolytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Beshlawy, Amal; Alaraby, Ibrahim; Abdel Kader, Mohamed S E M; Ahmed, Dina H; Abdelrahman, Hossam E M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the level of hepcidin in hereditary chronic hemolytic anemias and to correlate the serum hepcidin levels to the need for blood transfusions (frequency of blood transfusions and the serum ferritin level). Seventy pediatric patients with hereditary chronic hemolytic anemias, attending to hematology clinics of Cairo University and Misr University for Science and Technology (MUST) hospitals were the subjects of this study [53 patients with β-thalassemia major (β-TM), 10 patients with β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI), four patients with congenital spherocytosis and three patients with sickle cell disease) (38 males and 32 females)]; their ages ranged from 1-14 years. Seventy normal children, age- and sex-matched, served as the control group. The results of this study revealed decreased hepcidin levels in patients (all types of congenital chronic hemolytic anemias) [mean ± SD (standard deviation) = 22.9 ± 6.0] compared to controls (mean ± SD = 132.4 ± 16.7) with highly significant statistical difference in between. Hepcidin levels were higher in β-TM patients (mean ± SD = 23.7 ± 6.2) than in β-TI patients (mean ± SD = 21.8 ± 4.0), the hepcidin to ferritin ratio was significantly less than one. In β-TM patients, the mean ± SD was 0.03 ± 0.004, and in β-TI patients the mean ± SD = 0.025 ± 0.002, with highly significant statistical difference with hepcidin-to-ferritin ratios in controls being mean ± SD = 2.3 ± 0.7. Hepcidin and hepcidin/ferritin ratios can be used as good markers of hemolytic anemia and iron overload as they have very high sensitivity (99.0 and 99.0%, respectively) and very high specificity (98.0 and 97.0%, respectively). Our findings highlight the potential usefulness of hepcidin measurement as a diagnostic tool. The use of hepcidin as an adjuvant therapy with iron chelators is important as it has a vital role in combating hemosidrosis.

  4. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S.; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A.; Haridy, Nourelhoda A.; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Korlipara, L.V. Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features, and are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked patterns. Genetic defects have been identified in over 40 different genes, with more than 70 loci in total. Complex recessive spastic paraplegias have in the past been frequently associated with mutations in SPG11 (spatacsin), ZFYVE26/SPG15, SPG7 (paraplegin) and a handful of other rare genes, but many cases remain genetically undefined. The overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders has been implied in a small number of reports, but not in larger disease series. This deficiency has been largely due to the lack of suitable high throughput techniques to investigate the genetic basis of disease, but the recent availability of next generation sequencing can facilitate the identification of disease-causing mutations even in extremely heterogeneous disorders. We investigated a series of 97 index cases with complex spastic paraplegia referred to a tertiary referral neurology centre in London for diagnosis or management. The mean age of onset was 16 years (range 3 to 39). The SPG11 gene was first analysed, revealing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in 30/97 (30.9%) of probands, the largest SPG11 series reported to date, and by far the most common cause of complex spastic paraplegia in the UK, with severe and progressive clinical features and other neurological manifestations, linked with magnetic resonance imaging defects. Given the high frequency of SPG11 mutations, we studied the autophagic response to starvation in eight affected SPG11 cases and control fibroblast cell lines, but in our restricted study we did not observe correlations between disease status and autophagic or lysosomal markers. In the remaining cases, next

  5. Aqueous humor ferritin in hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzhofer, Markus; Schroedl, Falk; Trost, Andrea; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Wiedemann, Helmut; Strohmaier, Clemens; Hohensinn, Melchior; Strasser, Michael; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Grabner, Guenther; Aigner, Elmar; Reitsamer, Herbert A

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disease, characterized by hyperferritinemia but with absence of body iron excess and early onset of bilateral cataracts. Although 5- to 20-fold increased serum ferritin concentrations have been reported in HHCS patients, data of ferritin levels in aqueous humor have not been obtained. We therefore aimed to investigate the ferritin levels in aqueous humor and serum and further present histological and ultrastructural data of the lens. During cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation, aqueous humor and lens aspirate of a 37-year-old HHCS patient were obtained from both eyes. Ferritin levels in serum and aqueous humor were quantitatively analyzed via immunoassays in the HHCS patient and healthy control subjects (n = 6). Lens aspirate in HHCS was analyzed histologically and at the ultrastructural level. Further, genetic mutation screening by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing in blood was performed. Serum ferritin levels in the control group were 142.2 ± 38.7 μg/L, whereas in the HHCS patient, this parameter was excessively increased (1086 μg/L). Analysis of ferritin in aqueous humor revealed 6.4 ± 3.8 μg/L in normal control subjects and 146.3 μg/L (OD) and 160.4 μg/L (OS) in the HHCS patient. DNA analysis detected a C>A mutation on position +18, a T>G mutation on position +22, a T>C mutation on position +24, and a T>G polymorphism on position +26 in the iron-responsive element of the light-chain ferritin (L-ferritin) gene. In the HHCS patient, a 23-fold (OD) to 25-fold (OS) increased aqueous humor ferritin level was detected. Therefore, the formation of bilateral cataract in HHCS is most likely a result of elevated aqueous humor ferritin. In addition, a novel mutation in this rare disease in the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin gene is reported.

  6. β-D-xylosides stimulate GAG synthesis in chondrocyte cultures due to elevation of the extracellular GAG domains, accompanied by the depletion of the intra-pericellular GAG pools, with alterations in the GAG profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Talia; Evron, Zoharia; Trebicz-Geffen, Meirav; Aviv, Moran; Robinson, Dror; Kollander, Yehuda; Nevo, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    The familial disease of hereditary multiple exostoses is characterized by abnormal skeletal deformities requiring extensive surgical procedures. In hereditary multiple exostoses patients there is a shortage in the pericellular glycosaminoglycan (GAG) of heparan sulfate (HS), related to defective activity of HS glycosyltransferases, mainly in the pericellular regions of chondrocytes. This study searched for a novel approach employing xylosides with different aglycone groups priming a variety of GAG chains, in attempting to alter the GAG compositional profile. Cell cultures of patients with osteochondroma responded to p-nitrophenyl β-D-xyloside by a significant increase in total GAG synthesis, expressed mainly in the extracellular domains, limited to chondroitin sulfate). The different β-D-xylosides, in addition to increasing the synthesis of extracellular GAGs, led to a significant depletion of the intracellular GAG domains. In mouse chondrocyte cultures, β-D-xylosides with different aglycones created a unique distribution of the GAG pools. Of special interest was the finding that the naphthalene methanol β-D-xyloside showed the highest absolute levels of HS-GAGs in both extracellular and intra-pericellular moieties compared with other β-D-xylosides and with controls without xyloside. In summary, β-D-xylosides can be utilized in chondrocyte cultures to modify the distribution of GAGs between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. In addition, xylosides may alter the profile of specific GAG chains in each moiety.

  7. High prevalence of hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in central Norway: from clinical observation to evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Krogh, A S; Quist-Paulsen, P; Waage, A; Langseth, Ø O; Thorstensen, K; Brudevold, R; Tjønnfjord, G E; Largiadèr, C R; Lämmle, B; Kremer Hovinga, J A

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The population prevalence of hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is unknown. We studied the prevalence of hereditary TTP and population frequencies of two ADAMTS-13 mutations. A high frequency of hereditary TTP related to ADAMTS-13 mutation c.4143_4144dupA was found. Vicinity of ABO blood group and ADAMTS-13 loci may facilitate screening of ADAMTS-13 mutations. Background Hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused by ADAMTS-13 mutations is a rare, but serious condition. The prevalence is unknown, but it seems to be high in Norway. Objectives To identify all patients with hereditary TTP in central Norway and to investigate the prevalence of hereditary TTP and the population frequencies of two common ADAMTS-13 mutations. Patients/Methods Patients were identified in a cross-sectional study within the Central Norway Health Region by means of three different search strategies. Frequencies of ADAMTS-13 mutations, c.4143_4144dupA and c.3178 C>T (p.R1060W), were investigated in a population-based cohort (500 alleles) and in healthy blood donors (2104 alleles) by taking advantage of the close neighborhood of the ADAMTS-13 and ABO blood group gene loci. The observed prevalence of hereditary TTP was compared with the rates of ADAMTS-13 mutation carriers in different geographical regions. Results We identified 11 families with hereditary TTP in central Norway during the 10-year study period. The prevalence of hereditary TTP in central Norway was 16.7 × 10(-6) persons. The most prevalent mutation was c.4143_4144dupA, accounting for two-thirds of disease causing alleles among patients and having an allelic frequency of 0.33% in the central, 0.10% in the western, and 0.04% in the southeastern Norwegian population. The allelic frequency of c.3178 C>T (p.R1060W) in the population was even higher (0.3-1%), but this mutation was infrequent among patients, with no homozygous cases. Conclusions We found a high prevalence of hereditary

  8. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Castellanos; Bernat Gel; Inma Rosas; Eva Tornero; Sheila Santín; Raquel Pluvinet; Juan Velasco; Lauro Sumoy; Jesús del Valle; Manuel Perucho; Ignacio Blanco; Matilde Navarro; Joan Brunet; Marta Pineda; Lidia Feliubadaló

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, ...

  9. Strumpellin and Spartin, Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Proteins, are Binding Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is one of the most heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases with more than 50 identified genes causing a relatively stereotypical phenotypic presentation. Recent studies of HSP pathogenesis have suggested the existence of shared biochemical pathways that are crucial for axonal maintenance and degeneration. We explored possible interactions of several proteins associated with this condition. Here we report interactions of endogenous and overexpressed strumpellin with another HSP-associated protein, spartin. This biochemical interaction does not appear to be a part of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and Scar homologue (WASH complex because spartin is not co-immunoprecipitated with WASH1 protein. The spartin–-strumpellin association does not require the presence of the microtubule interacting and trafficking domain of spartin. Over-expression of mutant forms of strumpellin with the introduced HSP-causing mutations does not alter the colocalization of these two proteins. Knockdown of strumpellin in cultured cortical rat neurons interferes with development of neuronal branching and results in reduced expression of endogenous spartin. Proteosomal inhibition stabilized the levels of spartin and WASH 1 proteins, supporting increased spartin degradation in the absence of strumpellin.

  10. Clinical Spectrum of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Roshan; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya M.; Al-Azri, Faisal M.; Mani, Ranjit; Abdelrahim, Rana A.; Koul, Vivek; Alfutaisi, Amna M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore the spectrum of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) in children in Oman. Methods: This retrospective study was carried out between January 1994 and August 2011 on children with delayed development, gait disorders and motor handicaps, with signs of symmetrical pyramidal tract involvement. A detailed perinatal and family history, including the age of onset of symptoms, was recorded. The children were labelled as having either the pure or complicated form of HSP based on the established diagnostic criteria. In families with more than one affected child, parents and all other siblings were also examined. Results: Within the study, 74 children from 31 families were diagnosed with HSP. Parental consanguinity was seen in 91% of cases, with 44 children (59.4%) experiencing onset of the disease under one year of age. Complicated HSP was the most common type, seen in 81.1%. Speech involvement, mental retardation, and epilepsy were the most common associated abnormalities. Nonspecific white matter changes and corpus callosum abnormalities were noted in 24.3% of cases on magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: The study described clinical features of 74 children with HSP. Autosomal recessive complicated HSP was seen in 81.1% of cases. PMID:23984021

  11. Nationwide epidemiological survey of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kaori; Morizane, Yuki; Shiraga, Fumio; Shikishima, Keigo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Wakakura, Masato; Nakamura, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy that leads to central loss of vision, predominantly in young males. Most LHON cases have one of three primary point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The annual incidence and prevalence of LHON in Japan are not known. Thus, we estimated the annual incidence of molecularly confirmed LHON in Japan during 2014. Sequential questionnaires were sent to 1397 facilities, which included all of the university hospitals in Japan, and they were certified by either the Japanese Ophthalmological Society or the Japanese Neuro-Ophthalmological Society. We calculated the incidence number (Ir) as the number of patients who developed LHON in 2014 and its 95% confidence interval. We received 861 responses to the first questionnaire, where 49 facilities reported 72 cases (67 were male and 5 were female) of newly developed LHON during 2014. Ir was calculated as 117, and the 95% confidence interval ranged from 81 to 153. For the second questionnaire, responses were received from 30 facilities, where the median age at onset was 38 years for males and 30 years for females, and 86.5% of cases possessed the mtDNA ND4/G11778A mutation. Approximately 120 cases of newly developed LHON were reported during 2014 in Japan, and 93.2% were males. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: bridging the translational gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkute, Neringa; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genetic disorder in the population. We address the clinical evolution of the disease, the secondary etiological factors that could contribute to visual loss, and the challenging task of developing effective treatments. LHON is characterized by a preclinical phase that reflects retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dysfunction before rapid visual deterioration ensues. Children can present atypically with slowly progressive visual loss or an insidious/subclinical onset that frequently results in considerable diagnostic delays. The LHON mtDNA mutation is not sufficient on its own to precipitate RGC loss and the current body of evidence supports a role for smoking and estrogen levels influencing disease conversion. Clinical trials are currently investigating the efficacy of adeno-associated viral vectors-based gene therapy approaches for patients carrying the m.11778G>A mutation. Mitochondrial replacement therapy is being developed as a reproductive option to prevent the maternal transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations. LHON is phenotypically more heterogeneous than previously considered and a complex interplay of genetic, environmental and hormonal factors modulates the risk of a LHON carrier losing vision. Advances in disease modelling, drug screening and genetic engineering offer promising avenues for therapeutic breakthroughs in LHON.

  13. Identification of MPL R102P Mutation in Hereditary Thrombocytosis

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    Christine Bellanné-Chantelot

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of hereditary thrombocytosis is germline mutations affecting the thrombopoietin (TPO/TPO receptor (MPL/JAK2 signaling axis. Here, we report one family presenting two cases with a mild thrombocytosis. By sequencing JAK2 and MPL coding exons, we identified a germline MPL R102P heterozygous mutation in the proband and his daughter. Concomitantly, we detected high TPO levels in the serum of these two patients. The mutation was not found in three other unaffected cases from the family except in another proband’s daughter who did not present thrombocytosis but had a high TPO level. The MPL R102P mutation was first described in congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia in a homozygous state with a loss-of-function activity. It was previously shown that MPL R102P was blocked in the endoplasmic reticulum without being able to translocate to the plasma membrane. Thus, this case report identifies for the first time that MPL R102P mutation can differently impact megakaryopoiesis: thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia depending on the presence of the heterozygous or homozygous state, respectively. The paradoxical effect associated with heterozygous MPL R102P may be due to subnormal cell-surface expression of wild-type MPL in platelets inducing a defective TPO clearance. As a consequence, increased TPO levels may activate megakaryocyte progenitors that express a lower, but still sufficient level of MPL for the induction of proliferation.

  14. Mitochondrial genetics and therapeutic overview of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Agaath Hedina; Michael, Minu Jenifer; Ramasamy, Sivasamy

    2017-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a common inherited mitochondrial disorder that is characterized by the degeneration of the optic nerves, leading to vision loss. The major mutations in the mitochondrial genes ND1, ND4, and ND6 of LHON subjects are found to increase the oxidative stress experienced by the optic nerve cell, thereby leading to nerve cell damage. Accurate treatments are not available and drugs that are commercially available like Idebenone, EPI-743, and Bendavia with their antioxidant role help in reducing the oxidative stress experienced by the cell thereby preventing the progression of the disease. Genetic counseling plays an effective role in making the family members aware of the inheritance pattern of the disease. Gene therapy is an alternative for curing the disease but is still under study. This review focuses on the role of mitochondrial genes in causing LHON and therapeutics available for treating the disease. A systematic search has been adopted in various databases using the keywords “LHON,” “mitochondria,” “ND1,” “ND4,” “ND6,” and “therapy” and the following review on mitochondrial genetics and therapeutics of LHON has been developed with obtained articles from 1988 to 2017. PMID:29133631

  15. Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: a Case Report

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    R. Daneshvar Kakhki

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: One of the most prevalent mitochondrial genetic diseases is Leber disease. Most of the patients are with the bilateral ocular involvement, simultaneously in 25% and one after another in 75% of the patients with an average of 8-week involvement distance between two eyes. The aim of the study was to report a rare case of Leber disease with 11-year engagement distance between two eyes. Patient Profile: A 38 years old male patient, who had been hospitalized in autumn 2012 in Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, due to his left-eye vision loss, was studied. One day before referring to the hospital, his left-eye vision had gradually blurred, only could perceive light. The patient were with HBs Ag positive (Carrier, and was hypertensive from about one year before hospitalization. Based on the ophthalmoscopy results, the right-eye disc was lost and the left-eye disc was pale. Findings: At first, the patient received methylprednisolone pulse therapy, while no treatment response was observed after a 2-week therapy. Based on the genetic assessments of peripheral blood cells, the homoplastic 14233 mutation was diagnosed, confirming the clinical suspicion of Leber disease (LHON. The patient received 100mg a day Q10 coenzyme and multivitamin. Conclusion: The diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy should be noticed in young men with bilateral optic atrophy.

  16. Management of upper airway edema caused by hereditary angioedema

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    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema is a rare disorder with a genetic background involving mutations in the genes encoding C1-INH and of factor XII. Its etiology is unknown in a proportion of cases. Recurrent edema formation may involve the subcutis and the submucosa - the latter can produce obstruction in the upper airways and thereby lead to life-threatening asphyxia. This is the reason for the high, 30-to 50-per-cent mortality of undiagnosed or improperly managed cases. Airway obstruction can be prevented through early diagnosis, meaningful patient information, timely recognition of initial symptoms, state-of-the-art emergency therapy, and close monitoring of the patient. Prophylaxis can substantially mitigate the risk of upper airway edema and also improve the patients' quality of life. Notwithstanding the foregoing, any form of upper airway edema should be regarded as a potentially life-threatening condition. None of the currently available prophylactic modalities is capable of preventing UAE with absolute certainty.

  17. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is multiorgan not mono-organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disorder with bilateral loss of central vision primarily due to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in subunits of complex I in the respiratory chain (primary LHON mutations), while other mtDNA mutations can also be causative. Since the first description, it is known that LHON is not restricted to the eyes but is a multisystem disorder additionally involving the central nervous system, ears, endocrinological organs, heart, bone marrow, arteries, kidneys, or the peripheral nervous system. Multisystem involvement may start before or after the onset of visual impairment. Involvement of organs other than the eyes may be subclinical depending on age, ethnicity, and possibly the heteroplasmy rate of the responsible primary LHON mutation. Primary LHON mutations may rarely manifest without ocular compromise but with arterial hypertension, various neurodegenerative diseases, or Leigh syndrome. Patients with LHON need to be closely followed up to detect at which point organs other than the eyes become affected. Multiorgan disease in LHON often responds more favorably to symptomatic treatment than the ocular compromise.

  18. Previvors' Uncertainty Management Strategies for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Marleah; Davidson, Lindy G

    2016-12-15

    Individuals with a genetic predisposition to develop hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), but who have not been diagnosed with cancer, are referred to as previvors. Although genetic testing may reduce previvors' worries about whether or not they have a high genetic cancer risk, testing positive produces negative emotions and long-term uncertainty-thus requiring the management of uncertainty. Existing research indicates family, friends, and social support networks are limited in their assistance for previvors' uncertainty management. Therefore, this study examined how health care providers may assist previvors in uncertainty management by asking: What strategies do BRCA-positive previvors enact with their health care providers to help manage their uncertainty about HBOC? Purposive sampling was employed to recruit participants via online social media. The final sample consisted of 34 BRCA-positive women. Interviews revealed four uncertainty management strategies-seeking health care providers as informational sources, seeking health care providers as partners for decision making, seeking health care providers for supportive communication, and seeking referrals from health care providers for social support networks. Findings indicate that health care providers who are knowledgeable about BRCA, provide information, answer questions, check understanding, and provide additional resources assist previvors in managing their uncertainties by distinguishing options and fostering meaning.

  19. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew Anthony; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Korsten, Alex; Leonhardt, Miriam; Dimitriadis, Konstantin; De Coo, Ireneaus F; Klopstock, Thomas; Chinnery, Patrick Francis

    2009-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to confirm this to be the case. LHON has no treatment, so identifying environmental triggers is the key to disease prevention, whilst potentially revealing new mechanisms amenable to therapeutic manipulation. To address this issue, we conducted a large, multicentre epidemiological study of 196 affected and 206 unaffected carriers from 125 LHON pedigrees known to harbour one of the three primary pathogenic mtDNA mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C. A comprehensive history of exposure to smoking, alcohol and other putative environmental insults was collected using a structured questionnaire. We identified a strong and consistent association between visual loss and smoking, independent of gender and alcohol intake, leading to a clinical penetrance of 93% in men who smoked. There was a trend towards increased visual failure with alcohol, but only with a heavy intake. Based on these findings, asymptomatic carriers of a LHON mtDNA mutation should be strongly advised not to smoke and to moderate their alcohol intake.

  20. Monocyte transferrin-iron uptake in hereditary hemochromatosis

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    Sizemore, D.J.; Bassett, M.L.

    1984-05-01

    Transferrin-iron uptake by peripheral blood monocytes was studied in vitro to test the hypothesis that the relative paucity of mononuclear phagocyte iron loading in hereditary hemochromatosis results from a defect in uptake of iron from transferrin. Monocytes from nine control subjects and 17 patients with hemochromatosis were cultured in the presence of 59Fe-labelled human transferrin. There was no difference in 59Fe uptake between monocytes from control subjects and monocytes from patients with hemochromatosis who had been treated by phlebotomy and who had normal body iron stores. However, 59Fe uptake by monocytes from iron-loaded patients with hemochromatosis was significantly reduced compared with either control subjects or treated hemochromatosis patients. It is likely that this was a secondary effect of iron loading since iron uptake by monocytes from treated hemochromatosis patients was normal. Assuming that monocytes in culture reflect mononuclear phagocyte iron metabolism in vivo, this study suggests that the relative paucity of mononuclear phagocyte iron loading in hemochromatosis is not related to an abnormality in transferrin-iron uptake by these cells.

  1. Mutation study of Spanish patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

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    Blanco Francisco J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant and age-dependent vascular disorder characterised mainly by mutations in the Endoglin (ENG or activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1, ACVRL1 genes. Methods Here, we have identified 22 ALK1 mutations and 15 ENG mutations, many of which had not previously been reported, in independent Spanish families afflicted with HHT. Results We identified mutations in thirty-seven unrelated families. A detailed analysis of clinical symptoms was recorded for each patient analyzed, with a higher significant presence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM in HHT1 patients over HHT2. Twenty-two mutations in ALK1 and fifteen in ENG genes were identified. Many of them, almost half, represented new mutations in ALK1 and in ENG. Missense mutations in ENG and ALK1 were localized in a tridimensional protein structure model. Conclusion Overall, ALK1 mutations (HHT2 were predominant over ENG mutations (HHT1 in our Spanish population, in agreement with previous data from our country and other Mediterranean countries (France, Italy, but different to Northern Europe or North America. There was a significant increase of PAVM associated with HHT1 over HHT2 in these families.

  2. Research on Potential Biomarkers in Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

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    Luisa Maria Botella

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, involving mutations in two predominant genes known as Endoglin (ENG; HHT1 and Activin receptor like kinase 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1; HHT2, as well as in some less frequent genes, such as MADH4/SMAD4 (JP-HHT or BMP9/GDF2 (HHT5. The diagnosis of HHT patients currently remains at the clinical level, according to the Curaçao criteria, whereas the molecular diagnosis is used to confirm or rule out suspected HHT cases, especially when a well characterized index case is present in the family or in an isolated population. Unfortunately, many suspected patients do not present a clear HHT diagnosis or do not show pathogenic mutations in HHT genes, prompting the need to investigate additional biomarkers of the disease. Here, several HHT biomarkers and novel methodological approaches developed during the last years will be reviewed. On one hand, products detected in plasma or serum samples: soluble proteins (VEGF, TGF-β1, soluble endoglin, angiopoietin-2 and microRNA variants (miR-27a, miR-205, miR-210. On the other hand, differential HHT gene expression fingerprinting, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS of a panel of genes involved in HHT, and infrared spectroscopy combined with Artificial Neural Network (ANN patterns will also be reviewed. All these biomarkers might help to improve and refine HHT diagnosis by distinguishing from the non-HHT population.

  3. 5'UTR mutations of ENG cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

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    Damjanovich Kristy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is a vascular disorder characterized by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations, and telangiectases. The majority of the patients have a mutation in the coding region of the activin A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1 or Endoglin (ENG gene. However, in approximately 15% of cases, sequencing analysis and deletion/duplication testing fail to identify mutations in the coding regions of these genes. Knowing its vital role in transcription and translation control, we were prompted to investigate the 5'untranslated region (UTR of ENG. Methods and Results We sequenced the 5'UTR of ENG for 154 HHT patients without mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 coding regions. We found a mutation (c.-127C > T, which is predicted to affect translation initiation and alter the reading frame of endoglin. This mutation was found in a family with linkage to the ENG, as well as in three other patients, one of which had an affected sibling with the same mutation. In vitro expression studies showed that a construct with the c.-127C > T mutation alters the translation and decreases the level of the endoglin protein. In addition, a c.-9G > A mutation was found in three patients, one of whom was homozygous for this mutation. Expression studies showed decreased protein levels suggesting that the c.-9G > A is a hypomorphic mutation. Conclusions Our results emphasize the need for the inclusion of the 5'UTR region of ENG in clinical testing for HHT.

  4. Investigation of auditory dysfunction in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Elliott, Clive; Griffiths, Philip G; Johnson, Ian J; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the possibility of auditory dysfunction in patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). We prospectively recruited 10 affected patients from the north-east of England harbouring one of the three primary mitochondrial LHON mutations (3460G>A n = 3, 11778G>A n = 5 and 14484T>C n = 2). A detailed auditory history was taken and they were asked to complete a validated hearing questionnaire. Each patient then underwent a comprehensive topographic neuroauditory assessment to evaluate both middle- and inner-ear functions and the integrity of the brainstem auditory pathways. We found no evidence of cochlear nerve dysfunction or abnormalities of the central brainstem auditory pathways in our LHON cohort and five patients had completely normal hearing tests. The remainder had mild conductive hearing loss from childhood ear infections and/or high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss from previous noise injury. Although further studies are required to confirm our findings, auditory dysfunction as a result of a primary LHON mutation is probably uncommon.

  5. [Hereditary ichthyosis in Tunisia: epidemiological study of 60 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharfi, Monia; El Fekih, Nadia; Ammar, Donia; Khaled, Aida; Fazaa, Bécima; Ridha Kamoun, Mohamed

    2008-11-01

    Ichthyosis are a group of inherited keratinizing disorders. The cutaneous abnormalities may be isolated or associated with extra-cutaneous symptoms. To report the epidemiological and clinical profiles of patients with these genodermatoses from a hospital tunisian study. A retrospective study of all cases of ichthyosis referred during a period of 5 years to the department of dermatology of Charles Nicole's hospital of Tunis. Sixty cases of hereditary ichthyosis were seen. The sex-ratio was of 0.5. Parental consanguinity was noted in 36 patients (60%). Seventeen patients (25.7%) had a positive familial history of ichthyosis. The clinical form of ichthyosis was determined in 52 cases. The nonbullous ichthyosiform erythroderma was observed in 25 patients (41.6%). Sixty patients presented an ichthyosis vulgaris (26.6%). The other forms of ichthyosis were rarely observed : 4 cases of X-linked recessive ichthyosis, 2 cases of lamellar ichthyosis and 2 cases of bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma. Two patients were born with collodion-like membranes. Two cases presented a complex syndrome. The NBIE, commonly considered as a rare form of ichthyosis, was the most frequently form seen in our study (41.6%), probably because of the high frequency of consanguineous marriages in Tunisia. The IV represents the most frequent form reported in the literature and was observed in 25% of our patients. The classification of some ichthyosis associated with other extracutaneous abnormalities (found in 2 of our patients) remains difficult.

  6. Malignant melanoma in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G; Losi, L; Pellacani, G; Wannesson, L; Cesinaro, A M; Venesio, T; Petti, C; Seidenari, S

    2008-07-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is the most aggressive skin cancer. Most MMs are sporadic, and in this setting an association with mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations, typical of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) tumours, has been proposed. To characterize clinically and/or by molecular biology the patients with MM belonging to a cohort of 60 kindreds with HNPCC. Methods Patients with HNPCC with a diagnosis of MM were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tumour tissue using antibodies to MLH1, MSH2, p16, beta-catenin and E-cadherin, and by direct sequencing of MMR genes on germline DNA, and BRAF and NRAS on somatic DNA extracted from MM. Nine cutaneous MMs were detected in the tumour spectrum of eight families with HNPCC. The median age at diagnosis was 46 years. In one HNPCC family the diagnosis of MM was made in two first-degree relatives fitting the clinical definition of familial melanoma. IHC and sequencing analysis showed an MSH2 mutation in one patient with MM. Dermatological surveillance should be recommended to families in which MM is diagnosed in at least one member, especially at a young age. The combination of MMR gene mutations and abnormalities of p16 or other molecular pathways is needed to induce melanocytic carcinogenesis in a familial setting as well as in sporadic MM.

  7. Laboratory markers of thrombosis risk in children with hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troendle, Sarah B; Adix, Leah; Crary, Shelley E; Buchanan, George R

    2007-11-01

    Recent data suggest that adults with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) may be protected from atherothrombosis before splenectomy but have increased risk of thrombosis following splenectomy. In order to aid in making informed decisions regarding splenectomy in children with HS, we conducted a retrospective study of several surrogate laboratory markers of thrombosis risk in children with HS. A retrospective record review was performed on 246 children with HS. Platelet count and hemoglobin concentration were recorded prior to and following splenectomy in each patient. Serum cholesterol levels were collected from the record when available. Prior to splenectomy, hypocholesterolemia was common. Mean platelet counts in 31 evaluable patients pre- and post-splenectomy were 334 and 608 x 10(9)/L, respectively (P thrombocytosis following splenectomy. Hemoglobin values following splenectomy often rose to higher than age and gender-matched norms, with 30% of measurements greater than the 90th percentile and 17% greater than the 97th percentile. The findings of hypocholesterolemia before splenectomy and thrombocytosis and mild polycythemia afterwards support the hypothesis that patients with HS might be protected from thrombosis before splenectomy and/or more susceptible afterwards. Prospective studies of additional prothrombotic biomarkers and thrombotic events in HS patients are warranted. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Complement factor C4 activation in patients with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åbom, Anne; Bygum, Anette; Koch, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Low complement factor C4 is usually considered a valuable screening tool for patients with the potentially life-threatening hereditary angioedema with C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency (C1-INH-HAE). However, there are patients with C1-INH-HAE presenting with normal C4 levels. This means......, that C1-INH-HAE may potentially be overlooked, if screening is performed only by measurement of C4. It has been suggested that measurement of C4 activation products is better suited to avoid false negative results. Our aim was to investigate whether total antigenic C4 or non-functional C4c is a better...... measure of the increased C4 activation in C1-INH-HAE patients. Design and methods: Two different monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to human C4 were produced: one had specificity for the β-chain of C4 and would thus react with both functional and non-functional C4, and the other was developed against the factor...

  9. Dose - response relationship of bevacizumab in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi, Nicolas; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Ternant, David; Fargeton, Anne-Emmanuelle; Ginon, Isabelle; Faure, Frédéric; Decullier, Evelyne; Roux, Adeline; Carette, Marie-France; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Lacombe, Pascal; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rivière, Sophie; Corre, Romain; Bailly, Sabine; Paintaud, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), a genetic vascular disorder associated with epistaxis and hepatic shunts, is responsible for high-output cardiac failure in rare cases. Bevacizumab, which targets vascular endothelial growth factor, was shown to decrease both cardiac index (CI) and epistaxis duration in HHT patients with severe liver involvement. The relationship between its serum concentration and change in both CI and epistaxis duration was investigated to design the bevacizumab maintenance dosing regimen of future therapeutic studies. Twenty-five HHT patients with dyspnea and high CI were included in a prospective non-comparative study. They received bevacizumab at a dose of 5 mg/kg per infusion every 14 days for a total of 6 injections. The relationships between bevacizumab serum concentration and both CI and epistaxis duration were described using transit compartments and direct inhibition pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models. The performances of different maintenance regimens were evaluated using simulation. Infusions every 3, 2 and one months were predicted to maintain 41%, 45% and 50% of patients with CI <4 L/min/m(2) at 24 months, respectively. The fraction of patients with <20 min epistaxis per month was predicted to be 34%, 43% and 60%, with infusion every 3, 2 or one months, respectively. Simulations of the effects of different maintenance dosing regimens predict that monthly 5 mg/kg infusions of bevacizumab should allow sustained control of both cardiac index and epistaxis.

  10. The concept of hereditary impairment of brain maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, H; Neubauer, B A; Petersen, B

    2000-01-01

    The classification of benign partial epilepsies and related conditions includes (besides rolandic epilepsy) atypical benign partial epilepsy, bioelectrical status epilepticus (ESES) and a variety of other syndromes. The broad overlap of the clinical and bioelectrical symptomatology might reflect a pathogenetic background common to these epilepsies. In order to understand the great phenotypic variability, the clinical symptomatology in 56 sibships with focal sharp waves of genetic origin was analyzed. A genetic determination was assumed if, in addition to the index case, at least one sibling or offspring revealed typical focal sharp waves. The 56 index-cases and their 61 sib/offspring/parents showed a broad spectrum of epileptic and non-epileptic conditions ranging from mild selective performance deficits to severe complex mental retardation, from neonatal seizures, febrile convulsions, and simple rolandic epilepsy to severe epilepsies with minor seizures or ESES. The different conditions are not disease entities but sets of variably weighted symptoms of a complex pathogenetic background, in which a genetic disposition to focal anomalies of brain function is of decisive importance. As can be demonstrated by the data, this genetic liability coincides with other widespread genetic traits, expressed in certain EEG patterns, as well as with lesional pathogenetic factors. The biological background of the genetic focal anomaly is currently unknown. The marked age dependence of the symptoms justifies the assumption of an hereditary impairment of brain maturation.

  11. [Hereditary deafness in Kirov oblast: a genetic epidemiological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, R A; Osetrova, A A; Sharonova, E I; El'chinova, G I

    2012-03-01

    The results of a genetic epidemiological study of hereditary deafness (HD) in ten raions (districts) of Kirov oblast (administrative region), Russia, are presented. A total of 122 075 people have been examined. Segregation analysis of all families with diagnosed HD has demonstrated a good fit to either the autosomal dominant (AD) or autosomal recessive (AR) mode of inheritance. The total prevalence rates of AD and AR HDs, as well as the specific prevalence rates of nonsyndromic and syndromic forms of HD, have been calculated for the population often raions. The HD prevalence rate in Kirov oblast has been found to be 1 : 1043 people (1 : 1453 and 1 : 3699 for the nonsyndromic and syndromic forms, respectively). This value has been found to vary in different raions, which is explained by differences in the genetic subdivision levels of the populations studied; the correlation coefficient between the HD load and random inbreeding (F(ST)) in district populations is r = 0.81 +/- 0.22. The diversity of syndromic hearing disorders is described.

  12. Hereditary hemochromatosis: genetic complexity and new diagnostic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Dorine W; Janssen, Mirian C H; Bergmans, Jürgen; Marx, Joannes J M

    2006-06-01

    Since the discovery of the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996, several novel gene defects have been detected, explaining the mechanism and diversity of iron-overload diseases. At least 4 main types of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) have been identified. Surprisingly, genes involved in HH encode for proteins that all affect pathways centered around liver hepcidin synthesis and its interaction with ferroportin, an iron exporter in enterocytes and macrophages. Hepcidin concentrations in urine negatively correlate with the severity of HH. Cytokine-mediated increases in hepcidin appear to be an important causative factor in anemia of inflammation, which is characterized by sequestration of iron in the macrophage system. For clinicians, the challenge is now to diagnose HH before irreversible damage develops and, at the same time, to distinguish progressive iron overload from increasingly common diseases with only moderately increased body iron stores, such as the metabolic syndrome. Understanding the molecular regulation of iron homeostasis may be helpful in designing innovative and reliable DNA and protein tests for diagnosis. Subsequently, evidence-based diagnostic strategies must be developed, using both conventional and innovative laboratory tests, to differentiate between the various causes of distortions of iron metabolism. This review describes new insights in mechanisms of iron overload, which are needed to understand new developments in diagnostic medicine.

  13. The proteomic profile of hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Sela

    Full Text Available Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. The goal of this study was to unravel new clues on the biological pathways leading to HIBM by proteomic comparison. Muscle cultures and biopsies were analyzed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and the same biopsy extracts by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ. Proteins that were differentially expressed in all HIBM specimens versus all controls in each analysis were identified by mass spectrometry. The muscle cultures 2-DE analysis yielded 41 such proteins, while the biopsies 2-DE analysis showed 26 differentially expressed proteins. Out of the 400 proteins identified in biopsies by iTRAQ, 41 showed altered expression. In spite of the different nature of specimens (muscle primary cultures versus muscle biopsies and of the different methods applied (2D gels versus iTRAQ the differentially expressed proteins identified in each of the three analyses where related mainly to the same pathways, ubiquitination, stress response and mitochondrial processes, but the most robust cluster (30% was assigned to cytoskeleton and sarcomere organization. Taken together, these findings indicate a possible novel function of GNE in the muscle filamentous apparatus that could be involved in the pathogenesis of HIBM.

  14. Hereditary Breast Cancer in the Han Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenming; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and has a strong genetic background. So far, 13 breast cancer susceptibility genes of high or moderate penetrance have been identified. This review summarizes findings on these genes in Han Chinese. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the 2 most important susceptibility genes. They have a relatively low mutation rate, and the most frequent sites of mutation are in exon 11. Frameshift mutations are the main type of mutation. Founder mutations may also exist, and BRCA-associated breast cancer has specific clinicopathologic characteristics. TP53 and PALB2 are relatively rare susceptibility genes. The relationship between the other 9 genes and breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. At present, the mutation spectrum for these susceptibility genes is not well understood in the Chinese population, and there are few reports on prognosis and clinical intervention in high-risk populations. Therefore, the true value of genetic counseling for breast cancer has yet to be realized. This article reviews studies of hereditary breast cancer in the Han Chinese population, highlights potential inadequacies, and provides a foundation for genetic counseling for breast cancer in China. PMID:23318652

  15. Identification of novel hereditary cancer genes by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Bizin, Ilya V; Frishman, Dmitrij; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-12-28

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides a powerful tool for medical genetic research. Several dozens of WES studies involving patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have already been reported. WES led to breakthrough in understanding of the genetic basis of some exceptionally rare syndromes; for example, identification of germ-line SMARCA4 mutations in patients with ovarian hypercalcemic small cell carcinomas indeed explains a noticeable share of familial aggregation of this disease. However, studies on common cancer types turned out to be more difficult. In particular, there is almost a dozen of reports describing WES analysis of breast cancer patients, but none of them yet succeeded to reveal a gene responsible for the significant share of missing heritability. Virtually all components of WES studies require substantial improvement, e.g. technical performance of WES, interpretation of WES results, mode of patient selection, etc. Most of contemporary investigations focus on genes with autosomal dominant mechanism of inheritance; however, recessive and oligogenic models of transmission of cancer susceptibility also need to be considered. It is expected that the list of medically relevant tumor-predisposing genes will be rapidly expanding in the next few years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hereditary genes and SNPs associated with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Kooshyar Mohammad; Nassiri, Mohammad Reza; Nasiri, Khadijeh

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women affecting up to one third of tehm during their lifespans. Increased expression of some genes due to polymorphisms increases the risk of breast cancer incidence. Since mutations that are recognized to increase breast cancer risk within families are quite rare, identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are; BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, PPM1D, CDH1, MLH1, MRE11, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PMS1, PMS2, BRIP1, RAD50, RAD51C, STK11 and BARD1. Presence of SNPs in these genes increases the risk of breast cancer and associated diagnostic markers are among the most reliable for assessing prognosis of breast cancer. In this article we reviewed the hereditary genes of breast cancer and SNPs associated with increasing the risk of breast cancer that were recently were reported from candidate gene, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. SNPs of genes associated with breast cancer can be used as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  17. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer - pathophysiology and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Hugo; Oliveira, Carla; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited gastric cancer syndrome caused by germline alterations in CDH1 (E-cadherin) and CTNNA1 (alpha-E-catenin) genes. Germline CDH1 alterations encompass small frameshifts, splice-site, nonsense, and missense mutations, as well as large rearrangements. Most CDH1 truncating mutations are pathogenic, and several missense CDH1 mutations have a deleterious effect on E-cadherin function. CDH1 testing should be performed in probands. Screening of at-risk individuals is indicated from the age of consent following counselling with a multidisciplinary team. In mutation-positive individuals prophylactic gastrectomy is recommended. Endoscopic surveillance is an option for those refusing/postponing gastrectomy, those with mutations of undetermined significance, and in CDH1-negative families. Ongoing research focus on the search of genetic causes other than CDH1 or CTNNA1 germline defects; assessment of the pathogenicity and penetrance of CDH1 missense mutations and identification of somatic mechanisms behind the progression from early (indolent) lesions to invasive (lethal) carcinomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ayurvedic management of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, a rare hereditary disorder

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    Sarvesh Kumar Singh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda (SEDT is a rare genetic disease in which patient suffers from short stature, short trunk and neck with disproportionately long arms, coxa vara, skeletal features such as barrel shaped chest, kyphosis, scoliosis and early arthropathy. Only limited medical and surgical management is available in modern medicine. A 15 years old male suffering from SEDT and diagnosed as Vata vyadhi was treated with Panchakarma therapy and selected Ayurvedic oral medicines. Ayurvedic treatment was directed to ameliorate the orthopaedic clinical conditions in this case. Panchakarma procedures such as Shalishastika pinda svedana for a month and Mustadi yapana basti for 16 days were given along with oral Ayurvedic medicines. Same Panchakarma procedures were repeated after an interval of 2 months. A combination of Ayurvedic oral medicines such as Trayodashanga guggulu-500 mg twice a day, Dashmool kvatha (decoction of roots of 10 herbs 40 ml twice a day, Eranda paka 10 g twice a day, Shiva gutika-500 mg twice a day and Dashmoolarista-20 ml (with equal water twice a day were prescribed. Eight scales based Medical outcome study (MOS – 36 item short form – health surveys was assessed for outcome which shows good improvement. Kyphosis, scoliosis and pain were moderately reduced. Clinical experience of this case indicates that Ayurvedic herbs along with Panchakarma can play a major role in the management of hereditary disorder SEDT.

  19. Mitochondrial genetics and therapeutic overview of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

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    Agaath Hedina Manickam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a common inherited mitochondrial disorder that is characterized by the degeneration of the optic nerves, leading to vision loss. The major mutations in the mitochondrial genes ND1, ND4, and ND6 of LHON subjects are found to increase the oxidative stress experienced by the optic nerve cell, thereby leading to nerve cell damage. Accurate treatments are not available and drugs that are commercially available like Idebenone, EPI-743, and Bendavia with their antioxidant role help in reducing the oxidative stress experienced by the cell thereby preventing the progression of the disease. Genetic counseling plays an effective role in making the family members aware of the inheritance pattern of the disease. Gene therapy is an alternative for curing the disease but is still under study. This review focuses on the role of mitochondrial genes in causing LHON and therapeutics available for treating the disease. A systematic search has been adopted in various databases using the keywords “LHON,” “mitochondria,” “ND1,” “ND4,” “ND6,” and “therapy” and the following review on mitochondrial genetics and therapeutics of LHON has been developed with obtained articles from 1988 to 2017.

  20. Nationwide epidemiological survey of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in Japan

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    Kaori Ueda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy that leads to central loss of vision, predominantly in young males. Most LHON cases have one of three primary point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. The annual incidence and prevalence of LHON in Japan are not known. Thus, we estimated the annual incidence of molecularly confirmed LHON in Japan during 2014. Methods: Sequential questionnaires were sent to 1397 facilities, which included all of the university hospitals in Japan, and they were certified by either the Japanese Ophthalmological Society or the Japanese Neuro-Ophthalmological Society. We calculated the incidence number (Ir as the number of patients who developed LHON in 2014 and its 95% confidence interval. Results: We received 861 responses to the first questionnaire, where 49 facilities reported 72 cases (67 were male and 5 were female of newly developed LHON during 2014. Ir was calculated as 117, and the 95% confidence interval ranged from 81 to 153. For the second questionnaire, responses were received from 30 facilities, where the median age at onset was 38 years for males and 30 years for females, and 86.5% of cases possessed the mtDNA ND4/G11778A mutation. Conclusion: Approximately 120 cases of newly developed LHON were reported during 2014 in Japan, and 93.2% were males.