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Sample records for exon sequences specifically

  1. 11p15-subband specific search for transcribed sequences using exon trapping

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    Loebbert, R.; Prawitt, D. [Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Monroe, D. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Evidence from cytogenetic and molecular data suggest that the region 11p15 contains genes involved in different disorders, like Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), long QT syndrome (LQT), Usher syndrome type I and tumor development. Focusing on the subregion 11p15.1, we are isolating and characterizing new transcribed sequences. The applied strategy includes exon amplification and subsequent PCR screening of cDNA libraries. So far 100 YACs and 38 cosmid clones from 11p15.1-15.3 have been collected and are currently arrayed. 16 cosmids have been analyzed for transcribed sequences using the exon amplification scheme developed by Buckler et al. (1991). We were able to identify 18 exons that contain correct open reading frames and map back to the cosmid clones. A data base search revealed that two exons represent parts of known genes from this region (ST5 and AMPD3). Moreover, we identified one exon that represents an EGF-like repeat with homologies to various proteins. Using PCR and primers from the exon sequences, a fetal brain library, which has been arranged in the form of hierarchic arrayed phage pools, was screened. Up to now, two cDNA clones corresponding to different exons were isolated and are currently sequenced.

  2. A novel BAT3 sequence generated by alternative RNA splicing of exon 11B displays cell type-specific expression and impacts on subcellular localization.

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    Nadine Kämper

    Full Text Available The human lymphocyte antigen (HLA encoded BAT3/BAG6 recently attracted interest as a regulator of protein targeting and degradation, a function that could be exerted in the cytosol and in the nucleus. The BAT3 gene was described to consist of 25 exons. Diversity of transcripts can be generated by alternative RNA splicing, which may control subcellular distribution of BAT3.By cDNA sequencing we identified a novel alternatively spliced sequence of the BAT3 gene located between exons 11 and 12, which was designated as exon 11B. Using PCR and colony hybridization we identified six cDNA variants, which were produced by RNA splicing of BAT3 exons 5, 11B and 24. In four examined cell types the content of BAT3 splice variants was examined. Most of the cDNA clones from monocyte-derived dendritic cells contain exon 11B, whereas this sequence was almost absent in the B lymphoma Raji. Exon 5 was detected in most and exon 24 in approximately half of the cDNA clones. The subcellular distribution of endogenous BAT3 largely correlates with a cell type specific splicing pattern. In cells transfected with BAT3 variants, full-length and Δ24 BAT3 displayed nearly exclusive nuclear staining, whereas variants deleted of exon 11B showed substantial cytosolic expression. We show here that BAT3 is mainly expressed in the cytosol of Raji cells, while other cell types displayed both cytosolic and nuclear staining. Export of BAT3 from the nucleus to the cytosol is inhibited by treatment with leptomycin B, indicating that the Crm1 pathway is involved. Nuclear expression of BAT3 containing exon 11B suggests that this sequence plays a role for nuclear retention of the protein.Cell type-specific subcellular expression of BAT3 suggests distinct functions in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Differential expression of BAT3 variants may reconcile the multiple roles described for BAT3.

  3. A fast algorithm for exonic regions prediction in DNA sequences.

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    Saberkari, Hamidreza; Shamsi, Mousa; Heravi, Hamed; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a fast method for gene prediction in DNA sequences based on the period-3 property in exons. First, the symbolic DNA sequences were converted to digital signal using the electron ion interaction potential method. Then, to reduce the effect of background noise in the period-3 spectrum, we used the discrete wavelet transform at three levels and applied it on the input digital signal. Finally, the Goertzel algorithm was used to extract period-3 components in the filtered DNA sequence. The proposed algorithm leads to decrease the computational complexity and hence, increases the speed of the process. Detection of small size exons in DNA sequences, exactly, is another advantage of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm ability in exon prediction was compared with several existing methods at the nucleotide level using: (i) specificity - sensitivity values; (ii) receiver operating curves (ROC); and (iii) area under ROC curve. Simulation results confirmed that the proposed method can be used as a promising tool for exon prediction in DNA sequences.

  4. Rodent-specific alternative exons are more frequent in rapidly evolving genes and in paralogs

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    Mironov Andrey A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for generating functional and evolutionary diversity of proteins in eukaryotes. Here, we studied the frequency and functionality of recently gained, rodent-specific alternative exons. Results We projected the data about alternative splicing of mouse genes to the rat, human, and dog genomes, and identified exons conserved in the rat genome, but missing in more distant genomes. We estimated the frequency of rodent-specific exons while controlling for possible residual conservation of spurious exons. The frequency of rodent-specific exons is higher among predominantly skipped exons and exons disrupting the reading frame. Separation of all genes by the rate of sequence evolution and by gene families has demonstrated that rodent-specific cassette exons are more frequent in rapidly evolving genes and in rodent-specific paralogs. Conclusion Thus we demonstrated that recently gained exons tend to occur in fast-evolving genes, and their inclusion rate tends to be lower than that of older exons. This agrees with the theory that gain of alternative exons is one of the major mechanisms of gene evolution.

  5. Origin of introns by 'intronization' of exonic sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Penny, David

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of spliceosomal intron creation have proved elusive. Here we describe a new mechanism: the recruitment of internal exonic sequences ('intronization') in Caenorhabditis species. The numbers of intronization events and introns gained by other mechanisms are similar, suggesting...

  6. Evaluating the protein coding potential of exonized transposable element sequences

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    Borodovsky Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable element (TE sequences, once thought to be merely selfish or parasitic members of the genomic community, have been shown to contribute a wide variety of functional sequences to their host genomes. Analysis of complete genome sequences have turned up numerous cases where TE sequences have been incorporated as exons into mRNAs, and it is widely assumed that such 'exonized' TEs encode protein sequences. However, the extent to which TE-derived sequences actually encode proteins is unknown and a matter of some controversy. We have tried to address this outstanding issue from two perspectives: i-by evaluating ascertainment biases related to the search methods used to uncover TE-derived protein coding sequences (CDS and ii-through a probabilistic codon-frequency based analysis of the protein coding potential of TE-derived exons. Results We compared the ability of three classes of sequence similarity search methods to detect TE-derived sequences among data sets of experimentally characterized proteins: 1-a profile-based hidden Markov model (HMM approach, 2-BLAST methods and 3-RepeatMasker. Profile based methods are more sensitive and more selective than the other methods evaluated. However, the application of profile-based search methods to the detection of TE-derived sequences among well-curated experimentally characterized protein data sets did not turn up many more cases than had been previously detected and nowhere near as many cases as recent genome-wide searches have. We observed that the different search methods used were complementary in the sense that they yielded largely non-overlapping sets of hits and differed in their ability to recover known cases of TE-derived CDS. The probabilistic analysis of TE-derived exon sequences indicates that these sequences have low protein coding potential on average. In particular, non-autonomous TEs that do not encode protein sequences, such as Alu elements, are frequently

  7. Representation of DNA sequences in genetic codon context with applications in exon and intron prediction.

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    Yin, Changchuan

    2015-04-01

    To apply digital signal processing (DSP) methods to analyze DNA sequences, the sequences first must be specially mapped into numerical sequences. Thus, effective numerical mappings of DNA sequences play key roles in the effectiveness of DSP-based methods such as exon prediction. Despite numerous mappings of symbolic DNA sequences to numerical series, the existing mapping methods do not include the genetic coding features of DNA sequences. We present a novel numerical representation of DNA sequences using genetic codon context (GCC) in which the numerical values are optimized by simulation annealing to maximize the 3-periodicity signal to noise ratio (SNR). The optimized GCC representation is then applied in exon and intron prediction by Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) approach. The results show the GCC method enhances the SNR values of exon sequences and thus increases the accuracy of predicting protein coding regions in genomes compared with the commonly used 4D binary representation. In addition, this study offers a novel way to reveal specific features of DNA sequences by optimizing numerical mappings of symbolic DNA sequences.

  8. Towards a transcription map of human chromosome 21: Identification of expressed sequences by exon trapping

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    Chen, H.M.; Chrast, R.; Rossier, C. [Geneva Univ. Medical School (Switzerland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome 21q contains about 1% of the human genome, and when triplicated is responsible for Down syndrome. The genetic and physical maps of this chromosome are amongst the most developed of all human chromosomes. A considerable international effort is now under way with the aims of cloning and mapping all chromosome 21 genes, assigning functions, and determining their involvement in disease phenotypes. We have used exon trapping/amplification methods to identify exons of genes that map on chromosome 21. EcoR1 or Bam HI-digested DNA from pools of 96 cosmids from the chromosome 21 library LL21NC02{open_quotes}Q{close_quotes} were used for cloning in vector pSLP3 (after elimination of cosmids positive for ribosomal RNR genes and mouse DNA); recombinant plasmids were transfected into cos7 cells and trapped sequences were subcloned. False positive clones, i.e. those containing vector self-spliced sequences (which represented between 8-30% of clones in different experiments), have been eliminated by hybridization of oligonucleotides corresponding to sequences of the vector self-spliced events. More than 100 different trapped {open_quotes}exons{close_quotes} have been identified to date after single or double pass sequencing. Two sequences matched exons of known genes on chromosome 21 (COL6A 1 and MX1). About 45% of the sequences were entirely new, i.e. there was no homology with entries in the nucleotide or protein databases (blastin and blastx searches). An additional 48% of the sequences were homologous but not identical to sequences in the databases. Only 4% were repetitive elements. Specific homologies will be presented. All of the trapped sequences that have been mapped by filter hybridization, PCR, or FISH, map back to cosmids or YACs of chromosome 21. This approach permits rapid identification of expressed sequences of this chromosome, the cloning of its genes, and the understanding of its disorders.

  9. Targeted exon sequencing in Usher syndrome type I.

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    Bujakowska, Kinga M; Consugar, Mark; Place, Emily; Harper, Shyana; Lena, Jaclyn; Taub, Daniel G; White, Joseph; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Weigel DiFranco, Carol; Farkas, Michael H; Gai, Xiaowu; Berson, Eliot L; Pierce, Eric A

    2014-12-02

    Patients with Usher syndrome type I (USH1) have retinitis pigmentosa, profound congenital hearing loss, and vestibular ataxia. This syndrome is currently thought to be associated with at least six genes, which are encoded by over 180 exons. Here, we present the use of state-of-the-art techniques in the molecular diagnosis of a cohort of 47 USH1 probands. The cohort was studied with selective exon capture and next-generation sequencing of currently known inherited retinal degeneration genes, comparative genomic hybridization, and Sanger sequencing of new USH1 exons identified by human retinal transcriptome analysis. With this approach, we were able to genetically solve 14 of the 47 probands by confirming the biallelic inheritance of mutations. We detected two likely pathogenic variants in an additional 19 patients, for whom family members were not available for cosegregation analysis to confirm biallelic inheritance. Ten patients, in addition to primary disease-causing mutations, carried rare likely pathogenic USH1 alleles or variants in other genes associated with deaf-blindness, which may influence disease phenotype. Twenty-one of the identified mutations were novel among the 33 definite or likely solved patients. Here, we also present a clinical description of the studied cohort at their initial visits. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied USH1 cohort with multiplicity of mutations, of which many were novel. No obvious influence of genotype on phenotype was found, possibly due to small sample sizes of the genotypes under study. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  10. An increased specificity score matrix for the prediction of SF2/ASF-specific exonic splicing enhancers.

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    Smith, Philip J; Zhang, Chaolin; Wang, Jinhua; Chew, Shern L; Zhang, Michael Q; Krainer, Adrian R

    2006-08-15

    Numerous disease-associated point mutations exert their effects by disrupting the activity of exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs). We previously derived position weight matrices to predict putative ESEs specific for four human SR proteins. The score matrices are part of ESEfinder, an online resource to identify ESEs in query sequences. We have now carried out a refined functional SELEX screen for motifs that can act as ESEs in response to the human SR protein SF2/ASF. The test BRCA1 exon under selection was internal, rather than the 3'-terminal IGHM exon used in our earlier studies. A naturally occurring heptameric ESE in BRCA1 exon 18 was replaced with two libraries of random sequences, one seven nucleotides in length, the other 14. Following three rounds of selection for in vitro splicing via internal exon inclusion, new consensus motifs and score matrices were derived. Many winner sequences were demonstrated to be functional ESEs in S100-extract-complementation assays with recombinant SF2/ASF. Motif-score threshold values were derived from both experimental and statistical analyses. Motif scores were shown to correlate with levels of exon inclusion, both in vitro and in vivo. Our results confirm and extend our earlier data, as many of the same motifs are recognized as ESEs by both the original and our new score matrix, despite the different context used for selection. Finally, we have derived an increased specificity score matrix that incorporates information from both of our SF2/ASF-specific matrices and that accurately predicts the exon-skipping phenotypes of deleterious point mutations.

  11. Screening of BRCA1 sequence variants within exon 11 by heteroduplex analysis

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    Lucian Negura

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Germ-line mutations of either BRCA1 or BRCA2 represents the major hereditary risk to breast and ovariancancer. Screening for mutations in these genes is now standard practice in molecular diagnosis, opening the way tooncogenetic counselling and follow-up. Because mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are distributed throughout theloci, accepted clinical protocols involve screening their entire coding regions. Systematic Sanger sequencing is time andmoney consuming. Therefore, a lot of pre-screening techniques evolved over time in order to identify anomalousamplicons prior to sequencing. Because BRCA mutations are always heterozygous, heteroduplex analysis proved to be asuitable pre-screening step. We previously implemented mismatch specific endonuclease heteroduplex analysis forBRCA1 exon7. Here we show the utility of the same method for mutations and SNPs found in BRCA1 exon 11

  12. SEQUENCING AND SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF MYOSTATIN GENE IN THE EXON 1 OF THE CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS

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    M. G. SHAH, A. S. QURESHI1, M. REISSMANN2 AND H. J. SCHWARTZ3

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin, also called growth differentiation factor-8 (GDF-8, is a member of the mammalian growth transforming family (TGF-beta superfamily, which is expressed specifically in developing an adult skeletal muscle. Muscular hypertrophy allele (mh allele in the double muscle breeds involved mutation within the myostatin gene. Genomic DNA was isolated from the camel hair using NucleoSpin Tissue kit. Two animals of each of the six breeds namely, Marecha, Dhatti, Larri, Kohi, Sakrai and Cambelpuri were used for sequencing. For PCR amplification of the gene, a primer pair was designed from homolog regions of already published sequences of farm animals from GenBank. Results showed that camel myostatin possessed more than 90% homology with that of cattle, sheep and pig. Camel formed separate cluster from the pig in spite of having high homology (98% and showed 94% homology with cattle and sheep as reported in literature. Sequence analysis of the PCR amplified part of exon 1 (256 bp of the camel myostatin was identical among six camel breeds.

  13. An erythroid differentiation-specific splicing switch in protein 4.1R mediated by the interaction of SF2/ASF with an exonic splicing enhancer.

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    Yang, Guang; Huang, Shu-Ching; Wu, Jane Y; Benz, Edward J

    2005-03-01

    Protein 4.1R is a vital component of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. Promotion of cytoskeletal junctional complex stability requires an erythroid differentiation stage-specific splicing switch promoting inclusion of exon 16 within the spectrin/actin binding domain. We showed earlier that an intricate combination of positive and negative RNA elements controls exon 16 splicing. In this report, we further identified 3 putative exonic splicing enhancers within exon 16 and investigated the function of the sequence CAGACAT in the regulation of exon 16 splicing. Mutation of these sequences leads to increased exclusion of exon 16 in both in vivo and in vitro splicing assays, indicating that CAGACAT is a functional exonic splicing enhancer. UV cross-linking further detects an approximately 33-kDa protein that specifically binds to the CAGACAT-containing transcript. An anti-SF2/ASF antibody specifically immunoprecipitates the approximately 33-kDa protein. Furthermore, SF2/ASF stimulates exon 16 inclusion in both in vitro complementation assays and minigene-transfected mouse erythroleukemia cells (MELCs). Finally, SF2/ASF expression is up-regulated and correlates with exon 16 inclusion in differentiated MELCs. These results suggest that increased splicing factor 2/alternative splicing factor (SF2/ASF) expression in differentiated mouse erythroleukemia mediates a differentiation stage-specific exon 16 splicing switch through its interaction with the exonic splicing enhancer.

  14. Investigation of ANGPTL3 expression, exon sequence and promotor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like proteins, has been demonstrated to affect lipid metabolism by inhibiting the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Objective: To compare the ANGPTL3 mRNA and protein expression, exon mutation and promoter district CpG island methylation ...

  15. A consensus CaMK IV-responsive RNA sequence mediates regulation of alternative exons in neurons.

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    Xie, Jiuyong; Jan, Calvin; Stoilov, Peter; Park, Jennifer; Black, Douglas L

    2005-12-01

    Neurons make extensive use of alternative pre-mRNA splicing to regulate gene expression and diversify physiological responses. We showed previously in a pituitary cell line that the Ca(++)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase CaMK IV specifically repressed splicing of the BK channel STREX exon. This repression is dependent on a CaMK IV-responsive RNA element (CaRRE) within the STREX 3' splice site. Here, we report that similar Ca(++) regulation of splicing, mediated by L-type calcium channels and CaM kinase IV, occurs in cultured neurons and in the brain. We identify a critical CaRRE motif (CACATNRTTAT) that is essential for conferring CaMK IV repression on an otherwise constitutive exon. Additional Ca(++)-regulated exons that carry this consensus sequence are also identified in the human genome. Thus, the Ca(++)/CaMK IV pathway in neurons controls the alternative splicing of a group of exons through this short CaRRE consensus sequence. The functions of some of these exons imply that splicing control through the CaMK IV pathway will alter neuronal activity.

  16. A founder synonymous COL7A1 mutation in three Danish families with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa identifies exonic regulatory sequences required for exon 87 splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Covaciu, C; Grosso, F; Pisaneschi, E

    2011-01-01

    shoulders. DEB-Pr is caused by either dominant (DDEB-Pr) or recessive mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen (COLVII). The full spectrum of COL7A1 mutations in DEB-Pr remains elusive and the genotype-phenotype correlation is largely incomplete. Here, we report and functionally characterize...... a previously unrecognized translationally silent exonic COL7A1 mutation that results in skipping of exon 87 and is associated with DDEB-Pr phenotypes in several members of three apparently unrelated Danish families. A haplotype segregation study suggested a common ancestor in these kindred. Functional splicing...... analysis of the mutant exon by a COL7A1 minigene construct and computational prediction for splicing regulatory cis-sequences prove that the mutation alters the activity of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) critical for exon inclusion. These findings substantiate for the first time the involvement...

  17. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

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    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H. [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine and Science (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  18. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression

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    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Miller, Tyler E.; Masilamani, Anie P.; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M.; Yu, Irene L.Y.; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W.; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P.; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N.; Carro, Maria S.; Bredel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  19. Deep RNA sequencing reveals the smallest known mitochondrial micro exon in animals: The placozoan cox1 single base pair exon.

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    Osigus, Hans-Jürgen; Eitel, Michael; Schierwater, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Placozoa holds a key position for our understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genomes in Metazoa. Placozoans possess large mitochondrial genomes which harbor several remarkable characteristics such as a fragmented cox1 gene and trans-splicing cox1 introns. A previous study also suggested the existence of cox1 mRNA editing in Trichoplax adhaerens, yet the only formally described species in the phylum Placozoa. We have analyzed RNA-seq data of the undescribed sister species, Placozoa sp. H2 ("Panama" clone), with special focus on the mitochondrial mRNA. While we did not find support for a previously postulated cox1 mRNA editing mechanism, we surprisingly found two independent transcripts representing intermediate cox1 mRNA splicing stages. Both transcripts consist of partial cox1 exon as well as overlapping intron fragments. The data suggest that the cox1 gene harbors a single base pair (cytosine) micro exon. Furthermore, conserved group I intron structures flank this unique micro exon also in other placozoans. We discuss the evolutionary origin of this micro exon in the context of a self-splicing intron gain in the cox1 gene of the last common ancestor of extant placozoans.

  20. Splicing reporter mice revealed the evolutionally conserved switching mechanism of tissue-specific alternative exon selection.

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    Akihide Takeuchi

    Full Text Available Since alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is essential for generating tissue-specific diversity in proteome, elucidating its regulatory mechanism is indispensable to understand developmental process or tissue-specific functions. We have been focusing on tissue-specific regulation of mutually exclusive selection of alternative exons because this implies the typical molecular mechanism of alternative splicing regulation and also can be good examples to elicit general rule of "splice code". So far, mutually exclusive splicing regulation has been explained by the outcome from the balance of multiple regulators that enhance or repress either of alternative exons discretely. However, this "balance" model is open to questions of how to ensure the selection of only one appropriate exon out of several candidates and how to switch them. To answer these questions, we generated an original bichromatic fluorescent splicing reporter system for mammals using fibroblast growth factor-receptor 2 (FGFR2 gene as model. By using this splicing reporter, we demonstrated that FGFR2 gene is regulated by the "switch-like" mechanism, in which key regulators modify the ordered splice-site recognition of two mutually exclusive exons, eventually ensure single exon selection and their distinct switching. Also this finding elucidated the evolutionally conserved "splice code," in which combination of tissue-specific and broadly expressed RNA binding proteins regulate alternative splicing of specific gene in a tissue-specific manner. These findings provide the significant cue to understand how a number of spliced genes are regulated in various tissue-specific manners by a limited number of regulators, eventually to understand developmental process or tissue-specific functions.

  1. Chimeric snRNA molecules carrying antisense sequences against the splice junctions of exon 51 of the dystrophin pre-mRNA induce exon skipping and restoration of a dystrophin synthesis in Δ48-50 DMD cells

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    De Angelis, Fernanda Gabriella; Sthandier, Olga; Berarducci, Barbara; Toso, Silvia; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Ricci, Enzo; Cossu, Giulio; Bozzoni, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Deletions and point mutations in the dystrophin gene cause either the severe progressive myopathy Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder Becker muscular dystrophy, depending on whether the translational reading frame is lost or maintained. Because internal in-frame deletions in the protein produce only mild myopathic symptoms, it should be possible, by preventing the inclusion of specific mutated exon(s) in the mature dystrophin mRNA, to restore a partially corrected phenotype. Such control has been previously accomplished by the use of synthetic oligonucleotides; nevertheless, a significant drawback to this approach is caused by the fact that oligonucleotides would require periodic administrations. To circumvent this problem, we have produced several constructs able to express in vivo, in a stable fashion, large amounts of chimeric RNAs containing antisense sequences. In this paper we show that antisense molecules against exon 51 splice junctions are able to direct skipping of this exon in the human DMD deletion 48–50 and to rescue dystrophin synthesis. We also show that the highest skipping activity was found when antisense constructs against the 5′ and 3′ splice sites are coexpressed in the same cell. PMID:12077324

  2. Application of target capture sequencing of exons and conserved non-coding sequences to 20 inbred rat strains

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    Minako Yoshihara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We report sequence data obtained by our recently devised target capture method TargetEC applied to 20 inbred rat strains. This method encompasses not only all annotated exons but also highly conserved non-coding sequences shared among vertebrates. The total length of the target regions covers 146.8 Mb. On an average, we obtained 31.7× depth of target coverage and identified 154,330 SNVs and 24,368 INDELs for each strain. This corresponds to 470,037 unique SNVs and 68,652 unique INDELs among the 20 strains. The sequence data can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under accession number PRJDB4648, and the identified variants have been deposited at http://bioinfo.sls.kyushu-u.ac.jp/rat_target_capture/20_strains.vcf.gz.

  3. 3′ Splice Site Sequences of Spinal Muscular Atrophy Related SMN2 Pre-mRNA Include Enhancers for Nearby Exons

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    Sunghee Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a human genetic disease which occurs because of the deletion or mutation of SMN1 gene. SMN1 gene encodes the SMN protein which plays a key role in spliceosome assembly. Although human patients contain SMN2, a duplicate of SMN1, splicing of SMN2 produces predominantly exon 7 skipped isoform. In order to understand the functions of splice site sequences on exon 7 and 8, we analyzed the effects of conserved splice site sequences on exon 7 skipping of SMN2 and SMN1 pre-mRNA. We show here that conserved 5′ splice site sequence of exon 7 promoted splicing of nearby exons and subsequently reduced splicing of distant exons. However, to our surprise, conserved 3′ splice site sequence of exon 7 and 8 did not promote splicing of nearby exons. By contrast, the mutation inhibited splicing of nearby exons and subsequently promoted splicing of distant exons. Our study shows that 3′ splice sites of exon 7 and 8 contain enhancer for their splice site selection, in addition to providing cleavage sites.

  4. Analysis and Prediction of Exon Skipping Events from RNA-Seq with Sequence Information Using Rotation Forest

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    Xiuquan Du

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In bioinformatics, exon skipping (ES event prediction is an essential part of alternative splicing (AS event analysis. Although many methods have been developed to predict ES events, a solution has yet to be found. In this study, given the limitations of machine learning algorithms with RNA-Seq data or genome sequences, a new feature, called RS (RNA-seq and sequence features, was constructed. These features include RNA-Seq features derived from the RNA-Seq data and sequence features derived from genome sequences. We propose a novel Rotation Forest classifier to predict ES events with the RS features (RotaF-RSES. To validate the efficacy of RotaF-RSES, a dataset from two human tissues was used, and RotaF-RSES achieved an accuracy of 98.4%, a specificity of 99.2%, a sensitivity of 94.1%, and an area under the curve (AUC of 98.6%. When compared to the other available methods, the results indicate that RotaF-RSES is efficient and can predict ES events with RS features.

  5. Complete exon sequencing of all known Usher syndrome genes greatly improves molecular diagnosis

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    Lacombe Didier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Usher syndrome (USH combines sensorineural deafness with blindness. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Early diagnosis is critical for adapted educational and patient management choices, and for genetic counseling. To date, nine causative genes have been identified for the three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2 and USH3. Current diagnostic strategies make use of a genotyping microarray that is based on the previously reported mutations. The purpose of this study was to design a more accurate molecular diagnosis tool. Methods We sequenced the 366 coding exons and flanking regions of the nine known USH genes, in 54 USH patients (27 USH1, 21 USH2 and 6 USH3. Results Biallelic mutations were detected in 39 patients (72% and monoallelic mutations in an additional 10 patients (18.5%. In addition to biallelic mutations in one of the USH genes, presumably pathogenic mutations in another USH gene were detected in seven patients (13%, and another patient carried monoallelic mutations in three different USH genes. Notably, none of the USH3 patients carried detectable mutations in the only known USH3 gene, whereas they all carried mutations in USH2 genes. Most importantly, the currently used microarray would have detected only 30 of the 81 different mutations that we found, of which 39 (48% were novel. Conclusions Based on these results, complete exon sequencing of the currently known USH genes stands as a definite improvement for molecular diagnosis of this disease, which is of utmost importance in the perspective of gene therapy.

  6. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. (North East Wales Inst., Clwyd (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. POEM, A 3-dimensional exon taxonomy and patterns in untranslated exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Keith; Chonka, Ashley; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2008-09-20

    The existence of exons and introns has been known for thirty years. Despite this knowledge, there is a lack of formal research into the categorization of exons. Exon taxonomies used by researchers tend to be selected ad hoc or based on an information poor de-facto standard. Exons have been shown to have specific properties and functions based on among other things their location and order. These factors should play a role in the naming to increase specificity about which exon type(s) are in question. POEM (Protein Oriented Exon Monikers) is a new taxonomy focused on protein proximal exons. It integrates three dimensions of information (Global Position, Regional Position and Region), thus its exon categories are based on known statistical exon features. POEM is applied to two congruent untranslated exon datasets resulting in the following statistical properties. Using the POEM taxonomy previous wide ranging estimates of initial 5' untranslated region exons are resolved. According to our datasets, 29-36% of genes have wholly untranslated first exons. Untranslated exon containing sequences are shown to have consistently up to 6 times more 5' untranslated exons than 3' untranslated exons. Finally, three exon patterns are determined which account for 70% of untranslated exon genes. We describe a thorough three-dimensional exon taxonomy called POEM, which is biologically and statistically relevant. No previous taxonomy provides such fine grained information and yet still includes all valid information dimensions. The use of POEM will improve the accuracy of genefinder comparisons and analysis by means of a common taxonomy. It will also facilitate unambiguous communication due to its fine granularity.

  8. Next-Generation Sequencing of Lung Cancer EGFR Exons 18-21 Allows Effective Molecular Diagnosis of Small Routine Samples (Cytology and Biopsy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Malapelle, Umberto; Simonato, Francesca; Cesari, Valentina; Bellevicine, Claudio; Pession, Annalisa; Troncone, Giancarlo; Fassina, Ambrogio; Tallini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Selection of lung cancer patients for therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors directed at EGFR requires the identification of specific EGFR mutations. In most patients with advanced, inoperable lung carcinoma limited tumor samples often represent the only material available for both histologic typing and molecular analysis. We defined a next generation sequencing protocol targeted to EGFR exons 18-21 suitable for the routine diagnosis of such clinical samples. The protocol was validated in an unselected series of 80 small biopsies (n=14) and cytology (n=66) specimens representative of the material ordinarily submitted for diagnostic evaluation to three referral medical centers in Italy. Specimens were systematically evaluated for tumor cell number and proportion relative to non-neoplastic cells. They were analyzed in batches of 100-150 amplicons per run, reaching an analytical sensitivity of 1% and obtaining an adequate number of reads, to cover all exons on all samples analyzed. Next generation sequencing was compared with Sanger sequencing. The latter identified 15 EGFR mutations in 14/80 cases (17.5%) but did not detected mutations when the proportion of neoplastic cells was below 40%. Next generation sequencing identified 31 EGFR mutations in 24/80 cases (30.0%). Mutations were detected with a proportion of neoplastic cells as low as 5%. All mutations identified by the Sanger method were confirmed. In 6 cases next generation sequencing identified exon 19 deletions or the L858R mutation not seen after Sanger sequencing, allowing the patient to be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In one additional case the R831H mutation associated with treatment resistance was identified in an EGFR wild type tumor after Sanger sequencing. Next generation sequencing is robust, cost-effective and greatly improves the detection of EGFR mutations. Its use should be promoted for the clinical diagnosis of mutations in specimens with unfavorable tumor cell content. PMID

  9. Characterization of TTN Novex Splicing Variants across Species and the Role of RBM20 in Novex-Specific Exon Splicing

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    Zhilong Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Titin (TTN is a major disease-causing gene in cardiac muscle. Titin (TTN contains 363 exons in human encoding various sizes of TTN protein due to alternative splicing regulated mainly by RNA binding motif 20 (RBM20. Three isoforms of TTN protein are produced by mutually exclusive exons 45 (Novex 1, 46 (Novex 2, and 48 (Novex 3. Alternatively splicing in Novex isoforms across species and whether Novex isoforms are associated with heart disease remains completely unknown. Cross-species exon comparison with the mVISTA online tool revealed that exon 45 is more highly conserved across all species than exons 46 and 48. Importantly, a conserved region between exons 47 and 48 across species was revealed for the first time. Reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and DNA sequencing confirmed a new exon named as 48′ in Novex 3. In addition, with primer pairs for Novex 1, a new truncated form preserving introns 44 and 45 was discovered. We discovered that Novex 2 is not expressed in the pig, mouse, and rat with Novex 2 primer pairs. Unexpectedly, three truncated forms were identified. One TTN variant with intron 46 retention is mainly expressed in the human and frog heart, another variant with co-expression of exons 45 and 46 exists predominantly in chicken and frog heart, and a third with retention of introns 45 and 46 is mainly expressed in pig, mouse, rat, and chicken. Using Rbm20 knockout rat heart, we revealed that RBM20 is not a splicing regulator of Novex variants. Furthermore, the expression levels of Novex variants in human hearts with cardiomyopathies suggested that Novexes 2 and 3 could be associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and/or arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC. Taken together, our study reveals that splicing diversity of Novex exons across species and Novex variants might play a role in cardiomyopathy.

  10. Limited HLA sequence variation outside of antigen recognition domain exons of 360 10 of 10 matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplant donor-recipient pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, L; Vierra-Green, C; Lazaro, A; Brady, C; Haagenson, M; Spellman, S; Hurley, C K

    2017-01-01

    Traditional DNA-based typing focuses primarily on interrogating the exons of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes that form the antigen recognition domain (ARD). The relevance of mismatching donor and recipient for HLA variation outside the ARD on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) outcomes is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the frequency of variation outside the ARD in 10 of 10 (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1) matched unrelated donor transplant pairs (n = 360). Next-generation DNA sequencing was used to characterize both HLA exons and introns for HLA-A, -B, -C alleles; exons 2, 3 and the intervening intron for HLA-DRB1 and exons only for HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1. Over 97% of alleles at each locus were matched for their nucleotide sequence outside of the ARD exons. Of the 4320 allele comparisons overall, only 17 allele pairs were mismatched for non-ARD exons, 41 for noncoding regions and 9 for ARD exons. The observed variation between donor and recipient usually involved a single nucleotide difference (88% of mismatches); 88% of the non-ARD exon variants impacted the amino acid sequence. The impact of amino acid sequence variation caused by substitutions in exons outside ARD regions in D-R pairs will be difficult to assess in HSCT outcome studies because these mismatches do not occur very frequently. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Whole genome sequencing reveals a 7 base-pair deletion in DMD exon 42 in a dog with muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Peter P; Bello, Luca; Balog-Alvarez, Cindy; López, Sara Mata; Bettis, Amanda; Barnett, Heather; Hernandez, Briana; Schatzberg, Scott J; Piercy, Richard J; Kornegay, Joe N

    2017-04-01

    Dystrophin is a key cytoskeletal protein coded by the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene located on the X-chromosome. Truncating mutations in the DMD gene cause loss of dystrophin and the classical DMD clinical syndrome. Spontaneous DMD gene mutations and associated phenotypes occur in several other species. The mdx mouse model and the golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) canine model have been used extensively to study DMD disease pathogenesis and show efficacy and side effects of putative treatments. Certain DMD gene mutations in high-risk, the so-called hot spot areas can be particularly helpful in modeling molecular therapies. Identification of specific mutations has been greatly enhanced by new genomic methods. Whole genome, next generation sequencing (WGS) has been recently used to define DMD patient mutations, but has not been used in dystrophic dogs. A dystrophin-deficient Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS) dog was evaluated at the functional, histopathological, biochemical, and molecular level. The affected dog's phenotype was compared to the previously reported canine dystrophinopathies. WGS was then used to detect a 7 base pair deletion in DMD exon 42 (c.6051-6057delTCTCAAT mRNA), predicting a frameshift in gene transcription and truncation of dystrophin protein translation. The deletion was confirmed with conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing. This mutation is in a secondary DMD gene hotspot area distinct from the one identified earlier at the 5' donor splice site of intron 50 in the CKCS breed.

  12. Sequence polymorphism of PrP exon 3 gene in Istrian and crossbred sheep

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    Ino Curik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in sheep PrP (prion protein gene are known for scrapie susceptibility. We sequenced part of PrP exon 3 gene in 92 autochthonous Istrian (IS and 38 crossbred sheep (CBS. ARQ, ARR and AHQ alleles were predominant with frequency of 0.674 (0.526, 0.228 (0.132 and 0.082 (0.263 in IS (CBS, respectively, while VRQ (0.011 in IS and ARH (0.005 in IS and 0.079 in CBS alleles were rare. We also found non-synonymous mutations at codons 112 (M→T, 127 (G→S and 143 (H→R, and synonymous mutations at codons 231 (R and 237 (L. Additional mutations were associated only with AHQ, ARH and ARQ alleles. The polymorphism of PrP gene in IS was not critical with respect to scrapie susceptibility and with some efforts number of “favourable” genotypes can be increased.

  13. Decreased Usage of Specific Scrib Exons Defines a More Malignant Phenotype of Breast Cancer With Worsened Survival

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    Gergana Metodieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SCRIB is a polarity regulator known to be abnormally expressed in cancer at the protein level. Here we report that, in breast cancer, an additional and hidden dimension of deregulations exists: an unexpected SCRIB exon usage pattern appears to mark a more malignant tumor phenotype and significantly correlates with survival. Conserved exons encoding the leucine-rich repeats tend to be overexpressed while others are underused. Mechanistic studies revealed that the underused exons encode part of the protein necessary for interaction with Vimentin and Numa1, a protein which is required for proper positioning of the mitotic spindle. Thus, the inclusion/exclusion of specific SCRIB exons is a mechanistic hallmark of breast cancer, which could potentially be exploited to develop more efficient diagnostics and therapies.

  14. Diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues.

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    Lan Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Exonization of Alu elements is a major mechanism for birth of new exons in primate genomes. Prior analyses of expressed sequence tags show that almost all Alu-derived exons are alternatively spliced, and the vast majority of these exons have low transcript inclusion levels. In this work, we provide genomic and experimental evidence for diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues. Using Exon array data of 330 Alu-derived exons in 11 human tissues and detailed RT-PCR analyses of 38 exons, we show that some Alu-derived exons are constitutively spliced in a broad range of human tissues, and some display strong tissue-specific switch in their transcript inclusion levels. Most of such exons are derived from ancient Alu elements in the genome. In SEPN1, mutations of which are linked to a form of congenital muscular dystrophy, the muscle-specific inclusion of an Alu-derived exon may be important for regulating SEPN1 activity in muscle. Realtime qPCR analysis of this SEPN1 exon in macaque and chimpanzee tissues indicates human-specific increase in its transcript inclusion level and muscle specificity after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. Our results imply that some Alu exonization events may have acquired adaptive benefits during the evolution of primate transcriptomes.

  15. The exon-level biomarker SLC39A14 has organ-confined cancer-specificity in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Anita; Bakken, Anne Cathrine; Ågesen, Trude H; Lind, Guro E; Nesbakken, Arild; Nordgård, Oddmund; Brackmann, Stephan; Rognum, Torleiv O; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2012-09-15

    An alternative transcript variant of SLC39A14, caused by pre-mRNA splicing, was recently suggested as a biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC). In our study, we have validated the cancer-specific splicing pattern of the mutually exclusive exons 4A and 4B in altogether 244 colorectal tissue samples. Exon-specific quantitative RT-PCR analyses across 136 Stage I-IV CRC samples and 44 normal colonic mucosa samples showed complete cancer-specificity, as well as 94% sensitivity of SLC39A14-exon4B relative to SLC39A14-exon4A expression. However, across 20 samples from a range of healthy tissues, 18 expressed the CRC variant. This was true also for ten benign lymph nodes, demonstrating that the cancer-specificity is mainly confined to the colon and rectum. Hence, clinical use of SLC39A14-exon4B as a detection marker for CRC other than in samples taken from the bowel wall is diminished. Prognostic value by detection of metastasis to lymph nodes is also abated, elucidating an important pitfall to biomarker discovery. However, analyses of ten nondysplastic biopsies from patients with active inflammatory bowel disease showed negative results in seven samples and only weakly positive results in three samples, suggesting value of SLC39A14-exon4B as a marker to distinguish CRC from other pathologic conditions of the colon. In conclusion, the SLC39A14-exon4B transcript variant is a CRC biomarker with high sensitivity and organ-confined specificity. Further use of the transcript and its encoded protein isoform should be explored in an organ-confined context. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  16. Sequence comparison of the dopamine receptor D4 exon III repetitive region in several species of the order Carnivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Matsuura, Naoto; Murayama, Yuichi; Tsubota, Toshio; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Kitagawa, Hitoshi; Ito, Shin'ichi

    2002-08-01

    It was previously demonstrated that the dog dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene is polymorphic in terms of the repeat number and/or order of 39- and 12-bp sequences located in the third exon. To examine whether or not the repetitive region is present in other species of the order Carnivora, the homologous region of DRD4 genes were sequenced in the gray wolf, raccoon dog, Asiatic black bear, common raccoon and domestic cat. In the family Canidae, the wolf had an identical sequence to that of the dog 447b allele, and a repetitive sequence similar to the dog DRD4 was also recognized in the raccoon dog. On the other hand, no obvious repeated structure was observed in the sequences of the bear, raccoon and cat.

  17. Technology to accelerate pangenomic scanning for unknown point mutations in exonic sequences: cycling temperature capillary electrophoresis (CTCE

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    Bjørheim Jens

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid means to discover and enumerate unknown mutations in the exons of human genes on a pangenomic scale are needed to discover the genes carrying inherited risk for common diseases or the genes in which somatic mutations are required for clonal diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancers. The method of constant denaturing capillary electrophoresis (CDCE permitted sensitive detection and enumeration of unknown point mutations but labor-intensive optimization procedures for each exonic sequence made it impractical for application at a pangenomic scale. Results A variant denaturing capillary electrophoresis protocol, cycling temperature capillary electrophoresis (CTCE, has eliminated the need for the laboratory optimization of separation conditions for each target sequence. Here are reported the separation of wild type mutant homoduplexes from wild type/mutant heteroduplexes for 27 randomly chosen target sequences without any laboratory optimization steps. Calculation of the equilibrium melting map of each target sequence attached to a high melting domain (clamp was sufficient to design the analyte sequence and predict the expected degree of resolution. Conclusion CTCE provides practical means for economical pangenomic detection and enumeration of point mutations in large-scale human case/control cohort studies. We estimate that the combined reagent, instrumentation and labor costs for scanning the ~250,000 exons and splice sites of the ~25,000 human protein-coding genes using automated CTCE instruments in 100 case cohorts of 10,000 individuals each are now less than U.S. $500 million, less than U.S. $500 per person.

  18. Distinct intraspecific variations of garlic (Allium sativum L.) revealed by the exon-intron sequences of the alliinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Aki; Imai, Yukiko; Nakamura, Mizuho; Yanagisawa, Eri; Taguchi, Takaaki; Torii, Kosuke; Okumura, Hidenobu; Ichinose, Koji

    2014-04-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been used worldwide as a food and for medicinal purposes since early times. Garlic cultivars exhibit considerable morphological diversity despite the fact that they are mostly sterile and are grown only by vegetative propagation of cloves. Considerable recombination occurs in garlic genomes, including the genes involved in secondary metabolites. We examined the genomic DNAs (gDNAs) from garlic, encoding alliinase, a key enzyme involved in organosulfur metabolism in Allium plants. The 1.7-kb gDNA fragments, covering three exons (2, 3, and 4) and all four introns, were amplified from total DNAs prepared from garlic samples produced in Asia and Europe, leading to 73 sequences in total: Japan (JPN), China (CHN), India (IND), Spain (ESP), and France (FRA). The exon sequences were highly conserved among all the sequences, probably reflecting the fully functional alliinase associated with the flavor quality. Distinct intraspecific variations were detected for all four intron sequences, leading to the haplotype classifications. A close relationship between JPN and CHN was observed for all four introns, whereas IND showed a more divergent distribution. ESP and FRA afforded clearly different variants compared with those from Asian sequences. The present study provides information that could be useful in the development of an additional molecular marker for garlic authentication and quality control.

  19. Model for a transcript map of human chromosome 21: isolation of new coding sequences from exon and enriched cDNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaspo, M L; Gellen, L; Mott, R; Korn, B; Nizetic, D; Poustka, A M; Lehrach, H

    1995-08-01

    The construction of a transcriptional map for human chromosome 21 requires the generation of a specific catalogue of genes, together with corresponding mapping information. Towards this goal, we conducted a pilot study on a pool of random chromosome 21 cosmids representing 2 Mb of non-contiguous DNA. Exon-amplification and cDNA selection methods were used in combination to extract the coding content from these cosmids, and to derive expressed sequences libraries. These libraries and the source cosmid library were arrayed at high density for hybridisation screening. A strategy was used which related data obtained by multiple hybridisations of clones originating from one library, screened against the other libraries. In this way, it was possible to integrate the information with the physical map and to compare the gene recovery rate of each technique. cDNAs and exons were grouped into bins delineated by EcoRI cosmid fragments, and a subset of 91 cDNAs and 29 exons have been sequenced. These sequences defined 79 non-overlapping potential coding segments distributed in 24 transcriptional units, which were mapped along 21q. Northern blot analysis performed for a subset of cDNAs indicated the existence of a cognate transcript. Comparison to databases indicated three segments matching to known chromosome 21 genes: PFKL, COL6A1 and S100B and six segments matching to unmapped anonymous expressed sequence tags (ESTs). At the translated nucleotide level, strong homologies to known proteins were found with ATP-binding transporters of the ABC family and the dihydroorotase domain of pyrimidine synthetases. These data strongly suggest that bona fide partial genes have been isolated. Several of the newly isolated transcriptional units map to clinically important regions, in particular those involved in Down's syndrome, progressive myoclonus epilepsia and auto-immune polyglandular disease. The study presented here illustrates the complementarity of exon-amplification and c

  20. GMDH-GA Hybrid Model Extracting Exon Region from DNA Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, Kouji; Yoshihara, Ikuo; Yamamori, Kunihito; Yasunaga, Moritoshi

    2004-01-01

    Abstract ###A model building method based on Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) optimized by ###GA is developed for extracting exon regions. GMDH, that is originally a method to construct ###higher order polynomial model, is extended to constructing higher order logical model. ###The model built by proposed method is compared with Genetic Programming (GP)-based ###model as to the extraction rate of best, worst and average. The proposed method is superior to GP ###as to extraction rate of al...

  1. Altered splicing of the BIN1 muscle-specific exon in humans and dogs with highly progressive centronuclear myopathy.

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    Johann Böhm

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphysin 2, encoded by BIN1, is a key factor for membrane sensing and remodelling in different cell types. Homozygous BIN1 mutations in ubiquitously expressed exons are associated with autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy (CNM, a mildly progressive muscle disorder typically showing abnormal nuclear centralization on biopsies. In addition, misregulation of BIN1 splicing partially accounts for the muscle defects in myotonic dystrophy (DM. However, the muscle-specific function of amphiphysin 2 and its pathogenicity in both muscle disorders are not well understood. In this study we identified and characterized the first mutation affecting the splicing of the muscle-specific BIN1 exon 11 in a consanguineous family with rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal centronuclear myopathy. In parallel, we discovered a mutation in the same BIN1 exon 11 acceptor splice site as the genetic cause of the canine Inherited Myopathy of Great Danes (IMGD. Analysis of RNA from patient muscle demonstrated complete skipping of exon 11 and BIN1 constructs without exon 11 were unable to promote membrane tubulation in differentiated myotubes. Comparative immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of patient and canine biopsies revealed common structural defects, emphasizing the importance of amphiphysin 2 in membrane remodelling and maintenance of the skeletal muscle triad. Our data demonstrate that the alteration of the muscle-specific function of amphiphysin 2 is a common pathomechanism for centronuclear myopathy, myotonic dystrophy, and IMGD. The IMGD dog is the first faithful model for human BIN1-related CNM and represents a mammalian model available for preclinical trials of potential therapies.

  2. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. III. Exon sequences confirm most dendrograms based on protein sequences: calmodulin dendrograms show significant lack of parallelism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the first report in this series we presented dendrograms based on 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand family. In the second we used sequences from 228 proteins, containing 835 domains, and showed that eight of the 29 subfamilies are congruent and that the EF-hand domains of the remaining 21 subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories. In this study we have computed dendrograms within and among the EF-hand subfamilies using the encoding DNA sequences. In most instances the dendrograms based on protein and on DNA sequences are very similar. Significant differences between protein and DNA trees for calmodulin remain unexplained. In our fourth report we evaluate the sequences and the distribution of introns within the EF-hand family and conclude that exon shuffling did not play a significant role in its evolution.

  3. A consensus CaMK IV-responsive RNA sequence mediates regulation of alternative exons in neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, J. Y.; Jan, C.; Stoilov, P; Park, J.; Black, D L

    2005-01-01

    Neurons make extensive use of alternative pre-mRNA splicing to regulate gene expression and diversify physiological responses. We showed previously in a pituitary cell line that the Ca++/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase CaMK IV specifically repressed splicing of the BK channel STREX exon. This repression is dependent on a CaMK IV-responsive RNA element (CaRRE) within the STREX 3′ splice site. Here, we report that similar Ca++ regulation of splicing, mediated by L-type calcium channels and ...

  4. Use of a Fluorescent Aptamer RNA as an Exonic Sequence to Analyze Self-Splicing Ability of a Group I Intron from Structured RNAs

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    Airi Furukawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Group I self-splicing intron constitutes an important class of functional RNA molecules that can promote chemical transformation. Although the fundamental mechanism of the auto-excision from its precursor RNA has been established, convenient assay systems for its splicing activity are still useful for a further understanding of its detailed mechanism and of its application. Because some host RNA sequences, to which group I introns inserted form stable three-dimensional (3D structures, the effects of the 3D structures of exonic elements on the splicing efficiency of group I introns are important but not a fully investigated issue. We developed an assay system for group I intron self-splicing by employing a fluorescent aptamer RNA (spinach RNA as a model exonic sequence inserted by the Tetrahymena group I intron. We investigated self-splicing of the intron from spinach RNA, serving as a model exonic sequence with a 3D structure.

  5. Functional characterization of the ABCG2 5' non-coding exon variants: Stem cell specificity, translation efficiency and the influence of drug selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, Sára; Jordanidisz, Theodora; Schamberger, Anita; Várady, György; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Apáti, Ágota; Sarkadi, Balázs; Orbán, Tamás I

    2016-07-01

    ABCG2 is a multidrug transporter with wide substrate specificity, and is believed to protect several cell types from various xenobiotics and endobiotics. This "guardian" function is important in numerous cell types and tissue barriers but becomes disadvantageous by being responsible for the multidrug resistance phenotype in certain tumor cells. ABCG2 regulation at the protein level has already been extensively studied, however, regulation at the mRNA level, especially the functional role of the various 5' untranslated exon variants (5' UTRs) has been elusive. In the present work, we describe a comprehensive characterization of four ABCG2 mRNA variants with different exon 1 sequences, investigate drug inducibility, stem cell specificity, mRNA stability, and translation efficiency. Although certain variants (E1B and E1C) are considered as "constitutive" mRNA isoforms, we show that chemotoxic drugs significantly alter the expression pattern of distinct ABCG2 mRNA isoforms. When examining human embryonic stem cell lines, we provide evidence that variant E1A has an expression pattern coupled to undifferentiated stem cell stage, as its transcript level is regulated parallel to mRNAs of Oct4 and Nanog pluripotency marker genes. When characterizing the four exon 1 variants we found no significant differences in terms of mRNA stabilities and half-lives of the isoforms. In contrast, variant E1U showed markedly lower translation efficiency both at the total protein level or regarding the functional presence in the plasma membrane. Taken together, these results indicate that the different 5' UTR variants play an important role in cell type specific regulation and fine tuning of ABCG2 expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Screening for single nucleotide variants, small indels and exon deletions with a next-generation sequencing based gene panel approach for Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawitz, Peter M; Schiska, Daniela; Krüger, Ulrike; Appelt, Sandra; Heinrich, Verena; Parkhomchuk, Dmitri; Timmermann, Bernd; Millan, Jose M; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Hecht, Jochen; Gross, Manfred

    2014-09-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized both by deafness and blindness. For the three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome causal mutations in altogether 12 genes and a modifier gene have been identified. Due to the genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome, the molecular analysis is predestined for a comprehensive and parallelized analysis of all known genes by next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches. We describe here the targeted enrichment and deep sequencing for exons of Usher genes and compare the costs and workload of this approach compared to Sanger sequencing. We also present a bioinformatics analysis pipeline that allows us to detect single-nucleotide variants, short insertions and deletions, as well as copy number variations of one or more exons on the same sequence data. Additionally, we present a flexible in silico gene panel for the analysis of sequence variants, in which newly identified genes can easily be included. We applied this approach to a cohort of 44 Usher patients and detected biallelic pathogenic mutations in 35 individuals and monoallelic mutations in eight individuals of our cohort. Thirty-nine of the sequence variants, including two heterozygous deletions comprising several exons of USH2A, have not been reported so far. Our NGS-based approach allowed us to assess single-nucleotide variants, small indels, and whole exon deletions in a single test. The described diagnostic approach is fast and cost-effective with a high molecular diagnostic yield.

  7. A method to identify RNA A-to-I editing targets using I-specific cleavage and exon array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Stocker, Joel; Wang, Hui-Chun; Lu, Chiu-Chin; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Yang, Jyuer-Ger; Cho, Chung-Lung; Huang, Hurng-Wern

    2013-02-01

    RNA A-to-I editing is the most common single-base editing in the animal kingdom. Dysregulations of RNA A-to-I editing are associated with developmental defects in mouse and human diseases. Mouse knockout models deficient in ADAR activities show lethal phenotypes associated with defects in nervous system, failure of hematopoiesis and reduced tolerance to stress. While several methods of identifying RNA A-to-I editing sites are currently available, most of the critical editing targets responsible for the important biological functions of ADARs remain unknown. Here we report a method to systematically analyze RNA A-to-I editing targets by combining I-specific cleavage and exon array analysis. Our results show that I-specific cleavage on editing sites causes more than twofold signal reductions in edited exons of known targets such as Gria2, Htr2c, Gabra3 and Cyfip2 in mice. This method provides an experimental approach for genome-wide analysis of RNA A-to-I editing targets with exon-level resolution. We believe this method will help expedite inquiry into the roles of RNA A-to-I editing in various biological processes and diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sequence harmony: : detecting functional specificity from alignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, K Anton; Pirovano, Walter; Krab, Klaas; Heringa, Jaap

    Multiple sequence alignments are often used for the identification of key specificity-determining residues within protein families. We present a web server implementation of the Sequence Harmony (SH) method previously introduced. SH accurately detects subfamily specific positions from a multiple

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphism-specific regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 by multiple miRNAs targeting the coding exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Tyler; Warren, Christopher; Yang, Jay

    2014-05-01

    Microribonucleic acids (miRNAs) work with exquisite specificity and are able to distinguish a target from a non-target based on a single nucleotide mismatch in the core nucleotide domain. We questioned whether miRNA regulation of gene expression could occur in a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific manner, manifesting as a post-transcriptional control of expression of genetic polymorphisms. In our recent study of the functional consequences of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 SNPs, we discovered that expression of a coding exon SNP in the pro-domain of the protein resulted in a profound decrease in the secreted protein. This missense SNP results in the N38S amino acid change and a loss of an N-glycosylation site. A systematic study demonstrated that the loss of secreted protein was due not to the loss of an N-glycosylation site, but rather an SNP-specific targeting by miR-671-3p and miR-657. Bioinformatics analysis identified 41 SNP-specific miRNA targeting MMP-9 SNPs, mostly in the coding exon and an extension of the analysis to chromosome 20, where the MMP-9 gene is located, suggesting that SNP-specific miRNAs targeting the coding exon are prevalent. This selective post-transcriptional regulation of a target messenger RNA harboring genetic polymorphisms by miRNAs offers an SNP-dependent post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism, allowing for polymorphic-specific differential gene regulation. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Transforming pluripotency: an exon-level study of malignancy-specific transcripts in human embryonal carcinoma and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Harrison, Neil; Bakken, Anne Cathrine; Hoff, Andreas M; Jones, Mark; Sveen, Anita; Moore, Harry D; Andrews, Peter W; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-04-01

    To circumvent difficulties of isolating pure populations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) for the purpose of identifying malignancy-specific gene expression, we have compared exon-resolution transcriptomic profiles of 5 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell lines, a histological subtype of germ cell tumor (GCT), to their nonmalignant caricature, specifically 6 human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines. Both cell types are readily accessible, and were purified for undifferentiated cells only. We identified a set of 28 differentially expressed genes, many of which had cancer and stemness roles. Overexpression of the recently discovered pluripotency gene NR5A2 in malignant EC cells revealed an intriguing indication of how WNT-mediated dysregulation of pluripotency is involved with malignancy. Expression of these 28 genes was further explored within 2 publically available data sets of primary EC tumors and normal testis. At the exon-level, alternative splicing events were detected in ZNF195, DNMT3B, and PMF1, and alternative promoters were detected for ASH2L and ETV5. These events were validated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction-based methods in EC and ES lines, where the alternative splicing event in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B may have functional consequences. In conclusion, we have identified malignancy-specific gene expression differences within a rigorous pluripotent stem cell context. These findings are of particular interest for both GCT and ES cell biology, and, in general, to the concept of CSCs.

  11. CELF family RNA-binding protein UNC-75 regulates two sets of mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32 gene in neuron-specific manners in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Hidehito Kuroyanagi

    Full Text Available An enormous number of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a-4c and 7a-7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H(+-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA-binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA-binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive

  12. CELF Family RNA–Binding Protein UNC-75 Regulates Two Sets of Mutually Exclusive Exons of the unc-32 Gene in Neuron-Specific Manners in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Watanabe, Yohei; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    An enormous number of alternative pre–mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a–4c and 7a–7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc)-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H+-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA–binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA–binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive exons of

  13. CELF family RNA-binding protein UNC-75 regulates two sets of mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32 gene in neuron-specific manners in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Watanabe, Yohei; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    An enormous number of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a-4c and 7a-7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc)-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA-binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA-binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32

  14. Histone posttranslational modifications predict specific alternative exon subtypes in mammalian brain.

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    Qiwen Hu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A compelling body of literature, based on next generation chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA sequencing of reward brain regions indicates that the regulation of the epigenetic landscape likely underlies chronic drug abuse and addiction. It is now critical to develop highly innovative computational strategies to reveal the relevant regulatory transcriptional mechanisms that may underlie neuropsychiatric disease. We have analyzed chromatin regulation of alternative splicing, which is implicated in cocaine exposure in mice. Recent literature has described chromatin-regulated alternative splicing, suggesting a novel function for drug-induced neuroepigenetic remodeling. However, the extent of the genome-wide association between particular histone modifications and alternative splicing remains unexplored. To address this, we have developed novel computational approaches to model the association between alternative splicing and histone posttranslational modifications in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, a brain reward region. Using classical statistical methods and machine learning to combine ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq data, we found that specific histone modifications are strongly associated with various aspects of differential splicing. H3K36me3 and H3K4me1 have the strongest association with splicing indicating they play a significant role in alternative splicing in brain reward tissue.

  15. DNA-methylation effect on cotranscriptional splicing is dependent on GC architecture of the exon-intron structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfman, Sahar; Cohen, Noa; Yearim, Ahuvi; Ast, Gil

    2013-05-01

    DNA methylation is known to regulate transcription and was recently found to be involved in exon recognition via cotranscriptional splicing. We recently observed that exon-intron architectures can be grouped into two classes: one with higher GC content in exons compared to the flanking introns, and the other with similar GC content in exons and introns. The first group has higher nucleosome occupancy on exons than introns, whereas the second group exhibits weak nucleosome marking of exons, suggesting another type of epigenetic marker distinguishes exons from introns when GC content is similar. We find different and specific patterns of DNA methylation in each of the GC architectures; yet in both groups, DNA methylation clearly marks the exons. Exons of the leveled GC architecture exhibit a significantly stronger DNA methylation signal in relation to their flanking introns compared to exons of the differential GC architecture. This is accentuated by a reduction of the DNA methylation level in the intronic sequences in proximity to the splice sites and shows that different epigenetic modifications mark the location of exons already at the DNA level. Also, lower levels of methylated CpGs on alternative exons can successfully distinguish alternative exons from constitutive ones. Three positions at the splice sites show high CpG abundance and accompany elevated nucleosome occupancy in a leveled GC architecture. Overall, these results suggest that DNA methylation affects exon recognition and is influenced by the GC architecture of the exon and flanking introns.

  16. Characteristics of transposable element exonization within human and mouse.

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    Noa Sela

    Full Text Available Insertion of transposed elements within mammalian genes is thought to be an important contributor to mammalian evolution and speciation. Insertion of transposed elements into introns can lead to their activation as alternatively spliced cassette exons, an event called exonization. Elucidation of the evolutionary constraints that have shaped fixation of transposed elements within human and mouse protein coding genes and subsequent exonization is important for understanding of how the exonization process has affected transcriptome and proteome complexities. Here we show that exonization of transposed elements is biased towards the beginning of the coding sequence in both human and mouse genes. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs revealed that exonization of transposed elements can be population-specific, implying that exonizations may enhance divergence and lead to speciation. SNP density analysis revealed differences between Alu and other transposed elements. Finally, we identified cases of primate-specific Alu elements that depend on RNA editing for their exonization. These results shed light on TE fixation and the exonization process within human and mouse genes.

  17. Categorization of 77 dystrophin exons into 5 groups by a decision tree using indexes of splicing regulatory factors as decision markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malueka, Rusdy Ghazali; Takaoka, Yutaka; Yagi, Mariko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Lee, Tomoko; Dwianingsih, Ery Kus; Nishida, Atsushi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2012-03-31

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a fatal muscle-wasting disease, is characterized by dystrophin deficiency caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Skipping of a target dystrophin exon during splicing with antisense oligonucleotides is attracting much attention as the most plausible way to express dystrophin in DMD. Antisense oligonucleotides have been designed against splicing regulatory sequences such as splicing enhancer sequences of target exons. Recently, we reported that a chemical kinase inhibitor specifically enhances the skipping of mutated dystrophin exon 31, indicating the existence of exon-specific splicing regulatory systems. However, the basis for such individual regulatory systems is largely unknown. Here, we categorized the dystrophin exons in terms of their splicing regulatory factors. Using a computer-based machine learning system, we first constructed a decision tree separating 77 authentic from 14 known cryptic exons using 25 indexes of splicing regulatory factors as decision markers. We evaluated the classification accuracy of a novel cryptic exon (exon 11a) identified in this study. However, the tree mislabeled exon 11a as a true exon. Therefore, we re-constructed the decision tree to separate all 15 cryptic exons. The revised decision tree categorized the 77 authentic exons into five groups. Furthermore, all nine disease-associated novel exons were successfully categorized as exons, validating the decision tree. One group, consisting of 30 exons, was characterized by a high density of exonic splicing enhancer sequences. This suggests that AOs targeting splicing enhancer sequences would efficiently induce skipping of exons belonging to this group. The decision tree categorized the 77 authentic exons into five groups. Our classification may help to establish the strategy for exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  18. Exon prediction in eucaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignal, L; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Y; Lisacek, F; Mephu Ngüifo, E; Rouzé, P; Quinqueton, J; Thermes, C

    1996-01-01

    Two independent computer systems, NetPlantGene and AMELIE, dedicated to the identification of splice sites in plant and human genomes, respectively, are introduced here. Both methods were designed in relation to experimental work; they rely on automatically generated rules involving the nucleotide content of sequences regardless of the coding properties of exons. The specificity of plant sequences as considered in NetPlantGene is shown to enhance the quality of detection as opposed to general methods such as GRAIL. A scanning model of the acceptor site recognition is being simulated by AMELIE leading to a relatively accurate selection process of sites.

  19. Chromosome number9 specific repetitive DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joste, N.E.; Cram, L.S.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Jones, M.; Longmire, J.; Robinson, T.; Moyzis, R.K.

    1986-05-01

    Human repetitive DNA libraries have been constructed and various recombinant DNA clones isolated that are likely candidates for chromosome specific sequences. The first clone tested (pHuR 98; plasmid human repeat 98) was biotinylated and hybridized to human chromosomes in situ. The hybridized recombinant probe was detected with fluoresceinated avidin, and chromosomes were counter-stained with either propidium iodide or distamycin-DAPI. Specific hybridization to chromosome band 9q1 was obtained. The localization was confirmed by hybridizing radiolabeled pHuR 98 DNA to human chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry. Various methods, including orthogonal field pulsed gel electrophoresis analysis indicate that 75 kilobase blocks of this sequence are interspersed with other repetitive DNA sequences in this chromosome band. This study is the first to report a human repetitive DNA sequence uniquely localized to a specific chromosome. This clone provides an easily detected and highly specific chromosomal marker for molecular cytogenetic analyses in numerous basic research and clinical studies.

  20. articles: Association of An Intronic, but Not Any Exonic, FRMD4B Sequence Variant and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkovich, Scot J.; Van Booven, Derek J.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Dorn II, Gerald W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Common forms of heart failure (HF) exhibit familial clustering, but specific genetic risk factors have been challenging to identify. A recent single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray study implicated a locus within an intron of FRMD4B in Caucasian HF. Here, we used next‐generation resequencing of pooled DNA and individual Sequenom genotyping to test for associations between FRMD4B SNPs and ischemic and/or nonischemic cardiomyopathy in two independent populations. Exonic resequencing of Caucasians and African‐Americans identified 32 FRMD4B SNPs, 13 of which had allele frequencies greater than 1%. None of these common FRMD4B SNPs were significantly associated with ischemic, nonischemic, or all‐cause HF in either of the study populations. We individually genotyped the seminal intronic rs6787362 FRMD4B SNP in the primary study population and compared genotypes between HF cases and controls. The rs6787362 variant allele was more frequent in Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, and carriers (heterozygous or homozygous) of the variant allele had increased risk of HF (OR 1.437, CI 1.085–1.904; p= 0.0118). No such association was seen for African‐American HF. These results confirm an association between the intronic rs6787362 FRMD4B SNP and ischemic cardiomyopathy in a European‐derived population, but do not support the proposition that coding FRMD4B variants are susceptibility factors in common HF. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 134–139 PMID:20718813

  1. Exon-level transcriptome profiling in murine breast cancer reveals splicing changes specific to tumors with different metastatic abilities.

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    Amandine Bemmo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second most frequent type of cancer affecting women. We are increasingly aware that changes in mRNA splicing are associated with various characteristics of cancer. The most deadly aspect of cancer is metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads from the primary tumor to distant organs. However, little is known specifically about the involvement of alternative splicing in the formation of macroscopic metastases. Our study investigates transcript isoform changes that characterize tumors of different abilities to form growing metastases.To identify alternative splicing events (ASEs that are associated with the fully metastatic phenotype in breast cancer, we used Affymetrix Exon Microarrays to profile mRNA isoform variations genome-wide in weakly metastatic (168FARN and 4T07 and highly metastatic (4T1 mammary carcinomas. Statistical analysis identified significant expression changes in 7606 out of 155,994 (4% exons and in 1725 out of 189,460 (1% intronic regions, which affect 2623 out of 16,654 (16% genes. These changes correspond to putative alternative isoforms-several of which are novel-that are differentially expressed between tumors of varying metastatic phenotypes. Gene pathway analysis showed that 1224 of genes expressing alternative isoforms were involved in cell growth, cell interactions, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell death and have been previously linked to cancers and genetic disorders. We chose ten predicted splice variants for RT-PCR validation, eight of which were successfully confirmed (MED24, MFI2, SRRT, CD44, CLK1 and HNRNPH1. These include three novel intron retentions in CD44, a gene in which isoform variations have been previously associated with the metastasis of several cancers.Our findings reveal that various genes are differently spliced and/or expressed in association with the metastatic phenotype of tumor cells. Identification of metastasis-specific isoforms may contribute to the

  2. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of the HES/HEY gene family reveal exon/intron loss and teleost specific duplication events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Yan, Jun; Ma, Zhaowu; Zhou, Yang; Abbood, Nibras Najm; Liu, Jianfeng; Su, Li; Jia, Haibo; Guo, An-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    HES/HEY genes encode a family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors with both bHLH and Orange domain. HES/HEY proteins are direct targets of the Notch signaling pathway and play an essential role in developmental decisions, such as the developments of nervous system, somitogenesis, blood vessel and heart. Despite their important functions, the origin and evolution of this HES/HEY gene family has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we identified genes of the HES/HEY family in representative species and performed evolutionary analysis to elucidate their origin and evolutionary process. Our results showed that the HES/HEY genes only existed in metazoans and may originate from the common ancestor of metazoans. We identified HES/HEY genes in more than 10 species representing the main lineages. Combining the bHLH and Orange domain sequences, we constructed the phylogenetic trees by different methods (Bayesian, ML, NJ and ME) and classified the HES/HEY gene family into four groups. Our results indicated that this gene family had undergone three expansions, which were along with the origins of Eumetazoa, vertebrate, and teleost. Gene structure analysis revealed that the HES/HEY genes were involved in exon and/or intron loss in different species lineages. Genes of this family were duplicated in bony fishes and doubled than other vertebrates. Furthermore, we studied the teleost-specific duplications in zebrafish and investigated the expression pattern of duplicated genes in different tissues by RT-PCR. Finally, we proposed a model to show the evolution of this gene family with processes of expansion, exon/intron loss, and motif loss. Our study revealed the evolution of HES/HEY gene family, the expression and function divergence of duplicated genes, which also provide clues for the research of Notch function in development. This study shows a model of gene family analysis with gene structure evolution and duplication.

  3. Exon exchange approach to repair Duchenne dystrophin transcripts.

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    Stéphanie Lorain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trans-splicing strategies for mRNA repair involve engineered transcripts designed to anneal target mRNAs in order to interfere with their natural splicing, giving rise to mRNA chimeras where endogenous mutated exons have been replaced by exogenous replacement sequences. A number of trans-splicing molecules have already been proposed for replacing either the 5' or the 3' part of transcripts to be repaired. Here, we show the feasibility of RNA surgery by using a double trans-splicing approach allowing the specific substitution of a given mutated exon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a target we used a minigene encoding a fragment of the mdx dystrophin gene enclosing the mutated exon (exon 23. This minigene was cotransfected with a variety of exon exchange constructions, differing in their annealing domains. We obtained accurate and efficient replacement of exon 23 in the mRNA target. Adding up a downstream intronic splice enhancer DISE in the exon exchange molecule enhanced drastically its efficiency up to 25-45% of repair depending on the construction in use. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate the possibility to fix up mutated exons, refurbish deleted exons and introduce protein motifs, while keeping natural untranslated sequences, which are essential for mRNA stability and translation regulation. Conversely to the well-known exon skipping, exon exchange has the advantage to be compatible with almost any type of mutations and more generally to a wide range of genetic conditions. In particular, it allows addressing disorders caused by dominant mutations.

  4. Exon Exchange Approach to Repair Duchenne Dystrophin Transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorain, Stéphanie; Peccate, Cécile; Le Hir, Maëva; Garcia, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background Trans-splicing strategies for mRNA repair involve engineered transcripts designed to anneal target mRNAs in order to interfere with their natural splicing, giving rise to mRNA chimeras where endogenous mutated exons have been replaced by exogenous replacement sequences. A number of trans-splicing molecules have already been proposed for replacing either the 5′ or the 3′ part of transcripts to be repaired. Here, we show the feasibility of RNA surgery by using a double trans-splicing approach allowing the specific substitution of a given mutated exon. Methodology/Principal Findings As a target we used a minigene encoding a fragment of the mdx dystrophin gene enclosing the mutated exon (exon 23). This minigene was cotransfected with a variety of exon exchange constructions, differing in their annealing domains. We obtained accurate and efficient replacement of exon 23 in the mRNA target. Adding up a downstream intronic splice enhancer DISE in the exon exchange molecule enhanced drastically its efficiency up to 25–45% of repair depending on the construction in use. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate the possibility to fix up mutated exons, refurbish deleted exons and introduce protein motifs, while keeping natural untranslated sequences, which are essential for mRNA stability and translation regulation. Conversely to the well-known exon skipping, exon exchange has the advantage to be compatible with almost any type of mutations and more generally to a wide range of genetic conditions. In particular, it allows addressing disorders caused by dominant mutations. PMID:20531943

  5. Cell-Specific RNA Binding Protein Rbfox2 Regulates CaV2.2 mRNA Exon Composition and CaV2.2 Current Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Summer E; Toro, Cecilia P; Andrade, Arturo; López-Soto, Eduardo J; Denome, Sylvia; Lipscombe, Diane

    2017-01-01

    The majority of multiexon mammalian genes contain alternatively spliced exons that have unique expression patterns in different cell populations and that have important cell functions. The expression profiles of alternative exons are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors that can promote exon inclusion or exon skipping but with few exceptions we do not know which specific splicing factors control the expression of alternatively spliced exons of known biological function. Many ion channel genes undergo extensive alternative splicing including Cacna1b that encodes the voltage-gated CaV2.2 α1 subunit. Alternatively spliced exon 18a in Cacna1b RNA encodes 21 amino acids in the II-III loop of CaV2.2, and its expression differs across the nervous system and over development. Genome-wide, protein-RNA binding analyses coupled to high-throughput RNA sequencing show that RNA binding Fox (Rbfox) proteins associate with CaV2.2 (Cacna1b) pre-mRNAs. Here, we link Rbfox2 to suppression of e18a. We show increased e18a inclusion in CaV2.2 mRNAs: (1) after siRNA knockdown of Rbfox2 in a neuronal cell line and (2) in RNA from sympathetic neurons of adult compared to early postnatal mice. By immunoprecipitation of Rbfox2-RNA complexes followed by qPCR, we demonstrate reduced Rbfox2 binding upstream of e18a in RNA from sympathetic neurons of adult compared to early postnatal mice. CaV2.2 currents in cell lines and in sympathetic neurons expressing only e18a-CaV2.2 are larger compared to currents from those expressing only Δ18a-CaV2.2. We conclude that Rbfox2 represses e18a inclusion during pre-mRNA splicing of CaV2.2, limiting the size of CaV2.2 currents early in development in certain neuronal populations.

  6. Increasing the yield in targeted next-generation sequencing by implicating CNV analysis, non-coding exons and the overall variant load: the example of retinal dystrophies.

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    Tobias Eisenberger

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA are major causes of blindness. They result from mutations in many genes which has long hampered comprehensive genetic analysis. Recently, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS has proven useful to overcome this limitation. To uncover "hidden mutations" such as copy number variations (CNVs and mutations in non-coding regions, we extended the use of NGS data by quantitative readout for the exons of 55 RP and LCA genes in 126 patients, and by including non-coding 5' exons. We detected several causative CNVs which were key to the diagnosis in hitherto unsolved constellations, e.g. hemizygous point mutations in consanguineous families, and CNVs complemented apparently monoallelic recessive alleles. Mutations of non-coding exon 1 of EYS revealed its contribution to disease. In view of the high carrier frequency for retinal disease gene mutations in the general population, we considered the overall variant load in each patient to assess if a mutation was causative or reflected accidental carriership in patients with mutations in several genes or with single recessive alleles. For example, truncating mutations in RP1, a gene implicated in both recessive and dominant RP, were causative in biallelic constellations, unrelated to disease when heterozygous on a biallelic mutation background of another gene, or even non-pathogenic if close to the C-terminus. Patients with mutations in several loci were common, but without evidence for di- or oligogenic inheritance. Although the number of targeted genes was low compared to previous studies, the mutation detection rate was highest (70% which likely results from completeness and depth of coverage, and quantitative data analysis. CNV analysis should routinely be applied in targeted NGS, and mutations in non-coding exons give reason to systematically include 5'-UTRs in disease gene or exome panels. Consideration of all variants is indispensable

  7. Comparative analysis of antisense oligonucleotide sequences targeting exon 53 of the human DMD gene: Implications for future clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popplewell, Linda J; Adkin, Carl; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; de Winter, Christa L; Wilton, Steve D; Morgan, Jennifer E; Muntoni, Francesco; Graham, Ian R; Dickson, George

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of functional dystrophin protein, most commonly as a result of a range of out-of-frame mutations in the DMD gene. Modulation of pre-mRNA splicing with antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to restore the reading frame has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, such that truncated but functional dystrophin is expressed. AO-induced skipping of exon 51 of the DMD gene, which could treat 13% of DMD patients, has now progressed to clinical trials. We describe here the methodical, cooperative comparison, in vitro (in DMD cells) and in vivo (in a transgenic mouse expressing human dystrophin), of 24 AOs of the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) chemistry designed to target exon 53 of the DMD gene, skipping of which could be potentially applicable to 8% of patients. A number of the PMOs tested should be considered worthy of development for clinical trial. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Alternative splicing regulation of APP exon 7 by RBFox proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shafiul; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2014-12-01

    RBFox proteins are well-known alternative splicing regulators. We have shown previously that during neuronal differentiation of P19 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid and cell aggregation, RBFox1 shows markedly increased temporal expression. To find its key splicing regulation, we examined the effect of RBFox1 on 33 previously reported and validated neuronal splicing events of P19 cells. We observed that alternative splicing of three genes, specifically, amyloid precursor protein (APP), disks large homolog 3 (DLG3), and G protein, alpha activating activity polypeptide O (GNAO1), was altered by transient RBFox1 expression in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, an RBFox1 mutant (RBFox1FA) that was unable to bind the target RNA sequence ((U)GCAUG) did not induce these splicing events. APP generates amyloid beta peptides that are involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, and therefore we examined APP alternative splicing regulation by RBFox1 and other splicing regulators. Our results indicated that RBFox proteins promote the skipping of APP exon 7, but not the inclusion of exon 8. We made APP6789 minigenes and observed that two (U)GCAUG sequences, located upstream of exon 7 and in exon 7, functioned to induce skipping of exon 7 by RBFox proteins. Overall, RBFox proteins may shift APP from exon 7 containing isoforms, APP770 and APP751, toward the exon 7 lacking isoform, APP695, which is predominant in neural tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of the HES/HEY gene family reveal exon/intron loss and teleost specific duplication events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HES/HEY genes encode a family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factors with both bHLH and Orange domain. HES/HEY proteins are direct targets of the Notch signaling pathway and play an essential role in developmental decisions, such as the developments of nervous system, somitogenesis, blood vessel and heart. Despite their important functions, the origin and evolution of this HES/HEY gene family has yet to be elucidated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, we identified genes of the HES/HEY family in representative species and performed evolutionary analysis to elucidate their origin and evolutionary process. Our results showed that the HES/HEY genes only existed in metazoans and may originate from the common ancestor of metazoans. We identified HES/HEY genes in more than 10 species representing the main lineages. Combining the bHLH and Orange domain sequences, we constructed the phylogenetic trees by different methods (Bayesian, ML, NJ and ME and classified the HES/HEY gene family into four groups. Our results indicated that this gene family had undergone three expansions, which were along with the origins of Eumetazoa, vertebrate, and teleost. Gene structure analysis revealed that the HES/HEY genes were involved in exon and/or intron loss in different species lineages. Genes of this family were duplicated in bony fishes and doubled than other vertebrates. Furthermore, we studied the teleost-specific duplications in zebrafish and investigated the expression pattern of duplicated genes in different tissues by RT-PCR. Finally, we proposed a model to show the evolution of this gene family with processes of expansion, exon/intron loss, and motif loss. CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed the evolution of HES/HEY gene family, the expression and function divergence of duplicated genes, which also provide clues for the research of Notch function in development. This study shows a model of gene family analysis with gene structure

  10. An Exon-Specific U1snRNA Induces a Robust Factor IX Activity in Mice Expressing Multiple Human FIX Splicing Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Balestra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In cellular models we have demonstrated that a unique U1snRNA targeting an intronic region downstream of a defective exon (Exon-specific U1snRNA, ExSpeU1 can rescue multiple exon-skipping mutations, a relevant cause of genetic disease. Here, we explored in mice the ExSpeU1 U1fix9 toward two model Hemophilia B-causing mutations at the 5′ (c.519A > G or 3′ (c.392-8T > G splice sites of F9 exon 5. Hydrodynamic injection of wt-BALB/C mice with plasmids expressing the wt and mutant (hFIX-2G5′ss and hFIX-8G3′ss splicing-competent human factor IX (hFIX cassettes resulted in the expression of hFIX transcripts lacking exon 5 in liver, and in low plasma levels of inactive hFIX. Coinjection of U1fix9, but not of U1wt, restored exon inclusion of variants and in the intrinsically weak FIXwt context. This resulted in appreciable circulating hFIX levels (mean ± SD; hFIX-2G5′ss, 1.0 ± 0.5 µg/ml; hFIX-8G3′ss, 1.2 ± 0.3 µg/ml; and hFIXwt, 1.9 ± 0.6 µg/ml, leading to a striking shortening (from ≃100 seconds of untreated mice to ≃80 seconds of FIX-dependent coagulation times, indicating a hFIX with normal specific activity. This is the first proof-of-concept in vivo that a unique ExSpeU1 can efficiently rescue gene expression impaired by distinct exon-skipping variants, which extends the applicability of ExSpeU1s to panels of mutations and thus cohort of patients.

  11. The proximal first exon architecture of the murine ghrelin gene is highly similar to its human orthologue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seim Inge

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The murine ghrelin gene (Ghrl, originally sequenced from stomach tissue, contains five exons and a single transcription start site in a short, 19 bp first exon (exon 0. We recently isolated several novel first exons of the human ghrelin gene and found evidence of a complex transcriptional repertoire. In this report, we examined the 5' exons of the murine ghrelin orthologue in a range of tissues using 5' RACE. Findings 5' RACE revealed two transcription start sites (TSSs in exon 0 and four TSSs in intron 0, which correspond to 5' extensions of exon 1. Using quantitative, real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that extended exon 1 containing Ghrl transcripts are largely confined to the spleen, adrenal gland, stomach, and skin. Conclusion We demonstrate that multiple transcription start sites are present in exon 0 and an extended exon 1 of the murine ghrelin gene, similar to the proximal first exon organisation of its human orthologue. The identification of several transcription start sites in intron 0 of mouse ghrelin (resulting in an extension of exon 1 raises the possibility that developmental-, cell- and tissue-specific Ghrl mRNA species are created by employing alternative promoters and further studies of the murine ghrelin gene are warranted.

  12. Effector-independent and effector-dependent sequence representations underlie general and specific perceptuomotor sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, David R; Marsolek, Chad J

    2012-01-01

    Perceptuomotor sequence learning could be due to learning of effector-independent sequence information (e.g., response locations), effector-dependent information (e.g., motor movements of a particular effector), or both. Evidence also suggests that learning of statistical regularities in sequences (general-regularity learning) and specific sequences (specific-sequence learning) are dissociable. The authors examined the degree to which general and specific-sequence learning rely on effector-independent and effector-dependent representations. During training, participants typed sequences that followed a construction rule with a subset of sequences repeatedly processed. At test, effector-independent and effector-dependent learning was examined with respect to general-regularity and specific-sequence learning. Results suggest that general-regularity learning is subserved by effector-independent sequence representations, whereas specific-sequence learning is subserved by effector-dependent sequence representations, further dissociating these types of learning.

  13. Scipio: Using protein sequences to determine the precise exon/intron structures of genes and their orthologs in closely related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollmar Martin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many types of analyses, data about gene structure and locations of non-coding regions of genes are required. Although a vast amount of genomic sequence data is available, precise annotation of genes is lacking behind. Finding the corresponding gene of a given protein sequence by means of conventional tools is error prone, and cannot be completed without manual inspection, which is time consuming and requires considerable experience. Results Scipio is a tool based on the alignment program BLAT to determine the precise gene structure given a protein sequence and a genome sequence. It identifies intron-exon borders and splice sites and is able to cope with sequencing errors and genes spanning several contigs in genomes that have not yet been assembled to supercontigs or chromosomes. Instead of producing a set of hits with varying confidence, Scipio gives the user a coherent summary of locations on the genome that code for the query protein. The output contains information about discrepancies that may result from sequencing errors. Scipio has also successfully been used to find homologous genes in closely related species. Scipio was tested with 979 protein queries against 16 arthropod genomes (intra species search. For cross-species annotation, Scipio was used to annotate 40 genes from Homo sapiens in the primates Pongo pygmaeus abelii and Callithrix jacchus. The prediction quality of Scipio was tested in a comparative study against that of BLAT and the well established program Exonerate. Conclusion Scipio is able to precisely map a protein query onto a genome. Even in cases when there are many sequencing errors, or when incomplete genome assemblies lead to hits that stretch across multiple target sequences, it very often provides the user with the correct determination of intron-exon borders and splice sites, showing an improved prediction accuracy compared to BLAT and Exonerate. Apart from being able to find genes in the

  14. Isolation of the Male-Specific Transformer Exon as a Method for Immature Specimen Sex Identification in Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J L; Wells, J D

    2017-03-01

    Being able to efficiently differentiate between male and female individuals in the immature forms of insects allows for investigations into sexually dimorphic patterns of growth rates and gene expression. For species lacking sex-specific morphological characteristics during these periods, alternative methods must be devised. Commonly, isolation of sex determination genes reveals sex-specific band patterns and allows for markers that can be used in insect control. For blow flies, a family that includes flies of medical and forensic importance, sex has previously been identified in some members using the male-specific exon in the transformer gene. This gene is relatively conserved between members of the genera Cochliomyia and Lucilia (Diptera: Calliphoridae), and we isolated a portion of this gene in an additional forensically and medically important blow fly genus using the widespread Chrysomya megacephala (F.). We found a relatively high level of conservation between exons 1 and 2 of transformer and were able to amplify a region containing the male-specific exon in C. megacephala. A sex-specific molecular diagnostic test based on the presence of sexually dimorphic PCR product bands showed the expected genotype for adults and intrapuparial period specimens of known sex. The same result could be obtained from single third-instar larval specimens, opening up the possibility to not only determine if development rates are sex dependent, but also to investigate the development of sexually dimorphic traits of interest in C. megacephala. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Differential roles for MBD2 and MBD3 at methylated CpG islands, active promoters and binding to exon sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Katharina; Rust, Mareike; Leers, Joerg; Boettger, Thomas; Scharfe, Maren; Jarek, Michael; Bartkuhn, Marek; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    The heterogeneous collection of nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation (NuRD) complexes can be grouped into the MBD2- or MBD3-containing complexes MBD2-NuRD and MBD3-NuRD. MBD2 is known to bind to methylated CpG sequences in vitro in contrast to MBD3. Although functional differences have been described, a direct comparison of MBD2 and MBD3 in respect to genome-wide binding and function has been lacking. Here, we show that MBD2-NuRD, in contrast to MBD3-NuRD, converts open chromatin with euchromatic histone modifications into tightly compacted chromatin with repressive histone marks. Genome-wide, a strong enrichment for MBD2 at methylated CpG sequences is found, whereas CpGs bound by MBD3 are devoid of methylation. MBD2-bound genes are generally lower expressed as compared with MBD3-bound genes. When depleting cells for MBD2, the MBD2-bound genes increase their activity, whereas MBD2 plus MBD3-bound genes reduce their activity. Most strikingly, MBD3 is enriched at active promoters, whereas MBD2 is bound at methylated promoters and enriched at exon sequences of active genes.

  16. Splicing of designer exons informs a biophysical model for exon definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Mauricio A; Lubkin, Ashira; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2015-02-01

    Pre-mRNA molecules in humans contain mostly short internal exons flanked by longer introns. To explain the removal of such introns, exon recognition instead of intron recognition has been proposed. We studied this exon definition using designer exons (DEs) made up of three prototype modules of our own design: an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), an exonic splicing silencer (ESS), and a Reference Sequence (R) predicted to be neither. Each DE was examined as the central exon in a three-exon minigene. DEs made of R modules showed a sharp size dependence, with exons shorter than 14 nt and longer than 174 nt splicing poorly. Changing the strengths of the splice sites improved longer exon splicing but worsened shorter exon splicing, effectively displacing the curve to the right. For the ESE we found, unexpectedly, that its enhancement efficiency was independent of its position within the exon. For the ESS we found a step-wise positional increase in its effects; it was most effective at the 3' end of the exon. To apply these results quantitatively, we developed a biophysical model for exon definition of internal exons undergoing cotranscriptional splicing. This model features commitment to inclusion before the downstream exon is synthesized and competition between skipping and inclusion fates afterward. Collision of both exon ends to form an exon definition complex was incorporated to account for the effect of size; ESE/ESS effects were modeled on the basis of stabilization/destabilization. This model accurately predicted the outcome of independent experiments on more complex DEs that combined ESEs and ESSs. © 2015 Arias et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. Generation of physical map contig-specific sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang eJiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances of the next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed whole genome sequencing of many species. However, with the current sequencing technologies, the whole genome sequence assemblies often fall in short in one of the four quality measurements: accuracy, contiguity, connectivity, and completeness. In particular, small-sized contigs and scaffolds limit the applicability of whole genome sequences for genetic analysis. To enhance the quality of whole genome sequence assemblies, particularly the scaffolding capabilities, additional genomic resources are required. Among these, sequences derived from known physical locations offer great powers for scaffolding. In this mini-review, we will describe the principles, procedures and applications of physical-map-derived sequences, with the focus on physical map contig-specific sequences.

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic acids...

  19. Naturally occuring nucleosome positioning signals in human exons and introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1996-01-01

    We describe the structural implications of a periodic pattern found in human exons and introns by hidden Markov models. We show that exons (besides the reading frame) have a specific sequential structure in the form of a pattern with triplet consensus non-T(A/T)G, and a minimal periodicity...... faces inward and is compressed. The in-phase triplets are located adjacent to GCC/GGC triplets known to have the strongest bias in their positioning on the nucleosome. Analysis of mRNA sequences encoding proteins with known tertiary structure exclude the possibility that the pattern is a consequence...

  20. ASPIC: a novel method to predict the exon-intron structure of a gene that is optimally compatible to a set of transcript sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesole Graziano

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Currently available methods to predict splice sites are mainly based on the independent and progressive alignment of transcript data (mostly ESTs to the genomic sequence. Apart from often being computationally expensive, this approach is vulnerable to several problems – hence the need to develop novel strategies. Results: We propose a method, based on a novel multiple genome-EST alignment algorithm, for the detection of splice sites. To avoid limitations of splice sites prediction (mainly, over-predictions due to independent single EST alignments to the genomic sequence our approach performs a multiple alignment of transcript data to the genomic sequence based on the combined analysis of all available data. We recast the problem of predicting constitutive and alternative splicing as an optimization problem, where the optimal multiple transcript alignment minimizes the number of exons and hence of splice site observations. We have implemented a splice site predictor based on this algorithm in the software tool ASPIC (Alternative Splicing PredICtion. It is distinguished from other methods based on BLAST-like tools by the incorporation of entirely new ad hoc procedures for accurate and computationally efficient transcript alignment and adopts dynamic programming for the refinement of intron boundaries. ASPIC also provides the minimal set of non-mergeable transcript isoforms compatible with the detected splicing events. The ASPIC web resource is dynamically interconnected with the Ensembl and Unigene databases and also implements an upload facility. Conclusion: Extensive bench marking shows that ASPIC outperforms other existing methods in the detection of novel splicing isoforms and in the minimization of over-predictions. ASPIC also requires a lower computation time for processing a single gene and an EST cluster. The ASPIC web resource is available at http://aspic.algo.disco.unimib.it/aspic-devel/.

  1. The identification of exons from the MED/PSACH region of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Quan-Yi; Brook, J.D. [Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Lennon, G.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    We have used exon amplification to identify putative transcribed sequences from an 823-kb contig consisting of 28 cosmids that form a minimum tiling path from the interval 19p12-p13.1. This region contains the genes responsible for multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). We have trapped 66 exons (an average of 2.4 exons per cosmid) from pools of 2 or 3 cosmids. The majority of exons (51.5%) show only weak similarity or no similarity (36.3%) to sequences in current databases. Six of 8 exons examined from these groups, however, show cross-species sequence conservation, indicating that many of them probably represent authentic exons. Eight exons show identity or significant similarity to ESTs or known genes, including the human TNF receptor 3{prime}-flanking region gene, human epoxide hydrolase (EPHX), human growth/differentiation factor (GOF-1), human myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2, the rat neurocan gene, and the human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene (COMP). Mutations in this latter gene have recently been shown to be responsible for MED and PSACH. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang I; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Haerty, Wilfried; Ponting, Chris P

    2015-01-01

    Ninety-four percent of mammalian protein-coding exons exceed 51 nucleotides (nt) in length. The paucity of micro-exons (≤ 51 nt) suggests that their recognition and correct processing by the splicing machinery present greater challenges than for longer exons. Yet, because thousands of human genes harbor processed micro-exons, specialized mechanisms may be in place to promote their splicing. Here, we survey deep genomic data sets to define 13,085 micro-exons and to study their splicing mechanisms and molecular functions. More than 60% of annotated human micro-exons exhibit a high level of sequence conservation, an indicator of functionality. While most human micro-exons require splicing-enhancing genomic features to be processed, the splicing of hundreds of micro-exons is enhanced by the adjacent binding of splice factors in the introns of pre-messenger RNAs. Notably, splicing of a significant number of micro-exons was found to be facilitated by the binding of RBFOX proteins, which promote their inclusion in the brain, muscle, and heart. Our analyses suggest that accurate regulation of micro-exon inclusion by RBFOX proteins and PTBP1 plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue-specific protein-protein interactions. © 2015 Li et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Reduced-stringency DNA reassociation: sequence specific duplex formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Burr, H E; Schimke, R T

    1982-01-01

    Reduced-stringency DNA reassociation conditions allow low stability duplexes to be detected in prokaryotic, plant, fish, avian, mammalian, and primate genomes. Highly diverged families of sequences can be detected in avian, mouse, and human unique sequence dNAs. Such a family has been described among twelve species of birds; based on species specific melting profiles and fractionation of sequences belonging to this family, it was concluded that permissive reassociation conditions did not arti...

  4. ExonMiner: Web service for analysis of GeneChip Exon array data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imoto Seiya

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some splicing isoform-specific transcriptional regulations are related to disease. Therefore, detection of disease specific splice variations is the first step for finding disease specific transcriptional regulations. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array can measure exon-level expression profiles that are suitable to find differentially expressed exons in genome-wide scale. However, exon array produces massive datasets that are more than we can handle and analyze on personal computer. Results We have developed ExonMiner that is the first all-in-one web service for analysis of exon array data to detect transcripts that have significantly different splicing patterns in two cells, e.g. normal and cancer cells. ExonMiner can perform the following analyses: (1 data normalization, (2 statistical analysis based on two-way ANOVA, (3 finding transcripts with significantly different splice patterns, (4 efficient visualization based on heatmaps and barplots, and (5 meta-analysis to detect exon level biomarkers. We implemented ExonMiner on a supercomputer system in order to perform genome-wide analysis for more than 300,000 transcripts in exon array data, which has the potential to reveal the aberrant splice variations in cancer cells as exon level biomarkers. Conclusion ExonMiner is well suited for analysis of exon array data and does not require any installation of software except for internet browsers. What all users need to do is to access the ExonMiner URL http://ae.hgc.jp/exonminer. Users can analyze full dataset of exon array data within hours by high-level statistical analysis with sound theoretical basis that finds aberrant splice variants as biomarkers.

  5. Design of sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervan, P B

    1986-04-25

    Base sequence information can be stored in the local structure of right-handed double-helical DNA (B-DNA). The question arises as to whether a set of rules for the three-dimensional readout of the B-DNA helix can be developed. This would allow the design of synthetic molecules that bind DNA of any specific sequence and site size. There are four stages of development for each new synthetic sequence-specific DNA-binding molecule: design, synthesis, testing for sequence specificity, and reevaluation of the design. This approach has produced bis(distamycin)fumaramide, a synthetic, crescent-shaped oligopeptide that binds nine contiguous adenine-thymine base pairs in the minor groove of double-helical DNA.

  6. Retinal degeneration slow (rds) in mouse results from simple insertion of a t haplotype-specific element into protein-coding exon II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Norton, J.C.; Allen, A.C.; Burns, J.L.; Travis, G.H. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-20

    Retinal degeneration slow (rds) is a semidominant mutation of mice that causes dysplasia and degeneration of rod and cone photoreceptors. Mutations in RDS, the human ortholog of the rds gene, are responsible for several inherited retinal dystrophies including a subset of retinitis pigmentosa. The normal rds locus encodes rds/peripherin, an integral membrane glycoprotein present in outer segment discs. Genomic libraries form wildtype and rds/rds mice were screened with an rds cDNA, and phage {lambda} clones that span the normal and mutant loci were mapped. We show that in mice, rds is caused by the insertion into exon II of a 9.2-kb repetitive genomic element that is very similar to the t haplotype-specific element in the H-2 complex. The entire element is included in the RNA products of the mutant locus. We present evidence that rds in mice represents a null allele. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Predicting tissue-specific expressions based on sequence characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Paik, Hyojung

    2011-04-30

    In multicellular organisms, including humans, understanding expression specificity at the tissue level is essential for interpreting protein function, such as tissue differentiation. We developed a prediction approach via generated sequence features from overrepresented patterns in housekeeping (HK) and tissue-specific (TS) genes to classify TS expression in humans. Using TS domains and transcriptional factor binding sites (TFBSs), sequence characteristics were used as indices of expressed tissues in a Random Forest algorithm by scoring exclusive patterns considering the biological intuition; TFBSs regulate gene expression, and the domains reflect the functional specificity of a TS gene. Our proposed approach displayed better performance than previous attempts and was validated using computational and experimental methods.

  8. The DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin cleavage in a systematically altered DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Shweta D; Chen, Jon K; Murray, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    Bleomycin is an anti-tumour agent that is clinically used to treat several types of cancers. Bleomycin cleaves DNA at specific DNA sequences and recent genome-wide DNA sequencing specificity data indicated that the sequence 5'-RTGT*AY (where T* is the site of bleomycin cleavage, R is G/A and Y is T/C) is preferentially cleaved by bleomycin in human cells. Based on this DNA sequence, we constructed a plasmid clone to explore this bleomycin cleavage preference. By systematic variation of single nucleotides in the 5'-RTGT*AY sequence, we were able to investigate the effect of nucleotide changes on bleomycin cleavage efficiency. We observed that the preferred consensus DNA sequence for bleomycin cleavage in the plasmid clone was 5'-YYGT*AW (where W is A/T). The most highly cleaved sequence was 5'-TCGT*AT and, in fact, the seven most highly cleaved sequences conformed to the consensus sequence 5'-YYGT*AW. A comparison with genome-wide results was also performed and while the core sequence was similar in both environments, the surrounding nucleotides were different.

  9. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  10. Modality-specific organization in the representation of sensorimotor sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud eBoutin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor representations of movement sequences are hierarchically organized. Here we test the effects of different stimulus modalities on such organizations. In the visual group, participants responded to a repeated sequence of visually presented stimuli by depressing spatially compatible keys on a response pad. In the auditory group, learners were required to respond to auditorily presented stimuli, which had no direct spatial correspondence with the response keys: the lowest pitch corresponded to the leftmost key and the highest pitch to the rightmost key. We demonstrate that hierarchically and auto-organised sensorimotor representations are developed through practice, which are specific both to individuals and stimulus modalities. These findings highlight the dynamic and sensory-specific modulation of chunk processing during sensorimotor learning – sensorimotor chunking – and provide evidence that modality-specific mechanisms underlie the hierarchical organization of sequence representations.

  11. Modality-specific organization in the representation of sensorimotor sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Arnaud; Massen, Cristina; Heuer, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Sensorimotor representations of movement sequences are hierarchically organized. Here we test the effects of different stimulus modalities on such organizations. In the visual group, participants responded to a repeated sequence of visually presented stimuli by depressing spatially compatible keys on a response pad. In the auditory group, learners were required to respond to auditorily presented stimuli, which had no direct spatial correspondence with the response keys: the lowest pitch corresponded to the leftmost key and the highest pitch to the rightmost key. We demonstrate that hierarchically and auto-organized sensorimotor representations are developed through practice, which are specific both to individuals and stimulus modalities. These findings highlight the dynamic and sensory-specific modulation of chunk processing during sensorimotor learning – sensorimotor chunking – and provide evidence that modality-specific mechanisms underlie the hierarchical organization of sequence representations. PMID:24376432

  12. Complete amino acid sequence of the human alpha 5 (IV) collagen chain and identification of a single-base mutation in exon 23 converting glycine 521 in the collagenous domain to cysteine in an Alport syndrome patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Hertz, Jens Michael; Leinonen, A

    1992-01-01

    We have generated and characterized cDNA clones providing the complete amino acid sequence of the human type IV collagen chain whose gene has been shown to be mutated in X chromosome-linked Alport syndrome. The entire translation product has 1,685 amino acid residues. There is a 26-residue signal...... alleles. The mutation which was located to exon 23 was sequenced from a polymerase chain reaction-amplified product, and shown to be a G----T change in the coding strand. The mutation changed the GGT codon of glycine 521 to cysteine. The same mutation was found in one allele of the female cousin...

  13. Factor IX[sub Madrid 2]: A deletion/insertion in Facotr IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solera, J. (Unidades de Genetica Molecular, Madrid (Spain)); Magallon, M.; Martin-Villar, J. (Hemofilia Hospital, Madrid (Spain)); Coloma, A. (Departamento deBioquimica de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5[prime] end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3[prime] end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of human-specific SVAF₁ retrotransposons by cis-regulatory MAST2 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotneva, Anastasia A; Bantysh, Olga; Suntsova, Maria V; Efimova, Nadezhda; Malakhova, Galina V; Schumann, Gerald G; Gayfullin, Nurshat M; Buzdin, Anton A

    2012-08-15

    SVA elements represent the youngest family of hominid non-LTR retrotransposons. Recently, a human-specific subfamily (termed SVA(F1), CpG-SVA, or MAST2-SVA) was discovered representing fusion of the CpG island-containing exon 1 of the MAST2 gene and a 5'-truncated SVA. SVA(F1) includes at least 84 members, which suggests exceptionally high retrotransposition level. We investigated if the acquirement of the MAST2 CpG-island might play a role in the success of the SVA(F1) subfamily. We observed that in 16 samples representing seven human tissues, MAST2 was cotranscribed with the members of the SVA(F1) subfamily, but not with other retrotransposons. We found that the methylation status of the MAST2-derived sequences of SVA(F1) elements reversely correlates with the transcriptional activity of MAST2. The MAST2 sequence at the 5' end of SVA(F1) acts as a positive transcriptional regulator in human germ cells. Finally, in various testicular tissue samples we uncovered a transcriptional correlation of MAST2 with the human L1, Alu and SVA retrotransposons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tracking the evolution of alternatively spliced exons within the Dscam family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vision Todd J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dscam gene in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, contains twenty-four exons, four of which are composed of tandem arrays that each undergo mutually exclusive alternative splicing (4, 6, 9 and 17, potentially generating 38,016 protein isoforms. This degree of transcript diversity has not been found in mammalian homologs of Dscam. We examined the molecular evolution of exons within this gene family to locate the point of divergence for this alternative splicing pattern. Results Using the fruit fly Dscam exons 4, 6, 9 and 17 as seed sequences, we iteratively searched sixteen genomes for homologs, and then performed phylogenetic analyses of the resulting sequences to examine their evolutionary history. We found homologs in the nematode, arthropod and vertebrate genomes, including homologs in several vertebrates where Dscam had not been previously annotated. Among these, only the arthropods contain homologs arranged in tandem arrays indicative of mutually exclusive splicing. We found no homologs to these exons within the Arabidopsis, yeast, tunicate or sea urchin genomes but homologs to several constitutive exons from fly Dscam were present within tunicate and sea urchin. Comparing the rate of turnover within the tandem arrays of the insect taxa (fruit fly, mosquito and honeybee, we found the variants within exons 4 and 17 are well conserved in number and spatial arrangement despite 248–283 million years of divergence. In contrast, the variants within exons 6 and 9 have undergone considerable turnover since these taxa diverged, as indicated by deeply branching taxon-specific lineages. Conclusion Our results suggest that at least one Dscam exon array may be an ancient duplication that predates the divergence of deuterostomes from protostomes but that there is no evidence for the presence of arrays in the common ancestor of vertebrates. The different patterns of conservation and turnover among the Dscam exon arrays

  16. Differential transcription of exon 1 of the human c-fms gene in placental trophoblasts and monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvader, J.; Verma, I.M. (Salk Inst. for Biological Studies, San Diego, CA (USA))

    1989-03-01

    Structural analysis of the 5' end of the human c-fms gene revealed that a large intron of about 25 kilobases separates an upstream noncoding exon (exon 1) from the signal peptide-containing exon (exon 2). Northern (RNA) blot analysis, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extensions showed that exon 1 is transcribed in placenta but not in cells of the monocytic lineage. This is due to the differential usage or promoters, separated by approximately 25 kilobases, in cell-specific manner. One major c-fms transcript was observed in U-937 cells, whereas multiple initiation sites for transcription appeared to be utilized in placental cells. Nucleotide sequence comparisons showed that the 3' end of the human platelet-derived growth factor receptor gene lies approximately 350 base pairs upstream of the major initiation sites for c-fms transcription in placental trophoblasts.

  17. Differential transcription of exon 1 of the human c-fms gene in placental trophoblasts and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvader, J; Verma, I M

    1989-01-01

    Structural analysis of the 5' end of the human c-fms gene revealed that a large intron of about 25 kilobases separates an upstream noncoding exon (exon 1) from the signal peptide-containing exon (exon 2). Northern (RNA) blot analysis, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extensions showed that exon 1 is transcribed in placenta but not in cells of the monocytic lineage. This is due to the differential usage of promoters, separated by approximately 25 kilobases, in a cell-specific manner. One major c-fms transcript was observed in U-937 cells, whereas multiple initiation sites for transcription appeared to be utilized in placental cells. Nucleotide sequence comparisons showed that the 3' end of the human platelet-derived growth factor receptor gene lies approximately 350 base pairs upstream of the major initiation sites for c-fms transcription in placental trophoblasts. Images PMID:2524648

  18. Concordant genetic distinctness of the phylogroup of the Siberian chipmunk from the Korean peninsula (Tamias sibiricus barberi), reexamined with nuclear DNA c-myc gene exon 2 and mtDNA control region sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hung Sun; Zhang, Minghai; Bayarlkhagva, Damdingiin; Ham, Eui Jeong; Kim, Jin Seong; Jang, Kyung Hee; Park, Nam Jeong

    2010-08-01

    We reexamined Tamias sibiricus barberi from Korea by sequencing c-myc exon 2 and the mtDNA control region. In the c-myc exon, the monogenic T. s. barberi differed from the monogenic T. s. orientalis (nucleotide distance 0.48%; 3 variable sites at 168, 306, and 552), whereas T. s. orientalis was identical to T. s. sibiricus. In the control region, T. s. barberi differed from T. s. orientalis (distance 6.84%) and T. s. sibiricus (9.35%). We considered the concordant, extensive gaps between the phylogroup of T. s. barberi and other subspecies of T. sibiricus in the c-myc gene, control region, and cytochrome b gene to be evidence of a lack of intergradation through North Korea from T. s. barberi to T. s. orientalis. Our results, showing the genetic and morphological distinctness of T. s. barberi, support that this phylogroup is a distinct species.

  19. Procedural learning in specific language impairment: effects of sequence complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Audrey; Maillart, Christelle; Stefaniak, Nicolas; Lejeune, Caroline; Desmottes, Lise; Meulemans, Thierry

    2013-03-01

    According to the procedural deficit hypothesis (PDH), abnormal development in the procedural memory system could account for the language deficits observed in specific language impairment (SLI). Recent studies have supported this hypothesis by using a serial reaction time (SRT) task, during which a slower learning rate is observed in children with SLI compared to controls. Recently, we obtained contrasting results, demonstrating that children with SLI were able to learn a sequence as quickly and as accurately as controls. These discrepancies could be related to differences in the statistical structure of the SRT sequence between these studies. The aim of this study was to further assess, in a group of 21 children with SLI, the PDH with second-order conditional sequences, which are more difficult to learn than those used in previous studies. Our results show that children with SLI had impaired procedural memory, as evidenced by both longer reaction times and no sign of sequence-specific learning in comparison with typically developing controls. These results are consistent with the PDH proposed by Ullman and Pierpont (2005) and suggest that procedural sequence-learning in SLI children depends on the complexity of the to-be-learned sequence.

  20. Variations in CCL3L gene cluster sequence and non-specific gene copy numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edberg Jeffrey C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variations (CNVs of the gene CC chemokine ligand 3-like1 (CCL3L1 have been implicated in HIV-1 susceptibility, but the association has been inconsistent. CCL3L1 shares homology with a cluster of genes localized to chromosome 17q12, namely CCL3, CCL3L2, and, CCL3L3. These genes are involved in host defense and inflammatory processes. Several CNV assays have been developed for the CCL3L1 gene. Findings Through pairwise and multiple alignments of these genes, we have shown that the homology between these genes ranges from 50% to 99% in complete gene sequences and from 70-100% in the exonic regions, with CCL3L1 and CCL3L3 being identical. By use of MEGA 4 and BioEdit, we aligned sense primers, anti-sense primers, and probes used in several previously described assays against pre-multiple alignments of all four chemokine genes. Each set of probes and primers aligned and matched with overlapping sequences in at least two of the four genes, indicating that previously utilized RT-PCR based CNV assays are not specific for only CCL3L1. The four available assays measured median copies of 2 and 3-4 in European and African American, respectively. The concordance between the assays ranged from 0.44-0.83 suggesting individual discordant calls and inconsistencies with the assays from the expected gene coverage from the known sequence. Conclusions This indicates that some of the inconsistencies in the association studies could be due to assays that provide heterogenous results. Sequence information to determine CNV of the three genes separately would allow to test whether their association with the pathogenesis of a human disease or phenotype is affected by an individual gene or by a combination of these genes.

  1. Language-specific listening : the case of phonetic sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, A.C.

    2001-01-01

    The research reported in this thesis focuses on the processing of phonetic sequences in both native and non-native spoken language. For the recognition of spoken words adult listeners have learned early in life to make use of phonological regularities that are specific to their native language. But

  2. PNA-mediated modulation and redirection of Her-2 pre-mRNA splicing: specific skipping of erbB-2 exon 19 coding for the ATP catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Birgit N; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2010-01-01

    interference as a means of manipulating erbB-2 expression in a therapeutically relevant fashion, we have studied the effect on mRNA splicing of a series of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers targeting specific intron-exon junctions in the erbB-2 pre-mRNA. In particular, we are interested in identifying PNA...

  3. Complexity of a small non-protein coding sequence in chromosomal region 22q11.2: presence of specialized DNA secondary structures and RNA exon/intron motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delihas, Nicholas

    2015-10-14

    DiGeorge Syndrome is a genetic abnormality involving ~3 Mb deletion in human chromosome 22, termed 22q.11.2. To better understand the non-coding regions of 22q.11.2, a small 10,000 bp non-protein-coding sequence close to the DiGeorge Critical Region 6 gene (DGCR6) was chosen for analysis and functional entities as the homologous sequence in the chimpanzee genome could be aligned and used for comparisons. The GenBank database provided genomic sequences. In silico computer programs were used to find homologous DNA sequences in human and chimpanzee genomes, generate random sequences, determine DNA sequence alignments, sequence comparisons and nucleotide repeat copies, and to predicted DNA secondary structures. At its 5' half, the 10,000 bp sequence has three distinct sections that represent phylogenetically variable sequences. These Variable Regions contain biased mutations with a very high A + T content, multiple copies of the motif TATAATATA and sequences that fold into long A:T-base-paired stem loops. The 3' half of the 10,000 bp unit, highly conserved between human and chimpanzee, has sequences representing exons of lncRNA genes and segments of introns of protein genes. Central to the 10,000 bp unit are the multiple copies of a sequence that originates from the flanking 5' end of the translocation breakpoint Type A sequence. This breakpoint flanking sequence carries the exon and intron motifs. The breakpoint Type A sequence seems to be a major player in the proliferation of these RNA motifs, as well as the proliferation of Variable Regions in the 10,000 bp segment and other regions within 22q.11.2. The data indicate that a non-coding region of the chromosome may be reserved for highly biased mutations that lead to formation of specialized sequences and DNA secondary structures. On the other hand, the highly conserved nucleotide sequence of the non-coding region may form storage sites for RNA motifs.

  4. Investigation of biochemical changes of the ovine calpain 3 exon-10 polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Yukiyo; Morton, Jim; Palmer, David

    2015-12-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3) is a tissue specific calpain, and its mRNA is the most expressed calpain isoform in skeletal muscles. Many mutations and polymorphisms within the human CAPN3 gene have been reported and related to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Several reports link CAPN3 polymorphisms and meat quality. An association between three allele variants in exon-10 of ovine CAPN3 and the yield of fat trimmed meat cuts has been reported. This research investigated the biochemical significance of polymorphic variation in CAPN3. CAPN3 mRNA sequences were obtained from muscle samples collected from lambs which were homozygous for each of the three alleles. Four single base substitutions were found besides those in exon-10, but none of them, including the variations within exon-10, caused a change in amino acid sequence. The expression of CAPN3 mRNA and the amounts of CAPN3 protein were also compared among genotypes, and no significant differences were found. These results suggest that the reported association of specific allele variants within CAPN3 exon-10 to phenotype variations were not direct effects of CAPN3 polymorphisms. Interspecies analyses of the CAPN3 sequences indicated that the sequence reported here is more likely to be the correct common ovine CAPN3 sequence than the reference sequence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Correct immunoglobulin alpha mRNA processing depends on specific sequence in the C alpha 3-alpha M intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, J H; Lebman, D A

    2000-04-01

    The maturation of IgM-expressing B cells to IgM-secreting plasma cells is associated with both an increase in mu mRNA and the ratio of secreted to membrane forms of mu mRNA which differ at the 3' termini. In contrast, both in vitro and in vivo the secreted form of alpha mRNA is predominant at all stages in the development of a secretory IgA response. Previous studies demonstrated that preferential usage of the alpha s poly(A) site does not result from transcription termination and is independent of either the poly(A) sites or the 3' splice site associated with the exon encoding the membrane exon of IgA (alpha M). The present study demonstrates that a 349-bp region located 774 bp 3' to the alpha s poly(A) site is required for the preferential usage of the alpha s terminus. This region, which is the first isotype-specific cis-acting regulatory sequence not immediately adjacent to a secretory poly(A) site to be identified, contains regulatory elements that increase the efficiency of polyadenylation/cleavage. A ubiquitous, approximately 58-kDa RNA-binding protein interacts specifically with this regulatory region. These studies support the premise that cis-acting elements unique to each CH gene can impinge upon a common mechanism regulating Ig mRNA processing.

  6. Endonuclease specificity and sequence dependence of type IIS restriction enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverker Lundin

    Full Text Available Restriction enzymes that recognize specific sequences but cleave unknown sequence outside the recognition site are extensively utilized tools in molecular biology. Despite this, systematic functional categorization of cleavage performance has largely been lacking. We established a simple and automatable model system to assay cleavage distance variation (termed slippage and the sequence dependence thereof. We coupled this to massively parallel sequencing in order to provide sensitive and accurate measurement. With this system 14 enzymes were assayed (AcuI, BbvI, BpmI, BpuEI, BseRI, BsgI, Eco57I, Eco57MI, EcoP15I, FauI, FokI, GsuI, MmeI and SmuI. We report significant variation of slippage ranging from 1-54%, variations in sequence context dependence, as well as variation between isoschizomers. We believe this largely overlooked property of enzymes with shifted cleavage would benefit from further large scale classification and engineering efforts seeking to improve performance. The gained insights of in-vitro performance may also aid the in-vivo understanding of these enzymes.

  7. Endonuclease specificity and sequence dependence of type IIS restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Sverker; Jemt, Anders; Terje-Hegge, Finn; Foam, Napoleon; Pettersson, Erik; Käller, Max; Wirta, Valtteri; Lexow, Preben; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2015-01-01

    Restriction enzymes that recognize specific sequences but cleave unknown sequence outside the recognition site are extensively utilized tools in molecular biology. Despite this, systematic functional categorization of cleavage performance has largely been lacking. We established a simple and automatable model system to assay cleavage distance variation (termed slippage) and the sequence dependence thereof. We coupled this to massively parallel sequencing in order to provide sensitive and accurate measurement. With this system 14 enzymes were assayed (AcuI, BbvI, BpmI, BpuEI, BseRI, BsgI, Eco57I, Eco57MI, EcoP15I, FauI, FokI, GsuI, MmeI and SmuI). We report significant variation of slippage ranging from 1-54%, variations in sequence context dependence, as well as variation between isoschizomers. We believe this largely overlooked property of enzymes with shifted cleavage would benefit from further large scale classification and engineering efforts seeking to improve performance. The gained insights of in-vitro performance may also aid the in-vivo understanding of these enzymes.

  8. The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, D; Garrity, G; Gray, T

    2008-01-01

    the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources...... that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the 'transparency' of the information contained in existing genomic databases....

  9. Sequence signatures involved in targeting the male-specific lethal complex to X-chromosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Philge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage-compensation system that equalizes X-linked gene expression between males and females, thereby assuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between the expression of genes on the X chromosome(s and the autosomes, is at least partially mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL complex. This complex binds to genes with a preference for exons on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias, and it targets most expressed genes on the X chromosome. However, a number of genes are expressed but not targeted by the complex. High affinity sites seem to be responsible for initial recruitment of the complex to the X chromosome, but the targeting to and within individual genes is poorly understood. Results We have extensively examined X chromosome sequence variation within five types of gene features (promoters, 5' UTRs, coding sequences, introns, 3' UTRs and intergenic sequences, and assessed its potential involvement in dosage compensation. Presented results show that: the X chromosome has a distinct sequence composition within its gene features; some of the detected variation correlates with genes targeted by the MSL-complex; the insulator protein BEAF-32 preferentially binds upstream of MSL-bound genes; BEAF-32 and MOF co-localizes in promoters; and that bound genes have a distinct sequence composition that shows a 3' bias within coding sequence. Conclusions Although, many strongly bound genes are close to a high affinity site neither our promoter motif nor our coding sequence signatures show any correlation to HAS. Based on the results presented here, we believe that there are sequences in the promoters and coding sequences of targeted genes that have the potential to direct the secondary spreading of the MSL-complex to nearby genes.

  10. Selective Knockdowns in Maize by Sequence-Specific Protein Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Camilla; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Russinova, Eugenia

    2018-01-01

    Protein aggregation is determined by 5-15 amino acids peptides of the target protein sequence, so-called aggregation-prone regions (APRs) that specifically self-associate to form β-structured inclusions. The presence of APRs in a target protein can be predicted by a dedicated algorithm, such as TANGO. Synthetic aggregation-prone proteins are designed by expressing specific APRs fused to a fluorescent carrier for stability and visualization. Previously, the stable expression of these proteins in Zea mays (maize) has been demonstrated to induce aggregation of target proteins with specific localization, such as the starch-degrading enzyme α-glucan water dikinase, giving rise to plants displaying knockdown phenotypes. Here, we describe how to design synthetic aggregation-prone proteins to harness the sequence specificity of APRs to generate aggregation-associated phenotypes in a targeted manner and in different subcellular compartments. This method points toward the application of induced targeted aggregation as a useful tool to knock down protein functions in maize and to generate crops with improved traits.

  11. Accurate clinical detection of exon copy number variants in a targeted NGS panel using DECoN [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Fowler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS panels are increasingly being used in clinical genomics to increase capacity, throughput and affordability of gene testing. Identifying whole exon deletions or duplications (termed exon copy number variants, ‘exon CNVs’ in exon-targeted NGS panels has proved challenging, particularly for single exon CNVs.  Methods: We developed a tool for the Detection of Exon Copy Number variants (DECoN, which is optimised for analysis of exon-targeted NGS panels in the clinical setting. We evaluated DECoN performance using 96 samples with independently validated exon CNV data. We performed simulations to evaluate DECoN detection performance of single exon CNVs and to evaluate performance using different coverage levels and sample numbers. Finally, we implemented DECoN in a clinical laboratory that tests BRCA1 and BRCA2 with the TruSight Cancer Panel (TSCP. We used DECoN to analyse 1,919 samples, validating exon CNV detections by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA.  Results: In the evaluation set, DECoN achieved 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity for BRCA exon CNVs, including identification of 8 single exon CNVs. DECoN also identified 14/15 exon CNVs in 8 other genes. Simulations of all possible BRCA single exon CNVs gave a mean sensitivity of 98% for deletions and 95% for duplications. DECoN performance remained excellent with different levels of coverage and sample numbers; sensitivity and specificity was >98% with the typical NGS run parameters. In the clinical pipeline, DECoN automatically analyses pools of 48 samples at a time, taking 24 minutes per pool, on average. DECoN detected 24 BRCA exon CNVs, of which 23 were confirmed by MLPA, giving a false discovery rate of 4%. Specificity was 99.7%.  Conclusions: DECoN is a fast, accurate, exon CNV detection tool readily implementable in research and clinical NGS pipelines. It has high sensitivity and specificity and acceptable

  12. Use of fluorescent sequence-specific polyamides to discriminate human chromosomes by microscopy and flow cytometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gygi, Melanie P; Ferguson, Mark D; Mefford, Heather C; Lund, Kevin P; O'Day, Christine; Zhou, Peiwen; Friedman, Cynthia; van den Engh, Ger; Stolowitz, Mark L; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-01-01

    .... Polyamides bind to the minor groove of DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Unlike conventional sequence-specific DNA or RNA probes, polyamides can recognize their target sequence without the need to subject chromosomes to harsh denaturing conditions...

  13. Periodicity of DNA in exons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinghorn Brian

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The periodic pattern of DNA in exons is a known phenomenon. It was suggested that one of the initial causes of periodicity could be the universal (RNYnpattern (R = A or G, Y = C or U, N = any base of ancient RNA. Two major questions were addressed in this paper. Firstly, the cause of DNA periodicity, which was investigated by comparisons between real and simulated coding sequences. Secondly, quantification of DNA periodicity was made using an evolutionary algorithm, which was not previously used for such purposes. Results We have shown that simulated coding sequences, which were composed using codon usage frequencies only, demonstrate DNA periodicity very similar to the observed in real exons. It was also found that DNA periodicity disappears in the simulated sequences, when the frequencies of codons become equal. Frequencies of the nucleotides (and the dinucleotide AG at each location along phase 0 exons were calculated for C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens. Two models were used to fit these data, with the key objective of describing periodicity. Both of the models showed that the best-fit curves closely matched the actual data points. The first dynamic period determination model consistently generated a value, which was very close to the period equal to 3 nucleotides. The second fixed period model, as expected, kept the period exactly equal to 3 and did not detract from its goodness of fit. Conclusions Conclusion can be drawn that DNA periodicity in exons is determined by codon usage frequencies. It is essential to differentiate between DNA periodicity itself, and the length of the period equal to 3. Periodicity itself is a result of certain combinations of codons with different frequencies typical for a species. The length of period equal to 3, instead, is caused by the triplet nature of genetic code. The models and evolutionary algorithm used for characterising DNA periodicity are proven to be an effective tool

  14. Sequence-Specific Procedural Learning Deficits in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the procedural deficit hypothesis of specific language impairment (SLI) by comparing children's performance in two motor procedural learning tasks and an implicit verbal sequence learning task. Participants were 7- to 11-year-old children with SLI (n = 48), typically developing age-matched children (n = 20) and younger…

  15. Sequence-specific and domain-specific DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Y; Bates, S; Pfeifer, G P

    1997-08-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells have specific DNA repair defects. We had previously analyzed repair rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers at nucleotide resolution along the human JUN gene in normal fibroblasts and found very efficient repair of sequences near the transcription initiation site but slow repair along the promoter. To investigate sequence-specific repair rate patterns in XP and CS cells, we conducted a similar analysis in XPA, XPB, XPC, XPD, and CSB fibroblasts. XPA cells were almost completely repair-deficient at all sequences analyzed. XPC cells repaired only the transcribed DNA strand beginning at position -20 relative to the transcription start site. Both XBP and XPD cells were deficient in repair of nontranscribed DNA and also very inefficiently repaired the transcribed strand including sequences near the transcription start site. CSB cells exhibited rapid repair near the transcription initiation site but were deficient in repair of sequences encountered by RNA polymerase during elongation (beginning at position +20). Since transcription of the JUN gene was UV-induced in all fibroblast strains, including CSB, the defective repair of the transcribed strand in CSB cannot be explained by a lack of transcription; rather, it appears to be a true DNA repair defect.

  16. Species-specific protein sequence and fold optimizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalickova Katerina

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An organism's ability to adapt to its particular environmental niche is of fundamental importance to its survival and proliferation. In the largest study of its kind, we sought to identify and exploit the amino-acid signatures that make species-specific protein adaptation possible across 100 complete genomes. Results Environmental niche was determined to be a significant factor in variability from correspondence analysis using the amino acid composition of over 360,000 predicted open reading frames (ORFs from 17 archae, 76 bacteria and 7 eukaryote complete genomes. Additionally, we found clusters of phylogenetically unrelated archae and bacteria that share similar environments by amino acid composition clustering. Composition analyses of conservative, domain-based homology modeling suggested an enrichment of small hydrophobic residues Ala, Gly, Val and charged residues Asp, Glu, His and Arg across all genomes. However, larger aromatic residues Phe, Trp and Tyr are reduced in folds, and these results were not affected by low complexity biases. We derived two simple log-odds scoring functions from ORFs (CG and folds (CF for each of the complete genomes. CF achieved an average cross-validation success rate of 85 ± 8% whereas the CG detected 73 ± 9% species-specific sequences when competing against all other non-redundant CG. Continuously updated results are available at http://genome.mshri.on.ca. Conclusion Our analysis of amino acid compositions from the complete genomes provides stronger evidence for species-specific and environmental residue preferences in genomic sequences as well as in folds. Scoring functions derived from this work will be useful in future protein engineering experiments and possibly in identifying horizontal transfer events.

  17. Genomic organization and complete cDNA sequence of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 gene (PLCB3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagercrantz, J.; Carson, E.; Phelan, C. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    We have characterized the complete cDNA sequence, genomic structure, and expression of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 (PLC {beta}3) gene (gene symbol PLCB3). PLC {beta}3 plays an important role in initiating receptor-mediated signal transduction. Activation of PLC takes place in many cells as a response to stimulation by hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and other ligands. The partial cDNA sequence of PLC {beta}3, previously published, was extended with 876 bp in the 5{prime} direction, giving a transcript of 4400 bp and a total open reading frame of 1234 amino acids. This was in accordance with expression analysis by Northern blotting that revealed a single 4.4-kb transcript in all tissues tested. Genomic data were obtained by sequencing plasmid subclones of a cosmid that contained the whole gene. The size of the complete transcription unit was estimated to be on the order of 15 kb. The gene contains 31 exons, with all splice donor and acceptor sites conforming to the GT/AG rule. No exon exceeds 571 bp in length, and the shortest exon spans only 36 bp. More than half of the introns are smaller than 200 bp, with the smallest being only 79 bp long. The transcription initiation site was determined to be within an 8-bp cluster 328-321 bp upstream of the translation initiation site. The 5{prime} flanking region is highly GC rich, with multiple CpG doublets, and contains multiple binding sites for Sp1. Lacking typical transcriptional regulatory sequences such as TATA and CAAT boxes, the putative promoter region conforms to the group of housekeeping promoters. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Unmasking the roles of N- and C-terminal flanking sequences from exon 1 of huntingtin as modulators of polyglutamine aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Scott L; Ruff, Kiersten M; Garai, Kanchan; Frieden, Carl; Pappu, Rohit V

    2013-12-10

    Huntington disease is caused by mutational expansion of the CAG trinucleotide within exon 1 of the huntingtin (Htt) gene. Exon 1 spanning N-terminal fragments (NTFs) of the Htt protein result from aberrant splicing of transcripts of mutant Htt. NTFs typically encompass a polyglutamine tract flanked by an N-terminal 17-residue amphipathic stretch (N17) and a C-terminal 38-residue proline-rich stretch (C38). We present results from in vitro biophysical studies that quantify the driving forces for and mechanisms of polyglutamine aggregation as modulated by N17 and C38. Although N17 is highly soluble by itself, it lowers the saturation concentration of soluble NTFs and increases the driving force, vis-à-vis homopolymeric polyglutamine, for forming insoluble aggregates. Kinetically, N17 accelerates fibril formation and destabilizes nonfibrillar intermediates. C38 is also highly soluble by itself, and it lends its high intrinsic solubility to lower the driving force for forming insoluble aggregates by increasing the saturation concentration of soluble NTFs. In NTFs with both modules, N17 and C38 act synergistically to destabilize nonfibrillar intermediates (N17 effect) and lower the driving force for forming insoluble aggregates (C38 effect). Morphological studies show that N17 and C38 promote the formation of ordered fibrils by NTFs. Homopolymeric polyglutamine forms a mixture of amorphous aggregates and fibrils, and its aggregation mechanisms involve early formation of heterogeneous distributions of nonfibrillar species. We propose that N17 and C38 act as gatekeepers that control the intrinsic heterogeneities of polyglutamine aggregation. This provides a biophysical explanation for the modulation of in vivo NTF toxicities by N17 and C38.

  19. A novel KCNQ1 nonsense variant in the isoform-specific first exon causes both jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome 1 and long QT syndrome 1: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Motoi; Ueda, Marehiko; Ebata, Ryota; Utsuno, Emi; Ishii, Takuma; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Ohara, Osamu; Shimojo, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio

    2017-06-08

    According to previous KCNQ1 (potassium channel, voltage gated, KQT-like subfamily, member 1) gene screening studies, missense variants, but not nonsense or frame-shift variants, cause the majority of long QT syndrome (LQTS; Romano-Ward syndrome [RWS]) 1 cases. Several missense variants are reported to cause RWS by a dominant-negative mechanism, and some KCNQ1 variants can cause both Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome (JLNS; in an autosomal recessive manner) and LQTS1 (in an autosomal dominant manner), while other KCNQ1 variants cause only JLNS. The human KCNQ1 gene is known to have two transcript isoforms (kidney isoform and pancreas isoform), and both isoforms can form a functional cardiac potassium channel. Here, we report a novel nonsense KCNQ1 variant causing not only JLNS, but also significant QTc prolongation identical to RWS in an autosomal dominant manner. Our case study supports that haploinsufficiency in the KCNQ1 gene is causative of significant QTc prolongation identical to RWS. Interestingly, the nonsense variant (NM_000218.2:c.115G > T [p.Glu39X]) locates in exon 1a of KCNQ1, which is a kidney-isoform specific exon. The variant is located closer to the N-terminus than previously identified nonsense or frame-shift variants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that a nonsense variant in exon 1a of KCNQ1, which is the kidney-isoform specific exon, causes JLNS. Our findings may be informative to the genetic pathogenesis of RWS and JLNS caused by KCNQ1 variants.

  20. The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gray, Tanya; Morrison, Norman; Selengut, Jeremy; Sterk, Peter; Tatusova, Tatiana; Thomson, Nicholas; Allen, Michael J; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Ashburner, Michael; Axelrod, Nelson; Baldauf, Sandra; Ballard, Stuart; Boore, Jeffrey; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James; Dawyndt, Peter; De Vos, Paul; dePamphilis, Claude; Edwards, Robert; Faruque, Nadeem; Feldman, Robert; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Goldstein, Philip; Guralnick, Robert; Haft, Dan; Hancock, David; Hermjakob, Henning; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hugenholtz, Phil; Joint, Ian; Kagan, Leonid; Kane, Matthew; Kennedy, Jessie; Kowalchuk, George; Kottmann, Renzo; Kolker, Eugene; Kravitz, Saul; Kyrpides, Nikos; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Lewis, Suzanna E; Li, Kelvin; Lister, Allyson L; Lord, Phillip; Maltsev, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Martiny, Jennifer; Methe, Barbara; Mizrachi, Ilene; Moxon, Richard; Nelson, Karen; Parkhill, Julian; Proctor, Lita; White, Owen; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Spiers, Andrew; Stevens, Robert; Swift, Paul; Taylor, Chris; Tateno, Yoshio; Tett, Adrian; Turner, Sarah; Ussery, David; Vaughan, Bob; Ward, Naomi; Whetzel, Trish; Gil, Ingio San; Wilson, Gareth; Wipat, Anil

    2008-01-01

    With the quantity of genomic data increasing at an exponential rate, it is imperative that these data be captured electronically, in a standard format. Standardization activities must proceed within the auspices of open-access and international working bodies. To tackle the issues surrounding the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the ‘transparency’ of the information contained in existing genomic databases. PMID:18464787

  1. Comparative genomic survey, exon-intron annotation and phylogenetic analysis of NAT-homologous sequences in archaea, protists, fungi, viruses, and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously published extensive genomic surveys [1-3], reporting NAT-homologous sequences in hundreds of sequenced bacterial, fungal and vertebrate genomes. We present here the results of our latest search of 2445 genomes, representing 1532 (70 archaeal, 1210 bacterial, 43 protist, 97 fungal,...

  2. Exonic remnants of whole-genome duplication reveal cis-regulatory function of coding exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xianjun; Navratilova, Pavla; Fredman, David; Drivenes, Øyvind; Becker, Thomas S; Lenhard, Boris

    2010-03-01

    Using a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct the fate of genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) and identify exonic remnants that have survived the disappearance of their host genes after whole-genome duplication (WGD) in teleosts, we discover a set of 38 candidate cis-regulatory coding exons (RCEs) with predicted target genes. These elements demonstrate evolutionary separation of overlapping protein-coding and regulatory information after WGD in teleosts. We present evidence that the corresponding mammalian exons are still under both coding and non-coding selection pressure, are more conserved than other protein coding exons in the host gene and several control sets, and share key characteristics with highly conserved non-coding elements in the same regions. Their dual function is corroborated by existing experimental data. Additionally, we show examples of human exon remnants stemming from the vertebrate 2R WGD. Our findings suggest that long-range cis-regulatory inputs for developmental genes are not limited to non-coding regions, but can also overlap the coding sequence of unrelated genes. Thus, exonic regulatory elements in GRBs might be functionally equivalent to those in non-coding regions, calling for a re-evaluation of the sequence space in which to look for long-range regulatory elements and experimentally test their activity.

  3. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable - Molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    distributed throughout the exon. Finally, we identified a pseudoexon in intron 11, which would have pathogenic consequences if activated by mutations or improved splicing conditions. Exonic mutations that disrupt splicing are unlikely to facilitate response to BH(4) and may lead to inconsistent genotype......In about 20-30% of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients, phenylalanine (Phe) levels can be controlled by cofactor 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) administration. The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype has a predictive value concerning BH(4)-response and therefore a correct assessment of the mutation...... molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11...

  4. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  5. SR proteins induce alternative exon skipping through their activities on the flanking constitutive exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Joonhee; Ding, Jian-Hua; Byeon, Cheol W; Kim, Jee H; Hertel, Klemens J; Jeong, Sunjoo; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2011-02-01

    SR proteins are well known to promote exon inclusion in regulated splicing through exonic splicing enhancers. SR proteins have also been reported to cause exon skipping, but little is known about the mechanism. We previously characterized SRSF1 (SF2/ASF)-dependent exon skipping of the CaMKIIδ gene during heart remodeling. By using mouse embryo fibroblasts derived from conditional SR protein knockout mice, we now show that SR protein-induced exon skipping depends on their prevalent actions on a flanking constitutive exon and requires collaboration of more than one SR protein. These findings, coupled with other established rules for SR proteins, provide a theoretical framework to understand the complex effect of SR protein-regulated splicing in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that heart-specific CaMKIIδ splicing can be reconstituted in fibroblasts by downregulating SR proteins and upregulating a RBFOX protein and that SR protein overexpression impairs regulated CaMKIIδ splicing and neuronal differentiation in P19 cells, illustrating that SR protein-dependent exon skipping may constitute a key strategy for synergism with other splicing regulators in establishing tissue-specific alternative splicing critical for cell differentiation programs.

  6. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  7. Aberrant splicing in transgenes containing introns, exons, and V5 epitopes: lessons from developing an FSHD mouse model expressing a D4Z4 repeat with flanking genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available The DUX4 gene, encoded within D4Z4 repeats on human chromosome 4q35, has recently emerged as a key factor in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. This recognition prompted development of animal models expressing the DUX4 open reading frame (ORF alone or embedded within D4Z4 repeats. In the first published model, we used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV and strong viral control elements (CMV promoter, SV40 poly A to demonstrate that the DUX4 cDNA caused dose-dependent toxicity in mouse muscles. As a follow-up, we designed a second generation of DUX4-expressing AAV vectors to more faithfully genocopy the FSHD-permissive D4Z4 repeat region located at 4q35. This new vector (called AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM contained the D4Z4/DUX4 promoter region, a V5 epitope-tagged DUX4 ORF, and the natural 3' untranslated region (pLAM harboring two small introns, DUX4 exons 2 and 3, and the non-canonical poly A signal required for stabilizing DUX4 mRNA in FSHD. AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM failed to recapitulate the robust pathology of our first generation vectors following delivery to mouse muscle. We found that the DUX4.V5 junction sequence created an unexpected splice donor in the pre-mRNA that was preferentially utilized to remove the V5 coding sequence and DUX4 stop codon, yielding non-functional DUX4 protein with 55 additional residues on its carboxyl-terminus. Importantly, we further found that aberrant splicing could occur in any expression construct containing a functional splice acceptor and sequences resembling minimal splice donors. Our findings represent an interesting case study with respect to AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM, but more broadly serve as a note of caution for designing constructs containing V5 epitope tags and/or transgenes with downstream introns and exons.

  8. Identification of novel androgen-regulated pathways and mRNA isoforms through genome-wide exon-specific profiling of the LNCaP transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Rajan

    Full Text Available Androgens drive the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa by modulating androgen receptor (AR transcriptional activity. Although several microarray-based studies have identified androgen-regulated genes, here we identify in-parallel global androgen-dependent changes in both gene and alternative mRNA isoform expression by exon-level analyses of the LNCaP transcriptome. While genome-wide gene expression changes correlated well with previously-published studies, we additionally uncovered a subset of 226 novel androgen-regulated genes. Gene expression pathway analysis of this subset revealed gene clusters associated with, and including the tyrosine kinase LYN, as well as components of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which is commonly dysregulated in cancer. We also identified 1279 putative androgen-regulated alternative events, of which 325 (∼25% mapped to known alternative splicing events or alternative first/last exons. We selected 30 androgen-dependent alternative events for RT-PCR validation, including mRNAs derived from genes encoding tumour suppressors and cell cycle regulators. Of seven positively-validating events (∼23%, five events involved transcripts derived from alternative promoters of known AR gene targets. In particular, we found a novel androgen-dependent mRNA isoform derived from an alternative internal promoter within the TSC2 tumour suppressor gene, which is predicted to encode a protein lacking an interaction domain required for mTOR inhibition. We confirmed that expression of this alternative TSC2 mRNA isoform was directly regulated by androgens, and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated recruitment of AR to the alternative promoter region at early timepoints following androgen stimulation, which correlated with expression of alternative transcripts. Together, our data suggest that alternative mRNA isoform expression might mediate the cellular response to androgens, and may have roles in clinical

  9. Design of a tobacco exon array with application to investigate the differential cadmium accumulation property in two tobacco varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florian; Bovet, Lucien; Cordier, Audrey; Stanke, Mario; Gunduz, Irfan; Peitsch, Manuel C; Ivanov, Nikolai V

    2012-11-28

    For decades the tobacco plant has served as a model organism in plant biology to answer fundamental biological questions in the areas of plant development, physiology, and genetics. Due to the lack of sufficient coverage of genomic sequences, however, none of the expressed sequence tag (EST)-based chips developed to date cover gene expression from the whole genome. The availability of Tobacco Genome Initiative (TGI) sequences provides a useful resource to build a whole genome exon array, even if the assembled sequences are highly fragmented. Here, the design of a Tobacco Exon Array is reported and an application to improve the understanding of genes regulated by cadmium (Cd) in tobacco is described. From the analysis and annotation of the 1,271,256 Nicotiana tabacum fasta and quality files from methyl filtered genomic survey sequences (GSS) obtained from the TGI and ~56,000 ESTs available in public databases, an exon array with 272,342 probesets was designed (four probes per exon) and tested on two selected tobacco varieties.Two tobacco varieties out of 45 accumulating low and high cadmium in leaf were identified based on the GGE biplot analysis, which is analysis of the genotype main effect (G) plus analysis of the genotype by environment interaction (GE) of eight field trials (four fields over two years) showing reproducibility across the trials. The selected varieties were grown under greenhouse conditions in two different soils and subjected to exon array analyses using root and leaf tissues to understand the genetic make-up of the Cd accumulation. An Affymetrix Exon Array was developed to cover a large (~90%) proportion of the tobacco gene space. The Tobacco Exon Array will be available for research use through Affymetrix array catalogue. As a proof of the exon array usability, we have demonstrated that the Tobacco Exon Array is a valuable tool for studying Cd accumulation in tobacco leaves. Data from field and greenhouse experiments supported by gene

  10. Exon Shuffling and Origin of Scorpion Venom Biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueli Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion venom is a complex combinatorial library of peptides and proteins with multiple biological functions. A combination of transcriptomic and proteomic techniques has revealed its enormous molecular diversity, as identified by the presence of a large number of ion channel-targeted neurotoxins with different folds, membrane-active antimicrobial peptides, proteases, and protease inhibitors. Although the biodiversity of scorpion venom has long been known, how it arises remains unsolved. In this work, we analyzed the exon-intron structures of an array of scorpion venom protein-encoding genes and unexpectedly found that nearly all of these genes possess a phase-1 intron (one intron located between the first and second nucleotides of a codon near the cleavage site of a signal sequence despite their mature peptides remarkably differ. This observation matches a theory of exon shuffling in the origin of new genes and suggests that recruitment of different folds into scorpion venom might be achieved via shuffling between body protein-coding genes and ancestral venom gland-specific genes that presumably contributed tissue-specific regulatory elements and secretory signal sequences.

  11. Whole exon 5 and intron 5 replaced by RHCE in DVa(Hus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chaopeng; Xiong, Wen; Wang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    The DVa(Hus) was previously investigated through cDNA analysis, which revealed an RHD-CE(5)-D hybrid allele. However, the 5' and 3' breakpoints remain unknown. In this article, gene recombinations between the RHD and RHCE alleles were investigated by a combination approach of a sequence-specific primer PCR (PCR-SSP) and an RHD full-length coding region sequencing method on two Chinese subjects with weak D phenotypes. The hybrid Rhesus box of each individual was also investigated through an established PCR-based method. As a result, two partial D phenotypes, DVa(Hus) and DVI type III, were identified, each carrying one hybrid RHD-CE-D allele. The two samples were also serotyped with Rh phontypes of DccEe and DCcee, respectively. Other sequencing analyses of the DVaHus sample showed that the sequence of intron 4 is identical with RHD, whereas the whole sequence of exon 5 and intron 5 is identical with RHCE except for seven polymorphisms in the intron 5. We may concluded that in the case of this Chinese DVa(Hus), the whole exon 5 and complete intron 5 of a total segment of 1801 nucleotides were replaced by RHCE suggesting that the breakpoints of the replaced region are the 5' end of the exon 5 and the 3' end of the intron 5.

  12. Thermodynamics of sequence-specific binding of PNA to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratilainen, T; Holmén, A; Tuite, E

    2000-01-01

    For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes) and seq......For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes...... relative to that of the perfectly matched sequence with a corresponding free energy penalty of about 15 kJ mol(-1) bp(-1). The average cost of a single mismatch is therefore estimated to be on the order of or larger than the gain of two matched base pairs, resulting in an apparent binding constant of only...

  13. Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-08-15

    Identification of transgenic sequences in an unknown genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) by whole genome sequence analysis was demonstrated. Whole genome sequence data were generated for a GM-positive fresh papaya fruit commodity detected in monitoring using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequences obtained were mapped against an open database for papaya genome sequence. Transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences were identified as a GM papaya developed to resist infection from a Papaya ringspot virus. Based on the transgenic sequences, a specific real-time PCR detection method for GM papaya applicable to various food commodities was developed. Whole genome sequence analysis enabled identifying unknown transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences in GM papaya and development of a reliable method for detecting them in papaya food commodities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Human glucose phosphate isomerase: Exon mapping and gene structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiming; Lee, Pauline; Beutler, E. [Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1995-10-10

    The structure of the gene for human glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) has been determined. Three GPI clones were isolated from a human genomic library by using a full-length GPI cDNA probe and were characterized. Oligonucleotides based on the known cDNA sequence were used as primers in amplification and sequence analyses. This led to the identification of the exon-intron junctions. By this approach, 18 exons and 17 introns have been identified. The exons range in size from 44 to 431 nucleotides. The intronic sequences surrounding the exons provide useful information for the identification of mutations that give rise to human GPI deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Development of specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bulk segregant analysis (BSA) using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were deployed to identify the location and genetic effect of this gene. We have generated new set of SSR markers to identify progenies carrying TGMS gene in a cross TGMS/PTT1. The TGMS gene was located on chromosome 2 with 0.0 cM ...

  16. Specification and Refinement of Soft Real-time Requirements Using Sequence Diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Refsdal, Atle; Husa, Knut Eilif; Stølen, Ketil

    2007-01-01

    Soft real-time requirements are often related to communication in distributed systems. Therefore it is interesting to understand how UML sequence diagrams can be used to specify such requirements. We propose a way of integrating soft real-time requirements in sequence diagram specifications by adding probabilities to timed sequence diagrams. Our approach builds on timed STAIRS, which is an approach to the compositional and incremental development of sequence diagrams supporting specification ...

  17. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, T M; Boominathan, K; Reddy, C A

    1996-01-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR prod...

  18. Antisense-induced exon skipping for duplications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert-Jan B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting specific exons the DMD reading frame is restored and partially functional dystrophins are produced. Following proof of concept in cultured muscle cells from patients with various deletions and point mutations, we now focus on single and multiple exon duplications. These mutations are in principle ideal targets for this approach since the specific skipping of duplicated exons would generate original, full-length transcripts. Methods Cultured muscle cells from DMD patients carrying duplications were transfected with AONs targeting the duplicated exons, and the dystrophin RNA and protein were analyzed. Results For two brothers with an exon 44 duplication, skipping was, even at suboptimal transfection conditions, so efficient that both exons 44 were skipped, thus generating, once more, an out-of-frame transcript. In such cases, one may resort to multi-exon skipping to restore the reading frame, as is shown here by inducing skipping of exon 43 and both exons 44. By contrast, in cells from a patient with an exon 45 duplication we were able to induce single exon 45 skipping, which allowed restoration of wild type dystrophin. The correction of a larger duplication (involving exons 52 to 62, by combinations of AONs targeting the outer exons, appeared problematic due to inefficient skipping and mistargeting of original instead of duplicated exons. Conclusion The correction of DMD duplications by exon skipping depends on the specific exons targeted. Its options vary from the ideal one, restoring for the first time the true, wild type dystrophin, to requiring more 'classical' skipping strategies, while the correction of multi-exon deletions may need the design of tailored approaches.

  19. Computational Identification of Tissue-Specific Splicing Regulatory Elements in Human Genes from RNA-Seq Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Eman; ElHefnawi, Mahmoud; Heath, Lenwood S.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a vital process for regulating gene expression and promoting proteomic diversity. It plays a key role in tissue-specific expressed genes. This specificity is mainly regulated by splicing factors that bind to specific sequences called splicing regulatory elements (SREs). Here, we report a genome-wide analysis to study alternative splicing on multiple tissues, including brain, heart, liver, and muscle. We propose a pipeline to identify differential exons across tissues and hence tissue-specific SREs. In our pipeline, we utilize the DEXSeq package along with our previously reported algorithms. Utilizing the publicly available RNA-Seq data set from the Human BodyMap project, we identified 28,100 differentially used exons across the four tissues. We identified tissue-specific exonic splicing enhancers that overlap with various previously published experimental and computational databases. A complicated exonic enhancer regulatory network was revealed, where multiple exonic enhancers were found across multiple tissues while some were found only in specific tissues. Putative combinatorial exonic enhancers and silencers were discovered as well, which may be responsible for exon inclusion or exclusion across tissues. Some of the exonic enhancers are found to be co-occurring with multiple exonic silencers and vice versa, which demonstrates a complicated relationship between tissue-specific exonic enhancers and silencers. PMID:27861625

  20. A novel splicing silencer generated by DMD exon 45 deletion junction could explain upstream exon 44 skipping that modifies dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwianingsih, Ery Kus; Malueka, Rusdy Ghazali; Nishida, Atsushi; Itoh, Kyoko; Lee, Tomoko; Yagi, Mariko; Iijima, Kazumoto; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2014-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive muscle-wasting disease, is mostly caused by exon deletion mutations in the DMD gene. The reading frame rule explains that out-of-frame deletions lead to muscle dystrophin deficiency in DMD. In outliers to this rule, deletion junction sequences have never previously been explored as splicing modulators. In a Japanese case, we identified a single exon 45 deletion in the patient's DMD gene, indicating out-of-frame mutation. However, immunohistochemical examination disclosed weak dystrophin signals in his muscle. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of DMD exons 42 to 47 revealed a major normally spliced product with exon 45 deletion and an additional in-frame product with deletion of both exons 44 and 45, indicating upstream exon 44 skipping. We considered the latter to underlie the observed dystrophin expression. Remarkably, the junction sequence cloned by PCR walking abolished the splicing enhancer activity of the upstream intron in a chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA in vitro splicing. Furthermore, antisense oligonucleotides directed against the junction site counteracted this effect. These indicated that the junction sequence was a splicing silencer that induced upstream exon 44 skipping. It was strongly suggested that creation of splicing regulator is a modifier of dystrophinopathy.

  1. Design of Protein Multi-specificity Using an Independent Sequence Search Reduces the Barrier to Low Energy Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Sevy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Computational protein design has found great success in engineering proteins for thermodynamic stability, binding specificity, or enzymatic activity in a 'single state' design (SSD paradigm. Multi-specificity design (MSD, on the other hand, involves considering the stability of multiple protein states simultaneously. We have developed a novel MSD algorithm, which we refer to as REstrained CONvergence in multi-specificity design (RECON. The algorithm allows each state to adopt its own sequence throughout the design process rather than enforcing a single sequence on all states. Convergence to a single sequence is encouraged through an incrementally increasing convergence restraint for corresponding positions. Compared to MSD algorithms that enforce (constrain an identical sequence on all states the energy landscape is simplified, which accelerates the search drastically. As a result, RECON can readily be used in simulations with a flexible protein backbone. We have benchmarked RECON on two design tasks. First, we designed antibodies derived from a common germline gene against their diverse targets to assess recovery of the germline, polyspecific sequence. Second, we design "promiscuous", polyspecific proteins against all binding partners and measure recovery of the native sequence. We show that RECON is able to efficiently recover native-like, biologically relevant sequences in this diverse set of protein complexes.

  2. Sequence-Specific Covalent Capture Coupled with High-Contrast Nanopore Detection of a Disease-Derived Nucleic Acid Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, Maryam Imani; Shi, Ruicheng; Zhang, Xinyue; Gu, Li-Qun; Gates, Kent S

    2017-07-18

    Hybridization-based methods for the detection of nucleic acid sequences are important in research and medicine. Short probes provide sequence specificity, but do not always provide a durable signal. Sequence-specific covalent crosslink formation can anchor probes to target DNA and might also provide an additional layer of target selectivity. Here, we developed a new crosslinking reaction for the covalent capture of specific nucleic acid sequences. This process involved reaction of an abasic (Ap) site in a probe strand with an adenine residue in the target strand and was used for the detection of a disease-relevant T→A mutation at position 1799 of the human BRAF kinase gene sequence. Ap-containing probes were easily prepared and displayed excellent specificity for the mutant sequence under isothermal assay conditions. It was further shown that nanopore technology provides a high contrast-in essence, digital-signal that enables sensitive, single-molecule sensing of the cross-linked duplexes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Multi-exon deletions of the FBN1 gene in Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrijver Iris

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the fibrillin -1 gene (FBN1 cause Marfan syndrome (MFS, an autosomal dominant multi-system connective tissue disorder. The 200 different mutations reported in the 235 kb, 65 exon-containing gene include only one family with a genomic multi-exon deletion. Methods We used long-range RT-PCR for mutation detection and long-range genomic PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of deletion breakpoints, allele-specific transcript analyses to determine stability of the mutant RNA, and pulse-chase studies to quantitate fibrillin synthesis and extracellular matrix deposition in cultured fibroblasts. Southern blots of genomic DNA were probed with three overlapping fragments covering the FBN1 coding exons Results Two novel multi-exon FBN1 deletions were discovered. Identical nucleotide pentamers were found at or near the intronic breakpoints. In a Case with classic MFS, an in-frame deletion of exons 42 and 43 removed the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the 5th LTBP (8-cysteine domain and the adjacent 25th calcium-binding EGF-like (6-cysteine domain. The mutant mRNA was stable, but fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition were significantly reduced. A Case with severe childhood-onset MFS has a de novo deletion of exons 44–46 that removed three EGF-like domains. Fibrillin protein synthesis was normal, but matrix deposition was strikingly reduced. No genomic rearrangements were detected by Southern analysis of 18 unrelated MFS samples negative for FBN1 mutation screening. Conclusions Two novel deletion cases expand knowledge of mutational mechanisms and genotype/phenotype correlations of fibrillinopathies. Deletions or mutations affecting an LTBP domain may result in unstable mutant protein cleavage products that interfere with microfibril assembly.

  4. Sequence-specific bias correction for RNA-seq data using recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao-Zhong; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2017-01-25

    The recent success of deep learning techniques in machine learning and artificial intelligence has stimulated a great deal of interest among bioinformaticians, who now wish to bring the power of deep learning to bare on a host of bioinformatical problems. Deep learning is ideally suited for biological problems that require automatic or hierarchical feature representation for biological data when prior knowledge is limited. In this work, we address the sequence-specific bias correction problem for RNA-seq data redusing Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) to model nucleotide sequences without pre-determining sequence structures. The sequence-specific bias of a read is then calculated based on the sequence probabilities estimated by RNNs, and used in the estimation of gene abundance. We explore the application of two popular RNN recurrent units for this task and demonstrate that RNN-based approaches provide a flexible way to model nucleotide sequences without knowledge of predetermined sequence structures. Our experiments show that training a RNN-based nucleotide sequence model is efficient and RNN-based bias correction methods compare well with the-state-of-the-art sequence-specific bias correction method on the commonly used MAQC-III data set. RNNs provides an alternative and flexible way to calculate sequence-specific bias without explicitly pre-determining sequence structures.

  5. 29 CFR 1926.752 - Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence. 1926.752 Section 1926.752 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Steel Erection § 1926.752 Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence. (a...

  6. Sequence of a DNA probe specific for Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D W; Cockburn, A F; Seawright, J A

    1993-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined for a portion of a 12-kb genomic DNA clone specific for Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A. Four short, internally repeated sequences were identified. Synthetic oligonucleotide probes were prepared based on these four repeats. The oligonucleotides are highly specific and can be reliably used to separate individuals of An. quadrimaculatus species A from members of other species of the complex.

  7. Short Exon Detection via Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Guishan; Shen, Yuanyu; Chen, Miaomiao; Zhao, Jiaxiang; Wu, Renhua

    2016-01-01

    The detection of short exons is a challenging open problem in the field of bioinformatics. Due to the fact that the weakness of existing model-independent methods lies in their inability to reliably detect small exons, a model-independent method based on the singularity detection with wavelet transform modulus maxima has been developed for detecting short coding sequences (exons) in eukaryotic DNA sequences. In the analysis of our method, the local maxima can capture and characterize singularities of short exons, which helps to yield significant patterns that are rarely observed with the traditional methods. In order to get some information about singularities on the differences between the exon signal and the background noise, the noise level is estimated by filtering the genomic sequence through a notch filter. Meanwhile, a fast method based on a piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial is applied to reconstruct the wavelet coefficients for improving the computational efficiency. In addition, the output measure of a paired-numerical representation calculated in both forward and reverse directions is used to incorporate a useful DNA structural property. The performances of our approach and other techniques are evaluated on two benchmark data sets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms all assessed model-independent methods for detecting short exons in terms of evaluation metrics.

  8. Short Exon Detection via Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Zhang

    Full Text Available The detection of short exons is a challenging open problem in the field of bioinformatics. Due to the fact that the weakness of existing model-independent methods lies in their inability to reliably detect small exons, a model-independent method based on the singularity detection with wavelet transform modulus maxima has been developed for detecting short coding sequences (exons in eukaryotic DNA sequences. In the analysis of our method, the local maxima can capture and characterize singularities of short exons, which helps to yield significant patterns that are rarely observed with the traditional methods. In order to get some information about singularities on the differences between the exon signal and the background noise, the noise level is estimated by filtering the genomic sequence through a notch filter. Meanwhile, a fast method based on a piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial is applied to reconstruct the wavelet coefficients for improving the computational efficiency. In addition, the output measure of a paired-numerical representation calculated in both forward and reverse directions is used to incorporate a useful DNA structural property. The performances of our approach and other techniques are evaluated on two benchmark data sets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms all assessed model-independent methods for detecting short exons in terms of evaluation metrics.

  9. Exonization of the LTR transposable elements in human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodovsky Mark

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons have been shown to contribute to evolution of both structure and regulation of protein coding genes. It has been postulated that the primary mechanism by which retrotransposons contribute to structural gene evolution is through insertion into an intron or a gene flanking region, and subsequent incorporation into an exon. Results We found that Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons are associated with 1,057 human genes (5.8%. In 256 cases LTR retrotransposons were observed in protein-coding regions, while 50 distinct protein coding exons in 45 genes were comprised exclusively of LTR RetroTransposon Sequence (LRTS. We go on to reconstruct the evolutionary history of an alternatively spliced exon of the Interleukin 22 receptor, alpha 2 gene (IL22RA2 derived from a sequence of retrotransposon of the Mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposons (MaLR family. Sequencing and analysis of the homologous regions of genomes of several primates indicate that the LTR retrotransposon was inserted into the IL22RA2 gene at least prior to the divergence of Apes and Old World monkeys from a common ancestor (~25 MYA. We hypothesize that the recruitment of the part of LTR as a novel exon in great ape species occurred prior to the divergence of orangutans and humans from a common ancestor (~14 MYA as a result of a single mutation in the proto-splice site. Conclusion Our analysis of LRTS exonization events has shown that the patterns of LRTS distribution in human exons support the hypothesis that LRTS played a significant role in human gene evolution by providing cis-regulatory sequences; direct incorporation of LTR sequences into protein coding regions was observed less frequently. Combination of computational and experimental approaches used for tracing the history of the LTR exonization process of IL22RA2 gene presents a promising strategy that could facilitate further studies of transposon initiated gene evolution.

  10. Optimized Exon-Exon Junction Library and its Application on Rodents' Brain Transcriptome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Hai Dou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Alternative splicing (AS, which plays an important role in gene expression and functional regulation, has been analyzed on genome-scale by various bioinformatic approaches based on RNA-seq data. Compared with the huge number of studies on mouse, the AS researches approaching the rat, whose genome is intermedia between mouse and human, were still limited. To enrich the knowledge on AS events in rodents' brain, we perfomed a comprehensive analysis on four transcriptome libraries (mouse cerebrum, mouse cerebellum, rat cerebrum, and rat cerebellum, recruiting high-throughput sequencing technology. An optimized exon-exon junction library approach was introduced to adapt the longer RNA-seq reads and to improve mapping efficiency. Results: In total, 7,106 mouse genes and 2,734 rat genes were differentially expressed between cerebrum and cerebellum, while 7,125 mouse genes and 1,795 rat genes exhibited varieties on transcript variant level. Only half of the differentially expressed exon-exon junctions could be reflected at gene expression level. Functional cluster analysis showed that 32 pathways in mouse and 9 pathways in rat were significantly enriched, and 6 of them were in both. Interestingly, some differentially expressed transcript variants did not show difference on gene expression level, such as PLCβ1 and Kcnma1. Conclusion: Our work provided a case study of a novel exon-exon junction strategy to analyze the expression of genes and isoforms, helping us understand which transcript contributes to the overall expression and further functional change.

  11. VDJdb: a curated database of T-cell receptor sequences with known antigen specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugay, Mikhail; Bagaev, Dmitriy V; Zvyagin, Ivan V; Vroomans, Renske M; Crawford, Jeremy Chase; Dolton, Garry; Komech, Ekaterina A; Sycheva, Anastasiya L; Koneva, Anna E; Egorov, Evgeniy S; Eliseev, Alexey V; Van Dyk, Ewald; Dash, Pradyot; Attaf, Meriem; Rius, Cristina; Ladell, Kristin; McLaren, James E; Matthews, Katherine K; Clemens, E Bridie; Douek, Daniel C; Luciani, Fabio; van Baarle, Debbie; Kedzierska, Katherine; Kesmir, Can; Thomas, Paul G; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K; Chudakov, Dmitriy M

    2018-01-04

    The ability to decode antigen specificities encapsulated in the sequences of rearranged T-cell receptor (TCR) genes is critical for our understanding of the adaptive immune system and promises significant advances in the field of translational medicine. Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing methods (immune repertoire sequencing technology, or RepSeq) and single-cell RNA sequencing technology have allowed us to obtain huge numbers of TCR sequences from donor samples and link them to T-cell phenotypes. However, our ability to annotate these TCR sequences still lags behind, owing to the enormous diversity of the TCR repertoire and the scarcity of available data on T-cell specificities. In this paper, we present VDJdb, a database that stores and aggregates the results of published T-cell specificity assays and provides a universal platform that couples antigen specificities with TCR sequences. We demonstrate that VDJdb is a versatile instrument for the annotation of TCR repertoire data, enabling a concatenated view of antigen-specific TCR sequence motifs. VDJdb can be accessed at https://vdjdb.cdr3.net and https://github.com/antigenomics/vdjdb-db. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals dynamic evolution of the elastin gene that has involved purifying selection and lineage-specific insertions/deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Eric D

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elastin gene (ELN is implicated as a factor in both supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and Williams Beuren Syndrome (WBS, two diseases involving pronounced complications in mental or physical development. Although the complete spectrum of functional roles of the processed gene product remains to be established, these roles are inferred to be analogous in human and mouse. This view is supported by genomic sequence comparison, in which there are no large-scale differences in the ~1.8 Mb sequence block encompassing the common region deleted in WBS, with the exception of an overall reversed physical orientation between human and mouse. Results Conserved synteny around ELN does not translate to a high level of conservation in the gene itself. In fact, ELN orthologs in mammals show more sequence divergence than expected for a gene with a critical role in development. The pattern of divergence is non-conventional due to an unusually high ratio of gaps to substitutions. Specifically, multi-sequence alignments of eight mammalian sequences reveal numerous non-aligning regions caused by species-specific insertions and deletions, in spite of the fact that the vast majority of aligning sites appear to be conserved and undergoing purifying selection. Conclusions The pattern of lineage-specific, in-frame insertions/deletions in the coding exons of ELN orthologous genes is unusual and has led to unique features of the gene in each lineage. These differences may indicate that the gene has a slightly different functional mechanism in mammalian lineages, or that the corresponding regions are functionally inert. Identified regions that undergo purifying selection reflect a functional importance associated with evolutionary pressure to retain those features.

  13. Characterization of sequences and mechanisms through which ISE/ISS-3 regulates FGFR2 splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovhannisyan, Ruben H; Warzecha, Claude C; Carstens, Russ P

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (FGFR2) mutually exclusive exons IIIb and IIIc results in highly cell-type-specific expression of functionally distinct receptors, FGFR2-IIIb and FGFR2-IIIc. We previously identified an RNA cis-element, ISE/ISS-3, that enhanced exon IIIb splicing and silenced exon IIIc splicing. Here, we have performed comprehensive mutational analysis to define critical sequence motifs within this element that independently either enhance splicing of upstream exons or repress splicing of downstream exons. Such analysis included use of a novel fluorescence-based splicing reporter assay that allowed quantitative determination of relative functional activity of ISE/ISS-3 mutants using flow cytometric analysis of live cells. We determined that specific sequences within this element that mediate splicing enhancement also mediate splicing repression, depending on their position relative to a regulated exon. Thus, factors that bind the element are likely to be coordinately involved in mediating both aspects of splicing regulation. Exon IIIc silencing is dependent upon a suboptimal branchpoint sequence containing a guanine branchpoint nucleotide. Previous studies of exon IIIc splicing in HeLa nuclear extracts demonstrated that this guanine branchsite primarily impaired the second step of splicing suggesting that ISE/ISS-3 may block exon IIIc inclusion at this step. However, results presented here that include use of newly developed in vitro splicing assays of FGFR2 using extracts from a cell line expressing FGFR2-IIIb strongly suggest that cell-type-specific silencing of exon IIIc occurs at or prior to the first step of splicing.

  14. cisASE: a likelihood-based method for detecting putative cis-regulated allele-specific expression in RNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Gui, Tuantuan; Wang, Zhen; Li, Hong; Fu, Yunhe; Dong, Xiao; Li, Yixue

    2016-11-01

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) is a useful way to identify cis-acting regulatory variation, which provides opportunities to develop new therapeutic strategies that activate beneficial alleles or silence mutated alleles at specific loci. However, multiple problems hinder the identification of ASE in next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. We developed cisASE, a likelihood-based method for detecting ASE on single nucleotide variant (SNV), exon and gene levels from sequencing data without requiring phasing or parental information. cisASE uses matched DNA-seq data to control technical bias and copy number variation (CNV) in putative cis-regulated ASE identification. Compared with state-of-the-art methods, cisASE exhibits significantly increased accuracy and speed. cisASE works moderately well for datasets without DNA-seq and thus is widely applicable. By applying cisASE to real datasets, we identified specific ASE characteristics in normal and cancer tissues, thus indicating that cisASE has potential for wide applications in cancer genomics. cisASE is freely available at http://lifecenter.sgst.cn/cisASE CONTACT: biosinodx@gmail.com or yxli@sibs.ac.cnSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Nostoc PCC7524, a cyanobacterium which contains five sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reaston, J.; Duybesteyn, M.G.C.; Waard, Adrian de

    1982-01-01

    Five nucleotide sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases present in cell-free extracts of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC7524 have been purified and characterized. One of these enzymes, designated Nsp(7524)I cleaves at a new kind of nucleotide sequence i.e. 5'-PuCATG λ Py-3'. The other four

  16. Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella and methods for the detection of Brucella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCready, Paula M [Tracy, CA; Radnedge, Lyndsay [San Mateo, CA; Andersen, Gary L [Berkeley, CA; Ott, Linda L [Livermore, CA; Slezak, Thomas R [Livermore, CA; Kuczmarski, Thomas A [Livermore, CA

    2009-02-24

    Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium were identified. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  17. Sequence-specific protection of duplex DNA against restriction and methylation enzymes by pseudocomplementary PNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izvolsky, K I; Demidov, V V; Nielsen, P E

    2000-01-01

    I restriction endonuclease and dam methylase. The pcPNA-assisted protection against enzymatic methylation is more efficient when the PNA-binding site embodies the methylase-recognition site rather than overlaps it. We conclude that pcPNAs may provide the robust tools allowing to sequence-specifically manipulate...... DNA duplexes in a virtually sequence-unrestricted manner....

  18. Nostoc PCC7524, a cyanobacterium which contains five sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reaston, J.; Duybesteyn, M.G.C.; Waard, Adrian de

    Five nucleotide sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases present in cell-free extracts of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC7524 have been purified and characterized. One of these enzymes, designated Nsp(7524)I cleaves at a new kind of nucleotide sequence i.e. 5'-PuCATG λ Py-3'. The other four

  19. Rapid functional and sequence differentiation of a tandemly repeated species-specific multigene family in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clifton, Bryan D.; Sanz, Pablo Librado; Yeh, Shu-Dan

    2017-01-01

    results in their inaccurate representation in genome assemblies. The presumed testis-specific, chimeric gene Sdic originated, and tandemly expanded in Drosophila melanogaster, contributing to increased male-male competition. Using various types of massively parallel sequencing data, we studied...

  20. Identification of DNA Sequences Specific for Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2 Strains by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chung-Te; Amaro, Carmen; Sanjuán, Eva; Hor, Lien-I

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus can be divided into three biotypes, and only biotype 2, which is further divided into serovars, contains eel-virulent strains. We compared the genomic DNA of a biotype 2 serovar E isolate (tester) with the genomic DNAs of three biotype 1 strains by suppression subtractive hybridization and then tested the distribution of the tester-specific DNA sequences in a wide collection of bacterial strains. In this way we identified three plasmid-borne DNA sequences that were specific ...

  1. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity, Sequence Specificity and Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of naturally......-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain C1-C8 alkylamine side chains. Methods of enhancing the solubility, binding affinity and sequence specificity of PNAs are provided....

  2. Utilization and evaluation of CHO-specific sequence databases for mass spectrometry based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleady, Paula; Hoffrogge, Raimund; Henry, Michael; Rupp, Oliver; Bort, Juan Hernandez; Clarke, Colin; Brinkrolf, Karina; Kelly, Shane; Müller, Benjamin; Doolan, Padraig; Hackl, Matthias; Beckmann, Tim Frederik; Noll, Thomas; Grillari, Johannes; Barron, Niall; Pühler, Alf; Clynes, Martin; Borth, Nicole

    2012-06-01

    Recently released sequence information on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells promises to not only facilitate our understanding of these industrially important cell factories through direct analysis of the sequence, but also to enhance existing methodologies and allow new tools to be developed. In this article we demonstrate the utilization of CHO specific sequence information to improve mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomic identification. The use of various CHO specific databases enabled the identification of 282 additional proteins, thus increasing the total number of identified proteins by 40-50%, depending on the sample source and methods used. In addition, a considerable portion of those proteins that were identified previously based on inter-species sequence homology were now identified by a larger number of peptides matched, thus increasing the confidence of identification. The new sequence information offers improved interpretation of proteomic analyses and will, in the years to come, prove vital to unraveling the CHO proteome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Protein sequence alignment with family-specific amino acid similarity matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Alignment of amino acid sequences by means of dynamic programming is a cornerstone sequence comparison method. The quality of alignments produced by dynamic programming critically depends on the choice of the alignment scoring function. Therefore, for a specific alignment problem one needs a way of selecting the best performing scoring function. This work is focused on the issue of finding optimized protein family- and fold-specific scoring functions for global similarity matrix-based sequence alignment. Findings I utilize a comprehensive set of reference alignments obtained from structural superposition of homologous and analogous proteins to design a quantitative statistical framework for evaluating the performance of alignment scoring functions in global pairwise sequence alignment. This framework is applied to study how existing general-purpose amino acid similarity matrices perform on individual protein families and structural folds, and to compare them to family-specific and fold-specific matrices derived in this work. I describe an adaptive alignment procedure that automatically selects an appropriate similarity matrix and optimized gap penalties based on the properties of the sequences being aligned. Conclusions The results of this work indicate that using family-specific similarity matrices significantly improves the quality of the alignment of homologous sequences over the traditional sequence alignment based on a single general-purpose similarity matrix. However, using fold-specific similarity matrices can only marginally improve sequence alignment of proteins that share the same structural fold but do not share a common evolutionary origin. The family-specific matrices derived in this work and the optimized gap penalties are available at http://taurus.crc.albany.edu/fsm. PMID:21846354

  4. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-13

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecule, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G • U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G • U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  5. Muscle-specific deletion of exons 2 and 3 of the IL15RA gene in mice: effects on contractile properties of fast and slow muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Grant; Guo, Ge; Stricker, Janelle; Quinn, LeBris S; Ma, Averil; Pistilli, Emidio E

    2015-02-15

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a putative myokine hypothesized to induce an oxidative skeletal muscle phenotype. The specific IL-15 receptor alpha subunit (IL-15Rα) has also been implicated in specifying this contractile phenotype. The purposes of this study were to determine the muscle-specific effects of IL-15Rα functional deficiency on skeletal muscle isometric contractile properties, fatigue characteristics, spontaneous cage activity, and circulating IL-15 levels in male and female mice. Muscle creatine kinase (MCK)-driven IL-15Rα knockout mice (mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+)) were generated using the Cre-loxP system. We tested the hypothesis that IL-15Rα functional deficiency in skeletal muscle would increase resistance to contraction-induced fatigue, cage activity, and circulating IL-15 levels. There was a significant effect of genotype on the fatigue curves obtained in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from female mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+) mice, such that force output was greater during the repeated contraction protocol compared with mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(-) control mice. Muscles from female mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+) mice also had a twofold greater amount of the mitochondrial genome-specific COXII gene compared with muscles from mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(-) control mice, indicating a greater mitochondrial density in these skeletal muscles. There was a significant effect of genotype on the twitch:tetanus ratio in EDL and soleus muscles from mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+) mice, such that the ratio was lower in these muscles compared with mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(-) control mice, indicating a pro-oxidative shift in muscle phenotype. However, spontaneous cage activity was not different and IL-15 protein levels were lower in male and female mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+) mice compared with control. Collectively, these data support a direct effect of muscle IL-15Rα deficiency in altering contractile properties and fatigue characteristics in skeletal muscles.

  6. Unusual intron conservation near tissue-regulated exons found by splicing microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W Sugnet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing contributes to both gene regulation and protein diversity. To discover broad relationships between regulation of alternative splicing and sequence conservation, we applied a systems approach, using oligonucleotide microarrays designed to capture splicing information across the mouse genome. In a set of 22 adult tissues, we observe differential expression of RNA containing at least two alternative splice junctions for about 40% of the 6,216 alternative events we could detect. Statistical comparisons identify 171 cassette exons whose inclusion or skipping is different in brain relative to other tissues and another 28 exons whose splicing is different in muscle. A subset of these exons is associated with unusual blocks of intron sequence whose conservation in vertebrates rivals that of protein-coding exons. By focusing on sets of exons with similar regulatory patterns, we have identified new sequence motifs implicated in brain and muscle splicing regulation. Of note is a motif that is strikingly similar to the branchpoint consensus but is located downstream of the 5' splice site of exons included in muscle. Analysis of three paralogous membrane-associated guanylate kinase genes reveals that each contains a paralogous tissue-regulated exon with a similar tissue inclusion pattern. While the intron sequences flanking these exons remain highly conserved among mammalian orthologs, the paralogous flanking intron sequences have diverged considerably, suggesting unusually complex evolution of the regulation of alternative splicing in multigene families.

  7. Fuzzy-adaptive-thresholding-based exon prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ankit; Mittal, Ankush; Jain, Rahul; Takkar, Raghav

    2010-01-01

    Thresholding is always critical and decisive in many bioinformatics problems. In this paper, we propose and apply a fuzzy-logic-based adaptive thresholding approach to a well-known solution for the exon prediction problem, which uses a threshold on the frequency component at f = 1/3 in the nucleotide sequence. The proposed approach allows the thresholds to vary along the data set based on the local statistical properties. Experiments and results on the nucleotide data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Bakers yeast) illustrate the advantage of our approach. A user-friendly GUI in MATLAB is freely available for academic use at www.cs.iastate.edu/˜ankitag/FATBEP.html.

  8. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Souza, T.M.; Boominathan, K.; Reddy, C.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequences of each of the PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. How effector-specific is the effect of sequence learning by motor execution and motor imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Przekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaśkowski, Wojciech; van der Lubbe, Rob H J

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was twofold. First, we wanted to examine how effector specific the effect of sequence learning by motor execution is, and second, we wanted to compare this effect with learning by motor imagery. We employed a Go/NoGo discrete sequence production task in which in each trial a spatial sequence of five stimuli was presented. After a Go signal the corresponding spatial response sequence had to be executed, while after a NoGo signal, the response sequence had to be mentally imagined. For the training phase, participants were divided into two groups. In the index finger group, participants had to respond (physically or mentally) with the left or right index finger, while in the hand group they had to respond with four fingers of the left or right hand. In a final test phase both execution modes were compared and all trials had to be executed. Response times and the percentage of correct responses were determined to establish learning effects. Results showed that sequence learning effects as assessed in the test phase were independent of the effector used during the training phase. Results revealed the presence of aspecific learning effects in the case of learning a required motor task with an index finger, but sequence-specific learning effects, both due to motor execution and to motor imagery, were not effector specific.

  10. SCALE: modeling allele-specific gene expression by single-cell RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuchao; Zhang, Nancy R; Li, Mingyao

    2017-04-26

    Allele-specific expression is traditionally studied by bulk RNA sequencing, which measures average expression across cells. Single-cell RNA sequencing allows the comparison of expression distribution between the two alleles of a diploid organism and the characterization of allele-specific bursting. Here, we propose SCALE to analyze genome-wide allele-specific bursting, with adjustment of technical variability. SCALE detects genes exhibiting allelic differences in bursting parameters and genes whose alleles burst non-independently. We apply SCALE to mouse blastocyst and human fibroblast cells and find that cis control in gene expression overwhelmingly manifests as differences in burst frequency.

  11. Identification of evolutionarily conserved exons as regulated targets for the splicing activator tra2β in development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Grellscheid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing amplifies the information content of the genome, creating multiple mRNA isoforms from single genes. The evolutionarily conserved splicing activator Tra2β (Sfrs10 is essential for mouse embryogenesis and implicated in spermatogenesis. Here we find that Tra2β is up-regulated as the mitotic stem cell containing population of male germ cells differentiate into meiotic and post-meiotic cells. Using CLIP coupled to deep sequencing, we found that Tra2β binds a high frequency of exons and identified specific G/A rich motifs as frequent targets. Significantly, for the first time we have analysed the splicing effect of Sfrs10 depletion in vivo by generating a conditional neuronal-specific Sfrs10 knock-out mouse (Sfrs10(fl/fl; Nestin-Cre(tg/+. This mouse has defects in brain development and allowed correlation of genuine physiologically Tra2β regulated exons. These belonged to a novel class which were longer than average size and importantly needed multiple cooperative Tra2β binding sites for efficient splicing activation, thus explaining the observed splicing defects in the knockout mice. Regulated exons included a cassette exon which produces a meiotic isoform of the Nasp histone chaperone that helps monitor DNA double-strand breaks. We also found a previously uncharacterised poison exon identifying a new pathway of feedback control between vertebrate Tra2 proteins. Both Nasp-T and the Tra2a poison exon are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting they might control fundamental developmental processes. Tra2β protein isoforms lacking the RRM were able to activate specific target exons indicating an additional functional role as a splicing co-activator. Significantly the N-terminal RS1 domain conserved between flies and humans was essential for the splicing activator function of Tra2β. Versions of Tra2β lacking this N-terminal RS1 domain potently repressed the same target exons activated by full-length Tra2β protein.

  12. PTESFinder: a computational method to identify post-transcriptional exon shuffling (PTES) events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuogu, Osagie G; Alhasan, Abd A; Alafghani, Hani M; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Elliott, David J; Elliot, David J; Jackson, Michael S

    2016-01-13

    Transcripts, which have been subject to Post-transcriptional exon shuffling (PTES), have an exon order inconsistent with the underlying genomic sequence. These have been identified in a wide variety of tissues and cell types from many eukaryotes, and are now known to be mostly circular, cytoplasmic, and non-coding. Although there is no uniformly ascribed function, several have been shown to be involved in gene regulation. Accurate identification of these transcripts can, however, be difficult due to artefacts from a wide variety of sources. Here, we present a computational method, PTESFinder, to identify these transcripts from high throughput RNAseq data. Uniquely, it systematically excludes potential artefacts emanating from pseudogenes, segmental duplications, and template switching, and outputs both PTES and canonical exon junction counts to facilitate comparative analyses. In comparison with four existing methods, PTESFinder achieves highest specificity and comparable sensitivity at a variety of read depths. PTESFinder also identifies between 13 % and 41.6 % more structures, compared to publicly available methods recently used to identify human circular RNAs. With high sensitivity and specificity, user-adjustable filters that target known sources of false positives, and tailored output to facilitate comparison of transcript levels, PTESFinder will facilitate the discovery and analysis of these poorly understood transcripts.

  13. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqiu Diao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e., introns between coding exons. Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted “plug-and-play” cassettes (called “Trojan exons” that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC (Minos-mediated integration cassette transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system.

  14. Bacteriophage SPP1 pac Cleavage: A Precise Cut without Sequence Specificity Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djacem, Karima; Tavares, Paulo; Oliveira, Leonor

    2017-05-05

    In many tailed bacteriophages, DNA packaging is initiated by recognition and cleavage of a specific sequence pac by the small (TerS) and large (TerL) terminase subunits. It was previously shown that the SPP1 pac region has two sequences where TerS binds (pacR and pacL), flanking the segment where TerL cleaves the SPP1 DNA (pacC). However, the pac-specific sequences required to achieve this endonucleolytic cut were not established. Their characterization is essential to understand the underlying mechanism. We show that the pacR sequence localized within 35bp downstream of the pac cut can be extensively degenerated, including its c1 and c2 repeats, and that only a disruption of a 5-bp polyadenine tract impairs the pac cleavage. This result together with deletion analysis of pacL shows that the specific DNA sequences required for targeting the terminase for pac cleavage are considerably shorter than the large region bound by TerS. Furthermore, extensive degeneration of the 6-bp target sequence within pacC where pac cleavage occurs reveals that TerL maintains, remarkably, its precise position of cleavage. Studies with SPP1-related phages show the conservation of the cut position, irrespective of the sequence variation in pacC and in pacR or the changes in pacL-pacC distance. Mechanistically, our data are compatible with a model in which TerS interactions with part of the pacL sequence and a poly-A tract in pacR are sufficient to orient very accurately the TerL nuclease to a defined pacC position. They also demonstrate that the resulting precise cut at pacC is independent of the targeted DNA sequence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Association between A59V polymorphism in exon 3 of leptin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique to screen for DNA polymorphisms of the leptin gene in 255 cows of Iranian Holstein. Amplified region is located in exon 3 of leptin gene. The genomic bovine leptin sequences, which consist of three exons, were ...

  16. Chromatin accessibility data sets show bias due to sequence specificity of the DNase I enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Koohy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNase I is an enzyme which cuts duplex DNA at a rate that depends strongly upon its chromatin environment. In combination with high-throughput sequencing (HTS technology, it can be used to infer genome-wide landscapes of open chromatin regions. Using this technology, systematic identification of hundreds of thousands of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS per cell type has been possible, and this in turn has helped to precisely delineate genomic regulatory compartments. However, to date there has been relatively little investigation into possible biases affecting this data. RESULTS: We report a significant degree of sequence preference spanning sites cut by DNase I in a number of published data sets. The two major protocols in current use each show a different pattern, but for a given protocol the pattern of sequence specificity seems to be quite consistent. The patterns are substantially different from biases seen in other types of HTS data sets, and in some cases the most constrained position lies outside the sequenced fragment, implying that this constraint must relate to the digestion process rather than events occurring during library preparation or sequencing. CONCLUSIONS: DNase I is a sequence-specific enzyme, with a specificity that may depend on experimental conditions. This sequence specificity is not taken into account by existing pipelines for identifying open chromatin regions. Care must be taken when interpreting DNase I results, especially when looking at the precise locations of the reads. Future studies may be able to improve the sensitivity and precision of chromatin state measurement by compensating for sequence bias.

  17. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, T M; Boominathan, K; Reddy, C A

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases.

  18. Primique: automatic design of specific PCR primers for each sequence in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Mette

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many contexts, researchers need specific primers for all sequences in a family such that each primer set amplifies only its target sequence and none of the others, e.g. to detect which transcription factor out of a family of very similar proteins that is present in a sample, or to design diagnostic assays for the identification of pathogen strains. Results This paper presents primique, a new graphical, user-friendly, fast, web-based tool which solves the problem: It designs specific primers for each sequence in an uploaded set. Further, a secondary set of sequences not to be amplified by any primer pair may be uploaded. Primers with high sequence similarity to non-target sequences are selected against. Lastly, the suggested primers may be checked against the National Center for Biotechnology Information databases for possible mis-priming. Conclusion Results are presented in interactive tables, and various primer properties are listed and displayed graphically. Any close match alignments can be displayed. Given 30 sequences, the running time of primique is about 20 seconds. primique can be reached via this web address: http://cgi-www.daimi.au.dk/cgi-chili/primique/front.py

  19. Efficient use of a translation start codon in BDNF exon I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Indrek; Tuvikene, Jürgen; Lekk, Ingrid; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains a number of 5' exons alternatively spliced with a common 3' exon. BDNF protein is synthesized from alternative transcripts as a prepro-precursor encoded by the common 3' exon IX, which has a translation start site 21 bp downstream of the splicing site. BDNF mRNAs containing exon I are an exception to this arrangement as the last three nucleotides of this exon constitute an in-frame AUG. Here, we show that this AUG is efficiently used for translation initiation in PC12 cells and cultured cortical neurons. Use of exon I-specific AUG produces higher levels of BDNF protein than use of the common translation start site, resulting from a higher translation rate. No differences in protein degradation, constitutive or regulated secretion were detected between BDNF isoforms with alternative 5' termini. As the BDNF promoter preceding exon I is known to be highly regulated by neuronal activity, our results suggest that the function of this translation start site may be efficient stimulus-dependent synthesis of BDNF protein. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains multiple untranslated 5' exons alternatively spliced to one common protein-coding 3' exon. However, exon I contains an in-frame ATG in a favorable translation context. Here, we show that use of this ATG is associated with more efficient protein synthesis than the commonly used ATG in exon IX. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Exon silencing by UAGG motifs in response to neuronal excitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping An

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays fundamental roles in neurons by generating functional diversity in proteins associated with the communication and connectivity of the synapse. The CI cassette of the NMDA R1 receptor is one of a variety of exons that show an increase in exon skipping in response to cell excitation, but the molecular nature of this splicing responsiveness is not yet understood. Here we investigate the molecular basis for the induced changes in splicing of the CI cassette exon in primary rat cortical cultures in response to KCl-induced depolarization using an expression assay with a tight neuron-specific readout. In this system, exon silencing in response to neuronal excitation was mediated by multiple UAGG-type silencing motifs, and transfer of the motifs to a constitutive exon conferred a similar responsiveness by gain of function. Biochemical analysis of protein binding to UAGG motifs in extracts prepared from treated and mock-treated cortical cultures showed an increase in nuclear hnRNP A1-RNA binding activity in parallel with excitation. Evidence for the role of the NMDA receptor and calcium signaling in the induced splicing response was shown by the use of specific antagonists, as well as cell-permeable inhibitors of signaling pathways. Finally, a wider role for exon-skipping responsiveness is shown to involve additional exons with UAGG-related silencing motifs, and transcripts involved in synaptic functions. These results suggest that, at the post-transcriptional level, excitable exons such as the CI cassette may be involved in strategies by which neurons mount adaptive responses to hyperstimulation.

  1. Specific versus non-specific immune responses in an invertebrate species evidenced by a comparative de novo sequencing study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeline Deleury

    Full Text Available Our present understanding of the functioning and evolutionary history of invertebrate innate immunity derives mostly from studies on a few model species belonging to ecdysozoa. In particular, the characterization of signaling pathways dedicated to specific responses towards fungi and Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria in Drosophila melanogaster challenged our original view of a non-specific immunity in invertebrates. However, much remains to be elucidated from lophotrochozoan species. To investigate the global specificity of the immune response in the fresh-water snail Biomphalaria glabrata, we used massive Illumina sequencing of 5'-end cDNAs to compare expression profiles after challenge by Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria or after a yeast challenge. 5'-end cDNA sequencing of the libraries yielded over 12 millions high quality reads. To link these short reads to expressed genes, we prepared a reference transcriptomic database through automatic assembly and annotation of the 758,510 redundant sequences (ESTs, mRNAs of B. glabrata available in public databases. Computational analysis of Illumina reads followed by multivariate analyses allowed identification of 1685 candidate transcripts differentially expressed after an immune challenge, with a two fold ratio between transcripts showing a challenge-specific expression versus a lower or non-specific differential expression. Differential expression has been validated using quantitative PCR for a subset of randomly selected candidates. Predicted functions of annotated candidates (approx. 700 unisequences belonged to a large extend to similar functional categories or protein types. This work significantly expands upon previous gene discovery and expression studies on B. glabrata and suggests that responses to various pathogens may involve similar immune processes or signaling pathways but different genes belonging to multigenic families. These results raise the question of the importance

  2. Increased sequence diversity coverage improves detection of HIV-Specific T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm, N.; Kaufmann, D.E.; Yusim, K.

    2007-01-01

    The accurate identification of HIV-specific T cell responses is important for determining the relationship between immune response, viral control, and disease progression. HIV-specific immune responses are usually measured using peptide sets based on consensus sequences, which frequently miss...... assay, these "toggled" peptides detected HIV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses of significantly higher breadth and magnitude than matched consensus peptides. The observed increases were explained by a closer match of the toggled peptides to the autologous viral sequence. Toggled peptides...... responses to regions where test set and infecting virus differ. In this study, we report the design of a peptide test set with significantly increased coverage of HIV sequence diversity by including alternative amino acids at variable positions during the peptide synthesis step. In an IFN-gamma ELISpot...

  3. Identification, characterization and expression of novel Sex Hormone Binding Globulin alternative first exons in the human prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Torres Inés

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG gene, located at 17p13.1, comprises, at least, two different transcription units regulated by two different promoters. The first transcription unit begins with the exon 1 sequence and is responsible for the production of plasma SHBG by the hepatocytes, while the second begins with an alternative exon 1 sequence, which replaces the exon 1 present in liver transcripts. Alternative exon 1 transcription and translation has only been demonstrated in the testis of transgenic mice containing an 11-kb human SHBG transgene and in the human testis. Our goal has been to further characterize the 5' end of the SHBG gene and analyze the presence of the SHBG alternative transcripts in human prostate tissue and derived cell lines. Results Using a combination of in silico and in vitro studies, we have demonstrated that the SHBG gene, along with exon 1 and alternative exon 1 (renamed here exon 1A, contains four additional alternative first exons: the novel exons 1B, 1C, and 1E, and a previously identified exon 1N, which has been further characterized and renamed as exon 1D. We have shown that these four alternative first exons are all spliced to the same 3' splice site of SHBG exon 2, and that exon 1A and the novel exon 1B can be spliced to exon 1. We have also demonstrated the presence of SHBG transcripts beginning with exons 1B, 1C and 1D in prostate tissues and cell lines, as well as in several non-prostatic cell lines. Finally, the alignment of the SHBG mammalian sequences revealed that, while exons 1C, 1D and 1E are very well conserved phylogenetically through non-primate mammal species, exon 1B probably aroused in apes due to a single nucleotide change that generated a new 5' splice site in exon 1B. Conclusion The identification of multiple transcription start sites (TSS upstream of the annotated first exon of human SHBG, and the detection of the alternative transcripts in human prostate

  4. kpLogo: positional k-mer analysis reveals hidden specificity in biological sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Motifs of only 1–4 letters can play important roles when present at key locations within macromolecules. Because existing motif-discovery tools typically miss these position-specific short motifs, we developed kpLogo, a probability-based logo tool for integrated detection and visualization of position-specific ultra-short motifs from a set of aligned sequences. kpLogo also overcomes the limitations of conventional motif-visualization tools in handling positional interdependencies and utilizing ranked or weighted sequences increasingly available from high-throughput assays. kpLogo can be found at http://kplogo.wi.mit.edu/. PMID:28460012

  5. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  6. Motif Discovery in Tissue-Specific Regulatory Sequences Using Directed Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    States David

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Motif discovery for the identification of functional regulatory elements underlying gene expression is a challenging problem. Sequence inspection often leads to discovery of novel motifs (including transcription factor sites with previously uncharacterized function in gene expression. Coupled with the complexity underlying tissue-specific gene expression, there are several motifs that are putatively responsible for expression in a certain cell type. This has important implications in understanding fundamental biological processes such as development and disease progression. In this work, we present an approach to the identification of motifs (not necessarily transcription factor sites and examine its application to some questions in current bioinformatics research. These motifs are seen to discriminate tissue-specific gene promoter or regulatory regions from those that are not tissue-specific. There are two main contributions of this work. Firstly, we propose the use of directed information for such classification constrained motif discovery, and then use the selected features with a support vector machine (SVM classifier to find the tissue specificity of any sequence of interest. Such analysis yields several novel interesting motifs that merit further experimental characterization. Furthermore, this approach leads to a principled framework for the prospective examination of any chosen motif to be discriminatory motif for a group of coexpressed/coregulated genes, thereby integrating sequence and expression perspectives. We hypothesize that the discovery of these motifs would enable the large-scale investigation for the tissue-specific regulatory role of any conserved sequence element identified from genome-wide studies.

  7. Sequence specific motor performance gains after memory consolidation in children and adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshi Dorfberger

    Full Text Available Memory consolidation for a trained sequence of finger opposition movements, in 9- and 12-year-old children, was recently found to be significantly less susceptible to interference by a subsequent training experience, compared to that of 17-year-olds. It was suggested that, in children, the experience of training on any sequence of finger movements may affect the performance of the sequence elements, component movements, rather than the sequence as a unit; the latter has been implicated in the learning of the task by adults. This hypothesis implied a possible childhood advantage in the ability to transfer the gains from a trained to the reversed, untrained, sequence of movements. Here we report the results of transfer tests undertaken to test this proposal in 9-, 12-, and 17-year-olds after training in the finger-to-thumb opposition sequence (FOS learning task. Our results show that the performance gains in the trained sequence partially transferred from the left, trained hand, to the untrained hand at 48-hours after a single training session in the three age-groups tested. However, there was very little transfer of the gains from the trained to the untrained, reversed, sequence performed by either hand. The results indicate sequence specific post-training gains in FOS performance, as opposed to a general improvement in performance of the individual, component, movements that comprised both the trained and untrained sequences. These results do not support the proposal that the reduced susceptibility to interference, in children before adolescence, reflects a difference in movement syntax representation after training.

  8. Amelogenin Exon4 Forms a Novel miRNA That Directs Ameloblast and Osteoblast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, M H; Warotayanont, R; Stahl, J; Den Besten, P K; Nakano, Y

    2016-04-01

    Amelogenins constitute the major portion of secretory enamel matrix proteins and are known to be highly alternative spliced. Of all the alternatively spliced forms of amelogenins, exon4 is most commonly spliced out. Our analyses of the exon4 sequence led us to hypothesize that when spliced out, exon4 may generate a novel mature miRNA. To explore this possibility, we used in vivo mouse models (wild-type and Amel knockout mice) and in vitro cell culture to investigate the presence and function of a mature miRNA derived from exon4 (miR-exon4). When ameloblast-like cells (LS8) were transfected with an amelogenin minigene to increase amelogenin synthesis, the transfected cells synthesized miR-exon4. Introduction of a mutation in the conserved CNNC sequence required for primary miRNA recognition, downstream of the mature miR-exon4 sequence, resulted in a significantly reduced production of miR-exon4 in the transfected cells. In vivo, miR-exon4 was most highly amplified from wild-type mouse enamel organs at the secretory stage. In Amel knockout mice, an in vivo model for reduced amelogenin synthesis, we found reduced miR-exon4, with no changes in expression of enamel matrix-related genes. However, expression of Runx2 and its downstream genes Odam and Amtn were significantly downregulated. Transfection of miR-exon4 mimic to the LS8 cells also significantly upregulated Runx2. The mature miR-exon4 as well as Runx2 was also present in mouse osteoblasts with no apparent change in expression level between wild-type and Amel knockout mice. However, transfecting miR-exon4 inhibitor to the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells resulted in a significant downregulation of Runx2 expression. These data indicate that when exon4 is spliced out, as occurs most of the time during alternative splicing of amelogenin pre-mRNA, a novel mature miRNA is generated from exon4. This miR-exon4 may contribute to the differentiation of ameloblasts and osteoblasts through regulation of Runx2 expression.

  9. Sequence motifs in MADS transcription factors responsible for specificity and diversification of protein-protein interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and

  10. Discrimination of reproductive forms of Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) by PCR with sequence specific primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Eisuke

    2012-04-01

    In agriculture, although it is important to identify species of pest insects, the morphological identification is often difficult. DNA genotyping is useful for the identification of species in morphologically indiscriminable species. Thrips tabaci (Lindeman) can be divided into two reproductive forms (arrhenotoky and thelytoky, each of which different in pesticide resistance) but morphological discrimination is not possible. Here, we establish a simple method to discriminate the strains based on their mitochondrial DNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis including the T. tabaci and congeneric species provided ancestor sequences of each strain of T tabaci. Based on the ancestor sequences, we developed a primer set that include strain specific primers on sense strand and common primer on anti sense strand. Using this primer set, the strains of 196 individuals of T. tabaci were successfully assigned to each ofgenotypic forms. As the phylogeny and ancestor sequences were based on worldwide samples, this method will work well on most populations around the world.

  11. Implicit Spoken Words and Motor Sequences Learning Are Impaired in Children with Specific Language Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmottes, Lise; Meulemans, Thierry; Maillart, Christelle

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to compare verbal and motor implicit sequence learning abilities in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Forty-eight children (24 control and 24 SLI) were administered the Serial Search Task (SST), which enables the simultaneous assessment of implicit spoken words and visuomotor sequences learning. Results showed that control children implicitly learned both the spoken words as well as the motor sequences. In contrast, children with SLI showed deficits in both types of learning. Moreover, correlational analyses revealed that SST performance was linked with grammatical abilities in control children but with lexical abilities in children with SLI. Overall, this pattern of results supports the procedural deficit hypothesis and suggests that domain general implicit sequence learning is impaired in SLI.

  12. Molecular recognition by van der Waals interaction between polymers with sequence-specific polarizabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    We analyze van der Waals interactions between two rigid polymers with sequence-specific, anisotropic polarizabilities along the polymer backbones, so that the dipole moments fluctuate parallel to the polymer backbones. Assuming that each polymer has a quenched-in polarizability sequence which reflects, for example, the polynucleotide sequence of a double-stranded DNA molecule, we study the van der Waals interaction energy between a pair of such polymers with rod-like structure for the cases where their respective polarizability sequences are (i) distinct and (ii) identical, with both zero and non-zero correlation length of the polarizability correlator along the polymer backbones in the latter case. For identical polymers, we find a novel $r^{-5}$ scaling behavior of the van der Waals interaction energy for small inter-polymer separation $r$, in contradistinction to the $r^{-4}$ scaling behavior of distinct polymers, with furthermore a pronounced angular dependence favoring attraction between sufficiently ali...

  13. A novel deletion of SNURF/SNRPN exon 1 in a patient with Prader-Willi-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; AlHumaidi, Susan S; Faqeih, Eissa A; Pitel, Beth A; Lundquist, Patrick; Aypar, Umut

    2017-08-01

    Here we report the smallest deletion involving SNURF/SNRPN that causes major symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), including hypotonia, dysmorphic features, intellectual disability, and obesity. A female patient with the aforementioned and additional features was referred to the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics laboratory for genetic testing. Chromosomal microarray analysis and subsequent Sanger sequencing identified a de novo 6.4 kb deletion at 15q11.2, containing exon 1 of the SNURF gene and exon 1 of the shortest isoform of the SNRPN gene. SNURF/SNRPN exon 1, which is methylated on the silent maternal allele, is associated with acetylated histones on the expressed paternal allele. This region also overlaps with the PWS-imprinting center (IC). Subsequent molecular methylation analysis was performed using methylation-specific MLPA (MS-MLPA), which characterized that the deletion of SNURF/SNRPN exon 1 was paternal in origin, consistent with the PWS-like phenotype. Since SNURF/SNRPN gene and the PWS-IC are known to regulate snoRNAs, it is likely that the PWS-like phenotype observed in patients with paternal SNURF/SNRPN deletion is due to the disrupted expression of SNORD116 snoRNAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Sequence specificity of DNA alkylation by the antitumor natural product leinamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Hong; Gates, Kent S

    2003-12-01

    Reaction with thiol converts the antitumor natural product leinamycin to an episulfonium ion that alkylates the N(7)-position of guanine residues in double-stranded DNA. The sequence specificity for DNA alkylation by this structurally novel compound has not previously been examined. It is reported here that leinamycin shows significant (>10-fold) preferences for alkylation at the 5'-G in 5'-GG and 5'-GT sequences. The sequence preferences for activated leinamycin are significantly different from that observed for the structurally simple episulfonium ion generated from 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide. DNA alkylation by activated leinamycin is inhibited by addition of salt (100 mM NaClO(4)), although the degree of inhibition is somewhat less than that seen for 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide. This result suggests that electrostatic interactions between the activated leinamycin and the N(7)-position of guanine residues facilitate efficient DNA alkylation. However, the observed sequence preferences for DNA alkylation by activated leinamycin do not correlate strongly with calculated sequence-dependent variations in the molecular electrostatic potential at the N(7)-atom of guanine residues in duplex DNA. Thus, electrostatic interactions between activated leinamycin and DNA do not appear to be the primary determinant for sequence specificity. Rather, the results suggest that sequence-specific noncovalent interactions of leinamycin with the DNA double helix on the 3'-side of the alkylated guanine residue play a major role in determining the preferred alkylation sites. Consistent with the notion that noncovalent binding plays an important role in DNA alkylation by leinamycin, experiments with 2'-deoxyoligonucleotide substrates confirm that the natural product does not alkylate single-stranded DNA under conditions where duplex DNA is efficiently alkylated.

  15. Generating quantitative models describing the sequence specificity of biological processes with the stabilized matrix method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sette Alessandro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many processes in molecular biology involve the recognition of short sequences of nucleic-or amino acids, such as the binding of immunogenic peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. From experimental data, a model of the sequence specificity of these processes can be constructed, such as a sequence motif, a scoring matrix or an artificial neural network. The purpose of these models is two-fold. First, they can provide a summary of experimental results, allowing for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in sequence recognition. Second, such models can be used to predict the experimental outcome for yet untested sequences. In the past we reported the development of a method to generate such models called the Stabilized Matrix Method (SMM. This method has been successfully applied to predicting peptide binding to MHC molecules, peptide transport by the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP and proteasomal cleavage of protein sequences. Results Herein we report the implementation of the SMM algorithm as a publicly available software package. Specific features determining the type of problems the method is most appropriate for are discussed. Advantageous features of the package are: (1 the output generated is easy to interpret, (2 input and output are both quantitative, (3 specific computational strategies to handle experimental noise are built in, (4 the algorithm is designed to effectively handle bounded experimental data, (5 experimental data from randomized peptide libraries and conventional peptides can easily be combined, and (6 it is possible to incorporate pair interactions between positions of a sequence. Conclusion Making the SMM method publicly available enables bioinformaticians and experimental biologists to easily access it, to compare its performance to other prediction methods, and to extend it to other applications.

  16. The first insight into the tissue specific taxus transcriptome via Illumina second generation sequencing.

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    Da Cheng Hao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Illumina second generation sequencing is now an efficient route for generating enormous sequence collections that represent expressed genes and quantitate expression level. Taxus is a world-wide endangered gymnosperm genus and forms an important anti-cancer medicinal resource, but the large and complex genomes of Taxus have hindered the development of genomic resources. The research of its tissue-specific transcriptome is absent. There is also no study concerning the association between the plant transcriptome and metabolome with respect to the plant tissue type. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed the de novo assembly of Taxus mairei transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In a single run, we produced 13,737,528 sequencing reads corresponding to 2.03 Gb total nucleotides. These reads were assembled into 36,493 unique sequences. Based on similarity search with known proteins, 23,515 Unigenes were identified to have the Blast hit with a cut-off E-value above 10⁻⁵. Furthermore, we investigated the transcriptome difference of three Taxus tissues using a tag-based digital gene expression system. We obtained a sequencing depth of over 3.15 million tags per sample and identified a large number of genes associated with tissue specific functions and taxane biosynthetic pathway. The expression of the taxane biosynthetic genes is significantly higher in the root than in the leaf and the stem, while high activity of taxane-producing pathway in the root was also revealed via metabolomic analyses. Moreover, many antisense transcripts and novel transcripts were found; clusters with similar differential expression patterns, enriched GO terms and enriched metabolic pathways with regard to the differentially expressed genes were revealed for the first time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provides the most comprehensive sequence resource available for Taxus study and will help define mechanisms of tissue

  17. A Novel Homozygous Frameshift Mutation in Exon 2 of LEP Gene Associated with Severe Obesity: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altawil, Ashwaq Shukri; Mawlawi, Horia Ahmad; Alghamdi, Khalid Ateeq; Almijmaj, Faten Fohaid

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic obesity is a rare type of obesity caused by a mutation in a single gene. Patients with monogenic obesity may develop early onset of obesity and severe metabolic abnormalities. A two-and-half-year-old girl was presented to our clinic because of excessive weight gain and hyperphagia. She was born at full term, by normal vaginal delivery with birth weight of 2.82 kg and no complications during pregnancy. The patient was the second child of two healthy, non-obese Saudis with known consanguinity. She gained weight rapidly leading to obesity at the age of three months. The demographic data and clinical features were recorded. Blood samples were collected and tested for endocrine and metabolic characteristics and genetic studies. Mutations of the LEP gene were screened. The coding exons 2 and 3 and the corresponding exon-intron boundaries were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers, analyzed by direct sequencing using an ABI sequencer 3500 xL GA (Applied Biosystems), and evaluated using the JSI SeqPilot software. The resulting sequence data were compared with the reference MM_0002302. We report a novel homozygous frameshift mutation c.144delin TAC (G1n49Thrfs*23) in exon 2 of the LEP gene associated with extreme obesity.

  18. Distributed Training Enhances Implicit Sequence Acquisition in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmottes, Lise; Meulemans, Thierry; Patinec, Marie-Aude; Maillart, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the effects of 2 different training structures on the implicit acquisition of a sequence in a serial reaction time (SRT) task in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: All of the children underwent 3 training sessions, followed by a retention session 2 weeks after the last session. In the…

  19. Analysis of sequence variation underlying tissue-specific transcription factor binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Karen M; De Gobbi, Marco; Hughes, Jim R; Derry, Christopher J; Ayyub, Helena; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; Vernimmen, Douglas; Garrick, David; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2013-08-01

    Although mutations causing monogenic disorders most frequently lie within the affected gene, sequence variation in complex disorders is more commonly found in noncoding regions. Furthermore, recent genome- wide studies have shown that common DNA sequence variants in noncoding regions are associated with "normal" variation in gene expression resulting in cell-specific and/or allele-specific differences. The mechanism by which such sequence variation causes changes in gene expression is largely unknown. We have addressed this by studying natural variation in the binding of key transcription factors (TFs) in the well-defined, purified cell system of erythropoiesis. We have shown that common polymorphisms frequently directly perturb the binding sites of key TFs, and detailed analysis shows how this causes considerable (~10-fold) changes in expression from a single allele in a tissue-specific manner. We also show how a SNP, located at some distance from the recognized TF binding site, may affect the recruitment of a large multiprotein complex and alter the associated chromatin modification of the variant regulatory element. This study illustrates the principles by which common sequence variation may cause changes in tissue-specific gene expression, and suggests that such variation may underlie an individual's propensity to develop complex human genetic diseases. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. Structure-guided sequence specificity engineering of the modification-dependent restriction endonuclease LpnPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Zagorskaitė, Evelina; Kauneckaitė, Kotryna; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-07-13

    The eukaryotic Set and Ring Associated (SRA) domains and structurally similar DNA recognition domains of prokaryotic cytosine modification-dependent restriction endonucleases recognize methylated, hydroxymethylated or glucosylated cytosine in various sequence contexts. Here, we report the apo-structure of the N-terminal SRA-like domain of the cytosine modification-dependent restriction enzyme LpnPI that recognizes modified cytosine in the 5'-C(mC)DG-3' target sequence (where mC is 5-methylcytosine or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and D = A/T/G). Structure-guided mutational analysis revealed LpnPI residues involved in base-specific interactions and demonstrated binding site plasticity that allowed limited target sequence degeneracy. Furthermore, modular exchange of the LpnPI specificity loops by structural equivalents of related enzymes AspBHI and SgrTI altered sequence specificity of LpnPI. Taken together, our results pave the way for specificity engineering of the cytosine modification-dependent restriction enzymes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Meldgaard, Michael; Sørensen, S

    1997-01-01

    rate of embryos. HLA-G seems to play an important role in the feto-maternal relationship. The polymorphism of the HLA-G locus is not fully clarified. One study has shown extensive nucleotide sequence variation in the exon 3 (alpha-2 domain) in healthy African Americans. A few studies in other...... populations have only revealed a limited polymorphism. We investigated the polymorphism of the exon 3 of HLA-G by means of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP)- and DNA sequencing analysis in a Danish population. We detected four single-base substitutions in exon 3...... compared to the sequence of HLA-6.0 (G*01011); one of these has not been reported before. We also found a deletion of the first base of codon 130 or the third of codon 129 in a heterozygous individual. This study, together with previous results, suggests that the polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene...

  2. Analysis of stranded information using an automated procedure for strand specific RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurgeirsson, Benjamín; Emanuelsson, Olof; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2014-07-28

    Strand specific RNA sequencing is rapidly replacing conventional cDNA sequencing as an approach for assessing information about the transcriptome. Alongside improved laboratory protocols the development of bioinformatical tools is steadily progressing. In the current procedure the Illumina TruSeq library preparation kit is used, along with additional reagents, to make stranded libraries in an automated fashion which are then sequenced on Illumina HiSeq 2000. By the use of freely available bioinformatical tools we show, through quality metrics, that the protocol is robust and reproducible. We further highlight the practicality of strand specific libraries by comparing expression of strand specific libraries to non-stranded libraries, by looking at known antisense transcription of pseudogenes and by identifying novel transcription. Furthermore, two ribosomal depletion kits, RiboMinus and RiboZero, are compared and two sequence aligners, Tophat2 and STAR, are also compared. The, non-stranded, Illumina TruSeq kit can be adapted to generate strand specific libraries and can be used to access detailed information on the transcriptome. The RiboZero kit is very effective in removing ribosomal RNA from total RNA and the STAR aligner produces high mapping yield in a short time. Strand specific data gives more detailed and correct results than does non-stranded data as we show when estimating expression values and in assembling transcripts. Even well annotated genomes need improvements and corrections which can be achieved using strand specific data. Researchers in the field should strive to use strand specific data; it allows for more confidence in the data analysis and is less likely to lead to false conclusions. If faced with analysing non-stranded data, researchers should be well aware of the caveats of that approach.

  3. A DNA sequence recognition loop on APOBEC3A controls substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Logue

    Full Text Available APOBEC3A (A3A, one of the seven-member APOBEC3 family of cytidine deaminases, lacks strong antiviral activity against lentiviruses but is a potent inhibitor of adeno-associated virus and endogenous retroelements. In this report, we characterize the biochemical properties of mammalian cell-produced and catalytically active E. coli-produced A3A. The enzyme binds to single-stranded DNA with a Kd of 150 nM and forms dimeric and monomeric fractions. A3A, unlike APOBEC3G (A3G, deaminates DNA substrates nonprocessively. Using a panel of oligonucleotides that contained all possible trinucleotide contexts, we identified the preferred target sequence as TC (A/G. Based on a three-dimensional model of A3A, we identified a putative binding groove that contains residues with the potential to bind substrate DNA and to influence target sequence specificity. Taking advantage of the sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of A3G, we generated A3A/A3G chimeric proteins and analyzed their target site preference. We identified a recognition loop that altered A3A sequence specificity, broadening its target sequence preference. Mutation of amino acids in the predicted DNA binding groove prevented substrate binding, confirming the role of this groove in substrate binding. These findings shed light on how APOBEC3 proteins bind their substrate and determine which sites to deaminate.

  4. Comparison of HPV genotyping by type-specific PCR and sequencing

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    Nara de Oliveira Carvalho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and there is a strong link between certain high-risk viral types and cervical carcinogenesis. Although there are several typing methods, it is still unclear which test is the best. This study compared the effectiveness of type-specific PCR (TS-PCR and sequencing, with a focus on their clinical application. A total of 260 cervical samples from HPV-positive patients were tested for types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 using TS-PCR and sequencing. The genotype was identified in 36% of cases by TS-PCR and in 75% by sequencing. Sequencing was four times more likely to identify the viral type in positive samples than TS-PCR (p = 0.00. Despite being more effective for virus genotyping, sequencing was unable to identify viral types in multiple infections. Combining both techniques resulted in highly sensitive detection (87% of cases, showing that they are complementary methods. HPV genotyping is an important step in HPV management, helping to identify patients with a higher risk of developing cervical cancer and contributing to the development of type-specific vaccines.

  5. Comparison of HPV genotyping by type-specific PCR and sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Nara de Oliveira; del Castillo, Dora Méndez; Perone, Carlos; Januário, José Nélio; Melo, Victor Hugo de; Brasileiro Filho, Geraldo

    2010-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and there is a strong link between certain high-risk viral types and cervical carcinogenesis. Although there are several typing methods, it is still unclear which test is the best. This study compared the effectiveness of type-specific PCR (TS-PCR) and sequencing, with a focus on their clinical application. A total of 260 cervical samples from HPV-positive patients were tested for types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 using TS-PCR and sequencing. The genotype was identified in 36% of cases by TS-PCR and in 75% by sequencing. Sequencing was four times more likely to identify the viral type in positive samples than TS-PCR (p = 0.00). Despite being more effective for virus genotyping, sequencing was unable to identify viral types in multiple infections. Combining both techniques resulted in highly sensitive detection (87% of cases), showing that they are complementary methods. HPV genotyping is an important step in HPV management, helping to identify patients with a higher risk of developing cervical cancer and contributing to the development of type-specific vaccines.

  6. Intron Retention and TE Exonization Events in ZRANB2

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    Sang-Je Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Zinc finger, RAN-binding domain-containing protein 2 (ZRANB2, contains arginine/serine-rich (RS domains that mediate its function in the regulation of alternative splicing. The ZRANB2 gene contains 2 LINE elements (L3b, Plat_L3 between the 9th and 10th exons. We identified the exonization event of a LINE element (Plat_L3. Using genomic PCR, RT-PCR amplification, and sequencing of primate DNA and RNA samples, we analyzed the evolutionary features of ZRANB2 transcripts. The results indicated that 2 of the LINE elements were integrated in human and all of the tested primate samples (hominoids: 3 species; Old World monkey: 8 species; New World monkey: 6 species; prosimian: 1 species. Human, rhesus monkey, crab-eating monkey, African-green monkey, and marmoset harbor the exon derived from LINE element (Plat_L3. RT-PCR amplification revealed the long transcripts and their differential expression patterns. Intriguingly, these long transcripts were abundantly expressed in Old World monkey lineages (rhesus, crab-eating, and African-green monkeys and were expressed via intron retention (IR. Thus, the ZRANB2 gene produces 3 transcript variants in which the Cterminus varies by transposable elements (TEs exonization and IR mechanisms. Therefore, ZRANB2 is valuable for investigating the evolutionary mechanisms of TE exonization and IR during primate evolution.

  7. Pathogenic exon-trapping by SVA retrotransposon and rescue in Fukuyama muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Kanagawa, Motoi; Yu, Chih-chieh; Mori, Kouhei; Oda, Tetsuya; Kuga, Atsushi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Akman, Hasan O; DiMauro, Salvatore; Kaji, Ryuji; Yokota, Toshifumi; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Toda, Tatsushi

    2011-10-05

    Fukuyama muscular dystrophy (FCMD; MIM253800), one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders in Japan, was the first human disease found to result from ancestral insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) retrotransposon into a causative gene. In FCMD, the SVA insertion occurs in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the fukutin gene. The pathogenic mechanism for FCMD is unknown, and no effective clinical treatments exist. Here we show that aberrant messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, induced by SVA exon-trapping, underlies the molecular pathogenesis of FCMD. Quantitative mRNA analysis pinpointed a region that was missing from transcripts in patients with FCMD. This region spans part of the 3' end of the fukutin coding region, a proximal part of the 3' UTR and the SVA insertion. Correspondingly, fukutin mRNA transcripts in patients with FCMD and SVA knock-in model mice were shorter than the expected length. Sequence analysis revealed an abnormal splicing event, provoked by a strong acceptor site in SVA and a rare alternative donor site in fukutin exon 10. The resulting product truncates the fukutin carboxy (C) terminus and adds 129 amino acids encoded by the SVA. Introduction of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) targeting the splice acceptor, the predicted exonic splicing enhancer and the intronic splicing enhancer prevented pathogenic exon-trapping by SVA in cells of patients with FCMD and model mice, rescuing normal fukutin mRNA expression and protein production. AON treatment also restored fukutin functions, including O-glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) and laminin binding by α-DG. Moreover, we observe exon-trapping in other SVA insertions associated with disease (hypercholesterolemia, neutral lipid storage disease) and human-specific SVA insertion in a novel gene. Thus, although splicing into SVA is known, we have discovered in human disease a role for SVA-mediated exon-trapping and demonstrated the promise of splicing modulation therapy as the first radical

  8. Specific Deficit in Implicit Motor Sequence Learning following Spinal Cord Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Bloch

    Full Text Available Physical and psychosocial rehabilitation following spinal cord injury (SCI leans heavily on learning and practicing new skills. However, despite research relating motor sequence learning to spinal cord activity and clinical observations of impeded skill-learning after SCI, implicit procedural learning following spinal cord damage has not been examined.To test the hypothesis that spinal cord injury (SCI in the absence of concomitant brain injury is associated with a specific implicit motor sequence learning deficit that cannot be explained by depression or impairments in other cognitive measures.Ten participants with SCI in T1-T11, unharmed upper limb motor and sensory functioning, and no concomitant brain injury were compared to ten matched control participants on measures derived from the serial reaction time (SRT task, which was used to assess implicit motor sequence learning. Explicit generation of the SRT sequence, depression, and additional measures of learning, memory, and intelligence were included to explore the source and specificity of potential learning deficits.There was no between-group difference in baseline reaction time, indicating that potential differences between the learning curves of the two groups could not be attributed to an overall reduction in response speed in the SCI group. Unlike controls, the SCI group showed no decline in reaction time over the first six blocks of the SRT task and no advantage for the initially presented sequence over the novel interference sequence. Meanwhile, no group differences were found in explicit learning, depression, or any additional cognitive measures.The dissociation between impaired implicit learning and intact declarative memory represents novel empirical evidence of a specific implicit procedural learning deficit following SCI, with broad implications for rehabilitation and adjustment.

  9. Determining DNA Sequence Specificity of Natural and Artificial Transcription Factors by Cognate Site Identifier Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozers, Mary S.; Warren, Christopher L.; Ansari, Aseem Z.

    Artificial transcription factors (ATFs) are designed to mimic natural transcription factors in the control of gene expression and are comprised of domains for DNA binding and gene regulation. ATF domains are modular, interchangeable, and can be composed of protein-based or nonpeptidic moieties, yielding DNA-interacting regulatory molecules that can either activate or inhibit transcription. Sequence-specific targeting is a key determinant in ATF activity, and DNA-binding domains such as natural zinc fingers and synthetic polyamides have emerged as useful DNA targeting molecules. Defining the comprehensive DNA binding specificity of these targeting molecules for accurate manipulations of the genome can be achieved using cognate site identifier DNA microarrays to explore the entire sequence space of binding sites. Design of ATFs that regulate gene expression with temporal control will generate important molecular tools to probe cell- and tissue-specific gene regulation and to function as potential therapeutic agents.

  10. Cofactory: Sequence-based prediction of cofactor specificity of Rossmann folds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Blom, Nikolaj; Feist, Adam

    2014-01-01

    cofactor specificity using only primary amino acid sequence information. The algorithm identifies potential cofactor binding Rossinann folds and predicts the specificity for the cofactors FAD(H2), NAD(H), and NADP(H) The Rossmann fold sequence search is carried out using hidden Markov models whereas......Obtaining optimal cofactor balance to drive production is a challenge metabolically engineered microbial strains. To facilitate identification of heterologous enzymes with desirable altered cofactor requirements from native content, we have developed Cofactory, a method for prediction of enzyme...... artificial neural networks are used for specificity prediction. Training was carried out using experimental data from protein cofactor structure complexes. The overall performance was benchmarked against an independent evaluation set obtaining Matthews correlation coefficients of 0.94, 0.79, and 0.65 for FAD...

  11. Efficient and specific internal cleavage of a retroviral palindromic DNA sequence by tetrameric HIV-1 integrase.

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    Olivier Delelis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 integrase (IN catalyses the retroviral integration process, removing two nucleotides from each long terminal repeat and inserting the processed viral DNA into the target DNA. It is widely assumed that the strand transfer step has no sequence specificity. However, recently, it has been reported by several groups that integration sites display a preference for palindromic sequences, suggesting that a symmetry in the target DNA may stabilise the tetrameric organisation of IN in the synaptic complex. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the ability of several palindrome-containing sequences to organise tetrameric IN and investigated the ability of IN to catalyse DNA cleavage at internal positions. Only one palindromic sequence was successfully cleaved by IN. Interestingly, this symmetrical sequence corresponded to the 2-LTR junction of retroviral DNA circles-a palindrome similar but not identical to the consensus sequence found at integration sites. This reaction depended strictly on the cognate retroviral sequence of IN and required a full-length wild-type IN. Furthermore, the oligomeric state of IN responsible for this cleavage differed from that involved in the 3'-processing reaction. Palindromic cleavage strictly required the tetrameric form, whereas 3'-processing was efficiently catalysed by a dimer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that the restriction-like cleavage of palindromic sequences may be a general physiological activity of retroviral INs and that IN tetramerisation is strongly favoured by DNA symmetry, either at the target site for the concerted integration or when the DNA contains the 2-LTR junction in the case of the palindromic internal cleavage.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Menghai flavivirus, a novel insect-specific flavivirus from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Guo, Xiaofang; Fan, Hang; Zhao, Qiumin; Zuo, Shuqing; Sun, Qiang; Pei, Guangqian; Cheng, Shi; An, Xiaoping; Wang, Yunfei; Mi, Zhiqiang; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Zhiyi; Tong, Yigang; Zhou, Hongning; Zhang, Jiusong

    2017-05-01

    Menghai flavivirus (MFV) was isolated from Aedes albopictus in Menghai county of Yunnan Province, China, during an arboviruses screening program in August 2010. Whole genome sequencing of MFV was performed using an Ion PGM™ Sequencer. The complete genome of MFV was 10897 nucleotides in length and encoded a polyprotein and fairly interesting flavivirus orf (FIFO). The polyprotein contained three flavivirus structural proteins (C, prM/M and E) and seven nonstructural proteins. Nucleotide BLAST analysis revealed that the MFV genome showed highest similarity to Xishuangbanna Aedes flavivirus, a novel insect-specific flavivirus recently isolated from the same area. These species shared a query cover of 99%, but only 71% identity, while FIFO showed no similarity with any of the published sequences. Genomic and phylogenetic analyses suggested that MFV was a novel species of the genus Flavivirus. Our findings enrich our understanding of the genetics and prevalence of the family Flaviviridae.

  13. High sequence variability among hemocyte-specific Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors in decapod crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerenius, Lage; Liu, Haipeng; Zhang, Yanjiao; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Gunnar Andersson, M; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Crustacean hemocytes were found to produce a large number of transcripts coding for Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs). A detailed study performed with the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the shrimp Penaeus monodon revealed the presence of at least 26 and 20 different Kazal domains from the hemocyte KPIs, respectively. Comparisons with KPIs from other taxa indicate that the sequences of these domains evolve rapidly. A few conserved positions, e.g. six invariant cysteines were present in all domain sequences whereas the position of P1 amino acid, a determinant for substrate specificity, varied highly. A study with a single crayfish animal suggested that even at the individual level considerable sequence variability among hemocyte KPIs produced exist. Expression analysis of four crayfish KPI transcripts in hematopoietic tissue cells and different hemocyte types suggest that some of these KPIs are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis or hemocyte release as they were produced in particular hemocyte types or maturation stages only.

  14. A molecular code dictates sequence-specific DNA recognition by homeodomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damante, G; Pellizzari, L; Esposito, G; Fogolari, F; Viglino, P; Fabbro, D; Tell, G; Formisano, S; Di Lauro, R

    1996-09-16

    Most homeodomains bind to DNA sequences containing the motif 5'-TAAT-3'. The homeodomain of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1HD) binds to sequences containing a 5'-CAAG-3' core motif, delineating a new mechanism for differential DNA recognition by homeodomains. We investigated the molecular basis of the DNA binding specificity of TTF-1HD by both structural and functional approaches. As already suggested by the three-dimensional structure of TTF-1HD, the DNA binding specificities of the TTF-1, Antennapedia and Engrailed homeodomains, either wild-type or mutants, indicated that the amino acid residue in position 54 is involved in the recognition of the nucleotide at the 3' end of the core motif 5'-NAAN-3'. The nucleotide at the 5' position of this core sequence is recognized by the amino acids located in position 6, 7 and 8 of the TTF-1 and Antennapedia homeodomains. These data, together with previous suggestions on the role of amino acids in position 50, indicate that the DNA binding specificity of homeodomains can be determined by a combinatorial molecular code. We also show that some specific combinations of the key amino acid residues involved in DNA recognition do not follow a simple, additive rule.

  15. Strong physical constraints on sequence-specific target location by proteins on DNA molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Keatch, S.A.; Dryden, D.T.F

    2006-01-01

    of the loading bay and allows an estimation of the size of the footprint on the DNA of the sequence-specific protein by assaying protein binding or function in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-specific ligand. Assaying for function gives an 'activity footprint'; the minimum length of DNA required...... for function rather than the more commonly measured physical footprint. Assaying the complex type I restriction enzyme, EcoKI, gives an activity footprint of similar to 66 bp for ATP hydrolysis and 300 bp for the DNA cleavage function which is intimately linked with translocation of DNA by EcoKI. Furthermore......Sequence-specific binding to DNA in the presence of competing non-sequence-specific ligands is a problem faced by proteins in all organisms. It is akin to the problem of parking a truck at a loading bay by the side of a road in the presence of cars parked at random along the road. Cars even...

  16. Conservation of CD44 exon v3 functional elements in mammals

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    Fernández-Bellon Hugo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human CD44 gene contains 10 variable exons (v1 to v10 that can be alternatively spliced to generate hundreds of different CD44 protein isoforms. Human CD44 variable exon v3 inclusion in the final mRNA depends on a multisite bipartite splicing enhancer located within the exon itself, which we have recently described, and provides the protein domain responsible for growth factor binding to CD44. Findings We have analyzed the sequence of CD44v3 in 95 mammalian species to report high conservation levels for both its splicing regulatory elements (the 3' splice site and the exonic splicing enhancer, and the functional glycosaminglycan binding site coded by v3. We also report the functional expression of CD44v3 isoforms in peripheral blood cells of different mammalian taxa with both consensus and variant v3 sequences. Conclusion CD44v3 mammalian sequences maintain all functional splicing regulatory elements as well as the GAG binding site with the same relative positions and sequence identity previously described during alternative splicing of human CD44. The sequence within the GAG attachment site, which in turn contains the Y motif of the exonic splicing enhancer, is more conserved relative to the rest of exon. Amplification of CD44v3 sequence from mammalian species but not from birds, fish or reptiles, may lead to classify CD44v3 as an exclusive mammalian gene trait.

  17. Frustration, specific sequence dependence, and nonlinearity in large-amplitude fluctuations of allosteric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfei; Wolynes, Peter G; Takada, Shoji

    2011-03-01

    Proteins have often evolved sequences so as to acquire the ability for regulation via allosteric conformational change. Here we investigate how allosteric dynamics is designed through sequences with nonlinear interaction features. First, for 71 allosteric proteins of which two, open and closed, structures are available, a statistical survey of interactions using an all-atom model with effective solvation shows that those residue contact interactions specific to one of the two states are significantly weaker than are the contact interactions shared by the two states. This interaction feature indicates there is underlying sequence design to facilitate conformational change. Second, based on the energy landscape theory, we implement these interaction features into a new atomic-interaction-based coarse-grained model via a multiscale simulation protocol (AICG). The AICG model outperforms standard coarse-grained models for predictions of the native-state mean fluctuations and of the conformational change direction. Third, using the new model for adenylate kinase, we show that intrinsic fluctuations in one state contain rare and large-amplitude motions nearly reaching the other state. Such large-amplitude motions are realized partly by sequence specificity and partly by the nonlinear nature of contact interactions, leading to cracking. Both features enhance conformational transition rates.

  18. Identification of Bacillus anthracis specific chromosomal sequences by suppressive subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redkar Rajendra

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus are closely related members of the B. cereus-group of bacilli. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH was used to identify specific chromosomal sequences unique to B. anthracis. Results Two SSH libraries were generated. Genomic DNA from plasmid-cured B. anthracis was used as the tester DNA in both libraries, while genomic DNA from either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis served as the driver DNA. Progressive screening of the libraries by colony filter and Southern blot analyses identified 29 different clones that were specific for the B. anthracis chromosome relative not only to the respective driver DNAs, but also to seven other different strains of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis included in the process. The nucleotide sequences of the clones were compared with those found in genomic databases, revealing that over half of the clones were located into 2 regions on the B. anthracis chromosome. Conclusions Genes encoding potential cell wall synthesis proteins dominated one region, while bacteriophage-related sequences dominated the other region. The latter supports the hypothesis that acquisition of these bacteriophage sequences occurred during or after speciation of B. anthracis relative to B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This study provides insight into the chromosomal differences between B. anthracis and its closest phylogenetic relatives.

  19. Sequence-specific electron injection into DNA from an intermolecular electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Hironobu; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Electron transfer in DNA has been intensively studied to elucidate its biological roles and for applications in bottom-up DNA nanotechnology. Recently, mechanisms of electron transfer to DNA have been investigated; however, most of the systems designed are intramolecular. Here, we synthesized pyrene-conjugated pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PPIs) to achieve sequence-specific electron injection into DNA in an intermolecular fashion. Electron injection from PPIs into DNA was detected using 5-bromouracil as an electron acceptor. Twelve different 5-bromouracil-containing oligomers were synthesized to examine the electron-injection ability of PPI. Product analysis demonstrated that the electron transfer from PPIs was localized in a range of 8 bp from the binding site of the PPIs. These results demonstrate that PPIs can be a useful tool for sequence-specific electron injection.

  20. Organism-specific rRNA capture system for application in next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Kam Li

    Full Text Available RNA-sequencing is a powerful tool in studying RNomics. However, the highly abundance of ribosomal RNAs (rRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA have predominated in the sequencing reads, thereby hindering the study of lowly expressed genes. Therefore, rRNA depletion prior to sequencing is often performed in order to preserve the subtle alteration in gene expression especially those at relatively low expression levels. One of the commercially available methods is to use DNA or RNA probes to hybridize to the target RNAs. However, there is always a concern with the non-specific binding and unintended removal of messenger RNA (mRNA when the same set of probes is applied to different organisms. The degree of such unintended mRNA removal varies among organisms due to organism-specific genomic variation. We developed a computer-based method to design probes to deplete rRNA in an organism-specific manner. Based on the computation results, biotinylated-RNA-probes were produced by in vitro transcription and were used to perform rRNA depletion with subtractive hybridization. We demonstrated that the designed probes of 16S rRNAs and 23S rRNAs can efficiently remove rRNAs from Mycobacterium smegmatis. In comparison with a commercial subtractive hybridization-based rRNA removal kit, using organism-specific probes is better in preserving the RNA integrity and abundance. We believe the computer-based design approach can be used as a generic method in preparing RNA of any organisms for next-generation sequencing, particularly for the transcriptome analysis of microbes.

  1. Sequence-specific electron injection into DNA from an intermolecular electron donor

    OpenAIRE

    Morinaga, Hironobu; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer in DNA has been intensively studied to elucidate its biological roles and for applications in bottom-up DNA nanotechnology. Recently, mechanisms of electron transfer to DNA have been investigated; however, most of the systems designed are intramolecular. Here, we synthesized pyrene-conjugated pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PPIs) to achieve sequence-specific electron injection into DNA in an intermolecular fashion. Electron injection from PPIs into DNA was detected using 5-bro...

  2. cDNA sequence and gene locus of the human retinal phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-C{beta}4 (PLCB4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Ghalayini, A.J.; Anderson, R.E. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Defects in the Drosophila norpA (no receptor potential A) gene encoding a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) block invertebrate phototransduction and lead to retinal degeneration. The mammalian homolog, PLCB4, is expressed in rat brain, bovine cerebellum, and the bovine retina in several splice variants. To determine a possible role of PLCB4 gene defects in human disease, we isolated several overlapping cDNA clones from a human retina library. The composite cDNA sequence predicts a human PLC{beta}4 polypeptide of 1022 amino acid residues (MW 117,000). This PLC{beta}4 variant lacks a 165-amino-acid N-terminal domain characteristic for the rat brain isoforms, but has a distinct putative exon 1 unique for human and bovine retina isoforms. A PLC{beta}4 monospecific antibody detected a major (130 kDa) and a minor (160 kDa) isoform in retina homogenates. Somatic cell hybrids and deletion panels were used to localize the PCLB4 gene to the short arm of chromosome 20. The gene was further sublocalized to 20p12 by florescence in situ hybridization. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  3. JACUSA: site-specific identification of RNA editing events from replicate sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechotta, Michael; Wyler, Emanuel; Ohler, Uwe; Landthaler, Markus; Dieterich, Christoph

    2017-01-03

    RNA editing is a co-transcriptional modification that increases the molecular diversity, alters secondary structure and protein coding sequences by changing the sequence of transcripts. The most common RNA editing modification is the single base substitution (A→I) that is catalyzed by the members of the Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADAR) family. Typically, editing sites are identified as RNA-DNA-differences (RDDs) in a comparison of genome and transcriptome data from next-generation sequencing experiments. However, a method for robust detection of site-specific editing events from replicate RNA-seq data has not been published so far. Even more surprising, condition-specific editing events, which would show up as differences in RNA-RNA comparisons (RRDs) and depend on particular cellular states, are rarely discussed in the literature. We present JACUSA, a versatile one-stop solution to detect single nucleotide variant positions from comparing RNA-DNA and/or RNA-RNA sequencing samples. The performance of JACUSA has been carefully evaluated and compared to other variant callers in an in silico benchmark. JACUSA outperforms other algorithms in terms of the F measure, which combines precision and recall, in all benchmark scenarios. This performance margin is highest for the RNA-RNA comparison scenario. We further validated JACUSA's performance by testing its ability to detect A→I events using sequencing data from a human cell culture experiment and publicly available RNA-seq data from Drosophila melanogaster heads. To this end, we performed whole genome and RNA sequencing of HEK-293 cells on samples with lowered activity of candidate RNA editing enzymes. JACUSA has a higher recall and comparable precision for detecting true editing sites in RDD comparisons of HEK-293 data. Intriguingly, JACUSA captures most A→I events from RRD comparisons of RNA sequencing data derived from Drosophila and HEK-293 data sets. Our software JACUSA detects single nucleotide

  4. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seung-Joo

    2010-03-28

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5\\'-TGGTC-3\\') than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Automated sequence-specific protein NMR assignment using the memetic algorithm MATCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volk, Jochen [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Universite de Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB-Lyon 1 (France); Wuethrich, Kurt [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik (Switzerland)], E-mail: wuthrich@mol.biol.ethz.ch

    2008-07-15

    MATCH (Memetic Algorithm and Combinatorial Optimization Heuristics) is a new memetic algorithm for automated sequence-specific polypeptide backbone NMR assignment of proteins. MATCH employs local optimization for tracing partial sequence-specific assignments within a global, population-based search environment, where the simultaneous application of local and global optimization heuristics guarantees high efficiency and robustness. MATCH thus makes combined use of the two predominant concepts in use for automated NMR assignment of proteins. Dynamic transition and inherent mutation are new techniques that enable automatic adaptation to variable quality of the experimental input data. The concept of dynamic transition is incorporated in all major building blocks of the algorithm, where it enables switching between local and global optimization heuristics at any time during the assignment process. Inherent mutation restricts the intrinsically required randomness of the evolutionary algorithm to those regions of the conformation space that are compatible with the experimental input data. Using intact and artificially deteriorated APSY-NMR input data of proteins, MATCH performed sequence-specific resonance assignment with high efficiency and robustness.

  6. Advantage of whole exome sequencing over allele-specific and targeted segment sequencing in detection of novel TULP1 mutation in leber congenital amaurosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yiran; Prokudin, Ivan; Yu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    . A broader next-generation sequencing (NGS) strategy, such as whole exome sequencing, provides an improved molecular genetic diagnostic capacity for patients with these conditions.Materials and Methods: In a child with LCA, an allele-specific assay analyzing 135 known LCA-causing variations, followed......Background: Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe form of retinal dystrophy with marked underlying genetic heterogeneity. Until recently, allele-specific assays and Sanger sequencing of targeted segments were the only available approaches for attempted genetic diagnosis in this condition......Eff to annotate the variants.Results: No disease-causing variants were found using the allele-specific or targeted segment Sanger sequencing assays. Analysis of variants in the exome sequence data revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1081C > T, p.Arg361) in TULP1, a gene with roles in photoreceptor...

  7. Global analysis of aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in glioblastoma using exon expression arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nixon Tamara J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-predominant splice isoforms were identified during comparative in silico sequence analysis of EST clones, suggesting that global aberrant alternative pre-mRNA splicing may be an epigenetic phenomenon in cancer. We used an exon expression array to perform an objective, genome-wide survey of glioma-specific splicing in 24 GBM and 12 nontumor brain samples. Validation studies were performed using RT-PCR on glioma cell lines, patient tumor and nontumor brain samples. Results In total, we confirmed 14 genes with glioma-specific splicing; seven were novel events identified by the exon expression array (A2BP1, BCAS1, CACNA1G, CLTA, KCNC2, SNCB, and TPD52L2. Our data indicate that large changes (> 5-fold in alternative splicing are infrequent in gliomagenesis ( Conclusion While we observed some tumor-specific alternative splicing, the number of genes showing exclusive tumor-specific isoforms was on the order of tens, rather than the hundreds suggested previously by in silico mining. Given the important role of alternative splicing in neural differentiation, there may be selective pressure to maintain a majority of splicing events in order to retain glial-like characteristics of the tumor cells.

  8. Determinants of antigenicity and specificity in immune response for protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Target specific antibodies are pivotal for the design of vaccines, immunodiagnostic tests, studies on proteomics for cancer biomarker discovery, identification of protein-DNA and other interactions, and small and large biochemical assays. Therefore, it is important to understand the properties of protein sequences that are important for antigenicity and to identify small peptide epitopes and large regions in the linear sequence of the proteins whose utilization result in specific antibodies. Results Our analysis using protein properties suggested that sequence composition combined with evolutionary information and predicted secondary structure, as well as solvent accessibility is sufficient to predict successful peptide epitopes. The antigenicity and the specificity in immune response were also found to depend on the epitope length. We trained the B-Cell Epitope Oracle (BEOracle, a support vector machine (SVM classifier, for the identification of continuous B-Cell epitopes with these protein properties as learning features. The BEOracle achieved an F1-measure of 81.37% on a large validation set. The BEOracle classifier outperformed the classical methods based on propensity and sophisticated methods like BCPred and Bepipred for B-Cell epitope prediction. The BEOracle classifier also identified peptides for the ChIP-grade antibodies from the modENCODE/ENCODE projects with 96.88% accuracy. High BEOracle score for peptides showed some correlation with the antibody intensity on Immunofluorescence studies done on fly embryos. Finally, a second SVM classifier, the B-Cell Region Oracle (BROracle was trained with the BEOracle scores as features to predict the performance of antibodies generated with large protein regions with high accuracy. The BROracle classifier achieved accuracies of 75.26-63.88% on a validation set with immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, protein arrays and western blot results from Protein Atlas database

  9. Lack of exon 10 in the murine tau gene results in mild sensorimotor defects with aging

    OpenAIRE

    Gumucio, Astrid; Lannfelt, Lars; Nilsson, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex species-specific, developmental- and tissue-dependent mechanisms regulate alternative splicing of tau, thereby diversifying tau protein synthesis. The functional role of alternative splicing of tau e.g. exon 10 has never been examined in vivo, although genetic studies suggest that it is important to neurodegenerative disease. Results Gene-targeting was used to delete exon 10 in muri...

  10. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  11. Surface Structure and Hydration of Sequence-Specific Amphiphilic Polypeptoids for Antifouling/Fouling Release Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chuan; Buss, Hilda G; Segalman, Rachel A; Chen, Zhan

    2015-09-01

    Amphiphilic polypeptoids can be designed with specific sequences of hydrophilic and hydrophobic units, which determine their surface properties for antifouling/fouling release purposes. Although the sequence-dependent surface structures of polypeptoids have been extensively investigated, e.g., with X-ray spectroscopy, their molecular structures under the aqueous conditions relevant to marine fouling have not been studied. In this work, we applied sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to study the surface structures and hydration of a series of amphiphilic polypeptoid coatings with different sequences in air and water. SFG spectra, in agreement with X-ray spectroscopy studies, revealed that the surface coverage of the hydrophilic N-(2-methoxyethyl)glycine (Nme) units in air is affected by both the number and position of the hydrophobic N-(heptafluorobutyl)glycine (NF) units in the peptoid chain and is negatively correlated with the surface concentration of the fluorine element. Our ability to probe the SFG signals of water molecules at the peptoid surface provides new information on the hydrated film properties. From these SFG signals and the time evolution of water contact angles on the polymers, we see that the hydrated film properties are also dependent upon the peptoid sequence. This work indicates that the surface presence of the Nme groups and the ability of the polymers to order and strongly hydrogen bond with interfacial water molecules determine their antifouling properties, whereas the surface restructuring rate upon contact with water affects their fouling release behaviors.

  12. Gaucher disease: A G[sup +1][yields]A[sup +1] IVS2 splice donor site mutation causing exon 2 skipping in the acid [beta]-glucosidase mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Guo-Shun (Mount Siani School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G.A. (Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disease and the most prevalent Jewish genetic disease. About 30 identified missense mutations are causal to the defective activity of acid [beta]-glucosidase in this disease. cDNAs were characterized from a moderately affected 9-year-old Ashkenazi Jewish Gaucher disease type 1 patient whose 80-years-old, enzyme-deficient, 1226G (Asn[sup 370][yields]Ser [N370S]) homozygous grandfather was nearly asymptomatic. Sequence analyses revealed four populations of cDNAs with either the 1226G mutation, an exact exon 2 ([Delta] EX2) deletion, a deletion of exon 2 and the first 115 bp of exon 3 ([Delta] EX2-3), or a completely normal sequence. About 50% of the cDNAs were the [Delta] EX2, the [Delta] EX2-3, and the normal cDNAs, in a ratio of 6:3:1. Specific amplification and characterization of exon 2 and 5[prime] and 3[prime] intronic flanking sequences from the structural gene demonstrated clones with either the normal sequence or with a G[sup +1][yields]A[sup +1] transition at the exon 2/intron 2 boundary. This mutation destroyed the splice donor consensus site (U1 binding site) for mRNA processing. This transition also was present at the corresponding exon/intron boundary of the highly homologous pseudogene. This new mutation, termed [open quotes]IVS2 G[sup +1],[close quotes] is the first in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The occurrence of this [open quotes]pseudogene[close quotes]-type mutation in the structural gene indicates the role of acid [beta]-glucosidase pseudogene and structural gene rearrangements in the pathogenesis of this disease. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Birgit G

    2014-12-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR PCR kit, Qiagen, UK; reference method). For immunohistochemistry, antibodies against exon19 deletions (clone 6B6), exon21 mutations (clone 43B2) from Cell Signaling Technology (Boston, USA) and EGFR variantIII (clone 218C9) from Dako (Copenhagen, DK) were applied. Protein expression was evaluated, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94.4-99.4%). Sensitivity of exon19 antibody was 63.2% (95% confidence interval=38.4-83.7%) and of exon21 antibody was 80.0% (95% confidence interval=44.4-97.5%). Seven exon19 and four exon21 mutations were false negatives (immunohistochemistry negative, RT-PCR positive). Two exon19 and three exon21 mutations were false positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC

  14. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish K Mishra

    Full Text Available Membrane transport proteins (transporters move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task.Support vector machine (SVM-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM, were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset.Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions

  15. Conserved usage of alternative 5' untranslated exons of the GATA4 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Mazaud Guittot

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available GATA4 is an essential transcription factor required for the development and function of multiple organs. Despite this important role, our knowledge of how the GATA4 gene is regulated remains limited. To better understand this regulation, we characterized the 5' region of the mouse, rat, and human GATA4 genes.Using 5' RACE, we identified novel transcription start sites in all three species. GATA4 is expressed as multiple transcripts with varying 5' ends encoded by alternative untranslated first exons. Two of these non-coding first exons are conserved between species: exon 1a located 3.5 kb upstream of the GATA4 ATG site in exon 2, and a second first exon (exon 1b located 28 kb further upstream. Expression of both mRNA variants was found in all GATA4-expressing organs but with a preference for the exon 1a-containing transcript. The exception was the testis where exon 1a- and 1b-containing transcripts were similarly expressed. In some tissues such as the intestine, alternative transcript expression appears to be regionally regulated. Polysome analysis suggests that both mRNA variants contribute to GATA4 protein synthesis.Taken together, our results indicate that the GATA4 gene closely resembles the other GATA family members in terms of gene structure where alternative first exon usage appears to be an important mechanism for regulating its tissue- and cell-specific expression.

  16. Identification of sex in Cetaceans by multiplexing with three ZFX and ZFY specific primers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berube, M; Palsboll, P

    We sequenced 540 nucleotides of the last exon in the ZFY/ZFX gene in two males and two females for eight cetacean species; four odontocetes (toothed whales) and four mysticetes (baleen whales). Based upon the obtained nucleotide sequences, we designed two sets of oligonucleotide primers for specific

  17. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    packages' apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we...

  18. An algorithm and program for finding sequence specific oligo-nucleotide probes for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tautz Diethard

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of species or species groups with specific oligo-nucleotides as molecular signatures is becoming increasingly popular for bacterial samples. However, it shows also great promise for other small organisms that are taxonomically difficult to tract. Results We have devised here an algorithm that aims to find the optimal probes for any given set of sequences. The program requires only a crude alignment of these sequences as input and is optimized for performance to deal also with very large datasets. The algorithm is designed such that the position of mismatches in the probes influences the selection and makes provision of single nucleotide outloops. Program implementations are available for Linux and Windows.

  19. hnRNP A1 and hnRNP F modulate the alternative splicing of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Talukdar

    Full Text Available Exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene (INSR is alternatively spliced in a developmentally and tissue-specific manner. Linker scanning mutations in a 5' GA-rich enhancer in intron 10 identified AGGGA sequences that are important for enhancer function. Using RNA-affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified hnRNP F and hnRNP A1 binding to these AGGGA sites and also to similar motifs at the 3' end of the intron. The hnRNPs have opposite functional effects with hnRNP F promoting and hnRNP A1 inhibiting exon 11 inclusion, and deletion of the GA-rich elements eliminates both effects. We also observed specific binding of hnRNP A1 to the 5' splice site of intron 11. The SR protein SRSF1 (SF2/ASF co-purified on the GA-rich enhancer and, interestingly, also competes with hnRNP A1 for binding to the splice site. A point mutation -3U→C decreases hnRNP A1 binding, increases SRSF1 binding and renders the exon constitutive. Lastly, our data point to a functional interaction between hnRNP F and SRSF1 as a mutant that eliminates SRSF1 binding to exon 11, or a SRSF1 knockdown, which prevents the stimulatory effect of hnRNP F over expression.

  20. Detection of an exon 53 polymorphism in the dystrophin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S

    1993-10-01

    We utilized a heteroduplex method to screen for small mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients who did not have deletions or duplications. A dystrophin exon 53 heteroduplex band was identified in 14.4% of the affected patients. Direct sequencing of the amplified product from DNA producing the heteroduplex revealed the presence of a polymorphism in the coding region. The codon for asparagine was converted from AAT to AAC.

  1. Sequence-non-specific effects generated by various types of RNA interference triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejniczak, Marta; Urbanek, Martyna O; Jaworska, Edyta; Witucki, Lukasz; Szczesniak, Michal W; Makalowska, Izabela; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-02-01

    RNA interference triggers such as short interfering RNA (siRNA) or genetically encoded short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and artificial miRNA (sh-miR) are widely used to silence the expression of specific genes. In addition to silencing selected targets, RNAi reagents may induce various side effects, including immune responses. To determine the molecular markers of immune response activation when using RNAi reagents, we analyzed the results of experiments gathered in the RNAimmuno (v 2.0) and GEO Profiles databases. To better characterize and compare cellular responses to various RNAi reagents in one experimental system, we designed a reagent series in corresponding siRNA, D-siRNA, shRNA and sh-miR forms. To exclude sequence-specific effects the reagents targeted 3 different transcripts (Luc, ATXN3 and HTT). We demonstrate that RNAi reagents induce a broad variety of sequence-non-specific effects, including the deregulation of cellular miRNA levels. Typical siRNAs are weak stimulators of interferon response but may saturate the miRNA biogenesis pathway, leading to the downregulation of highly expressed miRNAs, whereas plasmid-based reagents induce known markers of immune response and may alter miRNA levels and their isomiR composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Emergence and Evolution of Hominidae-Specific Coding and Noncoding Genomic Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Morteza Mahmoudi; Adeyemi Babarinde, Isaac; Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-07-12

    Family Hominidae, which includes humans and great apes, is recognized for unique complex social behavior and intellectual abilities. Despite the increasing genome data, however, the genomic origin of its phenotypic uniqueness has remained elusive. Clade-specific genes and highly conserved noncoding sequences (HCNSs) are among the high-potential evolutionary candidates involved in driving clade-specific characters and phenotypes. On this premise, we analyzed whole genome sequences along with gene orthology data retrieved from major DNA databases to find Hominidae-specific (HS) genes and HCNSs. We discovered that Down syndrome critical region 4 (DSCR4) is the only experimentally verified gene uniquely present in Hominidae. DSCR4 has no structural homology to any known protein and was inferred to have emerged in several steps through LTR/ERV1, LTR/ERVL retrotransposition, and transversion. Using the genomic distance as neutral evolution threshold, we identified 1,658 HS HCNSs. Polymorphism coverage and derived allele frequency analysis of HS HCNSs showed that these HCNSs are under purifying selection, indicating that they may harbor important functions. They are overrepresented in promoters/untranslated regions, in close proximity of genes involved in sensory perception of sound and developmental process, and also showed a significantly lower nucleosome occupancy probability. Interestingly, many ancestral sequences of the HS HCNSs showed very high evolutionary rates. This suggests that new functions emerged through some kind of positive selection, and then purifying selection started to operate to keep these functions. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. A new explanation for recessive myotonia congenita: exon deletions and duplications in CLCN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Rayan, D L; Haworth, A; Sud, R; Matthews, E; Fialho, D; Burge, J; Portaro, S; Schorge, S; Tuin, K; Lunt, P; McEntagart, M; Toscano, A; Davis, M B; Hanna, M G

    2012-06-12

    To assess whether exon deletions or duplications in CLCN1 are associated with recessive myotonia congenita (MC). We performed detailed clinical and electrophysiologic characterization in 60 patients with phenotypes consistent with MC. DNA sequencing of CLCN1 followed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to screen for exon copy number variation was undertaken in all patients. Exon deletions or duplications in CLCN1 were identified in 6% of patients with MC. Half had heterozygous exonic rearrangements. The other 2 patients (50%), with severe disabling infantile onset myotonia, were identified with both a homozygous mutation, Pro744Thr, which functional electrophysiology studies suggested was nonpathogenic, and a triplication/homozygous duplication involving exons 8-14, suggesting an explanation for the severe phenotype. These data indicate that copy number variation in CLCN1 may be an important cause of recessive MC. Our observations suggest that it is important to check for exon deletions and duplications as part of the genetic analysis of patients with recessive MC, especially in patients in whom sequencing identifies no mutations or only a single recessive mutation. These results also indicate that additional, as yet unidentified, genetic mechanisms account for cases not currently explained by either CLCN1 point mutations or exonic deletions or duplications.

  4. Sequence-specific inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robaczewska, Magdalena; Narayan, Ramamurthy; Seigneres, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) appear as promising new antisense agents, that have not yet been examined as hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitors. Our aim was to study the ability of PNAs targeting the duck HBV (DHBV) encapsidation signal epsilon to inhibit reverse transcription (RT...... inhibitor than the PNA targeting only the bulge. Importantly, the inhibition was highly sequence-specific since double-mismatched PNA had no effect on the RT reaction. Moreover, in PDH the PNA coupled to Arg(7) cationic delivery peptide decreased DHBV replication. CONCLUSIONS: We provide the first evidence...

  5. Molecular design of specific metal-binding peptide sequences from protein fragments: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozísek, Milan; Svatos, Ales; Budesínský, Milos; Muck, Alexander; Bauer, Mikael C; Kotrba, Pavel; Ruml, Tomás; Havlas, Zdenek; Linse, Sara; Rulísek, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    A novel strategy is presented for designing peptides with specific metal-ion chelation sites, based on linking computationally predicted ion-specific combinations of amino acid side chains coordinated at the vertices of the desired coordination polyhedron into a single polypeptide chain. With this aim, a series of computer programs have been written that 1) creates a structural combinatorial library containing Zi-(X)n-Zj sequences (n=0-14; Z: amino acid that binds the metal through the side chain; X: any amino acid) from the existing protein structures in the non-redundant Protein Data Bank; 2) merges these fragments into a single Z1-(X)n1 -Z2-(X)n2 -Z3-(X)n3 -...-Zj polypeptide chain; and 3) automatically performs two simple molecular mechanics calculations that make it possible to estimate the internal strain in the newly designed peptide. The application of this procedure for the most M2+-specific combinations of amino acid side chains (M: metal; see L. Rulísek, Z. Havlas J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 2376-2385) yielded several peptide sequences (with lengths of 6-20 amino acids) with the potential for specific binding with six metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+). The gas-phase association constants of the studied metal ions with these de novo designed peptides were experimentally determined by MALDI mass spectrometry by using 3,4,5-trihydroxyacetophenone as a matrix, whereas the thermodynamic parameters of the metal-ion coordination in the condensed phase were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), chelatometry and NMR spectroscopy methods. The data indicate that some of the computationally predicted peptides are potential M2+-specific metal-ion chelators.

  6. 454 next generation-sequencing outperforms allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and pyrosequencing for routine KRAS mutation analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altimari, Annalisa; de Biase, Dario; De Maglio, Giovanna; Gruppioni, Elisa; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; D’Errico, Antonia; Pession, Annalisa; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Tallini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Detection of KRAS mutations in archival pathology samples is critical for therapeutic appropriateness of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Sanger sequencing, ARMS-Scorpion (TheraScreen®) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), pyrosequencing, chip array hybridization, and 454 next-generation sequencing to assess KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations in 60 nonconsecutive selected cases of colorectal cancer. Twenty of the 60 cases were detected as wild-type KRAS by all methods with 100% specificity. Among the 40 mutated cases, 13 were discrepant with at least one method. The sensitivity was 85%, 90%, 93%, and 92%, and the accuracy was 90%, 93%, 95%, and 95% for Sanger sequencing, TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization, respectively. The main limitation of Sanger sequencing was its low analytical sensitivity, whereas TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization showed higher sensitivity but suffered from the limitations of predesigned assays. Concordance between the methods was k = 0.79 for Sanger sequencing and k > 0.85 for the other techniques. Tumor cell enrichment correlated significantly with the abundance of KRAS-mutated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), evaluated as ΔCt for TheraScreen real-time PCR (P = 0.03), percentage of mutation for pyrosequencing (P = 0.001), ratio for chip array hybridization (P = 0.003), and percentage of mutation for 454 next-generation sequencing (P = 0.004). Also, 454 next-generation sequencing showed the best cross correlation for quantification of mutation abundance compared with all the other methods (P < 0.001). Our comparison showed the superiority of next-generation sequencing over the other techniques in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Next-generation sequencing will replace Sanger sequencing as the reference technique for diagnostic detection of KRAS mutation in archival tumor tissues. PMID

  7. Sequence characterisation of deletion breakpoints in the dystrophin gene by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbs, S.; Sandhu, S.; Bobrow, M. [Guy`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Partial deletions of the dystrophin gene account for 65% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A high proportion of these structural changes are generated by new mutational events, and lie predominantly within two `hotspot` regions, yet the underlying reasons for this are not known. We are characterizing and sequencing the regions surrounding deletion breakpoints in order to: (i) investigate the mechanisms of deletion mutation, and (ii) enable the design of PCR assays to specifically amplify mutant and normal sequences, allowing us to search for the presence of somatic mosaicism in appropriate family members. Using this approach we have been able to demonstrate the presence of somatic mosaicism in a maternal grandfather of a DMD-affected male, deleted for exons 49-50. Three deletions, namely of exons 48-49, 49-50, and 50, have been characterized using a PCR approach that avoids any cloning procedures. Breakpoints were initially localized to within regions of a few kilobases using Southern blot restriction analyses with exon-specific probes and PCR amplification of exonic and intronic loci. Sequencing was performed directly on PCR products: (i) mutant sequences were obtained from long-range or inverse-PCR across the deletion junction fragments, and (ii) normal sequences were obtained from the products of standard PCR, vectorette PCR, or inverse-PCR performed on YACs. Further characterization of intronic sequences will allow us to amplify and sequence across other deletion breakpoints and increase our knowledge of the mechanisms of mutation in the dystophin gene.

  8. The effects of multiple features of alternatively spliced exons on the KA/KS ratio test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Feng-Chi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of alternatively spliced exons (ASEs is of primary interest because these exons are suggested to be a major source of functional diversity of proteins. Many exon features have been suggested to affect the evolution of ASEs. However, previous studies have relied on the KA/KS ratio test without taking into consideration information sufficiency (i.e., exon length > 75 bp, cross-species divergence > 5% of the studied exons, leading to potentially biased interpretations. Furthermore, which exon feature dominates the results of the KA/KS ratio test and whether multiple exon features have additive effects have remained unexplored. Results In this study, we collect two different datasets for analysis – the ASE dataset (which includes lineage-specific ASEs and conserved ASEs and the ACE dataset (which includes only conserved ASEs. We first show that information sufficiency can significantly affect the interpretation of relationship between exons features and the KA/KS ratio test results. After discarding exons with insufficient information, we use a Boolean method to analyze the relationship between test results and four exon features (namely length, protein domain overlapping, inclusion level, and exonic splicing enhancer (ESE frequency for the ASE dataset. We demonstrate that length and protein domain overlapping are dominant factors, and they have similar impacts on test results of ASEs. In addition, despite the weak impacts of inclusion level and ESE motif frequency when considered individually, combination of these two factors still have minor additive effects on test results. However, the ACE dataset shows a slightly different result in that inclusion level has a marginally significant effect on test results. Lineage-specific ASEs may have contributed to the difference. Overall, in both ASEs and ACEs, protein domain overlapping is the most dominant exon feature while ESE frequency is the weakest one in affecting

  9. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; de Paula, Lucas F.; Soares, Marcia M. C. N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L-1. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  10. Structural basis for sequence-specific recognition of DNA by TAL effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Dong

    2012-01-05

    TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors, secreted by phytopathogenic bacteria, recognize host DNA sequences through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each repeat comprises 33 to 35 conserved amino acids and targets a specific base pair by using two hypervariable residues [known as repeat variable diresidues (RVDs)] at positions 12 and 13. Here, we report the crystal structures of an 11.5-repeat TAL effector in both DNA-free and DNA-bound states. Each TAL repeat comprises two helices connected by a short RVD-containing loop. The 11.5 repeats form a right-handed, superhelical structure that tracks along the sense strand of DNA duplex, with RVDs contacting the major groove. The 12th residue stabilizes the RVD loop, whereas the 13th residue makes a base-specific contact. Understanding DNA recognition by TAL effectors may facilitate rational design of DNA-binding proteins with biotechnological applications.

  11. Rapid Functional and Sequence Differentiation of a Tandemly Repeated Species-Specific Multigene Family in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Bryan D; Librado, Pablo; Yeh, Shu-Dan; Solares, Edwin S; Real, Daphne A; Jayasekera, Suvini U; Zhang, Wanting; Shi, Mijuan; Park, Ronni V; Magie, Robert D; Ma, Hsiu-Ching; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Marco, Antonio; Rozas, Julio; Ranz, José M

    2017-01-01

    Gene clusters of recently duplicated genes are hotbeds for evolutionary change. However, our understanding of how mutational mechanisms and evolutionary forces shape the structural and functional evolution of these clusters is hindered by the high sequence identity among the copies, which typically results in their inaccurate representation in genome assemblies. The presumed testis-specific, chimeric gene Sdic originated, and tandemly expanded in Drosophila melanogaster, contributing to increased male-male competition. Using various types of massively parallel sequencing data, we studied the organization, sequence evolution, and functional attributes of the different Sdic copies. By leveraging long-read sequencing data, we uncovered both copy number and order differences from the currently accepted annotation for the Sdic region. Despite evidence for pervasive gene conversion affecting the Sdic copies, we also detected signatures of two episodes of diversifying selection, which have contributed to the evolution of a variety of C-termini and miRNA binding site compositions. Expression analyses involving RNA-seq datasets from 59 different biological conditions revealed distinctive expression breadths among the copies, with three copies being transcribed in females, opening the possibility to a sexually antagonistic effect. Phenotypic assays using Sdic knock-out strains indicated that should this antagonistic effect exist, it does not compromise female fertility. Our results strongly suggest that the genome consolidation of the Sdic gene cluster is more the result of a quick exploration of different paths of molecular tinkering by different copies than a mere dosage increase, which could be a recurrent evolutionary outcome in the presence of persistent sexual selection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Sequence-specific base pair mimics are efficient topoisomerase IB inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekhoff, Pierre; Duca, Maria; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Benhida, Rachid; Arimondo, Paola B

    2012-01-10

    Topoisomerase IB controls DNA topology by cleaving DNA transiently. This property is used by inhibitors, such as camptothecin, that stabilize, by inhibiting the religation step, the cleavage complex, in which the enzyme is covalently attached to the 3'-phosphate of the cleaved DNA strand. These drugs are used in clinics as antitumor agents. Because three-dimensional structural studies have shown that camptothecin derivatives act as base pair mimics and intercalate between two base pairs in the ternary DNA-topoisomerase-inhibitor complex, we hypothesized that base pairs mimics could act like campthotecin and inhibit the religation reaction after the formation of the topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complex. We show here that three base pair mimics, nucleobases analogues of the aminophenyl-thiazole family, once targeted specifically to a DNA sequence were potent topoisomerase IB inhibitors. The targeting was achieved through covalent linkage to a sequence-specific DNA ligand, a triplex-forming oligonucleotide, and was necessary to position and keep the nucleobase analogue in the cleavage complex. In the absence of triplex formation, only a weak binding to the DNA and topoisomerase I-mediated DNA cleavage was observed. The three compounds were equally active once conjugated, implying that the intercalation of the nucleobase upon triplex formation is the essential feature for the inhibition activity.

  13. Sequence-Specific Fidelity Alterations Associated with West Nile Virus Attenuation in Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta A Van Slyke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High rates of error-prone replication result in the rapid accumulation of genetic diversity of RNA viruses. Recent studies suggest that mutation rates are selected for optimal viral fitness and that modest variations in replicase fidelity may be associated with viral attenuation. Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses are unique in their requirement for host cycling and may necessitate substantial genetic and phenotypic plasticity. In order to more thoroughly investigate the correlates, mechanisms and consequences of arbovirus fidelity, we selected fidelity variants of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus utilizing selection in the presence of a mutagen. We identified two mutations in the WNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with increased fidelity, V793I and G806R, and a single mutation in the WNV methyltransferase, T248I, associated with decreased fidelity. Both deep-sequencing and in vitro biochemical assays confirmed strain-specific differences in both fidelity and mutational bias. WNV fidelity variants demonstrated host-specific alterations to replicative fitness in vitro, with modest attenuation in mosquito but not vertebrate cell culture. Experimental infections of colonized and field populations of Cx. quinquefaciatus demonstrated that WNV fidelity alterations are associated with a significantly impaired capacity to establish viable infections in mosquitoes. Taken together, these studies (i demonstrate the importance of allosteric interactions in regulating mutation rates, (ii establish that mutational spectra can be both sequence and strain-dependent, and (iii display the profound phenotypic consequences associated with altered replication complex function of flaviviruses.

  14. Rapid and Specific Detection of the Escherichia coli Sequence Type 648 Complex within Phylogroup F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R; Johnston, Brian D; Gordon, David M

    2017-04-01

    The Escherichia coli sequence type 648 complex (STc648) is an emerging lineage within phylogroup F-formerly included within phylogroup D-that is associated with multidrug resistance. Here, we designed and validated a novel multiplex PCR-based assay for STc648 that took advantage of (i) four distinctive single-nucleotide polymorphisms in icd allele 96 and gyrB allele 87, two of the multilocus sequence typing alleles that define ST648; and (ii) the typical absence within STc648 of uidA, an E. coli-specific gene encoding β-glucuronidase. Within a diverse 212-strain validation set that included 109 STs other than STc648, from phylogroups A, B1, B2, C, D, E, and F, the assay exhibited 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 82% to 100%) and specificity (95% CI, 98% to 100%). It functioned similarly well in two distant laboratories that used boiled lysates or DNAzol-purified DNA as the template DNA. Thus, this novel multiplex PCR-based assay should enable any laboratory equipped for diagnostic PCR to rapidly, accurately, and economically screen E. coli isolates for membership in STc648. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Post-transcriptional exon shuffling events in humans can be evolutionarily conserved and abundant

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Balool, Haya H.; Weber, David; Liu, Yilei; Wade, Mark; Guleria, Kamlesh; Nam, Pitsien Lang Ping; Clayton, Jake; Rowe, William; Coxhead, Jonathan; Irving, Julie; Elliott, David J.; Hall, Andrew G.; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Jackson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    In silico analyses have established that transcripts from some genes can be processed into RNAs with rearranged exon order relative to genomic structure (post-transcriptional exon shuffling, or PTES). Although known to contribute to transcriptome diversity in some species, to date the structure, distribution, abundance, and functional significance of human PTES transcripts remains largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we identify 205 putative human PTES produc...

  16. Advantage of Whole Exome Sequencing over Allele-Specific and Targeted Segment Sequencing in Detection of Novel TULP1 Mutation in Leber Congenital Amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiran; Prokudin, Ivan; Yu, Cong; Liang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi; Flaherty, Maree; Tian, Lifeng; Crofts, Stephanie; Wang, Fengxiang; Snyder, James; Donaldson, Craig; Abdel-Magid, Nada; Vazquez, Lyam; Keating, Brendan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Wang, Jun; Jamieson, Robyn V

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe form of retinal dystrophy with marked underlying genetic heterogeneity. Until recently, allele-specific assays and Sanger sequencing of targeted segments were the only available approaches for attempted genetic diagnosis in this condition. A broader next-generation sequencing (NGS) strategy, such as whole exome sequencing, provides an improved molecular genetic diagnostic capacity for patients with these conditions. In a child with LCA, an allele-specific assay analyzing 135 known LCA-causing variations, followed by targeted segment sequencing of 61 regions in 14 causative genes was performed. Subsequently, exome sequencing was undertaken in the proband, unaffected consanguineous parents and two unaffected siblings. Bioinformatic analysis used two independent pipelines, BWA-GATK and SOAP, followed by Annovar and SnpEff to annotate the variants. No disease-causing variants were found using the allele-specific or targeted segment Sanger sequencing assays. Analysis of variants in the exome sequence data revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1081C > T, p.Arg361*) in TULP1, a gene with roles in photoreceptor function where mutations were previously shown to cause LCA and retinitis pigmentosa. The identified homozygous variant was the top candidate using both bioinformatic pipelines. This study highlights the value of the broad sequencing strategy of exome sequencing for disease gene identification in LCA, over other existing methods. NGS is particularly beneficial in LCA where there are a large number of causative disease genes, few distinguishing clinical features for precise candidate disease gene selection, and few mutation hotspots in any of the known disease genes.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF AVIAN-SPECIFIC FECAL METAGENOMIC SEQUENCES USING GENOME FRAGMENT ENRICHMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequence analysis of microbial genomes has provided biologists the opportunity to compare genetic differences between closely related microorganisms. While random sequencing has also been used to study natural microbial communities, metagenomic comparisons via sequencing analysis...

  18. SMA carrier testing - validation of hemizygous SMN exon 7 deletion test for the identification of proximal spinal muscular atrophy carriers and patients with a single allele deletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, H; Cobben, JM; Mensink, RGJ; Stulp, RP; van der Steege, G; Buys, CHCM

    To facilitate the detection of carriers of a hemizygous survival motor neuron (SMN) exon 7 deletion we have modified the quantitative SMN exon 7 assay described by McAndrew ct al (1997). The major changes include quantitative analysis of the amount of SMN exon 7-specific fluorescently-labelled PCR

  19. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G. [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Paula, Lucas F. de [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Soares, Marcia M.C.N. [Adolfo Lutz Institute, Regional Laboratory in São José do Rio Preto (Brazil); Goulart, Luiz R. [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Madurro, João M. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil); Brito-Madurro, Ana G., E-mail: agbrito@iqufu.ufu.br [Institute of Genetics and Biochemistry, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia (Brazil)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Specific oligonucleotide detection for hepatitis B based on poly-4-aminophenol matrix. • Electrochemical detection of the gene specific using ethidium bromide as indicator. • The detection limit was 2.61 nmol L{sup −1}, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 (n = 3). • The system discriminates three-base mismatches and non-complementary target. - Abstract: An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L{sup −1}. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  20. Screening for sequence-specific RNA-BPs by comprehensive UV crosslinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Meuth-Metzinger Valerie

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific cis-elements and the associated trans-acting factors have been implicated in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In the era of genome wide analyses identifying novel trans-acting factors and cis-regulatory elements is a step towards understanding coordinated gene expression. UV-crosslink analysis is a standard method used to identify RNA-binding proteins. Uridine is traditionally used to radiolabel substrate RNAs, however, proteins binding to cis-elments particularly uridine poor will be weakly or not detected. We evaluate here the possibility of using UV-crosslinking with RNA substrates radiolabeled with each of the four ribonucleotides as an approach for screening for novel sequence specific RNA-binding proteins. Results The radiolabeled RNA substrates were derived from the 3'UTRs of the cloned Eg and c-mos Xenopus laevis maternal mRNAs. Specific, but not identical, uv-crosslinking signals were obtained, some of which corresponded to already identified proteins. A signal for a novel 90 kDa protein was observed with the c-mos 3'UTR radiolabeled with both CTP and GTP but not with UTP. The binding site of the 90 kDa RNA-binding protein was localised to a 59-nucleotide portion of the c-mos 3'UTR. Conclusion That the 90 kDa signal was detected with RNAs radiolabeled with CTP or GTP but not UTP illustrates the advantage of radiolabeling all four nucleotides in a UV-crosslink based screen. This method can be used for both long and short RNAs and does not require knowledge of the cis-acting sequence. It should be amenable to high throughput screening for RNA binding proteins.

  1. Unraveling the sequence dynamics of the formation of genus-specific satellite DNAs in the family solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, S-H; Park, H-M; Kim, S-M; Kim, H H; Hur, C-G; Choi, D

    2011-05-01

    Tandemly repeated DNAs, referred to as satellite DNAs, often occur in a genome in a genus-specific manner. However, the mechanisms for generation and evolution for these sequences are largely unknown because of the uncertain origins of the satellite DNAs. We found highly divergent genus-specific satellite DNAs that showed sequence similarity with genus-specific intergenic spacers (IGSs) in the family Solanaceae, which includes the genera Nicotiana, Solanum and Capsicum. The conserved position of the IGS between 25S and 18S rDNA facilitates comparison of IGS sequences across genera, even in the presence of very low sequence similarity. Sequence comparison of IGS may elucidate the procedure of the genesis of complex monomer units of the satellite DNAs. Within the IGS of Capsicum species, base substitutions and copy number variation of subrepeat monomers were causes of monomer divergence in IGS sequences. At the level of inter-generic IGS sequences of the family Solanaceae, however, genus-specific motif selection, motif shuffling between subrepeats and differential amplification among motifs were involved in formation of genus-specific IGS. Therefore, the genus-specific satellite DNAs in Solanaceae plants can be generated from differentially organized repeat monomers of the IGS rather than by accumulation of mutations from pre-existent satellite DNAs.

  2. Haematobia irritans dataset of raw sequence reads from Illumina-based transcriptome sequencing of specific tissues and life stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illumina HiSeq technology was used to sequence the transcriptome from various dissected tissues and life stages from the horn fly, Haematobia irritans. These samples include eggs (0, 2, 4, and 9 hours post-oviposition), adult fly gut, adult fly legs, adult fly malpighian tubule, adult fly ovary, adu...

  3. Random Splicing of Several Exons Caused by a Single Base Change in the Target Exon of CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Gene Knockout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapahnke, Marcel; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2016-12-14

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated sequence 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system is widely used for genome editing purposes as it facilitates an efficient knockout of a specific gene in, e.g. cultured cells. Targeted double-strand breaks are introduced to the target sequence of the guide RNAs, which activates the cellular DNA repair mechanism for non-homologous-end-joining, resulting in unprecise repair and introduction of small deletions or insertions. Due to this, sequence alterations in the coding region of the target gene frequently cause frame-shift mutations, facilitating degradation of the mRNA. We here show that such CRISPR/Cas9-mediated alterations in the target exon may also result in altered splicing of the respective pre-mRNA, most likely due to mutations of splice-regulatory sequences. Using the human FLOT-1 gene as an example, we demonstrate that such altered splicing products also give rise to aberrant protein products. These may potentially function as dominant-negative proteins and thus interfere with the interpretation of the data generated with these cell lines. Since most researchers only control the consequences of CRISPR knockout at genomic and protein level, our data should encourage to also check the alterations at the mRNA level.

  4. Random Splicing of Several Exons Caused by a Single Base Change in the Target Exon of CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Gene Knockout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Kapahnke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-associated sequence 9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system is widely used for genome editing purposes as it facilitates an efficient knockout of a specific gene in, e.g. cultured cells. Targeted double-strand breaks are introduced to the target sequence of the guide RNAs, which activates the cellular DNA repair mechanism for non-homologous-end-joining, resulting in unprecise repair and introduction of small deletions or insertions. Due to this, sequence alterations in the coding region of the target gene frequently cause frame-shift mutations, facilitating degradation of the mRNA. We here show that such CRISPR/Cas9-mediated alterations in the target exon may also result in altered splicing of the respective pre-mRNA, most likely due to mutations of splice-regulatory sequences. Using the human FLOT-1 gene as an example, we demonstrate that such altered splicing products also give rise to aberrant protein products. These may potentially function as dominant-negative proteins and thus interfere with the interpretation of the data generated with these cell lines. Since most researchers only control the consequences of CRISPR knockout at genomic and protein level, our data should encourage to also check the alterations at the mRNA level.

  5. Identification of MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7 in clinical evaluation of families with suspected Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen E; Rodriguez, Andrea; Taggart, Melissa W; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Lynch, Patrick M; Bannon, Sarah A; You, Y Nancy; Vilar, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    Traditional germline sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis does not detect Lynch syndrome-causing mutations in all individuals whose colorectal or endometrial tumors demonstrate mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. Unique inversions and other rearrangements of the MMR genes have been reported in families with Lynch syndrome. In 2014, a recurrent inversion of MSH2 exons 1-7 was identified in five families suspected to have Lynch syndrome. We aimed to describe our clinical experience in identifying families with this specific inversion. Four probands whose Lynch syndrome-associated tumors demonstrated absence of MSH2/MSH6 staining and who had negative MMR germline testing were evaluated for the MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7, offered during initial genetic workup or upon routine clinical follow-up. All four probands tested positive for the MSH2 inversion. Proband cancer diagnoses included colon and endometrial adenocarcinoma and sebaceous adenoma. A variety of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were reported in the family histories, although only one family met Amsterdam II criteria. Thirteen at-risk relatives underwent predictive testing. MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7 was found in four probands previously suspected to have Lynch syndrome based on family history and tumor testing. This testing should be offered routinely to patients with tumors demonstrating loss of MSH2/MSH6 staining.

  6. An Exon-Based Comparative Variant Analysis Pipeline to Study the Scale and Role of Frameshift and Nonsense Mutation in the Human-Chimpanzee Divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GongXin Yu

    2009-01-01

    important biological processes such as T cell lineage development, the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, and antigen induced cell death. A “less-is-more” model was previously established to illustrate the role of the gene inactivation and disruptions during human evolution. Here this analysis suggested a different model where the chimpanzee-specific exon-disrupting mutations may act as additional evolutionary force that drove the human-chimpanzee divergence. Finally, the analysis revealed a number of sequencing errors in the chimpanzee and human genome sequences and further illustrated that they could be corrected without resequencing.

  7. Real-time, sequence-specific detection of nucleic acids during strand displacement amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, J G; Pitner, J B; Linn, C P; Schram, J L; Dean, C H; Nycz, C M

    1999-12-15

    Strand displacement amplification (SDA) is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification method based on the primer-directed nicking activity of a restriction enzyme and the strand displacement activity of an exonuclease-deficient polymerase. Here we describe fluorogenic reporter probes that permit real-time, sequence-specific detection of targets amplified during SDA. The new probes possess the single-strand half of a BsoBI recognition sequence flanked on opposite sides by a fluorophore and a quencher. The probes also contain target-binding sequences located 3' to the BsoBI site. Fluorophore and quencher are maintained in sufficiently close proximity that fluorescence is quenched in the intact single-stranded probe. If target is present during SDA, the probe is converted into a fully double-stranded form and is cleaved by the restriction enzyme BsoBI, which also serves as the nicking agent for SDA. Fluorophore and quencher diffuse apart upon probe cleavage, causing increased fluorescence. Target replication may thus be followed in real time during the SDA reaction. Probe performance may be enhanced by embedding the fluorogenic BsoBI site within the loop of a folded hairpin structure. The new probe designs permit detection of as few as 10 target copies within 30 min in a closed-tube, real-time format, eliminating the possibility of carry-over contamination. The probes may be used to detect RNA targets in SDA mixtures containing reverse transcriptase. Furthermore, a two-color competitive SDA format permits accurate quantification of target levels from the real-time fluorescence data. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is a mosaic of discrete sequence classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaletsky, Helen; Kuroda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Minx, Patrick J.; Cordum, Holland S.; Hillier, LaDeana; Brown, Laura G.; Repping, Sjoerd; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Ali, Johar; Bieri, Tamberlyn; Chinwalla, Asif; Delehaunty, Andrew; Delehaunty, Kim; Du, Hui; Fewell, Ginger; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Graves, Tina; Hou, Shun-Fang; Latrielle, Philip; Leonard, Shawn; Mardis, Elaine; Maupin, Rachel; McPherson, John; Miner, Tracie; Nash, William; Nguyen, Christine; Ozersky, Philip; Pepin, Kymberlie; Rock, Susan; Rohlfing, Tracy; Scott, Kelsi; Schultz, Brian; Strong, Cindy; Tin-Wollam, Aye; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Waterston, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard K.; Rozen, Steve; Page, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length. Here, we report that the MSY is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatic sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic. These classes

  9. Differential representation of sunflower ESTs in enriched organ-specific cDNA libraries in a small scale sequencing project

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    Heinz Ruth A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtractive hybridization methods are valuable tools for identifying differentially regulated genes in a given tissue avoiding redundant sequencing of clones representing the same expressed genes, maximizing detection of low abundant transcripts and thus, affecting the efficiency and cost effectiveness of small scale cDNA sequencing projects aimed to the specific identification of useful genes for breeding purposes. The objective of this work is to evaluate alternative strategies to high-throughput sequencing projects for the identification of novel genes differentially expressed in sunflower as a source of organ-specific genetic markers that can be functionally associated to important traits. Results Differential organ-specific ESTs were generated from leaf, stem, root and flower bud at two developmental stages (R1 and R4. The use of different sources of RNA as tester and driver cDNA for the construction of differential libraries was evaluated as a tool for detection of rare or low abundant transcripts. Organ-specificity ranged from 75 to 100% of non-redundant sequences in the different cDNA libraries. Sequence redundancy varied according to the target and driver cDNA used in each case. The R4 flower cDNA library was the less redundant library with 62% of unique sequences. Out of a total of 919 sequences that were edited and annotated, 318 were non-redundant sequences. Comparison against sequences in public databases showed that 60% of non-redundant sequences showed significant similarity to known sequences. The number of predicted novel genes varied among the different cDNA libraries, ranging from 56% in the R4 flower to 16 % in the R1 flower bud library. Comparison with sunflower ESTs on public databases showed that 197 of non-redundant sequences (60% did not exhibit significant similarity to previously reported sunflower ESTs. This approach helped to successfully isolate a significant number of new reported sequences

  10. Microbial Diversity and Host-Specific Sequences of Canada Goose Feces▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingrang; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Hill, Stephen; Edge, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Methods to assess the impact of goose fecal contamination are needed as the result of the increasing number of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) near North American inland waters. However, there is little information on goose fecal microbial communities, and such data are important for the development of host-specific source-tracking methods. To address this issue, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries for Canada goose fecal samples from Ontario, Canada, and Ohio were analyzed. Analyses of fecal clones from Ontario (447) and Ohio (302) showed that goose fecal communities are dominated by the classes “Clostridia” (represented by 33.7% of clones) and “Bacilli” (38.1% of clones) and the phylum “Bacteroidetes” (10.1% of clones). Sequences not previously found in other avian fecal communities were used to develop host-specific assays. Fecal DNA extracts from sewage plants (10 samples) and different species of birds (11 samples) and mammals (18 samples) were used to test for host specificity. Of all the assays tested, one assay showed specificity for Canada goose fecal DNA. The PCR assay was positive for Canada goose fecal DNA extracts collected from three locations in North America (Ohio, Oregon, and Ontario, Canada). Additionally, of 48 DNA extracts from Lake Ontario waters presumed to be impacted by waterfowl feces, 19 tested positive by the assay, although 10 were positive only after a nested PCR approach was used. Due to the level of host specificity and the presence of signals in environmental waters, the assay is proposed as a part of the toolbox to detect Canada goose contamination in waterfowl-contaminated waters. PMID:19633110

  11. Fingerprinting the Asterid species using subtracted diversity array reveals novel species-specific sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Mantri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asterids is one of the major plant clades comprising of many commercially important medicinal species. One of the major concerns in medicinal plant industry is adulteration/contamination resulting from misidentification of herbal plants. This study reports the construction and validation of a microarray capable of fingerprinting medicinally important species from the Asterids clade. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pooled genomic DNA of 104 non-asterid angiosperm and non-angiosperm species was subtracted from pooled genomic DNA of 67 asterid species. Subsequently, 283 subtracted DNA fragments were used to construct an Asterid-specific array. The validation of Asterid-specific array revealed a high (99.5% subtraction efficiency. Twenty-five Asterid species (mostly medicinal representing 20 families and 9 orders within the clade were hybridized onto the array to reveal its level of species discrimination. All these species could be successfully differentiated using their hybridization patterns. A number of species-specific probes were identified for commercially important species like tea, coffee, dandelion, yarrow, motherwort, Japanese honeysuckle, valerian, wild celery, and yerba mate. Thirty-seven polymorphic probes were characterized by sequencing. A large number of probes were novel species-specific probes whilst some of them were from chloroplast region including genes like atpB, rpoB, and ndh that have extensively been used for fingerprinting and phylogenetic analysis of plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Subtracted Diversity Array technique is highly efficient in fingerprinting species with little or no genomic information. The Asterid-specific array could fingerprint all 25 species assessed including three species that were not used in constructing the array. This study validates the use of chloroplast genes for bar-coding (fingerprinting plant species. In addition, this method allowed detection of several new loci that can be

  12. Exome sequencing reveals a potential mutational trajectory and treatments for a specific pancreatic cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotterell J

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available James Cotterell1,21Center for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona, Spain; 2Garvan Institute for Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth biggest killer, and has one of the worst prognoses, of any cancer type. Approximately 95% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer will not survive beyond 5 years post diagnosis, and these statistics have barely improved in over 40 years. Here, genomic changes in one particular patient with stage IV metastatic pancreatic cancer were explored to suggest a potential personalized treatment. In particular, exome sequencing of genomic DNA extracted from blood and the cancer biopsy was utilized with the aim of identifying mutational drivers of the cancer. This analysis revealed a splice site mutation in RBCK1 as the most promising driver of the cancer and a therapy based on a pan-cyclin-dependent kinase (pan-CDK inhibitor, flavopiridol. This study suggests that drugs whose effectiveness is unclear for general populations of cancer sufferers should possibly be reconsidered for specific patients where the drug could be rationally argued to improve outcome.Keyword: personalized medicine, driver mutation identification, next generation sequencing

  13. RNA-Mediated Gene Duplication and Retroposons: Retrogenes, LINEs, SINEs, and Sequence Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Ohshima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of “retrogenes” that are derived from the mRNA of various intron-containing genes have been reported. A class of mammalian retroposons, long interspersed element-1 (LINE1, L1, has been shown to be involved in the reverse transcription of retrogenes (or processed pseudogenes and non-autonomous short interspersed elements (SINEs. The -end sequences of various SINEs originated from a corresponding LINE. As the -untranslated regions of several LINEs are essential for retroposition, these LINEs presumably require “stringent” recognition of the -end sequence of the RNA template. However, the -ends of mammalian L1s do not exhibit any similarity to SINEs, except for the presence of -poly(A repeats. Since the -poly(A repeats of L1 and Alu SINE are critical for their retroposition, L1 probably recognizes the poly(A repeats, thereby mobilizing not only Alu SINE but also cytosolic mRNA. Many flowering plants only harbor L1-clade LINEs and a significant number of SINEs with poly(A repeats, but no homology to the LINEs. Moreover, processed pseudogenes have also been found in flowering plants. I propose that the ancestral L1-clade LINE in the common ancestor of green plants may have recognized a specific RNA template, with stringent recognition then becoming relaxed during the course of plant evolution.

  14. MetaSRA: normalized human sample-specific metadata for the Sequence Read Archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Matthew N; Doan, AnHai; Dewey, Colin N

    2017-09-15

    The NCBI's Sequence Read Archive (SRA) promises great biological insight if one could analyze the data in the aggregate; however, the data remain largely underutilized, in part, due to the poor structure of the metadata associated with each sample. The rules governing submissions to the SRA do not dictate a standardized set of terms that should be used to describe the biological samples from which the sequencing data are derived. As a result, the metadata include many synonyms, spelling variants and references to outside sources of information. Furthermore, manual annotation of the data remains intractable due to the large number of samples in the archive. For these reasons, it has been difficult to perform large-scale analyses that study the relationships between biomolecular processes and phenotype across diverse diseases, tissues and cell types present in the SRA. We present MetaSRA, a database of normalized SRA human sample-specific metadata following a schema inspired by the metadata organization of the ENCODE project. This schema involves mapping samples to terms in biomedical ontologies, labeling each sample with a sample-type category, and extracting real-valued properties. We automated these tasks via a novel computational pipeline. The MetaSRA is available at metasra.biostat.wisc.edu via both a searchable web interface and bulk downloads. Software implementing our computational pipeline is available at http://github.com/deweylab/metasra-pipeline. cdewey@biostat.wisc.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Geminivirus-mediated genome editing in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. using sequence-specific nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel M Butler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated systems (Cas for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via nonhomologous end-joining has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1 gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held both point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and an approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species.

  16. Geminivirus-Mediated Genome Editing in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Using Sequence-Specific Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathaniel M; Baltes, Nicholas J; Voytas, Daniel F; Douches, David S

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems (CRISPR/Cas) for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR) was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1) gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and a novel approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species.

  17. Domain-specific and domain-general constraints on word and sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Lisa M D; Joanisse, Marc F

    2013-02-01

    The relative influences of language-related and memory-related constraints on the learning of novel words and sequences were examined by comparing individual differences in performance of children with and without specific deficits in either language or working memory. Children recalled lists of words in a Hebbian learning protocol in which occasional lists repeated, yielding improved recall over the course of the task on the repeated lists. The task involved presentation of pictures of common nouns followed immediately by equivalent presentations of the spoken names. The same participants also completed a paired-associate learning task involving word-picture and nonword-picture pairs. Hebbian learning was observed for all groups. Domain-general working memory constrained immediate recall, whereas language abilities impacted recall in the auditory modality only. In addition, working memory constrained paired-associate learning generally, whereas language abilities disproportionately impacted novel word learning. Overall, all of the learning tasks were highly correlated with domain-general working memory. The learning of nonwords was additionally related to general intelligence, phonological short-term memory, language abilities, and implicit learning. The results suggest that distinct associations between language- and memory-related mechanisms support learning of familiar and unfamiliar phonological forms and sequences.

  18. Sequence-Specific β-Peptide Synthesis by a Rotaxane-Based Molecular Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bo, Guillaume; Gall, Malcolm A Y; Kitching, Matthew O; Kuschel, Sonja; Leigh, David A; Tetlow, Daniel J; Ward, John W

    2017-08-09

    We report on the synthesis and operation of a three-barrier, rotaxane-based, artificial molecular machine capable of sequence-specific β-homo (β 3 ) peptide synthesis. The machine utilizes nonproteinogenic β 3 -amino acids, a class of amino acids not generally accepted by the ribosome, particularly consecutively. Successful operation of the machine via native chemical ligation (NCL) demonstrates that even challenging 15- and 19-membered ligation transition states are suitable for information translation using this artificial molecular machine. The peptide-bond-forming catalyst region can be removed from the transcribed peptide by peptidases, artificial and biomachines working in concert to generate a product that cannot be made by either machine alone.

  19. The sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic test of sequence-space synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothen, Nicolas; Jünemann, Kristin; Mealor, Andy D; Burckhardt, Vera; Ward, Jamie

    2016-12-01

    People with sequence-space synesthesia (SSS) report stable visuo-spatial forms corresponding to numbers, days, and months (amongst others). This type of synesthesia has intrigued scientists for over 130 years but the lack of an agreed upon tool for assessing it has held back research on this phenomenon. The present study builds on previous tests by measuring the consistency of spatial locations that is known to discriminate controls from synesthetes. We document, for the first time, the sensitivity and specificity of such a test and suggest a diagnostic cut-off point for discriminating between the groups based on the area bounded by different placement attempts with the same item.

  20. Evolution of hydra, a recently evolved testis-expressed gene with nine alternative first exons in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Tao Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe here the Drosophila gene hydra that appears to have originated de novo in the melanogaster subgroup and subsequently evolved in both structure and expression level in Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species. D. melanogaster hydra encodes a predicted protein of approximately 300 amino acids with no apparent similarity to any previously known proteins. The syntenic region flanking hydra on both sides is found in both D. ananassae and D. pseudoobscura, but hydra is found only in melanogaster subgroup species, suggesting that it originated less than approximately 13 million y ago. Exon 1 of hydra has undergone recurrent duplications, leading to the formation of nine tandem alternative exon 1s in D. melanogaster. Seven of these alternative exons are flanked on their 3' side by the transposon DINE-1 (Drosophila interspersed element-1. We demonstrate that at least four of the nine duplicated exon 1s can function as alternative transcription start sites. The entire hydra locus has also duplicated in D. simulans and D. sechellia. D. melanogaster hydra is expressed most intensely in the proximal testis, suggesting a role in late-stage spermatogenesis. The coding region of hydra has a relatively high Ka/Ks ratio between species, but the ratio is less than 1 in all comparisons, suggesting that hydra is subject to functional constraint. Analysis of sequence polymorphism and divergence of hydra shows that it has evolved under positive selection in the lineage leading to D. melanogaster. The dramatic structural changes surrounding the first exons do not affect the tissue specificity of gene expression: hydra is expressed predominantly in the testes in D. melanogaster, D. simulans, and D. yakuba. However, we have found that expression level changed dramatically (approximately >20-fold between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. While hydra initially evolved in the absence of nearby transposable element insertions, we suggest that the subsequent

  1. Thermodynamic Molecular Switch in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction: Two Computational Models Compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Chun

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown in our published work the existence of a thermodynamic switch in biological systems wherein a change of sign in ΔCp°(Treaction leads to a true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, and hence, a maximum in the related Keq. We have examined 35 pair-wise, sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions over the temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. A closer look at a single example, the pair-wise hydrophobic interaction of leucine-isoleucine, will demonstrate the significant differences when the data are analyzed using the Nemethy-Scheraga model or treated by the Planck-Benzinger methodology which we have developed. The change in inherent chemical bond energy at 0 K, ΔH°(T0 is 7.53 kcal mol-1 compared with 2.4 kcal mol-1, while ‹ts› is 365 K as compared with 355 K, for the Nemethy-Scheraga and Planck-Benzinger model, respectively. At ‹tm›, the thermal agitation energy is about five times greater than ΔH°(T0 in the Planck-Benzinger model, that is 465 K compared to 497 K in the Nemethy-Scheraga model. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy minimum at a well-defined ‹ts›, where TΔS° = 0 at about 355 K, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, which are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. The Nemethy-Scheraga model shows no evidence of the thermodynamic molecular switch that we have found to be a universal feature of biological interactions. The Planck-Benzinger method is the best known for evaluating the innate temperature-invariant enthalpy, ΔH°(T0, and provides for better understanding of the heat of reaction for biological molecules.

  2. Sequence variability, recombination analysis, and specific detection of the W strain of Plum pox virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasa, Miroslav; Malinowski, Tadeusz; Predajňa, Lukáš; Pupola, Neda; Dekena, Dzintra; Michalczuk, Lech; Candresse, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, is the causal agent of Sharka, the most detrimental disease of stone-fruit trees worldwide. PPV isolates are grouped into seven distinct strains. The minor PPV-W strain was established recently for the divergent W3174 isolate found in Canada. Here, the partial or complete genomic sequences of four PPV-W isolates from Latvia have been determined. The completely sequenced isolates LV-141pl and LV-145bt share 93.1 and 92.1% nucleotide identity, respectively, with isolate W3174, with two regions of higher (>20%) divergence in the P1/HC-Pro and NIa (VPg) regions. Further analyses demonstrated that these two regions correspond to two independent recombination events in the W3174 genome, one involving PPV-M (approximate genome positions 692 to 1424) and the other PPV-D (nucleotides 5672 to 5789). The LV-141pl and LV-145bt isolates appear to be representatives of the "ancestral" PPV-W strain, not affected by recombination. The PPV-W intrastrain variability is substantially higher than that of all other PPV strains, with potential implications for the serological detection of PPV-W isolates. A PPV-W-specific primer pair has been developed, allowing the specific reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction detection of all five presently available W isolates. The characterization of these new PPV-W isolates sheds light on PPV-W evolutionary history, further supports the hypothesis of its East-European origin, and opens the way for the biological and epidemiological characterization of this poorly known PPV strain.

  3. Genome-Based Selection and Characterization of Fusarium circinatum-Specific Sequences

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    Mkhululi N. Maphosa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium circinatum is an important pathogen of pine trees and its management in the commercial forestry environment relies largely on early detection, particularly in seedling nurseries. The fact that the entire genome of this pathogen is available opens new avenues for the development of diagnostic tools for this fungus. In this study we identified open reading frames (ORFs unique to F. circinatum and determined that they were specific to the pathogen. The ORF identification process involved bioinformatics-based screening of all the putative F. circinatum ORFs against public databases. This was followed by functional characterization of ORFs found to be unique to F. circinatum. We used PCR- and hybridization-based approaches to confirm the presence of selected unique genes in different strains of F. circinatum and their absence from other Fusarium species for which genome sequence data are not yet available. These included species that are closely related to F. circinatum as well as those that are commonly encountered in the forestry environment. Thirty-six ORFs were identified as potentially unique to F. circinatum. Nineteen of these encode proteins with known domains while the other 17 encode proteins of unknown function. The results of our PCR analyses and hybridization assays showed that three of the selected genes were present in all of the strains of F. circinatum tested and absent from the other Fusarium species screened. These data thus indicate that the selected genes are common and unique to F. circinatum. These genes thus could be good candidates for use in rapid, in-the-field diagnostic assays specific to F. circinatum. Our study further demonstrates how genome sequence information can be mined for the identification of new diagnostic markers for the detection of plant pathogens.

  4. 454 next generation-sequencing outperforms allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and pyrosequencing for routine KRAS mutation analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altimari A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Annalisa Altimari,1,* Dario de Biase,2,* Giovanna De Maglio,3 Elisa Gruppioni,1 Elisa Capizzi,1 Alessio Degiovanni,1 Antonia D'Errico,1 Annalisa Pession,2 Stefano Pizzolitto,3 Michelangelo Fiorentino,1,# Giovanni Tallini2,#1Laboratory of Molecular Oncologic and Transplantation Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Anatomic Pathology, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, 3Department of Pathology, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Udine, Italy*These authors contributed equally to this work #These authors share senior authorshipAbstract: Detection of KRAS mutations in archival pathology samples is critical for therapeutic appropriateness of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Sanger sequencing, ARMS-Scorpion (TheraScreen® real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, pyrosequencing, chip array hybridization, and 454 next-generation sequencing to assess KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations in 60 nonconsecutive selected cases of colorectal cancer. Twenty of the 60 cases were detected as wild-type KRAS by all methods with 100% specificity. Among the 40 mutated cases, 13 were discrepant with at least one method. The sensitivity was 85%, 90%, 93%, and 92%, and the accuracy was 90%, 93%, 95%, and 95% for Sanger sequencing, TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization, respectively. The main limitation of Sanger sequencing was its low analytical sensitivity, whereas TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization showed higher sensitivity but suffered from the limitations of predesigned assays. Concordance between the methods was k = 0.79 for Sanger sequencing and k > 0.85 for the other techniques. Tumor cell enrichment correlated significantly with the abundance of KRAS-mutated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, evaluated as ΔCt for TheraScreen real-time PCR (P = 0.03, percentage of mutation for

  5. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development......, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94...... positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies...

  6. SP-Designer: a user-friendly program for designing species-specific primer pairs from DNA sequence alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, Pierre; Malausa, Thibaut

    2013-07-01

    SP-Designer is an open-source program providing a user-friendly tool for the design of specific PCR primer pairs from a DNA sequence alignment containing sequences from various taxa. SP-Designer selects PCR primer pairs for the amplification of DNA from a target species on the basis of several criteria: (i) primer specificity, as assessed by interspecific sequence polymorphism in the annealing regions, (ii) the biochemical characteristics of the primers and (iii) the intended PCR conditions. SP-Designer generates tables, detailing the primer pair and PCR characteristics, and a FASTA file locating the primer sequences in the original sequence alignment. SP-Designer is Windows-compatible and freely available from http://www2.sophia.inra.fr/urih/sophia_mart/sp_designer/info_sp_designer.php. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An exonic insertion within Tex14 gene causes spermatogenic arrest in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sironen Anu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male infertility is an increasing problem in all domestic species including man. Localization and identification of genes involved in defects causing male infertility provide valuable information of specific events in sperm development. Sperm development is a complex process, where diploid spermatogonia develop into haploid, highly specialized spermatozoa. Correct expression and function of various genes and their protein products are required for production of fertile sperm. We have identified an infertility defect in Finnish Yorkshire boars caused by spermatogenic arrest. The aim of this study was to locate the disease associated region using genome wide screen with the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip and identify the causal mutation by candidate gene approach. Results In the Finnish Yorkshire pig population the spermatogenic arrest (SA defect appears to be of genetic origin and causes severe degeneration of germ cells and total absence of spermatozoa. Genome wide scan with the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip localized the SA defect to porcine chromosome 12 in a 2 Mbp region. Sequencing of a candidate gene Tex14 revealed a 51 bp insertion within exon 27, which caused differential splicing of the exon and created a premature translation stop codon. The expression of Tex14 was markedly down regulated in the testis of a SA affected boar compared to control boars and no protein product was identified by Western blotting. The SA insertion sequence was also found within intron 27 in all analyzed animals, thus the insertion appears to be a possible duplication event. Conclusion In this study we report the identification of a causal mutation for infertility caused by spermatogenic arrest at an early meiotic phase. Our results highlight the role of TEX14 specifically in spermatogenesis and the importance of specific genomic remodeling events as causes for inherited defects.

  8. A rare missense variant in RET exon 8 in a Portuguese family with atypical multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana Filipa; Martins, João Martin; do Vale, Sónia; Dias, Teresa; Silveira, Catarina; da Silva, Inês Rodrigues; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma and primary hyperparathyroidism. MEN2 is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the RET proto-oncogene. In the vast majority of patients, the mutations are localized in exons 10, 11 and 13-15 of the RET gene. Rare variants located in exon 8 were recently identified but their clinical significance remains unclear. We studied two sisters presenting with pheochromocytoma as the first tumor. One of the sisters was diagnosed with a right pheochromocytoma at the age of 44 and at age 53 she developed an invasive left pheochromocytoma with no other endocrine neoplasia. The other sister was diagnosed with a left pheochromocytoma at age 50 and at age 64 she had a right phemochromocytoma and MTC. Neither of the two sisters presented evidence of primary hyperparathyroidism. Mutations of the RET proto-oncogene were investigated by DNA sequencing. We detected a germline missense variant in RET exon 8 (p.Cys531Arg) in both sisters. The p.Cys531Arg variant was not present in a third 50-year-old sister who has remained to date clinically unaffected. This is the first case showing the p.Cys531Arg variant in RET exon 8 co-segregating with family members affected by a syndrome reminiscent of MEN2A. Our results suggest that this variant has a specific genotype-phenotype correlation as it is associated with the development of pheochromocytoma before the onset of MTC.

  9. Loss of exon identity is a common mechanism of human inherited disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Howard, Jonathan; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Sanford, Jeremy R

    2011-10-01

    It is widely accepted that at least 10% of all mutations causing human inherited disease disrupt splice-site consensus sequences. In contrast to splice-site mutations, the role of auxiliary cis-acting elements such as exonic splicing enhancers (ESE) and exonic splicing silencers (ESS) in human inherited disease is still poorly understood. Here we use a top-down approach to determine rates of loss or gain of known human exonic splicing regulatory (ESR) sequences associated with either disease-causing mutations or putatively neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We observe significant enrichment toward loss of ESEs and gain of ESSs among inherited disease-causing variants relative to neutral polymorphisms, indicating that exon skipping may play a prominent role in aberrant gene regulation. Both computational and biochemical approaches underscore the relevance of exonic splicing enhancer loss and silencer gain in inherited disease. Additionally, we provide direct evidence that both SRp20 (SRSF3) and possibly PTB (PTBP1) are involved in the function of a splicing silencer that is created de novo by a total of 83 different inherited disease mutations in 67 different disease genes. Taken together, we find that ~25% (7154/27,681) of known mis-sense and nonsense disease-causing mutations alter functional splicing signals within exons, suggesting a much more widespread role for aberrant mRNA processing in causing human inherited disease than has hitherto been appreciated.

  10. Global transcriptome sequencing identifies chlamydospore specific markers in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Palige

    Full Text Available Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are pathogenic fungi that are highly related but differ in virulence and in some phenotypic traits. During in vitro growth on certain nutrient-poor media, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are the only yeast species which are able to produce chlamydospores, large thick-walled cells of unknown function. Interestingly, only C. dubliniensis forms pseudohyphae with abundant chlamydospores when grown on Staib medium, while C. albicans grows exclusively as a budding yeast. In order to further our understanding of chlamydospore development and assembly, we compared the global transcriptional profile of both species during growth in liquid Staib medium by RNA sequencing. We also included a C. albicans mutant in our study which lacks the morphogenetic transcriptional repressor Nrg1. This strain, which is characterized by its constitutive pseudohyphal growth, specifically produces masses of chlamydospores in Staib medium, similar to C. dubliniensis. This comparative approach identified a set of putatively chlamydospore-related genes. Two of the homologous C. albicans and C. dubliniensis genes (CSP1 and CSP2 which were most strongly upregulated during chlamydospore development were analysed in more detail. By use of the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the encoded putative cell wall related proteins were found to exclusively localize to C. albicans and C. dubliniensis chlamydospores. Our findings uncover the first chlamydospore specific markers in Candida species and provide novel insights in the complex morphogenetic development of these important fungal pathogens.

  11. Identification of specific gene sequences conserved in contemporary epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Su; Besser, Thomas E; Hancock, Dale D; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Call, Douglas R

    2006-11-01

    Genetic elements specific to recent and contemporary epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica were identified using comparative genomic analysis. Two epidemic multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) and cephalosporin-resistant MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, and an epidemic pansusceptible strain, Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT160, were subjected to Salmonella gene microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses. Their genome contents were compared with those of coexisting sporadic strains matched by serotype, geographic and temporal distribution, and host species origin. These paired comparisons revealed that epidemic strains of S. enterica had specific genes and gene regions that were shared by isolates of the same subtype. Most of these gene sequences are related to mobile genetic elements, including phages, plasmids, and plasmid-like and transposable elements, and some genes may encode proteins conferring growth or survival advantages. The emergence of epidemic MDR strains may therefore be associated with the presence of fitness-associated genetic factors in addition to their antimicrobial resistance genes.

  12. Global Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies Chlamydospore Specific Markers in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palige, Katja

    2013-04-15

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are pathogenic fungi that are highly related but differ in virulence and in some phenotypic traits. During in vitro growth on certain nutrient-poor media, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are the only yeast species which are able to produce chlamydospores, large thick-walled cells of unknown function. Interestingly, only C. dubliniensis forms pseudohyphae with abundant chlamydospores when grown on Staib medium, while C. albicans grows exclusively as a budding yeast. In order to further our understanding of chlamydospore development and assembly, we compared the global transcriptional profile of both species during growth in liquid Staib medium by RNA sequencing. We also included a C. albicans mutant in our study which lacks the morphogenetic transcriptional repressor Nrg1. This strain, which is characterized by its constitutive pseudohyphal growth, specifically produces masses of chlamydospores in Staib medium, similar to C. dubliniensis. This comparative approach identified a set of putatively chlamydospore-related genes. Two of the homologous C. albicans and C. dubliniensis genes (CSP1 and CSP2) which were most strongly upregulated during chlamydospore development were analysed in more detail. By use of the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the encoded putative cell wall related proteins were found to exclusively localize to C. albicans and C. dubliniensis chlamydospores. Our findings uncover the first chlamydospore specific markers in Candida species and provide novel insights in the complex morphogenetic development of these important fungal pathogens.

  13. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  14. Precise genome modification via sequence-specific nucleases-mediated gene targeting for crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homology-directed repair (HDR. While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired ‘safe’ harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential

  15. Targeted sequencing of clade-specific markers from skin microbiomes for forensic human identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah E; Woerner, August E; Novroski, Nicole M M; Wendt, Frank R; King, Jonathan L; Stephens, Kathryn M; Budowle, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    The human skin microbiome is comprised of diverse communities of bacterial, eukaryotic, and viral taxa and contributes millions of additional genes to the repertoire of human genes, affecting human metabolism and immune response. Numerous genetic and environmental factors influence the microbiome composition and as such contribute to individual-specific microbial signatures which may be exploited for forensic applications. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential to associate skin microbial profiles collected from touched items to their individual owner, mainly using unsupervised methods from samples collected over short time intervals. Those studies utilize either targeted 16S rRNA or shotgun metagenomic sequencing to characterize skin microbiomes; however, these approaches have limited species and strain resolution and susceptibility to stochastic effects, respectively. Clade-specific markers from the skin microbiome, using supervised learning, can predict individual identity using skin microbiomes from their respective donors with high accuracy. In this study the hidSkinPlex is presented, a novel targeted sequencing method using skin microbiome markers developed for human identification. The hidSkinPlex (comprised of 286 bacterial (and phage) family-, genus-, species-, and subspecies-level markers), initially was evaluated on three bacterial control samples represented in the panel (i.e., Propionibacterium acnes, Propionibacterium granulosum, and Rothia dentocariosa) to assess the performance of the multiplex. The hidSkinPlex was further evaluated for prediction purposes. The hidSkinPlex markers were used to attribute skin microbiomes collected from eight individuals from three body sites (i.e., foot (Fb), hand (Hp) and manubrium (Mb)) to their host donor. Supervised learning, specifically regularized multinomial logistic regression and 1-nearest-neighbor classification were used to classify skin microbiomes to their hosts with up to 92% (Fb), 96% (Mb

  16. PSI-BLAST-ISS: an intermediate sequence search tool for estimation of the position-specific alignment reliability

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    Venclovas Česlovas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein sequence alignments have become indispensable for virtually any evolutionary, structural or functional study involving proteins. Modern sequence search and comparison methods combined with rapidly increasing sequence data often can reliably match even distantly related proteins that share little sequence similarity. However, even highly significant matches generally may have incorrectly aligned regions. Therefore when exact residue correspondence is used to transfer biological information from one aligned sequence to another, it is critical to know which alignment regions are reliable and which may contain alignment errors. Results PSI-BLAST-ISS is a standalone Unix-based tool designed to delineate reliable regions of sequence alignments as well as to suggest potential variants in unreliable regions. The region-specific reliability is assessed by producing multiple sequence alignments in different sequence contexts followed by the analysis of the consistency of alignment variants. The PSI-BLAST-ISS output enables the user to simultaneously analyze alignment reliability between query and multiple homologous sequences. In addition, PSI-BLAST-ISS can be used to detect distantly related homologous proteins. The software is freely available at: http://www.ibt.lt/bioinformatics/iss. Conclusion PSI-BLAST-ISS is an effective reliability assessment tool that can be useful in applications such as comparative modelling or analysis of individual sequence regions. It favorably compares with the existing similar software both in the performance and functional features.

  17. A Novel Homozygous Frameshift Mutation in Exon 2 of Gene Associated with Severe Obesity: A Case Report

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    Ashwaq Shukri Altawil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Monogenic obesity is a rare type of obesity caused by a mutation in a single gene. Patients with monogenic obesity may develop early onset of obesity and severe metabolic abnormalities. Case Presentation A two-and-half-year-old girl was presented to our clinic because of excessive weight gain and hyperphagia. She was born at full term, by normal vaginal delivery with birth weight of 2.82 kg and no complications during pregnancy. The patient was the second child of two healthy, non-obese Saudis with known consanguinity. She gained weight rapidly leading to obesity at the age of three months. Methods The demographic data and clinical features were recorded. Blood samples were collected and tested for endocrine and metabolic characteristics and genetic studies. Mutations of the LEP gene were screened. The coding exons 2 and 3 and the corresponding exon–intron boundaries were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers, analyzed by direct sequencing using an ABI sequencer 3500 xL GA (Applied Biosystems, and evaluated using the JSI SeqPilot software. The resulting sequence data were compared with the reference MM_0002302. Conclusion We report a novel homozygous frameshift mutation c.144delin TAC (G1n49Thrfs * 23 in exon 2 of the LEP gene associated with extreme obesity.

  18. Targeted next-generation sequencing can replace Sanger sequencing in clinical diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema-Raddatz, B.; Johansson, L.F.; de Boer, E.N.; Almomani, R.; Boven, L.G.; van den Berg, M.P.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K.Y.; van Tintelen, J.P.; Sijmons, R.H.; Jongbloed, J.D.H.; Sinke, R.J.

    Mutation detection through exome sequencing allows simultaneous analysis of all coding sequences of genes. However, it cannot yet replace Sanger sequencing (SS) in diagnostics because of incomplete representation and coverage of exons leading to missing clinically relevant mutations. Targeted

  19. SR Proteins Induce Alternative Exon Skipping through Their Activities on the Flanking Constitutive Exons▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Joonhee; Ding, Jian-Hua; Byeon, Cheol W.; Kim, Jee H.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Jeong, Sunjoo; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    SR proteins are well known to promote exon inclusion in regulated splicing through exonic splicing enhancers. SR proteins have also been reported to cause exon skipping, but little is known about the mechanism. We previously characterized SRSF1 (SF2/ASF)-dependent exon skipping of the CaMKIIδ gene during heart remodeling. By using mouse embryo fibroblasts derived from conditional SR protein knockout mice, we now show that SR protein-induced exon skipping depends on their prevalent actions on a flanking constitutive exon and requires collaboration of more than one SR protein. These findings, coupled with other established rules for SR proteins, provide a theoretical framework to understand the complex effect of SR protein-regulated splicing in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that heart-specific CaMKIIδ splicing can be reconstituted in fibroblasts by downregulating SR proteins and upregulating a RBFOX protein and that SR protein overexpression impairs regulated CaMKIIδ splicing and neuronal differentiation in P19 cells, illustrating that SR protein-dependent exon skipping may constitute a key strategy for synergism with other splicing regulators in establishing tissue-specific alternative splicing critical for cell differentiation programs. PMID:21135118

  20. The hydrophobic core of twin-arginine signal sequences orchestrates specific binding to Tat-pathway related chaperones.

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    Anitha Shanmugham

    Full Text Available Redox enzyme maturation proteins (REMPs bind pre-proteins destined for translocation across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane via the twin-arginine translocation system and enable the enzymatic incorporation of complex cofactors. Most REMPs recognize one specific pre-protein. The recognition site usually resides in the N-terminal signal sequence. REMP binding protects signal peptides against degradation by proteases. REMPs are also believed to prevent binding of immature pre-proteins to the translocon. The main aim of this work was to better understand the interaction between REMPs and substrate signal sequences. Two REMPs were investigated: DmsD (specific for dimethylsulfoxide reductase, DmsA and TorD (specific for trimethylamine N-oxide reductase, TorA. Green fluorescent protein (GFP was genetically fused behind the signal sequences of TorA and DmsA. This ensures native behavior of the respective signal sequence and excludes any effects mediated by the mature domain of the pre-protein. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that these chimeric pre-proteins specifically bind to the cognate REMP. Furthermore, the region of the signal sequence that is responsible for specific binding to the corresponding REMP was identified by creating region-swapped chimeric signal sequences, containing parts of both the TorA and DmsA signal sequences. Surprisingly, specificity is not encoded in the highly variable positively charged N-terminal region of the signal sequence, but in the more similar hydrophobic C-terminal parts. Interestingly, binding of DmsD to its model substrate reduced membrane binding of the pre-protein. This property could link REMP-signal peptide binding to its reported proofreading function.

  1. Genomic V exons from whole genome shotgun data in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, D N; von Haeften, B; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Faro, J; Gambón-Deza, F

    2014-08-01

    Reptiles and mammals diverged over 300 million years ago, creating two parallel evolutionary lineages amongst terrestrial vertebrates. In reptiles, two main evolutionary lines emerged: one gave rise to Squamata, while the other gave rise to Testudines, Crocodylia, and Aves. In this study, we determined the genomic variable (V) exons from whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS) data in reptiles corresponding to the three main immunoglobulin (IG) loci and the four main T cell receptor (TR) loci. We show that Squamata lack the TRG and TRD genes, and snakes lack the IGKV genes. In representative species of Testudines and Crocodylia, the seven major IG and TR loci are maintained. As in mammals, genes of the IG loci can be grouped into well-defined IMGT clans through a multi-species phylogenetic analysis. We show that the reptilian IGHV and IGLV genes are distributed amongst the established mammalian clans, while their IGKV genes are found within a single clan, nearly exclusive from the mammalian sequences. The reptilian and mammalian TRAV genes cluster into six common evolutionary clades (since IMGT clans have not been defined for TR). In contrast, the reptilian TRBV genes cluster into three clades, which have few mammalian members. In this locus, the V exon sequences from mammals appear to have undergone different evolutionary diversification processes that occurred outside these shared reptilian clans. These sequences can be obtained in a freely available public repository (http://vgenerepertoire.org).

  2. Introducing a model of pairing based on base pair specific interactions between identical DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    (O’ Lee, Dominic J.

    2018-02-01

    At present, there have been suggested two types of physical mechanism that may facilitate preferential pairing between DNA molecules, with identical or similar base pair texts, without separation of base pairs. One mechanism solely relies on base pair specific patterns of helix distortion being the same on the two molecules, discussed extensively in the past. The other mechanism proposes that there are preferential interactions between base pairs of the same composition. We introduce a model, built on this second mechanism, where both thermal stretching and twisting fluctuations are included, as well as the base pair specific helix distortions. Firstly, we consider an approximation for weak pairing interactions, or short molecules. This yields a dependence of the energy on the square root of the molecular length, which could explain recent experimental data. However, analysis suggests that this approximation is no longer valid at large DNA lengths. In a second approximation, for long molecules, we define two adaptation lengths for twisting and stretching, over which the pairing interaction can limit the accumulation of helix disorder. When the pairing interaction is sufficiently strong, both adaptation lengths are finite; however, as we reduce pairing strength, the stretching adaptation length remains finite but the torsional one becomes infinite. This second state persists to arbitrarily weak values of the pairing strength; suggesting that, if the molecules are long enough, the pairing energy scales as length. To probe differences between the two pairing mechanisms, we also construct a model of similar form. However, now, pairing between identical sequences solely relies on the intrinsic helix distortion patterns. Between the two models, we see interesting qualitative differences. We discuss our findings, and suggest new work to distinguish between the two mechanisms.

  3. Rapid identification of rice blast resistance gene by specific length amplified fragment sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Excavation of resistance genes is one of the most effective and environment-friendly measures to control the devastating rice disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae. Many resistance genes have been mapped and characterized in the last century. Nevertheless, only a few of the total resistance genes could be really applied in the rice breeding program. Huazhan (HZ is a new native rice restorer line developed in China and widely used in hybrid rice in recent years. HZ and its crossed combinations usually show a broad spectrum of resistance against rice blast in different rice ecosystems in China. Dissection of the genetic background of HZ is very useful for its further application. In this study, a combined method based on bulked segregation analysis (BSA and specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq was used to identify blast resistance gene(s in HZ. A total of 56,187 SLAFs labels were captured and 9051 polymorphic SLAFs markers were analysed and procured in this study. One trait associated with candidate resistance genes region on chromosome 12 overlapping 10.2–17.6 Mb has been identified, in which 10 NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat coding genes were used as resistance gene candidates. Our result indicated that SLAF-seq with BSA is a rapid and effective method for initial identification of blast resistance genes. The identification of resistance gene in HZ will improve its molecular breeding and resistance variety application.

  4. Noc protein binds to specific DNA sequences to coordinate cell division with chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling Juan; Ishikawa, Shu; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake; Errington, Jeff

    2009-07-08

    Coordination of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis is crucial for efficient cell proliferation. In Bacillus subtilis, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc protects the chromosomes by associating with the chromosome and preventing cell division in its vicinity. Using protein localization, ChAP-on-Chip and bioinformatics, we have identified a consensus Noc-binding DNA sequence (NBS), and have shown that Noc is targeted to about 70 discrete regions scattered around the chromosome, though absent from a large region around the replication terminus. Purified Noc bound specifically to an NBS in vitro. NBSs inserted near the replication terminus bound Noc-YFP and caused a delay in cell division. An autonomous plasmid carrying an NBS array recruited Noc-YFP and conferred a severe Noc-dependent inhibition of cell division. This shows that Noc is a potent inhibitor of division, but that its activity is strictly localized by the interaction with NBS sites in vivo. We propose that Noc serves not only as a spatial regulator of cell division to protect the nucleoid, but also as a timing device with an important role in the coordination of chromosome segregation and cell division.

  5. Sequence specific visual detection of LAMP reactions by addition of cationic polymers

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    Hirano Tsuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of a practical gene point-of-care testing device (g-POCT device requires innovative detection methods for demonstrating the results of the gene amplification reaction without the use of expensive equipment. We have studied a new method for the sequence-specific visual detection of minute amounts of nucleic acids using precipitation reaction by addition of cationic polymers to amplicons of Loop mediated isothermal Amplification (LAMP. Results Oligo DNA probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes were prepared for multiple nucleic acid templates, and the templates were amplified by the LAMP reactions under the existence of the probes. At completion of the LAMP reaction, an optimal amount of low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI was added, resulting in the precipitation of the insoluble LAMP amplicon-PEI complex. The fluorescently labeled Oligo DNA probes hybridized to the LAMP product were incorporated into the precipitation, and the precipitate emitted fluorescence corresponding to the amplified nucleic acid templates. The color of emitted fluorescence can be detected easily by naked eye on a conventional UV illuminator. Conclusion The presence or absence of minute amount of nucleic acid templates could be detected in a simple manner through visual assessment for the color of the LAMP amplicon-PEI complex precipitate. We conclude that this detection method may facilitate development of small and simple g-POCT device.

  6. A deep intronic CLRN1 (USH3A) founder mutation generates an aberrant exon and underlies severe Usher syndrome on the Arabian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif O; Becirovic, Elvir; Betz, Christian; Neuhaus, Christine; Altmüller, Janine; Maria Riedmayr, Lisa; Motameny, Susanne; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Bolz, Hanno J

    2017-05-03

    Deafblindness is mostly due to Usher syndrome caused by recessive mutations in the known genes. Mutation-negative patients therefore either have distinct diseases, mutations in yet unknown Usher genes or in extra-exonic parts of the known genes - to date a largely unexplored possibility. In a consanguineous Saudi family segregating Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1), NGS of genes for Usher syndrome, deafness and retinal dystrophy and subsequent whole-exome sequencing each failed to identify a mutation. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed two small candidate regions on chromosome 3, one containing the USH3A gene CLRN1, which has never been associated with Usher syndrome in Saudi Arabia. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) identified a homozygous deep intronic mutation, c.254-649T > G, predicted to generate a novel donor splice site. CLRN1 minigene-based analysis confirmed the splicing of an aberrant exon due to usage of this novel motif, resulting in a frameshift and a premature termination codon. We identified this mutation in an additional two of seven unrelated mutation-negative Saudi USH1 patients. Locus-specific markers indicated that c.254-649T > G CLRN1 represents a founder allele that may significantly contribute to deafblindness in this population. Our finding underlines the potential of WGS to uncover atypically localized, hidden mutations in patients who lack exonic mutations in the known disease genes.

  7. A Brassica exon array for whole-transcript gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Love

    Full Text Available Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3' exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E(-5, with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18, and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html.

  8. Group A Streptococcal Vir Types Are M-Protein Gene (emm) Sequence Type Specific

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, Don L.; Goodfellow, Alison M.; Martin, Diana R.; Sriprakash, Kadaba S.

    1998-01-01

    The M-protein genes (emm genes) of 103 separate impetiginous Streptococcus pyogenes isolates were sequenced and the sequence types were compared to the types obtained by Vir typing. Vir typing is based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of a 4- to 7-kb pathogenicity island encoding emm and other virulence genes. By using both HaeIII and HinfI to generate RFLP profiles, complete concordance between Vir type and emm sequence type was found. Comparison of the emm sequenc...

  9. BEAT: Bioinformatics Exon Array Tool to store, analyze and visualize Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon Array data from disease experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consiglio Arianna

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known from recent studies that more than 90% of human multi-exon genes are subject to Alternative Splicing (AS, a key molecular mechanism in which multiple transcripts may be generated from a single gene. It is widely recognized that a breakdown in AS mechanisms plays an important role in cellular differentiation and pathologies. Polymerase Chain Reactions, microarrays and sequencing technologies have been applied to the study of transcript diversity arising from alternative expression. Last generation Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays offer a more detailed view of the gene expression profile providing information on the AS patterns. The exon array technology, with more than five million data points, can detect approximately one million exons, and it allows performing analyses at both gene and exon level. In this paper we describe BEAT, an integrated user-friendly bioinformatics framework to store, analyze and visualize exon arrays datasets. It combines a data warehouse approach with some rigorous statistical methods for assessing the AS of genes involved in diseases. Meta statistics are proposed as a novel approach to explore the analysis results. BEAT is available at http://beat.ba.itb.cnr.it. Results BEAT is a web tool which allows uploading and analyzing exon array datasets using standard statistical methods and an easy-to-use graphical web front-end. BEAT has been tested on a dataset with 173 samples and tuned using new datasets of exon array experiments from 28 colorectal cancer and 26 renal cell cancer samples produced at the Medical Genetics Unit of IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza. To highlight all possible AS events, alternative names, accession Ids, Gene Ontology terms and biochemical pathways annotations are integrated with exon and gene level expression plots. The user can customize the results choosing custom thresholds for the statistical parameters and exploiting the available clinical

  10. Chirality- and sequence-selective successive self-sorting via specific homo- and complementary-duplex formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makiguchi, Wataru; Tanabe, Junki; Yamada, Hidekazu; Iida, Hiroki; Taura, Daisuke; Ousaka, Naoki; Yashima, Eiji

    2015-06-08

    Self-recognition and self-discrimination within complex mixtures are of fundamental importance in biological systems, which entirely rely on the preprogrammed monomer sequences and homochirality of biological macromolecules. Here we report artificial chirality- and sequence-selective successive self-sorting of chiral dimeric strands bearing carboxylic acid or amidine groups joined by chiral amide linkers with different sequences through homo- and complementary-duplex formations. A mixture of carboxylic acid dimers linked by racemic-1,2-cyclohexane bis-amides with different amide sequences (NHCO or CONH) self-associate to form homoduplexes in a completely sequence-selective way, the structures of which are different from each other depending on the linker amide sequences. The further addition of an enantiopure amide-linked amidine dimer to a mixture of the racemic carboxylic acid dimers resulted in the formation of a single optically pure complementary duplex with a 100% diastereoselectivity and complete sequence specificity stabilized by the amidinium-carboxylate salt bridges, leading to the perfect chirality- and sequence-selective duplex formation.

  11. The exon junction complex differentially marks spliced junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulière, Jérôme; Haque, Nazmul; Harms, Scot; Barbosa, Isabelle; Blanchette, Marco; Le Hir, Hervé

    2010-10-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC), which is deposited onto mRNAs as a consequence of splicing, is involved in multiple post-transcriptional events in metazoa. Here, using Drosophila melanogaster cells, we show that only some introns trigger EJC-dependent nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and that EJC association with particular spliced junctions depends on RNA cis-acting sequences. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that EJC deposition is not constitutive but instead is a regulated process.

  12. Visual Sequence Learning in Infancy: Domain-General and Domain-Specific Associations with Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafto, Carissa L.; Conway, Christopher M.; Field, Suzanne L.; Houston, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that nonlinguistic sequence learning abilities are an important contributor to language development (Conway, Bauernschmidt, Huang, & Pisoni, 2010). The current study investigated visual sequence learning (VSL) as a possible predictor of vocabulary development in infants. Fifty-eight 8.5-month-old infants were presented with a…

  13. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (UTSMC)

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates.

  14. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V; Zhang, Hong

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of chromosome site-specific repetitive sequences in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum, Petromyzontidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishijima, Junko; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nunome, Mitsuo; Nishida, Chizuko; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract All extant lamprey karyotypes are characterized by almost all dot-shaped microchromosomes. To understand the molecular basis of chromosome structure in lampreys, we performed chromosome C-banding and silver staining and chromosome mapping of the 18S–28S and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and telomeric TTAGGG repeats in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum). In addition, we cloned chromosome site-specific repetitive DNA sequences and characterized them by nucleotide sequencing, chromosome in situ hybridization, and filter hybridization. Three types of repetitive sequences were detected; a 200-bp AT-rich repetitive sequence, LCA-EcoRIa that co-localized with the 18S–28S rRNA gene clusters of 3 chromosomal pairs; a 364-bp AT-rich LCA-EcoRIb sequence that showed homology to the EcoRI sequence family from the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), which contains short repeats as centromeric motifs; and a GC-rich 702-bp LCA-ApaI sequence that was distributed on nearly all chromosomes and showed significant homology with the integrase-coding region of a Ty3/Gypsy family long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon. All three repetitive sequences are highly conserved within the Petromyzontidae or within Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of these site-specific repeats showed that they may be correlated with programed genome rearrangement (LCA-EcoRIa), centromere structure and function (LCA-EcoRIb), and site-specific amplification of LTR retroelements through homogenization between non-homologous chromosomes (LCA-ApaI). PMID:28025319

  16. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments and solution structure of bovine pancreatic polypeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang Li; Dobson, C.M. (Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sutcliffe, M.J. (Leicester Univ. (United Kingdom)); Schwartz, T.W. (Lab. for Molecular Endocrinology, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1992-02-04

    Sequence-specific {sup 1}H NMR assignments for the 36 residue bovine pancreatic polypeptide (bPP) have been completed. The secondary and tertiary structure of bPP in solution has been determined from experimental NMR data. It is shown that bPP has a very well-defined C-terminal {alpha}-helix involving residues 15-32. Although regular secondary structure cannot be clearly defined in the N-terminal region, residues 15-32. Although regular secondary structure cannot be clearly defined in the N-terminal region, residues 4-8 maintain a rather ordered conformation in solution. This is attributed primarily to the hydrophobic interaction between this region and the C-terminal helix. The two segments of the structure are joined by a turn which is poorly defined. The four end residues both at the N-terminus and the C-terminus are highly disordered in solution. The overall fold of the bPP molecule is very closely similar to that found in the crystal structure of avian pancreatic polypeptide (aPP). The RMS deviation for backbone atoms of residues 4-8 and 15-32 between the bPP mean structure and the aPP crystal structure is 0.65 {angstrom}, although there is only 39% identity of the residues. Furthermore, the average conformations of some (mostly from the {alpha}-helix) side chains of bPP in solution are closely similar to those of aPP in the crystal structure. A large number of side chains of bPP, however, show significant conformational averaging in solution.

  17. Association of E26 Transformation Specific Sequence 1 Variants with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Chinese Han Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available E26 transformation specific sequence 1 (ETS-1 belongs to the ETS family of transcription factors that regulate the expression of various immune-related genes. Increasing evidence indicates that ETS-1 could contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Recent research has provided evidence that ETS-1 might correlate with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but it's not clearly defined. In this study, we aimed to identify whether polymorphisms of ETS-1 play a role in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA susceptibility and development in Chinese Han population.Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within ETS-1 were selected based on HapMap data and previous associated studies. Whole blood and serum samples were obtained from 158 patients with RA and 192 healthy subjects. Genotyping was performed with polymerase chain reaction-high resolution melting (PCR-HRM assay and the data was analyzed using SPSS17.0.A significantly positive correlation was observed between the SNP rs73013527 of ETS-1 and RA susceptibility, DAS28 and CRP (P<0.001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.028, respectively. Carriers of the haplotype CCT or TCT for rs4937333, rs11221332 and rs73013527 were associated with decreased risk of RA as compared to controls. No statistical significant difference was observed in the distribution of rs10893872, rs4937333 and rs11221332 genotypes between RA patients and controls.Our data further supports that ETS-1 has a relevant role in the pathogenesis and development of RA. Allele T of rs73013527 plays a protective role in occurrence of RA but a risk factor in the high disease activity. Rs10893872, rs11221332 and rs4937333 are not associated with RA susceptibility and clinical features.

  18. BrEPS: a flexible and automatic protocol to compute enzyme-specific sequence profiles for functional annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schomburg D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Models for the simulation of metabolic networks require the accurate prediction of enzyme function. Based on a genomic sequence, enzymatic functions of gene products are today mainly predicted by sequence database searching and operon analysis. Other methods can support these techniques: We have developed an automatic method "BrEPS" that creates highly specific sequence patterns for the functional annotation of enzymes. Results The enzymes in the UniprotKB are identified and their sequences compared against each other with BLAST. The enzymes are then clustered into a number of trees, where each tree node is associated with a set of EC-numbers. The enzyme sequences in the tree nodes are aligned with ClustalW. The conserved columns of the resulting multiple alignments are used to construct sequence patterns. In the last step, we verify the quality of the patterns by computing their specificity. Patterns with low specificity are omitted and recomputed further down in the tree. The final high-quality patterns can be used for functional annotation. We ran our protocol on a recent Swiss-Prot release and show statistics, as well as a comparison to PRIAM, a probabilistic method that is also specialized on the functional annotation of enzymes. We determine the amount of true positive annotations for five common microorganisms with data from BRENDA and AMENDA serving as standard of truth. BrEPS is almost on par with PRIAM, a fact which we discuss in the context of five manually investigated cases. Conclusions Our protocol computes highly specific sequence patterns that can be used to support the functional annotation of enzymes. The main advantages of our method are that it is automatic and unsupervised, and quite fast once the patterns are evaluated. The results show that BrEPS can be a valuable addition to the reconstruction of metabolic networks.

  19. Molecular evolution of the leptin exon 3 in some species of the family Canidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Switonski Marek

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of the leptin gene seems to be well conserved. The polymorphism of this gene in four species belonging to the Canidae family (the dog (Canis familiaris – 16 different breeds, the Chinese racoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides procyonoides, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes and the arctic fox (Alopex lagopus were studied with the use of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and DNA sequencing techniques. For exon 2, all species presented the same SSCP pattern, while in exon 3 some differences were found. DNA sequencing of exon 3 revealed the presence of six nucleotide substitutions, differentiating the studied species. Three of them cause amino acid substitutions as well. For all dog breeds studied, SSCP patterns were identical.

  20. DISC1 exon 11 rare variants found more commonly in schizoaffective spectrum cases than controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, E K; Grozeva, D; Sims, R; Raybould, R; Forty, L; Gordon-Smith, K; Russell, E; St Clair, D; Young, A H; Ferrier, I N; Kirov, G; Jones, I; Jones, L; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C; Craddock, N

    2011-06-01

    We previously performed a linkage study using families identified through probands meeting criteria for DSM-IV schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type (SABP) and observed a genome-wide significant signal (LOD = 3.54) at chromosome 1q42 close to DISC1. An initial sequencing study of DISC1 using 14 unrelated DSM-IV SABP samples from the linkage study identified 2 non-synonymous coding SNPs in exon 11 in 2 separate individuals. Here we provide evidence of additional rare coding SNPs within exon 11. In sequencing exon 11 in 506 cases and 1,211 controls for variants that occurred only once, 4 additional rare variants were found in cases (P-value = 0.008, Fisher's exact trend test). Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Species-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences in Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Olmedo, Isabel; Tobes, Raquel; Manzanera, Maximino; Ramos, Juan L.; Marqués, Silvia

    2002-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a soil bacterium that effectively colonises the roots of many plants and degrades a variety of toxic aromatic compounds. Its genome has recently been sequenced. We describe that a 35 bp sequence with the structure of an imperfect palindrome, originally found repeated three times downstream of the rpoH gene terminator, is detected more than 800 times in the chromosome of this strain. The structure of this DNA segment is analogous to that of the so-called enterobacteriaceae repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences, although its sequence is different. Computer-assisted analysis of the presence and distribution of this repeated sequence in the P.putida chromosome revealed that in at least 80% of the cases the sequence is extragenic, and in 82% of the cases the distance of this extragenic element to the end of one of the neighbouring genes was <100 bp. This 35 bp element can be found either as a single element, as pairs of elements, or sometimes forming clusters of up to five elements in which they alternate orientation. PCR scanning of chromosomes from different isolates of Pseudomonas sp. strains using oligonucleotides complementary to the most conserved region of this sequence shows that it is only present in isolates of the species P.putida. For this reason we suggest that the P.putida 35 bp element is a distinctive REP sequence in P.putida. This is the first time that REP sequences have been described and characterised in a group of non-enterobacteriaceae. PMID:11937637

  2. Exchange of regions of the carboxypeptidase Y propeptide. Sequence specificity and function in folding in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, C; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    a more strict requirement for sequence conservation. Nevertheless, an overall lack of requirement for propeptide sequence conservation was found by substitution of the carboxypeptidase Y propeptide with that of a highly divergent propeptide sequence from an otherwise similar carboxypeptidase from Candida...... albicans. This propeptide was partially functional when combined with carboxypeptidase Y. Analysis of the biosynthesis of the mutant forms of the zymogen showed that a fraction of the molecules proceeded from the endoplasmic reticulum with fairly rapid kinetics, while the rest was degraded....

  3. A new large animal model of CLN5 neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Borderdale sheep is caused by a nucleotide substitution at a consensus splice site (c.571+1G>A) leading to excision of exon 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frugier, Tony; Mitchell, Nadia L; Tammen, Imke; Houweling, Peter J; Arthur, Donald G; Kay, Graham W; van Diggelen, Otto P; Jolly, Robert D; Palmer, David N

    2008-02-01

    Batten disease (neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, NCLs) are a group of inherited childhood diseases that result in severe brain atrophy, blindness and seizures, leading to premature death. To date, eight different genes have been identified, each associated with a different form. Linkage analysis indicated a CLN5 form in a colony of affected New Zealand Borderdale sheep. Sequencing studies established the disease-causing mutation to be a substitution at a consensus splice site (c.571+1G>A), leading to the excision of exon 3 and a truncated putative protein. A molecular diagnostic test has been developed based on the excision of exon 3. Sequence alignments support the gene product being a soluble lysosomal protein. Western blotting of isolated storage bodies indicates the specific storage of subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase. This flock is being expanded as a large animal model for mechanistic studies and trial therapies.

  4. Methyl-Cytosine-Driven Structural Changes Enhance Adduction Kinetics of an Exon 7 fragment of the p53 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Spundana; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Fu, You-Jun; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine (C) at C-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites enhances reactivity of DNA towards electrophiles. Mutations at CpG sites on the p53 tumor suppressor gene that can result from these adductions are in turn correlated with specific cancers. Here we describe the first restriction-enzyme-assisted LC-MS/MS sequencing study of the influence of methyl cytosines (MeC) on kinetics of p53 gene adduction by model metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), using methodology applicable to correlate gene damage sites for drug and pollutant metabolites with mutation sites. This method allows direct kinetic measurements by LC-MS/MS sequencing for oligonucleotides longer than 20 base pairs (bp). We used MeC and non-MeC (C) versions of a 32 bp exon 7 fragment of the p53 gene. Methylation of 19 cytosines increased the rate constant 3-fold for adduction on G at the major reactive CpG in codon 248 vs. the non-MeC fragment. Rate constants for non-CpG codons 244 and 243 were not influenced significantly by MeC. Conformational and hydrophobicity changes in the MeC-p53 exon 7 fragment revealed by CD spectra and molecular modeling increase the BPDE binding constant to G in codon 248 consistent with a pathway in which preceding reactant binding greatly facilitates the rate of covalent SN2 coupling.

  5. An Enhancer Near ISL1 and an Ultraconserved Exon of PCBP2 areDerived from a Retroposon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejerano, Gill; Lowe, Craig; Ahituv, Nadav; King, Bryan; Siepel,Adam; Salama, Sofie; Rubin, Edward M.; Kent, W. James; Haussler, David

    2005-11-27

    Hundreds of highly conserved distal cis-regulatory elementshave been characterized to date in vertebrate genomes1. Many thousandsmore are predicted based on comparative genomics2,3. Yet, in starkcontrast to the genes they regulate, virtually none of these regions canbe traced using sequence similarity in invertebrates, leaving theirevolutionary origin obscure. Here we show that a class of conserved,primarily non-coding regions in tetrapods originated from a novel shortinterspersed repetitive element (SINE) retroposon family that was activein Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes and terrestrial vertebrates) in theSilurian at least 410 Mya4, and, remarkably, appears to be recentlyactive in the "living fossil" Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeriamenadoensis. We show that one copy is a distal enhancer, located 500kbfrom the neuro-developmental gene ISL1. Several others represent new,possibly regulatory, alternatively spliced exons in the middle ofpre-existing Sarcopterygian genes. One of these is the>200bpultraconserved region5, 100 percent identical in mammals, and 80 percentidentical to the coelacanth SINE, that contains a 31aa alternativelyspliced exon of the mRNA processing gene PCBP26. These add to a growinglist of examples7 in which relics of transposable elements have acquireda function that serves their host, a process termed "exaptation"8, andprovide an origin for at least some of the highly-conservedvertebrate-specific genomic sequences recently discovered usingcomparative genomics.

  6. Mechanism of Deletion Removing All Dystrophin Exons in a Canine Model for DMD Implicates Concerted Evolution of X Chromosome Pseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBelzen, D Jake; Malik, Alock S; Henthorn, Paula S; Kornegay, Joe N; Stedman, Hansell H

    2017-03-17

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the large, 2.4-Mb dystrophin gene. The majority of DMD-causing mutations are sporadic, multi-exon, frameshifting deletions, with the potential for variable immunological tolerance to the dystrophin protein from patient to patient. While systemic gene therapy holds promise in the treatment of DMD, immune responses to vectors and transgenes must first be rigorously evaluated in informative preclinical models to ensure patient safety. A widely used canine model for DMD, golden retriever muscular dystrophy, expresses detectable amounts of near full-length dystrophin due to alternative splicing around an intronic point mutation, thereby confounding the interpretation of immune responses to dystrophin-derived gene therapies. Here we characterize a naturally occurring deletion in a dystrophin-null canine, the German shorthaired pointer. The deletion spans 5.6 Mb of the X chromosome and encompasses all coding exons of the DMD and TMEM47 genes. The sequences surrounding the deletion breakpoints are virtually identical, suggesting that the deletion occurred through a homologous recombination event. Interestingly, the deletion breakpoints are within loci that are syntenically conserved among mammals, yet the high homology among this subset of ferritin-like loci is unique to the canine genome, suggesting lineage-specific concerted evolution of these atypical sequence elements.

  7. Evidence for widespread exonic small RNAs in the glaucophyte alga Cyanophora paradoxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Gross

    Full Text Available RNAi (RNA interference relies on the production of small RNAs (sRNAs from double-stranded RNA and comprises a major pathway in eukaryotes to restrict the propagation of selfish genetic elements. Amplification of the initial RNAi signal by generation of multiple secondary sRNAs from a targeted mRNA is catalyzed by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs. This phenomenon is known as transitivity and is particularly important in plants to limit the spread of viruses. Here we describe, using a genome-wide approach, the distribution of sRNAs in the glaucophyte alga Cyanophora paradoxa. C. paradoxa is a member of the supergroup Plantae (also known as Archaeplastida that includes red algae, green algae, and plants. The ancient (>1 billion years ago split of glaucophytes within Plantae suggests that C. paradoxa may be a useful model to learn about the early evolution of RNAi in the supergroup that ultimately gave rise to plants. Using next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analyses we find that sRNAs in C. paradoxa are preferentially associated with mRNAs, including a large number of transcripts that encode proteins arising from different functional categories. This pattern of exonic sRNAs appears to be a general trend that affects a large fraction of mRNAs in the cell. In several cases we observe that sRNAs have a bias for a specific strand of the mRNA, including many instances of antisense predominance. The genome of C. paradoxa encodes four sequences that are homologous to RdRPs in Arabidopsis thaliana. We discuss the possibility that exonic sRNAs in the glaucophyte may be secondarily derived from mRNAs by the action of RdRPs. If this hypothesis is confirmed, then transitivity may have had an ancient origin in Plantae.

  8. Isolation and characterization of antigen-specific alpaca (Lama pacos) VHH antibodies by biopanning followed by high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Nobuo; Kiyose, Norihiko; Akazawa, Yoko; Takashima, Mizuki; Hagihara, Yosihisa; Inoue, Naokazu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Ogawa, Ryu; Inoue, Seiya; Ito, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    The antigen-binding domain of camelid dimeric heavy chain antibodies, known as VHH or Nanobody, has much potential in pharmaceutical and industrial applications. To establish the isolation process of antigen-specific VHH, a VHH phage library was constructed with a diversity of 8.4 × 10(7) from cDNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of an alpaca (Lama pacos) immunized with a fragment of IZUMO1 (IZUMO1PFF) as a model antigen. By conventional biopanning, 13 antigen-specific VHHs were isolated. The amino acid sequences of these VHHs, designated as N-group VHHs, were very similar to each other (>93% identity). To find more diverse antibodies, we performed high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of VHH genes. By comparing the frequencies of each sequence between before and after biopanning, we found the sequences whose frequencies were increased by biopanning. The top 100 sequences of them were supplied for phylogenic tree analysis. In total 75% of them belonged to N-group VHHs, but the other were phylogenically apart from N-group VHHs (Non N-group). Two of three VHHs selected from non N-group VHHs showed sufficient antigen binding ability. These results suggested that biopanning followed by HTS provided a useful method for finding minor and diverse antigen-specific clones that could not be identified by conventional biopanning. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequenza: allele-specific copy number and mutation profiles from tumor sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favero, Francesco; Joshi, Tejal; Marquard, Andrea Marion

    2015-01-01

    specimen, by intratumor heterogeneity, and by the sheer size of the raw data. In particular, determination of copy number variations from exome sequencing data alone has proven difficult; thus SNP arrays have often been used for this task. Recently, algorithms to estimate absolute, but not allele...... data simulating normal-tumor admixtures, Sequenza detected the correct ploidy in samples with tumor content as low as 30%. Conclusions : The agreement between Sequenza and SNP array-based copy number profiles suggests that exome sequencing alone is sufficient not only for identifying small scale......Background : Exome or whole genome deep sequencing of tumor DNA along with paired normal DNA can potentially provide a detailed picture of the somatic mutations that characterize the tumor. However, analysis of such sequence data can be complicated by the presence of normal cells in the tumor...

  10. Cloning, protein sequence clarification, and substrate specificity of a leucine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus ATCC4525.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Zhu, Dunming; Hyatt, Brooke A; Malik, Fahad M; Biehl, Edward R; Hua, Ling

    2009-08-01

    Although an X-ray model sequence of a leucine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus ATCC4525 was reported, the amino acid sequence of this enzyme has not been confirmed. In the current study, this leucine dehydrogenase gene was cloned, sequenced, and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein sequence has been clarified. This leucine dehydrogenase is not identical with that of B. sphaericus IFO3525 because there are 16 different amino acid residues between these two proteins. Since the information on the catalytic properties of leucine dehydrogenase from B. sphaericus ATCC4525 has been limited, the recombinant enzyme was purified as His-tagged protein and further studied. This enzyme showed activity toward aliphatic substrates for both oxidative deamination and reductive amination and is an effective catalyst for the asymmetric synthesis of alpha-amino acids from the corresponding alpha-ketoacids.

  11. ExDom: an integrated database for comparative analysis of the exon-intron structures of protein domains in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasi, Ashwini; Philip, Philge; Manikandan, Vinu; Senapathy, Periannan

    2009-01-01

    We have developed ExDom, a unique database for the comparative analysis of the exon-intron structures of 96 680 protein domains from seven eukaryotic organisms (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Bos taurus, Rattus norvegicus, Danio rerio, Gallus gallus and Arabidopsis thaliana). ExDom provides integrated access to exon-domain data through a sophisticated web interface which has the following analytical capabilities: (i) intergenomic and intragenomic comparative analysis of exon-intron structure of domains; (ii) color-coded graphical display of the domain architecture of proteins correlated with their corresponding exon-intron structures; (iii) graphical analysis of multiple sequence alignments of amino acid and coding nucleotide sequences of homologous protein domains from seven organisms; (iv) comparative graphical display of exon distributions within the tertiary structures of protein domains; and (v) visualization of exon-intron structures of alternative transcripts of a gene correlated to variations in the domain architecture of corresponding protein isoforms. These novel analytical features are highly suited for detailed investigations on the exon-intron structure of domains and make ExDom a powerful tool for exploring several key questions concerning the function, origin and evolution of genes and proteins. ExDom database is freely accessible at: http://66.170.16.154/ExDom/.

  12. Sequence-specific high mobility group box factors recognize 10-12-base pair minor groove motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beest, M; Dooijes, D; van De Wetering, M

    2000-01-01

    , 12, and 10 base pairs, respectively. Footprinting with a deletion mutant of Ste11 reveals a novel interaction between the 3' base pairs of the extended DNA motif and amino acids C-terminal to the HMG domain. The sequence-specific interaction of Ste11 with these 3' base pairs contributes significantly......Sequence-specific high mobility group (HMG) box factors bind and bend DNA via interactions in the minor groove. Three-dimensional NMR analyses have provided the structural basis for this interaction. The cognate HMG domain DNA motif is generally believed to span 6-8 bases. However, alignment...... of promoter elements controlled by the yeast genes ste11 and Rox1 has indicated strict conservation of a larger DNA motif. By site selection, we identify a highly specific 12-base pair motif for Ste11, AGAACAAAGAAA. Similarly, we show that Tcf1, MatMc, and Sox4 bind unique, highly specific DNA motifs of 12...

  13. Two New Complete Genome Sequences Offer Insight into Host and Tissue Specificity of Plant Pathogenic Xanthomonas spp.▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanove, Adam J.; Koebnik, Ralf; Lu, Hong; Furutani, Ayako; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Patil, Prabhu B.; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Ryan, Robert P.; Meyer, Damien F.; Han, Sang-Wook; Aparna, Gudlur; Rajaram, Misha; Delcher, Arthur L.; Phillippy, Adam M.; Puiu, Daniela; Schatz, Michael C.; Shumway, Martin; Sommer, Daniel D.; Trapnell, Cole; Benahmed, Faiza; Dimitrov, George; Madupu, Ramana; Radune, Diana; Sullivan, Steven; Jha, Gopaljee; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Lee, Sang-Won; Pandey, Alok; Sharma, Vikas; Sriariyanun, Malinee; Szurek, Boris; Vera-Cruz, Casiana M.; Dorman, Karin S.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Verdier, Valérie; Dow, J. Maxwell; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Tsuge, Seiji; Brendel, Volker P.; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.; Leach, Jan E.; White, Frank F.; Salzberg, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas is a large genus of bacteria that collectively cause disease on more than 300 plant species. The broad host range of the genus contrasts with stringent host and tissue specificity for individual species and pathovars. Whole-genome sequences of Xanthomonas campestris pv. raphani strain 756C and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strain BLS256, pathogens that infect the mesophyll tissue of the leading models for plant biology, Arabidopsis thaliana and rice, respectively, were determined and provided insight into the genetic determinants of host and tissue specificity. Comparisons were made with genomes of closely related strains that infect the vascular tissue of the same hosts and across a larger collection of complete Xanthomonas genomes. The results suggest a model in which complex sets of adaptations at the level of gene content account for host specificity and subtler adaptations at the level of amino acid or noncoding regulatory nucleotide sequence determine tissue specificity. PMID:21784931

  14. Species-specific shifts in centromere sequence composition are coincident with breakpoint reuse in karyotypically divergent lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulazel, Kira V; Ferreri, Gianni C; Eldridge, Mark DB; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that rapid divergence in centromere sequences accompanies rapid karyotypic change during speciation. However, the reuse of breakpoints coincident with centromeres in the evolution of divergent karyotypes poses a potential paradox. In distantly related species where the same centromere breakpoints are used in the independent derivation of karyotypes, centromere-specific sequences may undergo convergent evolution rather than rapid sequence divergence. To determine whether centromere sequence composition follows the phylogenetic history of species evolution or patterns of convergent breakpoint reuse through chromosome evolution, we examined the phylogenetic trajectory of centromere sequences within a group of karyotypically diverse mammals, macropodine marsupials (wallabies, wallaroos and kangaroos). Results The evolution of three classes of centromere sequences across nine species within the genus Macropus (including Wallabia) were compared with the phylogenetic history of a mitochondrial gene, Cytochrome b (Cyt b), a nuclear gene, selenocysteine tRNA (TRSP), and the chromosomal histories of the syntenic blocks that define the different karyotype arrangements. Convergent contraction or expansion of predominant satellites is found to accompany specific karyotype rearrangements. The phylogenetic history of these centromere sequences includes the convergence of centromere composition in divergent species through convergent breakpoint reuse between syntenic blocks. Conclusion These data support the 'library hypothesis' of centromere evolution within this genus as each species possesses all three satellites yet each species has experienced differential expansion and contraction of individual classes. Thus, we have identified a correlation between the evolution of centromere satellite sequences, the reuse of syntenic breakpoints, and karyotype convergence in the context of a gene-based phylogeny. PMID:17708770

  15. Detection of Borrelia-specific 16S rRNA sequence in total RNA extracted from Ixodes ricinus ticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ž. Radulović

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction based assay for Borrelia species detection in ticks was developed. The method was based on amplification of 552 nucleotide bases long sequence of 16S rRNA, targeted by Borrelia specific primers. In the present study, total RNA extracted from Ixodes ricinus ticks was used as template. The results showed higher sensitivity for Borrelia detection as compared to standard dark-field microscopy. Method specificity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing of obtained 552 base pairs long amplicons. Phylogenetic analysis of obtained sequences showed that they belong to B. lusitaniae and B. afzelii genospecies. RT-PCR based method presented in this paper could be very useful as a screening test for detecting pathogen presence, especially when in investigations is required extraction of total RNA from ticks.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION AND CHROMOSOMAL ASSIGNMENT OF YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES CONTAINING HUMAN 3P13-P21-SPECIFIC SEQUENCE-TAGGED SITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MICHAELIS, SC; BARDENHEUER, W; LUX, A; SCHRAMM, A; GOCKEL, A; SIEBERT, R; WILLERS, C; SCHMIDTKE, K; TODT, B; VANDERHOUT, AH; BUYS, CHCM; HEPPELLPARTON, AC; RABBITTS, PH; UNGAR, S; SMITH, D; LEPASLIER, D; COHEN, D; OPALKA, B; SCHUTTE, J

    Human chromosomal region 3p12-p23 is proposed to harbor at least three tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and other neoplasias. In order to identify one of these genes we defined sequence tagged sites (STSs) specific for 3p13-p24.2 by analyzing a

  17. Sequence specific 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of hahellin in 8 M urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul K; Chary, K V R

    2010-10-01

    The sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of hahellin in 8 M urea-denatured state have been accomplished by NMR spectroscopy. Secondary chemical shift analysis reveals the native-like propensities for β-rich conformation in the denatured state.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Holospora undulata Strain HU1, a Micronucleus-Specific Symbiont of the Ciliate Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohra, Hideo; Suzuki, Haruo; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Kenya; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2013-08-22

    Holospora undulata is a micronucleus-specific symbiont of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We report here the draft genome sequence of H. undulata strain HU1. This genome information will contribute to the study of symbiosis between H. undulata and the host P. caudatum.

  19. A plasmonic multi-logic gate platform based on sequence-specific binding of estrogen receptors and gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Roger M; Bosman, Michel; Thanh, Nguyen T K; Su, Xiaodi

    2016-12-08

    A hybrid system made of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is used to build a versatile multi-logic gate platform, capable of performing six different logic operations. The sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to the DNA drives the optical response of the design.

  20. Improvement of the repetitive sequence-based identification and genotyping of Candida albicans using ALT-specific primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Hisao; Tanaka, Reiko; Chibana, Hiroji; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Adachi, Hidesada; Shimizu, Kazue; Kanbe, Toshio

    2009-05-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the inner repeats of the repetitive sequence (RPS), termed ALTs, of Candida albicans and its related species C. albicans var. stellatoidea and C. dubliniensis, were analyzed. ALT sequences were grouped into 4 types for C. albicans (Aa, Ab, Ac and Ad) and C. albicans var. stellatoidea (Sa1, Sa2, Sb, Sc and Sd), and 3 types for C. dubliniensis (Da, Db and Dc). In addition to the primer set P-II (specific to RPS), 2 primer sets (AS-I and AiR-I) specific to the nucleotide sequences of C. albicans ALT were designed and tested for their potential for RPS-based identification/genotyping of C. albicans. PCRs using AS-I and AiR-I clearly distinguished C. albicans from both C. albicans var. stellatoidea and C. dubliniensis. Furthermore, the strains of C. albicans that showed similar electrophoretic patterns in the PCR using P-II were discriminated at the subtype level. These results indicate that the PCRs using RPS- and ALT-specific primer sets are useful as simple and rapid systems for the specific identification and genotyping of C. albicans.

  1. Variants affecting exon skipping contribute to complex traits.

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    Younghee Lee

    Full Text Available DNA variants that affect alternative splicing and the relative quantities of different gene transcripts have been shown to be risk alleles for some Mendelian diseases. However, for complex traits characterized by a low odds ratio for any single contributing variant, very few studies have investigated the contribution of splicing variants. The overarching goal of this study is to discover and characterize the role that variants affecting alternative splicing may play in the genetic etiology of complex traits, which include a significant number of the common human diseases. Specifically, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in splicing regulatory elements can be characterized in silico to identify variants affecting splicing, and that these variants may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases as well as the inter-individual variability in the ratios of alternative transcripts. We leverage high-throughput expression profiling to 1 experimentally validate our in silico predictions of skipped exons and 2 characterize the molecular role of intronic genetic variations in alternative splicing events in the context of complex human traits and diseases. We propose that intronic SNPs play a role as genetic regulators within splicing regulatory elements and show that their associated exon skipping events can affect protein domains and structure. We find that SNPs we would predict to affect exon skipping are enriched among the set of SNPs reported to be associated with complex human traits.

  2. Translational and regulatory challenges for exon skipping therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ferlini, Alessandra; Goemans, Nathalie; Pasmooij, Anna M G; Wells, Dominic J; Bushby, Katerine; Vroom, Elizabeth; Balabanov, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    Several translational challenges are currently impeding the therapeutic development of antisense-mediated exon skipping approaches for rare diseases. Some of these are inherent to developing therapies for rare diseases, such as small patient numbers and limited information on natural history and interpretation of appropriate clinical outcome measures. Others are inherent to the antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping approach, which employs small modified DNA or RNA molecules to manipulate the splicing process. This is a new approach and only limited information is available on long-term safety and toxicity for most AON chemistries. Furthermore, AONs often act in a mutation-specific manner, in which case multiple AONs have to be developed for a single disease. A workshop focusing on preclinical development, trial design, outcome measures, and different forms of marketing authorization was organized by the regulatory models and biochemical outcome measures working groups of Cooperation of Science and Technology Action: "Networking towards clinical application of antisense-mediated exon skipping for rare diseases." The workshop included participants from patient organizations, academia, and members of staff from the European Medicine Agency and Medicine Evaluation Board (the Netherlands). This statement article contains the key outcomes of this meeting.

  3. Stem loop sequences specific to transposable element IS605 are found linked to lipoprotein genes in Borrelia plasmids.

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    Nicholas Delihas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmids of Borrelia species are dynamic structures that contain a large number of repetitive genes, gene fragments, and gene fusions. In addition, the transposable element IS605/200 family, as well as degenerate forms of this IS element, are prevalent. In Helicobacter pylori, flanking regions of the IS605 transposase gene contain sequences that fold into identical small stem loops. These function in transposition at the single-stranded DNA level. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In work reported here, bioinformatics techniques were used to scan Borrelia plasmid genomes for IS605 transposable element specific stem loop sequences. Two variant stem loop motifs are found in the left and right flanking regions of the transposase gene. Both motifs appear to have dispersed in plasmid genomes and are found "free-standing" and phylogenetically conserved without the associated IS605 transposase gene or the adjacent flanking sequence. Importantly, IS605 specific stem loop sequences are also found at the 3' ends of lipoprotein genes (PFam12 and PFam60, however the left and right sequences appear to develop their own evolutionary patterns. The lipoprotein gene-linked left stem loop sequences maintain the IS605 stem loop motif in orthologs but only at the RNA level. These show mutations whereby variants fold into phylogenetically conserved RNA-type stem loops that contain the wobble non-Watson-Crick G-U base-pairing. The right flanking sequence is associated with the family lipoprotein-1 genes. A comparison of homologs shows that the IS605 stem loop motif rapidly dissipates, but a more elaborate secondary structure appears to develop in its place. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Stem loop sequences specific to the transposable element IS605 are present in plasmid regions devoid of a transposase gene and significantly, are found linked to lipoprotein genes in Borrelia plasmids. These sequences are evolutionarily conserved and/or structurally developed in

  4. Mouse tetranectin: cDNA sequence, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibaraki, K; Kozak, C A; Wewer, U M

    1995-01-01

    % identity and 87% similarity at the amino acid level. Sequence comparisons between mouse and human tetranectin and some C-type lectins confirmed a complete conservation in the position of six cysteines as well as numerous other amino acid residues, indicating an essential structure for potential function...... regulation, mouse tetranectin cDNA was cloned from a 16-day-old mouse embryo library. Sequence analysis revealed a 992-bp cDNA with an open reading frame of 606 bp, which is identical in length to the human tetranectin cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology to the human cDNA with 76......(s) of tetranectin. The sequence analysis revealed a difference in both sequence and size of the noncoding regions between mouse and human cDNAs. Northern analysis of the various tissues from mouse, rat, and cow showed the major transcript(s) to be approximately 1 kb, which is similar in size to that observed...

  5. DNA recognition by F factor TraI36: highly sequence-specific binding of single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J C; Schildbach, J F

    2001-09-25

    The TraI protein has two essential roles in transfer of conjugative plasmid F Factor. As part of a complex of DNA-binding proteins, TraI introduces a site- and strand-specific nick at the plasmid origin of transfer (oriT), cutting the DNA strand that is transferred to the recipient cell. TraI also acts as a helicase, presumably unwinding the plasmid strands prior to transfer. As an essential feature of its nicking activity, TraI is capable of binding and cleaving single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing an oriT sequence. The specificity of TraI DNA recognition was examined by measuring the binding of oriT oligonucleotide variants to TraI36, a 36-kD amino-terminal domain of TraI that retains the sequence-specific nucleolytic activity. TraI36 recognition is highly sequence-specific for an 11-base region of oriT, with single base changes reducing affinity by as much as 8000-fold. The binding data correlate with plasmid mobilization efficiencies: plasmids containing sequences bound with lower affinities by TraI36 are transferred between cells at reduced frequencies. In addition to the requirement for high affinity binding to oriT, efficient in vitro nicking and in vivo plasmid mobilization requires a pyrimidine immediately 5' of the nick site. The high sequence specificity of TraI single-stranded DNA recognition suggests that despite its recognition of single-stranded DNA, TraI is capable of playing a major regulatory role in initiation and/or termination of plasmid transfer.

  6. Polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Meldgaard, M; Sørensen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    HLA-G is a non-classical MHC class I gene with a limited tissue distribution. The most pronounced expression is detected in the cytotrophoblast of first trimester placenta. It is possible to detect mRNA for HLA-G in preimplantation blastocysts where expression is correlated with a high cleavage...... compared to the sequence of HLA-6.0 (G*01011); one of these has not been reported before. We also found a deletion of the first base of codon 130 or the third of codon 129 in a heterozygous individual. This study, together with previous results, suggests that the polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene...... rate of embryos. HLA-G seems to play an important role in the feto-maternal relationship. The polymorphism of the HLA-G locus is not fully clarified. One study has shown extensive nucleotide sequence variation in the exon 3 (alpha-2 domain) in healthy African Americans. A few studies in other...

  7. Design of Tail-Clamp Peptide Nucleic Acid Tethered with Azobenzene Linker for Sequence-Specific Detection of Homopurine DNA

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    Shinjiro Sawada

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA carries genetic information in its sequence of bases. Synthetic oligonucleotides that can sequence-specifically recognize a target gene sequence are a useful tool for regulating gene expression or detecting target genes. Among the many synthetic oligonucleotides, tail-clamp peptide nucleic acid (TC-PNA offers advantages since it has two homopyrimidine PNA strands connected via a flexible ethylene glycol-type linker that can recognize complementary homopurine sequences via Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairings and form thermally-stable PNA/PNA/DNA triplex structures. Here, we synthesized a series of TC-PNAs that can possess different lengths of azobenzene-containing linkers and studied their binding behaviours to homopurine single-stranded DNA. Introduction of azobenzene at the N-terminus amine of PNA increased the thermal stability of PNA-DNA duplexes. Further extension of the homopyrimidine PNA strand at the N-terminus of PNA-AZO further increased the binding stability of the PNA/DNA/PNA triplex to the target homopurine sequence; however, it induced TC-PNA/DNA/TC-PNA complex formation. Among these TC-PNAs, 9W5H-C4-AZO consisting of nine Watson-Crick bases and five Hoogsteen bases tethered with a beta-alanine conjugated azobenzene linker gave a stable 1:1 TC-PNA/ssDNA complex and exhibited good mismatch recognition. Our design for TC-PNA-AZO can be utilized for detecting homopurine sequences in various genes.

  8. Plasmodium-specific molecular assays produce uninterpretable results and non-Plasmodium spp. sequences in field-collected Anopheles vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Genelle F; Foley, Desmond H; Rueda, Leopoldo M; Melanson, Vanessa R; Wilkerson, Richard C; Long, Lewis S; Richardson, Jason H; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Heung-Chul; Lee, Won-Ja

    2013-12-01

    The Malaria Research and Reference Reagent Resource-recommended PLF/UNR/VIR polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Plasmodium vivax in Anopheles spp. mosquitoes collected in South Korea. Samples that were amplified were sequenced and compared with known Plasmodium spp. by using the PlasmoDB.org Basic Local Alignment Search Tool/n and the National Center for Biotechnology Information Basic Local Alignment Search Tool/n tools. Results show that the primers PLF/UNR/VIR used in this PCR can produce uninterpretable results and non-specific sequences in field-collected mosquitoes. Three additional PCRs (PLU/VIV, specific for 18S small subunit ribosomal DNA; Pvr47, specific for a nuclear repeat; and GDCW/PLAS, specific for the mitochondrial marker, cytB) were then used to find a more accurate and interpretable assay. Samples that were amplified were again sequenced. The PLU/VIV and Pvr47 assays showed cross-reactivity with non-Plasmodium spp. and an arthropod fungus (Zoophthora lanceolata). The GDCW/PLAS assay amplified only Plasmodium spp. but also amplified the non-human specific parasite P. berghei from an Anopheles belenrae mosquito. Detection of P. berghei in South Korea is a new finding.

  9. Identification of H. pylori strain specific DNA sequences between two clinical isolates from NUD and gastric ulcer by SSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Feng-Chan; Gong, Min; Ng, Han-Chong; Ho, Bow

    2003-08-01

    The genomes of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) from different individuals are different. This project was to identify the strain specific DNA sequences between two clinical H. pylori isolates by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Two clinical H. pylori isolates, one from gastric ulcer (GU, tester) and the other from non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD, driver), were cultured and the genomic DNA was prepared and submitted to Alu I digestion. Then two different adaptors were ligated respectively to the 5'-end of two aliquots of the tester DNA fragments and SSH was made between the tester and driver DNA. The un-hybridized tester DNA sequences were amplified by two sequential PCR and cloned into pGEM-T-Easy Vector. The tester strain specific inserts were screened and disease related DNA sequences were identified by dot blotting. Among the 240 colonies randomly chosen, 50 contained the tester strain specific DNA sequences. Twenty three inserts were sequenced and the sizes ranged from 261 bp to 1 036 bp. Fifteen inserts belonged to the H.pylori plasmid pHPO100 that is about 3.5 kb and codes a replication protein A. Other inserts had patches of homologous to the genes of H.pylori in GenBank. Various patterns of dot blots were given and no GU strain unique DNA sequences were found when 4 inserts were used as probes to screen the genomic DNA from 27 clinical isolates, 8 from GU, 12 from duodenum ulcer (DU), 4 from GU-DU, 2 from NUD and 1 from gastric cancer (GC). But a 670 bp DNA fragment (GU198) that was a bit homologous to the 3'-end of the gene of thymidylate kinase was positive in 7 GU strains (7/8), 3 GU-DU strains (3/4) and 3 DU strains (3/12). A 384 bp fragment (GU79) of the replication gene A (repA) was positive only in 4 H.pylori isolates, 2 from GU and 2 from GU-DU. Differences exist in the genes of different H.pylori isolates. SSH is very effective to screen H.pylori strain specific DNA sequences between two clinical isolates, and some of these sequences may have

  10. A specific indel marker for the Philippines Schistosoma japonicum revealed by analysis of mitochondrial genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Chen, Fen; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Blair, David; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, near-complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences for Schistosoma japonicum from different regions in the Philippines and Japan were amplified and sequenced. Comparisons among S. japonicum from the Philippines, Japan, and China revealed a geographically based length difference in mt genomes, but the mt genomic organization and gene arrangement were the same. Sequence differences among samples from the Philippines and all samples from the three endemic areas were 0.57-2.12 and 0.76-3.85 %, respectively. The most variable part of the mt genome was the non-coding region. In the coding portion of the genome, protein-coding genes varied more than rRNA genes and tRNAs. The near-complete mt genome sequences for Philippine specimens were identical in length (14,091 bp) which was 4 bp longer than those of S. japonicum samples from Japan and China. This indel provides a unique genetic marker for S. japonicum samples from the Philippines. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated amino acids of 12 protein-coding genes showed that samples of S. japonicum clustered according to their geographical origins. The identified mitochondrial indel marker will be useful for tracing the source of S. japonicum infection in humans and animals in Southeast Asia.

  11. Discrete versus Probabilistic Sequence Classifiers for Domain-specific Entity Chunking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canisius, S.V.M.; van den Bosch, A.; Daelemans, W.; Schobbens, P.-Y.; Vanhof, W.; Schwanen, G.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparative case study of discrete and probabilistic sequence classification methods applied to two real-world entity chunking tasks in the medical domain. It is shown that a discrete version of maximum-entropy models that does not coordinate its decisions is outperformed by both

  12. Exon first nucleotide mutations in splicing: evaluation of in silico prediction tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodecká, Lucie; Lockerová, Pavla; Ravčuková, Barbora; Buratti, Emanuele; Baralle, Francisco E; Dušek, Ladislav; Freiberger, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the first nucleotide of exons (E(+1)) mostly affect pre-mRNA splicing when found in AG-dependent 3' splice sites, whereas AG-independent splice sites are more resistant. The AG-dependency, however, may be difficult to assess just from primary sequence data as it depends on the quality of the polypyrimidine tract. For this reason, in silico prediction tools are commonly used to score 3' splice sites. In this study, we have assessed the ability of sequence features and in silico prediction tools to discriminate between the splicing-affecting and non-affecting E(+1) variants. For this purpose, we newly tested 16 substitutions in vitro and derived other variants from literature. Surprisingly, we found that in the presence of the substituting nucleotide, the quality of the polypyrimidine tract alone was not conclusive about its splicing fate. Rather, it was the identity of the substituting nucleotide that markedly influenced it. Among the computational tools tested, the best performance was achieved using the Maximum Entropy Model and Position-Specific Scoring Matrix. As a result of this study, we have now established preliminary discriminative cut-off values showing sensitivity up to 95% and specificity up to 90%. This is expected to improve our ability to detect splicing-affecting variants in a clinical genetic setting.

  13. Identification of POMC exonic variants associated with substance dependence and body mass index.

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    Fan Wang

    Full Text Available Risk of substance dependence (SD and obesity has been linked to the function of melanocortin peptides encoded by the proopiomelanocortin gene (POMC.POMC exons were Sanger sequenced in 280 African Americans (AAs and 308 European Americans (EAs. Among them, 311 (167 AAs and 114 EAs were affected with substance (alcohol, cocaine, opioid and/or marijuana dependence and 277 (113 AAs and164 EAs were screened controls. We identified 23 variants, including two common polymorphisms (rs10654394 and rs1042571 and 21 rare variants; 12 of which were novel. We used logistic regression to analyze the association between the two common variants and SD or body mass index (BMI, with sex, age, and ancestry proportion as covariates. The common variant rs1042571 in the 3'UTR was significantly associated with BMI in EAs (Overweight: P(adj = 0.005; Obese: P(adj = 0.018; Overweight+Obese: P(adj = 0.002 but not in AAs. The common variant, rs10654394, was not associated with BMI and neither common variant was associated with SD in either population. To evaluate the association between the rare variants and SD or BMI, we collapsed rare variants and tested their prevalence using Fisher's exact test. In AAs, rare variants were nominally associated with SD overall and with specific SD traits (SD: P(FET,1df = 0.026; alcohol dependence: P(FET,1df = 0.027; cocaine dependence: P(FET,1df = 0.007; marijuana dependence: P(FET,1df = 0.050 (the P-value from cocaine dependence analysis survived Bonferroni correction. There was no such effect in EAs. Although the frequency of the rare variants did not differ significantly between the normal-weight group and the overweight or obese group in either population, certain rare exonic variants occurred only in overweight or obese subjects without SD.These findings suggest that POMC exonic variants may influence risk for both SD and elevated BMI, in a population-specific manner. However, common and rare variants in this gene may exert

  14. Molecular characterization of exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goat

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    Jai Prakash Khichar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To estimate genetic variability in exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goats. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 blood samples from unrelated Marwari goats were randomly collected from different villages of Bikaner (Rajasthan, India. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood using blood DNA isolation kit (Himedia Ltd. as per manufacturer’s protocol. The quality of extracted genomic DNA was checked on 0.8% agarose gel. Specifically designed a primer set for caprine myostatin (MSTN gene (Genebank accession no. DQ167575 was used to amplify the exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat. The genetic variability in exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat was assessed on 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to detect single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP pattern. Results: The exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat showed two types of conformation patterns on 8% polyacrylamide gel. One of the patterns showed only two bands and was considered as genotype AA, whereas another pattern having an extra band was designated as genotype AB. The frequencies of AA and AB genotype for exon 3 region of MSTN gene were calculated as 0.90 and 0.10, respectively. Conclusion: Low level of polymorphism was observed at exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat through SSCP analysis. This information could be utilized in future breeding plan to exploit the unique characteristics of Marwari goat of Rajasthan.

  15. Molecular characterization of exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khichar, Jai Prakash; Gahlot, Gyan Chand; Agrawal, Vijay Kumar; Kiran; Dewna, Ajay Singh; Prakash; Ashraf, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To estimate genetic variability in exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goats. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 blood samples from unrelated Marwari goats were randomly collected from different villages of Bikaner (Rajasthan), India. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood using blood DNA isolation kit (Himedia Ltd.) as per manufacturer’s protocol. The quality of extracted genomic DNA was checked on 0.8% agarose gel. Specifically designed a primer set for caprine myostatin (MSTN) gene (Genebank accession no. DQ167575) was used to amplify the exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat. The genetic variability in exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat was assessed on 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to detect single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) pattern. Results: The exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat showed two types of conformation patterns on 8% polyacrylamide gel. One of the patterns showed only two bands and was considered as genotype AA, whereas another pattern having an extra band was designated as genotype AB. The frequencies of AA and AB genotype for exon 3 region of MSTN gene were calculated as 0.90 and 0.10, respectively. Conclusion: Low level of polymorphism was observed at exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat through SSCP analysis. This information could be utilized in future breeding plan to exploit the unique characteristics of Marwari goat of Rajasthan. PMID:27397994

  16. A Large Inversion Involving GNAS Exon A/B and All Exons Encoding Gsα Is Associated With Autosomal Dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib (PHP1B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigelioniene, Giedre; Nevalainen, Pasi I; Reyes, Monica; Thiele, Susanne; Tafaj, Olta; Molinaro, Angelo; Takatani, Rieko; Ala-Houhala, Marja; Nilsson, Daniel; Eisfeldt, Jesper; Lindstrand, Anna; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Mäkitie, Outi; Jüppner, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B) is characterized primarily by resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) and thus hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, in most cases without evidence for Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). PHP1B is associated with epigenetic changes at one or several differentially-methylated regions (DMRs) within GNAS, which encodes the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα) and splice variants thereof. Heterozygous, maternally inherited STX16 or GNAS deletions leading to isolated loss-of-methylation (LOM) at exon A/B alone or at all maternal DMRs are the cause of autosomal dominant PHP1B (AD-PHP1B). In this study, we analyzed three affected individuals, the female proband and her two sons. All three revealed isolated LOM at GNAS exon A/B, whereas the proband's healthy maternal grandmother and uncle showed normal methylation at this locus. Haplotype analysis was consistent with linkage to the STX16/GNAS region, yet no deletion could be identified. Whole-genome sequencing of one of the patients revealed a large heterozygous inversion (1,882,433 bp). The centromeric breakpoint of the inversion is located 7,225 bp downstream of GNAS exon XL, but its DMR showed no methylation abnormality, raising the possibility that the inversion disrupts a regulatory element required only for establishing or maintaining exon A/B methylation. Because our three patients presented phenotypes consistent with PHP1B, and not with PHP1A, the Gsα promoter is probably unaffected by the inversion. Our findings expand the spectrum of genetic mutations that lead to LOM at exon A/B alone and thus biallelic expression of the transcript derived from this alternative first GNAS exon. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  17. Decoding of exon splicing patterns in the human RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinev, Vasily V; Migas, Alexandr A; Kirsanava, Aksana D; Mishkova, Olga A; Siomava, Natalia; Ramanouskaya, Tatiana V; Vaitsiankova, Alina V; Ilyushonak, Ilia M; Nazarov, Petr V; Vallar, Laurent; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2015-11-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is the most widespread genetic defect found in human acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation results in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene that produces a wide variety of alternative transcripts and influences the course of the disease. The rules of combinatorics and splicing of exons in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts are not known. To address this issue, we developed an exon graph model of the fusion gene organization and evaluated its local exon combinatorics by the exon combinatorial index (ECI). Here we show that the local exon combinatorics of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene follows a power-law behavior and (i) the vast majority of exons has a low ECI, (ii) only a small part is represented by "exons-hubs" of splicing with very high ECI values, and (iii) it is scale-free and very sensitive to targeted skipping of "exons-hubs". Stochasticity of the splicing machinery and preferred usage of exons in alternative splicing can explain such behavior of the system. Stochasticity may explain up to 12% of the ECI variance and results in a number of non-coding and unproductive transcripts that can be considered as a noise. Half-life of these transcripts is increased due to the deregulation of some key genes of the nonsense-mediated decay system in leukemia cells. On the other hand, preferred usage of exons may explain up to 75% of the ECI variability. Our analysis revealed a set of splicing-related cis-regulatory motifs that can explain "attractiveness" of exons in alternative splicing but only when they are considered together. Cis-regulatory motifs are guides for splicing trans-factors and we observed a leukemia-specific profile of expression of the splicing genes in t(8;21)-positive blasts. Altogether, our results show that alternative splicing of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts follows strict rules and that the power-law component of the fusion gene organization confers a high flexibility to this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Evaluation of a hybrid approach using UBLAST and BLASTX for metagenomic sequences annotation of specific functional genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    Full Text Available The fast development of next generation sequencing (NGS has dramatically increased the application of metagenomics in various aspects. Functional annotation is a major step in the metagenomics studies. Fast annotation of functional genes has been a challenge because of the deluge of NGS data and expanding databases. A hybrid annotation pipeline proposed previously for taxonomic assignments was evaluated in this study for metagenomic sequences annotation of specific functional genes, such as antibiotic resistance genes, arsenic resistance genes and key genes in nitrogen metabolism. The hybrid approach using UBLAST and BLASTX is 44-177 times faster than direct BLASTX in the annotation using the small protein database for the specific functional genes, with the cost of missing a small portion (<1.8% of target sequences compared with direct BLASTX hits. Different from direct BLASTX, the time required for specific functional genes annotation using the hybrid annotation pipeline depends on the abundance for the target genes. Thus this hybrid annotation pipeline is more suitable in specific functional genes annotation than in comprehensive functional genes annotation.

  19. Sequence Diagram Test Case Specification and Virtual Integration Analysis using Timed-Arc Petri Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Sieverding

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we formally define Test Case Sequence Diagrams (TCSD as an easy-to-use means to specify test cases for components including timing constraints. These test cases are modeled using the UML2 syntax and can be specified by standard UML-modeling-tools. In a component-based design an early identification of errors can be achieved by a virtual integration of components before the actual system is build. We define such a procedure which integrates the individual test cases of the components according to the interconnections of a given architecture and checks if all specified communication sequences are consistent. Therefore, we formally define the transformation of TCSD into timed-arc Petri nets and a process for the combination of these nets. The applicability of our approach is demonstrated on an avionic use case from the ARP4761 standard.

  20. Individual differences in implicit motor learning: task specificity in sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark-Inbar, Alit; Raza, Meher; Taylor, Jordan A; Ivry, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    In standard taxonomies, motor skills are typically treated as representative of implicit or procedural memory. We examined two emblematic tasks of implicit motor learning, sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning, asking whether individual differences in learning are correlated between these tasks, as well as how individual differences within each task are related to different performance variables. As a prerequisite, it was essential to establish the reliability of learning measures for each task. Participants were tested twice on a visuomotor adaptation task and on a sequence learning task, either the serial reaction time task or the alternating reaction time task. Learning was evident in all tasks at the group level and reliable at the individual level in visuomotor adaptation and the alternating reaction time task but not in the serial reaction time task. Performance variability was predictive of learning in both domains, yet the relationship was in the opposite direction for adaptation and sequence learning. For the former, faster learning was associated with lower variability, consistent with models of sensorimotor adaptation in which learning rates are sensitive to noise. For the latter, greater learning was associated with higher variability and slower reaction times, factors that may facilitate the spread of activation required to form predictive, sequential associations. Interestingly, learning measures of the different tasks were not correlated. Together, these results oppose a shared process for implicit learning in sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning and provide insight into the factors that account for individual differences in learning within each task domain. We investigated individual differences in the ability to implicitly learn motor skills. As a prerequisite, we assessed whether individual differences were reliable across test sessions. We found that two commonly used tasks of implicit learning, visuomotor adaptation and the

  1. Identification of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Transcript Sequences Expressed during Infection Reveals Isolate-Specific Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, A.; Stassen, J.H.; Seidl, M.F.; Bautor, J.; Parker, J. E.; Van den Ackerveken, G.

    2011-01-01

    Biotrophic plant pathogens secrete effector proteins that are important for infection of the host. The aim of this study was to identify effectors of the downy mildew pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) that are expressed during infection of its natural host Arabidopsis thaliana. Infection-related transcripts were identified from Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) derived from leaves of the susceptible Arabidopsis Ws eds1-1 mutant inoculated with the highly virulent Hpa isolate Waco9. A...

  2. Using RNase sequence specificity to refine the identification of RNA-protein binding regions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinguo; Li Lang; Shen Changyu; Wang Guohua; Wang Xin; Mooney Sean D; Edenberg Howard J; Sanford Jeremy R; Liu Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Massively parallel pyrosequencing is a high-throughput technology that can sequence hundreds of thousands of DNA/RNA fragments in a single experiment. Combining it with immunoprecipitation-based biochemical assays, such as cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), provides a genome-wide method to detect the sites at which proteins bind DNA or RNA. In a CLIP-pyrosequencing experiment, the resolutions of the detected protein binding regions are partially determined by the length of the...

  3. Genomic library screening for viruses from the human dental plaque revealed pathogen-specific lytic phage sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarbou, Ahmed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenesis presents an astounding arsenal of virulence factors that allow them to conquer many different niches throughout the course of infection. Principally fascinating is the fact that some bacterial species are able to induce different diseases by expression of different combinations of virulence factors. Nevertheless, studies aiming at screening for the presence of bacteriophages in humans have been limited. Such screening procedures would eventually lead to identification of phage-encoded properties that impart increased bacterial fitness and/or virulence in a particular niche, and hence, would potentially be used to reverse the course of bacterial infections. As the human oral cavity represents a rich and dynamic ecosystem for several upper respiratory tract pathogens. However, little is known about virus diversity in human dental plaque which is an important reservoir. We applied the culture-independent approach to characterize virus diversity in human dental plaque making a library from a virus DNA fraction amplified using a multiple displacement method and sequenced 80 clones. The resulting sequence showed 44% significant identities to GenBank databases by TBLASTX analysis. TBLAST homology comparisons showed that 66% was viral; 18% eukarya; 10% bacterial; 6% mobile elements. These sequences were sorted into 6 contigs and 45 single sequences in which 4 contigs and a single sequence showed significant identity to a small region of a putative prophage in the Corynebacterium diphtheria genome. These findings interestingly highlight the uniqueness of over half of the sequences, whilst the dominance of a pathogen-specific prophage sequences imply their role in virulence.

  4. DNA minor groove electrostatic potential: influence of sequence-specific transitions of the torsion angle gamma and deoxyribose conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitnikova, M Y; Shestopalova, A V

    2017-11-01

    The structural adjustments of the sugar-phosphate DNA backbone (switching of the γ angle (O5'-C5'-C4'-C3') from canonical to alternative conformations and/or C2'-endo → C3'-endo transition of deoxyribose) lead to the sequence-specific changes in accessible surface area of both polar and non-polar atoms of the grooves and the polar/hydrophobic profile of the latter ones. The distribution of the minor groove electrostatic potential is likely to be changing as a result of such conformational rearrangements in sugar-phosphate DNA backbone. Our analysis of the crystal structures of the short free DNA fragments and calculation of their electrostatic potentials allowed us to determine: (1) the number of classical and alternative γ angle conformations in the free B-DNA; (2) changes in the minor groove electrostatic potential, depending on the conformation of the sugar-phosphate DNA backbone; (3) the effect of the DNA sequence on the minor groove electrostatic potential. We have demonstrated that the structural adjustments of the DNA double helix (the conformations of the sugar-phosphate backbone and the minor groove dimensions) induce changes in the distribution of the minor groove electrostatic potential and are sequence-specific. Therefore, these features of the minor groove sizes and distribution of minor groove electrostatic potential can be used as a signal for recognition of the target DNA sequence by protein in the implementation of the indirect readout mechanism.

  5. A strand specific high resolution normalization method for chip-sequencing data employing multiple experimental control measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enroth, Stefan; Andersson, Claes; Andersson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is becoming the standard tool for investigating protein-DNA interactions or epigenetic modifications. However, the data generated will always contain noise due to e.g. repetitive regions or non-specific antibody interactions. The noise will appear in the form of a backg......High-throughput sequencing is becoming the standard tool for investigating protein-DNA interactions or epigenetic modifications. However, the data generated will always contain noise due to e.g. repetitive regions or non-specific antibody interactions. The noise will appear in the form...... of a background distribution of reads that must be taken into account in the downstream analysis, for example when detecting enriched regions (peak-calling). Several reported peak-callers can take experimental measurements of background tag distribution into account when analysing a data set. Unfortunately...

  6. Linking maternal and somatic 5S rRNA types with different sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locati, Mauro D; Pagano, Johanna F B; Ensink, Wim A; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Zhu, Kongju; Spaink, Herman P; Girard, Geneviève; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J; Dekker, Rob J; Breit, Timo M

    2017-04-01

    5S rRNA is a ribosomal core component, transcribed from many gene copies organized in genomic repeats. Some eukaryotic species have two 5S rRNA types defined by their predominant expression in oogenesis or adult tissue. Our next-generation sequencing study on zebrafish egg, embryo, and adult tissue identified maternal-type 5S rRNA that is exclusively accumulated during oogenesis, replaced throughout the embryogenesis by a somatic-type, and thus virtually absent in adult somatic tissue. The maternal-type 5S rDNA contains several thousands of gene copies on chromosome 4 in tandem repeats with small intergenic regions, whereas the somatic-type is present in only 12 gene copies on chromosome 18 with large intergenic regions. The nine-nucleotide variation between the two 5S rRNA types likely affects TFIII binding and riboprotein L5 binding, probably leading to storage of maternal-type rRNA. Remarkably, these sequence differences are located exactly at the sequence-specific target site for genome integration by the 5S rRNA-specific Mutsu retrotransposon family. Thus, we could define maternal- and somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies. Furthermore, we identified four additional maternal-type and two new somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies, each with their own target sequence. This target-site specificity, frequently intact maternal-type retrotransposon elements, plus specific presence of Mutsu retrotransposon RNA and piRNA in egg and adult tissue, suggest an involvement of retrotransposons in achieving the differential copy number of the two types of 5S rDNA loci. © 2017 Locati et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. Exon 5 Polymorphisms in the O6-Alkylguanine DNA Alkyltransferase Gene and Lung Cancer Risk in Non–Smokers Exposed to Second-Hand Smoke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Catherine Cohet; Stephane Borel; Fredrik Nyberg; Anush Mukeria; Irene Brüske-Hohlfeld; Vali Constantinescu; Simone Benhamou; Paul Brennan; Janet Hall; Paolo Boffetta

    2004-01-01

    .... Experimental Design: Exon 5 of the AGT gene was sequenced in genomic DNA from 136 cases and 133 hospital- or population-based controls for whom questionnaire information on second-hand smoke and diet was available...

  8. Novel Rbfox2 isoforms associated with alternative exon usage in rat cortex and suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, L M M; Carter, D A

    2017-08-30

    Transcriptome diversity in adult neurons is partly mediated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs), including the RBFOX factors. RBFOX3/NeuN, a neuronal maturity marker, is strangely depleted in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons, and may be compensated by a change in Rbfox2 expression. In this study, we found no superficial changes in Rbfox2 expression in the SCN, but mRNA population analysis revealed a distinct SCN transcript profile that includes multiple novel Rbfox2 isoforms. Of eleven isoforms in SCN and cerebral cortex that exhibit exon variation across two protein domains, we found a 3-fold higher abundance of a novel ('-12-40') C-terminal domain (CTD)-variant in the SCN. This isoform embraces an alternative reading frame that imparts a 50% change in CTD protein sequence, and functional impairment of exon 7 exclusion activity in a RBFOX2-target, the L-type calcium channel gene, Cacna1c. We have also demonstrated functional correlates in SCN gene transcripts; inclusion of Cacna1c exon 7, and also exclusion of both NMDA receptor gene Grin1 exon 4, and Enah exon 12, all consistent with a change in SCN RBFOX activity. The demonstrated regional diversity of Rbfox2 in adult brain highlights the functional adaptability of this RBP, enabling neuronal specialization, and potentially responding to disease-related neuronal dysfunction.

  9. Common and specific genomic sequences of avian and human extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli as determined by genomic subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan Lisa K

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH strategy was used with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (EXPEC that cause avian colibacillosis (avian pathogenic E. coli or APEC and human urinary tract infections (uropathogenic E. coli or UPEC to determine if they possessed genes that were host and/or niche specific. Both APEC and UPEC isolates were used as tester and driver strains in 4 different SSHs in order to obtain APEC- and UPEC-specific subtraction fragments (SFs. Results These procedures yielded a total of 136 tester-specific SFs of which 85 were APEC-derived and 51 were UPEC-derived. Most of the APEC-derived SFs were associated with plasmids; whereas, the majority of UPEC-derived sequences matched to the bacterial chromosome. We further determined the distribution of these tester-derived sequences in a collection of UPEC and APEC isolates using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Plasmid-borne, APEC-derived sequences (tsh, cvaB, traR, traC and sopB were predominantly present in APEC, as compared to UPEC. Of the UPEC-derived SFs, those encoding hemolysin D and F1C major and minor fimbrial subunits were present only in UPEC. However, two UPEC-derived SFs that showed strong similarity to the uropathgenic-specific protein gene (usp occurred in APEC, demonstrating that usp is not specific to UPEC. Conclusion This study provides evidence of the genetic variability of ExPEC as well as genomic similarities between UPEC and APEC; it did not identify any single marker that would dictate host and/or niche specificity in APEC or UPEC. However, further studies on the genes that encode putative or hypothetical proteins might offer important insight into the pathogenesis of disease, as caused by these two ExPEC.

  10. Identification of bovine Neospora parasites by PCR amplification and specific small-subunit rRNA sequence probe hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M S; Barr, B C; Marsh, A E; Anderson, M L; Rowe, J D; Tarantal, A F; Hendrickx, A G; Sverlow, K; Dubey, J P; Conrad, P A

    1996-05-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized genus of pathogenic coccidia, closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, that can cause abortion or congenital disease in a variety of domestic animal hosts. On the basis of the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences of Neospora spp. and other apicomplexa coccidia, oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 were used for PCR amplification of conserved sequences of approximately 300 bp in size. A Neospora-specific chemiluminescent probe hybridized to Southern blots of amplification products from Neospora DNA but not to Southern blots with amplified DNA from the other coccidian parasites tested. A Toxoplasma-specific probe whose sequence differed from that of the probe for Neospora spp. by a single base pair was used to distinguish these parasites by specific Southern blot hybridization. The PCR system detected as few as one Neospora tachyzoite in the culture medium or five tachyzoites in samples of whole blood or amniotic fluid spiked with Neospora parasites. In addition, Neospora PCR products were successfully amplified from whole blood and amniotic fluid samples of experimentally infected bovine and rhesus macaque fetuses. These results indicate that this PCR and probe hybridization system could be a valuable adjunct to serology and immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of Neospora infections in bovine or primate fetuses.

  11. Sequence-specific targeting of dosage compensation in Drosophila favors an active chromatin context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom A Alekseyenko

    Full Text Available The Drosophila MSL complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcription of the single X chromosome in males approximately two-fold. This is accomplished through recognition of the X chromosome and subsequent acetylation of histone H4K16 on X-linked genes. Initial binding to the X is thought to occur at "entry sites" that contain a consensus sequence motif ("MSL recognition element" or MRE. However, this motif is only ∼2 fold enriched on X, and only a fraction of the motifs on X are initially targeted. Here we ask whether chromatin context could distinguish between utilized and non-utilized copies of the motif, by comparing their relative enrichment for histone modifications and chromosomal proteins mapped in the modENCODE project. Through a comparative analysis of the chromatin features in male S2 cells (which contain MSL complex and female Kc cells (which lack the complex, we find that the presence of active chromatin modifications, together with an elevated local GC content in the surrounding sequences, has strong predictive value for functional MSL entry sites, independent of MSL binding. We tested these sites for function in Kc cells by RNAi knockdown of Sxl, resulting in induction of MSL complex. We show that ectopic MSL expression in Kc cells leads to H4K16 acetylation around these sites and a relative increase in X chromosome transcription. Collectively, our results support a model in which a pre-existing active chromatin environment, coincident with H3K36me3, contributes to MSL entry site selection. The consequences of MSL targeting of the male X chromosome include increase in nucleosome lability, enrichment for H4K16 acetylation and JIL-1 kinase, and depletion of linker histone H1 on active X-linked genes. Our analysis can serve as a model for identifying chromatin and local sequence features that may contribute to selection of functional protein binding sites in the genome.

  12. Structural insights into the exon junction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hir, Hervé; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2008-02-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the exon junction complex is loaded onto spliced mRNAs at a precise position upstream of exon junctions, where it remains during nuclear export and cytoplasmic localisation until it is removed during the first translation round. The exon junction core complex consists of four proteins that form a dynamic binding platform for a variety of peripheral factors involved in mRNA metabolism. In the complex, mRNA binding is mediated by the DEAD-box protein eIF4AIII, and inhibition of its ATPase activity forms the mechanistic basis for the long-term stability of the complex. Recent crystal structures of the exon junction complex and eIF4AIII have provided the structural framework for investigating the function of the eIF4AIII ATPase and for localisation of surface patches involved in binding peripheral factors. Additionally, by comparison with the structure of a second DEAD-box protein also bound to RNA and ATP, general principles for the ATPase and unwinding/mRNP remodelling activities for this important group of enzymes can be proposed on the basis of atomic structures.

  13. Cryptic splice site usage in exon 7 of the human fibrinogen Bbeta-chain gene is regulated by a naturally silent SF2/ASF binding site within this exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spena, Silvia; Tenchini, Maria Luisa; Buratti, Emanuele

    2006-06-01

    In this work we report the identification of a strong SF2/ASF binding site within exon 7 of the human fibrinogen Bbeta-chain gene (FGB). Its disruption in the wild-type context has no effect on exon recognition. However, when the mutation IVS7 + 1G>T--initially described in a patient suffering from congenital afibrinogenemia--is present, this SF2/ASF binding site is critical for cryptic 5'ss (splice site) definition. These findings, besides confirming and extending previous results regarding the effect of SF2/ASF on cryptic splice site activation, identify for the first time an enhancer sequence in the FGB gene specific for cryptic splice site usage. Taken together, they suggest the existence of a splicing-regulatory network that is normally silent in the FGB natural splicing environment but which can nonetheless influence splicing decisions when local contexts allow. On a more general note, our conclusions have implications for the evolution of alternative splicing processes and for the development of methods to control aberrant splicing in the context of disease-causing mutations.

  14. Assembly of splicing complexes on exon 11 of the human insulin receptor gene does not correlate with splicing efficiency in-vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caples Matt

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incorporation of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene is both developmentally and hormonally-regulated. Previously, we have shown the presence of enhancer and silencer elements that modulate the incorporation of the small 36-nucleotide exon. In this study, we investigated the role of inherent splice site strength in the alternative splicing decision and whether recognition of the splice sites is the major determinant of exon incorporation. Results We found that mutation of the flanking sub-optimal splice sites to consensus sequences caused the exon to be constitutively spliced in-vivo. These findings are consistent with the exon-definition model for splicing. In-vitro splicing of RNA templates containing exon 11 and portions of the upstream intron recapitulated the regulation seen in-vivo. Unexpectedly, we found that the splice sites are occupied and spliceosomal complex A was assembled on all templates in-vitro irrespective of splicing efficiency. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the exon-definition model explains alternative splicing of exon 11 in the IR gene in-vivo but not in-vitro. The in-vitro results suggest that the regulation occurs at a later step in spliceosome assembly on this exon.

  15. Sequence-specific determination of protein and peptide concentrations by absorbance at 205 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthis, Nicholas J; Clore, G Marius

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative studies in molecular and structural biology generally require accurate and precise determination of protein concentrations, preferably via a method that is both quick and straightforward to perform. The measurement of ultraviolet absorbance at 280 nm has proven especially useful, since the molar absorptivity (extinction coefficient) at 280 nm can be predicted directly from a protein sequence. This method, however, is only applicable to proteins that contain tryptophan or tyrosine residues. Absorbance at 205 nm, among other wavelengths, has been used as an alternative, although generally using absorptivity values that have to be uniquely calibrated for each protein, or otherwise only roughly estimated. Here, we propose and validate a method for predicting the molar absorptivity of a protein or peptide at 205 nm directly from its amino acid sequence, allowing one to accurately determine the concentrations of proteins that do not contain tyrosine or tryptophan residues. This method is simple to implement, requires no calibration, and should be suitable for a wide range of proteins and peptides. © 2013 The Protein Society.

  16. Domain-specific and domain-general constraints on word and sequence learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Archibald, Lisa M. D; Joanisse, Marc F

    2013-01-01

    ... with and without specific deficits in either language or working memory. Children recalled lists of words in a Hebbian learning protocol in which occasional lists repeated, yielding improved recall over the course of the task on the repeated lists...

  17. Analysis of ELA-DQB exon 2 polymorphism in Argentine Creole horses by PCR-RFLP and PCR-SSCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Castagnasso, E E; Díaz, S; Giovambattista, G; Dulout, F N; Peral-García, P

    2003-08-01

    The second exon of equine leucocyte antigen (ELA)-DQB genes was amplified from genomic DNA of 32 Argentine Creole horses by PCR. Amplified DNA was analysed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). The PCR-RFLP analysis revealed two HaeIII patterns, four RsaI patterns, five MspI patterns and two HinfI patterns. EcoRI showed no variation in the analysed sample. Additional patterns that did not account for known exon 2 DNA sequences were observed, suggesting the existence of novel ELA-DQB alleles. PCR-SSCP analysis exhibited seven different band patterns, and the number of bands per animal ranged from four to nine. Both methods indicated that at least two DQB genes are present. The presence of more than two alleles in each animal showed that the primers employed in this work are not specific for a unique DQB locus. The improvement of this PCR-RFLP method should provide a simple and rapid technique for an accurate definition of ELA-DQB typing in horses.

  18. A highly sensitive quantitative real-time pcr assay for determination of mutant jak2 exon 12 allele burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, L.; Riley, C.H.; Westman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene have become an important identifier for the Philadelphia-chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. In contrast to the JAK2V617F mutation, the large number of JAK2 exon 12 mutations has challenged the development of quantitative assays. We...... present a highly sensitive real-time quantitative PCR assay for determination of the mutant allele burden of JAK2 exon 12 mutations. In combination with high resolution melting analysis and sequencing the assay identified six patients carrying previously described JAK2 exon 12 mutations and one novel...... tool for quantitative monitoring of the mutant allele burden and accordingly also for determining the impact of treatment with interferon-α-2, shown to induce molecular remission in JAK2V617F-positive patients, which may be a future treatment option for JAK2 exon 12-positive patients as well....

  19. Targeted RNA-Seq profiling of splicing pattern in the DMD gene: exons are mostly constitutively spliced in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougé, Anne-Laure; Murauer, Eva; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Miro, Julie; Varilh, Jessica; Taulan, Magali; Koenig, Michel; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2017-01-03

    We have analysed the splicing pattern of the human Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) NB transcript in normal skeletal muscle. To achieve depth of coverage required for the analysis of this lowly expressed gene in muscle, we designed a targeted RNA-Seq procedure that combines amplification of the full-length 11.3 kb DMD cDNA sequence and 454 sequencing technology. A high and uniform coverage of the cDNA sequence was obtained that allowed to draw up a reliable inventory of the physiological alternative splicing events in the muscular DMD transcript. In contrast to previous assumptions, we evidenced that most of the 79 DMD exons are constitutively spliced in skeletal muscle. Only a limited number of 12 alternative splicing events were identified, all present at a very low level. These include previously known exon skipping events but also newly described pseudoexon inclusions and alternative 3' splice sites, of which one is the first functional NAGNAG splice site reported in the DMD gene. This study provides the first RNA-Seq-based reference of DMD splicing pattern in skeletal muscle and reports on an experimental procedure well suited to detect condition-specific differences in this low abundance transcript that may prove useful for diagnostic, research or RNA-based therapeutic applications.

  20. An HLB-B null allele (B*0808N) caused by a nucleotide deletion in exon 3, found in the family of a bone marrow transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, V; Dunn, P P; Cavanagh, G; Day, S; Ross, J; Chapman, C

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a variant HLA-B allele, B*0808N, segregating through two generations of healthy individuals, whilst HLA typing the family of a bone marrow patient. Serological typing identified a disparity between the father (A1, A3 B7 DR7) and the brother (A1, A2 B56 DR1, DR7) of the patient. Low/medium resolution polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) revealed a B*08 allele undetectable by serological methods. High resolution DNA typing by polymerase chain reaction-sequencing based typing (PCR-SBT), revealed a nucleotide deletion at position 131 (C) in exon 3, the only difference between the new allele and B*0801. The deletion results in a frame shift in the protein coding sequence, introducing a premature termination codon (TGA) in exon 4. Although a B*08 allele is present in these individuals, the deletion prevents correct expression of the antigen on the cell surface.

  1. Tissue-specific DNA methylation is conserved across human, mouse, and rat, and driven by primary sequence conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; Sears, Renee L; Xing, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Bo; Li, Daofeng; Rockweiler, Nicole B; Jang, Hyo Sik; Choudhary, Mayank N K; Lee, Hyung Joo; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Arand, Jason; Tabers, Brianne; Gu, C Charles; Cicero, Theodore J; Wang, Ting

    2017-09-12

    Uncovering mechanisms of epigenome evolution is an essential step towards understanding the evolution of different cellular phenotypes. While studies have confirmed DNA methylation as a conserved epigenetic mechanism in mammalian development, little is known about the conservation of tissue-specific genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. Using a comparative epigenomics approach, we identified and compared the tissue-specific DNA methylation patterns of rat against those of mouse and human across three shared tissue types. We confirmed that tissue-specific differentially methylated regions are strongly associated with tissue-specific regulatory elements. Comparisons between species revealed that at a minimum 11-37% of tissue-specific DNA methylation patterns are conserved, a phenomenon that we define as epigenetic conservation. Conserved DNA methylation is accompanied by conservation of other epigenetic marks including histone modifications. Although a significant amount of locus-specific methylation is epigenetically conserved, the majority of tissue-specific DNA methylation is not conserved across the species and tissue types that we investigated. Examination of the genetic underpinning of epigenetic conservation suggests that primary sequence conservation is a driving force behind epigenetic conservation. In contrast, evolutionary dynamics of tissue-specific DNA methylation are best explained by the maintenance or turnover of binding sites for important transcription factors. Our study extends the limited literature of comparative epigenomics and suggests a new paradigm for epigenetic conservation without genetic conservation through analysis of transcription factor binding sites.

  2. Developing market class specific InDel markers from next generation sequence data in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Samira Mafi; Song, Qijian; Mamidi, Sujan; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lee, Rian; Cregan, Perry; Osorno, Juan M; McClean, Phillip E

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequence data provides valuable information and tools for genetic and genomic research and offers new insights useful for marker development. This data is useful for the design of accurate and user-friendly molecular tools. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a diverse crop in which separate domestication events happened in each gene pool followed by race and market class diversification that has resulted in different morphological characteristics in each commercial market class. This has led to essentially independent breeding programs within each market class which in turn has resulted in limited within market class sequence variation. Sequence data from selected genotypes of five bean market classes (pinto, black, navy, and light and dark red kidney) were used to develop InDel-based markers specific to each market class. Design of the InDel markers was conducted through a combination of assembly, alignment and primer design software using 1.6× to 5.1× coverage of Illumina GAII sequence data for each of the selected genotypes. The procedure we developed for primer design is fast, accurate, less error prone, and higher throughput than when they are designed manually. All InDel markers are easy to run and score with no need for PCR optimization. A total of 2687 InDel markers distributed across the genome were developed. To highlight their usefulness, they were employed to construct a phylogenetic tree and a genetic map, showing that InDel markers are reliable, simple, and accurate.

  3. LOVD: easy creation of a locus-specific sequence variation database using an "LSDB-in-a-box" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, Ivo F A C; den Dunnen, Johan T; Taschner, Peter E M

    2005-08-01

    The completion of the human genome project has initiated, as well as provided the basis for, the collection and study of all sequence variation between individuals. Direct access to up-to-date information on sequence variation is currently provided most efficiently through web-based, gene-centered, locus-specific databases (LSDBs). We have developed the Leiden Open (source) Variation Database (LOVD) software approaching the "LSDB-in-a-Box" idea for the easy creation and maintenance of a fully web-based gene sequence variation database. LOVD is platform-independent and uses PHP and MySQL open source software only. The basic gene-centered and modular design of the database follows the recommendations of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) and focuses on the collection and display of DNA sequence variations. With minimal effort, the LOVD platform is extendable with clinical data. The open set-up should both facilitate and promote functional extension with scripts written by the community. The LOVD software is freely available from the Leiden Muscular Dystrophy pages (www.DMD.nl/LOVD/). To promote the use of LOVD, we currently offer curators the possibility to set up an LSDB on our Leiden server. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Deep sequencing identifies ethnicity-specific bacterial signatures in the oral microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Mason

    Full Text Available Oral infections have a strong ethnic predilection; suggesting that ethnicity is a critical determinant of oral microbial colonization. Dental plaque and saliva samples from 192 subjects belonging to four major ethnicities in the United States were analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP and 16S pyrosequencing. Ethnicity-specific clustering of microbial communities was apparent in saliva and subgingival biofilms, and a machine-learning classifier was capable of identifying an individual's ethnicity from subgingival microbial signatures. The classifier identified African Americans with a 100% sensitivity and 74% specificity and Caucasians with a 50% sensitivity and 91% specificity. The data demonstrates a significant association between ethnic affiliation and the composition of the oral microbiome; to the extent that these microbial signatures appear to be capable of discriminating between ethnicities.

  5. A 5' Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5' UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo.

  6. cDNA, amino acid carbohydrate sequence of barley seed-specific peroxidase BP 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, A.; Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgård; Harthill, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The major peroxidase of barley seed BP 1 was characterized. Previous studies showed a low carbohydrate content, low specific activity and tissue-specific expression, and suggested that this basic peroxidase could be particularly useful in the elucidation of the structure-function relationship...... plant modified-type structure, Man-alpha-1-6(Xyl-beta-1-2)Man-beta-1-4GlcNAc-beta-1-4(Fuc-alpha-1-3)GlcNAc. The BP 1 gene was RFLP-mapped on barley chromosome 3, and we propose Prx5 as the name for this new peroxidase locus....

  7. Exon - ASTRA | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...ontents Exons in variants Data file File name: astra_exon.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/a... About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Exon - ASTRA | LSDB Archive ...

  8. Enactment versus observation: item-specific and relational processing in goal-directed action sequences (and lists of single actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Schult

    Full Text Available What are the memory-related consequences of learning actions (such as "apply the patch" by enactment during study, as compared to action observation? Theories converge in postulating that enactment encoding increases item-specific processing, but not the processing of relational information. Typically, in the laboratory enactment encoding is studied for lists of unrelated single actions in which one action execution has no overarching purpose or relation with other actions. In contrast, real-life actions are usually carried out with the intention to achieve such a purpose. When actions are embedded in action sequences, relational information provides efficient retrieval cues. We contrasted memory for single actions with memory for action sequences in three experiments. We found more reliance on relational processing for action-sequences than single actions. To what degree can this relational information be used after enactment versus after the observation of an actor? We found indicators of superior relational processing after observation than enactment in ordered pair recall (Experiment 1A and in emerging subjective organization of repeated recall protocols (recall runs 2-3, Experiment 2. An indicator of superior item-specific processing after enactment compared to observation was recognition (Experiment 1B, Experiment 2. Similar net recall suggests that observation can be as good a learning strategy as enactment. We discuss possible reasons why these findings only partly converge with previous research and theorizing.

  9. Development of a graphene oxide-based assay for the sequence-specific detection of double-stranded DNA molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Giuliodori

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO is a promising material for the development of cost-effective detection systems. In this work, we have devised a simple and rapid GO-based method for the sequence-specific identification of DNA molecules generated by PCR amplification. The csp genes of Escherichia coli, which share a high degree of sequence identity, were selected as paradigm DNA templates. All tested csp genes were amplified with unlabelled primers, which can be rapidly removed at the end of the PCR taking advantage of the preferential binding to GO of single-stranded versus duplex DNA molecules. The amplified DNAs (targets were heat-denatured and hybridized to a fluorescently-labelled single strand oligonucleotide (probe, which recognizes a region of the target DNAs displaying sequence variability. This interaction is extremely specific, taking place with high efficiency only when target and probe show perfect or near perfect matching. Upon GO addition, the unbound fraction of the probe was captured and its fluorescence quenched by the GO's molecular properties. On the other hand, the probe-target complexes remained in solution and emitted a fluorescent signal whose intensity was related to their degree of complementarity.

  10. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A. [Emory-MED; (Keele); (Scripps)

    2014-12-23

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Although lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions.

  11. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-05-19

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. In silico screening based on predictive algorithms as a design tool for exon skipping oligonucleotides in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echigoya, Yusuke; Mouly, Vincent; Garcia, Luis; Yokota, Toshifumi; Duddy, William

    2015-01-01

    The use of antisense 'splice-switching' oligonucleotides to induce exon skipping represents a potential therapeutic approach to various human genetic diseases. It has achieved greatest maturity in exon skipping of the dystrophin transcript in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), for which several clinical trials are completed or ongoing, and a large body of data exists describing tested oligonucleotides and their efficacy. The rational design of an exon skipping oligonucleotide involves the choice of an antisense sequence, usually between 15 and 32 nucleotides, targeting the exon that is to be skipped. Although parameters describing the target site can be computationally estimated and several have been identified to correlate with efficacy, methods to predict efficacy are limited. Here, an in silico pre-screening approach is proposed, based on predictive statistical modelling. Previous DMD data were compiled together and, for each oligonucleotide, some 60 descriptors were considered. Statistical modelling approaches were applied to derive algorithms that predict exon skipping for a given target site. We confirmed (1) the binding energetics of the oligonucleotide to the RNA, and (2) the distance in bases of the target site from the splice acceptor site, as the two most predictive parameters, and we included these and several other parameters (while discounting many) into an in silico screening process, based on their capacity to predict high or low efficacy in either phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (89% correctly predicted) and/or 2'O Methyl RNA oligonucleotides (76% correctly predicted). Predictions correlated strongly with in vitro testing for sixteen de novo PMO sequences targeting various positions on DMD exons 44 (R² 0.89) and 53 (R² 0.89), one of which represents a potential novel candidate for clinical trials. We provide these algorithms together with a computational tool that facilitates screening to predict exon skipping efficacy at each position of

  13. COI and ITS2 sequences delimit species, reveal cryptic taxa and host specificity of fig-associated Sycophila (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Zhou, Xin; Feng, Gui; Hu, Haoyuan; Niu, Liming; Hebert, Paul D N; Huang, Dawei

    2010-01-01

    Although the genus Sycophila has broad host preferences, some species are specifically associated with figs as nonpollinator wasps. Because of their sexual dimorphism, morphological plasticity, cryptic mating behaviour and poorly known biology, species identifications are often uncertain. It is particularly difficult to match conspecific females and males. In this study, we employed two molecular markers, mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS2, to identify Sycophila from six Chinese fig species. Morphological studies revealed 25 female and male morphs, while sequence results for both genes were consistent in supporting the presence of 15 species, of which 13 were host specialists and two used dual hosts. A single species of Sycophila was respectively found on four fig species, but six species were isolated from Ficus benjamina and a same number was reared from Ficus microcarpa. Sequence results revealed three male morphs in one species and detected two species that were overlooked by morphological analysis. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Structure and Function of Lineage-Specific Sequence Insertions in the Bacterial RNA Polymerase beta' Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chlenov,M.; Masuda, Y.; Murakami, K.; Nikiforov, V.; Darst, S.; Mustaev, A.

    2005-01-01

    The large {beta} and {beta}{prime} subunits of the bacterial core RNA polymerase (RNAP) are highly conserved throughout evolution. Nevertheless, large sequence insertions in {beta} and {beta}' characterize specific evolutionary lineages of bacteria. The Thermus aquaticus RNAP {beta}{prime} subunit contains a 283 residue insert between conserved regions A and B that is found in only four bacterial species. The Escherichia coli RNAP {beta}{prime} subunit contains a 188 residue insert in the middle of conserved region G that is found in a wide range of bacterial species. Here, we present structural studies of these two {beta}{prime} insertions. We show that the inserts comprise repeats of a previously characterized fold, the sandwich-barrel hybrid motif (as predicted from previous sequence analysis) and that the inserts serve significant roles in facilitating protein/protein and/or protein/nucleic acid interactions.

  15. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  16. Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC Markers for Evolutionary Studies of Ficus and Other Taxa in the Fig Family (Moraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Yao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: The genus Ficus (fig trees comprises ca. 750 species of trees, vines, and stranglers found in tropical forests throughout the world. Fig trees are keystone species in many tropical forests, and their relationship with host-specific wasp pollinators has received much attention, although many questions remain unresolved regarding the levels of host specificity, cospeciation, and the role of hybridization in fig and wasp speciation. We developed exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC markers to obtain phylogenetic resolution needed to address these questions. Methods and Results: Expressed sequence tags (ESTs from F. elastica were compared to Arabidopsis and Populus genomes to locate introns and to design primers in flanking exons. Primer pairs for 80 EPIC markers were tested in samples from divergent clades within Ficus and the outgroup Poulsenia (Moraceae. Conclusions: Thirty-one EPIC markers were successfully sequenced across Ficus, and 29 of the markers also amplified in Poulsenia, indicating broad transferability within Moraceae. All of the EPIC markers were polymorphic and showed levels of polymorphism similar to that of the widely used internal transcribed spacer (ITS.

  17. Functionally distinct, sequence-specific replicator and origin elements are required for Drosophila chorion gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L; Zhang, H; Tower, J

    2001-01-15

    To meet the demand for the rapid synthesis of chorion (eggshell) proteins, Drosophila ovarian follicle cells amplify the chromosomal loci containing the chorion gene clusters up to 60-fold. Amplification occurs by repeated firing of one or more origins located within each gene cluster. Deletion analyses of transgenic constructs derived from the third chromosome cluster have identified a 320-bp amplification control element (ACE3) required for amplification, as well as several stimulatory amplification enhancing regions (AERs). Two-dimensional (2D) gel analyses have identified multiple DNA replication initiation sites (origins) that partially overlap in location with ACE3 and the AERs. To further study sequence requirements for amplification, a vector was used in which transgenic constructs are protected from chromosomal position effects by flanking insulator elements, the suppressor Hairy-wing protein binding site (SHWBS). Using the buffered vector, the 320-bp ACE3 and an 884-bp element designated ori-beta were found to be necessary and sufficient for amplification. Two-dimensional gels revealed that ori-beta was acting as the origin. In contrast, origin activity could not be detected for ACE3. An insulator placed between ACE3 and ori-beta inhibited amplification, indicating that ACE3 activates ori-beta in cis. The results suggest that ACE3 acts as a replicator and support and extend the replicator model for the organization of metazoan chromosomal replicons.

  18. Identification of Specific Gene Sequences Conserved in Contemporary Epidemic Strains of Salmonella enterica▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Min-Su; Besser, Thomas E.; Hancock, Dale D.; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Call, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    Genetic elements specific to recent and contemporary epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica were identified using comparative genomic analysis. Two epidemic multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) and cephalosporin-resistant MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, and an epidemic pansusceptible strain, Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT160, were subjected to Salmonella gene microarray and suppression subtractive hybridi...

  19. Hitting bacteria at the heart of the central dogma: sequence-specific inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Louise Carøe Vohlander; Sperling-Petersen, Hans Uffe; Mortensen, Kim Kusk

    2007-08-10

    An important objective in developing new drugs is the achievement of high specificity to maximize curing effect and minimize side-effects, and high specificity is an integral part of the antisense approach. The antisense techniques have been extensively developed from the application of simple long, regular antisense RNA (asRNA) molecules to highly modified versions conferring resistance to nucleases, stability of hybrid formation and other beneficial characteristics, though still preserving the specificity of the original nucleic acids. These new and improved second- and third-generation antisense molecules have shown promising results. The first antisense drug has been approved and more are in clinical trials. However, these antisense drugs are mainly designed for the treatment of different human cancers and other human diseases. Applying antisense gene silencing and exploiting RNA interference (RNAi) are highly developed approaches in many eukaryotic systems. But in bacteria RNAi is absent, and gene silencing by antisense compounds is not nearly as well developed, despite its great potential and the intriguing possibility of applying antisense molecules in the fight against multiresistant bacteria. Recent breakthrough and current status on the development of antisense gene silencing in bacteria including especially phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ODNs), peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) will be presented in this review.

  20. Hitting bacteria at the heart of the central dogma: sequence-specific inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Kim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An important objective in developing new drugs is the achievement of high specificity to maximize curing effect and minimize side-effects, and high specificity is an integral part of the antisense approach. The antisense techniques have been extensively developed from the application of simple long, regular antisense RNA (asRNA molecules to highly modified versions conferring resistance to nucleases, stability of hybrid formation and other beneficial characteristics, though still preserving the specificity of the original nucleic acids. These new and improved second- and third-generation antisense molecules have shown promising results. The first antisense drug has been approved and more are in clinical trials. However, these antisense drugs are mainly designed for the treatment of different human cancers and other human diseases. Applying antisense gene silencing and exploiting RNA interference (RNAi are highly developed approaches in many eukaryotic systems. But in bacteria RNAi is absent, and gene silencing by antisense compounds is not nearly as well developed, despite its great potential and the intriguing possibility of applying antisense molecules in the fight against multiresistant bacteria. Recent breakthrough and current status on the development of antisense gene silencing in bacteria including especially phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ODNs, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs will be presented in this review.

  1. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Mohideen-Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most nuclear receptors (NRs bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD with that of the estrogen receptor (ER. In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3, but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS, non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3, such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3, where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half

  2. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohideen-Abdul, Kareem; Tazibt, Karima; Bourguet, Maxime; Hazemann, Isabelle; Lebars, Isabelle; Takacs, Maria; Cianférani, Sarah; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Moras, Dino; Billas, Isabelle M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Most nuclear receptors (NRs) bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs) involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR) belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR) family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD) with that of the estrogen receptor (ER). In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3), but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs)], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS), non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3), such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3), where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half-site is

  3. Sequence and chromosomal localization of the mouse brevican gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, U; Meyer, H; Brakebusch, C

    1997-01-01

    Brevican is a brain-specific proteoglycan belonging to the aggrecan family. Phage clones containing the complete mouse brevican open reading frame of 2649 bp and the complete 3'-untranslated region of 341 bp were isolated from a mouse brain cDNA library, and cosmid clones containing the mouse......-intron structure reflected the structural organization of the multidomain protein brevican. No consensus TATA sequence was found upstream of the first exon, and RNase protection experiments revealed multiple transcriptional start sites for the brevican gene. The first part of the sequence of intron 8 corresponded...

  4. Association between polymorphisms of exon 12 and exon 24 of JHDM2A gene and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hojati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some dynamic changes occurs during spermatogenesis such as histone removal and its replacement with transition nuclear protein and protamine. These proteins are required for packing and condensation of sperm chromatin. JHDM2A is a histone demethylase that directly binds to promoter regions of Tnp1 and Prm1 genes and controls their expression by removing H3K9 at their promoters. Objective: The association between polymorphisms of exon 12 and exon 24 in JHDM2A gene and male infertility were evaluated for the first time. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 400 infertile men (oligospermia and azoospermia and normal healthy fathers were evaluated (n=200. Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP-PCR and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP methods were used for screening any polymorphisms that are exist in exon 12 and exon 24. Results: Exon 24 PCR products were analyzed by RFLP but no polymorphism was found in this exon at the restriction site of EcoRV enzyme. Our monitoring along the whole nucleotides of exon 12 and exon 24 were continued using SSCP method, but we found no change along these exons. Conclusion: Generally, this study evaluated the association between polymorphisms in exon 12 and exon 24 of JHDM2A gene and male infertility which suggests that polymorphisms of these exons may not be associated with the risk of male infertility.

  5. PCR detection of a C/T polymorphism in exon 1 of the porphobilinogen deaminase gene (PBGD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picat, C.; Bourgeois, F.; Grandchamp, B. (Faculte de Medicine, Paris (France))

    1991-09-25

    Sequencing of exon 1 revealed a C/T polymorphism in exon 1 of human porphobilinogen deaminase gene (PBGD) at position {minus}64 relatively to the initiation translational codon. Genetic defects of PBGD are responsible for acute intermittent porphyria. The use of a 5{prime} primer with a mutated sequence to amplify the region containing this polymorphism allows its restriction analysis. After a ApaI digest of the amplified fragment, two alleles can be identified: F1: 164 bp, F2: 145 bp + 19 bp. Codominant inheritance was demonstrated in two large families with AIP.

  6. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within......-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14...

  7. High-throughput sequencing reveals extensive variation in human-specific L1 content in individual human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Adam D; Kazazian, Haig H

    2010-09-01

    Using high-throughput sequencing, we devised a technique to determine the insertion sites of virtually all members of the human-specific L1 retrotransposon family in any human genome. Using diagnostic nucleotides, we were able to locate the approximately 800 L1Hs copies corresponding specifically to the pre-Ta, Ta-0, and Ta-1 L1Hs subfamilies, with over 90% of sequenced reads corresponding to human-specific elements. We find that any two individual genomes differ at an average of 285 sites with respect to L1 insertion presence or absence. In total, we assayed 25 individuals, 15 of which are unrelated, at 1139 sites, including 772 shared with the reference genome and 367 nonreference L1 insertions. We show that L1Hs profiles recapitulate genetic ancestry, and determine the chromosomal distribution of these elements. Using these data, we estimate that the rate of L1 retrotransposition in humans is between 1/95 and 1/270 births, and the number of dimorphic L1 elements in the human population with gene frequencies greater than 0.05 is between 3000 and 10,000.

  8. An analysis of the sequence requirements of EDEN-BP for specific RNA binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnet-Corven, Sylvie; Audic, Yann; Omilli, Francis; Osborne, Howard Beverley

    2002-01-01

    International audience; EDEN-BP (embryo deadenylation element-binding protein) binds specifically to the EDEN motif in the 3'-untranslated regions of maternal mRNAs and targets these mRNAs for deadenylation and translational repression in Xenopus laevis embryos. EDEN-BP contains three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and is related to the elav family of RNA-binding proteins. In the present study we show that the two N-terminal RRMs of EDEN-BP are necessary for the interaction with EDEN as well a...

  9. Conjugative Mating Assays for Sequence-specific Analysis of Transfer Proteins Involved in Bacterial Conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Fettah; Lento, Cristina; Yaseen, Ayat; Nowroozi-Dayeni, Roksana; Kheyson, Sasha; Audette, Gerald F

    2017-01-04

    The transfer of genetic material by bacterial conjugation is a process that takes place via complexes formed by specific transfer proteins. In Escherichia coli, these transfer proteins make up a DNA transfer machinery known as the mating pair formation, or DNA transfer complex, which facilitates conjugative plasmid transfer. The objective of this paper is to provide a method that can be used to determine the role of a specific transfer protein that is involved in conjugation using a series of deletions and/or point mutations in combination with mating assays. The target gene is knocked out on the conjugative plasmid and is then provided in trans through the use of a small recovery plasmid harboring the target gene. Mutations affecting the target gene on the recovery plasmid can reveal information about functional aspects of the target protein that result in the alteration of mating efficiency of donor cells harboring the mutated gene. Alterations in mating efficiency provide insight into the role and importance of the particular transfer protein, or a region therein, in facilitating conjugative DNA transfer. Coupling this mating assay with detailed three-dimensional structural studies will provide a comprehensive understanding of the function of the conjugative transfer protein as well as provide a means for identifying and characterizing regions of protein-protein interaction.

  10. Multimeric small interfering ribonucleic acid for highly efficient sequence-specific gene silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Hyejung; Lee, Soo Hyeon; Park, Ji Won; Park, Tae Gwan

    2010-03-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) with 19-21 base pairs has been recently recognized as a new therapeutic agent for effectively silencing a specific gene on a post-transcription level. For siRNA therapeutics, safe and efficient delivery issues are significant hurdles to clinical applications. Here we present a new class of biologically active siRNA structure based on chemically self-crosslinked and multimerized siRNA through cleavable disulphide linkages. The multimerized siRNA can produce more stable and compact polyelectrolyte complexes with less cytotoxic cationic carriers than naked siRNA because of substantially increased charge densities and the presence of flexible chemical linkers in the backbone. The cleavable and multimerized siRNA shows greatly enhanced gene-silencing efficiencies in vitro and in vivo through a target-messenger-RNA-specific RNA interference processing without significantly eliciting immune induction. This study demonstrates that the multimerized siRNA structure complexed with selected cationic condensing agents can serve as potential gene-silencing therapeutics for treating various diseases.

  11. Specific triplex binding capacity of mixed base sequence duplex nucleic acids used for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daksis, Jasmine I; Erikson, Glen H

    2005-01-01

    Specific base recognition and binding between native double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) of mixed base sequence is presented. Third-strand binding, facilitated and stabilized by a DNA intercalator, YOYO-1, occurs within 5 min at room temperature. This triplex binding capability has been used to develop a homogeneous assay that accurately detects 1-, 2-, or 3-bp mutations or deletions in the dsDNA target. Every type of 1-bp mismatch can be identified. The assay can reliably distinguish homozygous from heterozygous polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic dsDNA, thus providing a highly sensitive clinical diagnostic assay.

  12. Sequence-specific validation of LAMP amplicons in real-time optomagnetic detection of Dengue serotype 2 synthetic DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minero, Gabriel Khose Antonio; Nogueira, Catarina; Rizzi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    We report on an optomagnetic technique optimised for real-time molecular detection of Dengue fever virus under ideal as well as non-ideal laboratory conditions using two different detection approaches. The first approach is based on the detection of the hydrodynamic volume of streptavidin coated...... magnetic nanoparticles attached to biotinylated LAMP amplicons. We demonstrate detection of sub-femtomolar Dengue DNA target concentrations in the ideal contamination-free lab environment within 20 min. The second detection approach is based on sequence-specific binding of functionalised magnetic...... claim detection of down to 100 fM of Dengue target after 20 min of LAMP with a contamination background....

  13. Probing and characterizing the high specific sequences of ssDNA aptamer against SGIV-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Yu, Qing; Zhou, Lingli; Dong, Dexin; Wei, Shina; Ya, Hanzheng; Chen, Bo; Qin, Qiwei

    2018-02-15

    As the major viral pathogen of grouper aquaculture, Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) has caused great economic losses in China and Southeast Asia. In the previous study, we have generated highly specific ssDNA aptamers against SGIV-infected grouper spleen cells (GS) by Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment technology (SELEX), in which Q2 had the highest binding affinity of 16.43 nM. In this study, we would try to identify the specific sequences in the aptamer Q2 that exhibited the high binding affinity to SGIV-infected cells by truncating the original Q2 into some different specific segments. We first evaluated the specificity and binding affinity of these truncated aptamers to SGIV-infected cells by flow cytometry, fluorescent imaging of cells and aptamer-based enzyme-linked apta-sorbent assay (ELASA). We then performed cytotoxicity analysis, assessment of the inhibitory effects upon SGIV infection and the celluar internalization kinetics of each truncated aptamer. Compared to the initial Q2, one of the truncated aptamer Q2-C5 showed a 3-fold increase in the binding affinity for SGIV-infected cells, and held more effective inhibitory effects, higher internalization kinetics and stability. Hence, the aptamer's truncated methods could be applied in the research of identifying aptamer's key sequences. The shorter, structure optimizing aptamer showed more excellent performance over the originally selected aptamer, which could potentially be applied in developing commercial detection probes for the early and rapid diagnosis of SGIV infection, and highly specific therapeutic drugs against SGIV infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple non-coding exons and alternative splicing in the mouse Mas protooncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenina, Natalia; Böhme, Ilka; Bader, Michael; Walther, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The Mas protooncogene encodes a G protein-coupled receptor with the common seven transmembrane domains, expressed mainly in the testis and brain. We provided evidence that Mas is a functional angiotensin-(1-7) receptor and can interact with the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor. The gene is transcriptionally regulated during development in the brain and testis, but its structure was unresolved. In this study we used 5'- and 3'-RACE, RT-PCR, and RNase-protection assays to elucidate the complete Mas gene structure and organization. We identified 12 exons in the mouse Mas gene with 11 in the 5' untranslated mRNA, which can be alternatively spliced. We also showed that Mas transcription can start from 4 tissue-specific promoters, whereby testis-specific Mas mRNA is transcribed from two upstream promoters, and the expression of Mas in the brain starts from two downstream promoters. Alternative splicing and multiple promoter usage result in at least 12 Mas transcripts in which different 5' untranslated regions are fused to a common coding sequence. Moreover, termination of Mas mRNA is regulated by two different polyadenylation signals. The gene spans approximately 27 kb, and the longest detected mRNA contains 2,451 bp. Thus, our results characterize the Mas protooncogene as the gene with the most complex gene structure of all described members of the gene family coding for G protein-coupled receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptome sequencing of the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC RNA reference samples using next generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry-Mieg Danielle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptome sequencing using next-generation sequencing platforms will soon be competing with DNA microarray technologies for global gene expression analysis. As a preliminary evaluation of these promising technologies, we performed deep sequencing of cDNA synthesized from the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC reference RNA samples using Roche's 454 Genome Sequencer FLX. Results We generated more that 3.6 million sequence reads of average length 250 bp for the MAQC A and B samples and introduced a data analysis pipeline for translating cDNA read counts into gene expression levels. Using BLAST, 90% of the reads mapped to the human genome and 64% of the reads mapped to the RefSeq database of well annotated genes with e-values ≤ 10-20. We measured gene expression levels in the A and B samples by counting the numbers of reads that mapped to individual RefSeq genes in multiple sequencing runs to evaluate the MAQC quality metrics for reproducibility, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy and compared the results with DNA microarrays and Quantitative RT-PCR (QRTPCR from the MAQC studies. In addition, 88% of the reads were successfully aligned directly to the human genome using the AceView alignment programs with an average 90% sequence similarity to identify 137,899 unique exon junctions, including 22,193 new exon junctions not yet contained in the RefSeq database. Conclusion Using the MAQC metrics for evaluating the performance of gene expression platforms, the ExpressSeq results for gene expression levels showed excellent reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity that improved systematically with increasing shotgun sequencing depth, and quantitative accuracy that was comparable to DNA microarrays and QRTPCR. In addition, a careful mapping of the reads to the genome using the AceView alignment programs shed new light on the complexity of the human transcriptome including the discovery of thousands of new splice variants.

  16. Structural basis for sequence-specific DNA recognition by an Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Satoru; Inoue, Makoto; Yamasaki, Tomoko; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2012-03-02

    The WRKY family transcription factors regulate plant-specific reactions that are mostly related to biotic and abiotic stresses. They share the WRKY domain, which recognizes a DNA element (TTGAC(C/T)) termed the W-box, in target genes. Here, we determined the solution structure of the C-terminal WRKY domain of Arabidopsis WRKY4 in complex with the W-box DNA by NMR. A four-stranded β-sheet enters the major groove of DNA in an atypical mode termed the β-wedge, where the sheet is nearly perpendicular to the DNA helical axis. Residues in the conserved WRKYGQK motif contact DNA bases mainly through extensive apolar contacts with thymine methyl groups. The importance of these contacts was verified by substituting the relevant T bases with U and by surface plasmon resonance analyses of DNA binding.

  17. Mutation in exon 1a of PLEC, leading to disruption of plectin isoform 1a, causes autosomal-recessive skin-only epidermolysis bullosa simplex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gostynska, Katarzyna B.; Nijenhuis, Miranda; Lemmink, Henny; Pas, Hendrikus; Pasmooij, Anna M. G.; Lang, Kristin Kernland; Castanon, Maria J.; Wiche, Gerhard; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2015-01-01

    PLEC, the gene encoding the cytolinker protein plectin, has eight tissue-specific isoforms in humans, arising by alternate splicing of the first exon. To date, all PLEC mutations that cause epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) were found in exons common to all isoforms. Due to the ubiquitous presence

  18. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction typing and sequencing of mitochondrial D-loop region in broiler chickens in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harumi, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Naito, Mitsuru

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to comprehend a feature of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mainly of general broiler chickens in Japan. We typed two SNP sites (199C/T and 792A/G) of the D-loop region in mtDNA by allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) in 359 broiler (182 chunky and 177 cobb) and 506 layer (233 White Leghorn, 140 Barred Plymouth Rock and 133 Rhode Island Red) chickens. The SNP of 199C or 792A by AS-PCR was observed in the chunky and cobb chickens, and not in the layers. The haplotype 199T/792G was observed in a part of cobb and all layers. By the result of AS-PCR haplotyping and the broiler brands, the D-loop region was sequenced in 44 broiler chickens (20 chunky and 24 cobb) and compared with the layers' sequence data. Among the broiler and layer chickens, 21 SNP sites (including one insertion) and 11 sequence haplotypes were observed. Haplotype variation or correspondence was observed in and between the broiler brands. This study provides important information to establish a chicken meat traceability system by SNP haplotyping of mtDNA in Japan. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. A Sensitive and Selective Label-Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensor for the Detection of Specific Dengue Virus Serotype 3 Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in the world, with nearly 100 million people infected every year. Early diagnosis and identification of the pathogen are crucial steps for the treatment and for prevention of the disease, mainly in areas where the co-circulation of different serotypes is common, increasing the outcome of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS. Due to the lack of fast and inexpensive methods available for the identification of dengue serotypes, herein we report the development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of sequences of dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV-3. DENV-3 probe was designed using bioinformatics software and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV was used for electrochemical analysis. The results showed that a 22-m sequence was the best DNA probe for the identification of DENV-3. The optimum concentration of the DNA probe immobilized onto the electrode surface is 500 nM and a low detection limit of the system (3.09 nM. Moreover, this system allows selective detection of DENV-3 sequences in buffer and human serum solutions. Therefore, the application of DNA biosensors for diagnostics at the molecular level may contribute to future advances in the implementation of specific, effective and rapid detection methods for the diagnosis dengue viruses.

  20. Allelome.PRO, a pipeline to define allele-specific genomic features from high-throughput sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andergassen, Daniel; Dotter, Christoph P; Kulinski, Tomasz M; Guenzl, Philipp M; Bammer, Philipp C; Barlow, Denise P; Pauler, Florian M; Hudson, Quanah J

    2015-12-02

    Detecting allelic biases from high-throughput sequencing data requires an approach that maximises sensitivity while minimizing false positives. Here, we present Allelome.PRO, an automated user-friendly bioinformatics pipeline, which uses high-throughput sequencing data from reciprocal crosses of two genetically distinct mouse strains to detect allele-specific expression and chromatin modifications. Allelome.PRO extends approaches used in previous studies that exclusively analyzed imprinted expression to give a complete picture of the 'allelome' by automatically categorising the allelic expression of all genes in a given cell type into imprinted, strain-biased, biallelic or non-informative. Allelome.PRO offers increased sensitivity to analyze lowly expressed transcripts, together with a robust false discovery rate empirically calculated from variation in the sequencing data. We used RNA-seq data from mouse embryonic fibroblasts from F1 reciprocal crosses to determine a biologically relevant allelic ratio cutoff, and define for the first time an entire allelome. Furthermore, we show that Allelome.PRO detects differential enrichment of H3K4me3 over promoters from ChIP-seq data validating the RNA-seq results. This approach can be easily extended to analyze histone marks of active enhancers, or transcription factor binding sites and therefore provides a powerful tool to identify candidate cis regulatory elements genome wide. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Assessment of the feasibility of exon 45–55 multiexon skipping for duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert-Jan B

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The specific skipping of an exon, induced by antisense oligonucleotides (AON during splicing, has shown to be a promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients. As different mutations require skipping of different exons, this approach is mutation dependent. The skipping of an entire stretch of exons (e.g. exons 45 to 55 has recently been suggested as an approach applicable to larger groups of patients. However, this multiexon skipping approach is technically challenging. The levels of intended multiexon skips are typically low and highly variable, and may be dependent on the order of intron removal. We hypothesized that the splicing order might favor the induction of multiexon 45–55 skipping. Methods We here tested the feasibility of inducing multiexon 45–55 in control and patient muscle cell cultures using various AON cocktails. Results In all experiments, the exon 45–55 skip frequencies were minimal and comparable to those observed in untreated cells. Conclusion We conclude that current state of the art does not sufficiently support clinical development of multiexon skipping for DMD.

  2. Rat tenascin-R gene: structure, chromosome location and transcriptional activity of promoter and exon 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprini, A; Gherzi, R; Vecchi, E; Borsi, L; Zardi, L; Siri, A

    1998-01-01

    Tenascin-R is an extracellular matrix protein expressed exclusively in the central nervous system where it is thought to play a relevant role in regulating neurite outgrowth. We have i) cloned the cDNA of the rat tenascin-R 5' region; ii) defined its genomic organization, obtaining the sequence of two novel untranslated exons; iii) mapped the gene to rat chromosome 13q23 and suggested a previously unreported synteny between rat chromosome 13q23, human chromosome 1q24, and mouse chromosome 4E; and iv) sequenced and characterized the elements responsible for its neural cell-restricted transcription. We found that two discrete regions of the rat gene (the first in the proximal promoter, the second in the first exon) are independently able to activate to a high degree the transcription of a reporter gene in either human or rat neuroblastoma cell lines but not in other cell lines. Based on this observation, we re-evaluated the arrangement of transcriptionally active regions in the human tenascin-R gene we recently cloned and found that the human gene also contains an exon sequence able to initiate and sustain transcription independently of promoter sequences.

  3. Histone hyperacetylation and exon skipping: a calcium-mediated dynamic regulation in cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Nguyen, Hieu; Cai, Lu; Lou, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to cell type-specific pre-mRNA alternative splicing, mechanisms controlling activity-dependent alternative splicing is under-studied and not well understood. In a recent study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of calcium-mediated mechanism that regulates alternative exon skipping in mouse cardiomyocytes. Our results reveal a strong link between histone hyperacetylation and skipping of cassette exons, and provide support to the kinetic coupling model of the epigenetic regulation of alternative splicing at the chromatin level. PMID:26325491

  4. HPV Genotyping of Modified General Primer-Amplicons Is More Analytically Sensitive and Specific by Sequencing than by Hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Meisal

    Full Text Available Sensitive and specific genotyping of human papillomaviruses (HPVs is important for population-based surveillance of carcinogenic HPV types and for monitoring vaccine effectiveness. Here we compare HPV genotyping by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS to an established DNA hybridization method. In DNA isolated from urine, the overall analytical sensitivity of NGS was found to be 22% higher than that of hybridization. NGS was also found to be the most specific method and expanded the detection repertoire beyond the 37 types of the DNA hybridization assay. Furthermore, NGS provided an increased resolution by identifying genetic variants of individual HPV types. The same Modified General Primers (MGP-amplicon was used in both methods. The NGS method is described in detail to facilitate implementation in the clinical microbiology laboratory and includes suggestions for new standards for detection and calling of types and variants with improved resolution.

  5. CRISPR/Cas9 system as an innovative genetic engineering tool: Enhancements in sequence specificity and delivery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young-Il; Suresh, Bharathi; Kim, Hyongbum; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    While human gene therapy has gained significant attention for its therapeutic promise, CRISPR/Cas9 technology has made a breakthrough as an efficient genome editing tool by emulating prokaryotic immune defense mechanisms. Although many studies have found that CRISPR/Cas9 technology is more efficient, specific and manipulable than previous generations of gene editing tools, it can be further improved by elevating its overall efficiency in a higher frequency of genome modifications and reducing its off-target effects. Here, we review the development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology, focusing on enhancement of its sequence specificity, reduction of off-target effects and delivery systems. Moreover, we describe recent successful applications of CRISPR/Cas9 technology in laboratory and clinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ion-channel genosensor for the detection of specific DNA sequences derived from Plum Pox Virus in plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecka, Kamila; Michalczuk, Lech; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2014-10-09

    A DNA biosensor for detection of specific oligonucleotides sequences of Plum Pox Virus (PPV) in plant extracts and buffer is proposed. The working principles of a genosensor are based on the ion-channel mechanism. The NH2-ssDNA probe was deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface to form an amide bond between the carboxyl group of oxidized electrode surface and amino group from ssDNA probe. The analytical signals generated as a result of hybridization were registered in Osteryoung square wave voltammetry in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- as a redox marker. The 22-mer and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences derived from PPV and DNA samples from plants infected with PPV were used as targets. Similar detection limits of 2.4 pM (31.0 pg/mL) and 2.3 pM (29.5 pg/mL) in the concentration range 1-8 pM were observed in the presence of the 22-mer ssDNA and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences of PPV, respectively. The genosensor was capable of discriminating between samples consisting of extracts from healthy plants and leaf extracts from infected plants in the concentration range 10-50 pg/mL. The detection limit was 12.8 pg/mL. The genosensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity. The 20-mer partially complementary DNA sequences with four complementary bases and DNA samples from healthy plants used as negative controls generated low signal.

  7. Ion-Channel Genosensor for the Detection of Specific DNA Sequences Derived from Plum Pox Virus in Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Malecka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A DNA biosensor for detection of specific oligonucleotides sequences of Plum Pox Virus (PPV in plant extracts and buffer is proposed. The working principles of a genosensor are based on the ion-channel mechanism. The NH2-ssDNA probe was deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface to form an amide bond between the carboxyl group of oxidized electrode surface and amino group from ssDNA probe. The analytical signals generated as a result of hybridization were registered in Osteryoung square wave voltammetry in the presence of [Fe(CN6]3−/4− as a redox marker. The 22-mer and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences derived from PPV and DNA samples from plants infected with PPV were used as targets. Similar detection limits of 2.4 pM (31.0 pg/mL and 2.3 pM (29.5 pg/mL in the concentration range 1–8 pM were observed in the presence of the 22-mer ssDNA and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences of PPV, respectively. The genosensor was capable of discriminating between samples consisting of extracts from healthy plants and leaf extracts from infected plants in the concentration range 10–50 pg/mL. The detection limit was 12.8 pg/mL. The genosensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity. The 20-mer partially complementary DNA sequences with four complementary bases and DNA samples from healthy plants used as negative controls generated low signal.

  8. The mitochondrial DNA sequence specificity of the anti-tumour drug bleomycin using end-labeled DNA and capillary electrophoresis and a comparison with genome-wide DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Long H; Murray, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The DNA sequence specificity of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent, bleomycin, was investigated in two human mitochondrial DNA sequences. Bleomycin was found to cleave preferentially at 5'-TGT*A-3' DNA sequences (where * is the cleavage site). The bleomycin analysis using capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence was determined on both DNA strands and each strand was independently fluorescently labelled at the 3'- and 5'-ends. There was a high level of correlation between the intensity of bleomycin cleavage sites analysed by 3'- and 5'-end labelling. This is the first occasion that a comprehensive comparison has been made between these two end-labelling procedures to quantify cleavage by a DNA damaging agent and to investigate end-label bias. A comparison was also made between the bleomycin DNA sequence specificity obtained from genome-wide next-generation sequencing with that obtained from purified plasmid DNA sequences. This was accomplished by cloning sections of human mitochondrial DNA and comparing these identical mitochondrial DNA in the human mitochondrial genome. At individual sites, there was a very low level of correlation between bleomycin cleavage in plasmid sequencing and genome-wide sequencing. However, the overall bleomycin DNA sequence specificity was very similar in the two environments, namely 5'-TGT*A-3'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Germline mutations of BRCA1 gene exon 11 are not associated with platinum response neither with survival advantage in patients with primary ovarian cancer: understanding the clinical importance of one of the biggest human exons. A study of the Tumor Bank Ovarian Cancer (TOC) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Desislava; Ruscito, Ilary; Olek, Sven; Richter, Rolf; Hellwag, Alexander; Türbachova, Ivana; Woopen, Hannah; Baron, Udo; Braicu, Elena Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid

    2016-09-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 gene have been reported in up to 20 % of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Distinct clinical characteristics have been attributed to this special EOC population. We hypothesized that mutations in different BRCA1 gene exons may differently affect the clinical course of the disease. The aim of this study was to analyze, in a large cohort of primary EOCs, the clinical impact of mutations in BRCA1 gene exon 11, the largest exon of the gene sequence encoding the 60 % of BRCA1 protein. Two hundred sixty-three primary EOC patients, treated between 2000 and 2008 at Charité University Hospital of Berlin, were included. Patients' blood samples were obtained from the Tumor Ovarian Cancer (TOC) Network ( www.toc-network.de ). Direct sequencing of BRCA1 gene exon 11 was performed for each patient to detect mutations. Based on their BRCA1 exon 11 mutational status, patients were compared regarding clinico-pathological variables and survival. Mutations in BRCA1 exon 11 were found in 18 out of 263 patients (6.8 %). Further 10/263 (3.8 %) cases showed variants of uncertain significance (VUS). All exon 11 BRCA1-positive tumors (100 %) were Type 2 ovarian carcinomas (p = 0.05). Age at diagnosis was significantly younger in Type 2 exon 11 mutated patients (p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, BRCA1 exon 11 mutational status was not found to be an independent predictive factor for optimal cytoreduction, platinum response, or survival. Mutations in BRCA1 gene exon 11 seem to predispose women to exclusively develop a Type 2 ovarian cancer at younger age. Exon 11 BRCA1-mutated EOC patients showed distinct clinico-pathological features but similar clinical outcome with respect to sporadic EOC patients.

  10. De novo disruption of promoter and exon 1 of STAR gene reveals essential role for gonadal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piya, Anil; Kaur, Jasmeet; Rice, Alan M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol transport into the mitochondria is required for synthesis of the first steroid, pregnenolone. Cholesterol is transported by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), which acts at the outer mitochondrial membrane prior to its import. Mutations in the STAR protein result in lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Although the STAR protein consists of seven exons, biochemical analysis in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells showed that the first two were not essential for pregnenolone synthesis. Here, we present a patient with ambiguous genitalia, salt-lossing crisis within two weeks after birth and low cortisol levels. Sequence analysis of the STAR, including the exon-intron boundaries, showed the complete deletion of exon 1 as well as more than 50 nucleotides upstream of STAR promoter. Mitochondrial protein import with the translated protein through synthesis cassette of the mutant STAR lacking exon 1 showed protein translation, but it is less likely to have synthesized without a promoter in our patient. Thus, a full-length STAR gene is necessary for physiological mitochondrial cholesterol transport in vivo. STAR exon 1 deletion caused lipoid CAH.Exon 1 substitution does not affect biochemical activity.StAR promoter is responsible for gonadal development.

  11. Sequence and structure requirements for specific recognition of HIV-1 TAR and DIS RNA by the HIV-1 Vif protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freisz, Séverine; Mezher, Joelle; Hafirassou, Lamine; Wolff, Philippe; Nominé, Yves; Romier, Christophe; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2012-07-01

    The HIV-1 Vif protein plays an essential role in the regulation of the infectivity of HIV-1 virion and in vivo pathogenesis. Vif neutralizes the human DNA-editing enzyme APOBEC3 protein, an antiretroviral cellular factor from the innate immune system, allowing the virus to escape the host defence system. It was shown that Vif is packaged into viral particles through specific interactions with the viral genomic RNA. Conserved and structured sequences from the 5'-noncoding region, such as the Tat-responsive element (TAR) or the genomic RNA dimerization initiation site (DIS), are primary binding sites for Vif. In the present study we used isothermal titration calorimetry to investigate sequence and structure determinants important for Vif binding to short viral RNA corresponding to TAR and DIS stem-loops. We showed that Vif specifically binds TAR and DIS in the low nanomolar range. In addition, Vif primarily binds the TAR UCU bulge, but not the apical loop. Determinants for Vif binding to the DIS loop-loop complex are likely more complex and involve the self-complementary loop together with the upper part of the stem. These results suggest that Tat-TAR inhibitors or DIS small molecule binders might be also effective to disturb Vif-TAR and Vif-DIS binding in order to reduce Vif packaging into virions.

  12. One-year retention of general and sequence-specific skills in a probabilistic, serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Jennifer C; Howard, James H; Howard, Darlene V

    2010-05-01

    Procedural skills such as riding a bicycle and playing a musical instrument play a central role in daily life. Such skills are learned gradually and are retained throughout life. The present study investigated 1-year retention of procedural skill in a version of the widely used serial reaction time task (SRTT) in young and older motor-skill experts and older controls in two experiments. The young experts were college-age piano and action video-game players, and the older experts were piano players. Previous studies have reported sequence-specific skill retention in the SRTT as long as 2 weeks but not at 1 year. Results indicated that both young and older experts and older non-experts revealed sequence-specific skill retention after 1 year with some evidence that general motor skill was retained as well. These findings are consistent with theoretical accounts of procedural skill learning such as the procedural reinstatement theory as well as with previous studies of retention of other motor skills.

  13. SEARCHPATTOOL: a new method for mining the most specific frequent patterns for binding sites with application to prokaryotic DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nason Martha

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational methods to predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS based on exhaustive algorithms are guaranteed to find the best patterns but are often limited to short ones or impose some constraints on the pattern type. Many patterns for binding sites in prokaryotic species are not well characterized but are known to be large, between 16–30 base pairs (bp and contain at least 2 conserved bases. The length of prokaryotic species promoters (about 400 bp and our interest in studying a small set of genes that could be a cluster of co-regulated genes from microarray experiments led to the development of a new exhaustive algorithm targeting these large patterns. Results We present Searchpattool, a new method to search for and select the most specific (conservative frequent patterns. This method does not impose restrictions on the density or the structure of the pattern. The best patterns (motifs are selected using several statistics, including a new application of a z-score based on the number of matching sequences. We compared Searchpattool against other well known algorithms on a Bacillus subtilis group of 14 input sequences and found that in our experiments Searchpattool always performed the best based on performance scores. Conclusion Searchpattool is a new method for pattern discovery relative to transcription factor binding sites for species or genes with short promoters. It outputs the most specific significant patterns and helps the biologist to choose the best candidates.

  14. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    KAUST Repository

    Domina, Maria

    2014-12-04

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  15. Sequence of the dog immunoglobulin alpha and epsilon constant region genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, M.; Selinger, D.; Mark, G.E.; Hollis, G.F.; Hickey, G.J. [Merck Research Labs., Rathway, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The immunoglobulin alpha (IGHAC) and epsilon (IGHEC) germline constant region genes were isolated from a dog liver genomic DNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that the dog IGHEC gene is encoded by four exons spread out over 1.7 kilobases (kb). The IGHAC sequence encompasses 1.5 kb and includes all three constant region coding exons. The complete exon/intron sequence of these genes is described. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Genetic variation at Exon2 of TLR4 gene and its association with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... role as a key linkage between innate immunity and specific immunity. But to date, no mutation has been detected in exon 2 in chicken. The correlation between polymorphism of TLR4 gene and its resistance to disease have rarely been reported in china. This study analyzed the polymorphism of chicken ...

  17. Fox-2 Splicing Factor Binds to a Conserved Intron Motif to PromoteInclusion of Protein 4.1R Alternative Exon 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponthier, Julie L.; Schluepen, Christina; Chen, Weiguo; Lersch,Robert A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Hou, Victor C.; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Chasis, Joel A.; Winkelmann, John C.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-03-01

    Activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) inclusion during erythropoiesis represents a physiologically important splicing switch that increases 4.1R affinity for spectrin and actin. Previous studies showed that negative regulation of E16 splicing is mediated by the binding of hnRNP A/B proteins to silencer elements in the exon and that downregulation of hnRNP A/B proteins in erythroblasts leads to activation of E16 inclusion. This paper demonstrates that positive regulation of E16 splicing can be mediated by Fox-2 or Fox-1, two closely related splicing factors that possess identical RNA recognition motifs. SELEX experiments with human Fox-1 revealed highly selective binding to the hexamer UGCAUG. Both Fox-1 and Fox-2 were able to bind the conserved UGCAUG elements in the proximal intron downstream of E16, and both could activate E16 splicing in HeLa cell co-transfection assays in a UGCAUG-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of Fox-2 expression, achieved with two different siRNA sequences resulted in decreased E16 splicing. Moreover, immunoblot experiments demonstrate mouse erythroblasts express Fox-2, but not Fox-1. These findings suggest that Fox-2 is a physiological activator of E16 splicing in differentiating erythroid cells in vivo. Recent experiments show that UGCAUG is present in the proximal intron sequence of many tissue-specific alternative exons, and we propose that the Fox family of splicing enhancers plays an important role in alternative splicing switches during differentiation in metazoan organisms.

  18. Exome sequencing: what clinicians need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sastre L

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leandro SastreInstituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, CSIC/UAM, C/Arturo Duperier 4, Madrid, Spain; Terapias Experimentales y Biomarcadores en Cáncer, IdiPaz, Madrid, Spain; CIBER de Enfermedades Raras, CIBERER, Valencia, SpainAbstract: The recent development of high throughput methods of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing has made it possible to determine individual genome sequences and their specific variations. A region of particular interest is the protein-coding part of the genome, or exome, which is composed of gene exons. The principles of exome purification and sequencing will be described in this review, as well as analyses of the data generated. Results will be discussed in terms of their possible functional and clinical significance. The advantages and limitations of exome sequencing will be compared to those of other massive sequencing approaches such as whole-genome sequencing, ribonucleic acid sequencing or selected DNA sequencing. Exome sequencing has been used recently in the study of various diseases. Monogenic diseases with Mendelian inheritance are among these, but studies have also been carried out on genetic variations that represent risk factors for complex diseases. Cancer is another intensive area for exome sequencing studies. Several examples of the use of exome sequencing in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of these diseases will be described. Finally, remaining challenges and some practical and ethical considerations for the clinical application of exome sequencing will be discussed.Keywords: massively parallel sequencing, RNA sequencing, whole-genome sequencing, genetic variants, molecular diagnosis, pharmacogenomics, personalized medicine, NGS, SGS, SNP, SNV

  19. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Amish, Stephen J.; Smith, Seth; Cosart, Ted F.; Kardos, Marty; Schwartz, Michael K.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding and nearby 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of chosen candidate genes. Targeted sequences were taken from bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) exon capture data and directly from the domestic sheep genome (Ovis aries v. 3; oviAri3). The bighorn sheep sequences used in the Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) exon capture aligned to 2350 genes on the oviAri3 genome with an average of 2 exons each. We developed a microfluidic qPCR-based SNP chip to genotype 476 Dall's sheep from locations across their range and test for patterns of selection. Using multiple corroborating approaches (lositan and bayescan), we detected 28 SNP loci potentially under selection. We additionally identified candidate loci significantly associated with latitude, longitude, precipitation and temperature, suggesting local environmental adaptation. The three methods demonstrated consistent support for natural selection on nine genes with immune and disease-regulating functions (e.g. Ovar-DRA, APC, BATF2, MAGEB18), cell regulation signalling pathways (e.g. KRIT1, PI3K, ORRC3), and respiratory health (CYSLTR1). Characterizing adaptive allele distributions from novel genetic techniques will facilitate investigation of the influence of environmental variation on local adaptation of a northern alpine ungulate throughout its range. This research demonstrated the utility of exon capture for gene-targeted SNP discovery and subsequent SNP chip genotyping using low-quality samples in a nonmodel species.

  20. Post-transcriptional exon shuffling events in humans can be evolutionarily conserved and abundant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balool, Haya H; Weber, David; Liu, Yilei; Wade, Mark; Guleria, Kamlesh; Nam, Pitsien Lang Ping; Clayton, Jake; Rowe, William; Coxhead, Jonathan; Irving, Julie; Elliott, David J; Hall, Andrew G; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Jackson, Michael S

    2011-11-01

    In silico analyses have established that transcripts from some genes can be processed into RNAs with rearranged exon order relative to genomic structure (post-transcriptional exon shuffling, or PTES). Although known to contribute to transcriptome diversity in some species, to date the structure, distribution, abundance, and functional significance of human PTES transcripts remains largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we identify 205 putative human PTES products from 176 genes. We validate 72 out of 112 products analyzed using RT-PCR, and identify additional PTES products structurally related to 61% of validated targets. Sequencing of these additional products reveals GT-AG dinucleotides at >95% of the splice junctions, confirming that they are processed by the spliceosome. We show that most PTES transcripts are expressed in a wide variety of human tissues, that they can be polyadenylated, and that some are conserved in mouse. We also show that they can extend into 5' and 3' UTRs, consistent with formation via trans-splicing of independent pre-mRNA molecules. Finally, we use real-time PCR to compare the abundance of PTES exon junctions relative to canonical exon junctions within the transcripts from seven genes. PTES exon junctions are present at 90% of the levels of canonical junctions, with transcripts from MAN1A2, PHC3, TLE4, and CDK13 exhibiting the highest levels. This is the first systematic experimental analysis of PTES in human, and it suggests both that the phenomenon is much more widespread than previously thought and that some PTES transcripts could be functional.

  1. Short Tandem Repeats in Human Exons: A Target for Disease Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villesen Palle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years it has been demonstrated that structural variations, such as indels (insertions and deletions, are common throughout the genome, but the implications of structural variations are still not clearly understood. Long tandem repeats (e.g. microsatellites or simple repeats are known to be hypermutable (indel-rich, but are rare in exons and only occasionally associated with diseases. Here we focus on short (imperfect tandem repeats (STRs which fall below the radar of conventional tandem repeat detection, and investigate whether STRs are targets for disease-related mutations in human exons. In particular, we test whether they share the hypermutability of the longer tandem repeats and whether disease-related genes have a higher STR content than non-disease-related genes. Results We show that validated human indels are extremely common in STR regions compared to non-STR regions. In contrast to longer tandem repeats, our definition of STRs found them to be present in exons of most known human genes (92%, 99% of all STR sequences in exons are shorter than 33 base pairs and 62% of all STR sequences are imperfect repeats. We also demonstrate that STRs are significantly overrepresented in disease-related genes in both human and mouse. These results are preserved when we limit the analysis to STRs outside known longer tandem repeats. Conclusion Based on our findings we conclude that STRs represent hypermutable regions in the human genome that are linked to human disease. In addition, STRs constitute an obvious target when screening for rare mutations, because of the relatively low amount of STRs in exons (1,973,844 bp and the limited length of STR regions.

  2. The Transposon Provides Messages That Yield Unique Profiles of Protein Isoforms and Acts Synergistically With to Enrich Proteome Complexity via Exonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Chyang Charng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In exonization events, Ds1 may provide donor and/or acceptor sites for splicing after inserting into genes and be incorporated into new transcripts with new exon(s. In this study, the protein variants of Ds1 exonization yielding additional functional profile(s were studied. Unlike Ds exonization, which creates new profiles mostly by incorporating flanking intron sequences with the Ds message, Ds1 exonization additionally creates new profiles through the presence or absence of Ds1 messages. The number of unique functional profiles harboring Ds1 messages is 1.3-fold more than that of functional profiles without Ds1 messages. The highly similar 11 protein isoforms at a single insertion site also contribute to proteome complexity enrichment by exclusively creating new profiles. Particularly, Ds1 exonization produces 459 unique profiles, of which 129 cannot be built by Ds . We thus conclude that Ds and Ds1 are independent but synergistic in their capacity to enrich proteome complexity through exonization.

  3. Mouse Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequence and expression analyses reveal conservation of tissue-specific MHC-independent immunosurveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Rahim, Mir Munir A; Allan, David S J; Tu, Megan M; Belanger, Simon; Abou-Samra, Elias; Ma, Jaehun; Sekhon, Harman S; Fairhead, Todd; Zein, Haggag S; Carlyle, James R; Anderson, Stephen K; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    The Nkrp1 (Klrb1)-Clr (Clec2) genes encode a receptor-ligand system utilized by NK cells as an MHC-independent immunosurveillance strategy for innate immune responses. The related Ly49 family of MHC-I receptors displays extreme allelic polymorphism and haplotype plasticity. In contrast, previous BAC-mapping and aCGH studies in the mouse suggest the neighboring and related Nkrp1-Clr cluster is evolutionarily stable. To definitively compare the relative evolutionary rate of Nkrp1-Clr vs. Ly49 gene clusters, the Nkrp1-Clr gene clusters from two Ly49 haplotype-disparate inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and 129S6, were sequenced. Both Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequences are highly similar to the C57BL/6 reference sequence, displaying the same gene numbers and order, complete pseudogenes, and gene fragments. The Nkrp1-Clr clusters contain a strikingly dissimilar proportion of repetitive elements compared to the Ly49 clusters, suggesting that certain elements may be partly responsible for the highly disparate Ly49 vs. Nkrp1 evolutionary rate. Focused allelic polymorphisms were found within the Nkrp1b/d (Klrb1b), Nkrp1c (Klrb1c), and Clr-c (Clec2f) genes, suggestive of possible immune selection. Cell-type specific transcription of Nkrp1-Clr genes in a large panel of tissues/organs was determined. Clr-b (Clec2d) and Clr-g (Clec2i) showed wide expression, while other Clr genes showed more tissue-specific expression patterns. In situ hybridization revealed specific expression of various members of the Clr family in leukocytes/hematopoietic cells of immune organs, various tissue-restricted epithelial cells (including intestinal, kidney tubular, lung, and corneal progenitor epithelial cells), as well as myocytes. In summary, the Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster appears to evolve more slowly relative to the related Ly49 cluster, and likely regulates innate immunosurveillance in a tissue-specific manner.

  4. Mouse Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequence and expression analyses reveal conservation of tissue-specific MHC-independent immunosurveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    Full Text Available The Nkrp1 (Klrb1-Clr (Clec2 genes encode a receptor-ligand system utilized by NK cells as an MHC-independent immunosurveillance strategy for innate immune responses. The related Ly49 family of MHC-I receptors displays extreme allelic polymorphism and haplotype plasticity. In contrast, previous BAC-mapping and aCGH studies in the mouse suggest the neighboring and related Nkrp1-Clr cluster is evolutionarily stable. To definitively compare the relative evolutionary rate of Nkrp1-Clr vs. Ly49 gene clusters, the Nkrp1-Clr gene clusters from two Ly49 haplotype-disparate inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and 129S6, were sequenced. Both Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequences are highly similar to the C57BL/6 reference sequence, displaying the same gene numbers and order, complete pseudogenes, and gene fragments. The Nkrp1-Clr clusters contain a strikingly dissimilar proportion of repetitive elements compared to the Ly49 clusters, suggesting that certain elements may be partly responsible for the highly disparate Ly49 vs. Nkrp1 evolutionary rate. Focused allelic polymorphisms were found within the Nkrp1b/d (Klrb1b, Nkrp1c (Klrb1c, and Clr-c (Clec2f genes, suggestive of possible immune selection. Cell-type specific transcription of Nkrp1-Clr genes in a large panel of tissues/organs was determined. Clr-b (Clec2d and Clr-g (Clec2i showed wide expression, while other Clr genes showed more tissue-specific expression patterns. In situ hybridization revealed specific expression of various members of the Clr family in leukocytes/hematopoietic cells of immune organs, various tissue-restricted epithelial cells (including intestinal, kidney tubular, lung, and corneal progenitor epithelial cells, as well as myocytes. In summary, the Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster appears to evolve more slowly relative to the related Ly49 cluster, and likely regulates innate immunosurveillance in a tissue-specific manner.

  5. Comparison of next generation sequencing technologies for transcriptome characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltis Douglas E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a simulation approach to help determine the optimal mixture of sequencing methods for most complete and cost effective transcriptome sequencing. We compared simulation results for traditional capillary sequencing with "Next Generation" (NG ultra high-throughput technologies. The simulation model was parameterized using mappings of 130,000 cDNA sequence reads to the Arabidopsis genome (NCBI Accession SRA008180.19. We also generated 454-GS20 sequences and de novo assemblies for the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica and the magnoliid avocado (Persea americana using a variety of methods for cDNA synthesis. Results The Arabidopsis reads tagged more than 15,000 genes, including new splice variants and extended UTR regions. Of the total 134,791 reads (13.8 MB, 119,518 (88.7% mapped exactly to known exons, while 1,117 (0.8% mapped to introns, 11,524 (8.6% spanned annotated intron/exon boundaries, and 3,066 (2.3% extended beyond the end of annotated UTRs. Sequence-based inference of relative gene expression levels correlated significantly with microarray data. As expected, NG sequencing of normalized libraries tagged more genes than non-normalized libraries, although non-normalized libraries yielded more full-length cDNA sequences. The Arabidopsis data were used to simulate additional rounds of NG and traditional EST sequencing, and various combinations of each. Our simulations suggest a combination of FLX and Solexa sequencing for optimal transcriptome coverage at modest cost. We have also developed ESTcalc http://fgp.huck.psu.edu/NG_Sims/ngsim.pl, an online webtool, which allows users to explore the results of this study by specifying individualized costs and sequencing characteristics. Conclusion NG sequencing technologies are a highly flexible set of platforms that can be scaled to suit different project goals. In terms of sequence coverage alone, the NG sequencing is a dramatic advance

  6. ISVASE: identification of sequence variant associated with splicing event using RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohi, Hasan Awad; Liu, Wanfei; Lin, Qiang; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2017-06-28

    Exon recognition and splicing precisely and efficiently by spliceosome is the key to generate mature mRNAs. About one third or a half of disease-related mutations affect RNA splicing. Software PVAAS has been developed to identify variants associated with aberrant splicing by directly using RNA-seq data. However, it bases on the assumption that annotated splicing site is normal splicing, which is not true in fact. We develop the ISVASE, a tool for specifically identifying sequence variants associated with splicing events (SVASE) by using RNA-seq data. Comparing with PVAAS, our tool has several advantages, such as multi-pass stringent rule-dependent filters and statistical filters, only using split-reads, independent sequence variant identification in each part of splicing (junction), sequence variant detection for both of known and novel splicing event, additional exon-exon junction shift event detection if known splicing events provided, splicing signal evaluation, known DNA mutation and/or RNA editing data supported, higher precision and consistency, and short running time. Using a realistic RNA-seq dataset, we performed a case study to illustrate the functionality and effectiveness of our method. Moreover, the output of SVASEs can be used for downstream analysis such as splicing regulatory element study and sequence variant functional analysis. ISVASE is useful for researchers interested in sequence variants (DNA mutation and/or RNA editing) associated with splicing events. The package is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/isvase/ .

  7. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gideon D; Gur, Noa; Koopman, Werner J H; Pines, Ophry; Vardimon, Lily

    2010-02-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS gene, it is not clear how tissue-specific subcellular localization is achieved. Here we show that in chicken, which utilizes the uricotelic system, the GS transcripts of liver and brain cells are identical and, consistently, there is no difference in the amino acid sequence of the protein. The N-terminus of GS, which constitutes a 'weak' mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS), is sufficient to direct a chimeric protein to the mitochondria in hepatocytes and to the cytoplasm in astrocytes. Considering that a weak MTS is dependent on a highly negative mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi) for import, we examined the magnitude of DeltaPsi in hepatocytes and astrocytes. Our results unexpectedly revealed that DeltaPsi in hepatocytes is considerably more negative than that of astrocytes and that converting the targeting signal into 'strong' MTS abolished the capability to confer tissue-specific subcellular localization. We suggest that evolutional selection of weak MTS provided a tool for differential targeting of an identical protein by taking advantage of tissue-specific differences in DeltaPsi.

  8. Somatic mutations of the ret Protooncogene in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma are not restricted to exon 16 and are associated with tumor recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romei, C.; Elisei, R.; Pinchera, A. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Germline point mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the ret protooncogene have been identified as causative in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and in familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Somatic point mutations of the same gene, exclusively associated with codon 918 of exon 16, have also been reported in few cases of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma. We analyzed the blood and tumor DNA of 19 patients with sporadic MTC and 6 patients with primary parathyroid adenoma for point mutations at exons 10, 11, and 16 of the ret protooncogene by restriction analysis of the PCR-amplified product and by sequence analysis of exons 10 and 11. A Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Tyr mutation was found in both the tumoral and blood DNA of one patient, indicating that he was affected by an hereditary form of MTC, erroneously considered sporadic. In the other 18 patients with MTC, somatic point mutations of ret were found in 8 cases (44.4%). In 5 cases the mutation affected exon 16 (Met{sup 918}{r_arrow}Thr), and in 3 cases it affected exon 11 (Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Arg in 1 and Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Trp in 2); these 3 mutations were confirmed by sequence analysis. The remaining 10 patients had no mutation in exon 10 by either restriction analysis or sequence analysis. Clinical data showed that 75% of the patients whose tumor carried ret mutation had tumor recurrence and/or increased serum calcitonin concentrations during the postsurgical follow-up period as opposed to 10% of the patients without mutations (P < 0.02, by {chi}{sup 2} analysis). No ret mutation was found in the tumoral DNA from parathyroid adenomas. Our findings indicate that the somatic ret point mutation frequently found in sporadic MTC may affect not only exon 16 but also exon 11 and is associated with less favorable clinical outcome. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A powerful method for transcriptional profiling of specific cell types in eukaryotes: laser-assisted microdissection and RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc W Schmid

    Full Text Available The acquisition of distinct cell fates is central to the development of multicellular organisms and is largely mediated by gene expression patterns specific to individual cells and tissues. A spatially and temporally resolved analysis of gene expression facilitates the elucidation of transcriptional networks linked to cellular identity and function. We present an approach that allows cell type-specific transcriptional profiling of distinct target cells, which are rare and difficult to access, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. We combined laser-assisted microdissection (LAM, linear amplification starting from <1 ng of total RNA, and RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq. As a model we used the central cell of the Arabidopsis thaliana female gametophyte, one of the female gametes harbored in the reproductive organs of the flower. We estimated the number of expressed genes to be more than twice the number reported previously in a study using LAM and ATH1 microarrays, and identified several classes of genes that were systematically underrepresented in the transcriptome measured with the ATH1 microarray. Among them are many genes that are likely to be important for developmental processes and specific cellular functions. In addition, we identified several intergenic regions, which are likely to be transcribed, and describe a considerable fraction of reads mapping to introns and regions flanking annotated loci, which may represent alternative transcript isoforms. Finally, we performed a de novo assembly of the transcriptome and show that the method is suitable for studying individual cell types of organisms lacking reference sequence information, demonstrating that this approach can be applied to most eukaryotic organisms.

  10. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping of CHRNA1 pre-mRNA as potential therapy for Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Shoin; Ishii, Hiroshige T; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2015-06-05

    CHRNA1 encodes the α subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and is expressed at the neuromuscular junction. Moreover, it is one of the causative genes of Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes (CMS). CHRNA1 undergoes alternative splicing to produce two splice variants: P3A(-), without exon P3A, and P3A(+), with the exon P3A. Only P3A(-) forms functional nAChR. Aberrant alternative splicing caused by intronic or exonic point mutations in patients leads to an extraordinary increase in P3A(+) and a concomitant decrease in P3A(-). Consequently this resulted in a shortage of functional receptors. Aiming to restore the imbalance between the two splice products, antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) were employed to induce exon P3A skipping. Three AON sequences were designed to sterically block the putative binding sequences for splicing factors necessary for exon recognition. Herein, we show that AON complementary to the 5' splice site of the exon was the most effective at exon skipping of the minigene with causative mutations, as well as endogenous wild-type CHRNA1. We conclude that single administration of the AON against the 5' splice site is a promising therapeutic approach for patients based on the dose-dependent effect of the AON and the additive effect of combined AONs. This conclusion is favorable to patients with inherited diseases of uncertain etiology that arise from aberrant splicing leading to a subsequent loss of functional translation products because our findings encourage the option of AON treatment as a therapeutic for these prospectively identified diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential methylation of the promoter and first exon of the RASSF1A gene in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Surbhi; Xie, Lijia; Boldbaatar, Batbold; Lin, Selena Y.; Hamilton, James P.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Chen, Shun-Hua; Hu, Chi-Tan; Block, Timothy M.; Song, Wei; Su, Ying-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    Aim Aberrant methylation of the promoter, P2, and the first exon, E1, regions of the tumor suppressor gene RASSF1A, have been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), albeit with poor specificity. This study analyzed the methylation profiles of P1, P2 and E1 regions of the gene to identify the region of which methylation most specifically corresponds to HCC and to evaluate the potential of this methylated region as a biomarker in urine for HCC screening. Methods Bisulfite DNA sequencing and quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assays were performed to compare methylation of the 56 CpG sites in regions P1, P2 and E1 in DNA isolated from normal, hepatitic, cirrhotic, adjacent non-HCC, and HCC liver tissue and urine samples for the characterization of hypermethylation of the RASSF1A gene as a biomarker for HCC screening. Results In tissue, comparing HCC (n = 120) with cirrhosis and hepatitis together (n = 70), methylation of P1 had an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) of 0.90, whereas methylation of E1 and P2 had AUROC of 0.84 and 0.72, respectively. At 90% sensitivity, specificity for P1 methylation was 72.9% versus 38.6% for E1 and 27.1% for P2. Methylated P1 DNA was detected in urine in association with cirrhosis and HCC. It had a sensitivity of 81.8% for α-fetoprotein negative HCC. Conclusion Among the three regions analyzed, methylation of P1 is the most specific for HCC and holds great promise as a DNA marker in urine for screening of cirrhosis and HCC. PMID:25382672

  12. Mutations in exon 10 of the RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attie, T.; Eng, C.; Mulligan, L.M. [Hospital des Enfants-Malades, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital malformation ascribed to the absence of autonomic ganglion cells in the terminal hindgut. Recently, we have identified mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR families. Mutations of the RET gene have also been reported in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). While RET mutations in HSCR are scattered on the whole coding sequence, MEN 2A and FMTC mutations are clustered in 5 cystein codons of exons 10 and 11. Here, we report on HSCR families carrying mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene, one of them involving a cystein codon. Germ-line mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene may contribute to either an early development defect (HSCR) or inherited predisposition to cancer (MEN 2A and FMTC), probable depending on the nature and location of the mutation. These data also suggest that HSCR patients with mutations in exon 10 might subsequently prove to be at risk for MEN 2A or FMTC since several MEN 2A/HSCR associations have been reported.

  13. Dynamic ASXL1 Exon Skipping and Alternative Circular Splicing in Single Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston Koh

    Full Text Available Circular RNAs comprise a poorly understood new class of noncoding RNA. In this study, we used a combination of targeted deletion, high-resolution splicing detection, and single-cell sequencing to deeply probe ASXL1 circular splicing. We found that efficient circular splicing required the canonical transcriptional start site and inverted AluSx elements. Sequencing-based interrogation of isoforms after ASXL1 overexpression identified promiscuous linear splicing between all exons, with the two most abundant non-canonical linear products skipping the exons that produced the circular isoforms. Single-cell sequencing revealed a strong preference for either the linear or circular ASXL1 isoforms in each cell, and found the predominant exon skipping product is frequently co-expressed with its reciprocal circular isoform. Finally, absolute quantification of ASXL1 isoforms confirmed our findings and suggests that standard methods overestimate circRNA abundance. Taken together, these data reveal a dynamic new view of circRNA genesis, providing additional framework for studying their roles in cellular biology.

  14. Transcriptome-based exon capture enables highly cost-effective comparative genomic data collection at moderate evolutionary scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Ke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, exon capture has largely been restricted to species with fully sequenced genomes, which has precluded its application to lineages that lack high quality genomic resources. We developed a novel strategy for designing array-based exon capture in chipmunks (Tamias based on de novo transcriptome assemblies. We evaluated the performance of our approach across specimens from four chipmunk species. Results We selectively targeted 11,975 exons (~4 Mb on custom capture arrays, and enriched over 99% of the targets in all libraries. The percentage of aligned reads was highly consistent (24.4-29.1% across all specimens, including in multiplexing up to 20 barcoded individuals on a single array. Base coverage among specimens and within targets in each species library was uniform, and the performance of targets among independent exon captures was highly reproducible. There was no decrease in coverage among chipmunk species, which showed up to 1.5% sequence divergence in coding regions. We did observe a decline in capture performance of a subset of targets designed from a much more divergent ground squirrel genome (30 My, however, over 90% of the targets were also recovered. Final assemblies yielded over ten thousand orthologous loci (~3.6 Mb with thousands of fixed and polymorphic SNPs among species identified. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential of a transcriptome-enabled, multiplexed, exon capture method to create thousands of informative markers for population genomic and phylogenetic studies in non-model species across the tree of life.

  15. Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus and TP53 Mutaions at Exons 5 to 7 in Lung Cancer Patients from Iran

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    Hossein Jafari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a powerful relationship between high-risk human papillomaviruses and lung cancer. In fact, inactivation of p53 is the most common genetic abnormality in lung cancer. Indeed, the frequency of HPV types and TP53 mutations in squamous cell carcinoma of lung, among patients from the northwest of Iran has been evaluated in this article. Methodes: Fifty Paraffin embedded blocks of lung SCC were selected for detection of HPV DNA by Nested PCR, and then DNA was sequenced for HPV typing. Equal numbers of positive and negative samples for the HPV DNA were examined for the presence of mutations in exons 5-7 of the TP53 gene by PCR and direct sequencing. Results: Overtly 9 (18% of 50 samples presented the HPV DNA: eight were HPV-18 and one was HPV-6. TP53 mutations were found in 5 samples (27.7%. Of these, 4 cases showed mutations in exon 5 and one case contained a mutation in exon 7.The most frequent mutation in exon 5 was the C to G transversion (c.409C>G, and also the T to A tansversion (c.770T>A in exon 7. Conclusion: This study showed that HPV-18 is more likely to conscequence in the development of lung cancer among some communities. Genetic alterations, alongside with environmental factors, all play a significant role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  16. Sequential combination of karyotyping and RNA-sequencing in the search for cancer-specific fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Thorsen, Jim; Gorunova, Ludmila; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre

    2014-08-01

    Cancer-specific fusion genes are often caused by cytogenetically visible chromosomal rearrangements such as translocations, inversions, deletions or insertions, they can be the targets of molecular therapy, they play a key role in the accurate diagnosis and classification of neoplasms, and they are of prognostic impact. The identification of novel fusion genes in various neoplasms therefore not only has obvious research importance, but is also potentially of major clinical significance. The "traditional" methodology to detect them began with cytogenetic analysis to find the chromosomal rearrangement, followed by utilization of fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques to find the probe which spans the chromosomal breakpoint, and finally molecular cloning to localize the breakpoint more precisely and identify the genes fused by the chromosomal rearrangement. Although laborious, the above-mentioned sequential approach is robust and reliable and a number of fusion genes have been cloned by such means. Next generation sequencing (NGS), mainly RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), has opened up new possibilities to detect fusion genes even when cytogenetic aberrations are cryptic or information about them is unknown. However, NGS suffers from the shortcoming of identifying as "fusion genes" also many technical, biological and, perhaps in particular, clinical "false positives," thus making the assessment of which fusions are important and which are noise extremely difficult. The best way to overcome this risk of information overflow is, whenever reliable cytogenetic information is at hand, to compare karyotyping and sequencing data and concentrate exclusively on those suggested fusion genes that are found in chromosomal breakpoints. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare Cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of novel Salmonella enterica Serovar Thyphimurium DT104-specific prophage and nonprophage chromosomal sequences among serovar Thyphimurium isolates by genomic subtractive hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, A.P.H.M.; Abee, T.; Zwietering, M.H.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Genomic subtractive hybridization was performed between Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 and DT104 to search for novel Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104-specific sequences. The subtraction resulted mainly in the isolation of DNA fragments with sequence similarity to phages. Two

  18. Sequence-specific nucleic acid mobility using a reversible block copolymer gel matrix and DNA amphiphiles (lipid-DNA) in capillary and microfluidic electrophoretic separations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagler, Patrick; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S.; Tangen, Uwe; de Vries, Jan Willem; Prusty, Deepak; Kwak, Minseok; Herrmann, Andreas; McCaskill, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible noncovalent but sequence-dependent attachment of DNA to gels is shown to allow programmable mobility processing of DNA populations. The covalent attachment of DNA oligomers to polyacrylamide gels using acrydite-modified oligonucleotides has enabled sequence-specific mobility assays for

  19. Specific reverse transcriptase slippage at the HIV ribosomal frameshift sequence: potential implications for modulation of GagPol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penno, Christophe; Kumari, Romika; Baranov, Pavel V; van Sinderen, Douwe; Atkins, John F

    2017-09-29

    Synthesis of HIV GagPol involves a proportion of ribosomes translating a U6A shift site at the distal end of the gag gene performing a programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift event to enter the overlapping pol gene. In vitro studies here show that at the same shift motif HIV reverse transcriptase generates -1 and +1 indels with their ratio being sensitive to the relative concentration ratio of dNTPs specified by the RNA template slippage-prone sequence and its 5' adjacent base. The GGG sequence 3' adjacent to the U6A shift/slippage site, which is important for ribosomal frameshifting, is shown here to limit reverse transcriptase base substitution and indel 'errors' in the run of A's in the product. The indels characterized here have either 1 more or less A, than the corresponding number of template U's. cDNA with 5 A's may yield novel Gag product(s), while cDNA with an extra base, 7 A's, may only be a minor contributor to GagPol polyprotein. Synthesis of a proportion of non-ribosomal frameshift derived GagPol would be relevant in efforts to identify therapeutically useful compounds that perturb the ratio of GagPol to Gag, and pertinent to the extent in which specific polymerase slippage is utilized in gene expression. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Exome sequencing in an admixed isolated population indicates NFXL1 variants confer a risk for specific language impairment.

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    Pía Villanueva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Children affected by Specific Language Impairment (SLI fail to acquire age appropriate language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. SLI is highly heritable, but the understanding of underlying genetic mechanisms has proved challenging. In this study, we use molecular genetic techniques to investigate an admixed isolated founder population from the Robinson Crusoe Island (Chile, who are affected by a high incidence of SLI, increasing the power to discover contributory genetic factors. We utilize exome sequencing in selected individuals from this population to identify eight coding variants that are of putative significance. We then apply association analyses across the wider population to highlight a single rare coding variant (rs144169475, Minor Allele Frequency of 4.1% in admixed South American populations in the NFXL1 gene that confers a nonsynonymous change (N150K and is significantly associated with language impairment in the Robinson Crusoe population (p = 2.04 × 10-4, 8 variants tested. Subsequent sequencing of NFXL1 in 117 UK SLI cases identified four individuals with heterozygous variants predicted to be of functional consequence. We conclude that coding variants within NFXL1 confer an increased risk of SLI within a complex genetic model.