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Sample records for exon array analysis

  1. ExonMiner: Web service for analysis of GeneChip Exon array data

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    Imoto Seiya

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some splicing isoform-specific transcriptional regulations are related to disease. Therefore, detection of disease specific splice variations is the first step for finding disease specific transcriptional regulations. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array can measure exon-level expression profiles that are suitable to find differentially expressed exons in genome-wide scale. However, exon array produces massive datasets that are more than we can handle and analyze on personal computer. Results We have developed ExonMiner that is the first all-in-one web service for analysis of exon array data to detect transcripts that have significantly different splicing patterns in two cells, e.g. normal and cancer cells. ExonMiner can perform the following analyses: (1 data normalization, (2 statistical analysis based on two-way ANOVA, (3 finding transcripts with significantly different splice patterns, (4 efficient visualization based on heatmaps and barplots, and (5 meta-analysis to detect exon level biomarkers. We implemented ExonMiner on a supercomputer system in order to perform genome-wide analysis for more than 300,000 transcripts in exon array data, which has the potential to reveal the aberrant splice variations in cancer cells as exon level biomarkers. Conclusion ExonMiner is well suited for analysis of exon array data and does not require any installation of software except for internet browsers. What all users need to do is to access the ExonMiner URL http://ae.hgc.jp/exonminer. Users can analyze full dataset of exon array data within hours by high-level statistical analysis with sound theoretical basis that finds aberrant splice variants as biomarkers.

  2. Global analysis of aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in glioblastoma using exon expression arrays

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    Nixon Tamara J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-predominant splice isoforms were identified during comparative in silico sequence analysis of EST clones, suggesting that global aberrant alternative pre-mRNA splicing may be an epigenetic phenomenon in cancer. We used an exon expression array to perform an objective, genome-wide survey of glioma-specific splicing in 24 GBM and 12 nontumor brain samples. Validation studies were performed using RT-PCR on glioma cell lines, patient tumor and nontumor brain samples. Results In total, we confirmed 14 genes with glioma-specific splicing; seven were novel events identified by the exon expression array (A2BP1, BCAS1, CACNA1G, CLTA, KCNC2, SNCB, and TPD52L2. Our data indicate that large changes (> 5-fold in alternative splicing are infrequent in gliomagenesis ( Conclusion While we observed some tumor-specific alternative splicing, the number of genes showing exclusive tumor-specific isoforms was on the order of tens, rather than the hundreds suggested previously by in silico mining. Given the important role of alternative splicing in neural differentiation, there may be selective pressure to maintain a majority of splicing events in order to retain glial-like characteristics of the tumor cells.

  3. A method to identify RNA A-to-I editing targets using I-specific cleavage and exon array analysis.

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    Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Stocker, Joel; Wang, Hui-Chun; Lu, Chiu-Chin; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Yang, Jyuer-Ger; Cho, Chung-Lung; Huang, Hurng-Wern

    2013-02-01

    RNA A-to-I editing is the most common single-base editing in the animal kingdom. Dysregulations of RNA A-to-I editing are associated with developmental defects in mouse and human diseases. Mouse knockout models deficient in ADAR activities show lethal phenotypes associated with defects in nervous system, failure of hematopoiesis and reduced tolerance to stress. While several methods of identifying RNA A-to-I editing sites are currently available, most of the critical editing targets responsible for the important biological functions of ADARs remain unknown. Here we report a method to systematically analyze RNA A-to-I editing targets by combining I-specific cleavage and exon array analysis. Our results show that I-specific cleavage on editing sites causes more than twofold signal reductions in edited exons of known targets such as Gria2, Htr2c, Gabra3 and Cyfip2 in mice. This method provides an experimental approach for genome-wide analysis of RNA A-to-I editing targets with exon-level resolution. We believe this method will help expedite inquiry into the roles of RNA A-to-I editing in various biological processes and diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. BEAT: Bioinformatics Exon Array Tool to store, analyze and visualize Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon Array data from disease experiments

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    Consiglio Arianna

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known from recent studies that more than 90% of human multi-exon genes are subject to Alternative Splicing (AS, a key molecular mechanism in which multiple transcripts may be generated from a single gene. It is widely recognized that a breakdown in AS mechanisms plays an important role in cellular differentiation and pathologies. Polymerase Chain Reactions, microarrays and sequencing technologies have been applied to the study of transcript diversity arising from alternative expression. Last generation Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays offer a more detailed view of the gene expression profile providing information on the AS patterns. The exon array technology, with more than five million data points, can detect approximately one million exons, and it allows performing analyses at both gene and exon level. In this paper we describe BEAT, an integrated user-friendly bioinformatics framework to store, analyze and visualize exon arrays datasets. It combines a data warehouse approach with some rigorous statistical methods for assessing the AS of genes involved in diseases. Meta statistics are proposed as a novel approach to explore the analysis results. BEAT is available at http://beat.ba.itb.cnr.it. Results BEAT is a web tool which allows uploading and analyzing exon array datasets using standard statistical methods and an easy-to-use graphical web front-end. BEAT has been tested on a dataset with 173 samples and tuned using new datasets of exon array experiments from 28 colorectal cancer and 26 renal cell cancer samples produced at the Medical Genetics Unit of IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza. To highlight all possible AS events, alternative names, accession Ids, Gene Ontology terms and biochemical pathways annotations are integrated with exon and gene level expression plots. The user can customize the results choosing custom thresholds for the statistical parameters and exploiting the available clinical

  5. Comprehensive survey of SNPs in the Affymetrix exon array using the 1000 Genomes dataset.

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    Eric R Gamazon

    Full Text Available Microarray gene expression data has been used in genome-wide association studies to allow researchers to study gene regulation as well as other complex phenotypes including disease risks and drug response. To reach scientifically sound conclusions from these studies, however, it is necessary to get reliable summarization of gene expression intensities. Among various factors that could affect expression profiling using a microarray platform, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in target mRNA may lead to reduced signal intensity measurements and result in spurious results. The recently released 1000 Genomes Project dataset provides an opportunity to evaluate the distribution of both known and novel SNPs in the International HapMap Project lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. We mapped the 1000 Genomes Project genotypic data to the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0ST array (exon array, which had been used in our previous studies and for which gene expression data had been made publicly available. We also evaluated the potential impact of these SNPs on the differentially spliced probesets we had identified previously. Though the 1000 Genomes Project data allowed a comprehensive survey of the SNPs in this particular array, the same approach can certainly be applied to other microarray platforms. Furthermore, we present a detailed catalogue of SNP-containing probesets (exon-level and transcript clusters (gene-level, which can be considered in evaluating findings using the exon array as well as benefit the design of follow-up experiments and data re-analysis.

  6. Design of a tobacco exon array with application to investigate the differential cadmium accumulation property in two tobacco varieties.

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    Martin, Florian; Bovet, Lucien; Cordier, Audrey; Stanke, Mario; Gunduz, Irfan; Peitsch, Manuel C; Ivanov, Nikolai V

    2012-11-28

    For decades the tobacco plant has served as a model organism in plant biology to answer fundamental biological questions in the areas of plant development, physiology, and genetics. Due to the lack of sufficient coverage of genomic sequences, however, none of the expressed sequence tag (EST)-based chips developed to date cover gene expression from the whole genome. The availability of Tobacco Genome Initiative (TGI) sequences provides a useful resource to build a whole genome exon array, even if the assembled sequences are highly fragmented. Here, the design of a Tobacco Exon Array is reported and an application to improve the understanding of genes regulated by cadmium (Cd) in tobacco is described. From the analysis and annotation of the 1,271,256 Nicotiana tabacum fasta and quality files from methyl filtered genomic survey sequences (GSS) obtained from the TGI and ~56,000 ESTs available in public databases, an exon array with 272,342 probesets was designed (four probes per exon) and tested on two selected tobacco varieties.Two tobacco varieties out of 45 accumulating low and high cadmium in leaf were identified based on the GGE biplot analysis, which is analysis of the genotype main effect (G) plus analysis of the genotype by environment interaction (GE) of eight field trials (four fields over two years) showing reproducibility across the trials. The selected varieties were grown under greenhouse conditions in two different soils and subjected to exon array analyses using root and leaf tissues to understand the genetic make-up of the Cd accumulation. An Affymetrix Exon Array was developed to cover a large (~90%) proportion of the tobacco gene space. The Tobacco Exon Array will be available for research use through Affymetrix array catalogue. As a proof of the exon array usability, we have demonstrated that the Tobacco Exon Array is a valuable tool for studying Cd accumulation in tobacco leaves. Data from field and greenhouse experiments supported by gene

  7. A Brassica exon array for whole-transcript gene expression profiling.

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    Christopher G Love

    Full Text Available Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3' exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E(-5, with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18, and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html.

  8. Noncoder: a web interface for exon array-based detection of long non-coding RNAs.

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    Gellert, Pascal; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Braun, Thomas; Uchida, Shizuka

    2013-01-07

    Due to recent technical developments, a high number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in mammals. Although it has been shown that lncRNAs are regulated differently among tissues and disease statuses, functions of these transcripts are still unknown in most cases. GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (exon arrays) from Affymetrix, Inc. have been used widely to profile genome-wide expression changes and alternative splicing of protein-coding genes. Here, we demonstrate that re-annotation of exon array probes can be used to profile expressions of tens of thousands of lncRNAs. With this annotation, a detailed inspection of lncRNAs and their isoforms is possible. To allow for a general usage to the research community, we developed a user-friendly web interface called 'noncoder'. By uploading CEL files from exon arrays and with a few mouse clicks and parameter settings, exon array data will be normalized and analysed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs. Noncoder provides the detailed annotation information of lncRNAs and is equipped with unique features to allow for an efficient search for interesting lncRNAs to be studied further. The web interface is available at http://noncoder.mpi-bn.mpg.de.

  9. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

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    Aramburu Ander

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP and sensitivity (ST of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available.

  10. Optimized Exon-Exon Junction Library and its Application on Rodents' Brain Transcriptome Analysis

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    Tong-Hai Dou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Alternative splicing (AS, which plays an important role in gene expression and functional regulation, has been analyzed on genome-scale by various bioinformatic approaches based on RNA-seq data. Compared with the huge number of studies on mouse, the AS researches approaching the rat, whose genome is intermedia between mouse and human, were still limited. To enrich the knowledge on AS events in rodents' brain, we perfomed a comprehensive analysis on four transcriptome libraries (mouse cerebrum, mouse cerebellum, rat cerebrum, and rat cerebellum, recruiting high-throughput sequencing technology. An optimized exon-exon junction library approach was introduced to adapt the longer RNA-seq reads and to improve mapping efficiency. Results: In total, 7,106 mouse genes and 2,734 rat genes were differentially expressed between cerebrum and cerebellum, while 7,125 mouse genes and 1,795 rat genes exhibited varieties on transcript variant level. Only half of the differentially expressed exon-exon junctions could be reflected at gene expression level. Functional cluster analysis showed that 32 pathways in mouse and 9 pathways in rat were significantly enriched, and 6 of them were in both. Interestingly, some differentially expressed transcript variants did not show difference on gene expression level, such as PLCβ1 and Kcnma1. Conclusion: Our work provided a case study of a novel exon-exon junction strategy to analyze the expression of genes and isoforms, helping us understand which transcript contributes to the overall expression and further functional change.

  11. Exon microarray analysis of human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in alcoholism.

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    Manzardo, Ann M; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Wang, Kun; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with cellular and biochemical disturbances that impact upon protein and nucleic acid synthesis, brain development, function, and behavioral responses. To further characterize the genetic influences in alcoholism and the effects of alcohol consumption on gene expression, we used a highly sensitive exon microarray to examine mRNA expression in human frontal cortex of alcoholics and control males. Messenger RNA was isolated from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC; Brodmann area 9) of 7 adult alcoholic (6 males, 1 female, mean age 49 years) and 7 matched controls. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST array was performed according to standard procedures and the results analyzed at the gene level. Microarray findings were validated using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the ontology of disturbed genes characterized using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Decreased mRNA expression was observed for genes involved in cellular adhesion (e.g., CTNNA3, ITGA2), transport (e.g., TF, ABCA8), nervous system development (e.g., LRP2, UGT8, GLDN), and signaling (e.g., RASGRP3, LGR5) with influence over lipid and myelin synthesis (e.g., ASPA, ENPP2, KLK6). IPA identified disturbances in network functions associated with neurological disease and development including cellular assembly and organization impacting on psychological disorders. Our data in alcoholism support a reduction in expression of dlPFC mRNA for genes involved with neuronal growth, differentiation, and signaling that targets white matter of the brain. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  12. A statistical framework for genome-wide discovery of biomarker splice variations with GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays.

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    Yoshida, Ryo; Numata, Kazuyuki; Imoto, Seiya; Nagasaki, Masao; Doi, Atsushi; Ueno, Kazuko; Miyano, Satoru

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important regulatory mechanism that generates multiple mRNA transcripts which are transcribed into functionally diverse proteins. According to the current studies, aberrant transcripts due to splicing mutations are known to cause for 15% of genetic diseases. Therefore understanding regulatory mechanism of alternative splicing is essential for identifying potential biomarkers for several types of human diseases. Most recently, advent of GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array enables us to measure genome-wide expression profiles of over one million exons. With this new microarray platform, analysis of functional gene expressions could be extended to detect not only differentially expressed genes, but also a set of specific-splicing events that are differentially observed between one or more experimental conditions, e.g. tumor or normal control cells. In this study, we address the statistical problems to identify differentially observed splicing variations from exon expression profiles. The proposed method is organized according to the following process: (1) Data preprocessing for removing systematic biases from the probe intensities. (2) Whole transcript analysis with the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to identify a set of loci that cause the alternative splicing-related to a certain disease. We test the proposed statistical approach on exon expression profiles of colorectal carcinoma. The applicability is verified and discussed in relation to the existing biological knowledge. This paper intends to highlight the potential role of statistical analysis of all exon microarray data. Our work is an important first step toward development of more advanced statistical technology. Supplementary information and materials are available from http://bonsai.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~yoshidar/IBSB2006_ExonArray.htm.

  13. High-resolution ERG-expression profiling on GeneChip exon 1.0 ST arrays in primary and castration-resistant prostate cancer.

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    Smit, Frank P; Salagierski, Maciej; Jannink, Sander; Schalken, Jack A

    2013-05-01

    To assess whether oestrogen-regulated gene (ERG) expression analysis using GeneChip arrays can predict transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ERG fusion. The expression level of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene was studied in various histological grades of prostate cancer and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CPRC). GeneChip Affymetrix exon 1.0 ST arrays were used for expression profiling of ERG, erythroblast transformation-specific (ETS) variant gene 1 (ETV1), ETV4 and ETV5 genes in 67 prostate cancer tissue specimens. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and in some cases DNA sequencing was used to validate the presence and the expression levels of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions. In our series of patients with prostate cancer over expression of the ERG gene predicted the presence of TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements in almost all cases. ETS expression by itself outmatched the diagnostic performance of the ERG exons ratioing allowing equal detection of the less frequent ETS gene fusion transcripts. The gene fusions were expressed at significantly lower levels in CPRC but occurred more frequently than in primary prostate cancer. ERG expression analysis using GeneChip arrays appears to be an excellent diagnostic tool for identifying gene rearrangements. In coming years, measuring expression of the ETS gene family by itself might become a clinically relevant surrogate test to identify patients with fusion-positive prostate cancer. The variation of gene fusion expression levels, particularly in CPRC, needs to be taken into account when using quantitative molecular diagnosis of prostate cancer. © 2013 BJU International.

  14. Comparison of Nasal Epithelial Smoking-Induced Gene Expression on Affymetrix Exon 1.0 and Gene 1.0 ST Arrays

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    Xiaoling Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously defined the impact of tobacco smoking on nasal epithelium gene expression using Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST arrays. In this paper, we compared the performance of the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array with the Human Exon 1.0 ST array for detecting nasal smoking-related gene expression changes. RNA collected from the nasal epithelium of five current smokers and five never smokers was hybridized to both arrays. While the intersample correlation within each array platform was relatively higher in the Gene array than that in the Exon array, the majority of the genes most changed by smoking were tightly correlated between platforms. Although neither array dataset was powered to detect differentially expressed genes (DEGs at a false discovery rate (FDR <0.05, we identified more DEGs than expected by chance using the Gene ST array. These findings suggest that while both platforms show a high degree of correlation for detecting smoking-induced differential gene expression changes, the Gene ST array may be a more cost-effective platform in a clinical setting for gene-level genomewide expression profiling and an effective tool for exploring the host response to cigarette smoking and other inhaled toxins.

  15. Diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues.

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    Lan Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Exonization of Alu elements is a major mechanism for birth of new exons in primate genomes. Prior analyses of expressed sequence tags show that almost all Alu-derived exons are alternatively spliced, and the vast majority of these exons have low transcript inclusion levels. In this work, we provide genomic and experimental evidence for diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues. Using Exon array data of 330 Alu-derived exons in 11 human tissues and detailed RT-PCR analyses of 38 exons, we show that some Alu-derived exons are constitutively spliced in a broad range of human tissues, and some display strong tissue-specific switch in their transcript inclusion levels. Most of such exons are derived from ancient Alu elements in the genome. In SEPN1, mutations of which are linked to a form of congenital muscular dystrophy, the muscle-specific inclusion of an Alu-derived exon may be important for regulating SEPN1 activity in muscle. Realtime qPCR analysis of this SEPN1 exon in macaque and chimpanzee tissues indicates human-specific increase in its transcript inclusion level and muscle specificity after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. Our results imply that some Alu exonization events may have acquired adaptive benefits during the evolution of primate transcriptomes.

  16. Splicing Analysis of Exonic OCRL Mutations Causing Lowe Syndrome or Dent-2 Disease

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    Lorena Suarez-Artiles

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the OCRL gene are associated with both Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease. Patients with Lowe syndrome present congenital cataracts, mental disabilities and a renal proximal tubulopathy, whereas patients with Dent-2 disease exhibit similar proximal tubule dysfunction but only mild, or no additional clinical defects. It is not yet understood why some OCRL mutations cause the phenotype of Lowe syndrome, while others develop the milder phenotype of Dent-2 disease. Our goal was to gain new insights into the consequences of OCRL exonic mutations on pre-mRNA splicing. Using predictive bioinformatics tools, we selected thirteen missense mutations and one synonymous mutation based on their potential effects on splicing regulatory elements or splice sites. These mutations were analyzed in a minigene splicing assay. Results of the RNA analysis showed that three presumed missense mutations caused alterations in pre-mRNA splicing. Mutation c.741G>T; p.(Trp247Cys generated splicing silencer sequences and disrupted splicing enhancer motifs that resulted in skipping of exon 9, while mutations c.2581G>A; p.(Ala861Thr and c.2581G>C; p.(Ala861Pro abolished a 5′ splice site leading to skipping of exon 23. Mutation c.741G>T represents the first OCRL exonic variant outside the conserved splice site dinucleotides that results in alteration of pre-mRNA splicing. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating the effects of OCRL exonic mutations at the mRNA level.

  17. Screening of BRCA1 sequence variants within exon 11 by heteroduplex analysis

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    Lucian Negura

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Germ-line mutations of either BRCA1 or BRCA2 represents the major hereditary risk to breast and ovariancancer. Screening for mutations in these genes is now standard practice in molecular diagnosis, opening the way tooncogenetic counselling and follow-up. Because mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are distributed throughout theloci, accepted clinical protocols involve screening their entire coding regions. Systematic Sanger sequencing is time andmoney consuming. Therefore, a lot of pre-screening techniques evolved over time in order to identify anomalousamplicons prior to sequencing. Because BRCA mutations are always heterozygous, heteroduplex analysis proved to be asuitable pre-screening step. We previously implemented mismatch specific endonuclease heteroduplex analysis forBRCA1 exon7. Here we show the utility of the same method for mutations and SNPs found in BRCA1 exon 11

  18. ExDom: an integrated database for comparative analysis of the exon-intron structures of protein domains in eukaryotes.

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    Bhasi, Ashwini; Philip, Philge; Manikandan, Vinu; Senapathy, Periannan

    2009-01-01

    We have developed ExDom, a unique database for the comparative analysis of the exon-intron structures of 96 680 protein domains from seven eukaryotic organisms (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Bos taurus, Rattus norvegicus, Danio rerio, Gallus gallus and Arabidopsis thaliana). ExDom provides integrated access to exon-domain data through a sophisticated web interface which has the following analytical capabilities: (i) intergenomic and intragenomic comparative analysis of exon-intron structure of domains; (ii) color-coded graphical display of the domain architecture of proteins correlated with their corresponding exon-intron structures; (iii) graphical analysis of multiple sequence alignments of amino acid and coding nucleotide sequences of homologous protein domains from seven organisms; (iv) comparative graphical display of exon distributions within the tertiary structures of protein domains; and (v) visualization of exon-intron structures of alternative transcripts of a gene correlated to variations in the domain architecture of corresponding protein isoforms. These novel analytical features are highly suited for detailed investigations on the exon-intron structure of domains and make ExDom a powerful tool for exploring several key questions concerning the function, origin and evolution of genes and proteins. ExDom database is freely accessible at: http://66.170.16.154/ExDom/.

  19. Functional Analysis of Mutations in Exon 9 of NF1 Reveals the Presence of Several Elements Regulating Splicing.

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    Elisabete Hernández-Imaz

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is one of the most common human hereditary disorders, predisposing individuals to the development of benign and malignant tumors in the nervous system, as well as other clinical manifestations. NF1 is caused by heterozygous mutations in the NF1 gene and around 25% of the pathogenic changes affect pre-mRNA splicing. Since the molecular mechanisms affected by these mutations are poorly understood, we have analyzed the splicing mutations identified in exon 9 of NF1, which is particularly prone to such changes, to better define the possible splicing regulatory elements. Using a minigene approach, we studied the effect of five splicing mutations in this exon described in patients. These highlighted three regulatory motifs within the exon. An in vivo splicing analysis of an extensive collection of changes generated in the minigene demonstrated that the CG motif at c.910-911 is critical for the recognition of exon 9. We also found that the GC motif at c.945-946 is involved in exon recognition through SRSF2 and that this motif is part of a Composite Exon Splicing Regulatory Element made up of physically overlapping enhancer and silencer elements. Finally, through an in vivo splicing analysis and in vitro binding assays, we demonstrated that the c.1007G>A mutation creates an Exonic Splicing Silencer element that binds the hnRNPA1 protein. The complexity of the splicing regulatory elements present in exon 9 is most likely responsible for the fact that mutations in this region represent 25% of all exonic changes that affect splicing in the NF1 gene.

  20. Leakage analysis of crossbar memristor arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2014-07-01

    Crossbar memristor arrays provide a promising high density alternative for the current memory and storage technologies. These arrays suffer from parasitic current components that significantly increase the power consumption, and could ruin the readout operation. In this work we study the trade-off between the crossbar array density and the power consumption required for its readout. Our analysis is based on simulating full memristor arrays on a SPICE platform.

  1. Exon 44 nonsense mutation in two-Duchenne muscular dystrophy brothers detected by heteroduplex analysis.

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    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartolo, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing a heteroduplex method, we screened the dystrophin exon 43-45 region for point mutations, including small deletions and insertions. The method depends upon the formation of a heteroduplex between wild-type and mutant DNA PCR products. DNA specimens from one hundred and four DMD patients without detected deletions or duplications were multiplexed amplified for exons 43, 44, and 45. The PCR products were mixed with the PCR products from nonaffected controls, electrophoresed, and examined for the presence of altered mobility heteroduplex bands. An exon 44 nonsense mutation in two DMD brothers and a common intron 44 polymorphism were identified using this approach. Although the exon 44-45 region is a hotspot for deletion breakpoints, it does not appear to be prone to point mutations. The technique is extremely useful for screening several exons simultaneously and it allowed us to screen a large number of patients.

  2. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence.

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    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Davey Smith, G; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-08-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence.

  3. Performance Analysis of Digital loudspeaker Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Kontomichos, Fotios; Mourjopoulos, John

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of digital loudspeaker arrays shows that the ways in which bits are mapped to the drivers influence the quality of the audio result. Specifically, a "bit-summed" rather than the traditional "bit-mapped" strategy greatly reduces the number of times drivers make binary transitions per...... period of the input frequency. Detailed simulations compare the results for a 32-loudspeaker array with a similar configuration with analog excitation of the drivers. Ideally, drivers in digital arrays should be very small and span a small area, but that sets limits on the low-frequency response...

  4. Molecular analysis of exons 6 and 7 of phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in Phenylketonuria patients in Western Iran

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    Moradi, Keyvan; Alibakhshi, Reza; Ghadiri, Keyghobad; Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism that results from a deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). According to PAH database, exons 6 and 7 and their flanking introns of PAH gene contain the greatest number of mutant alleles. Therefore, as a preliminary study, nucleotide sequence analysis of exons 6 and 7 of the PAH gene has been performed in 25 PKU patients whose ancestors lived in Kermanshah province of Iran. To date, there has been no mutation data describing the genotypes of the PKU disease in this Kurdish ethnic region background. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients (aged between 2 and 23 years) participated in this study. The DNA fragments containing two exons of the PAH gene [6 and 7] and their exon-flanking intronic sequences were amplified and sequenced. RESULTS: The total of detected mutations were R261X (8%), R176X (4%), R243Q (4%), R243X (2%) and R261Q (2%), as they accounted for 20% of all mutant alleles in this study. The identified polymorphisms are: IVS5 -54 G > A (22%), Q232Q (8%) and V245V (4%). All of the detected mutations in this study are related to CpG dinucleotides in the PAH gene sequence. CONCLUSION: The frequency of R261X, the most common mutation in our study, in Iranian population is Iran. Therefore, it may be necessary to study the PAH gene mutations in other provinces of Iran separately. PMID:23716935

  5. SEQUENCING AND SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF MYOSTATIN GENE IN THE EXON 1 OF THE CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. SHAH, A. S. QURESHI1, M. REISSMANN2 AND H. J. SCHWARTZ3

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin, also called growth differentiation factor-8 (GDF-8, is a member of the mammalian growth transforming family (TGF-beta superfamily, which is expressed specifically in developing an adult skeletal muscle. Muscular hypertrophy allele (mh allele in the double muscle breeds involved mutation within the myostatin gene. Genomic DNA was isolated from the camel hair using NucleoSpin Tissue kit. Two animals of each of the six breeds namely, Marecha, Dhatti, Larri, Kohi, Sakrai and Cambelpuri were used for sequencing. For PCR amplification of the gene, a primer pair was designed from homolog regions of already published sequences of farm animals from GenBank. Results showed that camel myostatin possessed more than 90% homology with that of cattle, sheep and pig. Camel formed separate cluster from the pig in spite of having high homology (98% and showed 94% homology with cattle and sheep as reported in literature. Sequence analysis of the PCR amplified part of exon 1 (256 bp of the camel myostatin was identical among six camel breeds.

  6. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  7. High-resolution ERG-expression profiling on GeneChip exon 1.0 ST arrays in primary and castration-resistant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, F.P.; Salagierski, M.; Jannink, S.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether oestrogen-regulated gene (ERG) expression analysis using GeneChip arrays can predict transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ERG fusion. The expression level of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene was studied in various histological grades of prostate cancer and castration-resistant

  8. An Exon-Based Comparative Variant Analysis Pipeline to Study the Scale and Role of Frameshift and Nonsense Mutation in the Human-Chimpanzee Divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, GongXin

    2009-01-01

    Chimpanzees and humans are closely related but differ in many deadly human diseases and other characteristics in physiology, anatomy, and pathology. In spite of decades of extensive research, crucial questions about the molecular mechanisms behind the differences are yet to be understood. Here I report ExonVar, a novel computational pipeline for Exon-based human-chimpanzee comparative Variant analysis. The objective is to comparatively analyze mutations specifically those that caused th...

  9. Alternative splicing in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer identified by exon-array analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Kasper; Sørensen, Karina D.; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie

    2008-01-01

    from colon, urinary bladder, and prostate. We identified 2069 candidate alternative splicing events between normal tissue samples from colon, bladder, and prostate and selected 15 splicing events for RT-PCR validation, 10 of which were successfully validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. Furthermore 23, 19......, and 18 candidate tumor-specific splicing alterations in colon, bladder, and prostate, respectively, were selected for RT-PCR validation on an independent set of 81 normal and tumor tissue samples. In total, seven genes with tumor-specific splice variants were identified (ACTN1, CALD1, COL6A3, LRRFIP2....... In conclusion, we identified and validated alternative splicing between normal tissue samples from colon, bladder, and prostate in addition to cancer-specific splicing events in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer that may have diagnostic and prognostic implications....

  10. POEM, A 3-dimensional exon taxonomy and patterns in untranslated exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Keith; Chonka, Ashley; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2008-09-20

    The existence of exons and introns has been known for thirty years. Despite this knowledge, there is a lack of formal research into the categorization of exons. Exon taxonomies used by researchers tend to be selected ad hoc or based on an information poor de-facto standard. Exons have been shown to have specific properties and functions based on among other things their location and order. These factors should play a role in the naming to increase specificity about which exon type(s) are in question. POEM (Protein Oriented Exon Monikers) is a new taxonomy focused on protein proximal exons. It integrates three dimensions of information (Global Position, Regional Position and Region), thus its exon categories are based on known statistical exon features. POEM is applied to two congruent untranslated exon datasets resulting in the following statistical properties. Using the POEM taxonomy previous wide ranging estimates of initial 5' untranslated region exons are resolved. According to our datasets, 29-36% of genes have wholly untranslated first exons. Untranslated exon containing sequences are shown to have consistently up to 6 times more 5' untranslated exons than 3' untranslated exons. Finally, three exon patterns are determined which account for 70% of untranslated exon genes. We describe a thorough three-dimensional exon taxonomy called POEM, which is biologically and statistically relevant. No previous taxonomy provides such fine grained information and yet still includes all valid information dimensions. The use of POEM will improve the accuracy of genefinder comparisons and analysis by means of a common taxonomy. It will also facilitate unambiguous communication due to its fine granularity.

  11. Analysis of ELA-DQB exon 2 polymorphism in Argentine Creole horses by PCR-RFLP and PCR-SSCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Castagnasso, E E; Díaz, S; Giovambattista, G; Dulout, F N; Peral-García, P

    2003-08-01

    The second exon of equine leucocyte antigen (ELA)-DQB genes was amplified from genomic DNA of 32 Argentine Creole horses by PCR. Amplified DNA was analysed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). The PCR-RFLP analysis revealed two HaeIII patterns, four RsaI patterns, five MspI patterns and two HinfI patterns. EcoRI showed no variation in the analysed sample. Additional patterns that did not account for known exon 2 DNA sequences were observed, suggesting the existence of novel ELA-DQB alleles. PCR-SSCP analysis exhibited seven different band patterns, and the number of bands per animal ranged from four to nine. Both methods indicated that at least two DQB genes are present. The presence of more than two alleles in each animal showed that the primers employed in this work are not specific for a unique DQB locus. The improvement of this PCR-RFLP method should provide a simple and rapid technique for an accurate definition of ELA-DQB typing in horses.

  12. SNP identification and polymorphism analysis in exon 2 of the horse myostatin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, E E; Lopes, M S; Mendonça, D; da Câmara Machado, A

    2012-04-01

    The myostatin gene (MSTN) belongs to the TGF-β superfamily of secreted growth and differentiation factors and is responsible for embryonic and adult skeletal muscle development. In this study, exon 2 of the MSTN gene, which encodes part of the TGF-β pro-peptide, was sequenced in 332 horses of 20 different breeds and compared with the horse MSTN gene sequence deposited in GenBank. The sequences obtained revealed the presence of 11 haplotypes represented by 10 variable nucleotide mutations, eight of them corresponding to amino acid sequence changes. This gene shows a high variability when compared with other genes. This might be an indication that some breeds have the same ancestry but different pressures of selection. © 2011 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2011 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  13. Exome Array Analysis of Nuclear Lens Opacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Stephanie J; Klein, Alison P; Lee, Kristine E; Chen, Fei; Bomotti, Samantha; Truitt, Barbara; Iyengar, Sudha K; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Duggal, Priya

    2017-11-28

    Nuclear cataract is the most common subtype of age-related cataract, the leading cause of blindness worldwide. It results from advanced nuclear sclerosis, or opacity in the center of the optic lens, and is affected by both genetic and environmental risk factors, including smoking. We sought to understand the genetic factors associated with nuclear sclerosis through interrogation of rare and low frequency coding variants using exome array data. We analyzed Illumina Human Exome Array data for 1,488 participants of European ancestry in the Beaver Dam Eye Study who were without cataract surgery for association with nuclear sclerosis grade, controlling for age and sex. We performed single-variant regression analysis for 32,138 variants with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥0.003. In addition, gene-based analysis of 11,844 genes containing at least two variants with MAF nuclear sclerosis, the possible association with the RNF149 gene highlights a potential candidate gene for future studies that aim to understand the genetic architecture of nuclear sclerosis.

  14. Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Long, KIenwyn J.; Curtis, Henry B.; Gardner, Barbara; Davis, Victoria; Messenger, Scott; Walters, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Modeling solar cell performance for a specific radiation environment to obtain the end-of-life photovoltaic array performance has become both increasingly important and, with the rapid advent of new types of cell technology, more difficult. For large constellations of satellites, a few percent difference in the lifetime prediction can have an enormous economic impact. The tool described here automates the assessment of solar array on-orbit end-of-life performance and assists in the development and design of ground test protocols for different solar cell designs. Once established, these protocols can be used to calculate on-orbit end-of-life performance from ground test results. The Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) utilizes the radiation environment from the Environment Work Bench (EWB) model developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center s Photovoltaic and Space Environmental Effects Branch in conjunction with Maxwell Technologies. It then modifies and combines this information with the displacement damage model proposed by Summers et al. (ref. 1) of the Naval Research Laboratory to determine solar cell performance during the course of a given mission. The resulting predictions can then be compared with flight data. The Environment WorkBench (ref. 2) uses the NASA AE8 (electron) and AP8 (proton) models of the radiation belts to calculate the trapped radiation flux. These fluxes are integrated over the defined spacecraft orbit for the duration of the mission to obtain the total omnidirectional fluence spectra. Components such as the solar cell coverglass, adhesive, and antireflective coatings can slow and attenuate the particle fluence reaching the solar cell. In SAVANT, a continuous slowing down approximation is used to model this effect.

  15. The analysis of mutations and exon deletions at TSC2 gene in angiomyolipomas associated with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heung-Mo; Choi, Hye-Jung; Hong, Doo-Pyo; Joo, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Na-Eun; Song, Ji-Young; Choi, Yoon-La; Lee, Jeeyun; Choi, Dongil; Kim, BoKyung; Park, Hyo-Jun; Park, Jae-Berm; Kim, Sung Joo

    2014-12-01

    Angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are relatively rare hamartomatous or benign tumors that occasionally occur as part of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Mutations in either of the two genes, TSC1 and TSC2, have been attributed to the development of TSC. Between 1994 and January 2009, 83 patients were diagnosed with AML at the Samsung Medical Center. In that group of patients, 5 (6%) had AML with TSC (AML-TSC). Mutational analysis of the TSC2 gene was performed using 7 samples from the 5 AML-TSC patients and 14 samples from 14 patients with sporadic AML without TSC (AML-non-TSC). From this analysis, mutations in TSC genes were identified in 5 samples from the AML-TSC patients (mutation detection rate=71%) and 3 samples from AML-non-TSC patients (mutation detection rate=21%). In the case of AML-TSC, 6 mutations were found including 3 recurrent mutations and 3 novel mutations, while in the case of AML-non-TSC, 4 mutations were identified once, including 1 novel mutation. Also MLPA analysis of the TSC2 gene showed that TSC2 exon deletion is more frequently observed in AML-TSC patients than in AML-non-TSC patients. This is the first mutation and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses of TSC2 in Korean AMLs that focus on TSC. This study provides data that are representative of the distribution of mutations and exon deletions at TSC genes in clinically diagnosed AML-TSC cases of the Korean population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. TAT gene mutation analysis in three Palestinian kindreds with oculocutaneous tyrosinaemia type II; characterization of a silent exonic transversion that causes complete missplicing by exon 11 skipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maydan, G; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Madsen, Pia Pinholt

    2006-01-01

    therefore seek prenatal diagnosis, but this is not possible by biochemical assays as tyrosine does not accumulate in amniotic fluid and TAT is not expressed in chorionic villi or amniocytes. Molecular analysis is therefore the only possible approach for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection. To this end....... Homozygosity for a c.1249C > T (R417X) exon 12 nonsense mutation (previously reported in a French patient) was identified in both patients from the third kindred, enabling successful prenatal diagnosis of an unaffected fetus using chorionic villous tissue....

  17. Molecular genetic analysis of cereal β-amylase genes using exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stratula Olga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteins encoded by cereal β-amylase genes Bamy1 and Bamy2 genes play an important role in seedling germination and in the brewing process. Here, we use exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC to analyse Bamy1 and Bamy2 genetic diversity among 38 accessions belonging to six Poaceae tribes. DNA sequence alignment of multiple Poaceae species β-amylase sequences allowed design of EPIC primers that simultaneously amplify Bamy1 and Bamy2 in all the cereal species investigated. The genetic variation observed in the samples investigated is analysed and discussed, and illustrates the effectiveness of this approach for intra- and interspecific analysis in plant species.

  18. ALGORITHM OF PRIMARY STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF ARRAYS OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAUKHIN D. V.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Annotation. Purpose. Construction of an algorithm for preliminary (primary estimation of arrays of experimental data for further obtaining a mathematical model of the process under study. Methodology. The use of the main regularities of the theory of processing arrays of experimental values in the initial analysis of data. Originality. An algorithm for performing a primary statistical analysis of the arrays of experimental data is given. Practical value. Development of methods for revealing statistically unreliable values in arrays of experimental data for the purpose of their subsequent detailed analysis and construction of a mathematical model of the studied processes.

  19. Analysis of 30 putative BRCA1 splicing mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families identifies exonic splice site mutations that escape in silico prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wappenschmidt

    Full Text Available Screening for pathogenic mutations in breast and ovarian cancer genes such as BRCA1/2, CHEK2 and RAD51C is common practice for individuals from high-risk families. However, test results may be ambiguous due to the presence of unclassified variants (UCV in the concurrent absence of clearly cancer-predisposing mutations. Especially the presence of intronic or exonic variants within these genes that possibly affect proper pre-mRNA processing poses a challenge as their functional implications are not immediately apparent. Therefore, it appears necessary to characterize potential splicing UCV and to develop appropriate classification tools. We investigated 30 distinct BRCA1 variants, both intronic and exonic, regarding their spliceogenic potential by commonly used in silico prediction algorithms (HSF, MaxEntScan along with in vitro transcript analyses. A total of 25 variants were identified spliceogenic, either causing/enhancing exon skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites, or both. Except from a single intronic variant causing minor effects on BRCA1 pre-mRNA processing in our analyses, 23 out of 24 intronic variants were correctly predicted by MaxEntScan, while HSF was less accurate in this cohort. Among the 6 exonic variants analyzed, 4 severely impair correct pre-mRNA processing, while the remaining two have partial effects. In contrast to the intronic alterations investigated, only half of the spliceogenic exonic variants were correctly predicted by HSF and/or MaxEntScan. These data support the idea that exonic splicing mutations are commonly disease-causing and concurrently prone to escape in silico prediction, hence necessitating experimental in vitro splicing analysis.

  20. Comprehensive performance comparison of high-resolution array platforms for genome-wide Copy Number Variation (CNV) analysis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraksingh, Rajini R; Abyzov, Alexej; Urban, Alexander Eckehart

    2017-04-24

    High-resolution microarray technology is routinely used in basic research and clinical practice to efficiently detect copy number variants (CNVs) across the entire human genome. A new generation of arrays combining high probe densities with optimized designs will comprise essential tools for genome analysis in the coming years. We systematically compared the genome-wide CNV detection power of all 17 available array designs from the Affymetrix, Agilent, and Illumina platforms by hybridizing the well-characterized genome of 1000 Genomes Project subject NA12878 to all arrays, and performing data analysis using both manufacturer-recommended and platform-independent software. We benchmarked the resulting CNV call sets from each array using a gold standard set of CNVs for this genome derived from 1000 Genomes Project whole genome sequencing data. The arrays tested comprise both SNP and aCGH platforms with varying designs and contain between ~0.5 to ~4.6 million probes. Across the arrays CNV detection varied widely in number of CNV calls (4-489), CNV size range (~40 bp to ~8 Mbp), and percentage of non-validated CNVs (0-86%). We discovered strikingly strong effects of specific array design principles on performance. For example, some SNP array designs with the largest numbers of probes and extensive exonic coverage produced a considerable number of CNV calls that could not be validated, compared to designs with probe numbers that are sometimes an order of magnitude smaller. This effect was only partially ameliorated using different analysis software and optimizing data analysis parameters. High-resolution microarrays will continue to be used as reliable, cost- and time-efficient tools for CNV analysis. However, different applications tolerate different limitations in CNV detection. Our study quantified how these arrays differ in total number and size range of detected CNVs as well as sensitivity, and determined how each array balances these attributes. This analysis will

  1. High-resolution SNP array analysis of patients with developmental disorder and normal array CGH results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siggberg Linda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnostic analysis of patients with developmental disorders has improved over recent years largely due to the use of microarray technology. Array methods that facilitate copy number analysis have enabled the diagnosis of up to 20% more patients with previously normal karyotyping results. A substantial number of patients remain undiagnosed, however. Methods and Results Using the Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0, we analyzed 35 patients with a developmental disorder of unknown cause and normal array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH results, in order to characterize previously undefined genomic aberrations. We detected no seemingly pathogenic copy number aberrations. Most of the vast amount of data produced by the array was polymorphic and non-informative. Filtering of this data, based on copy number variant (CNV population frequencies as well as phenotypically relevant genes, enabled pinpointing regions of allelic homozygosity that included candidate genes correlating to the phenotypic features in four patients, but results could not be confirmed. Conclusions In this study, the use of an ultra high-resolution SNP array did not contribute to further diagnose patients with developmental disorders of unknown cause. The statistical power of these results is limited by the small size of the patient cohort, and interpretation of these negative results can only be applied to the patients studied here. We present the results of our study and the recurrence of clustered allelic homozygosity present in this material, as detected by the SNP 6.0 array.

  2. Association Studies of CYP1A1 Exon7 Polymorphism and -GSTM1 Interaction with Esophageal Cancer Risk: a Meta-Analysis in the Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin-Ping; Xu, Da-Feng; Xu, Wei-Hua; Ma, Zhi-Chao; Yao, Jia; Fu, Sheng-Miao

    2016-09-01

    Although many epidemiological studies have investigated the CYP1A1 exon7 polymorphism and -GSTM1 interaction with esophageal cancer (EC), definite conclusions cannot be drawn. This study was conducted to explore this association in the Chinese population using meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biology Medicine databases published through August 2015. The association of CYP1A1 exon7 polymorphisms and EC risk was estimated by odds ratio (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In addition, the interaction between the CYP1A1 exon7 and GSTM1 genotypes was assessed. A total of 13 case-control studies including 1781 EC cases and 1996 controls were included in this metaanalysis. Overall, significantly increased EC risk was associated with the CYP1A1 exon7 polymorphism (G vs. A OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.14 - 1.64; GG vs. AA: OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.22 - 2.79; GG vs. AG: OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.01 - 1.96; GG + AG vs. AA: OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.28 - 1.68; GG vs. AA + AG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10 - 2.31). In a subgroup analyses stratified by geographic areas, histopathology type and source of controls, the significant risk was found in hospital-based population, in South and North China. Analysis of CYP1A1- GSTM1 interaction did find synergistic interaction between these two genes. This meta-analysis provides the evidence that CYP1A1 exon7 polymorphism may contribute to the EC development in the Chinese population, and CYP1A1- GSTM1 interaction might elevate the risk.

  3. Analysis and Prediction of Exon Skipping Events from RNA-Seq with Sequence Information Using Rotation Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuquan Du

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In bioinformatics, exon skipping (ES event prediction is an essential part of alternative splicing (AS event analysis. Although many methods have been developed to predict ES events, a solution has yet to be found. In this study, given the limitations of machine learning algorithms with RNA-Seq data or genome sequences, a new feature, called RS (RNA-seq and sequence features, was constructed. These features include RNA-Seq features derived from the RNA-Seq data and sequence features derived from genome sequences. We propose a novel Rotation Forest classifier to predict ES events with the RS features (RotaF-RSES. To validate the efficacy of RotaF-RSES, a dataset from two human tissues was used, and RotaF-RSES achieved an accuracy of 98.4%, a specificity of 99.2%, a sensitivity of 94.1%, and an area under the curve (AUC of 98.6%. When compared to the other available methods, the results indicate that RotaF-RSES is efficient and can predict ES events with RS features.

  4. Update-in-Place Analysis for True Multidimensional Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Fitzgerald

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Applicative languages have been proposed for defining algorithms for parallel architectures because they are implicitly parallel and lack side effects. However, straightforward implementations of applicative-language compilers may induce large amounts of copying to preserve program semantics. The unnecessary copying of data can increase both the execution time and the memory requirements of an application. To eliminate the unnecessary copying of data, the Sisal compiler uses both build-in-place and update-in-place analyses. These optimizations remove unnecessary array copy operations through compile-time analysis. Both build-in-place and update-in-place are based on hierarchical ragged arrays, i.e., the vector-of-vectors array model. Although this array model is convenient for certain applications, many optimizations are precluded, e.g., vectorization. To compensate for this deficiency, new languages, such as Sisal 2.0, have extended array models that allow for both high-level array operations to be performed and efficient implementations to be devised. In this article, we introduce a new method to perform update-in-place analysis that is applicable to arrays stored either in hierarchical or in contiguous storage. Consequently, the array model that is appropriate for an application can be selected without the loss of performance. Moreover, our analysis is more amenable for distributed memory and large software systems.

  5. Atmospheric effects on microphone array analysis of aircraft vortex sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-08

    This paper provides the basis of a comprehensive analysis of vortex sound propagation : through the atmosphere in order to assess real atmospheric effects on acoustic array : processing. Such effects may impact vortex localization accuracy and detect...

  6. Design and Analysis Tools for Deployable Solar Array Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large, lightweight, deployable solar array structures have been identified as a key enabling technology for NASA with analysis and design of these structures being...

  7. Microarray blob-defect removal improves array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun S; Maghsoudi, Kaveh; Li, Wei; Fox, Edward; Quackenbush, John; Shirley Liu, X

    2007-04-15

    New generation Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays often have blob-like image defects that will require investigators to either repeat their hybridization assays or analyze their data with the defects left in place. We investigated the effect of analyzing a spike-in experiment on Affymetrix ENCODE tiling arrays in the presence of simulated blobs covering between 1 and 9% of the array area. Using two different ChIP-chip tiling array analysis programs (Affymetrix tiling array software, TAS, and model-based analysis of tiling arrays, MAT), we found that even the smallest blob defects significantly decreased the sensitivity and increased the false discovery rate (FDR) of the spike-in target prediction. We introduced a new software tool, the microarray blob remover (MBR), which allows rapid visualization, detection and removal of various blob defects from the .CEL files of different types of Affymetrix microarrays. It is shown that using MBR significantly improves the sensitivity and FDR of a tiling array analysis compared to leaving the affected probes in the analysis. The MBR software and the sample array .CEL files used in this article are available at: http://liulab.dfci.harvard.edu/Software/MBR/MBR.htm

  8. Partial correlation analysis indicates causal relationships between GC-content, exon density and recombination rate in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Jan; Wang, Mingyi; Yang, Yaning; Li, Wentian

    2009-01-30

    Several features are known to correlate with the GC-content in the human genome, including recombination rate, gene density and distance to telomere. However, by testing for pairwise correlation only, it is impossible to distinguish direct associations from indirect ones and to distinguish between causes and effects. We use partial correlations to construct partially directed graphs for the following four variables: GC-content, recombination rate, exon density and distance-to-telomere. Recombination rate and exon density are unconditionally uncorrelated, but become inversely correlated by conditioning on GC-content. This pattern indicates a model where recombination rate and exon density are two independent causes of GC-content variation. Causal inference and graphical models are useful methods to understand genome evolution and the mechanisms of isochore evolution in the human genome.

  9. Performance analysis of microphone array methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Gert; Sarradj, Ennes

    2017-08-01

    Microphone array methods aim at the characterization of multiple simultaneously operating sound sources. However, existing data processing algorithms have been shown to yield different results when applied to the same input data. The present paper introduces a method for estimating the reliability of such algorithms. Using Monte Carlo simulations, data sets with random variation of selected parameters are generated. Four different microphone array methods are applied to analyze the simulated data sets. The calculated results are compared with the expected outcome, and the dependency of the reliability on several parameters is quantified. It is shown not only that the performance of a method depends on the given source distribution, but also that the methods differ in terms of their sensitivity to imperfect input data.

  10. Ceramic ball grid array package stress analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, S. H. B. S.; Aziz, M. H. A.; Ong, N. R.; Sauli, Z.; Alcain, J. B.; Retnasamy, V.

    2017-09-01

    The ball grid array (BGA), a form of chip scale package (CSP), was developed as one of the most advanced surface mount devices, which may be assembled by an ordinary surface ball bumps are used instead of plated nickel and gold (Ni/Au) bumps. Assembly and reliability of the BGA's printed circuit board (PCB), which is soldered by conventional surface mount technology is considered in this study. The Ceramic Ball Grid Array (CBGA) is a rectangular ceramic package or square-shaped that will use the solder ball for external electrical connections instead of leads or wire for connections. The solder balls will be arranged in an array or grid at the bottom of the ceramic package body. In this study, ANSYS software is used to investigate the stress on the package for 2 balls and 4 balls of the CBGA package with the various force range of 1-3 Newton applied to the top of the die, top of the substrate and side of the substrate. The highest maximum stress was analyzed and the maximum equivalent stress was observed on the solder ball and the die. From the simulation result, the CBGA package with less solder balls experience higher stress compared to the package with many solder balls. Therefore, less number of solder ball on the CBGA package results higher stress and critically affect the reliability of the solder balls itself, substrate and die which can lead to the solder crack and also die crack.

  11. Cytochrome P450 1A1 exon 7 polymorphism and susceptibility to lung cancer in the Chinese population: an updated meta-analysis and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiu-Ping; Hu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Although many epidemiologic studies have investigated the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) exon 7 gene polymorphism and its association with lung cancer (LC), definitive conclusions cannot be drawn. To clarify the effects of CYP1A1 exon 7 polymorphism on the risk of LC, an updated meta-analysis was performed in the Chinese population. Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, the Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and the Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) databases until October 2014. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the associations. A total of 25 articles including 3,540 LC cases and 5,284 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, significant association was found between CYP1A1 exon 7 polymorphism and LC risk when all studies in the Chinese population were pooled into this meta-analysis (GG versus AA: OR = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.46-2.01; GG versus AG: OR = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.64; GG + AG versus AA: OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16-1.62; GG versus AA + AG: OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.32-1.76). In subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, source of controls, and geographical locations, significantly increased risk was found in Chinese Han people, in population-based studies, in hospital-based studies, in South China, and in North China. This meta-analysis provides the evidence that CYP1A1 exon 7 polymorphism may contribute to LC development in the Chinese population, and studies with a larger sample size and wider population spectrum are warranted to verify this finding.

  12. Increasing the yield in targeted next-generation sequencing by implicating CNV analysis, non-coding exons and the overall variant load: the example of retinal dystrophies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Eisenberger

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA are major causes of blindness. They result from mutations in many genes which has long hampered comprehensive genetic analysis. Recently, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS has proven useful to overcome this limitation. To uncover "hidden mutations" such as copy number variations (CNVs and mutations in non-coding regions, we extended the use of NGS data by quantitative readout for the exons of 55 RP and LCA genes in 126 patients, and by including non-coding 5' exons. We detected several causative CNVs which were key to the diagnosis in hitherto unsolved constellations, e.g. hemizygous point mutations in consanguineous families, and CNVs complemented apparently monoallelic recessive alleles. Mutations of non-coding exon 1 of EYS revealed its contribution to disease. In view of the high carrier frequency for retinal disease gene mutations in the general population, we considered the overall variant load in each patient to assess if a mutation was causative or reflected accidental carriership in patients with mutations in several genes or with single recessive alleles. For example, truncating mutations in RP1, a gene implicated in both recessive and dominant RP, were causative in biallelic constellations, unrelated to disease when heterozygous on a biallelic mutation background of another gene, or even non-pathogenic if close to the C-terminus. Patients with mutations in several loci were common, but without evidence for di- or oligogenic inheritance. Although the number of targeted genes was low compared to previous studies, the mutation detection rate was highest (70% which likely results from completeness and depth of coverage, and quantitative data analysis. CNV analysis should routinely be applied in targeted NGS, and mutations in non-coding exons give reason to systematically include 5'-UTRs in disease gene or exome panels. Consideration of all variants is indispensable

  13. An Empirical Study of Precise Interprocedural Array Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hind

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we examine the role played by the interprocedural analysis of array accesses in the automatic parallelization of Fortran programs. We use the PTRAN system to provide measurements of several benchmarks to compare different methods of representing interprocedurally accessed arrays. We examine issues concerning the effectiveness of automatic parallelization using these methods and the efficiency of a precise summarization method.

  14. Hybrid analysis for the Telescope Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes B.T.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Telescope Array (TA experiment is the largest Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR hybrid detector which consists of three stations of Fluorescence Detectors (FDs and 507 Surface Detectors (SDs. The coincidence events which observed both by FD and SD is referred as hybrid event. The geometry and energy of each extensive air shower observed by hybrid mode are reconstructed with much more accurate resolution than monocular reconstruction alone. The hybrid event candidates were searched for by comparison of the trigger times between FD and SD in the good weather days from May 2008 to September 2010. By this search, we found 1306 hybrid events for BR, 1051 events for LR and 905 events for MD. In this paper, the performance of the hybrid technique and the energy spectra measured by using hybrid events are presented.

  15. Rapid Analysis, Self-Calibrating Array for Air Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Lara, Liana; Huerta, Ramon; Vergara, Alexander; Muezzinoglua, Mehmet K.

    2012-01-01

    Human space missions have critical needs for monitoring and control for life support systems. These systems have monitoring needs that include feedback for closed loop processes and quality control for environmental factors. Sensors and monitoring technologies assure that the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew habitat fall within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the more distant the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. The lifetime of the calibration, for some analytes, was as long as 24 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will include sensor response time in the analysis. The preliminary array analysis for two analytes shows that the analysis time, of an event, can be dropped from 45 minutes to less than10 minutes and array training time can be cut substantially. We will describe the lifetime testing of an array and show lifetime data on individual sensors. This progress will lead to more rapid identification of analytes, and faster training time of the array.

  16. Advanced spectral analysis of ionospheric waves observed with sparse arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Helmboldt, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study from a single, six-hour observing period to illustrate the application of techniques developed for interferometric radio telescopes to the spectral analysis of observations of ionospheric fluctuations with sparse arrays. We have adapted the deconvolution methods used for making high dynamic range images of cosmic sources with radio arrays to making comparably high dynamic range maps of spectral power of wavelike ionospheric phenomena. In the example presented here, we have used observations of the total electron content (TEC) gradient derived from Very Large Array (VLA) observations of synchrotron emission from two galaxy clusters at 330 MHz as well as GPS-based TEC measurements from a sparse array of 33 receivers located within New Mexico near the VLA. We show that these techniques provide a significant improvement in signal to noise (S/N) of detected wavelike structures by correcting for both measurement inaccuracies and wavefront distortions. This is especially true for the...

  17. Comparative analysis of antisense oligonucleotide sequences targeting exon 53 of the human DMD gene: Implications for future clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popplewell, Linda J; Adkin, Carl; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; de Winter, Christa L; Wilton, Steve D; Morgan, Jennifer E; Muntoni, Francesco; Graham, Ian R; Dickson, George

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of functional dystrophin protein, most commonly as a result of a range of out-of-frame mutations in the DMD gene. Modulation of pre-mRNA splicing with antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to restore the reading frame has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, such that truncated but functional dystrophin is expressed. AO-induced skipping of exon 51 of the DMD gene, which could treat 13% of DMD patients, has now progressed to clinical trials. We describe here the methodical, cooperative comparison, in vitro (in DMD cells) and in vivo (in a transgenic mouse expressing human dystrophin), of 24 AOs of the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) chemistry designed to target exon 53 of the DMD gene, skipping of which could be potentially applicable to 8% of patients. A number of the PMOs tested should be considered worthy of development for clinical trial. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Partial correlation analysis indicates causal relationships between GC-content, exon density and recombination rate in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Li Wentian; Yang Yaning; Wang Mingyi; Freudenberg Jan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Several features are known to correlate with the GC-content in the human genome, including recombination rate, gene density and distance to telomere. However, by testing for pairwise correlation only, it is impossible to distinguish direct associations from indirect ones and to distinguish between causes and effects. Results We use partial correlations to construct partially directed graphs for the following four variables: GC-content, recombination rate, exon density and ...

  19. An Exon-Based Comparative Variant Analysis Pipeline to Study the Scale and Role of Frameshift and Nonsense Mutation in the Human-Chimpanzee Divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GongXin Yu

    2009-01-01

    important biological processes such as T cell lineage development, the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, and antigen induced cell death. A “less-is-more” model was previously established to illustrate the role of the gene inactivation and disruptions during human evolution. Here this analysis suggested a different model where the chimpanzee-specific exon-disrupting mutations may act as additional evolutionary force that drove the human-chimpanzee divergence. Finally, the analysis revealed a number of sequencing errors in the chimpanzee and human genome sequences and further illustrated that they could be corrected without resequencing.

  20. Mutation analysis in exons 22 and 24 of SCN4A gene in Iranian patients with non-dystrophic myotonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Khatami, Mehri; Nafissi, Shahriar; Hesami-Zokai, Faezeh; Khorrami, Afshin

    2015-10-07

    Non-dystrophic myotonias are a heterogeneous set of skeletal, muscular channelopathies, which have been associated with point mutations within sodium channel α-subunit (SCN4A) gene. Because exons 22 and 24 of SCN4A gene are recognized as hot spots for this disease, the purpose of the study is to identify mutation in exons 22 and 24 of SCN4A gene in Iranian non-dystrophic myotonias patients. In this study, 28 Iranian patients with non-dystrophic myotonia analyzed for the mutation scanning in exons 22 and 24 of SCN4A gene by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and sequencing. We found 29073G>C substitution in SCN4A gene in one case and 31506A>G substitution in seven cases. The 29073G>C substitution causes a missense mutation G1306A, located in the conserved cytoplasmic loop connecting repeat III and IV of the SCN4A channel but, 31506A>G substitution do not alter amino acid in SCN4A protein. G1306A residue is located in functionally important protein region. In "hinged-lid model" for Na(+) channel inactivation in which glycines(1306) act as the hinge of the lid occluding the channel pore. Mutation in this region slowed fast inactivation. Therefore, it might be a pathogenic mutation. The causal relationship of this mutation with the disease is an object for further discussion.

  1. Assessing copy number from exome sequencing and exome array CGH based on CNV spectrum in a large clinical cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retterer, Kyle; Scuffins, Julie; Schmidt, Daniel; Lewis, Rachel; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel; Stafford, Amanda; Schmidt, Lindsay; Warren, Stephanie; Gibellini, Federica; Kondakova, Anastasia; Blair, Amanda; Bale, Sherri; Matyakhina, Ludmila; Meck, Jeanne; Aradhya, Swaroop; Haverfield, Eden

    2015-08-01

    Detection of copy-number variation (CNV) is important for investigating many genetic disorders. Testing a large clinical cohort by array comparative genomic hybridization provides a deep perspective on the spectrum of pathogenic CNV. In this context, we describe a bioinformatics approach to extract CNV information from whole-exome sequencing and demonstrate its utility in clinical testing. Exon-focused arrays and whole-genome chromosomal microarray analysis were used to test 14,228 and 14,000 individuals, respectively. Based on these results, we developed an algorithm to detect deletions/duplications in whole-exome sequencing data and a novel whole-exome array. In the exon array cohort, we observed a positive detection rate of 2.4% (25 duplications, 318 deletions), of which 39% involved one or two exons. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified 3,345 CNVs affecting single genes (18%). We demonstrate that our whole-exome sequencing algorithm resolves CNVs of three or more exons. These results demonstrate the clinical utility of single-exon resolution in CNV assays. Our whole-exome sequencing algorithm approaches this resolution but is complemented by a whole-exome array to unambiguously identify intragenic CNVs and single-exon changes. These data illustrate the next advancements in CNV analysis through whole-exome sequencing and whole-exome array.Genet Med 17 8, 623-629.

  2. Molecular characterization of HOXC8 gene and methylation status analysis of its exon 1 associated with the length of cashmere fiber in Liaoning cashmere goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wen L; Wang, Jiao J; Yin, Rong H; Dang, Yun L; Wang, Ze Y; Zhu, Yu B; Cong, Yu Y; Deng, Liang; Guo, Dan; Wang, Shi Q; Yang, Shu H; Xue, Hui L

    2017-02-01

    Homeobox protein Hox-C8 (HOXC8) is a member of Hox family. It is expressed in the dermal papilla of the skin and is thought to be associated with the hair inductive capacity of dermal papilla cells. In the present study, we isolated and characterized a full-length open reading frame of HOXC8 cDNA from the skin tissue of Liaoning cashmere goat, as well as, established a phylogenetic relationship of goat HOXC8 with that of other species. Also, we investigated the effect of methylation status of HOXC8 exon 1 at anagen secondary hair follicle on the cashmere fiber traits in Liaoning cashmere goat. The sequence analysis indicated that the obtained cDNA was 1134-bp in length containing a complete ORF of 729-bp. It encoded a peptide of 242 amino acid residues in length. The structural analysis indicated that goat HOXC8 contained a typical homeobox domain. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that Capra hircus HOXC8 had a closer genetic relationship with that of Ovis aries, followed by Bos Taurus and Bubalus bubalis. The methylation analysis suggested that the methylation degree of HOXC8 exon 1 in anagen secondary hair follicle might be involved in regulating the growth of cashmere fiber in Liaoning cashmere goat. Our results provide new evidence for understanding the molecular structural and evolutionary characteristics of HOXC8 in Liaoning cashmere goat, as well as, for further insight into the role of methylation degree of HOXC8 exon 1 regulates the growth of cashmere fiber in goat.

  3. Mutation Analysis of Exons 10 and 17a of CFTR Gene in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis in Kermanshah Province, Western Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahami, Abbas; Alibakhshi, Reza; Ghadiri, Keyghobad; Sadeghi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common genetic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance among Caucasian populations. So far, more than 1950 different mutations were identified in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR gene has 27 exons. The type and distribution of mutations vary widely among different countries and/or ethnic groups. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis was performed on exon10 and exon17a of CFTR gene in CF patients in the Kermanshah province, western Iran. We tested 27 patients admitted to the medical genetics laboratory of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. The patients were from different cities of Kermanshah province. All the patients had the clinical signals and two positive sweat tests. After filling agreement forms and questionnaire, the peripheral blood sampling and DNA extraction were done. DNA samples were extracted. PCR and sequencing special PCR were done. Finally analysis of the results with DNA sequencing analysis version 5.2 software was performed. CFTR mutations analysis identified 4 different mutations in our CF patients. The disease-causing mutations were p.F508del (ΔF508) (14.81%), p.S466X (1.85%), and p.T1036I (1.85%). M470V polymorphism with frequency of 74.1% was found in 23 patients (17 homozygous and 6 heterozygous). Three disease-causing mutations in CF patients in the present study account for approximately 18.51% of mutations. The frequency of p.F508del, the most common mutation was 16-18.1% in Iranian population. The results of the present study can be applied for genetic counseling, population screening and prenatal diagnosis.

  4. On the Statics for Micro-Array Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushibara, Tomoko; Akasaka, Shizu; Ito, Makiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Recently after human genome sequence has been determined almost perfectly, more and more researchers have been studying genes in detail. Therefore, we are sure that accumulated gene information for human will be getting more important in the near future to develop customized medicine and to make gene interactions clear. Among plenty of information, micro array might be one of the most important analysis method for genes because it is the technique that can get big amount of the gene expressions data from one time experiment and also can be used for DNA isolation. To get the novel knowledge from micro array data, we need to enrich statistical tools for its data analysis. So far, many mathematical theories and definition have been proposing. However, many of those proposals are tested with strict conditions or customized to data for specific species. In this paper, we reviewed existing typical statistical methods for micro array analysis and discussed the repeatability of the analysis, construction the guideline with more general procedure. First we analyzed the micro array data for TG rats, with statistical methods of family-wise error rate (FWER) control approach and False Discovery Rate (FDR) control approach. As existing report, no significantly different gene could be detected with FWER control approach. On the other hand, we could find several genes significantly with FDR control approach even q=0.5. To find out the reliability of FDR control approach with micro array conditions, we have analyzed 2 more pieces of data from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public database on the web site with SAM in addition to FWER and FDR control approaches. We could find a certain number of significantly different genes with BH method and SAM in the case of q=0.05. However, we have to note that the number and kinds of detected genes are different when we compare our result with the one from the published paper. Even if the same approach is used to analyze the same micro array

  5. Hybrid Information Flow Analysis for Programs with Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergö Barany

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Information flow analysis checks whether certain pieces of (confidential data may affect the results of computations in unwanted ways and thus leak information. Dynamic information flow analysis adds instrumentation code to the target software to track flows at run time and raise alarms if a flow policy is violated; hybrid analyses combine this with preliminary static analysis. Using a subset of C as the target language, we extend previous work on hybrid information flow analysis that handled pointers to scalars. Our extended formulation handles arrays, pointers to array elements, and pointer arithmetic. Information flow through arrays of pointers is tracked precisely while arrays of non-pointer types are summarized efficiently. A prototype of our approach is implemented using the Frama-C program analysis and transformation framework. Work on a full machine-checked proof of the correctness of our approach using Isabelle/HOL is well underway; we present the existing parts and sketch the rest of the correctness argument.

  6. Arrays in biological and chemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Bo Vöge

    2002-01-01

    Recently a dramatic change has happened for biological and biochemical analysis. Originally developed as an academic massive parallel screening tool, industry has caught the idea as well of performing all kinds of assays in the new format of microarrays. From food manufacturers over water supply...

  7. Gravitational wave detection and data analysis for pulsar timing arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasteren, Rutger van

    2011-01-01

    Long-term precise timing of Galactic millisecond pulsars holds great promise for measuring long-period (months-to-years) astrophysical gravitational waves. In this work we develop a Bayesian data analysis method for projects called pulsar timing arrays; projects aimed to detect these gravitational

  8. Analysis of Camera Arrays Applicable to the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiachen; Xu, Ru; Lv, Zhihan; Song, Houbing

    2016-03-22

    The Internet of Things is built based on various sensors and networks. Sensors for stereo capture are essential for acquiring information and have been applied in different fields. In this paper, we focus on the camera modeling and analysis, which is very important for stereo display and helps with viewing. We model two kinds of cameras, a parallel and a converged one, and analyze the difference between them in vertical and horizontal parallax. Even though different kinds of camera arrays are used in various applications and analyzed in the research work, there are few discussions on the comparison of them. Therefore, we make a detailed analysis about their performance over different shooting distances. From our analysis, we find that the threshold of shooting distance for converged cameras is 7 m. In addition, we design a camera array in our work that can be used as a parallel camera array, as well as a converged camera array and take some images and videos with it to identify the threshold.

  9. The Analysis of the MspI Polymorphism within Exon 3 of the Calpastatin Gene in Slovak Simmental Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Gábor

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Calpastatin has important function in the tenderization process. The SNP polymorphisms in the calpastatin gene suchas UoG-CAST (intron 5 and CAST-T1 (3´UTR region are used as markers in commercial test for prediction ofanimals with tenderness meat. The others research of the calpastatine gene confirmed the impact of a SNPpolymorphism in exon 3 on fertility and longevity in dairy cattle, too. The aim of this study was to analyse thepopulation of 113 animals of Slovak Simmental (42 bulls and 71 cows for the missense SNP polymorphism in exon3. Bovine genomic DNA was isolated from sperm and blood by commercial kit. The SNP CAST c.283 C>T wasdetected by PCR-RFLP method with restriction endonuclease MspI. The favourable allele C was detected by tworestriction fragments 135 bp and 173 bp and the allele T with the one 308 bp fragment. In the analyzed population ofSlovak Simmental cattle were detected the following frequency of alleles and genotypes for the SNP c.283 C>T ofthe CAST gene. Frequencies of allele C and allele T were 0.6460 and 0.3540 and frequencies of genotypes were0.4336 (genotype CC, 0.4248 (genotype CT and 0.1416 (genotype TT.

  10. Design and Analysis of MEMS Linear Phased Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxiang Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A structure of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS linear phased array based on “multi-cell” element is designed to increase radiation sound pressure of transducer working in bending vibration mode at high frequency. In order to more accurately predict the resonant frequency of an element, the theoretical analysis of the dynamic equation of a fixed rectangular composite plate and finite element method simulation are adopted. The effects of the parameters both in the lateral and elevation direction on the three-dimensional beam directivity characteristics are comprehensively analyzed. The key parameters in the analysis include the “cell” number of element, “cell” size, “inter-cell” spacing and the number of elements, element width. The simulation results show that optimizing the linear array parameters both in the lateral and elevation direction can greatly improve the three-dimensional beam focusing for MEMS linear phased array, which is obviously different from the traditional linear array.

  11. WebArray: an online platform for microarray data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClelland Michael

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cutting-edge microarray analysis tools and algorithms, including commonly used limma and affy packages in Bioconductor, need sophisticated knowledge of mathematics, statistics and computer skills for implementation. Commercially available software can provide a user-friendly interface at considerable cost. To facilitate the use of these tools for microarray data analysis on an open platform we developed an online microarray data analysis platform, WebArray, for bench biologists to utilize these tools to explore data from single/dual color microarray experiments. Results The currently implemented functions were based on limma and affy package from Bioconductor, the spacings LOESS histogram (SPLOSH method, PCA-assisted normalization method and genome mapping method. WebArray incorporates these packages and provides a user-friendly interface for accessing a wide range of key functions of limma and others, such as spot quality weight, background correction, graphical plotting, normalization, linear modeling, empirical bayes statistical analysis, false discovery rate (FDR estimation, chromosomal mapping for genome comparison. Conclusion WebArray offers a convenient platform for bench biologists to access several cutting-edge microarray data analysis tools. The website is freely available at http://bioinformatics.skcc.org/webarray/. It runs on a Linux server with Apache and MySQL.

  12. Phenotype-genotype analysis of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS): description of a rare non-exon 3 and a novel CIAS1 missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Adriana A; Silva, Clovis A; Segundo, Gesmar R; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Fujihira, Erika; Watanabe, Mônica; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda; Duarte, Alberto J S; Oliveira, João B

    2008-03-01

    We describe in this paper the phenotype-genotype analysis of a Brazilian cohort of patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Patient 1 presented with an urticarial rash and recurrent fever exacerbated by cold weather, arthritis, and anterior uveitis, thus, receiving a clinical diagnosis of familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. CIAS1 sequencing identified the T436I mutation, previously associated to a clinical phenotype of chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular/neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease. Patient 2 developed a papular exanthema with daily fever shortly after birth, frontal bossing, patellae enlargement, and cognitive and motor impairments. Sequencing identified the exceedingly rare G755R CIAS1 mutation in exon 4. Patient 3 developed skin rash and articular symptoms 6 h after birth, followed by aseptic meningitis. He was found to have the novel C148Y missense mutation in CIAS1. This report expands the spectrum of CIAS1 mutations associated to clinical disease, suggests that the same mutation can be associated with different clinical syndromes, and supports the evidence that CAPS patients should always be screened for mutations outside exon 3.

  13. Design, analysis, and testing of a CCD array mounting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, John A.; O'Neill, Mark B.

    1991-12-01

    A method has been developed for mounting charge-coupled device (CCD) arrays in an optical telescope so as to minimize thermal defocusing errors. The mounting arrangement was developed for a six-inch aperture, visible band, off-axis reimaging telescope attached to an experimental satellite. The mounting arrangement consists of two pieces: a fiberglass frame which holds the actively cooled CCD package and provides thermal isolation from the telescope body; and a titanium flexure, which acts to minimize structural distortions caused by the difference in thermal expansion properties of the CCD array and the telescope body. This paper describes the design, analysis, and testing of this CCD array mounting arrangement. A detailed finite-element model of the CCD array and the mount was developed and used to predict thermally-induced defocus and gravity sag deformations, as well as natural frequencies. Experimental tests to verify the computer model results were performed using holographic interferometry. Vibration tests were also performed to verify the natural frequencies as well as structural integrity during launch. A comparison of the computer model predictions and the holographic interferometric measurements of thermally-induced defocussing indicates agreement to within 15 to 20%. Both the experimental and computer results indicate that the mounting structure provides focus stability over the operational temperature range of the telescope with sufficient structural integrity to survive the anticipated spacecraft launch loads.

  14. Data-flow Analysis of Programs with Associative Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hauzar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic programming languages, such as PHP, JavaScript, and Python, provide built-in data structures including associative arrays and objects with similar semantics—object properties can be created at run-time and accessed via arbitrary expressions. While a high level of security and safety of applications written in these languages can be of a particular importance (consider a web application storing sensitive data and providing its functionality worldwide, dynamic data structures pose significant challenges for data-flow analysis making traditional static verification methods both unsound and imprecise. In this paper, we propose a sound and precise approach for value and points-to analysis of programs with associative arrays-like data structures, upon which data-flow analyses can be built. We implemented our approach in a web-application domain—in an analyzer of PHP code.

  15. Receiver function analysis using AlpArray stations in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dániel, Kalmár; Bálint, Süle; István, Bondár

    2017-04-01

    The AlpArray temporary seismic network, together with the permanent stations of the Hungarian National Seismological Network provid an unprecedented density and resolution to study the Eastern Alps - Pannonian basin transition zone. Previous receiver functions studies .(Hetényi et al., 2007, 2015) in the region used a much smaller station density and shorter time period than the present paper. In the analysis we used data from 48 permanent and temporary AlpArray stations in Hungary and neighbouring countries. We present our methodology (P-wave receiver function analysis, H-K grid search and cross-correlation matrix methods), the pitfalls in processing, and finally our result, the detailed Moho map of the region.

  16. Dual-Polarized Planar Phased Array Analysis for Meteorological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Pang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis for the accuracy requirements of the planar polarimetric phased array radar (PPPAR in meteorological applications. Among many factors that contribute to the polarimetric biases, four factors are considered and analyzed in this study, namely, the polarization distortion due to the intrinsic limitation of a dual-polarized antenna element, the antenna pattern measurement error, the entire array patterns, and the imperfect horizontal and vertical channels. Two operation modes, the alternately transmitting and simultaneously receiving (ATSR mode and the simultaneously transmitting and simultaneously receiving (STSR mode, are discussed. For each mode, the polarimetric biases are formulated. As the STSR mode with orthogonal waveforms is similar to the ATSR mode, the analysis is mainly focused on the ATSR mode and the impacts of the bias sources on the measurement of polarimetric variables are investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. Some insights of the accuracy requirements are obtained and summarized.

  17. Numerical analysis of patch antenna as antenna array element

    OpenAIRE

    Kizimenko, V.; Bobkov, Y

    2009-01-01

    The patch antennas as antenna array element can be modeling by finite element method (programs Microwave Office, Ansoft HFSS and other). But this method need to use fast computer with memory large size. In this work the authors make an attempt to use thin wire integral equation method for patch antenna analysis. The results of modeling by proposed method are compared with the same of modeling by finite elements method and experimental results.

  18. Analysis and design of low profile multiband multifunctional antenna arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsicker, Walker F.

    Light-weight phased array antennas for aerospace and mobile applications require utilizing the same antenna aperture to provide multiple functions with dissimilar radiation pattern specifications (e.g., multiband operation for communications and tracking). Multi-functional antennas provide advantages over aggregate antenna clusters by reducing space requirements, and can aid in the optimal placement of all required apertures to provide adequate isolation between channels. Furthermore, the combination of antenna apertures into a common geometry mitigates co-site installation issues by addressing interference within the integrated radiator design itself as opposed to the extensive analysis which is required to configure multiple radiators in close proximity. The combination of multiple radiators into a single aperture can only be achieved with the proper selection of antenna topology and accompanying feed network design. This research proposes a new technique for the design of multiband arrays in which a common aperture is used. Highlighted by this method is the integration of a tri-band array comprised of an X-band (12 GHz) microstrip patch array on a superstrate above printed dual-band (1 and 2 GHz) slot loop antenna arrays in an octave-spaced lattice. The selection of a ground backing reflector is considered for improved gain and system packaging, but restricts the utility of the design principally due to the lambda/4 depth of the ground plane. Therefore, a novel multiband high impedance surfaces (HIS) is proposed to load the slot apertures for reduced height. The novel techniques proposed here will enable the design of a low profile and conformal single aperture supporting multi-band and multi-functional operations.

  19. The silent mutation nucleotide 744 G --> A, Lys172Lys, in exon 6 of BRCA2 results in exon skipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    and intron variants are of unknown significance. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a silent mutation (nucleotide 744 G --> A/c.516 G --> A, Lys172Lys) in exon 6 of BRCA2 in a Danish family with breast and ovarian cancer. Exon trapping analysis showed that the mutation results in skipping...... of exon 6 and/or both exon 5 and 6, which was verified by RT-PCR analysis on RNA isolated from whole blood of the affected patient. We therefore conclude that the BRCA2 silent mutation Lys172Lys is a disease-causing mutation....

  20. CGHPRO – A comprehensive data analysis tool for array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenzner Steffen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array CGH (Comparative Genomic Hybridisation is a molecular cytogenetic technique for the genome wide detection of chromosomal imbalances. It is based on the co-hybridisation of differentially labelled test and reference DNA onto arrays of genomic BAC clones, cDNAs or oligonucleotides, and after correction for various intervening variables, loss or gain in the test DNA can be indicated from spots showing aberrant signal intensity ratios. Now that this technique is no longer confined to highly specialized laboratories and is entering the realm of clinical application, there is a need for a user-friendly software package that facilitates estimates of DNA dosage from raw signal intensities obtained by array CGH experiments, and which does not depend on a sophisticated computational environment. Results We have developed a user-friendly and versatile tool for the normalization, visualization, breakpoint detection and comparative analysis of array-CGH data. CGHPRO is a stand-alone JAVA application that guides the user through the whole process of data analysis. The import option for image analysis data covers several data formats, but users can also customize their own data formats. Several graphical representation tools assist in the selection of the appropriate normalization method. Intensity ratios of each clone can be plotted in a size-dependent manner along the chromosome ideograms. The interactive graphical interface offers the chance to explore the characteristics of each clone, such as the involvement of the clones sequence in segmental duplications. Circular Binary Segmentation and unsupervised Hidden Markov Model algorithms facilitate objective detection of chromosomal breakpoints. The storage of all essential data in a back-end database allows the simultaneously comparative analysis of different cases. The various display options facilitate also the definition of shortest regions of overlap and simplify the

  1. Whole-transcriptome RNA-seq, gene set enrichment pathway analysis, and exon coverage analysis of two plastid RNA editing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Justin B; Lu, Yan

    2017-05-04

    In land plants, plastid and mitochondrial RNAs are subject to post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing. T-DNA insertions in the ORGANELLE RNA RECOGNITION MOTIF PROTEIN6 gene resulted in reduced photosystem II (PSII) activity and smaller plant and leaf sizes. Exon coverage analysis of the ORRM6 gene showed that orrm6-1 and orrm6-2 are loss-of-function mutants. Compared to other ORRM proteins, ORRM6 affects a relative small number of RNA editing sites. Sanger sequencing of reverse transcription-PCR products of plastid transcripts revealed 2 plastid RNA editing sites that are substantially affected in the orrm6 mutants: psbF-C77 and accD-C794. The psbF gene encodes the β subunit of cytochrome b559, an essential component of PSII. The accD gene encodes the β subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a protein required in plastid fatty acid biosynthesis. Whole-transcriptome RNA-seq demonstrated that editing at psbF-C77 is nearly absent and the editing extent at accD-C794 was significantly reduced. Gene set enrichment pathway analysis showed that expression of multiple gene sets involved in photosynthesis, especially photosynthetic electron transport, is significantly upregulated in both orrm6 mutants. The upregulation could be a mechanism to compensate for the reduced PSII electron transport rate in the orrm6 mutants. These results further demonstrated that Organelle RNA Recognition Motif protein ORRM6 is required in editing of specific RNAs in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastid.

  2. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of the HES/HEY gene family reveal exon/intron loss and teleost specific duplication events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Yan, Jun; Ma, Zhaowu; Zhou, Yang; Abbood, Nibras Najm; Liu, Jianfeng; Su, Li; Jia, Haibo; Guo, An-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    HES/HEY genes encode a family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors with both bHLH and Orange domain. HES/HEY proteins are direct targets of the Notch signaling pathway and play an essential role in developmental decisions, such as the developments of nervous system, somitogenesis, blood vessel and heart. Despite their important functions, the origin and evolution of this HES/HEY gene family has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we identified genes of the HES/HEY family in representative species and performed evolutionary analysis to elucidate their origin and evolutionary process. Our results showed that the HES/HEY genes only existed in metazoans and may originate from the common ancestor of metazoans. We identified HES/HEY genes in more than 10 species representing the main lineages. Combining the bHLH and Orange domain sequences, we constructed the phylogenetic trees by different methods (Bayesian, ML, NJ and ME) and classified the HES/HEY gene family into four groups. Our results indicated that this gene family had undergone three expansions, which were along with the origins of Eumetazoa, vertebrate, and teleost. Gene structure analysis revealed that the HES/HEY genes were involved in exon and/or intron loss in different species lineages. Genes of this family were duplicated in bony fishes and doubled than other vertebrates. Furthermore, we studied the teleost-specific duplications in zebrafish and investigated the expression pattern of duplicated genes in different tissues by RT-PCR. Finally, we proposed a model to show the evolution of this gene family with processes of expansion, exon/intron loss, and motif loss. Our study revealed the evolution of HES/HEY gene family, the expression and function divergence of duplicated genes, which also provide clues for the research of Notch function in development. This study shows a model of gene family analysis with gene structure evolution and duplication.

  3. The On-Site Analysis of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgarelli, Andrea; Zoli, Andrea; Aboudan, Alessio; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; De Cesare, Giovanni; De Rosa, Adriano; Maier, Gernot; Lyard, Etienne; Bastieri, Denis; Lombardi, Saverio; Tosti, Gino; Bergamaschi, Sonia; Beneventano, Domenico; Lamanna, Giovanni; Jacquemier, Jean; Kosack, Karl; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Boisson, Catherine; Borkowski, Jerzy; Buson, Sara; Carosi, Alessandro; Conforti, Vito; Colomé, Pep; Reyes, Raquel de los; Dumm, Jon; Evans, Phil; Fortson, Lucy; Fuessling, Matthias; Gotz, Diego; Graciani, Ricardo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Grandi, Paola; Hinton, Jim; Humensky, Brian; Inoue, Susumu; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Flour, Thierry Le; Lindemann, Rico; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Markoff, Sera; Marisaldi, Martino; Neyroud, Nadine; Nicastro, Luciano; Ohm, Stefan; Osborne, Julian; Oya, Igor; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rosen, Simon; Ribo, Marc; Tacchini, Alessandro; Schüssler, Fabian; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Torresi, Eleonora; Testa, Vincenzo; Wegner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in part...

  4. Meta-GWAS and Meta-Analysis of Exome Array Studies Do Not Reveal Genetic Determinants of Serum Hepcidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesloot, Tessel E.; van Dijk, Freerk; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke J.; Girelli, Domenico; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Swertz, Morris A.; van der Meer, Peter; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Vermeulen, Sita H.; van der Harst, Pim; Swinkels, Dorine W.

    2016-01-01

    Serum hepcidin concentration is regulated by iron status, inflammation, erythropoiesis and numerous other factors, but underlying processes are incompletely understood. We studied the association of common and rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with serum hepcidin in one Italian study and two large Dutch population-based studies. We genotyped common SNVs with genome-wide association study (GWAS) arrays and subsequently performed imputation using the 1000 Genomes reference panel. Cohort-specific GWAS were performed for log-transformed serum hepcidin, adjusted for age and gender, and results were combined in a fixed-effects meta-analysis (total N 6,096). Six top SNVs (pp<1.4x10-6) was identified. Gene-based meta-analyses revealed 19 genes that showed significant association with hepcidin. Our results suggest the absence of common SNVs and rare exonic SNVs explaining a large proportion of phenotypic variation in serum hepcidin. We recommend extension of our study once additional substantial cohorts with hepcidin measurements, GWAS and/or exome array data become available in order to increase power to identify variants that explain a smaller proportion of hepcidin variation. In addition, we encourage follow-up of the potentially interesting genes that resulted from the gene-based analysis of low-frequency and rare variants. PMID:27846281

  5. Characteristics of transposable element exonization within human and mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Sela

    Full Text Available Insertion of transposed elements within mammalian genes is thought to be an important contributor to mammalian evolution and speciation. Insertion of transposed elements into introns can lead to their activation as alternatively spliced cassette exons, an event called exonization. Elucidation of the evolutionary constraints that have shaped fixation of transposed elements within human and mouse protein coding genes and subsequent exonization is important for understanding of how the exonization process has affected transcriptome and proteome complexities. Here we show that exonization of transposed elements is biased towards the beginning of the coding sequence in both human and mouse genes. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs revealed that exonization of transposed elements can be population-specific, implying that exonizations may enhance divergence and lead to speciation. SNP density analysis revealed differences between Alu and other transposed elements. Finally, we identified cases of primate-specific Alu elements that depend on RNA editing for their exonization. These results shed light on TE fixation and the exonization process within human and mouse genes.

  6. Spatio-Temporal Human Grip Force Analysis via Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Dieter F.; Wölfel, Alexander; Meindl, Tobias; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes a technique for measuring human grip forces exerted on a cylindrical object via a sensor array. Standardised resistor-based pressure sensor arrays for industrial and medical applications have been available for some time. We used a special 20 mm diameter grip rod that subjects could either move actively with their fingers in the horizontal direction or exert reactive forces against opposing forces generated in the rod by a linear motor. The sensor array film was attached to the rod by adhesive tape and covered approximately 45 cm2 of the rod surface. The sensor density was 4/cm2 with each sensor having a force resolution of 0.1 N. A scan across all sensors resulted in a corresponding frame containing force values at a frame repetition rate of 150/s. The force value of a given sensor was interpreted as a pixel value resulting in a false-colour image. Based on remote sensed image analysis an algorithm was developed to distinguish significant force-representing pixels from those affected by noise. This allowed tracking of the position of identified fingers in subsequent frames such that spatio-temporal grip force profiles for individual fingers could be derived. Moreover, the algorithm allowed simultaneous measurement of forces exerted without any constraints on the number of fingers or on the position of the fingers. The system is thus well suited for basic and clinical research in human physiology as well as for studies in psychophysics. PMID:22454588

  7. Spatio-Temporal Human Grip Force Analysis via Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian P. Kolb

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a technique for measuring human grip forces exerted on a cylindrical object via a sensor array. Standardised resistor-based pressure sensor arrays for industrial and medical applications have been available for some time. We used a special 20 mm diameter grip rod that subjects could either move actively with their fingers in the horizontal direction or exert reactive forces against opposing forces generated in the rod by a linear motor. The sensor array film was attached to the rod by adhesive tape and covered approximately 45 cm2 of the rod surface. The sensor density was 4/cm2 with each sensor having a force resolution of 0.1 N. A scan across all sensors resulted in a corresponding frame containing force values at a frame repetition rate of 150/s. The force value of a given sensor was interpreted as a pixel value resulting in a false-colour image. Based on remote sensed image analysis an algorithm was developed to distinguish significant force-representing pixels from those affected by noise. This allowed tracking of the position of identified fingers in subsequent frames such that spatio-temporal grip force profiles for individual fingers could be derived. Moreover, the algorithm allowed simultaneous measurement of forces exerted without any constraints on the number of fingers or on the position of the fingers. The system is thus well suited for basic and clinical research in human physiology as well as for studies in psychophysics.

  8. A comprehensive analysis of clinical outcomes in lung cancer patients harboring a MET exon 14 skipping mutation compared to other driver mutations in an East Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Chien-Hung; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Wu, Shang-Gin; Shih, Jin-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent somatic splice-site alterations at MET exon 14 (MET(Δ14)), which result in exon skipping and MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (MET) activation, have been characterised. However, their demographic features and clinical outcomes in East Asian lung cancer patients have yet to be determined. A one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using RNA samples from 850 East Asian lung cancer patients, was performed in order to detect MET(Δ14) and five other major driver mutations, including those in the EGFR, KRAS, ALK, HER2, and ROS1 genes. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to confirm the overexpression of MET in patients harbouring the MET(Δ14) mutation. We analysed the demographic data and clinical outcomes of MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients and compared them to those of MET(Δ14) mutation negative lung cancer patients. In total, 27 lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients and 1 squamous cell carcinoma patient with the MET(Δ14) mutation were identified. The overall incidence was 3.3% for lung cancer and 4.0% for lung ADC. IHC demonstrated that the majority of lung cancer patients harboring a MET(Δ14) mutation exhibited a strong cytoplasmic expression of MET. MET(Δ14) mutation positive patients were generally quite elderly individuals. Stage IV MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients receiving no specific anti-MET therapy were observed to have a similar overall survival (OS) compared to patients in the all negative group (P>0.05). In the multivariate analysis, mutation status was found not to be a major risk factor for OS in lung cancer patients without appropriate tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment. The OS of MET(Δ14) mutation positive lung cancer patients is comparable to that of the major driver gene mutation negative lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis of Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Patrick James

    2011-12-01

    Membrane-based thermal sensor arrays were developed for the high-throughput analysis of the thermophysical properties of thin films. The continuous growth of integrated circuits and microelectromechanical systems, as well as the development of functional materials and the optimization of materials properties, have produced the need for instruments capable of fast materials screening and analysis at reduced length scales. Two instruments were developed based on a similar architecture, one to measure thermal transport properties and the other to perform calorimetry measurements. Both have the capability to accelerate the pace of materials development and understanding using combinatorial measurement methods. The shared architecture of the instruments consists of a silicon-based micromachined array of thermal sensors. Each sensor consists of a SiN X membrane and a W heating element that also serves as a temperature gauge. The array design allows the simultaneous creation of a library of thin film samples by various deposition techniques while systematically varying a parameter of interest across the device. The membrane-based sensors have little thermal mass making them extremely sensitive to changes in thermal energy. The nano-thermal transport array has an array of sensors optimized for sensitivity to heat loss. The heat loss is determined from the temperature response of the sensor to an applied current. An analytical model is used with a linear regression analysis to fit the thermal properties of the samples to the temperature response. The assumptions of the analytical model are validated with a finite element model. Measured thermal properties include specific heat, thermal effusivity, thermal conductivity, and emissivity. The technique is demonstrated by measuring the thermal transport properties of sputter deposited Cu multilayers with a total film thickness from 15 to 470 nm. The experimental results compare well to a theory based on electronic thermal

  10. Cluster Computing For Real Time Seismic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; Giudicepietro, F.

    A seismic array is an instrument composed by a dense distribution of seismic sen- sors that allow to measure the directional properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) radiated by a seismic source. Over the last years arrays have been widely used in different fields of seismological researches. In particular they are applied in the investigation of seismic sources on volcanoes where they can be suc- cessfully used for studying the volcanic microtremor and long period events which are critical for getting information on the volcanic systems evolution. For this reason arrays could be usefully employed for the volcanoes monitoring, however the huge amount of data produced by this type of instruments and the processing techniques which are quite time consuming limited their potentiality for this application. In order to favor a direct application of arrays techniques to continuous volcano monitoring we designed and built a small PC cluster able to near real time computing the kinematics properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) produced by local seis- mic source. The cluster is composed of 8 Intel Pentium-III bi-processors PC working at 550 MHz, and has 4 Gigabytes of RAM memory. It runs under Linux operating system. The developed analysis software package is based on the Multiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm and is written in Fortran. The message-passing part is based upon the LAM programming environment package, an open-source imple- mentation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The developed software system includes modules devote to receiving date by internet and graphical applications for the continuous displaying of the processing results. The system has been tested with a data set collected during a seismic experiment conducted on Etna in 1999 when two dense seismic arrays have been deployed on the northeast and the southeast flanks of this volcano. A real time continuous acquisition system has been simulated by

  11. Meta-GWAS and Meta-Analysis of Exome Array Studies Do Not Reveal Genetic Determinants of Serum Hepcidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesloot, Tessel E; Verweij, Niek; Traglia, Michela; Barbieri, Caterina; van Dijk, Freerk; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke J; Girelli, Domenico; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Sweep, Fred C G J; Swertz, Morris A; van der Meer, Peter; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Vermeulen, Sita H; van der Harst, Pim; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-01-01

    Serum hepcidin concentration is regulated by iron status, inflammation, erythropoiesis and numerous other factors, but underlying processes are incompletely understood. We studied the association of common and rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with serum hepcidin in one Italian study and two large Dutch population-based studies. We genotyped common SNVs with genome-wide association study (GWAS) arrays and subsequently performed imputation using the 1000 Genomes reference panel. Cohort-specific GWAS were performed for log-transformed serum hepcidin, adjusted for age and gender, and results were combined in a fixed-effects meta-analysis (total N 6,096). Six top SNVs (p<5x10-6) were genotyped in 3,821 additional samples, but associations were not replicated. Furthermore, we meta-analyzed cohort-specific exome array association results of rare SNVs with serum hepcidin that were available for two of the three cohorts (total N 3,226), but no exome-wide significant signal (p<1.4x10-6) was identified. Gene-based meta-analyses revealed 19 genes that showed significant association with hepcidin. Our results suggest the absence of common SNVs and rare exonic SNVs explaining a large proportion of phenotypic variation in serum hepcidin. We recommend extension of our study once additional substantial cohorts with hepcidin measurements, GWAS and/or exome array data become available in order to increase power to identify variants that explain a smaller proportion of hepcidin variation. In addition, we encourage follow-up of the potentially interesting genes that resulted from the gene-based analysis of low-frequency and rare variants.

  12. Meta-GWAS and Meta-Analysis of Exome Array Studies Do Not Reveal Genetic Determinants of Serum Hepcidin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessel E Galesloot

    Full Text Available Serum hepcidin concentration is regulated by iron status, inflammation, erythropoiesis and numerous other factors, but underlying processes are incompletely understood. We studied the association of common and rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs with serum hepcidin in one Italian study and two large Dutch population-based studies. We genotyped common SNVs with genome-wide association study (GWAS arrays and subsequently performed imputation using the 1000 Genomes reference panel. Cohort-specific GWAS were performed for log-transformed serum hepcidin, adjusted for age and gender, and results were combined in a fixed-effects meta-analysis (total N 6,096. Six top SNVs (p<5x10-6 were genotyped in 3,821 additional samples, but associations were not replicated. Furthermore, we meta-analyzed cohort-specific exome array association results of rare SNVs with serum hepcidin that were available for two of the three cohorts (total N 3,226, but no exome-wide significant signal (p<1.4x10-6 was identified. Gene-based meta-analyses revealed 19 genes that showed significant association with hepcidin. Our results suggest the absence of common SNVs and rare exonic SNVs explaining a large proportion of phenotypic variation in serum hepcidin. We recommend extension of our study once additional substantial cohorts with hepcidin measurements, GWAS and/or exome array data become available in order to increase power to identify variants that explain a smaller proportion of hepcidin variation. In addition, we encourage follow-up of the potentially interesting genes that resulted from the gene-based analysis of low-frequency and rare variants.

  13. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of the HES/HEY gene family reveal exon/intron loss and teleost specific duplication events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HES/HEY genes encode a family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factors with both bHLH and Orange domain. HES/HEY proteins are direct targets of the Notch signaling pathway and play an essential role in developmental decisions, such as the developments of nervous system, somitogenesis, blood vessel and heart. Despite their important functions, the origin and evolution of this HES/HEY gene family has yet to be elucidated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, we identified genes of the HES/HEY family in representative species and performed evolutionary analysis to elucidate their origin and evolutionary process. Our results showed that the HES/HEY genes only existed in metazoans and may originate from the common ancestor of metazoans. We identified HES/HEY genes in more than 10 species representing the main lineages. Combining the bHLH and Orange domain sequences, we constructed the phylogenetic trees by different methods (Bayesian, ML, NJ and ME and classified the HES/HEY gene family into four groups. Our results indicated that this gene family had undergone three expansions, which were along with the origins of Eumetazoa, vertebrate, and teleost. Gene structure analysis revealed that the HES/HEY genes were involved in exon and/or intron loss in different species lineages. Genes of this family were duplicated in bony fishes and doubled than other vertebrates. Furthermore, we studied the teleost-specific duplications in zebrafish and investigated the expression pattern of duplicated genes in different tissues by RT-PCR. Finally, we proposed a model to show the evolution of this gene family with processes of expansion, exon/intron loss, and motif loss. CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed the evolution of HES/HEY gene family, the expression and function divergence of duplicated genes, which also provide clues for the research of Notch function in development. This study shows a model of gene family analysis with gene structure

  14. Stochastic resolution analysis of co-prime arrays in radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pribic, R; Coutiño Minguez, M.A.; Leus, G.J.T.

    2016-01-01

    Resolution from co-prime arrays and from a full ULA of the size equal to the virtual size of co-prime arrays is investigated. We take into account not only the resulting beam width but also the fact that fewer measurements are acquired by co-prime arrays. This fact is relevant in compressive

  15. Clustering and Network Analysis of Reverse Phase Protein Array Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Molecular profiling of proteins and phosphoproteins using a reverse phase protein array (RPPA) platform, with a panel of target-specific antibodies, enables the parallel, quantitative proteomic analysis of many biological samples in a microarray format. Hence, RPPA analysis can generate a high volume of multidimensional data that must be effectively interrogated and interpreted. A range of computational techniques for data mining can be applied to detect and explore data structure and to form functional predictions from large datasets. Here, two approaches for the computational analysis of RPPA data are detailed: the identification of similar patterns of protein expression by hierarchical cluster analysis and the modeling of protein interactions and signaling relationships by network analysis. The protocols use freely available, cross-platform software, are easy to implement, and do not require any programming expertise. Serving as data-driven starting points for further in-depth analysis, validation, and biological experimentation, these and related bioinformatic approaches can accelerate the functional interpretation of RPPA data.

  16. Analysis of Wide-Band Signals Using Wavelet Array Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisii, V.; Saccorotti, G.

    2005-12-01

    Wavelets transforms allow for precise time-frequency localization in the analysis of non-stationary signals. In wavelet analysis the trade-off between frequency bandwidth and time duration, also known as Heisenberg inequality, is by-passed using a fully scalable modulated window which solves the signal-cutting problem of Windowed Fourier Transform. We propose a new seismic array data processing procedure capable of displaying the localized spatial coherence of the signal in both the time- and frequency-domain, in turn deriving the propagation parameters of the most coherent signals crossing the array. The procedure consists in: a) Wavelet coherence analysis for each station pair of the instruments array, aimed at retrieving the frequency- and time-localisation of coherent signals. To this purpose, we use the normalised wavelet cross- power spectrum, smoothed along the time and scale domains. We calculate different coherence spectra adopting smoothing windows of increasing lengths; a final, robust estimate of the time-frequency localisation of spatially-coherent signals is eventually retrieved from the stack of the individual coherence distribution. This step allows for a quick and reliable signal discrimination: wave groups propagating across the network will manifest as high-coherence patches spanning the corresponding time-scale region. b) Once the signals have been localised in the time and frequency domain,their propagation parameters are estimated using a modified MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Characterization) algorithm. We select the MUSIC approach as it demonstrated superior performances in the case of low SNR signals, more plane waves contemporaneously impinging at the array and closely separated sources. The narrow-band Coherent Signal Subspace technique is applied to the complex Continuous Wavelet Transform of multichannel data for improving the singularity of the estimated cross-covariance matrix and the accuracy of the estimated signal eigenvectors. Using

  17. Analysis of the functional consequences of targeted exon deletion in COL7A1 reveals prospects for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bornert, Olivier; Kuhl, Tobias; Bremer, Jeroen; van den Akker, Peter C.; Pasmooij, Anna M. G.; Nystrom, Alexander

    Genetically evoked deficiency of collagen VII causes dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB)-a debilitating disease characterized by chronic skin fragility and progressive fibrosis. Removal of exons carrying frame-disrupting mutations can reinstate protein expression in genetic diseases. The

  18. SAVANT: Solar Array Verification and Analysis Tool Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chock, Ricaurte

    2000-01-01

    The photovoltaics (PV) industry is now being held to strict specifications, such as end-oflife power requirements, that force them to overengineer their products to avoid contractual penalties. Such overengineering has been the only reliable way to meet such specifications. Unfortunately, it also results in a more costly process than is probably necessary. In our conversations with the PV industry, the issue of cost has been raised again and again. Consequently, the Photovoltaics and Space Environment Effects branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has been developing a software tool to address this problem. SAVANT, Glenn's tool for solar array verification and analysis is in the technology demonstration phase. Ongoing work has proven that more efficient and less costly PV designs should be possible by using SAVANT to predict the on-orbit life-cycle performance. The ultimate goal of the SAVANT project is to provide a user-friendly computer tool to predict PV on-orbit life-cycle performance. This should greatly simplify the tasks of scaling and designing the PV power component of any given flight or mission. By being able to predict how a particular PV article will perform, designers will be able to balance mission power requirements (both beginning-of-life and end-of-life) with survivability concerns such as power degradation due to radiation and/or contamination. Recent comparisons with actual flight data from the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) mission validate this approach.

  19. Analysis of the modal behavior of an antiguide diode laser array with Talbot filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, P.D.; van Eijk, Pieter D.; Reglat, Muriel; Vassilief, Georges; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Driessen, A.; Mouthaan, A.J.

    An analysis of the filtering of the array modes in a resonant optical waveguide (ROW) array of antiguides by a diffractive spatial filter (a Talbot filter) is presented. A dispersion relation is derived for the array modes, allowing the calculation of the field distribution. The filtering is

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of WEC Array Layout Parameters Effect on the Power Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the effect that the array layout choice has on the power performance. To this end, a sensitivity analysis is carried out with six array layout parameters, as the simulation inputs, the array power performance (q-factor), as the simulation output, and a simulation model specially...

  1. Joint analysis of BICEP2/keck array and Planck Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, P A R; Aghanim, N; Ahmed, Z; Aikin, R W; Alexander, K D; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barkats, D; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Benton, S J; Bernard, J-P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Brevik, J A; Bucher, M; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Buza, V; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J-F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chary, R-R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Connors, J; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J-M; Désert, F-X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dowell, C D; Duband, L; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Dvorkin, C; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Filippini, J P; Finelli, F; Fliescher, S; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; Golwala, S R; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Hasselfield, M; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hilton, G C; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hristov, V V; Huffenberger, K M; Hui, H; Hurier, G; Irwin, K D; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Karakci, A; Karkare, K S; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kefeli, S; Keihänen, E; Kernasovskiy, S A; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kovac, J M; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kuo, C L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J-M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leitch, E M; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Lueker, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Mason, P; Matarrese, S; Megerian, K G; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M-A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Orlando, A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Pryke, C; Puget, J-L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Richter, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schwarz, R; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Sheehy, C D; Spencer, L D; Staniszewski, Z K; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A-S; Sygnet, J-F; Tauber, J A; Teply, G P; Terenzi, L; Thompson, K L; Toffolatti, L; Tolan, J E; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Turner, A D; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Vieregg, A G; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Weber, A C; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Yoon, K W; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-03-13

    We report the results of a joint analysis of data from BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck. BICEP2 and Keck Array have observed the same approximately 400  deg^{2} patch of sky centered on RA 0 h, Dec. -57.5°. The combined maps reach a depth of 57 nK deg in Stokes Q and U in a band centered at 150 GHz. Planck has observed the full sky in polarization at seven frequencies from 30 to 353 GHz, but much less deeply in any given region (1.2  μK deg in Q and U at 143 GHz). We detect 150×353 cross-correlation in B modes at high significance. We fit the single- and cross-frequency power spectra at frequencies ≥150  GHz to a lensed-ΛCDM model that includes dust and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio r), using a prior on the frequency spectral behavior of polarized dust emission from previous Planck analysis of other regions of the sky. We find strong evidence for dust and no statistically significant evidence for tensor modes. We probe various model variations and extensions, including adding a synchrotron component in combination with lower frequency data, and find that these make little difference to the r constraint. Finally, we present an alternative analysis which is similar to a map-based cleaning of the dust contribution, and show that this gives similar constraints. The final result is expressed as a likelihood curve for r, and yields an upper limit r_{0.05}<0.12 at 95% confidence. Marginalizing over dust and r, lensing B modes are detected at 7.0σ significance.

  2. Joint Analysis of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    BICEP2/Keck Collaboration; Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barkats, D.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Benton, S. J.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Brevik, J. A.; Bucher, M.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Buza, V.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Connors, J.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; De Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Dvorkin, C.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Filippini, J. P.; Finelli, F.; Fliescher, S.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; Golwala, S. R.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hasselfield, M.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hui, H.; Hurier, G.; Irwin, K. D.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kefeli, S.; Keihänen, E.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kovac, J. M.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leitch, E. M.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Lueker, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Mason, P.; Matarrese, S.; Megerian, K. G.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Pryke, C.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Richter, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schwarz, R.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Sheehy, C. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Teply, G. P.; Terenzi, L.; Thompson, K. L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tolan, J. E.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Turner, A. D.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Vieregg, A. G.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Weber, A. C.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Willmert, J.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.; Bicep2/Keck; Planck Collaborations

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of a joint analysis of data from BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck. BICEP2 and Keck Array have observed the same approximately 400 deg2 patch of sky centered on RA 0 h, Dec. -57.5 ° . The combined maps reach a depth of 57 nK deg in Stokes Q and U in a band centered at 150 GHz. Planck has observed the full sky in polarization at seven frequencies from 30 to 353 GHz, but much less deeply in any given region (1.2 μ K deg in Q and U at 143 GHz). We detect 150 ×353 cross-correlation in B modes at high significance. We fit the single- and cross-frequency power spectra at frequencies ≥150 GHz to a lensed-Λ CDM model that includes dust and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio r), using a prior on the frequency spectral behavior of polarized dust emission from previous Planck analysis of other regions of the sky. We find strong evidence for dust and no statistically significant evidence for tensor modes. We probe various model variations and extensions, including adding a synchrotron component in combination with lower frequency data, and find that these make little difference to the r constraint. Finally, we present an alternative analysis which is similar to a map-based cleaning of the dust contribution, and show that this gives similar constraints. The final result is expressed as a likelihood curve for r, and yields an upper limit r0.05confidence. Marginalizing over dust and r, lensing B modes are detected at 7.0 σ significance.

  3. Tracking the evolution of alternatively spliced exons within the Dscam family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vision Todd J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dscam gene in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, contains twenty-four exons, four of which are composed of tandem arrays that each undergo mutually exclusive alternative splicing (4, 6, 9 and 17, potentially generating 38,016 protein isoforms. This degree of transcript diversity has not been found in mammalian homologs of Dscam. We examined the molecular evolution of exons within this gene family to locate the point of divergence for this alternative splicing pattern. Results Using the fruit fly Dscam exons 4, 6, 9 and 17 as seed sequences, we iteratively searched sixteen genomes for homologs, and then performed phylogenetic analyses of the resulting sequences to examine their evolutionary history. We found homologs in the nematode, arthropod and vertebrate genomes, including homologs in several vertebrates where Dscam had not been previously annotated. Among these, only the arthropods contain homologs arranged in tandem arrays indicative of mutually exclusive splicing. We found no homologs to these exons within the Arabidopsis, yeast, tunicate or sea urchin genomes but homologs to several constitutive exons from fly Dscam were present within tunicate and sea urchin. Comparing the rate of turnover within the tandem arrays of the insect taxa (fruit fly, mosquito and honeybee, we found the variants within exons 4 and 17 are well conserved in number and spatial arrangement despite 248–283 million years of divergence. In contrast, the variants within exons 6 and 9 have undergone considerable turnover since these taxa diverged, as indicated by deeply branching taxon-specific lineages. Conclusion Our results suggest that at least one Dscam exon array may be an ancient duplication that predates the divergence of deuterostomes from protostomes but that there is no evidence for the presence of arrays in the common ancestor of vertebrates. The different patterns of conservation and turnover among the Dscam exon arrays

  4. Identification of novel candidate disease genes from de novo exonic copy number variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambin, Tomasz; Yuan, Bo; Bi, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Coban-Akdemir, Zeynep; Pursley, Amber N; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Marom, Ronit; Golla, Sailaja; Dengle, Lauren; Petrie, Heather G; Matalon, Reuben; Emrick, Lisa; Proud, Monica B; Treadwell-Deering, Diane; Chao, Hsiao-Tuan; Koillinen, Hannele; Brown, Chester; Urraca, Nora; Mostafavi, Roya; Bernes, Saunder; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Nugent, Kimberly M; Bader, Patricia I; Bellus, Gary; Cummings, Michael; Northrup, Hope; Ashfaq, Myla; Westman, Rachel; Wildin, Robert; Beck, Anita E; Immken, LaDonna; Elton, Lindsay; Varghese, Shaun; Buchanan, Edward; Faivre, Laurence; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Schaaf, Christian P; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Yang, Yaping; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Lalani, Seema R; Bacino, Carlos A; Beaudet, Arthur L; Breman, Amy M; Smith, Janice L; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lupski, James R; Patel, Ankita; Shaw, Chad A; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2017-09-21

    Exon-targeted microarrays can detect small (<1000 bp) intragenic copy number variants (CNVs), including those that affect only a single exon. This genome-wide high-sensitivity approach increases the molecular diagnosis for conditions with known disease-associated genes, enables better genotype-phenotype correlations, and facilitates variant allele detection allowing novel disease gene discovery. We retrospectively analyzed data from 63,127 patients referred for clinical chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) at Baylor Genetics laboratories, including 46,755 individuals tested using exon-targeted arrays, from 2007 to 2017. Small CNVs harboring a single gene or two to five non-disease-associated genes were identified; the genes involved were evaluated for a potential disease association. In this clinical population, among rare CNVs involving any single gene reported in 7200 patients (11%), we identified 145 de novo autosomal CNVs (117 losses and 28 intragenic gains), 257 X-linked deletion CNVs in males, and 1049 inherited autosomal CNVs (878 losses and 171 intragenic gains); 111 known disease genes were potentially disrupted by de novo autosomal or X-linked (in males) single-gene CNVs. Ninety-one genes, either recently proposed as candidate disease genes or not yet associated with diseases, were disrupted by 147 single-gene CNVs, including 37 de novo deletions and ten de novo intragenic duplications on autosomes and 100 X-linked CNVs in males. Clinical features in individuals with de novo or X-linked CNVs encompassing at most five genes (224 bp to 1.6 Mb in size) were compared to those in individuals with larger-sized deletions (up to 5 Mb in size) in the internal CMA database or loss-of-function single nucleotide variants (SNVs) detected by clinical or research whole-exome sequencing (WES). This enabled the identification of recently published genes (BPTF, NONO, PSMD12, TANGO2, and TRIP12), novel candidate disease genes (ARGLU1 and STK3), and further confirmation

  5. MATRIX DISCRIMINANT ANALYSIS WITH APPLICATION TO COLORIMETRIC SENSOR ARRAY DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wenxuan; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2015-09-01

    With the rapid development of nano-technology, a "colorimetric sensor array" (CSA) which is referred to as an optical electronic nose has been developed for the identification of toxicants. Unlike traditional sensors which rely on a single chemical interaction, CSA can measure multiple chemical interactions by using chemo-responsive dyes. The color changes of the chemo-responsive dyes are recorded before and after exposure to toxicants and serve as a template for classification. The color changes are digitalized in the form of a matrix with rows representing dye effects and columns representing the spectrum of colors. Thus, matrix-classification methods are highly desirable. In this article, we develop a novel classification method, matrix discriminant analysis (MDA), which is a generalization of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) for the data in matrix form. By incorporating the intrinsic matrix-structure of the data in discriminant analysis, the proposed method can improve CSA's sensitivity and more importantly, specificity. A penalized MDA method, PMDA, is also introduced to further incorporate sparsity structure in discriminant function. Numerical studies suggest that the proposed MDA and PMDA methods outperform LDA and other competing discriminant methods for matrix predictors. The asymptotic consistency of MDA is also established. R code and data are available online as supplementary material.

  6. arrayCGHbase: an analysis platform for comparative genomic hybridization microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Yves

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of the human genome sequence as well as the large number of physically accessible oligonucleotides, cDNA, and BAC clones across the entire genome has triggered and accelerated the use of several platforms for analysis of DNA copy number changes, amongst others microarray comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH. One of the challenges inherent to this new technology is the management and analysis of large numbers of data points generated in each individual experiment. Results We have developed arrayCGHbase, a comprehensive analysis platform for arrayCGH experiments consisting of a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment supportive database using MySQL underlying a data mining web tool, to store, analyze, interpret, compare, and visualize arrayCGH results in a uniform and user-friendly format. Following its flexible design, arrayCGHbase is compatible with all existing and forthcoming arrayCGH platforms. Data can be exported in a multitude of formats, including BED files to map copy number information on the genome using the Ensembl or UCSC genome browser. Conclusion ArrayCGHbase is a web based and platform independent arrayCGH data analysis tool, that allows users to access the analysis suite through the internet or a local intranet after installation on a private server. ArrayCGHbase is available at http://medgen.ugent.be/arrayCGHbase/.

  7. [Comparative study of prenatal diagnosis with single nucleotide polymorphism array and karyotype analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ling; Zhao, Nan; Wei, Yuan; Zhong, Su; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2014-10-18

    To compare the roles of single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP array) and karyotype analysis in high-risk pregnant women prenatal diagnosis. From July 2012 to December 2013, a total of 141 pregnant women with high-risk in prenatal diagnosis were selected as the object of study in Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, 78 cases of umbilical cord puncture and 63 of amnion cavity puncture , both taking SNP array detection and karyotype analysis. The abnormality karyotype rate was 6.4%, the abnormal rate of SNP array result was 11.3%, and the abnormal rate of the combined two methods for detecting was 12.1%. There were significant differences between the SNP array and karyotype analysis (P=0.039). There were obvious differences between the two techniques. It is an effective way to determine genetic disease by integrating SNP array and karyotype analysis in prenatal diagnosis.

  8. Approximate Methods in the Analysis of Conformal Array Antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Gerini, G.

    2000-01-01

    Conformal array antennas are required whenever an antenna must be located on a vehicle, e.g. the skin of an aircraft, missile or superstructure of a ship. Conforming the array antenna to the existing structure avoids compromising aerodynamic or stealth characteristics, but at the cost of an increase

  9. Integrated dynamic analysis simulation of space stations with controllable solar arrays (supplemental data and analyses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, J. A.; Fee, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Space station and solar array data and the analyses which were performed in support of the integrated dynamic analysis study. The analysis methods and the formulated digital simulation were developed. Control systems for space station altitude control and solar array orientation control include generic type control systems. These systems have been digitally coded and included in the simulation.

  10. Analysis of three-component ambient vibration array measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fäh, Donat; Stamm, Gabriela; Havenith, Hans-Balder

    2008-01-01

    Both synthetic and observed ambient vibration array data are analysed using high-resolution beam-forming. In addition to a classical analysis of the vertical component, this paper presents results derived from processing horizontal components. We analyse phase velocities of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh and Love waves, and particle motions (ellipticity) retrieved from H/V spectral ratios. A combined inversion with a genetic algorithm and a strategy for selecting possible model parameters allow us to define structural models explaining the data. The results from synthetic data for simple models with one or two layers of sediments suggest that, in most cases, the number of layers has to be reduced to a few sediment strata to find the original structure. Generally, reducing the number of soft-sediment layers in the inversion process with genetic algorithms leads to a class of models that are less smooth. They have a stronger impedance contrast between sediments and bedrock. Combining Love and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves with the ellipticity of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves has some advantages. Scatter is reduced when compared to using structural models obtained only from Rayleigh wave phase velocity curves. By adding information from Love waves some structures can be excluded. Another possibility for constraining inversion results is to include supplementary geological or borehole information. Analysing radial components also can provide segments of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves for modes not seen on the vertical component. Finally, using ellipticity information allows us to confine the total depth of the soft sediments. For real sites, considerable variability in the measured phase velocity curves is observed. This comes from lateral changes in the structure or seismic sources within the array. Constraining the inversion by combining Love and Rayleigh wave information can help reduce such problems. Frequency bands in which the Rayleigh wave

  11. Faster Array Training and Rapid Analysis for a Sensor Array Intended for an Event Monitor in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, A. V.; Fonollosa, J.; Huerta, R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental monitoring, in particular, air monitoring, is a critical need for human space flight. Both monitoring and life support systems have needs for closed loop process feedback and quality control for environmental factors. Monitoring protects the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew and different sensors help ensure that the habitat falls within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the farther the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. There is an acknowledged need for an event monitor which samples the air continuously and provides near real-time information on changes in the air. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will incorporate transient sensor responses in the analysis. Preliminary work has already showed more rapid quantification and identification of analytes and the potential for faster training time of the array. We will look at some of the factors that contribute to demonstrating faster training time for the array. Faster training will decrease the integrated sensor exposure to training analytes, which will also help extend sensor lifetime.

  12. Microsatellite and mini-exon analysis of Mexican human DTU I Trypanosoma cruzi strains and their susceptibility to nifurtimox and benznidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ignacio; Nogueda, Benjamín; Martínez-Hernández, Fernando; Espinoza, Bertha

    2013-03-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, and it affects as many as 10 million people in North and South America, where it represents a major public health problem. T. cruzi is a parasite with high genetic diversity, and it has been grouped into 6 discrete typing units (DTUs), designated as T. cruzi I (TcI) to T. cruzi VI (TcVI). Mexican isolates from humans and from vector insects have been primarily found to be TcI, and these isolates are likely to be the strains that cause the clinical manifestations observed in Mexico. However, genetic characterization and drug susceptibility assays are limited in Mexican TcI strains. In this work, 24 Mexican T. cruzi strains, obtained primarily from humans, were studied with 7 locus microsatellites and mini-exon gene by PCR. Also, drug susceptibility was evaluated by growth and mobility assays. All of the human strains belonged to TcI, and they could be further grouped through microsatellite analysis into 2 subgroups (microsatellite genotypes 1 and 2), which were not related to the host clinical status or biological origin of the strain. Two strains, both from wild mammals, belonged to the TcII-TcVI groups; these strains and the CL Brener strain constituted microsatellite genotype 3. The number of alleles in each locus was lower than reported for South American strains, and a departure from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed. The susceptibility of these strains to nifurtimox and benznidazole was heterogeneous. T. cruzi strains characterized as microsatellite genotypes 2 and 3 were significantly more susceptible to benznidazole than strains of microsatellite genotype 1. Only 1 Mexican strain resistant to both drugs was found in this study.

  13. EM design and analysis of dipole arrays on non-planar dielectric substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a simple and systematic description of EM design of antenna arrays. Printed dipole antennas are known to be simple yet more efficient than wire antennas. The dielectric substrate and the presence of ground plane affect the antenna performance and the resonant frequency is shifted. This book includes the EM design and performance analysis of printed dipole arrays on planar and cylindrical substrates. The antenna element is taken as half-wave centre-fed dipole. The substrate is taken as low-loss dielectric. The effect of substrate material, ground plane, and the curvature effect is discussed. Results are presented for both the linear and planar dipole arrays. The performance of dipole array is analyzed in terms of input impedance, return loss, and radiation pattern for different configurations. The effect of curved platform (substrate and ground plane) on the radiation behaviour of dipole array is analyzed. The book explains fundamentals of EM design and analysis of dipole antenna array throu...

  14. Screening of WT1 mutations in exon 8 and 9 in children with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome from a single centre and establishment of a rapid screening assay using high-resolution melting analysis in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siji, Annes; Pardeshi, Varsha Chhotusing; Ravindran, Shilpa; Vasudevan, Ambily; Vasudevan, Anil

    2017-01-10

    Mutations in Wilm's tumor 1 (WT1) gene is one of the commonly reported genetic mutations in children with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). We report the results of direct sequencing of exons 8 and 9 of WT1 gene in 100 children with SRNS from a single centre. We standardized and validated High Resolution Melt (HRM) as a rapid and cost effective screening step to identify individuals with normal sequence and distinguish it from those with a potential mutation. Since only mutation positive samples identified by HRM will be further processed for sequencing it will help in reducing the sequencing burden and speed up the screening process. One hundred SRNS children were screened for WT1 mutations in Exon 8 and 9 using Sanger sequencing. HRM assay was standardized and validated by performing analysis for exon 8 and 9 on 3 healthy control and 5 abnormal variants created by site directed mutagenesis and verified by sequencing. To further test the clinical applicability of the assay, we screened additional 91 samples for HRM testing and performed a blinded assessment. WT1 mutations were not observed in the cohort of children with SRNS. The results of HRM analysis were concordant with the sequencing results. The WT1 gene mutations were not observed in the SRNS cohort indicating it has a low prevalence. We propose applying this simple, rapid and cost effective assay using HRM technique as the first step for screening the WT1 gene hot spot region in a clinical setting.

  15. Design and Analysis of Printed Reflectarrays with Irregularly Positioned Array Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Min; Sørensen, Stig; Meincke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The design and analysis of printed reflectarrays with irregularly positioned array elements is presented. An accurate and efficient power pattern synthesis procedure, based on the Local Periodicity approach (LP) and the minimax optimization algorithm has been implemented. The analysis accuracy...

  16. HAT: Hypergeometric Analysis of Tiling-arrays with application to promoter-GeneChip data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Taskesen (Erdogan); R. Beekman (Renée); J. de Ridder (Jeroen); B.J. Wouters (Bas); J. Peeters (Justine); I.P. Touw (Ivo); M.J.T. Reinders (Marcel); H.R. Delwel (Ruud)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Tiling-arrays are applicable to multiple types of biological research questions. Due to its advantages (high sensitivity, resolution, unbiased), the technology is often employed in genome-wide investigations. A major challenge in the analysis of tiling-array data is to define

  17. HAT : Hypergeometric Analysis of Tiling-arrays with application to promoter-GeneChip data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taskesen, E.; Beekman, R.; De Ridder, J.; Wouters, B.J.; Peeters, J.K.; Touw, I.P.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Delwel, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tiling-arrays are applicable to multiple types of biological research questions. Due to its advantages (high sensitivity, resolution, unbiased), the technology is often employed in genome-wide investigations. A major challenge in the analysis of tiling-array data is to define

  18. Open-array analysis of genetic variants in Egyptian patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hanaa R.M. Attia

    Methods: Genotyping was performed using OpenArray® protocol on the QuantStudioTM 12K Flex Real-. Time PCR System. In the present case control study a custom array was designed to facilitate cost- effective analysis of selected SNPs related to glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, inflammation, insulin signalling, and immune ...

  19. Precise Analysis of Array Usage in Scientific Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manjunathaiah

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The automatic transformation of sequential programs for efficient execution on parallel computers involves a number of analyses and restructurings of the input. Some of these analyses are based on computing array sections, a compact description of a range of array elements. Array sections describe the set of array elements that are either read or written by program statements. These sections can be compactly represented using shape descriptors such as regular sections, simple sections, or generalized convex regions. However, binary operations such as Union performed on these representations do not satisfy a straightforward closure property, e.g., if the operands to Union are convex, the result may be nonconvex. Approximations are resorted to in order to satisfy this closure property. These approximations introduce imprecision in the analyses and, furthermore, the imprecisions resulting from successive operations have a cumulative effect. Delayed merging is a technique suggested and used in some of the existing analyses to minimize the effects of approximation. However, this technique does not guarantee an exact solution in a general setting. This article presents a generalized technique to precisely compute Union which can overcome these imprecisions.

  20. Microcantilever array instrument based on optical fiber and performance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangping; Wu, Lin; Li, Chao; Wu, Shangquan; Zhang, Qingchuan

    2017-07-01

    We developed a microcantilever array biosensor instrument based on optical readout from a microcantilever array in fluid environment. The microcantilever signals were read out sequentially by laser beams emitted from eight optical fibers. The optical fibers were coupled to lasers, while the other ends of the fibers were embedded in eight V-grooves with 250 μm pitch microfabricated from a Si wafer. Aspherical lens was used to keep the distance between lasers. A programmable logic controller was used to make the system work stably. To make sure that the output of lasers was stable, a temperature controller was set up for each laser. When the deflection signal was collected, lasers used here were set to be on for at least 400 ms in each scanning cycle to get high signal-to-noise ratio deflection curves. A test was performed by changing the temperature of the liquid cell holding a microcantilever array to verify the consistent response of the instrument to the cantilever deflections. The stability and conformance of the instrument were demonstrated by quantitative detection of mercury ions in aqueous solution and comparison detection of clenbuterol by setting test and reference cantilevers. This microcantilever array detection instrument can be applied to highly sensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules in fluid environment.

  1. Analysis and simulation tools for solar array power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongratananukul, Nattorn

    This dissertation presents simulation tools developed specifically for the design of solar array power systems. Contributions are made in several aspects of the system design phases, including solar source modeling, system simulation, and controller verification. A tool to automate the study of solar array configurations using general purpose circuit simulators has been developed based on the modeling of individual solar cells. Hierarchical structure of solar cell elements, including semiconductor properties, allows simulation of electrical properties as well as the evaluation of the impact of environmental conditions. A second developed tool provides a co-simulation platform with the capability to verify the performance of an actual digital controller implemented in programmable hardware such as a DSP processor, while the entire solar array including the DC-DC power converter is modeled in software algorithms running on a computer. This "virtual plant" allows developing and debugging code for the digital controller, and also to improve the control algorithm. One important task in solar arrays is to track the maximum power point on the array in order to maximize the power that can be delivered. Digital controllers implemented with programmable processors are particularly attractive for this task because sophisticated tracking algorithms can be implemented and revised when needed to optimize their performance. The proposed co-simulation tools are thus very valuable in developing and optimizing the control algorithm, before the system is built. Examples that demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodologies are presented. The proposed simulation tools are also valuable in the design of multi-channel arrays. In the specific system that we have designed and tested, the control algorithm is implemented on a single digital signal processor. In each of the channels the maximum power point is tracked individually. In the prototype we built, off

  2. Array2BIO: A Comprehensive Suite of Utilities for the Analysis of Microarray Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Chain, P G; Mabery, S; Rasley, A; Garcia, E; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-02-13

    We have developed an integrative and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray data, named Array2BIO. It identifies groups of coexpressed genes using two complementary approaches--comparative analysis of signal versus control microarrays and clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on the Gene Ontology classification, and a detection of corresponding KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods to quantify the odds of observations, including the Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. Automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis of identified gene loci while the interconnection with Creme allows high-throughput analysis of human promoter regions and prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie the observed expression patterns. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  3. Comparative analysis of copy number detection by whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bejjani Bassem A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH is a powerful diagnostic tool for the detection of DNA copy number gains and losses associated with chromosome abnormalities, many of which are below the resolution of conventional chromosome analysis. It has been presumed that whole-genome oligonucleotide (oligo arrays identify more clinically significant copy-number abnormalities than whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays, yet this has not been systematically studied in a clinical diagnostic setting. Results To determine the difference in detection rate between similarly designed BAC and oligo arrays, we developed whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide microarrays and validated them in a side-by-side comparison of 466 consecutive clinical specimens submitted to our laboratory for aCGH. Of the 466 cases studied, 67 (14.3% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome BAC array, and 73 (15.6% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome oligo array. However, because both platforms identified copy number variants of unclear clinical significance, we designed a systematic method for the interpretation of copy number alterations and tested an additional 3,443 cases by BAC array and 3,096 cases by oligo array. Of those cases tested on the BAC array, 17.6% were found to have a copy-number abnormality of potential clinical significance, whereas the detection rate increased to 22.5% for the cases tested by oligo array. In addition, we validated the oligo array for detection of mosaicism and found that it could routinely detect mosaicism at levels of 30% and greater. Conclusions Although BAC arrays have faster turnaround times, the increased detection rate of oligo arrays makes them attractive for clinical cytogenetic testing.

  4. Exon silencing by UAGG motifs in response to neuronal excitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping An

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays fundamental roles in neurons by generating functional diversity in proteins associated with the communication and connectivity of the synapse. The CI cassette of the NMDA R1 receptor is one of a variety of exons that show an increase in exon skipping in response to cell excitation, but the molecular nature of this splicing responsiveness is not yet understood. Here we investigate the molecular basis for the induced changes in splicing of the CI cassette exon in primary rat cortical cultures in response to KCl-induced depolarization using an expression assay with a tight neuron-specific readout. In this system, exon silencing in response to neuronal excitation was mediated by multiple UAGG-type silencing motifs, and transfer of the motifs to a constitutive exon conferred a similar responsiveness by gain of function. Biochemical analysis of protein binding to UAGG motifs in extracts prepared from treated and mock-treated cortical cultures showed an increase in nuclear hnRNP A1-RNA binding activity in parallel with excitation. Evidence for the role of the NMDA receptor and calcium signaling in the induced splicing response was shown by the use of specific antagonists, as well as cell-permeable inhibitors of signaling pathways. Finally, a wider role for exon-skipping responsiveness is shown to involve additional exons with UAGG-related silencing motifs, and transcripts involved in synaptic functions. These results suggest that, at the post-transcriptional level, excitable exons such as the CI cassette may be involved in strategies by which neurons mount adaptive responses to hyperstimulation.

  5. ArrayQuest: a web resource for the analysis of DNA microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Jeremy L

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous microarray analysis programs have been created through the efforts of Open Source software development projects. Providing browser-based interfaces that allow these programs to be executed over the Internet enhances the applicability and utility of these analytic software tools. Results Here we present ArrayQuest, a web-based DNA microarray analysis process controller. Key features of ArrayQuest are that (1 it is capable of executing numerous analysis programs such as those written in R, BioPerl and C++; (2 new analysis programs can be added to ArrayQuest Methods Library at the request of users or developers; (3 input DNA microarray data can be selected from public databases (i.e., the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC DNA Microarray Database or Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO or it can be uploaded to the ArrayQuest center-point web server into a password-protected area; and (4 analysis jobs are distributed across computers configured in a backend cluster. To demonstrate the utility of ArrayQuest we have populated the methods library with methods for analysis of Affymetrix DNA microarray data. Conclusion ArrayQuest enables browser-based implementation of DNA microarray data analysis programs that can be executed on a Linux-based platform. Importantly, ArrayQuest is a platform that will facilitate the distribution and implementation of new analysis algorithms and is therefore of use to both developers of analysis applications as well as users. ArrayQuest is freely available for use at http://proteogenomics.musc.edu/arrayquest.html.

  6. Short Exon Detection via Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Guishan; Shen, Yuanyu; Chen, Miaomiao; Zhao, Jiaxiang; Wu, Renhua

    2016-01-01

    The detection of short exons is a challenging open problem in the field of bioinformatics. Due to the fact that the weakness of existing model-independent methods lies in their inability to reliably detect small exons, a model-independent method based on the singularity detection with wavelet transform modulus maxima has been developed for detecting short coding sequences (exons) in eukaryotic DNA sequences. In the analysis of our method, the local maxima can capture and characterize singularities of short exons, which helps to yield significant patterns that are rarely observed with the traditional methods. In order to get some information about singularities on the differences between the exon signal and the background noise, the noise level is estimated by filtering the genomic sequence through a notch filter. Meanwhile, a fast method based on a piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial is applied to reconstruct the wavelet coefficients for improving the computational efficiency. In addition, the output measure of a paired-numerical representation calculated in both forward and reverse directions is used to incorporate a useful DNA structural property. The performances of our approach and other techniques are evaluated on two benchmark data sets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms all assessed model-independent methods for detecting short exons in terms of evaluation metrics.

  7. Short Exon Detection via Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Zhang

    Full Text Available The detection of short exons is a challenging open problem in the field of bioinformatics. Due to the fact that the weakness of existing model-independent methods lies in their inability to reliably detect small exons, a model-independent method based on the singularity detection with wavelet transform modulus maxima has been developed for detecting short coding sequences (exons in eukaryotic DNA sequences. In the analysis of our method, the local maxima can capture and characterize singularities of short exons, which helps to yield significant patterns that are rarely observed with the traditional methods. In order to get some information about singularities on the differences between the exon signal and the background noise, the noise level is estimated by filtering the genomic sequence through a notch filter. Meanwhile, a fast method based on a piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial is applied to reconstruct the wavelet coefficients for improving the computational efficiency. In addition, the output measure of a paired-numerical representation calculated in both forward and reverse directions is used to incorporate a useful DNA structural property. The performances of our approach and other techniques are evaluated on two benchmark data sets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms all assessed model-independent methods for detecting short exons in terms of evaluation metrics.

  8. Multipath propagation of low‐frequency radio waves inferred from high‐resolution array analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Füllekrug, Martin; Smith, Nathan; Mezentsev, Andrew; Watson, Robert; Astin, Ivan; Gaffet, Stéphane; Evans, Adrian; Rycroft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we report a thorough high‐resolution analysis of radio waves from low‐frequency (∼20–150 kHz) radio communication transmitters which are recorded with a small aperture array of radio receivers during the day...

  9. Electromagnetic linear machines with dual Halbach array design and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Liang; Peng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Lei; Jiao, Zongxia

    2017-01-01

    This book extends the conventional two-dimensional (2D) magnet arrangement into 3D pattern for permanent magnet linear machines for the first time, and proposes a novel dual Halbach array. It can not only effectively increase the radial component of magnetic flux density and output force of tubular linear machines, but also significantly reduce the axial flux density, radial force and thus system vibrations and noises. The book is also the first to address the fundamentals and provide a summary of conventional arrays, as well as novel concepts for PM pole design in electric linear machines. It covers theoretical study, numerical simulation, design optimization and experimental works systematically. The design concept and analytical approaches can be implemented to other linear and rotary machines with similar structures. The book will be of interest to academics, researchers, R&D engineers and graduate students in electronic engineering and mechanical engineering who wish to learn the core principles, met...

  10. 11p15-subband specific search for transcribed sequences using exon trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebbert, R.; Prawitt, D. [Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Monroe, D. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Evidence from cytogenetic and molecular data suggest that the region 11p15 contains genes involved in different disorders, like Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), long QT syndrome (LQT), Usher syndrome type I and tumor development. Focusing on the subregion 11p15.1, we are isolating and characterizing new transcribed sequences. The applied strategy includes exon amplification and subsequent PCR screening of cDNA libraries. So far 100 YACs and 38 cosmid clones from 11p15.1-15.3 have been collected and are currently arrayed. 16 cosmids have been analyzed for transcribed sequences using the exon amplification scheme developed by Buckler et al. (1991). We were able to identify 18 exons that contain correct open reading frames and map back to the cosmid clones. A data base search revealed that two exons represent parts of known genes from this region (ST5 and AMPD3). Moreover, we identified one exon that represents an EGF-like repeat with homologies to various proteins. Using PCR and primers from the exon sequences, a fetal brain library, which has been arranged in the form of hierarchic arrayed phage pools, was screened. Up to now, two cDNA clones corresponding to different exons were isolated and are currently sequenced.

  11. Genetic analysis of presbycusis by arrayed primer extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Ballay, Charles; Inserra, Michelle; Stidham, Katrina; Colen, Tahl; Roberson, Joseph; Gardner, Phyllis; Schrijver, Iris

    2008-01-01

    Using the Hereditary Hearing Loss arrayed primer extension (APEX) array, which contains 198 mutations across 8 hearing loss-associated genes (GJB2, GJB6, GJB3, GJA1, SLC26A4, SLC26A5, 12S-rRNA, and tRNA Ser), we compared the frequency of sequence variants in 94 individuals with early presbycusis to 50 unaffected controls and aimed to identify possible genetic contributors. This cross-sectional study was performed at Stanford University with presbycusis samples from the California Ear Institute. The patients were between ages 20 and 65 yr, with adult-onset sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology, and carried a clinical diagnosis of early presbycusis. Exclusion criteria comprised known causes of hearing loss such as significant noise exposure, trauma, ototoxic medication, neoplasm, and congenital infection or syndrome, as well as congenital or pediatric onset. Sequence changes were identified in 11.7% and 10% of presbycusis and control alleles, respectively. Among the presbycusis group, these solely occurred within the GJB2 and SLC26A4 genes. Homozygous and compound heterozygous pathogenic mutations were exclusively seen in affected individuals. We were unable to detect a statistically significant difference between our control and affected populations regarding the frequency of sequence variants detected with the APEX array. Individuals who carry two mild mutations in the GJB2 gene possibly have an increased risk of developing early presbycusis.

  12. Simplicity of core arrays in three-way principal component analysis and the typical rank of p x q x 2 arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Berge, Jos M.F.; Kiers, Henk A.L.

    1999-01-01

    Interpreting the solution of a Principal Component Analysis of a three-way array is greatly simplified when the core array has a large number of zero elements. The possibility of achieving this has recently been explored by rotations to simplicity or to simple targets on the one hand, and by

  13. [Unexpected discovery of a fetus with DMD gene deletion using single nucleotide polymorphism array].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaobin; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Bingyi; Gu, Heng

    2017-08-10

    To investigate the value of single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP array) for the identification of de novo mutations in the DMD gene among fetuses. G-banded karyotyping and SNP array were performed on a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction but without family history of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was subsequently applied on amniocytes and maternal peripheral blood sample to detect DMD gene deletion/duplication mutations. Karyotyping of amniocytes showed a normal 46, XY karyotype. SNP array on amniocytes detected a 116 kb deletion (chrX: 32 455 741-32 571 504) at Xp21.1 with breakpoints at introns 16 and 30 respectively, encompassing exons 17-29 of the DMD gene. In addition, MLPA analysis of the DMD gene on amniocytes confirmed the deletion of exons 17 to 29 identified by SNP array. However, no deletion/duplication mutation was detected by MLPA in the mother. The de novo deletion of exons 17 to 29 of the DMD gene detected in the fetus may result in BMD or DMD. SNP array can improve the efficiency for detecting genomic disorders in fetuses with unidentified pathogenic genes, negative family history and nonspecific phenotypes.

  14. Vertical nanowire arrays as a versatile platform for protein detection and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Katrine R.; Frederiksen, Rune S.; Liu, Yi-Chi

    2013-01-01

    the NWs unnecessary. Fluorescence detection of proteins allows quantitative measurements and spatial resolution, enabling us to track individual NWs through several analytical steps, thereby allowing multiplexed detection of different proteins immobilized on different regions of the NW array. We use NW...... solutions. Here we show that vertical arrays of nanowires (NWs) can overcome several bottlenecks of using nanoarrays for extraction and analysis of proteins. The high aspect ratio of the NWs results in a large surface area available for protein immobilization and renders passivation of the surface between...... arrays for on-chip extraction, detection and functional analysis of proteins on a nano-scale platform that holds great promise for performing protein analysis on minute amounts of material. The demonstration made here on highly ordered arrays of indium arsenide (InAs) NWs is generic and can be extended...

  15. Alignment error analysis of detector array for spatial heterodyne spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wei; Chen, Di-Hu; Li, Zhi-Wei; Luo, Hai-Yan; Hong, Jin

    2017-12-10

    Spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS) is a new spatial interference spectroscopy which can achieve high spectral resolution. The alignment error of the detector array can lead to a significant influence with the spectral resolution of a SHS system. Theoretical models for analyzing the alignment errors which are divided into three kinds are presented in this paper. Based on these models, the tolerance angle of these errors has been given, respectively. The result of simulation experiments shows that when the angle of slope error, tilt error, and rotation error are less than 1.21°, 1.21°, 0.066° respectively, the alignment reaches an acceptable level.

  16. Exonization of the LTR transposable elements in human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodovsky Mark

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons have been shown to contribute to evolution of both structure and regulation of protein coding genes. It has been postulated that the primary mechanism by which retrotransposons contribute to structural gene evolution is through insertion into an intron or a gene flanking region, and subsequent incorporation into an exon. Results We found that Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons are associated with 1,057 human genes (5.8%. In 256 cases LTR retrotransposons were observed in protein-coding regions, while 50 distinct protein coding exons in 45 genes were comprised exclusively of LTR RetroTransposon Sequence (LRTS. We go on to reconstruct the evolutionary history of an alternatively spliced exon of the Interleukin 22 receptor, alpha 2 gene (IL22RA2 derived from a sequence of retrotransposon of the Mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposons (MaLR family. Sequencing and analysis of the homologous regions of genomes of several primates indicate that the LTR retrotransposon was inserted into the IL22RA2 gene at least prior to the divergence of Apes and Old World monkeys from a common ancestor (~25 MYA. We hypothesize that the recruitment of the part of LTR as a novel exon in great ape species occurred prior to the divergence of orangutans and humans from a common ancestor (~14 MYA as a result of a single mutation in the proto-splice site. Conclusion Our analysis of LRTS exonization events has shown that the patterns of LRTS distribution in human exons support the hypothesis that LRTS played a significant role in human gene evolution by providing cis-regulatory sequences; direct incorporation of LTR sequences into protein coding regions was observed less frequently. Combination of computational and experimental approaches used for tracing the history of the LTR exonization process of IL22RA2 gene presents a promising strategy that could facilitate further studies of transposon initiated gene evolution.

  17. Exon and junction microarrays detect widespread mouse strain- and sex-bias expression differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schadt Eric E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that genetic and sex differences strongly influence gene expression in mice. Given the diversity and complexity of transcripts produced by alternative splicing, we sought to use microarrays to establish the extent of variation found in mouse strains and genders. Here, we surveyed the effect of strain and sex on liver gene and exon expression using male and female mice from three different inbred strains. Results 71 liver RNA samples from three mouse strains – DBA/2J, C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ – were profiled using a custom-designed microarray monitoring exon and exon-junction expression of 1,020 genes representing 9,406 exons. Gene expression was calculated via two different methods, using the 3'-most exon probe ("3' gene expression profiling" and using all probes associated with the gene ("whole-transcript gene expression profiling", while exon expression was determined using exon probes and flanking junction probes that spanned across the neighboring exons ("exon expression profiling". Widespread strain and sex influences were detected using a two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA regardless of the profiling method used. However, over 90% of the genes identified in 3' gene expression profiling or whole transcript profiling were identified in exon profiling, along with 75% and 38% more genes, respectively, showing evidence of differential isoform expression. Overall, 55% and 32% of genes, respectively, exhibited strain- and sex-bias differential gene or exon expression. Conclusion Exon expression profiling identifies significantly more variation than both 3' gene expression profiling and whole-transcript gene expression profiling. A large percentage of genes that are not differentially expressed at the gene level demonstrate exon expression variation suggesting an influence of strain and sex on alternative splicing and a need to profile expression changes at sub-gene resolution.

  18. Thermal Analysis of Implant-Defined Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Meng; Xu, Chen; Xie, Yi-Yang; Deng, Jun; Xu, Kun; Chen, Hong-Da

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional electrical-thermal coupling model based on the finite element method is applied to study thermal properties of implant-defined vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays. Several parameters including inter-element spacing, scales, injected current density and substrate temperature are considered. The actual temperatures obtained through experiment are in excellent agreement with the calculated results, which proves the accuracy of the model. Due to the serious thermal problem, it is essential to design arrays of low self-heating. The analysis can provide a foundation for designing VCSEL arrays in the future.

  19. Enhanced Performance Analysis of Inter-aircraft Optical Wireless Communication Link Using Array of Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mehtab

    2017-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of various parameters on the performance of inter-aircraft optical wireless communication (IaOWC) link. Also, an improved performance analysis of a 2.5 Gbps IaOWC link using an array of photodetectors at the receiver terminal has been reported. The results show an increase in the SNR and total power of the received signal at a link distance of 100 km by deploying a photodetector array at the receiver terminal.

  20. Array analysis of regional Pn and Pg wavefields from the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, M.A. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Small-aperture high-frequency seismic arrays with dimensions of a few kilometers or less, can improve our ability to seismically monitor compliance with a low-yield Threshold Test Ban Treaty. This work studies the characteristics and effectiveness of array processing of the regional Pn and Pg wavefields generated by underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. Waveform data from the explosion HARDIN (m{sub b} = 5.5) is recorded at a temporary 12-element, 3-component, 1.5 km-aperture array sited in an area of northern Nevada. The explosions VILLE (m{sub b} = 4.4) and SALUT (m{sub b} = 5.5) are recorded at two arrays sited in the Mojave desert, one a 96-element vertical-component 7 km-aperture array and the other a 155-element vertical-component 4 km-aperture array. Among the mean spectra for the m{sub b} = 5.5 events there are significant differences in low-frequency spectral amplitudes between array sites. The spectra become nearly identical beyond about 6 Hz. Spectral ratios are used to examine seismic source properties and the partitioning of energy between Pn and Pg. Frequency-wavenumber analysis at the 12-element array is used to obtain estimates of signal gain, phase velocity, and source azimuth. This analysis reveals frequency-dependent biases in velocity and azimuth of the coherent Pn and Pg arrivals. Signal correlation, the principal factor governing array performance, is examined in terms of spatial coherence estimates. The coherence is found to vary between the three sites. In all cases the coherence of Pn is greater than that for Pg. 81 refs., 92 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Nanomolar Trace Metal Analysis of Copper at Gold Microband Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, A; Dawson, K; Sassiat, N; Quinn, A J; O' Riordan, A, E-mail: alan.oriordan@tyndall.ie [Nanotechnology Group, Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    This paper describes the fabrication and electrochemical characterization of gold microband electrode arrays designated as a highly sensitive sensor for trace metal detection of copper in drinking water samples. Gold microband electrodes have been routinely fabricated by standard photolithographic methods. Electrochemical characterization were conducted in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and found to display characteristic gold oxide formation and reduction peaks. The advantages of gold microband electrodes as trace metal sensors over currently used methods have been investigated by employing under potential deposition anodic stripping voltammetry (UPD-ASV) in Cu{sup 2+} nanomolar concentrations. Linear correlations were observed for increasing Cu{sup 2+} concentrations from which the concentration of an unknown sample of drinking water was estimated. The results obtained for the estimation of the unknown trace copper concentration in drinking was in good agreement with expected values.

  2. Theoretical analysis of optical conveyor belt with plasmonic nanodisk array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhun; Kim, Donghyun

    2017-07-01

    Plasmonic optical trapping allows trapping and manipulation of micro- and even nanometer-sized particles using localized and enhanced electric fields by plasmon resonance in metallic nanostructure. We consider an optical conveyor belt consisting of an array of nanodisks acting as optical tweezers with different sizes to implement a system to trap and manipulate particles through a laser-induced gradient force. An electric field induced and localized at each optical resonator is sensitive to the wavelength and polarization. The maximum electric field is enhanced at resonant wavelength depending on the shape and size of the plasmonic nanostructure used for light localization. By changing the light wavelength and polarization, the position of localized light induced in the disk can be determined and nanoparticles can be moved to a desired location through the variation of resonance conditions without any mechanical forces.

  3. A PCR-based integrated protocol for the structural analysis of the 13th exon of the human beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7): development of a diagnostic tool for HCM disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Zapheiropoulos, Athanassios Z; Voutsinas, Gerassimos; Margaritis, Lukas H; Papassideri, Issidora S

    2008-06-01

    Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) constitutes a genetic disease of the sarcomere characterized by a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. A variety of different mutations affecting the at least eight sarcomeric gene products has been identified and the majority of them appear to function through a dominant negative mechanism. Family history analysis and genetic counseling have been widely adopted as integral tools for the evaluation and management of individuals with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Genetic testing of the disease has been progressively released into the clinical mainstream, thus rendering the development of novel and potent molecular diagnostic protocols an inevitable task. To this direction, we have evolved an integrated PCR-based molecular protocol, which through the utilization of novel "exonic" primers allows, among others, the structural analysis of the 13th exon of the human beta-myosin heavy chain gene locus (MYH7) mainly characterized by the critical for HCM Arginine residue 403 (R(403)). Interestingly, through a DNA sequencing approach, a single nucleotide substitution from "G" to "T" was detected in the adjacent 13th intron, thus divulging the versatile potential of the present molecular protocol to clinical practice.

  4. Periodicity of DNA in exons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinghorn Brian

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The periodic pattern of DNA in exons is a known phenomenon. It was suggested that one of the initial causes of periodicity could be the universal (RNYnpattern (R = A or G, Y = C or U, N = any base of ancient RNA. Two major questions were addressed in this paper. Firstly, the cause of DNA periodicity, which was investigated by comparisons between real and simulated coding sequences. Secondly, quantification of DNA periodicity was made using an evolutionary algorithm, which was not previously used for such purposes. Results We have shown that simulated coding sequences, which were composed using codon usage frequencies only, demonstrate DNA periodicity very similar to the observed in real exons. It was also found that DNA periodicity disappears in the simulated sequences, when the frequencies of codons become equal. Frequencies of the nucleotides (and the dinucleotide AG at each location along phase 0 exons were calculated for C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens. Two models were used to fit these data, with the key objective of describing periodicity. Both of the models showed that the best-fit curves closely matched the actual data points. The first dynamic period determination model consistently generated a value, which was very close to the period equal to 3 nucleotides. The second fixed period model, as expected, kept the period exactly equal to 3 and did not detract from its goodness of fit. Conclusions Conclusion can be drawn that DNA periodicity in exons is determined by codon usage frequencies. It is essential to differentiate between DNA periodicity itself, and the length of the period equal to 3. Periodicity itself is a result of certain combinations of codons with different frequencies typical for a species. The length of period equal to 3, instead, is caused by the triplet nature of genetic code. The models and evolutionary algorithm used for characterising DNA periodicity are proven to be an effective tool

  5. Theory and design of compact hybrid microphone arrays on two-dimensional planes for three-dimensional soundfield analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanchi; Abhayapala, Thushara D; Zhang, Wen

    2015-11-01

    Soundfield analysis based on spherical harmonic decomposition has been widely used in various applications; however, a drawback is the three-dimensional geometry of the microphone arrays. In this paper, a method to design two-dimensional planar microphone arrays that are capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) spatial soundfields is proposed. Through the utilization of both omni-directional and first order microphones, the proposed microphone array is capable of measuring soundfield components that are undetectable to conventional planar omni-directional microphone arrays, thus providing the same functionality as 3D arrays designed for the same purpose. Simulations show that the accuracy of the planar microphone array is comparable to traditional spherical microphone arrays. Due to its compact shape, the proposed microphone array greatly increases the feasibility of 3D soundfield analysis techniques in real-world applications.

  6. Objective performance analysis of spherical microphone arrays for speech enhancement in rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Yotam; Rafaely, Boaz

    2012-09-01

    Reverberation and noise have a significant effect on the intelligibility of speech in rooms. The detection of clear speech in highly reverberant and noisy enclosures is an extremely difficult task. Recently, spherical microphone arrays have been studied for processing of sound fields in three-dimensions, with applications ranging from acoustic analysis to speech enhancement. This paper presents the derivation of a model that facilitates the prediction of spherical array configurations that guarantee an acceptable level of speech intelligibility in reverberant and noisy environments. A spherical microphone array is employed to generate a spatial filter that maximizes speech intelligibility according to an objective measure that combines the effects of both reverberation and noise. The spherical array beamformer is designed to enhance the speech signal while minimizing noise power and maintaining robustness over a wide frequency range. The paper includes simulation and experimental studies with a comparison to speech transmission index based analysis to provide initial validation of the model. Examples are presented in which the minimum number of microphones in a spherical array can be determined from environment conditions such as reverberation time, noise level, and distance of the array to the speech source.

  7. Development of a cDNA array for chicken gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt David

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of microarray technology to functional genomic analysis in the chicken has been limited by the lack of arrays containing large numbers of genes. Results We have produced cDNA arrays using chicken EST collections generated by BBSRC, University of Delaware and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. From a total of 363,838 chicken ESTs representing 24 different adult or embryonic tissues, a set of 11,447 non-redundant ESTs were selected and added to an existing collection of clones (4,162 from immune tissues and a chicken bursal cell line (DT40. Quality control analysis indicates there are 13,007 useable features on the array, including 160 control spots. The array provides broad coverage of mRNAs expressed in many tissues; in addition, clones with expression unique to various tissues can be detected. Conclusions A chicken multi-tissue cDNA microarray with 13,007 features is now available to academic researchers from genomics@fhcrc.org. Sequence information for all features on the array is in GenBank, and clones can be readily obtained. Targeted users include researchers in comparative and developmental biology, immunology, vaccine and agricultural technology. These arrays will be an important resource for the entire research community using the chicken as a model.

  8. Computational analysis of vertical axis wind turbine arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremseth, J.; Duraisamy, K.

    2016-10-01

    Canonical problems involving single, pairs, and arrays of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are investigated numerically with the objective of understanding the underlying flow structures and their implications on energy production. Experimental studies by Dabiri (J Renew Sustain Energy 3, 2011) suggest that VAWTs demand less stringent spacing requirements than their horizontal axis counterparts and additional benefits may be obtained by optimizing the placement and rotational direction of VAWTs. The flowfield of pairs of co-/counter-rotating VAWTs shows some similarities with pairs of cylinders in terms of wake structure and vortex shedding. When multiple VAWTs are placed in a column, the extent of the wake is seen to spread further downstream, irrespective of the direction of rotation of individual turbines. However, the aerodynamic interference between turbines gives rise to regions of excess momentum between the turbines which lead to significant power augmentations. Studies of VAWTs arranged in multiple columns show that the downstream columns can actually be more efficient than the leading column, a proposition that could lead to radical improvements in wind farm productivity.

  9. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium analysis of the 48 bp VNTR in the III exon of the DRD4 gene in a sample of parents of ADHD cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, Salvador; Toscano-Flores, José J; Matute, Esmeralda; Ramírez-Dueñas, María de Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain the genotype and gene frequency from parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and then assess the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of genotype frequency of the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) III exon of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene. The genotypes of the III exon of 48 bp VNTR repeats of the DRD4 gene were determined by polymerase chain reaction in a sample of 30 parents of ADHD cases. In the 60 chromosomes analyzed, the following frequencies of DRD4 gene polymorphisms were observed: six chromosomes (c) with two repeat alleles (r) (10%); 1c with 3r (1.5%); 36c with 4r (60%); 1c with 5r (1.5%); and 16c with 7r (27%). The genotypic distribution of the 30 parents was two parents (p) with 2r/2r (6.67%); 1p with 2r/4r (3.33%); 1p with 2r/5r (3.33%); 1p with 3r/4r (3.33%); 15p with 4r/4r (50%); 4p with 4r/7r (13.33); and 6p with 7r/7r (20%). A Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (χ (2)=13.03, P<0.01) was found due to an over-representation of the 7r/7r genotype. These results suggest that the 7r polymorphism of the DRD4 gene is associated with the ADHD condition in a Mexican population.

  10. Integrated label-free silicon nanowire sensor arrays for (bio)chemical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De, Arpita; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan William; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert

    2013-01-01

    We present a label-free (bio)chemical analysis platform that uses all-electrical silicon nanowire sensor arrays integrated with a small volume microfluidic flow-cell for real-time (bio) chemical analysis and detection. The integrated sensing platform contains an automated multi-sample injection

  11. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  12. A founder synonymous COL7A1 mutation in three Danish families with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa identifies exonic regulatory sequences required for exon 87 splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Covaciu, C; Grosso, F; Pisaneschi, E

    2011-01-01

    shoulders. DEB-Pr is caused by either dominant (DDEB-Pr) or recessive mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen (COLVII). The full spectrum of COL7A1 mutations in DEB-Pr remains elusive and the genotype-phenotype correlation is largely incomplete. Here, we report and functionally characterize...... a previously unrecognized translationally silent exonic COL7A1 mutation that results in skipping of exon 87 and is associated with DDEB-Pr phenotypes in several members of three apparently unrelated Danish families. A haplotype segregation study suggested a common ancestor in these kindred. Functional splicing...... analysis of the mutant exon by a COL7A1 minigene construct and computational prediction for splicing regulatory cis-sequences prove that the mutation alters the activity of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) critical for exon inclusion. These findings substantiate for the first time the involvement...

  13. Splicing of designer exons informs a biophysical model for exon definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Mauricio A; Lubkin, Ashira; Chasin, Lawrence A

    2015-02-01

    Pre-mRNA molecules in humans contain mostly short internal exons flanked by longer introns. To explain the removal of such introns, exon recognition instead of intron recognition has been proposed. We studied this exon definition using designer exons (DEs) made up of three prototype modules of our own design: an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), an exonic splicing silencer (ESS), and a Reference Sequence (R) predicted to be neither. Each DE was examined as the central exon in a three-exon minigene. DEs made of R modules showed a sharp size dependence, with exons shorter than 14 nt and longer than 174 nt splicing poorly. Changing the strengths of the splice sites improved longer exon splicing but worsened shorter exon splicing, effectively displacing the curve to the right. For the ESE we found, unexpectedly, that its enhancement efficiency was independent of its position within the exon. For the ESS we found a step-wise positional increase in its effects; it was most effective at the 3' end of the exon. To apply these results quantitatively, we developed a biophysical model for exon definition of internal exons undergoing cotranscriptional splicing. This model features commitment to inclusion before the downstream exon is synthesized and competition between skipping and inclusion fates afterward. Collision of both exon ends to form an exon definition complex was incorporated to account for the effect of size; ESE/ESS effects were modeled on the basis of stabilization/destabilization. This model accurately predicted the outcome of independent experiments on more complex DEs that combined ESEs and ESSs. © 2015 Arias et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. Rules and tools to predict the splicing effects of exonic and intronic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kinji; Takeda, Jun-Ichi; Masuda, Akio

    2017-09-26

    Development of next generation sequencing technologies has enabled detection of extensive arrays of germline and somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in human diseases. SNVs affecting intronic GT-AG dinucleotides invariably compromise pre-mRNA splicing. Most exonic SNVs introduce missense/nonsense codons, but some affect auxiliary splicing cis-elements or generate cryptic GT-AG dinucleotides. Similarly, most intronic SNVs are silent, but some affect canonical and auxiliary splicing cis-elements or generate cryptic GT-AG dinucleotides. However, prediction of the splicing effects of SNVs is challenging. The splicing effects of SNVs generating cryptic AG or disrupting canonical AG can be inferred from the AG-scanning model. Similarly, the splicing effects of SNVs affecting the first nucleotide G of an exon can be inferred from AG-dependence of the 3' splice site (ss). A variety of tools have been developed for predicting the splicing effects of SNVs affecting the 5' ss, as well as exonic and intronic splicing enhancers/silencers. In contrast, only two tools, the Human Splicing Finder and the SVM-BP finder, are available for predicting the position of the branch point sequence. Similarly, IntSplice and Splicing based Analysis of Variants (SPANR) are the only tools to predict the splicing effects of intronic SNVs. The rules and tools introduced in this review are mostly based on observations of a limited number of genes, and no rule or tool can ensure 100% accuracy. Experimental validation is always required before any clinically relevant conclusions are drawn. Development of efficient tools to predict aberrant splicing, however, will facilitate our understanding of splicing pathomechanisms in human diseases. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Conserved usage of alternative 5' untranslated exons of the GATA4 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Mazaud Guittot

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available GATA4 is an essential transcription factor required for the development and function of multiple organs. Despite this important role, our knowledge of how the GATA4 gene is regulated remains limited. To better understand this regulation, we characterized the 5' region of the mouse, rat, and human GATA4 genes.Using 5' RACE, we identified novel transcription start sites in all three species. GATA4 is expressed as multiple transcripts with varying 5' ends encoded by alternative untranslated first exons. Two of these non-coding first exons are conserved between species: exon 1a located 3.5 kb upstream of the GATA4 ATG site in exon 2, and a second first exon (exon 1b located 28 kb further upstream. Expression of both mRNA variants was found in all GATA4-expressing organs but with a preference for the exon 1a-containing transcript. The exception was the testis where exon 1a- and 1b-containing transcripts were similarly expressed. In some tissues such as the intestine, alternative transcript expression appears to be regionally regulated. Polysome analysis suggests that both mRNA variants contribute to GATA4 protein synthesis.Taken together, our results indicate that the GATA4 gene closely resembles the other GATA family members in terms of gene structure where alternative first exon usage appears to be an important mechanism for regulating its tissue- and cell-specific expression.

  16. Naturally occuring nucleosome positioning signals in human exons and introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1996-01-01

    We describe the structural implications of a periodic pattern found in human exons and introns by hidden Markov models. We show that exons (besides the reading frame) have a specific sequential structure in the form of a pattern with triplet consensus non-T(A/T)G, and a minimal periodicity...... faces inward and is compressed. The in-phase triplets are located adjacent to GCC/GGC triplets known to have the strongest bias in their positioning on the nucleosome. Analysis of mRNA sequences encoding proteins with known tertiary structure exclude the possibility that the pattern is a consequence...

  17. OpenMSI Arrayed Analysis Toolkit: Analyzing Spatially Defined Samples Using Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Raad, Markus; de Rond, Tristan; Rübel, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    ://openmsinersc.gov), a platform for storing, sharing, and analyzing MSI data. By using a web-based python notebook (Jupyter), OMAAT is accessible to anyone without programming experience yet allows experienced users to leverage all features. OMAAT was :evaluated by analyzing an MSI data set of a high-throughput glycoside...... processing tools for the analysis of large arrayed MSI sample sets. The OpenMSI Arrayed Analysis Toolkit (OMAAT) is a software package that addresses the challenges of analyzing spatially defined samples in MSI data sets. OMAAT is written in Python and is integrated with OpenMSI (http...

  18. AVES: A high performance computer cluster array for the INTEGRAL satellite scientific data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Memmo; Martino, Bruno Luigi; Ubertini, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we describe a new computing system array, designed, built and now used at the Space Astrophysics and Planetary Institute (IAPS) in Rome, Italy, for the INTEGRAL Space Observatory scientific data analysis. This new system has become necessary in order to reduce the processing time of the INTEGRAL data accumulated during the more than 9 years of in-orbit operation. In order to fulfill the scientific data analysis requirements with a moderately limited investment the starting approach has been to use a `cluster' array of commercial quad-CPU computers, featuring the extremely large scientific and calibration data archive on line.

  19. Addictions biology: haplotype-based analysis for 130 candidate genes on a single array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Colin A; Yuan, Qiaoping; Xu, Ke; Shen, Pei-Hong; Heinz, Elizabeth; Lobos, Elizabeth A; Binder, Elizabeth B; Cubells, Joe; Ehlers, Cindy L; Gelernter, Joel; Mann, John; Riley, Brien; Roy, Alec; Tabakoff, Boris; Todd, Richard D; Zhou, Zhifeng; Goldman, David

    2008-01-01

    To develop a panel of markers able to extract full haplotype information for candidate genes in alcoholism, other addictions and disorders of mood and anxiety. A total of 130 genes were haplotype tagged and genotyped in 7 case/control populations and 51 reference populations using Illumina GoldenGate SNP genotyping technology, determining haplotype coverage. We also constructed and determined the efficacy of a panel of 186 ancestry informative markers. An average of 1465 loci were genotyped at an average completion rate of 91.3%, with an average call rate of 98.3% and replication rate of 99.7%. Completion and call rates were lowered by the performance of two datasets, highlighting the importance of the DNA quality in high throughput assays. A comparison of haplotypes captured by the Addictions Array tagging SNPs and commercially available whole-genome arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix shows comparable performance of the tag SNPs to the best whole-genome array in all populations for which data are available. Arrays of haplotype-tagged candidate genes, such as this addictions-focused array, represent a cost-effective approach to generate high-quality SNP genotyping data useful for the haplotype-based analysis of panels of genes such as these 130 genes of interest to alcohol and addictions researchers. The inclusion of the 186 ancestry informative markers allows for the detection and correction for admixture and further enhances the utility of the array.

  20. Discrimination of trace nitroaromatics using linear discriminant analysis on aerosol jet printed fluorescent sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolse, N.; Eckstein, R.; Schend, M.; Habermehl, A.; Hernandez-Sosa, G.; Eschenbaum, C.; Lemmer, U.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we report on fluorescent sensor arrays fabricated by aerosol jet printing on glass substrates to detect explosives-related nitroaromatic species. The printed sensor arrays consist of six different fluorescent polymers responding to nitroaromatic vapors through a photo-induced electron transfer. This results in a quenched fluorescence proportional to the vapor concentration. Distinct fluorescence quenching patterns are detected for nitroaromatic species including nitrobenzene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene. The detected fingerprints are evaluated at low concentrations of only 1, 3 and 10 parts-per-billion in air. Linear discriminant analysis is used to train each sensor array enabling the discrimination of the target analyte vapors. To investigate the reproducibility of multiple sensor arrays on a single substrate, the measured fluorescence quenching patterns are used to benchmark the linear discriminant models. For this purpose, the target analytes and vapor concentrations are predicted for each sensor array. On average, we report low and reproducible misclassification rates of about 4 % indicating excellent discriminatory abilities at low concentrations close to the detection limits. We conclude that digital printing of fluorescent polymers offers the potential to realize low-cost sensor arrays for a reliable detection of trace explosives.

  1. Exon prediction in eucaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignal, L; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Y; Lisacek, F; Mephu Ngüifo, E; Rouzé, P; Quinqueton, J; Thermes, C

    1996-01-01

    Two independent computer systems, NetPlantGene and AMELIE, dedicated to the identification of splice sites in plant and human genomes, respectively, are introduced here. Both methods were designed in relation to experimental work; they rely on automatically generated rules involving the nucleotide content of sequences regardless of the coding properties of exons. The specificity of plant sequences as considered in NetPlantGene is shown to enhance the quality of detection as opposed to general methods such as GRAIL. A scanning model of the acceptor site recognition is being simulated by AMELIE leading to a relatively accurate selection process of sites.

  2. A new soft x-ray pulse height analysis array in the HL-2A tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y P; Liu, Yi; Yang, J W; Song, X Y; Liao, M; Li, X; Yuan, G L; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R; Pan, C H

    2009-12-01

    A new soft x-ray pulse height analysis (PHA) array including nine independent subsystems, on basis of a nonconventional software multichannel analysis system and a silicon drift detector (SDD) linear array consisting of nine high performance SDD detectors, has been developed in the HL-2A tokamak. The use of SDD has greatly improved the measurement accuracy and the spatiotemporal resolutions of the soft x-ray PHA system. Since the ratio of peak to background counts obtained from the SDD PHA system is very high, p/b > or = 3000, the soft x-ray spectra measured by the SDD PHA system can approximatively be regarded as electron velocity distribution. The electron velocity distribution can be well derived in the pure ohmic and auxiliary heating discharges. The performance of the new soft x-ray PHA array and the first experimental results with some discussions are presented.

  3. Analysis of Array-CGH Data Using the R and Bioconductor Software Suite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried A. Hofmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH is an emerging high-resolution and high-throughput molecular genetic technique that allows genome-wide screening for chromosome alterations. DNA copy number alterations (CNAs are a hallmark of somatic mutations in tumor genomes and congenital abnormalities that lead to diseases such as mental retardation. However, accurate identification of amplified or deleted regions requires a sequence of different computational analysis steps of the microarray data. Results. We have developed a user-friendly and versatile tool for the normalization, visualization, breakpoint detection, and comparative analysis of array-CGH data which allows the accurate and sensitive detection of CNAs. Conclusion. The implemented option for the determination of minimal altered regions (MARs from a series of tumor samples is a step forward in the identification of new tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes.

  4. Study on dynamic behavior analysis of towed line array sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyoung Shin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A set of equations of motion is derived for vibratory motions of an underwater cable connected to a moving vehicle at one end and with drogues at the other end. From the static analysis, cable configurations are obtained for different vehicle speeds and towing pretensions are determined by fluid resistance of drogues. Also the dynamic analysis is required to predict its vibratory motion. Nonlinear fluid drag forces greatly influence the dynamic tension. In this study, a numerical analysis program was developed to find out the characteristic of cable behaviour. The motion is described in terms of space and time coordinates based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions. For the spatial integration the collocation method is employed and the Newmark method is applied for the time integration. Dynamic tensions, displacements, velocities, accelerations were predicted in the time domain while natural frequencies and transfer functions were obtained in the frequency domain.

  5. The effects of multiple features of alternatively spliced exons on the KA/KS ratio test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Feng-Chi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of alternatively spliced exons (ASEs is of primary interest because these exons are suggested to be a major source of functional diversity of proteins. Many exon features have been suggested to affect the evolution of ASEs. However, previous studies have relied on the KA/KS ratio test without taking into consideration information sufficiency (i.e., exon length > 75 bp, cross-species divergence > 5% of the studied exons, leading to potentially biased interpretations. Furthermore, which exon feature dominates the results of the KA/KS ratio test and whether multiple exon features have additive effects have remained unexplored. Results In this study, we collect two different datasets for analysis – the ASE dataset (which includes lineage-specific ASEs and conserved ASEs and the ACE dataset (which includes only conserved ASEs. We first show that information sufficiency can significantly affect the interpretation of relationship between exons features and the KA/KS ratio test results. After discarding exons with insufficient information, we use a Boolean method to analyze the relationship between test results and four exon features (namely length, protein domain overlapping, inclusion level, and exonic splicing enhancer (ESE frequency for the ASE dataset. We demonstrate that length and protein domain overlapping are dominant factors, and they have similar impacts on test results of ASEs. In addition, despite the weak impacts of inclusion level and ESE motif frequency when considered individually, combination of these two factors still have minor additive effects on test results. However, the ACE dataset shows a slightly different result in that inclusion level has a marginally significant effect on test results. Lineage-specific ASEs may have contributed to the difference. Overall, in both ASEs and ACEs, protein domain overlapping is the most dominant exon feature while ESE frequency is the weakest one in affecting

  6. Evaluation of Influenza-Specific Humoral Response by Microbead Array Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Keynan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Quantitation and determination of antigen specificity of systemic and mucosal immune responses to influenza vaccination is beneficial for future vaccine development. Previous methods to acquire this information were costly, time consuming and sample exhaustive. The benefits of suspension microbead array (MBA analysis are numerous. The multiplex capabilities of the system conserve time, money and sample, while generating statistically powerful data.

  7. Two-Stage MAS Technique for Analysis of DRA Elements and Arrays on Finite Ground Planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2007-01-01

    A two-stage Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) technique is proposed for analysis of dielectric resonator antenna (DRA) elements and arrays on finite ground planes (FGPs). The problem is solved by first analysing the DRA on an infinite ground plane (IGP) and then using this solution to model the FGP...... problem....

  8. Open-array analysis of genetic variants in Egyptian patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present case control study a custom array was designed to facilitate costeffective analysis of selected SNPs related to glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, inflammation, insulin signalling, and immune function. Results: Seven gene variants showed significant association with the risk of T2D patients including FCGRA2, ...

  9. TiArA: a virtual appliance for the analysis of Tiling Array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Jason A; Assarsson, Erika; Chung, Jo L; Head, Steven; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-04-01

    Genomic tiling arrays have been described in the scientific literature since 2003, yet there is a shortage of user-friendly applications available for their analysis. Tiling Array Analyzer (TiArA) is a software program that provides a user-friendly graphical interface for the background subtraction, normalization, and summarization of data acquired through the Affymetrix tiling array platform. The background signal is empirically measured using a group of nonspecific probes with varying levels of GC content and normalization is performed to enforce a common dynamic range. TiArA is implemented as a standalone program for Linux systems and is available as a cross-platform virtual machine that will run under most modern operating systems using virtualization software such as Sun VirtualBox or VMware. The software is available as a Debian package or a virtual appliance at http://purl.org/NET/tiara.

  10. TiArA: a virtual appliance for the analysis of Tiling Array data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A Greenbaum

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Genomic tiling arrays have been described in the scientific literature since 2003, yet there is a shortage of user-friendly applications available for their analysis.Tiling Array Analyzer (TiArA is a software program that provides a user-friendly graphical interface for the background subtraction, normalization, and summarization of data acquired through the Affymetrix tiling array platform. The background signal is empirically measured using a group of nonspecific probes with varying levels of GC content and normalization is performed to enforce a common dynamic range.TiArA is implemented as a standalone program for Linux systems and is available as a cross-platform virtual machine that will run under most modern operating systems using virtualization software such as Sun VirtualBox or VMware. The software is available as a Debian package or a virtual appliance at http://purl.org/NET/tiara.

  11. An integrated analysis-synthesis array system for spatial sound fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mingsian R; Hua, Yi-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Hao; Hsieh, Yu-Hao

    2015-03-01

    An integrated recording and reproduction array system for spatial audio is presented within a generic framework akin to the analysis-synthesis filterbanks in discrete time signal processing. In the analysis stage, a microphone array "encodes" the sound field by using the plane-wave decomposition. Direction of arrival of plane-wave components that comprise the sound field of interest are estimated by multiple signal classification. Next, the source signals are extracted by using a deconvolution procedure. In the synthesis stage, a loudspeaker array "decodes" the sound field by reconstructing the plane-wave components obtained in the analysis stage. This synthesis stage is carried out by pressure matching in the interior domain of the loudspeaker array. The deconvolution problem is solved by truncated singular value decomposition or convex optimization algorithms. For high-frequency reproduction that suffers from the spatial aliasing problem, vector panning is utilized. Listening tests are undertaken to evaluate the deconvolution method, vector panning, and a hybrid approach that combines both methods to cover frequency ranges below and above the spatial aliasing frequency. Localization and timbral attributes are considered in the subjective evaluation. The results show that the hybrid approach performs the best in overall preference. In addition, there is a trade-off between reproduction performance and the external radiation.

  12. Unusual intron conservation near tissue-regulated exons found by splicing microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W Sugnet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing contributes to both gene regulation and protein diversity. To discover broad relationships between regulation of alternative splicing and sequence conservation, we applied a systems approach, using oligonucleotide microarrays designed to capture splicing information across the mouse genome. In a set of 22 adult tissues, we observe differential expression of RNA containing at least two alternative splice junctions for about 40% of the 6,216 alternative events we could detect. Statistical comparisons identify 171 cassette exons whose inclusion or skipping is different in brain relative to other tissues and another 28 exons whose splicing is different in muscle. A subset of these exons is associated with unusual blocks of intron sequence whose conservation in vertebrates rivals that of protein-coding exons. By focusing on sets of exons with similar regulatory patterns, we have identified new sequence motifs implicated in brain and muscle splicing regulation. Of note is a motif that is strikingly similar to the branchpoint consensus but is located downstream of the 5' splice site of exons included in muscle. Analysis of three paralogous membrane-associated guanylate kinase genes reveals that each contains a paralogous tissue-regulated exon with a similar tissue inclusion pattern. While the intron sequences flanking these exons remain highly conserved among mammalian orthologs, the paralogous flanking intron sequences have diverged considerably, suggesting unusually complex evolution of the regulation of alternative splicing in multigene families.

  13. SMA carrier testing - validation of hemizygous SMN exon 7 deletion test for the identification of proximal spinal muscular atrophy carriers and patients with a single allele deletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, H; Cobben, JM; Mensink, RGJ; Stulp, RP; van der Steege, G; Buys, CHCM

    To facilitate the detection of carriers of a hemizygous survival motor neuron (SMN) exon 7 deletion we have modified the quantitative SMN exon 7 assay described by McAndrew ct al (1997). The major changes include quantitative analysis of the amount of SMN exon 7-specific fluorescently-labelled PCR

  14. Polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Meldgaard, Michael; Sørensen, S

    1997-01-01

    rate of embryos. HLA-G seems to play an important role in the feto-maternal relationship. The polymorphism of the HLA-G locus is not fully clarified. One study has shown extensive nucleotide sequence variation in the exon 3 (alpha-2 domain) in healthy African Americans. A few studies in other...... populations have only revealed a limited polymorphism. We investigated the polymorphism of the exon 3 of HLA-G by means of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP)- and DNA sequencing analysis in a Danish population. We detected four single-base substitutions in exon 3...... compared to the sequence of HLA-6.0 (G*01011); one of these has not been reported before. We also found a deletion of the first base of codon 130 or the third of codon 129 in a heterozygous individual. This study, together with previous results, suggests that the polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene...

  15. Genetic profiles of gastroesophageal cancer: combined analysis using expression array and tiling array--comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Ohlsson, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the genomic profiles of adenocarcinomas in the gastroesophageal junction in relation to cancers in the esophagus and the stomach. Profiles of gains/losses as well as gene expression profiles were obtained from 27 gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas by means of 32k high-resolution...... array-based comparative genomic hybridization and 27k oligo gene expression arrays, and putative target genes were validated in an extended series. Adenocarcinomas in the distal esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction showed strong similarities with the most common gains at 20q13, 8q24, 1q21-23, 5p...

  16. Cell culture arrays using magnetic force-based cell patterning for dynamic single cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Kosuke; Okochi, Mina; Konishi, Nao; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Imai, Rentaro; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the behavior of individual cells, single cell analyses have attracted attention since most cell-based assays provide data with values averaged across a large number of cells. Techniques for the manipulation and analysis of single cells are crucial for understanding the behavior of individual cells. In the present study, we have developed single cell culture arrays using magnetic force and a pin holder, which enables the allocation of the magnetically labeled cells on arrays, and have analyzed their dynamics. The pin holder was made from magnetic soft iron and contained more than 6000 pillars on its surface. The pin holder was placed on a magnet to concentrate the magnetic flux density above the pillars. NIH/3T3 fibroblasts that were labeled with magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) were seeded into a culture dish, and the dish was placed over the pin holder with the magnet. The magnetically labeled cells were guided on the surface where the pillars were positioned and allocated on the arrays with a high resolution. Single-cell patterning was achieved by adjusting the number of cells seeded, and the target cell was collected by a micromanipulator after removing the pin holder with the magnet. Furthermore, change in the morphology of magnetically patterned cells was analyzed by microscopic observation, and cell spreading on the array was observed with time duration. Magnetic force-based cell patterning on cell culture arrays would be a suitable technique for the analysis of cell behavior in studies of cell-cell variation and cell-cell interactions.

  17. Analysis of Protein Interactions with Immobilized Peptide Arrays Synthesized on Membrane Supports

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Ronald Frank and Stefan Dübel This protocol was adapted from “Analysis of Protein Interactions with Immobilized Peptide Arrays Synthesized on Membrane Supports,” contributed by Ronald Frank and Stefan Dübel, Chapter 31, in [*Protein-Protein Interactions*, ](http://www.cshlpress.com/link/protpro2p.htm)2nd edition (eds. Golemis and Adams). Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2005. ### INTRODUCTION The following protocol describes the synt...

  18. All-diamond functional surface micro-electrode arrays for brain-slice neural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vahidpour, Farnoosh; Curley, Lowry; Biró, István; McDonald, Matthew; Croux, Dieter; POBEDINSKAS, Paulius; Haenen, Ken; Giugliano, Michele; Zivcova, Zuzana Vlckova; Kavan, Ladislav; Nesladek, Milos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Diamond-based microelectrode arrays were fabricated by using nanocrystalline diamond as an insulating layer and conductive boron-doped in order to used them for analysis of brain cortical slices. MEA surface is solely composed of diamond, exposed to the cells. The impedance measurements showed negligible cross-talk between neighbouring diamond microelectrodes. Local field potentials related to neural signals were then successfully recorded from pharmacologically disinhibited rat cor...

  19. OpenMSI Arrayed Analysis Toolkit: Analyzing Spatially Defined Samples Using Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Raad, Markus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); de Rond, Tristan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Rübel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Keasling, Jay D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Northen, Trent R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Bowen, Benjamin P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has primarily been applied in localizing biomolecules within biological matrices. Although well-suited, the application of MSI for comparing thousands of spatially defined spotted samples has been limited. One reason for this is a lack of suitable and accessible data processing tools for the analysis of large arrayed MSI sample sets. In this paper, the OpenMSI Arrayed Analysis Toolkit (OMAAT) is a software package that addresses the challenges of analyzing spatially defined samples in MSI data sets. OMAAT is written in Python and is integrated with OpenMSI (http://openmsi.nersc.gov), a platform for storing, sharing, and analyzing MSI data. By using a web-based python notebook (Jupyter), OMAAT is accessible to anyone without programming experience yet allows experienced users to leverage all features. OMAAT was evaluated by analyzing an MSI data set of a high-throughput glycoside hydrolase activity screen comprising 384 samples arrayed onto a NIMS surface at a 450 μm spacing, decreasing analysis time >100-fold while maintaining robust spot-finding. The utility of OMAAT was demonstrated for screening metabolic activities of different sized soil particles, including hydrolysis of sugars, revealing a pattern of size dependent activities. Finally, these results introduce OMAAT as an effective toolkit for analyzing spatially defined samples in MSI. OMAAT runs on all major operating systems, and the source code can be obtained from the following GitHub repository: https://github.com/biorack/omaat.

  20. High-content analysis screening for cell cycle regulators using arrayed synthetic crRNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strezoska, Žaklina; Perkett, Matthew R; Chou, Eldon T; Maksimova, Elena; Anderson, Emily M; McClelland, Shawn; Kelley, Melissa L; Vermeulen, Annaleen; Smith, Anja van Brabant

    2017-06-10

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been utilized for large-scale, loss-of-function screens mainly using lentiviral pooled formats and cell-survival phenotypic assays. Screening in an arrayed format expands the types of phenotypic readouts that can be used to now include high-content, morphology-based assays, and with the recent availability of synthetic crRNA libraries, new studies are emerging. Here, we use a cell cycle reporter cell line to perform an arrayed, synthetic crRNA:tracrRNA screen targeting 169 genes (>600 crRNAs) and used high content analysis (HCA) to identify genes that regulate the cell cycle. Seven parameters were used to classify cells into cell cycle categories and multiple parameters were combined using a new analysis technique to identify hits. Comprehensive hit follow-up experiments included target gene expression analysis, confirmation of DNA insertions/deletions, and validation with orthogonal reagents. Our results show that most hits had three or more independent crRNAs per gene that demonstrated a phenotype with consistent individual parameters, indicating that our screen produced high-confidence hits with low off-target effects and allowed us to identify hits with more subtle phenotypes. The results of our screen demonstrate the power of using arrayed, synthetic crRNAs for functional phenotypic screening using multiparameter HCA assays. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy owing to double heterozygosity for a 403Arg--> Trp mutation in exon 13 of the MYH7 gene and a novel mutation, 453Arg--> His, in exon 14 of the MYH7 gene: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluza, R; Halouzková, S; Buncek, M; Smíd, O; Kvasnicka, J

    2001-01-01

    An unusual clinical history of a 23-year-old male proband with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with a rare genotype is presented. Genetic analysis of the proband found evidence for two distinct mutations of the MYH7 gene (the gene coding for the beta-myosin heavy chain): 403Arg--> Trp in exon 13 and a novel mutation, 453Arg--> His, in exon 14. A heterozygous site mutation was identified in exon 13 in the proband's father but no mutation site was found in his mother. Thus, the novel mutation in exon 14 is a de novo mutation.

  2. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy owing to double heterozygosity for a 403Arg→ Trp mutation in exon 13 of the MYH7 gene and a novel mutation, 453Arg→ His, in exon 14 of the MYH7 gene: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluza, Radovan; Halouzková, Štěpánka; Bunček, Martin; Šmíd, Ondřej; Kvasnička, Jiří

    2001-01-01

    An unusual clinical history of a 23-year-old male proband with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with a rare genotype is presented. Genetic analysis of the proband found evidence for two distinct mutations of the MYH7 gene (the gene coding for the beta-myosin heavy chain): 403Arg→ Trp in exon 13 and a novel mutation, 453Arg→ His, in exon 14. A heterozygous site mutation was identified in exon 13 in the proband’s father but no mutation site was found in his mother. Thus, the novel mutation in exon 14 is a de novo mutation. PMID:20428263

  3. 2015 Volcanic Tsunami Earthquake near Torishima Island: Array analysis of ocean bottom pressure gauge records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, Y.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.; Shiobara, H.; Sandanbata, O.; Watada, S.; Satake, K.

    2016-12-01

    An array of ocean bottom pressure gauges was deployed off east of Aogashima island of the Izu-Bonin arc from May 2014 to May 2015. The array consists of 10 ocean bottom pressure gauges using ParoScientific quartz resonators which can measure absolute water pressure at 7000m depth with nano-resolution. The array configures equilateral triangles with minimum and maximum lengths of 10 and 30km. This array recorded seismic and tsunami waves from the CLVD-type earthquake (M5.7) of May 02, 2015, that occurred near Torishima Island 100 km distant from the array. Comparison with records of ordinary thrust earthquakes with similar magnitudes at similar distances indicates that this event generated anomalously large tsunamis relative to seismic waves. We made an array analysis for the phase speed, propagating azimuth and travel time of tsunami wave in a frequency range 1-10 mHz, where the dispersion effect is significant. The results show excellent agreements with the frequency-dependent ray-tracing calculations. The tsunami trace apparently starts with positive onset (pressure increase) and reaches a maximum amplitude of about 200Pa (≈2cm in tsunami height). A closer inspection, however, shows a preceding negative small pulse (Fig. 1), suggesting that the seafloor deformation at the tsunami source consists of a central large uplift and a peripheral small depression. This mode of deformation is qualitatively consistent with a finite CLVD source uniformly shortened laterally and uniformly stretched vertically without volume change. The detection of weak initial motions is indebted to the array deployment of sensitive pressure gauges far away from coastal regions. The bandpass-filtered waveform is drastically different between the lower and higher frequency ranges. The waveform is single-peaked in the lower frequency range (5 mHz), corresponding to the tsunami spectrum that consists of the broad primary peak around 3.5 mHz and the sharp double peaks at around 6.5 and 9 m

  4. RoboSCell: An automated single cell arraying and analysis instrument

    KAUST Repository

    Sakaki, Kelly

    2009-09-09

    Single cell research has the potential to revolutionize experimental methods in biomedical sciences and contribute to clinical practices. Recent studies suggest analysis of single cells reveals novel features of intracellular processes, cell-to-cell interactions and cell structure. The methods of single cell analysis require mechanical resolution and accuracy that is not possible using conventional techniques. Robotic instruments and novel microdevices can achieve higher throughput and repeatability; however, the development of such instrumentation is a formidable task. A void exists in the state-of-the-art for automated analysis of single cells. With the increase in interest in single cell analyses in stem cell and cancer research the ability to facilitate higher throughput and repeatable procedures is necessary. In this paper, a high-throughput, single cell microarray-based robotic instrument, called the RoboSCell, is described. The proposed instrument employs a partially transparent single cell microarray (SCM) integrated with a robotic biomanipulator for in vitro analyses of live single cells trapped at the array sites. Cells, labeled with immunomagnetic particles, are captured at the array sites by channeling magnetic fields through encapsulated permalloy channels in the SCM. The RoboSCell is capable of systematically scanning the captured cells temporarily immobilized at the array sites and using optical methods to repeatedly measure extracellular and intracellular characteristics over time. The instrument\\'s capabilities are demonstrated by arraying human T lymphocytes and measuring the uptake dynamics of calcein acetoxymethylester-all in a fully automated fashion. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrese, James C.; Rao, Naveen; Paroo, Kaivon; Triebwasser, Corey; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Franquemont, Lachlan; Donoghue, John P.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) using chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have the potential to restore lost function to people with disabilities if they work reliably for years. Current sensors fail to provide reliably useful signals over extended periods of time for reasons that are not clear. This study reports a comprehensive retrospective analysis from a large set of implants of a single type of intracortical MEA in a single species, with a common set of measures in order to evaluate failure modes. Approach. Since 1996, 78 silicon MEAs were implanted in 27 monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We used two approaches to find reasons for sensor failure. First, we classified the time course leading up to complete recording failure as acute (abrupt) or chronic (progressive). Second, we evaluated the quality of electrode recordings over time based on signal features and electrode impedance. Failure modes were divided into four categories: biological, material, mechanical, and unknown. Main results. Recording duration ranged from 0 to 2104 days (5.75 years), with a mean of 387 days and a median of 182 days (n = 78). Sixty-two arrays failed completely with a mean time to failure of 332 days (median = 133 days) while nine array experiments were electively terminated for experimental reasons (mean = 486 days). Seven remained active at the close of this study (mean = 753 days). Most failures (56%) occurred within a year of implantation, with acute mechanical failures the most common class (48%), largely because of connector issues (83%). Among grossly observable biological failures (24%), a progressive meningeal reaction that separated the array from the parenchyma was most prevalent (14.5%). In the absence of acute interruptions, electrode recordings showed a slow progressive decline in spike amplitude, noise amplitude, and number of viable channels that predicts complete signal loss by about eight years. Impedance measurements showed

  6. Circular Array of Magnetic Sensors for Current Measurement: Analysis for Error Caused by Position of Conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Qian, Zheng; Liu, Huayi; Qu, Jiaqi

    2018-02-14

    This paper analyzes the measurement error, caused by the position of the current-carrying conductor, of a circular array of magnetic sensors for current measurement. The circular array of magnetic sensors is an effective approach for AC or DC non-contact measurement, as it is low-cost, light-weight, has a large linear range, wide bandwidth, and low noise. Especially, it has been claimed that such structure has excellent reduction ability for errors caused by the position of the current-carrying conductor, crosstalk current interference, shape of the conduction cross-section, and the Earth's magnetic field. However, the positions of the current-carrying conductor-including un-centeredness and un-perpendicularity-have not been analyzed in detail until now. In this paper, for the purpose of having minimum measurement error, a theoretical analysis has been proposed based on vector inner and exterior product. In the presented mathematical model of relative error, the un-center offset distance, the un-perpendicular angle, the radius of the circle, and the number of magnetic sensors are expressed in one equation. The comparison of the relative error caused by the position of the current-carrying conductor between four and eight sensors is conducted. Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors are used in the experimental prototype to verify the mathematical model. The analysis results can be the reference to design the details of the circular array of magnetic sensors for current measurement in practical situations.

  7. In situ analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation networks by FLIM on cell arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Hernán E; Roda-Navarro, Pedro; Girod, Andreas; Hou, Jian; Frahm, Thomas; Truxius, Dina C; Pepperkok, Rainer; Squire, Anthony; Bastiaens, Philippe I H

    2010-06-01

    Extracellular stimuli are transduced inside the cell by posttranslational modifications (PTMs), such as phosphorylation, of proteins in signaling networks. Insight into the structure of these networks requires quantification of PTM levels in individual cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful tool to image PTM levels in situ. FLIM on cell arrays that express fluorescent protein fusions can quantify tyrosine phosphorylation patterns in large networks in individual cells. We identified tyrosine kinase substrates by imaging their phosphorylation levels after inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Analysis of the correlation between protein phosphorylation and expression levels at single cell resolution allowed us to identify positive feedback motifs. Using FLIM on cell arrays (CA-FLIM), we uncovered components that transduce signals from epidermal growth factor receptor.

  8. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.L. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Martel, I. [Dpto de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, CH 1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Jiménez, R. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Galán, J., E-mail: jgalan@diesia.uhu.es [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Salmerón, P. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain)

    2016-09-11

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from {sup 12}C up to {sup 84}Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  9. A new explanation for recessive myotonia congenita: exon deletions and duplications in CLCN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Rayan, D L; Haworth, A; Sud, R; Matthews, E; Fialho, D; Burge, J; Portaro, S; Schorge, S; Tuin, K; Lunt, P; McEntagart, M; Toscano, A; Davis, M B; Hanna, M G

    2012-06-12

    To assess whether exon deletions or duplications in CLCN1 are associated with recessive myotonia congenita (MC). We performed detailed clinical and electrophysiologic characterization in 60 patients with phenotypes consistent with MC. DNA sequencing of CLCN1 followed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to screen for exon copy number variation was undertaken in all patients. Exon deletions or duplications in CLCN1 were identified in 6% of patients with MC. Half had heterozygous exonic rearrangements. The other 2 patients (50%), with severe disabling infantile onset myotonia, were identified with both a homozygous mutation, Pro744Thr, which functional electrophysiology studies suggested was nonpathogenic, and a triplication/homozygous duplication involving exons 8-14, suggesting an explanation for the severe phenotype. These data indicate that copy number variation in CLCN1 may be an important cause of recessive MC. Our observations suggest that it is important to check for exon deletions and duplications as part of the genetic analysis of patients with recessive MC, especially in patients in whom sequencing identifies no mutations or only a single recessive mutation. These results also indicate that additional, as yet unidentified, genetic mechanisms account for cases not currently explained by either CLCN1 point mutations or exonic deletions or duplications.

  10. Analysis of a Combined Antenna Arrays and Reverse-Link Synchronous DS-CDMA System over Multipath Rician Fading Channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim Yong-Seok; Whang Keum-Chan

    2005-01-01

    We present the BER analysis of antenna array (AA) receiver in reverse-link asynchronous multipath Rician channels and analyze the performance of an improved AA system which applies a reverse-link synchronous transmission technique (RLSTT...

  11. Numeric Program Analysis Techniques with Applications to Array Analysis and Library Summarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    importance for the areas of software engineering, soft - ware verification, and security: to identify many program errors, such as out-of-bounds array...ification language with primitives for specifying numeric conditional expressions in logic formu- lae , and for specifying numeric updates in TVLA

  12. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H. [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine and Science (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  13. Development of Antibody Arrays for Monoclonal Antibody Higher Order Structure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing eWang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibody arrays were developed to probe a monoclonal antibody’s three-dimensional structure (3-D structure. Peptides with overlapping regions were designed to cover the whole mAb light chain and heavy chain respectively and used to generate polyclonal antibodies after the conjugation of the peptides to a carrier protein, KLH. It was shown that good peptide specificity was achieved from the antibodies generated. Using more than 30 different polyclonal antibodies to measure the surface epitope distribution, it was shown that the mAb antibody array can detect epitope exposure as low as 0.1% of defined mAb populations. This ELISA-based analysis of mAb epitope exposure can be considered as a measurement of conformational impurity in biologics development, similar to the analysis of other product-related impurities such as different forms of glycosylation, deamidation and oxidation. This analysis of conformational impurity could provide valuable information on the mAb conformational comparability for biosimilar mAbs as well as novel mAbs, especially in the area of protein immunogenicity. Furthermore, stability studies indicated that there are several conformational hot spots in many mAbs tested, especially in the hinge region. This antibody array technology can be used for novel mAb Higher Order Structure (HOS analysis during process and formulation development. Another important area of application is for biosimilar mAb development where the innovator molecule and biosimilar molecule could be compared based on their systemic fingerprint from the 30 plus antibodies.

  14. Solar array design based on shadow analysis for increasing net energy collection in a competition vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Gómez, Gilberto; Mejía-Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Suárez-Castañeda, Nicolás; Gil-Herrera, Ana; Barrera-Velásquez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) applications such as in the architectural, automotive, and aerospace industries face design contradictions because they are expected to produce a lot of energy but are constrained by available area, surface shape, incident irradiance, shadows, and other aspects that have a negative influence on the energy produced by the solar panel. Solar competition vehicles are some of these challenging PV applications. The design of such solar arrays needs to consider efficiency evaluation in order to optimize space; it is difficult not to install solar modules in areas impacted by shadows. A design procedure for a solar array configuration based on shadow analysis for competition vehicles is presented. The principle is that shadows in moving objects can be simulated, since the vehicle, the earth and the sun are are moving in semipredictable patterns, thus net energy collection can be forecast. The case study presented is the solar array design of a vehicle that participated in the World Solar Challenge 2013. The obtained results illustrate how the employment of the procedure gives insights on important aspects to consider and also delivers qualitative and quantitative information for decision making. In addition, the experience in competition highlights some issues to be considered, modified, or improved in further vehicle designs.

  15. Data in support of proteomic analysis of pneumococcal pediatric clinical isolates to construct a protein array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Olaya-Abril

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface proteins play key roles in the interaction between cells and their environment, and in pathogenic microorganisms they are the best targets for drug or vaccine discovery and/or development. In addition, surface proteins can be the basis for serodiagnostic tools aiming at developing more affordable techniques for early diagnosis of infection in patients. We carried out a proteomic analysis of a collection of pediatric clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen responsible for more than 1.5 million child deaths worldwide. For that, cultured live bacterial cells were “shaved” with trypsin, and the recovered peptides were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. We selected 95 proteins to be produced as recombinant polypeptides, and printed them on an array. We probed the protein array with a collection of patient sera to define serodiagnostic antigens. The mass spectrometry proteomics data correspond to those published in [1] and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium [2] via the PRIDE partner repository [3] with the dataset identifier PXD001740. The protein array raw data are provided as supplemental material in this article.

  16. Evaluating the protein coding potential of exonized transposable element sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodovsky Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable element (TE sequences, once thought to be merely selfish or parasitic members of the genomic community, have been shown to contribute a wide variety of functional sequences to their host genomes. Analysis of complete genome sequences have turned up numerous cases where TE sequences have been incorporated as exons into mRNAs, and it is widely assumed that such 'exonized' TEs encode protein sequences. However, the extent to which TE-derived sequences actually encode proteins is unknown and a matter of some controversy. We have tried to address this outstanding issue from two perspectives: i-by evaluating ascertainment biases related to the search methods used to uncover TE-derived protein coding sequences (CDS and ii-through a probabilistic codon-frequency based analysis of the protein coding potential of TE-derived exons. Results We compared the ability of three classes of sequence similarity search methods to detect TE-derived sequences among data sets of experimentally characterized proteins: 1-a profile-based hidden Markov model (HMM approach, 2-BLAST methods and 3-RepeatMasker. Profile based methods are more sensitive and more selective than the other methods evaluated. However, the application of profile-based search methods to the detection of TE-derived sequences among well-curated experimentally characterized protein data sets did not turn up many more cases than had been previously detected and nowhere near as many cases as recent genome-wide searches have. We observed that the different search methods used were complementary in the sense that they yielded largely non-overlapping sets of hits and differed in their ability to recover known cases of TE-derived CDS. The probabilistic analysis of TE-derived exon sequences indicates that these sequences have low protein coding potential on average. In particular, non-autonomous TEs that do not encode protein sequences, such as Alu elements, are frequently

  17. Transcriptome-based exon capture enables highly cost-effective comparative genomic data collection at moderate evolutionary scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Ke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, exon capture has largely been restricted to species with fully sequenced genomes, which has precluded its application to lineages that lack high quality genomic resources. We developed a novel strategy for designing array-based exon capture in chipmunks (Tamias based on de novo transcriptome assemblies. We evaluated the performance of our approach across specimens from four chipmunk species. Results We selectively targeted 11,975 exons (~4 Mb on custom capture arrays, and enriched over 99% of the targets in all libraries. The percentage of aligned reads was highly consistent (24.4-29.1% across all specimens, including in multiplexing up to 20 barcoded individuals on a single array. Base coverage among specimens and within targets in each species library was uniform, and the performance of targets among independent exon captures was highly reproducible. There was no decrease in coverage among chipmunk species, which showed up to 1.5% sequence divergence in coding regions. We did observe a decline in capture performance of a subset of targets designed from a much more divergent ground squirrel genome (30 My, however, over 90% of the targets were also recovered. Final assemblies yielded over ten thousand orthologous loci (~3.6 Mb with thousands of fixed and polymorphic SNPs among species identified. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential of a transcriptome-enabled, multiplexed, exon capture method to create thousands of informative markers for population genomic and phylogenetic studies in non-model species across the tree of life.

  18. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getchell Thomas V

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease or absence (Control of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB or cerebellum (CER. In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033 determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  19. A simple physical model predicts small exon length variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common splice variations are small exon length variations caused by the use of alternative donor or acceptor splice sites that are in very close proximity on the pre-mRNA. Among these, three-nucleotide variations at so-called NAGNAG tandem acceptor sites have recently attracted considerable attention, and it has been suggested that these variations are regulated and serve to fine-tune protein forms by the addition or removal of a single amino acid. In this paper we first show that in-frame exon length variations are generally overrepresented and that this overrepresentation can be quantitatively explained by the effect of nonsense-mediated decay. Our analysis allows us to estimate that about 50% of frame-shifted coding transcripts are targeted by nonsense-mediated decay. Second, we show that a simple physical model that assumes that the splicing machinery stochastically binds to nearby splice sites in proportion to the affinities of the sites correctly predicts the relative abundances of different small length variations at both boundaries. Finally, using the same simple physical model, we show that for NAGNAG sites, the difference in affinities of the neighboring sites for the splicing machinery accurately predicts whether splicing will occur only at the first site, splicing will occur only at the second site, or three-nucleotide splice variants are likely to occur. Our analysis thus suggests that small exon length variations are the result of stochastic binding of the spliceosome at neighboring splice sites. Small exon length variations occur when there are nearby alternative splice sites that have similar affinity for the splicing machinery.

  20. Exon Shuffling and Origin of Scorpion Venom Biodiversity

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    Xueli Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion venom is a complex combinatorial library of peptides and proteins with multiple biological functions. A combination of transcriptomic and proteomic techniques has revealed its enormous molecular diversity, as identified by the presence of a large number of ion channel-targeted neurotoxins with different folds, membrane-active antimicrobial peptides, proteases, and protease inhibitors. Although the biodiversity of scorpion venom has long been known, how it arises remains unsolved. In this work, we analyzed the exon-intron structures of an array of scorpion venom protein-encoding genes and unexpectedly found that nearly all of these genes possess a phase-1 intron (one intron located between the first and second nucleotides of a codon near the cleavage site of a signal sequence despite their mature peptides remarkably differ. This observation matches a theory of exon shuffling in the origin of new genes and suggests that recruitment of different folds into scorpion venom might be achieved via shuffling between body protein-coding genes and ancestral venom gland-specific genes that presumably contributed tissue-specific regulatory elements and secretory signal sequences.

  1. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors.

  2. Cluster analysis of protein array results via similarity of Gene Ontology annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolting Cheryl

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advent of high-throughput proteomic experiments such as arrays of purified proteins comes the need to analyse sets of proteins as an ensemble, as opposed to the traditional one-protein-at-a-time approach. Although there are several publicly available tools that facilitate the analysis of protein sets, they do not display integrated results in an easily-interpreted image or do not allow the user to specify the proteins to be analysed. Results We developed a novel computational approach to analyse the annotation of sets of molecules. As proof of principle, we analysed two sets of proteins identified in published protein array screens. The distance between any two proteins was measured as the graph similarity between their Gene Ontology (GO annotations. These distances were then clustered to highlight subsets of proteins sharing related GO annotation. In the first set of proteins found to bind small molecule inhibitors of rapamycin, we identified three subsets containing four or five proteins each that may help to elucidate how rapamycin affects cell growth whereas the original authors chose only one novel protein from the array results for further study. In a set of phosphoinositide-binding proteins, we identified subsets of proteins associated with different intracellular structures that were not highlighted by the analysis performed in the original publication. Conclusion By determining the distances between annotations, our methodology reveals trends and enrichment of proteins of particular functions within high-throughput datasets at a higher sensitivity than perusal of end-point annotations. In an era of increasingly complex datasets, such tools will help in the formulation of new, testable hypotheses from high-throughput experimental data.

  3. Differential transcription of exon 1 of the human c-fms gene in placental trophoblasts and monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvader, J.; Verma, I.M. (Salk Inst. for Biological Studies, San Diego, CA (USA))

    1989-03-01

    Structural analysis of the 5' end of the human c-fms gene revealed that a large intron of about 25 kilobases separates an upstream noncoding exon (exon 1) from the signal peptide-containing exon (exon 2). Northern (RNA) blot analysis, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extensions showed that exon 1 is transcribed in placenta but not in cells of the monocytic lineage. This is due to the differential usage or promoters, separated by approximately 25 kilobases, in cell-specific manner. One major c-fms transcript was observed in U-937 cells, whereas multiple initiation sites for transcription appeared to be utilized in placental cells. Nucleotide sequence comparisons showed that the 3' end of the human platelet-derived growth factor receptor gene lies approximately 350 base pairs upstream of the major initiation sites for c-fms transcription in placental trophoblasts.

  4. Differential transcription of exon 1 of the human c-fms gene in placental trophoblasts and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvader, J; Verma, I M

    1989-01-01

    Structural analysis of the 5' end of the human c-fms gene revealed that a large intron of about 25 kilobases separates an upstream noncoding exon (exon 1) from the signal peptide-containing exon (exon 2). Northern (RNA) blot analysis, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extensions showed that exon 1 is transcribed in placenta but not in cells of the monocytic lineage. This is due to the differential usage of promoters, separated by approximately 25 kilobases, in a cell-specific manner. One major c-fms transcript was observed in U-937 cells, whereas multiple initiation sites for transcription appeared to be utilized in placental cells. Nucleotide sequence comparisons showed that the 3' end of the human platelet-derived growth factor receptor gene lies approximately 350 base pairs upstream of the major initiation sites for c-fms transcription in placental trophoblasts. Images PMID:2524648

  5. High-performance genetic analysis on microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis plastic chips fabricated by injection molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Fuquan; Tabata, Osamu; Kurokawa, Masaya; Ewis, Ashraf A; Zhang, Lihua; Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Shinohara, Shouji; Shinohara, Yasuo; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a novel technique for mass production of microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis (mu-CAE) plastic chips for high-speed, high-throughput genetic analysis. The mu-CAE chips, containing 10 individual separation channels of 50-microm width, 50-microm depth, and a 100-microm lane-to-lane spacing at the detection region and a sacrificial channel network, were fabricated on a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate by injection molding and then bonded manually using a pressure-sensitive sealing tape within several seconds at room temperature. The conditions for injection molding and bonding were carefully characterized to yield mu-CAE chips with well-defined channel and injection structures. A CCD camera equipped with an image intensifier was used to monitor simultaneously the separation in a 10-channel array with laser-induced fluorescence detection. High-performance electrophoretic separations of phiX174 HaeIII DNA restriction fragments and PCR products related to the human beta-globin gene and SP-B gene (the surfactant protein B) have been demonstrated on mu-CAE plastic chips using a methylcellulose sieving matrix in individual channels. The current work demonstrated greatly simplified the fabrication process as well as a detection scheme for mu-CAE chips and will bring the low-cost mass production and application of mu-CAE plastic chips for genetic analysis.

  6. Analytical Kinematics and Coupled Vibrations Analysis of Mechanical System Operated by Solar Array Drive Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, M.; Wei, C.; Jalali, A.; Sattar, R.

    2017-07-01

    To address the impact of solar array (SA) anomalies and vibrations on performance of precision space-based operations, it is important to complete its accurate jitter analysis. This work provides mathematical modelling scheme to approximate kinematics and coupled micro disturbance dynamics of rigid load supported and operated by solar array drive assembly (SADA). SADA employed in analysis provides a step wave excitation torque to activate the system. Analytical investigations into kinematics is accomplished by using generalized linear and Euler angle coordinates, applying multi-body dynamics concepts and transformations principles. Theoretical model is extended, to develop equations of motion (EoM), through energy method (Lagrange equation). The main emphasis is to research coupled frequency response by determining energies dissipated and observing dynamic behaviour of internal vibratory systems of SADA. The disturbance model captures discrete active harmonics of SADA, natural modes and vibration amplifications caused by interactions between active harmonics and structural modes of mechanical assembly. The proposed methodology can help to predict true micro disturbance nature of SADA operating rigid load. Moreover, performance outputs may be compared against actual mission requirements to assess precise spacecraft controller design to meet next space generation stringent accuracy goals.

  7. SR proteins induce alternative exon skipping through their activities on the flanking constitutive exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Joonhee; Ding, Jian-Hua; Byeon, Cheol W; Kim, Jee H; Hertel, Klemens J; Jeong, Sunjoo; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2011-02-01

    SR proteins are well known to promote exon inclusion in regulated splicing through exonic splicing enhancers. SR proteins have also been reported to cause exon skipping, but little is known about the mechanism. We previously characterized SRSF1 (SF2/ASF)-dependent exon skipping of the CaMKIIδ gene during heart remodeling. By using mouse embryo fibroblasts derived from conditional SR protein knockout mice, we now show that SR protein-induced exon skipping depends on their prevalent actions on a flanking constitutive exon and requires collaboration of more than one SR protein. These findings, coupled with other established rules for SR proteins, provide a theoretical framework to understand the complex effect of SR protein-regulated splicing in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that heart-specific CaMKIIδ splicing can be reconstituted in fibroblasts by downregulating SR proteins and upregulating a RBFOX protein and that SR protein overexpression impairs regulated CaMKIIδ splicing and neuronal differentiation in P19 cells, illustrating that SR protein-dependent exon skipping may constitute a key strategy for synergism with other splicing regulators in establishing tissue-specific alternative splicing critical for cell differentiation programs.

  8. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

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    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  9. Analysis of the Radiation Mechanisms in and Design of Tightly-Coupled Antenna Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Vogler, Terry Richard

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research is to design well-tuned, wideband elements for thin planar or cylindrically conformal arrays of balanced elements fed over ground. These arrays have closely spaced elements to achieve wide bandwidths through mutual coupling. This dissertation develops two wideband designs in infinite, semi-infinite, and finite array configurations. The infinite array is best for element tuning. This research advances a concept of a distributed, parallel capacitance between eleme...

  10. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (UTSMC)

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates.

  11. Molecular characterization of exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goat

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    Jai Prakash Khichar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To estimate genetic variability in exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goats. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 blood samples from unrelated Marwari goats were randomly collected from different villages of Bikaner (Rajasthan, India. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood using blood DNA isolation kit (Himedia Ltd. as per manufacturer’s protocol. The quality of extracted genomic DNA was checked on 0.8% agarose gel. Specifically designed a primer set for caprine myostatin (MSTN gene (Genebank accession no. DQ167575 was used to amplify the exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat. The genetic variability in exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat was assessed on 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to detect single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP pattern. Results: The exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat showed two types of conformation patterns on 8% polyacrylamide gel. One of the patterns showed only two bands and was considered as genotype AA, whereas another pattern having an extra band was designated as genotype AB. The frequencies of AA and AB genotype for exon 3 region of MSTN gene were calculated as 0.90 and 0.10, respectively. Conclusion: Low level of polymorphism was observed at exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat through SSCP analysis. This information could be utilized in future breeding plan to exploit the unique characteristics of Marwari goat of Rajasthan.

  12. Molecular characterization of exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khichar, Jai Prakash; Gahlot, Gyan Chand; Agrawal, Vijay Kumar; Kiran; Dewna, Ajay Singh; Prakash; Ashraf, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To estimate genetic variability in exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goats. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 blood samples from unrelated Marwari goats were randomly collected from different villages of Bikaner (Rajasthan), India. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood using blood DNA isolation kit (Himedia Ltd.) as per manufacturer’s protocol. The quality of extracted genomic DNA was checked on 0.8% agarose gel. Specifically designed a primer set for caprine myostatin (MSTN) gene (Genebank accession no. DQ167575) was used to amplify the exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat. The genetic variability in exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat was assessed on 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to detect single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) pattern. Results: The exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat showed two types of conformation patterns on 8% polyacrylamide gel. One of the patterns showed only two bands and was considered as genotype AA, whereas another pattern having an extra band was designated as genotype AB. The frequencies of AA and AB genotype for exon 3 region of MSTN gene were calculated as 0.90 and 0.10, respectively. Conclusion: Low level of polymorphism was observed at exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat through SSCP analysis. This information could be utilized in future breeding plan to exploit the unique characteristics of Marwari goat of Rajasthan. PMID:27397994

  13. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V; Zhang, Hong

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Decoding of exon splicing patterns in the human RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinev, Vasily V; Migas, Alexandr A; Kirsanava, Aksana D; Mishkova, Olga A; Siomava, Natalia; Ramanouskaya, Tatiana V; Vaitsiankova, Alina V; Ilyushonak, Ilia M; Nazarov, Petr V; Vallar, Laurent; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2015-11-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is the most widespread genetic defect found in human acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation results in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene that produces a wide variety of alternative transcripts and influences the course of the disease. The rules of combinatorics and splicing of exons in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts are not known. To address this issue, we developed an exon graph model of the fusion gene organization and evaluated its local exon combinatorics by the exon combinatorial index (ECI). Here we show that the local exon combinatorics of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene follows a power-law behavior and (i) the vast majority of exons has a low ECI, (ii) only a small part is represented by "exons-hubs" of splicing with very high ECI values, and (iii) it is scale-free and very sensitive to targeted skipping of "exons-hubs". Stochasticity of the splicing machinery and preferred usage of exons in alternative splicing can explain such behavior of the system. Stochasticity may explain up to 12% of the ECI variance and results in a number of non-coding and unproductive transcripts that can be considered as a noise. Half-life of these transcripts is increased due to the deregulation of some key genes of the nonsense-mediated decay system in leukemia cells. On the other hand, preferred usage of exons may explain up to 75% of the ECI variability. Our analysis revealed a set of splicing-related cis-regulatory motifs that can explain "attractiveness" of exons in alternative splicing but only when they are considered together. Cis-regulatory motifs are guides for splicing trans-factors and we observed a leukemia-specific profile of expression of the splicing genes in t(8;21)-positive blasts. Altogether, our results show that alternative splicing of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts follows strict rules and that the power-law component of the fusion gene organization confers a high flexibility to this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  15. Independent component analysis reveals new and biologically significant structures in micro array data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerla Srinivas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An alternative to standard approaches to uncover biologically meaningful structures in micro array data is to treat the data as a blind source separation (BSS problem. BSS attempts to separate a mixture of signals into their different sources and refers to the problem of recovering signals from several observed linear mixtures. In the context of micro array data, "sources" may correspond to specific cellular responses or to co-regulated genes. Results We applied independent component analysis (ICA to three different microarray data sets; two tumor data sets and one time series experiment. To obtain reliable components we used iterated ICA to estimate component centrotypes. We found that many of the low ranking components indeed may show a strong biological coherence and hence be of biological significance. Generally ICA achieved a higher resolution when compared with results based on correlated expression and a larger number of gene clusters with significantly enriched for gene ontology (GO categories. In addition, components characteristic for molecular subtypes and for tumors with specific chromosomal translocations were identified. ICA also identified more than one gene clusters significant for the same GO categories and hence disclosed a higher level of biological heterogeneity, even within coherent groups of genes. Conclusion Although the ICA approach primarily detects hidden variables, these surfaced as highly correlated genes in time series data and in one instance in the tumor data. This further strengthens the biological relevance of latent variables detected by ICA.

  16. Automatic Actin Filament Quantification of Osteoblasts and Their Morphometric Analysis on Microtextured Silicon-Titanium Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Matschegewski

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtexturing of implant surfaces is of major relevance in the endeavor to improve biorelevant implant designs. In order to elucidate the role of biomaterial’s topography on cell physiology, obtaining quantitative correlations between cellular behavior and distinct microarchitectural properties is in great demand. Until now, the microscopically observed reorganization of the cytoskeleton on structured biomaterials has been difficult to convert into data. We used geometrically microtextured silicon-titanium arrays as a model system. Samples were prepared by deep reactive-ion etching of silicon wafers, resulting in rectangular grooves (width and height: 2 µm and cubic pillars (pillar dimensions: 2 × 2 × 5 and 5 × 5 × 5 µm; finally sputter-coated with 100 nm titanium. We focused on the morphometric analysis of MG-63 osteoblasts, including a quantification of the actin cytoskeleton. By means of our novel software FilaQuant, especially developed for automatic actin filament recognition, we were first able to quantify the alterations of the actin network dependent on the microtexture of a material surface. The cells’ actin fibers were significantly reduced in length on the pillared surfaces versus the grooved array (4–5 fold and completely reorganized on the micropillars, but without altering the orientation of cells. Our morpho-functional approach opens new possibilities for the data correlation of cell-material interactions.

  17. Computationally efficient analysis of extraordinary optical transmission through infinite and truncated subwavelength hole arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Miguel; Boix, Rafael R; Medina, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    The authors present a computationally efficient technique for the analysis of extraordinary transmission through both infinite and truncated periodic arrays of slots in perfect conductor screens of negligible thickness. An integral equation is obtained for the tangential electric field in the slots both in the infinite case and in the truncated case. The unknown functions are expressed as linear combinations of known basis functions, and the unknown weight coefficients are determined by means of Galerkin's method. The coefficients of Galerkin's matrix are obtained in the spatial domain in terms of double finite integrals containing the Green's functions (which, in the infinite case, is efficiently computed by means of Ewald's method) times cross-correlations between both the basis functions and their divergences. The computation in the spatial domain is an efficient alternative to the direct computation in the spectral domain since this latter approach involves the determination of either slowly convergent double infinite summations (infinite case) or slowly convergent double infinite integrals (truncated case). The results obtained are validated by means of commercial software, and it is found that the integral equation technique presented in this paper is at least two orders of magnitude faster than commercial software for a similar accuracy. It is also shown that the phenomena related to periodicity such as extraordinary transmission and Wood's anomaly start to appear in the truncated case for arrays with more than 100 (10×10) slots.

  18. Comprehensive Analysis and Experimental Validation of an Improved Mathematical Modeling of Photovoltaic Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satarupa Bal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a simple, accurate, and easy to model approach for the simulation of photovoltaic (PV array and also provides a comparative analysis of the same with two other widely used models. It is highly imperative that the maximum power point (MPP is achieved effectively and thus a simple and robust mathematical model is necessary that poses less mathematical complexity as well as low data storage requirement, in which the maximum power point tracking (MPPT algorithm can be realized in an effective way. Further, the resemblance of the P-V and I-V curves as obtained on the basis of experimental data should also be taken into account for theoretical validation. In addition, the study incorporates the root mean square deviation (RMSD from the experimental data, the fill factor (FF, the efficiency of the model, and the time required for simulation. Two models have been used to investigate the I-V and P-V characteristics. Perturb and Observe method has been adopted for MPPT. The MPP tracking is realized using field programmable gate array (FPGA to prove the effectiveness of the proposed approach. All the systems are modeled and simulated in MATLAB/Simulink environment.

  19. Scattering Analysis of a Compact Dipole Array with Series and Parallel Feed Network including Mutual Coupling Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Sneha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in defense arena is towards the stealth technology with an emphasis to control the radar cross-section (RCS. The scattering from the antennas mounted over the platform is of prime importance especially for a low-observable aerospace vehicle. This paper presents the analysis of the scattering cross section of a uniformly spaced linear dipole array. Two types of feed networks, that is, series and parallel feed networks, are considered. The total RCS of phased array with either kind of feed network is obtained by following the signal as it enters through the aperture and travels through the feed network. The RCS estimation of array is done including the mutual coupling effect between the dipole elements in three configurations, that is, side-by-side, collinear, and parallel-in-echelon. The results presented can be useful while designing a phased array with optimum performance towards low observability.

  20. Structural insights into the exon junction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hir, Hervé; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2008-02-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the exon junction complex is loaded onto spliced mRNAs at a precise position upstream of exon junctions, where it remains during nuclear export and cytoplasmic localisation until it is removed during the first translation round. The exon junction core complex consists of four proteins that form a dynamic binding platform for a variety of peripheral factors involved in mRNA metabolism. In the complex, mRNA binding is mediated by the DEAD-box protein eIF4AIII, and inhibition of its ATPase activity forms the mechanistic basis for the long-term stability of the complex. Recent crystal structures of the exon junction complex and eIF4AIII have provided the structural framework for investigating the function of the eIF4AIII ATPase and for localisation of surface patches involved in binding peripheral factors. Additionally, by comparison with the structure of a second DEAD-box protein also bound to RNA and ATP, general principles for the ATPase and unwinding/mRNP remodelling activities for this important group of enzymes can be proposed on the basis of atomic structures.

  1. Multi-residue analysis of anabolics in calf urine using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, A; Franke, J.P.; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1999-01-01

    We describe the development of an HPLC method with diode-array detection (DAD) for the analysis and identification of 20 substances with anabolic properties, that are considered as potential growth promoters, to be used for the analysis of extracts of calf urine samples. The substances are separated

  2. Analysis of milk ageing by a sol-gel sensors array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, P.; Rella, R.; Capone, S.; Taurino, A.; Vasanelli, L.

    2000-12-01

    There is growing interest in the development of electronic odours-detection multisensor systems for objective evaluation of aroma food. Study of food storage, freshness control and ageing is one of the most important application field for this new class of device (named "electronic nose"). In this paper we report a specific application of a semiconductor thin films based electronic nose in the control of the rancidity of two different milk (UHT and pasteurised) during their storage days. The active elements of the array were undoped and Os-, Ni-, Pt-, Pd-doped SnO2 thin films prepared by the sol-gel method. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), applied to the data coming from the response of the sensors, gave satisfactory results in tracking dynamic evolution of milk, that could lead to commercial application in the food industry.

  3. PCR array analysis of gene expression profiles in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masanao; Hashida, Yumiko; Imajoh, Masayuki; Maeda, Akihiko; Kamioka, Mikio; Senda, Yasutaka; Sato, Tetsuya; Fujieda, Mikiya; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Daibata, Masanori

    2014-07-01

    To determine the host cellular gene expression profiles in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV), peripheral blood samples were obtained from three patients with CAEBV and investigated using a PCR array analysis that focused on T-cell/B-cell activation. We identified six genes with expression levels that were tenfold higher in CAEBV patients compared with those in healthy controls. These results were verified by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We identified four highly upregulated genes, i.e., IL-10, IL-2, IFNGR1, and INHBA. These genes may be involved in inflammatory responses and cell proliferation, and they may contribute to the development and progression of CAEBV. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative analysis of ginger components in commercial products using liquid chromatography with electrochemical array detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xi; Lv, Lishuang; Parks, Tiffany; Wu, Hou; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, a sensitive reversed-phase HPLC electrochemical array method has been developed for the quantitative analysis of eight major ginger components ([6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerol, [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-shogaol, [6]-paradol, and [1]-dehydrogingerdione) in eleven ginger-containing commercial products. This method was valid with unrivaled sensitivity as low as 7.3 – 20.2 pg of limit of detection and a range of 14.5 to 40.4 pg of limit of quantification. Using this method, we quantified the levels of eight ginger components in eleven different commercial products. Our results found that both levels and ratios among the eight compounds vary greatly in commercial products. PMID:21090746

  5. Ordered arrays of native chromatin molecules for high-resolution imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Tian, Harvey C; Craighead, Harold G

    2012-09-25

    Individual chromatin molecules contain valuable genetic and epigenetic information. To date, there have not been reliable techniques available for the controlled stretching and manipulation of individual chromatin fragments for high-resolution imaging and analysis of these molecules. We report the controlled stretching of single chromatin fragments extracted from two different cancerous cell types (M091 and HeLa) characterized through fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our method combines soft lithography with molecular stretching to form ordered arrays of more than 250,000 individual chromatin fragments immobilized into a beads-on-a-string structure on a solid transparent support. Using fluorescence microscopy and AFM, we verified the presence of histone proteins after the stretching and transfer process.

  6. Thermal Analysis and Correlation of the Mars Odyssey Spacecraft's Solar Array During Aerobraking Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; George, Benjamin E.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft made use of multipass aerobraking to gradually reduce its orbit period from a highly elliptical insertion orbit to its final science orbit. Aerobraking operations provided an opportunity to apply advanced thermal analysis techniques to predict the temperature of the spacecraft's solar array for each drag pass. Odyssey telemetry data was used to correlate the thermal model. The thermal analysis was tightly coupled to the flight mechanics, aerodynamics, and atmospheric modeling efforts being performed during operations. Specifically, the thermal analysis predictions required a calculation of the spacecraft's velocity relative to the atmosphere, a prediction of the atmospheric density, and a prediction of the heat transfer coefficients due to aerodynamic heating. Temperature correlations were performed by comparing predicted temperatures of the thermocouples to the actual thermocouple readings from the spacecraft. Time histories of the spacecraft relative velocity, atmospheric density, and heat transfer coefficients, calculated using flight accelerometer and quaternion data, were used to calculate the aerodynamic heating. During aerobraking operations, the correlations were used to continually update the thermal model, thus increasing confidence in the predictions. This paper describes the thermal analysis that was performed and presents the correlations to the flight data.

  7. Multiplex analysis of tumor multidrug-resistance genes expression with photonic suspension array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zixue; Chen, Baoan; Pei, Xiaoping; Shangguan, Fengqi

    2012-07-21

    An easy-operated suspension array based on silica colloidal crystal beads is developed for multiplex analysis of tumor multidrug-resistance genes expression, such as multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), and potentially single nucleotide polymorphism. In order to obtain high fluorescence intensity, controlled PCR was used to amplify targets at the samples pretreatment stage. By optimizing the conditions a hybridization procedure, which is similar to nucleic acids analysis with binary probes, was established. Small amounts of analytes 10(-19) M could be detected by the method. The K562 cell, human myeloma cell, and its multidrug-resistance string, adriamycin-selected P-glycoprotein-overexpressed K562/A02, were analyzed by using an established procedure to validate feasibility. Clinical blood samples were detected by our method and real-time PCR simultaneously to validate accuracy. Moreover, when combined with multiplex controlled PCR, the method successfully meets the requirements of multiplex analysis. Hence, the method presented is a good method for multiplex analysis of tumor multidrug-resistance genes expression.

  8. Exonic remnants of whole-genome duplication reveal cis-regulatory function of coding exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xianjun; Navratilova, Pavla; Fredman, David; Drivenes, Øyvind; Becker, Thomas S; Lenhard, Boris

    2010-03-01

    Using a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct the fate of genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) and identify exonic remnants that have survived the disappearance of their host genes after whole-genome duplication (WGD) in teleosts, we discover a set of 38 candidate cis-regulatory coding exons (RCEs) with predicted target genes. These elements demonstrate evolutionary separation of overlapping protein-coding and regulatory information after WGD in teleosts. We present evidence that the corresponding mammalian exons are still under both coding and non-coding selection pressure, are more conserved than other protein coding exons in the host gene and several control sets, and share key characteristics with highly conserved non-coding elements in the same regions. Their dual function is corroborated by existing experimental data. Additionally, we show examples of human exon remnants stemming from the vertebrate 2R WGD. Our findings suggest that long-range cis-regulatory inputs for developmental genes are not limited to non-coding regions, but can also overlap the coding sequence of unrelated genes. Thus, exonic regulatory elements in GRBs might be functionally equivalent to those in non-coding regions, calling for a re-evaluation of the sequence space in which to look for long-range regulatory elements and experimentally test their activity.

  9. A multilevel fast spectral domain algorithm for electromagnetic analysis of infinite periodic arrays with large unit cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Eibert

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A multilevel fast spectral domain algorithm (MLFSDA is introduced for the efficient evaluation of the matrix vector products due to the boundary integral (BI operator within a hybrid finite element - BI (FEBI method for the analysis of infinite periodic arrays. The MLFSDA utilizes the diagonalization property of the spectral domain (SD BI representation and handles the large numbers of Floquet modes required for large (with respect to wavelength periodic unit cells by similar hierarchical techniques as applied in the multilevel fast multipole method/algorithm (MLFMM/MLFMA. With the capability of the MLFSDA to handle very large periodic unit cells, it becomes possible to model finite antennas and scatterers with the infinite periodic array model. For a cavity-backed antenna element and for a semi-finite array of 4 cavity-backed antenna elements in the finite direction, the dependence of the input impedances on the unit cell sizes is investigated and it is found that array resonances disappear for reasonably large unit cell dimensions. Finally, a semi-finite array of antipodal Vivaldi antenna elements is considered and simulation results for infinite periodic, finite, and semi-finite array configurations are compared to measured data.

  10. Exon - ASTRA | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...ontents Exons in variants Data file File name: astra_exon.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/a... About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Exon - ASTRA | LSDB Archive ...

  11. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. (North East Wales Inst., Clwyd (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Population genetics of duplicated alternatively spliced exons of the Dscam gene in Daphnia and Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brites

    Full Text Available In insects and crustaceans, the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam occurs in many different isoforms. These are produced by mutually exclusive alternative splicing of dozens of tandem duplicated exons coding for parts or whole immunoglobulin (Ig domains of the Dscam protein. This diversity plays a role in the development of the nervous system and also in the immune system. Structural analysis of the protein suggested candidate epitopes where binding to pathogens could occur. These epitopes are coded by regions of the duplicated exons and are therefore diverse within individuals. Here we apply molecular population genetics and molecular evolution analyses using Daphnia magna and several Drosophila species to investigate the potential role of natural selection in the divergence between orthologs of these duplicated exons among species, as well as between paralogous exons within species. We found no evidence for a role of positive selection in the divergence of these paralogous exons. However, the power of this test was low, and the fact that no signs of gene conversion between paralogous exons were found suggests that paralog diversity may nonetheless be maintained by selection. The analysis of orthologous exons in Drosophila and in Daphnia revealed an excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms in the epitopes putatively involved in pathogen binding. This may be a sign of balancing selection. Indeed, in Dr. melanogaster the same derived non-synonymous alleles segregate in several populations around the world. Yet other hallmarks of balancing selection were not found. Hence, we cannot rule out that the excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms is caused by segregating slightly deleterious alleles, thus potentially indicating reduced selective constraints in the putative pathogen binding epitopes of Dscam.

  13. The Cherenkov Telescope Array production system for Monte Carlo simulations and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabito, L.; Bernloehr, K.; Bregeon, J.; Cumani, P.; Hassan, T.; Haupt, A.; Maier, G.; Moralejo, A.; Neyroud, N.; pre="for the"> CTA Consortium, DIRAC Consortium,

    2017-10-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), an array of many tens of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes deployed on an unprecedented scale, is the next-generation instrument in the field of very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. An average data stream of about 0.9 GB/s for about 1300 hours of observation per year is expected, therefore resulting in 4 PB of raw data per year and a total of 27 PB/year, including archive and data processing. The start of CTA operation is foreseen in 2018 and it will last about 30 years. The installation of the first telescopes in the two selected locations (Paranal, Chile and La Palma, Spain) will start in 2017. In order to select the best site candidate to host CTA telescopes (in the Northern and in the Southern hemispheres), massive Monte Carlo simulations have been performed since 2012. Once the two sites have been selected, we have started new Monte Carlo simulations to determine the optimal array layout with respect to the obtained sensitivity. Taking into account that CTA may be finally composed of 7 different telescope types coming in 3 different sizes, many different combinations of telescope position and multiplicity as a function of the telescope type have been proposed. This last Monte Carlo campaign represented a huge computational effort, since several hundreds of telescope positions have been simulated, while for future instrument response function simulations, only the operating telescopes will be considered. In particular, during the last 18 months, about 2 PB of Monte Carlo data have been produced and processed with different analysis chains, with a corresponding overall CPU consumption of about 125 M HS06 hours. In these proceedings, we describe the employed computing model, based on the use of grid resources, as well as the production system setup, which relies on the DIRAC interware. Finally, we present the envisaged evolutions of the CTA production system for the off-line data processing during CTA operations and

  14. Quantitative miRNA Expression Analysis Using Fluidigm Microfluidics Dynamic Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingle Wilma L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs represent a growing class of small non-coding RNAs that are important regulators of gene expression in both plants and animals. Studies have shown that miRNAs play a critical role in human cancer and they can influence the level of cell proliferation and apoptosis by modulating gene expression. Currently, methods for the detection and measurement of miRNA expression include small and moderate-throughput technologies, such as standard quantitative PCR and microarray based analysis. However, these methods have several limitations when used in large clinical studies where a high-throughput and highly quantitative technology needed for the efficient characterization of a large number of miRNA transcripts in clinical samples. Furthermore, archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE samples are increasingly becoming the primary resource for gene expression studies because fresh frozen (FF samples are often difficult to obtain and requires special storage conditions. In this study, we evaluated the miRNA expression levels in FFPE and FF samples as well as several lung cancer cell lines employing a high throughput qPCR-based microfluidic technology. The results were compared to standard qPCR and hybridization-based microarray platforms using the same samples. Results We demonstrated highly correlated Ct values between multiplex and singleplex RT reactions in standard qPCR assays for miRNA expression using total RNA from A549 (R = 0.98; p Conclusion The qPCR-array based microfluidic dynamic array platform can be used in conjunction with multiplexed RT reactions for miRNA gene expression profiling. We showed that this approach is highly reproducible and the results correlate closely with the existing singleplex qPCR platform at a throughput that is 5 to 20 times higher and a sample and reagent usage that was approximately 50-100 times lower than conventional assays. We established optimal conditions for using the

  15. Array Optimization for Tidal Energy Extraction in a Tidal Channel – A Numerical Modeling Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of m...

  16. Targeted exon sequencing in Usher syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujakowska, Kinga M; Consugar, Mark; Place, Emily; Harper, Shyana; Lena, Jaclyn; Taub, Daniel G; White, Joseph; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Weigel DiFranco, Carol; Farkas, Michael H; Gai, Xiaowu; Berson, Eliot L; Pierce, Eric A

    2014-12-02

    Patients with Usher syndrome type I (USH1) have retinitis pigmentosa, profound congenital hearing loss, and vestibular ataxia. This syndrome is currently thought to be associated with at least six genes, which are encoded by over 180 exons. Here, we present the use of state-of-the-art techniques in the molecular diagnosis of a cohort of 47 USH1 probands. The cohort was studied with selective exon capture and next-generation sequencing of currently known inherited retinal degeneration genes, comparative genomic hybridization, and Sanger sequencing of new USH1 exons identified by human retinal transcriptome analysis. With this approach, we were able to genetically solve 14 of the 47 probands by confirming the biallelic inheritance of mutations. We detected two likely pathogenic variants in an additional 19 patients, for whom family members were not available for cosegregation analysis to confirm biallelic inheritance. Ten patients, in addition to primary disease-causing mutations, carried rare likely pathogenic USH1 alleles or variants in other genes associated with deaf-blindness, which may influence disease phenotype. Twenty-one of the identified mutations were novel among the 33 definite or likely solved patients. Here, we also present a clinical description of the studied cohort at their initial visits. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied USH1 cohort with multiplicity of mutations, of which many were novel. No obvious influence of genotype on phenotype was found, possibly due to small sample sizes of the genotypes under study. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  17. Water turbidity optical meter using optical fiber array for topographical distribution analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Kussay Nugamesh; Mat Jafri, Mohd Zubir; Yeoh, Stephenie

    2017-06-01

    This work is presenting an analysis study for using optical fiber array as turbidity meter and topographical distribution. Although many studies have been figure out of utilizing optical fibers as sensors for turbidity measurements, still the topographical map of suspended particles in water as rare as expected among all of works in literatures in this scope. The effect of suspended particles are highly affect the water quality which varies according to the source of these particles. A two dimensional array of optical fibers in a 1 litter rectangular plastic container with 2 cm cladding off sensing portion prepared to point out 632.8 nm laser power at each fiber location at the container center. The overall output map of the optical power were found in an inhomogeneous distribution such that the top to down layers of a present water sample show different magnitudes. Each sample prepared by mixing a distilled water with large grains sand, small grains sand, glucose and salt. All with different amount of concentration which measured by refractometer and turbidity meter. The measurements were done in different times i.e. from 10 min to 60 min. This is to let the heavy particles to move down and accumulate at the bottom of the container. The results were as expected which had a gradually topographical map from low power at top layers into high power at bottom layers. There are many applications can be implemented of this study such as transport vehicles fuel meter, to measure the purity of tanks, and monitoring the fluids quality in pipes.

  18. Association between polymorphisms of exon 12 and exon 24 of JHDM2A gene and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hojati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some dynamic changes occurs during spermatogenesis such as histone removal and its replacement with transition nuclear protein and protamine. These proteins are required for packing and condensation of sperm chromatin. JHDM2A is a histone demethylase that directly binds to promoter regions of Tnp1 and Prm1 genes and controls their expression by removing H3K9 at their promoters. Objective: The association between polymorphisms of exon 12 and exon 24 in JHDM2A gene and male infertility were evaluated for the first time. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 400 infertile men (oligospermia and azoospermia and normal healthy fathers were evaluated (n=200. Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP-PCR and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP methods were used for screening any polymorphisms that are exist in exon 12 and exon 24. Results: Exon 24 PCR products were analyzed by RFLP but no polymorphism was found in this exon at the restriction site of EcoRV enzyme. Our monitoring along the whole nucleotides of exon 12 and exon 24 were continued using SSCP method, but we found no change along these exons. Conclusion: Generally, this study evaluated the association between polymorphisms in exon 12 and exon 24 of JHDM2A gene and male infertility which suggests that polymorphisms of these exons may not be associated with the risk of male infertility.

  19. Parsimonious Higher-Order Hidden Markov Models for Improved Array-CGH Analysis with Applications to Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael; Gohr, André; Strickert, Marc; Grosse, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) is an important technology in molecular biology for the detection of DNA copy number polymorphisms between closely related genomes. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are popular tools for the analysis of Array-CGH data, but current methods are only based on first-order HMMs having constrained abilities to model spatial dependencies between measurements of closely adjacent chromosomal regions. Here, we develop parsimonious higher-order HMMs enabling the interpolation between a mixture model ignoring spatial dependencies and a higher-order HMM exhaustively modeling spatial dependencies. We apply parsimonious higher-order HMMs to the analysis of Array-CGH data of the accessions C24 and Col-0 of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare these models against first-order HMMs and other existing methods using a reference of known deletions and sequence deviations. We find that parsimonious higher-order HMMs clearly improve the identification of these polymorphisms. Moreover, we perform a functional analysis of identified polymorphisms revealing novel details of genomic differences between C24 and Col-0. Additional model evaluations are done on widely considered Array-CGH data of human cell lines indicating that parsimonious HMMs are also well-suited for the analysis of non-plant specific data. All these results indicate that parsimonious higher-order HMMs are useful for Array-CGH analyses. An implementation of parsimonious higher-order HMMs is available as part of the open source Java library Jstacs (www.jstacs.de/index.php/PHHMM). PMID:22253580

  20. A Large Inversion Involving GNAS Exon A/B and All Exons Encoding Gsα Is Associated With Autosomal Dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib (PHP1B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigelioniene, Giedre; Nevalainen, Pasi I; Reyes, Monica; Thiele, Susanne; Tafaj, Olta; Molinaro, Angelo; Takatani, Rieko; Ala-Houhala, Marja; Nilsson, Daniel; Eisfeldt, Jesper; Lindstrand, Anna; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Mäkitie, Outi; Jüppner, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B) is characterized primarily by resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) and thus hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, in most cases without evidence for Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). PHP1B is associated with epigenetic changes at one or several differentially-methylated regions (DMRs) within GNAS, which encodes the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα) and splice variants thereof. Heterozygous, maternally inherited STX16 or GNAS deletions leading to isolated loss-of-methylation (LOM) at exon A/B alone or at all maternal DMRs are the cause of autosomal dominant PHP1B (AD-PHP1B). In this study, we analyzed three affected individuals, the female proband and her two sons. All three revealed isolated LOM at GNAS exon A/B, whereas the proband's healthy maternal grandmother and uncle showed normal methylation at this locus. Haplotype analysis was consistent with linkage to the STX16/GNAS region, yet no deletion could be identified. Whole-genome sequencing of one of the patients revealed a large heterozygous inversion (1,882,433 bp). The centromeric breakpoint of the inversion is located 7,225 bp downstream of GNAS exon XL, but its DMR showed no methylation abnormality, raising the possibility that the inversion disrupts a regulatory element required only for establishing or maintaining exon A/B methylation. Because our three patients presented phenotypes consistent with PHP1B, and not with PHP1A, the Gsα promoter is probably unaffected by the inversion. Our findings expand the spectrum of genetic mutations that lead to LOM at exon A/B alone and thus biallelic expression of the transcript derived from this alternative first GNAS exon. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  1. Noise characteristics analysis of short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunlei; Li, Xue; Yang, Bo; Huang, Songlei; Shao, Xiumei; Zhang, Yaguang; Gong, Haimei

    2017-09-01

    The increasing application of InGaAs short wave infrared (SWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) in low light level imaging requires ultra-low noise FPAs. This paper presents the theoretical analysis of FPA noise, and point out that both dark current and detector capacitance strongly affect the FPA noise. The impact of dark current and detector capacitance on FPA noise is compared in different situations. In order to obtain low noise performance FPAs, the demand for reducing detector capacitance is higher especially when pixel pitch is smaller, integration time is shorter, and integration capacitance is larger. Several InGaAs FPAs were measured and analyzed, the experiments' results could be well fitted to the calculated results. The study found that the major contributor of FPA noise is coupled noise with shorter integration time. The influence of detector capacitance on FPA noise is more significant than that of dark current. To investigate the effect of detector performance on FPA noise, two kinds of photodiodes with different concentration of the absorption layer were fabricated. The detectors' performance and noise characteristics were measured and analyzed, the results are consistent with that of theoretical analysis.

  2. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F. Galati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D. Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs.

  3. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 8: Project analysis and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcguire, P.; Henry, P.

    1986-01-01

    Project Analysis and Integration (PA&I) performed planning and integration activities to support management of the various Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project R&D activities. Technical and economic goals were established by PA&I for each R&D task within the project to coordinate the thrust toward the National Photovoltaic Program goals. A sophisticated computer modeling capability was developed to assess technical progress toward meeting the economic goals. These models included a manufacturing facility simulation, a photovoltaic power station simulation and a decision aid model incorporating uncertainty. This family of analysis tools was used to track the progress of the technology and to explore the effects of alternative technical paths. Numerous studies conducted by PA&I signaled the achievement of milestones or were the foundation of major FSA project and national program decisions. The most important PA&I activities during the project history are summarized. The PA&I planning function is discussed and how it relates to project direction and important analytical models developed by PA&I for its analytical and assessment activities are reviewed.

  4. Disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for online parallelized cell adhesion kinetics analysis on quartz crystal resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cama, G.; Jacobs, T.; Dimaki, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for the online analysis of adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK-II) cells on quartz crystal resonators (QCRs). The device was conceived for the parallel cultivation of cells providing the same experimental conditions...

  5. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Two Printed Circular Arrays for Power-Based Vehicle Localization Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Sharawi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the performance characteristics of a printed 8-element V-shaped circular antenna array and an 8-element Yagi circular array operating at 2.45 GHz for vehicular direction finding applications is presented. Two operating modes are investigated; switched and phased modes. The arrays were fabricated on FR-4 substrates with 0.8 mm thickness. Measured and simulated results were compared. Radiation gain patterns were measured on a 1 m diameter ground plane that resembles the rooftop of a vehicle. The HPBW of the Yagi was found to be about 3° narrower than its V-shaped counterpart when measured above a reflecting ground plane and operated in switched mode. The printed V-shaped antenna array offers 2.5 dB extra gain compared to the printed Yagi array.

  6. AnovArray: a set of SAS macros for the analysis of variance of gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renard Jean-Paul

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of variance is a powerful approach to identify differentially expressed genes in a complex experimental design for microarray and macroarray data. The advantage of the anova model is the possibility to evaluate multiple sources of variation in an experiment. Results AnovArray is a package implementing ANOVA for gene expression data using SAS® statistical software. The originality of the package is 1 to quantify the different sources of variation on all genes together, 2 to provide a quality control of the model, 3 to propose two models for a gene's variance estimation and to perform a correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion AnovArray is freely available at http://www-mig.jouy.inra.fr/stat/AnovArray and requires only SAS® statistical software.

  7. Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DRB Exon 2 and DRA Exon 3 Fragments in a Primary Terrestrial Rabies Vector (Procyon lotor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus) and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250bp) and DRB exon 2 (228 bp). MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4–15.8% divergence) and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3–27.6% divergence) amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005), indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host. PMID:20706587

  8. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC DRB exon 2 and DRA exon 3 fragments in a primary terrestrial rabies vector (Procyon lotor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarrah Castillo

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor. Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250 bp and DRB exon 2 (228 bp. MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4-15.8% divergence and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3-27.6% divergence amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005, indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host.

  9. Novel Rbfox2 isoforms associated with alternative exon usage in rat cortex and suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, L M M; Carter, D A

    2017-08-30

    Transcriptome diversity in adult neurons is partly mediated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs), including the RBFOX factors. RBFOX3/NeuN, a neuronal maturity marker, is strangely depleted in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons, and may be compensated by a change in Rbfox2 expression. In this study, we found no superficial changes in Rbfox2 expression in the SCN, but mRNA population analysis revealed a distinct SCN transcript profile that includes multiple novel Rbfox2 isoforms. Of eleven isoforms in SCN and cerebral cortex that exhibit exon variation across two protein domains, we found a 3-fold higher abundance of a novel ('-12-40') C-terminal domain (CTD)-variant in the SCN. This isoform embraces an alternative reading frame that imparts a 50% change in CTD protein sequence, and functional impairment of exon 7 exclusion activity in a RBFOX2-target, the L-type calcium channel gene, Cacna1c. We have also demonstrated functional correlates in SCN gene transcripts; inclusion of Cacna1c exon 7, and also exclusion of both NMDA receptor gene Grin1 exon 4, and Enah exon 12, all consistent with a change in SCN RBFOX activity. The demonstrated regional diversity of Rbfox2 in adult brain highlights the functional adaptability of this RBP, enabling neuronal specialization, and potentially responding to disease-related neuronal dysfunction.

  10. Analysis of a Combined Antenna Arrays and Reverse-Link Synchronous DS-CDMA System over Multipath Rician Fading Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Yong-Seok; Whang Keum-Chan

    2005-01-01

    We present the BER analysis of antenna array (AA) receiver in reverse-link asynchronous multipath Rician channels and analyze the performance of an improved AA system which applies a reverse-link synchronous transmission technique (RLSTT) in order to effectively make a better estimation of covariance matrices at a beamformer-RAKE receiver. In this work, we provide a comprehensive analysis of user capacity which reflects several important factors such as the ratio of the specular component pow...

  11. Eigenmode analysis of phased-coupled VCSEL arrays using spatial coherence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Elodie; Lundeberg, Lars D A; Kapon, Eli

    2011-08-01

    We apply the modal coherence theory to evaluate the spatial mode structure of a 2×2 phase-coupled array of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). The eigenmode structure is extracted for different pump currents by measuring the degree of spatial coherence of all VCSEL pairs in the array. The results reveal the impact of optical disorder and spatial hole burning on the modal discrimination. The approach is useful more generally for the evaluation of spatial mode content of other laser array. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  12. Field Programmable Gate Array Reliability Analysis Using the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip McNelles

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Field programmable gate array (FPGA-based systems are thought to be a practical option to replace certain obsolete instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants. An FPGA is a type of integrated circuit, which is programmed after being manufactured. FPGAs have some advantages over other electronic technologies, such as analog circuits, microprocessors, and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs, for nuclear instrumentation and control, and safety system applications. However, safety-related issues for FPGA-based systems remain to be verified. Owing to this, modeling FPGA-based systems for safety assessment has now become an important point of research. One potential methodology is the dynamic flowgraph methodology (DFM. It has been used for modeling software/hardware interactions in modern control systems. In this paper, FPGA logic was analyzed using DFM. Four aspects of FPGAs are investigated: the “IEEE 1164 standard,” registers (D flip-flops, configurable logic blocks, and an FPGA-based signal compensator. The ModelSim simulations confirmed that DFM was able to accurately model those four FPGA properties, proving that DFM has the potential to be used in the modeling of FPGA-based systems. Furthermore, advantages of DFM over traditional reliability analysis methods and FPGA simulators are presented, along with a discussion of potential issues with using DFM for FPGA-based system modeling.

  13. Microelectrode array-induced neuronal alignment directs neurite outgrowth: analysis using a fast Fourier transform (FFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radotić, Viktorija; Braeken, Dries; Kovačić, Damir

    2017-12-01

    Many studies have shown that the topography of the substrate on which neurons are cultured can promote neuronal adhesion and guide neurite outgrowth in the same direction as the underlying topography. To investigate this effect, isotropic substrate-complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) chips were used as one example of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) for directing neurite growth of spiral ganglion neurons. Neurons were isolated from 5 to 7-day-old rat pups, cultured 1 day in vitro (DIV) and 4 DIV, and then fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. For analysis of neurite alignment and orientation, fast Fourier transformation (FFT) was used. Results revealed that on the micro-patterned surface of a CMOS chip, neurons orient their neurites along three directional axes at 30, 90, and 150° and that neurites aligned in straight lines between adjacent pillars and mostly followed a single direction while occasionally branching perpendicularly. We conclude that the CMOS substrate guides neurites towards electrodes by means of their structured pillar organization and can produce electrical stimulation of aligned neurons as well as monitoring their neural activities once neurites are in the vicinity of electrodes. These findings are of particular interest for neural tissue engineering with the ultimate goal of developing a new generation of MEA essential for improved electrical stimulation of auditory neurons.

  14. Field programmable gate array reliability analysis using the dynamic flow graph methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNelles, Phillip; Lu, Lixuan [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), Ontario (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    Field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based systems are thought to be a practical option to replace certain obsolete instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants. An FPGA is a type of integrated circuit, which is programmed after being manufactured. FPGAs have some advantages over other electronic technologies, such as analog circuits, microprocessors, and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), for nuclear instrumentation and control, and safety system applications. However, safety-related issues for FPGA-based systems remain to be verified. Owing to this, modeling FPGA-based systems for safety assessment has now become an important point of research. One potential methodology is the dynamic flowgraph methodology (DFM). It has been used for modeling software/hardware interactions in modern control systems. In this paper, FPGA logic was analyzed using DFM. Four aspects of FPGAs are investigated: the 'IEEE 1164 standard', registers (D flip-flops), configurable logic blocks, and an FPGA-based signal compensator. The ModelSim simulations confirmed that DFM was able to accurately model those four FPGA properties, proving that DFM has the potential to be used in the modeling of FPGA-based systems. Furthermore, advantages of DFM over traditional reliability analysis methods and FPGA simulators are presented, along with a discussion of potential issues with using DFM for FPGA-based system modeling.

  15. Spectral Entropy Based Neuronal Network Synchronization Analysis Based on Microelectrode Array Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Fikret E; Välkki, Inkeri; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Leone, Chiara; Lenk, Kerstin; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2016-01-01

    Synchrony and asynchrony are essential aspects of the functioning of interconnected neuronal cells and networks. New information on neuronal synchronization can be expected to aid in understanding these systems. Synchronization provides insight in the functional connectivity and the spatial distribution of the information processing in the networks. Synchronization is generally studied with time domain analysis of neuronal events, or using direct frequency spectrum analysis, e.g., in specific frequency bands. However, these methods have their pitfalls. Thus, we have previously proposed a method to analyze temporal changes in the complexity of the frequency of signals originating from different network regions. The method is based on the correlation of time varying spectral entropies (SEs). SE assesses the regularity, or complexity, of a time series by quantifying the uniformity of the frequency spectrum distribution. It has been previously employed, e.g., in electroencephalogram analysis. Here, we revisit our correlated spectral entropy method (CorSE), providing evidence of its justification, usability, and benefits. Here, CorSE is assessed with simulations and in vitro microelectrode array (MEA) data. CorSE is first demonstrated with a specifically tailored toy simulation to illustrate how it can identify synchronized populations. To provide a form of validation, the method was tested with simulated data from integrate-and-fire model based computational neuronal networks. To demonstrate the analysis of real data, CorSE was applied on in vitro MEA data measured from rat cortical cell cultures, and the results were compared with three known event based synchronization measures. Finally, we show the usability by tracking the development of networks in dissociated mouse cortical cell cultures. The results show that temporal correlations in frequency spectrum distributions reflect the network relations of neuronal populations. In the simulated data, CorSE unraveled the

  16. Screening of WT1 mutations in exon 8 and 9 in children with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome from a single centre and establishment of a rapid screening assay using high-resolution melting analysis in a clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Siji, Annes; Pardeshi, Varsha Chhotusing; Ravindran, Shilpa; Vasudevan, Ambily; Vasudevan, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Background Mutations in Wilm?s tumor 1 (WT1) gene is one of the commonly reported genetic mutations in children with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). We report the results of direct sequencing of exons 8 and 9 of WT1 gene in 100 children with SRNS from a single centre. We standardized and validated High Resolution Melt (HRM) as a rapid and cost effective screening step to identify individuals with normal sequence and distinguish it from those with a potential mutation. Since only ...

  17. Transcriptome instability in colorectal cancer identified by exon microarray analyses: Associations with splicing factor expression levels and patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Anita; Agesen, Trude H; Nesbakken, Arild; Rognum, Torleiv O; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2011-05-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease that, on the molecular level, can be characterized by inherent genomic instabilities; chromosome instability and microsatellite instability. In the present study we analyze genome-wide disruption of pre-mRNA splicing, and propose transcriptome instability as a characteristic that is analogous to genomic instability on the transcriptome level. Exon microarray profiles from two independent series including a total of 160 CRCs were investigated for their relative amounts of exon usage differences. Each exon in each sample was assigned an alternative splicing score calculated by the FIRMA algorithm. Amounts of deviating exon usage per sample were derived from exons with extreme splicing scores. There was great heterogeneity within both series in terms of sample-wise amounts of deviating exon usage. This was strongly associated with the expression levels of approximately half of 280 splicing factors (54% and 48% of splicing factors were significantly correlated to deviating exon usage amounts in the two series). Samples with high or low amounts of deviating exon usage, associated with overall transcriptome instability, were almost completely separated into their respective groups by hierarchical clustering analysis of splicing factor expression levels in both sample series. Samples showing a preferential tendency towards deviating exon skipping or inclusion were associated with skewed transcriptome instability. There were significant associations between transcriptome instability and reduced patient survival in both sample series. In the test series, patients with skewed transcriptome instability showed the strongest prognostic association (P = 0.001), while a combination of the two characteristics showed the strongest association with poor survival in the validation series (P = 0.03). We have described transcriptome instability as a characteristic of CRC. This transcriptome instability has associations with splicing

  18. A multi-center ring trial of allergen analysis using fluorescent multiplex array technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, Eva M.; Filep, Stephanie; Smith, Bryan; Platts-Mills, Thomas; Hamilton, Robert G.; Schmechel, Detlef; Sordillo, Joanne E.; Milton, Donald; van Ree, Ronald; Krop, Esmeralda J. M.; Heederik, Dick J. J.; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Sever, Michelle L.; Calatroni, Agustin; Arbes, Samuel J.; Mitchell, Herman E.; Chapman, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    Consistent performance of allergen assays is essential to ensure reproducibility of exposure assessments for investigations of asthma and occupational allergic disease. This study evaluated intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of a fluorescent multiplex array, which simultaneously measures

  19. Genomic V exons from whole genome shotgun data in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, D N; von Haeften, B; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Faro, J; Gambón-Deza, F

    2014-08-01

    Reptiles and mammals diverged over 300 million years ago, creating two parallel evolutionary lineages amongst terrestrial vertebrates. In reptiles, two main evolutionary lines emerged: one gave rise to Squamata, while the other gave rise to Testudines, Crocodylia, and Aves. In this study, we determined the genomic variable (V) exons from whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS) data in reptiles corresponding to the three main immunoglobulin (IG) loci and the four main T cell receptor (TR) loci. We show that Squamata lack the TRG and TRD genes, and snakes lack the IGKV genes. In representative species of Testudines and Crocodylia, the seven major IG and TR loci are maintained. As in mammals, genes of the IG loci can be grouped into well-defined IMGT clans through a multi-species phylogenetic analysis. We show that the reptilian IGHV and IGLV genes are distributed amongst the established mammalian clans, while their IGKV genes are found within a single clan, nearly exclusive from the mammalian sequences. The reptilian and mammalian TRAV genes cluster into six common evolutionary clades (since IMGT clans have not been defined for TR). In contrast, the reptilian TRBV genes cluster into three clades, which have few mammalian members. In this locus, the V exon sequences from mammals appear to have undergone different evolutionary diversification processes that occurred outside these shared reptilian clans. These sequences can be obtained in a freely available public repository (http://vgenerepertoire.org).

  20. Automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 5. [Cost analysis and factory design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiello, R.V.

    1977-10-01

    During this quarter, an interim 1982 factory was designed for the large-scale production of silicon solar cell array modules. The boundary conditions for this design are the use of Czochralski silicon crystals and $25/kg polycrystalline silicon. The objective is a large-scale production facility to meet an intermediate ERDA cost goal of $2.00/W in 1982. The approach was to first consider a panel design which could be expected to have a 20-year life and would also meet the JPL specification on mechanical, electrical, and environmental stability. Attention was then directed to a cost analysis of the production of the elements comprising this panel. Since it was expected that wafer production would comprise a major fraction of the cost, several cost reduction schemes were considered for the Czochralski pulling and sawing of the wafers. A solar-cell processing sequence was selected on the basis of our previous cost studies and the projected availability of production equipment by 1982. These criteria resulted in the selection of POCl/sub 3/ gaseous diffusion for junction formation, thick-film Ag screen-printed metallization, spray-on antireflection (AR) coating, and solder reflow interconnect technology. The economic study was made by computer analysis of the cost elements of these process sequences at production levels ranging from 3 to 100 MW/yr. With the results of this study, a 30-MW/yr factory was designed, and a preliminary floor plan layout is given. A manufacturing cost of $2.01/W is projected and, including factory overhead and profit, a selling price of $2.27/W is projected.

  1. A prototype for the real-time analysis of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarelli, Andrea; Fioretti, Valentina; Zoli, Andrea; Aboudan, Alessio; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; Maier, Gernot; Lyard, Etienne; Bastieri, Denis; Lombardi, Saverio; Tosti, Gino; De Rosa, Adriano; Bergamaschi, Sonia; Interlandi, Matteo; Beneventano, Domenico; Lamanna, Giovanni; Jacquemier, Jean; Kosack, Karl; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Boisson, Catherine; Burkowski, Jerzy; Buson, Sara; Carosi, Alessandro; Conforti, Vito; Contreras, Jose Luis; De Cesare, Giovanni; de los Reyes, Raquel; Dumm, Jon; Evans, Phil; Fortson, Lucy; Fuessling, Matthias; Graciani, Ricardo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Grandi, Paola; Hinton, Jim; Humensky, Brian; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Marisaldi, Martino; Neyroud, Nadine; Nicastro, Luciano; Ohm, Stefan; Osborne, Julian; Rosen, Simon; Tacchini, Alessandro; Torresi, Eleonora; Testa, Vincenzo; Trifoglio, Massimo; Weinstein, Amanda

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the biggest ground-based very-high-energy (VHE) γ- ray observatory. CTA will achieve a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity from some tens of GeV to beyond 100 TeV with respect to existing telescopes. The CTA observatory will be capable of issuing alerts on variable and transient sources to maximize the scientific return. To capture these phenomena during their evolution and for effective communication to the astrophysical community, speed is crucial. This requires a system with a reliable automated trigger that can issue alerts immediately upon detection of γ-ray flares. This will be accomplished by means of a Real-Time Analysis (RTA) pipeline, a key system of the CTA observatory. The latency and sensitivity requirements of the alarm system impose a challenge because of the anticipated large data rate, between 0.5 and 8 GB/s. As a consequence, substantial efforts toward the optimization of highthroughput computing service are envisioned. For these reasons our working group has started the development of a prototype of the Real-Time Analysis pipeline. The main goals of this prototype are to test: (i) a set of frameworks and design patterns useful for the inter-process communication between software processes running on memory; (ii) the sustainability of the foreseen CTA data rate in terms of data throughput with different hardware (e.g. accelerators) and software configurations, (iii) the reuse of nonreal- time algorithms or how much we need to simplify algorithms to be compliant with CTA requirements, (iv) interface issues between the different CTA systems. In this work we focus on goals (i) and (ii).

  2. Histone hyperacetylation and exon skipping: a calcium-mediated dynamic regulation in cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Nguyen, Hieu; Cai, Lu; Lou, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to cell type-specific pre-mRNA alternative splicing, mechanisms controlling activity-dependent alternative splicing is under-studied and not well understood. In a recent study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of calcium-mediated mechanism that regulates alternative exon skipping in mouse cardiomyocytes. Our results reveal a strong link between histone hyperacetylation and skipping of cassette exons, and provide support to the kinetic coupling model of the epigenetic regulation of alternative splicing at the chromatin level. PMID:26325491

  3. Circular antenna array pattern analysis using radial basis function neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama Sanjeeva Reddy, B.; Vakula, D.; Sarma, N. V. S. N.

    2013-04-01

    A method is proposed to design circular antenna array for the given gain and beam width using Artificial Neural Networks. In optimizing circular arrays, the parameters to be controlled are excitation of the elements, their separation, lengths and the circle radius. This paper deals about finding the parameters of radiation pattern of given uniform circular antenna array. Initially, the network is trained with a set of input-output data pairs. The trained network is used for testing. The training data set is generated from MATLAB simulation with number of elements N=5, 10, 15 and 20 elements of uniform circular array, respectively, distributed over a given circle, assuming 20 training cases. The number of input nodes, hidden nodes and output nodes are 20, 20 and 1, respectively. Predicted values of the neural network are compared with those of MATLAB simulation results and are found to be in agreement. This work establishes the application of Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) for circular array pattern optimization. RBFNN is able to predict the output values with 97% of accuracy. This work proves that RBFNN can be used for circular antenna array design.

  4. Inactivating Mutation screening of Exon 6 and Exon 10E of FSHR gene in women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Vellore population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Sapre, Madhura; Kale, Vaikhari; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic Ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a major cause of infertility in females of reproducing age and is typified by oligo-anovulation, hyperandrogenism, hirsutism and polycystic ovaries. FSHR gene located on chromosome 2 p21 is responsible for the normal follicular development and any deletion or mutation in the gene affects the interaction of FSH with its receptor. Thus, it becomes the candidate gene for PCOS study. Inactivating mutation in FSHR gene limits the receptor’s function by creating a complete block, changing the receptor-ligand complex or the basic hormone signal transduction.To screen the inactivating mutations in Exon 6 and Exon 10E of FSHR gene in women diagnosed with PCOS.PCR-RFLP analysis indicated that there were no inactivating mutations found in Exon 6 and Exon 10E. Variations in hormone levels were seen amongst the PCOS patients. There were no inactivating mutations found in FSHR gene of the women diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria in Vellore population.

  5. Fuzzy-adaptive-thresholding-based exon prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ankit; Mittal, Ankush; Jain, Rahul; Takkar, Raghav

    2010-01-01

    Thresholding is always critical and decisive in many bioinformatics problems. In this paper, we propose and apply a fuzzy-logic-based adaptive thresholding approach to a well-known solution for the exon prediction problem, which uses a threshold on the frequency component at f = 1/3 in the nucleotide sequence. The proposed approach allows the thresholds to vary along the data set based on the local statistical properties. Experiments and results on the nucleotide data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Bakers yeast) illustrate the advantage of our approach. A user-friendly GUI in MATLAB is freely available for academic use at www.cs.iastate.edu/˜ankitag/FATBEP.html.

  6. Accurate clinical detection of exon copy number variants in a targeted NGS panel using DECoN [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Fowler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS panels are increasingly being used in clinical genomics to increase capacity, throughput and affordability of gene testing. Identifying whole exon deletions or duplications (termed exon copy number variants, ‘exon CNVs’ in exon-targeted NGS panels has proved challenging, particularly for single exon CNVs.  Methods: We developed a tool for the Detection of Exon Copy Number variants (DECoN, which is optimised for analysis of exon-targeted NGS panels in the clinical setting. We evaluated DECoN performance using 96 samples with independently validated exon CNV data. We performed simulations to evaluate DECoN detection performance of single exon CNVs and to evaluate performance using different coverage levels and sample numbers. Finally, we implemented DECoN in a clinical laboratory that tests BRCA1 and BRCA2 with the TruSight Cancer Panel (TSCP. We used DECoN to analyse 1,919 samples, validating exon CNV detections by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA.  Results: In the evaluation set, DECoN achieved 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity for BRCA exon CNVs, including identification of 8 single exon CNVs. DECoN also identified 14/15 exon CNVs in 8 other genes. Simulations of all possible BRCA single exon CNVs gave a mean sensitivity of 98% for deletions and 95% for duplications. DECoN performance remained excellent with different levels of coverage and sample numbers; sensitivity and specificity was >98% with the typical NGS run parameters. In the clinical pipeline, DECoN automatically analyses pools of 48 samples at a time, taking 24 minutes per pool, on average. DECoN detected 24 BRCA exon CNVs, of which 23 were confirmed by MLPA, giving a false discovery rate of 4%. Specificity was 99.7%.  Conclusions: DECoN is a fast, accurate, exon CNV detection tool readily implementable in research and clinical NGS pipelines. It has high sensitivity and specificity and acceptable

  7. Dynamin 3: a new candidate tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma detected by triple combination array analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inokawa Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yoshikuni Inokawa,1 Shuji Nomoto,1 Mitsuhiro Hishida,1 Masamichi Hayashi,1 Mitsuro Kanda,1 Yoko Nishikawa,1 Shin Takeda,2 Michitaka Fujiwara,1 Masahiko Koike,1 Hiroyuki Sugimoto,1 Tsutomu Fujii,1 Goro Nakayama,1 Suguru Yamada,1 Chie Tanaka,1 Daisuke Kobayashi,1 Yasuhiro Kodera11Gastroenterological Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya Japan; 2Department of Surgery, Nagoya Medical Center, Nagoya, JapanBackground: To identify genes associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC pathogenesis, we developed a triple combination array strategy comprising methylation, gene expression, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array analysis.Methods: Surgical specimens obtained from a 68-year-old female HCC patient were analyzed by triple combination array, and identified Dynamin 3 (DNM3 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in HCC. Subsequently, samples from 48 HCC patients were evaluated for DNM3 methylation and expression status using methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR; MSP and semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR, respectively. The relationship between clinicopathological factors and DNM3 methylation status was also investigated.Results: DNM3 was shown to be hypermethylated (methylation value 0.879, range 0–1.0 in cancer tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue (0.213 by methylation array in the 68-year-old female patient. Expression arrays revealed decreased expression of DNM3 in cancerous tissue. SNP arrays revealed that the copy number of chromosome 1q24.3, in which DNM3 resides, was normal. MSP revealed hypermethylation of the DNM3 promoter region in 33 of 48 tumor samples. A trend toward decreased DNM3 expression was observed in patients with DNM3 promoter methylation (P = 0.189. Furthermore, patients with reduced expression of DNM3 in tumor tissues exhibited worse prognosis with decreased disease specific survival compared to patients without decreased expression (P = 0.014.Conclusion: The

  8. Genetic associations of nonsynonymous exonic variants with psychophysiological endophenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieze, Scott I.; Malone, Stephen M.; Pankratz, Nathan; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Miller, Michael B.; Kang, Hyun Min; McGue, Matt; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    We mapped ~85,000 rare nonsynonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to 17 psychophysiological endophenotypes in 4,905 individuals, including antisaccade eye movements, resting EEG, P300 amplitude, electrodermal activity, affect-modulated startle eye blink. Nonsynonymous SNPs are predicted to directly change or disrupt proteins encoded by genes and are expected to have significant biological consequences. Most such variants are rare, and new technologies can efficiently assay them on a large scale. We assayed 247,870 mostly rare SNPs on an Illumina exome array. Approximately 85,000 of the SNPs were polymorphic, rare (MAF < .05), and nonsynonymous. Single variant association tests identified a SNP in the PARD3 gene associated with theta resting EEG power. The sequence kernel association test, a gene-based test, identified a gene PNPLA7 associated with pleasant difference startle, the difference in startle magnitude between pleasant and neutral images. No other single nonsynonymous variant, or gene-based group of variants, was strongly associated with any endophenotype. PMID:25387709

  9. Genetic polymorphism of exon 9-11 of the leptin gene receptor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genomic DNA was extracted using modified salting-out method and amplified polymerase chain reaction technique. Exon and intron 9-11 of the fowl leptin gene ... Further association analysis is required to clarify the effects of these marker genotypes on production traits in this breeder flock. Key words: Leptin gene receptor, ...

  10. Lithospheric and sublithospheric anisotropy beneath the Baltic shield from surface-wave array analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Helle A.; Bruneton, Marianne; Maupin, Valérie; Svekalapko Seismic Tomography Working Group

    2006-04-01

    We report measurements of radial and azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle beneath southern and central Finland, which we obtained by array analysis of fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love waves. Azimuthally averaged phase velocities were analysed in the period range 15 to 190 s for Rayleigh waves and 15 to 100 s for Love waves. The azimuthal variation of the Rayleigh wave phase velocities was obtained in the period range 20 to 100 s. The limited depth resolution of fundamental-mode surface waves necessitated strong damping constraints in the inversion for anisotropic parameters. We investigated the effects of non-unicity on the final model by experimenting with varying model geometries. The radial anisotropy beneath Finland can be explained by a lithosphere at least 200 km thick, predominantly (> 50% by volume) composed of olivine crystals having their a-axes randomly distributed in the horizontal plane. On the contrary, the measured lithospheric azimuthal anisotropy is small. This can be reconciled with body-wave observations made in the area that indicate a complex pattern of rapidly varying anisotropy. Below 200-250 km depth, that is below the petrologic lithosphere as revealed by xenolith analyses conducted in the area, the magnitude of the azimuthal anisotropy increases and would be compatible with a mantle containing 15-20% by volume of olivine crystals whose a-axes are coherently aligned in the N-NE direction. The alignment of the a-axes is off the direction of present-day absolute plate motion in either the no-net-rotation or hot-spot reference frame, currently N55-N60. We interpret this mismatch as evidence for a complex convective flow pattern of the mantle beneath the shield, which, by inference, is decoupled from the overlying lithosphere.

  11. Surface analysis and mechanical behaviour mapping of vertically aligned CNT forest array through nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koumoulos, Elias P.; Charitidis, C.A., E-mail: charitidis@chemeng.ntua.gr

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Structure and wall numbers are identified through TEM. • Static contact angle measurements revealed a super-hydrophobic behavior. • Hysteresis was observed (loading–unloading) due to the local stress distribution. • Hardness and modulus mapping for a grid of 70 μm{sup 2} is conducted. • Resistance is clearly divided in 2 regions (MWCNT and MWCNT – MWCNT) interface. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube (CNT) based architectures have increased the scientific interest owning to their exceptional performance rendering them promising candidates for advanced industrial applications in the nanotechnology field. Despite individual CNTs being considered as one of the most known strong materials, much less is known about other CNT forms, such as CNT arrays, in terms of their mechanical performance (integrity). In this work, thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method is employed to produce vertically aligned multiwall (VA-MW) CNT carpets. Their structural properties were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, while their hydrophobic behavior was investigated via contact angle measurements. The resistance to indentation deformation of VA-MWCNT carpets was investigated through nanoindentation technique. The synthesized VA-MWCNTs carpets consisted of well-aligned MWCNTs. Static contact angle measurements were performed with water and glycerol, revealing a rather super-hydrophobic behavior. The structural analysis, hydrophobic behavior and indentation response of VA-MWCNTs carpets synthesized via CVD method are clearly demonstrated. Additionally, cycle indentation load-depth curve was applied and hysteresis loops were observed in the indenter loading–unloading cycle due to the local stress distribution. Hardness (as resistance to applied load) and modulus mapping, at 200 nm of displacement for a grid of 70 μm{sup 2} is presented. Through trajection, the resistance is clearly divided in 2

  12. A highly sensitive quantitative real-time pcr assay for determination of mutant jak2 exon 12 allele burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, L.; Riley, C.H.; Westman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene have become an important identifier for the Philadelphia-chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. In contrast to the JAK2V617F mutation, the large number of JAK2 exon 12 mutations has challenged the development of quantitative assays. We...... present a highly sensitive real-time quantitative PCR assay for determination of the mutant allele burden of JAK2 exon 12 mutations. In combination with high resolution melting analysis and sequencing the assay identified six patients carrying previously described JAK2 exon 12 mutations and one novel...... tool for quantitative monitoring of the mutant allele burden and accordingly also for determining the impact of treatment with interferon-α-2, shown to induce molecular remission in JAK2V617F-positive patients, which may be a future treatment option for JAK2 exon 12-positive patients as well....

  13. Structural model of standard ultrasonic transducer array developed for FEM analysis of mechanical crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celmer, M; Opieliński, K J; Dopierała, M

    2018-02-01

    One of the reasons of distortions in ultrasonic imaging are crosstalk effects. They can be divided into groups according to the way of their formation. One of them is constituted by mechanical crosstalk, which is propagated by a construction of a multi-element array of piezoelectric transducers. When an individual transducer is excited, mechanical vibrations are transferred to adjacent construction components, thereby stimulating neighboring transducers to an undesired operation. In order to explore ways of the propagation of such vibrations, the authors developed the FEM model of the array of piezoelectric transducers designed for calculations in COMSOL Multiphysics software. Simulations of activating individual transducers and calculated electrical voltages appearing on transducers unstimulated intentionally, were performed in the time domain in order to assess the propagation velocity of different vibration modes through the construction elements. On this basis, conclusions were drawn in terms of the participation of various construction parts of the array of piezoelectric transducers in the process of creating the mechanical crosstalk. The elaborated FEM model allowed also to examine the ways aimed at reducing the transmission of mechanical crosstalk vibrations through the components of the array. Studies showed that correct cuts in the fasteners and the front layer improve the reduction of the mechanical crosstalk effect. The model can become a helpful tool in the process of design and modifications of manufactured ultrasonic arrays particularly in terms of mechanical crosstalk reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Two-Dimensional CMUT Linear Array for Underwater Applications: Directivity Analysis and Design Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs are one of the promising MEMS devices. This paper proposed an integrated vibration membrane structure to design a two-dimensional CMUT linear array for underwater applications. The operation frequencies for different medium have been calculated and simulated, which are 2.5 MHz in air and 0.7 MHz in water. The directivity analyses for the CMUT cell, subarray, and linear array have been provided. According to the product theorems, the directivity function of the complex array is obtained using a combination of the directivity functions of certain simple structures. Results show that the directivity of a CMUT cell is weak due to the small size, but the directivity of the designed linear array is very strong. Influential parameters of the linear array have been discussed, including the cell numbers, the adjacent distance, and the operation medium. In order to further suppress the side lobe interference and improve the resolution and the imaging quality of the imaging system, several weighting methods are used for optimization and comparison. Satisfactory side lobe suppression results are obtained, which can meet the actual requirements.

  15. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable - Molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    distributed throughout the exon. Finally, we identified a pseudoexon in intron 11, which would have pathogenic consequences if activated by mutations or improved splicing conditions. Exonic mutations that disrupt splicing are unlikely to facilitate response to BH(4) and may lead to inconsistent genotype......In about 20-30% of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients, phenylalanine (Phe) levels can be controlled by cofactor 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) administration. The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype has a predictive value concerning BH(4)-response and therefore a correct assessment of the mutation...... molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11...

  16. Multi-exon deletions of the FBN1 gene in Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrijver Iris

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the fibrillin -1 gene (FBN1 cause Marfan syndrome (MFS, an autosomal dominant multi-system connective tissue disorder. The 200 different mutations reported in the 235 kb, 65 exon-containing gene include only one family with a genomic multi-exon deletion. Methods We used long-range RT-PCR for mutation detection and long-range genomic PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of deletion breakpoints, allele-specific transcript analyses to determine stability of the mutant RNA, and pulse-chase studies to quantitate fibrillin synthesis and extracellular matrix deposition in cultured fibroblasts. Southern blots of genomic DNA were probed with three overlapping fragments covering the FBN1 coding exons Results Two novel multi-exon FBN1 deletions were discovered. Identical nucleotide pentamers were found at or near the intronic breakpoints. In a Case with classic MFS, an in-frame deletion of exons 42 and 43 removed the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the 5th LTBP (8-cysteine domain and the adjacent 25th calcium-binding EGF-like (6-cysteine domain. The mutant mRNA was stable, but fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition were significantly reduced. A Case with severe childhood-onset MFS has a de novo deletion of exons 44–46 that removed three EGF-like domains. Fibrillin protein synthesis was normal, but matrix deposition was strikingly reduced. No genomic rearrangements were detected by Southern analysis of 18 unrelated MFS samples negative for FBN1 mutation screening. Conclusions Two novel deletion cases expand knowledge of mutational mechanisms and genotype/phenotype correlations of fibrillinopathies. Deletions or mutations affecting an LTBP domain may result in unstable mutant protein cleavage products that interfere with microfibril assembly.

  17. Linearity Analysis on a Series-Split Capacitor Array for High-Speed SAR ADCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel Capacitor array structure for Successive Approximation Register (SAR ADC is proposed. This circuit efficiently utilizes charge recycling to achieve high-speed of operation and it can be applied to high-speed and low-to-medium-resolution SAR ADC. The parasitic effects and the static linearity performance, namely, the INL and DNL, of the proposed structure are theoretically analyzed and behavioral simulations are performed to demonstrate its effectiveness under those nonidealities. Simulation results show that to achieve the same conversion performance the proposed capacitor array structure can reduce the average power consumed from the reference ladder by 90% when compared to the binary-weighted splitting capacitor array structure.

  18. A Comprehensive Review and Analysis of Solar Photovoltaic Array Configurations under Partial Shaded Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramaprabha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of partial shading on energy output of different Solar Photovoltaic Array (SPVA configurations and to mitigate the losses faced in Solar Photovoltaic (SPV systems by incorporating bypass diodes. Owing to the practical difficulty of conducting experiments on varied array sizes, a generalized MATLAB M-code has been developed for any required array size, configuration, shading patterns, and number of bypass diodes. The proposed model which also includes the insolation-dependent shunt resistance can provide sufficient degree of precision without increasing the computational effort. All the configurations have been analyzed and comparative study is made for different random shading patterns to determine the configuration less susceptible to power losses under partial shading. Inferences have been drawn by testing several shading scenarios.

  19. De novo disruption of promoter and exon 1 of STAR gene reveals essential role for gonadal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piya, Anil; Kaur, Jasmeet; Rice, Alan M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol transport into the mitochondria is required for synthesis of the first steroid, pregnenolone. Cholesterol is transported by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), which acts at the outer mitochondrial membrane prior to its import. Mutations in the STAR protein result in lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Although the STAR protein consists of seven exons, biochemical analysis in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells showed that the first two were not essential for pregnenolone synthesis. Here, we present a patient with ambiguous genitalia, salt-lossing crisis within two weeks after birth and low cortisol levels. Sequence analysis of the STAR, including the exon-intron boundaries, showed the complete deletion of exon 1 as well as more than 50 nucleotides upstream of STAR promoter. Mitochondrial protein import with the translated protein through synthesis cassette of the mutant STAR lacking exon 1 showed protein translation, but it is less likely to have synthesized without a promoter in our patient. Thus, a full-length STAR gene is necessary for physiological mitochondrial cholesterol transport in vivo. STAR exon 1 deletion caused lipoid CAH.Exon 1 substitution does not affect biochemical activity.StAR promoter is responsible for gonadal development.

  20. Ctrl+Shift+Enter mastering Excel array formulas a book about building efficient formulas, advanced formulas, and array formulas for data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Girvin, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Designed with Excel gurus in mind, this handbook outlines how to create formulas that can be used to solve everyday problems with a series of data values that standard Excel formulas cannot or would be too arduous to attempt. Beginning with an introduction to array formulas, this manual examines topics such as how they differ from ordinary formulas, the benefits and drawbacks of their use, functions that can and cannot handle array calculations, and array constants and functions. Among the practical applications surveyed include how to extract data from tables and unique lists, how to get resu

  1. Triple-layer dissection of the lung adenocarcinoma transcriptome – regulation at the gene, transcript, and exon levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Min-Kung; Wu, I-Ching; Cheng, Ching-Chia; Su, Jen-Liang; Hsieh, Chang-Huain; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is one of the most deadly human diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, particularly RNA splicing, have remained underexplored. Here, we report a triple-level (gene-, transcript-, and exon-level) analysis of lung adenocarcinoma transcriptomes from 77 paired tumor and normal tissues, as well as an analysis pipeline to overcome genetic variability for accurate differentiation between tumor and normal tissues. We report three major results. First, more than 5,000 differentially expressed transcripts/exonic regions occur repeatedly in lung adenocarcinoma patients. These transcripts/exonic regions are enriched in nicotine metabolism and ribosomal functions in addition to the pathways enriched for differentially expressed genes (cell cycle, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and axon guidance). Second, classification models based on rationally selected transcripts or exonic regions can reach accuracies of 0.93 to 1.00 in differentiating tumor from normal tissues. Of the 28 selected exonic regions, 26 regions correspond to alternative exons located in such regulators as tumor suppressor (GDF10), signal receptor (LYVE1), vascular-specific regulator (RASIP1), ubiquitination mediator (RNF5), and transcriptional repressor (TRIM27). Third, classification systems based on 13 to 14 differentially expressed genes yield accuracies near 100%. Genes selected by both detection methods include C16orf59, DAP3, ETV4, GABARAPL1, PPAR, RADIL, RSPO1, SERTM1, SRPK1, ST6GALNAC6, and TNXB. Our findings imply a multilayered lung adenocarcinoma regulome in which transcript-/exon-level regulation may be dissociated from gene-level regulation. Our described method may be used to identify potentially important genes/transcripts/exonic regions for the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma and to construct accurate tumor vs. normal classification systems for this disease. PMID:26356813

  2. Onboard Acoustic Data-Processing for the Statistical Analysis of Array Beam-Noise,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-15

    level of confidence in the correct interpretation of the results and formulation of conclusions must also be low. Data quality can be a severe problem ... problem . Data contamination due to a nearby ship (including the towship) or poor beamforming (i.e. bad channels or array nonlinearity) are possible...SPEED -1500. SIDELODE - 30.0 LONG- 0 0 00 N LAT; 0 0. 0 DEPTHS - 0 0 0 0 ON WEIGHT UNIFORM ARRAY M ID AVG 5 BEAM, R’IO THOG THOG BId £07. 257. MEDIAN

  3. MethLAB: a graphical user interface package for the analysis of array-based DNA methylation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, Varun; Barfield, Richard T; Schroeder, James W; Smith, Alicia K; Conneely, Karen N

    2012-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that DNA methylation changes may underlie numerous complex traits and diseases. The advent of commercial, array-based methods to interrogate DNA methylation has led to a profusion of epigenetic studies in the literature. Array-based methods, such as the popular Illumina GoldenGate and Infinium platforms, estimate the proportion of DNA methylated at single-base resolution for thousands of CpG sites across the genome. These arrays generate enormous amounts of data, but few software resources exist for efficient and flexible analysis of these data. We developed a software package called MethLAB (http://genetics.emory.edu/conneely/MethLAB) using R, an open source statistical language that can be edited to suit the needs of the user. MethLAB features a graphical user interface (GUI) with a menu-driven format designed to efficiently read in and manipulate array-based methylation data in a user-friendly manner. MethLAB tests for association between methylation and relevant phenotypes by fitting a separate linear model for each CpG site. These models can incorporate both continuous and categorical phenotypes and covariates, as well as fixed or random batch or chip effects. MethLAB accounts for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at a user-specified level. Standard output includes a spreadsheet-ready text file and an array of publication-quality figures. Considering the growing interest in and availability of DNA methylation data, there is a great need for user-friendly open source analytical tools. With MethLAB, we present a timely resource that will allow users with no programming experience to implement flexible and powerful analyses of DNA methylation data.

  4. Exon exchange approach to repair Duchenne dystrophin transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Lorain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trans-splicing strategies for mRNA repair involve engineered transcripts designed to anneal target mRNAs in order to interfere with their natural splicing, giving rise to mRNA chimeras where endogenous mutated exons have been replaced by exogenous replacement sequences. A number of trans-splicing molecules have already been proposed for replacing either the 5' or the 3' part of transcripts to be repaired. Here, we show the feasibility of RNA surgery by using a double trans-splicing approach allowing the specific substitution of a given mutated exon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a target we used a minigene encoding a fragment of the mdx dystrophin gene enclosing the mutated exon (exon 23. This minigene was cotransfected with a variety of exon exchange constructions, differing in their annealing domains. We obtained accurate and efficient replacement of exon 23 in the mRNA target. Adding up a downstream intronic splice enhancer DISE in the exon exchange molecule enhanced drastically its efficiency up to 25-45% of repair depending on the construction in use. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate the possibility to fix up mutated exons, refurbish deleted exons and introduce protein motifs, while keeping natural untranslated sequences, which are essential for mRNA stability and translation regulation. Conversely to the well-known exon skipping, exon exchange has the advantage to be compatible with almost any type of mutations and more generally to a wide range of genetic conditions. In particular, it allows addressing disorders caused by dominant mutations.

  5. Exon Exchange Approach to Repair Duchenne Dystrophin Transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorain, Stéphanie; Peccate, Cécile; Le Hir, Maëva; Garcia, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background Trans-splicing strategies for mRNA repair involve engineered transcripts designed to anneal target mRNAs in order to interfere with their natural splicing, giving rise to mRNA chimeras where endogenous mutated exons have been replaced by exogenous replacement sequences. A number of trans-splicing molecules have already been proposed for replacing either the 5′ or the 3′ part of transcripts to be repaired. Here, we show the feasibility of RNA surgery by using a double trans-splicing approach allowing the specific substitution of a given mutated exon. Methodology/Principal Findings As a target we used a minigene encoding a fragment of the mdx dystrophin gene enclosing the mutated exon (exon 23). This minigene was cotransfected with a variety of exon exchange constructions, differing in their annealing domains. We obtained accurate and efficient replacement of exon 23 in the mRNA target. Adding up a downstream intronic splice enhancer DISE in the exon exchange molecule enhanced drastically its efficiency up to 25–45% of repair depending on the construction in use. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate the possibility to fix up mutated exons, refurbish deleted exons and introduce protein motifs, while keeping natural untranslated sequences, which are essential for mRNA stability and translation regulation. Conversely to the well-known exon skipping, exon exchange has the advantage to be compatible with almost any type of mutations and more generally to a wide range of genetic conditions. In particular, it allows addressing disorders caused by dominant mutations. PMID:20531943

  6. Accuracy and Resolution Analysis of a Direct Resistive Sensor Array to FPGA Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Oballe-Peinado

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistive sensor arrays are formed by a large number of individual sensors which are distributed in different ways. This paper proposes a direct connection between an FPGA and a resistive array distributed in M rows and N columns, without the need of analog-to-digital converters to obtain resistance values in the sensor and where the conditioning circuit is reduced to the use of a capacitor in each of the columns of the matrix. The circuit allows parallel measurements of the N resistors which form each of the rows of the array, eliminating the resistive crosstalk which is typical of these circuits. This is achieved by an addressing technique which does not require external elements to the FPGA. Although the typical resistive crosstalk between resistors which are measured simultaneously is eliminated, other elements that have an impact on the measurement of discharge times appear in the proposed architecture and, therefore, affect the uncertainty in resistance value measurements; these elements need to be studied. Finally, the performance of different calibration techniques is assessed experimentally on a discrete resistor array, obtaining for a new model of calibration, a maximum relative error of 0.066% in a range of resistor values which correspond to a tactile sensor.

  7. Accuracy and Resolution Analysis of a Direct Resistive Sensor Array to FPGA Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Sánchez-Durán, José A; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A

    2016-02-01

    Resistive sensor arrays are formed by a large number of individual sensors which are distributed in different ways. This paper proposes a direct connection between an FPGA and a resistive array distributed in M rows and N columns, without the need of analog-to-digital converters to obtain resistance values in the sensor and where the conditioning circuit is reduced to the use of a capacitor in each of the columns of the matrix. The circuit allows parallel measurements of the N resistors which form each of the rows of the array, eliminating the resistive crosstalk which is typical of these circuits. This is achieved by an addressing technique which does not require external elements to the FPGA. Although the typical resistive crosstalk between resistors which are measured simultaneously is eliminated, other elements that have an impact on the measurement of discharge times appear in the proposed architecture and, therefore, affect the uncertainty in resistance value measurements; these elements need to be studied. Finally, the performance of different calibration techniques is assessed experimentally on a discrete resistor array, obtaining for a new model of calibration, a maximum relative error of 0.066% in a range of resistor values which correspond to a tactile sensor.

  8. Mathematical analysis of the real time array PCR (RTA PCR) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksman, Johan Frederik; Pierik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Real time array PCR (RTA PCR) is a recently developed biochemical technique that measures amplification curves (like with quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT PCR)) of a multitude of different templates in a sample. It combines two different methods in order to profit from the

  9. HPLC-photodiode array detection analysis of curcuminoids in Curcuma species indigenous to Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Rein; Windono, Tri; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Boersma, Ykelien L.; Koulman, Albert; Kayser, Oliver

    An optimized HPLC method with photodiode array detection was developed and applied to analyse the curcuminoids curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bis-demethoxycurcumin in rhizomes of Curcuma mangga Val &. v. Zijp, C. heyneana Val. & v. Zijp, C. aeruginosa Roxb. and C. soloensis Val. (Zingiberaceae),

  10. Mathematical analysis of the real time array PCR (RTA PCR) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksman J.F.; Pierik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Real Time Array PCR is a recently developed biochemical technique that measures amplification curves (like quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR)) of a multitude of different templates ina sample. It combines two different techniques to profit from theadvantages of both techniques,

  11. Power balance and loss mechanism analysis in RF transmit coil arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehne, Andre; Goluch, Sigrun; Waxmann, Patrick; Seifert, Frank; Ittermann, Bernd; Moser, Ewald; Laistler, Elmar

    2015-10-01

    To establish a framework for transmit array power balance calculations based on power correlation matrices to accurately quantify the loss contributions from different mechanisms such as coupling, lumped components, and radiation. Starting from Poynting's theorem, power correlation matrices are derived for all terms in the power balance, which is formulated as a matrix equation. Finite-difference time-domain simulations of two 7 T eight-channel head array coils at 297.2 MHz are used to verify the theoretical considerations and demonstrate their application. Care is taken to accurately incorporate all loss mechanisms. The power balance for static B1 phase shims as well as two-dimensional spatially selective transmit SENSE pulses is shown. The simulated power balance shows an excellent agreement with theory, with a maximum power imbalance of less than 0.11%. Power loss contributions from the different loss mechanisms vary significantly between the investigated setups, and depending on the excitation mode imposed on the coil. The presented approach enables a straightforward loss evaluation for an arbitrary excitation of transmit coil arrays. Worst-case power imbalance and losses are calculated in a straightforward manner. This allows for deeper insight into transmit array loss mechanisms, incorporation of radiated power components in specific absorption rate calculations and verification of electromagnetic simulations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Analysis of Resonant Behavior in Planar Line Arrays of Rings by the Eigencurrent Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekers, D.J.; Eijndhoven, S.J.L. van; Ven, A.A.F. van de; Borsboom, P.P.; Tijhuis, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Resonant behavior in a finite array that appears as (modulated) impedance or current-amplitude oscillations may limit its bandwidth substantially. Therefore, simulations should predict such behavior. Recently, a new approach has been developed, called the eigencurrent approach, which can predict

  13. Coherency analysis of accelerograms recorded by the UPSAR array during the 2004 Parkfield earthquake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konakli, Katerina; Kiureghian, Armen Der; Dreger, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Spatial variability of near-fault strong motions recorded by the US Geological Survey Parkfield Seismograph Array (UPSAR) during the 2004 Parkfield (California) earthquake is investigated. Behavior of the lagged coherency for two horizontal and the vertical components is analyzed by separately...

  14. Performance Analysis of Compact FD-MIMO Antenna Arrays in a Correlated Environment

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2017-03-06

    Full dimension multiple-input-multiple-output (FDMIMO) is one of the key technologies proposed in the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) for the fifth generation (5G) communication systems. The reason can be attributed to its ability to yield significant performance gains through the deployment of active antenna elements at the base station in the vertical as well as the conventional horizontal directions, enabling several elevation beamforming strategies. The resulting improvement in spectral efficiency largely depends on the orthogonality of the sub-channels constituting the FD-MIMO system. Accommodating a large number of antenna elements with sufficient spacing poses several constraints for practical implementation, making it imperative to consider compact antenna arrangements that minimize the overall channel correlation. Two such configurations considered in this work are the uniform linear array (ULA) and the uniform circular array (UCA) of antenna ports, where each port is mapped to a group of physical antenna elements arranged in the vertical direction. The generalized analytical expression for the spatial correlation function (SCF) for the UCA is derived, exploiting results on spherical harmonics and Legendre polynomials. The mutual coupling between antenna dipoles is accounted for and the resulting SCF is also presented. The second part of this work compares the spatial correlation and mutual information (MI) performance of the ULA and UCA configurations in the 3GPP 3D urban-macro and urban-micro cell scenarios, utilizing results from Random Matrix Theory (RMT) on the deterministic equivalent of the MI for the Kronecker channel model. Simulation results study the performance patterns of the two arrays as a function of several channel and array parameters and identify applications and environments suitable for the deployment of each array.

  15. Spheroid arrays for high-throughput single-cell analysis of spatial patterns and biomarker expression in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Grabowska, Anna M

    2017-01-30

    We describe and share a device, methodology and image analysis algorithms, which allow up to 66 spheroids to be arranged into a gel-based array directly from a culture plate for downstream processing and analysis. Compared to processing individual samples, the technique uses 11-fold less reagents, saves time and enables automated imaging. To illustrate the power of the technology, we showcase applications of the methodology for investigating 3D spheroid morphology and marker expression and for in vitro safety and efficacy screens. First, spheroid arrays of 11 cell-lines were rapidly assessed for differences in spheroid morphology. Second, highly-positive (SOX-2), moderately-positive (Ki-67) and weakly-positive (βIII-tubulin) protein targets were detected and quantified. Third, the arrays enabled screening of ten media compositions for inducing differentiation in human neurospheres. Last, the application of spheroid microarrays for spheroid-based drug screens was demonstrated by quantifying the dose-dependent drop in proliferation and increase in differentiation in etoposide-treated neurospheres.

  16. Room acoustics analysis using circular arrays: an experimental study based on sound field plane-wave decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ana M; Lopez, Jose J; Pueo, Basilio; Cobos, Maximo

    2013-04-01

    Plane-wave decomposition (PWD) methods using microphone arrays have been shown to be a very useful tool within the applied acoustics community for their multiple applications in room acoustics analysis and synthesis. While many theoretical aspects of PWD have been previously addressed in the literature, the practical advantages of the PWD method to assess the acoustic behavior of real rooms have been barely explored so far. In this paper, the PWD method is employed to analyze the sound field inside a selected set of real rooms having a well-defined purpose. To this end, a circular microphone array is used to capture and process a number of impulse responses at different spatial positions, providing angle-dependent data for both direct and reflected wavefronts. The detection of reflected plane waves is performed by means of image processing techniques applied over the raw array response data and over the PWD data, showing the usefulness of image-processing-based methods for room acoustics analysis.

  17. Model for a transcript map of human chromosome 21: isolation of new coding sequences from exon and enriched cDNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaspo, M L; Gellen, L; Mott, R; Korn, B; Nizetic, D; Poustka, A M; Lehrach, H

    1995-08-01

    The construction of a transcriptional map for human chromosome 21 requires the generation of a specific catalogue of genes, together with corresponding mapping information. Towards this goal, we conducted a pilot study on a pool of random chromosome 21 cosmids representing 2 Mb of non-contiguous DNA. Exon-amplification and cDNA selection methods were used in combination to extract the coding content from these cosmids, and to derive expressed sequences libraries. These libraries and the source cosmid library were arrayed at high density for hybridisation screening. A strategy was used which related data obtained by multiple hybridisations of clones originating from one library, screened against the other libraries. In this way, it was possible to integrate the information with the physical map and to compare the gene recovery rate of each technique. cDNAs and exons were grouped into bins delineated by EcoRI cosmid fragments, and a subset of 91 cDNAs and 29 exons have been sequenced. These sequences defined 79 non-overlapping potential coding segments distributed in 24 transcriptional units, which were mapped along 21q. Northern blot analysis performed for a subset of cDNAs indicated the existence of a cognate transcript. Comparison to databases indicated three segments matching to known chromosome 21 genes: PFKL, COL6A1 and S100B and six segments matching to unmapped anonymous expressed sequence tags (ESTs). At the translated nucleotide level, strong homologies to known proteins were found with ATP-binding transporters of the ABC family and the dihydroorotase domain of pyrimidine synthetases. These data strongly suggest that bona fide partial genes have been isolated. Several of the newly isolated transcriptional units map to clinically important regions, in particular those involved in Down's syndrome, progressive myoclonus epilepsia and auto-immune polyglandular disease. The study presented here illustrates the complementarity of exon-amplification and c

  18. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Images: Data Processing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Richard; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S.; Mather, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the data reduction and analysis procedures that have been employed in our previous studies of spatial fluctuation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) using deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations. The self-calibration we apply removes a strong instrumental signal from the fluctuations that would otherwise corrupt the results. The procedures and results for masking bright sources and modeling faint sources down to levels set by the instrumental noise are presented. Various tests are performed to demonstrate that the resulting power spectra of these fields are not dominated by instrumental or procedural effects. These tests indicate that the large-scale ([greater, similar]30') fluctuations that remain in the deepest fields are not directly related to the galaxies that are bright enough to be individually detected. We provide the parameterization of these power spectra in terms of separate instrument noise, shot noise, and power-law components. We discuss the relationship between fluctuations measured at different wavelengths and depths, and the relations between constraints on the mean intensity of the CIB and its fluctuation spectrum. Consistent with growing evidence that the [approx]1-5 [mu]m mean intensity of the CIB may not be as far above the integrated emission of resolved galaxies as has been reported in some analyses of DIRBE and IRTS observations, our measurements of spatial fluctuations of the CIB intensity indicate the mean emission from the objects producing the fluctuations is quite low ([greater, similar]1 nW m-2 sr-1 at 3-5 [mu]m), and thus consistent with current [gamma]-ray absorption constraints. The source of the fluctuations may be high-z Population III objects, or a more local component of very low luminosity objects with clustering properties that differ from the resolved galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the upcoming space-based surveys to directly measure the epochs

  19. Leishmania donovani complex: genotyping with the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and the mini-exon

    OpenAIRE

    Mauricio, IL; Stothard, JR; Miles, MA

    2004-01-01

    Intergenic region typing by restriction analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and mini-exon provide diagnostic markers for some Leishmania. Here, we evaluate restriction analysis of these targets for genotyping and phylogenetic analysis within the Leishmania donovani complex (agents of visceral leishmaniasis). Each method was useful for genotyping of both L. donovani complex strains and Old World Leishmania species. The targets produced less robust groups than gp63 inter...

  20. Association between chromosomal aberration of COX8C and tethered spinal cord syndrome: array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-jiong Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variations have been found in patients with neural tube abnormalities. In this study, we performed genome-wide screening using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization in three children with tethered spinal cord syndrome and two healthy parents. Of eight copy number variations, four were non-polymorphic. These non-polymorphic copy number variations were associated with Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes, and microcephaly. Gene function enrichment analysis revealed that COX8C, a gene associated with metabolic disorders of the nervous system, was located in the copy number variation region of Patient 1. Our results indicate that array-based comparative genomic hybridization can be used to diagnose tethered spinal cord syndrome. Our results may help determine the pathogenesis of tethered spinal cord syndrome and prevent occurrence of this disease.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  2. Widespread evolutionary conservation of alternatively spliced exons in caenorhabditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Penny, David

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) contributes to increased transcriptome and proteome diversity in various eukaryotic lineages. Previous studies showed low levels of conservation of alternatively spliced (cassette) exons within mammals and within dipterans. We report a strikingly different pattern...... in Caenorhabditis nematodes-more than 92% of cassette exons from Caenorhabditis elegans are conserved in Caenorhabditis briggsae and/or Caenorhabditis remanei. High levels of conservation extend to minor-form exons (present in a minority of transcripts) and are particularly pronounced for exons showing complex...... patterns of splicing. The functionality of the vast majority of cassette exons is underscored by various other features. We suggest that differences in conservation between lineages reflect differences in levels of functionality and further suggest that these differences are due to differences in intron...

  3. Analysis of airborne antenna pattern and mutual coupling and their effects on adaptive array performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H. H.

    The uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) is employed in this high frequency study of airborne antenna radiation patterns. A numerical solution is developed to treat general type aircraft in which the fuselage is assumed to be a perfectly conducting composite prolate spheroid surface. The wings, stabilizers and cockpit are simulated by multiple finite flat plates. Various patterns are calculated for antennas mounted on a F-16 fighter and KC-135 aircraft. The validity of the solution is verified by comparing the computed results with scale model measurements. An element placement procedure for airborne adaptive arrays is presented and evaluated in terms of a practical example. The airborne antenna radiation pattern solution is used as the basic tool in developing this placement algorithm. It is shown using this algorithm that one is able to design a system to achieve the required minimum SINR performance as well as desired resolution using a highly thinned array.

  4. Simultaneous Profiling of DNA Mutation and Methylation by Melting Analysis Using Magnetoresistive Biosensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Dahl, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, in particular DNA methylation, are gaining increasing interest as complementary information to DNA mutations for cancer diagnostics and prognostics. We introduce a method to simultaneously profile DNA mutation and methylation events for an array of sites with single site...... specificity. Genomic (mutation) or bisulphite-treated (methylation) DNA is amplified using nondiscriminatory primers, and the amplicons are then hybridized to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor array followed by melting curve measurements. The GMR biosensor platform offers scalable multiplexed detection...... of DNA hybridization, which is insensitive to temperature variation. The melting curve approach further enhances the assay specificity and tolerance to variations in probe length. We demonstrate the utility of this method by simultaneously profiling five mutation and four methylation sites in human...

  5. Electron Photoemission in Plasmonic Nanoparticle Arrays: Analysis of Collective Resonances and Embedding Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically study the characteristics of photoelectron emission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays. Nanoparticles are partially embedded in a semiconductor, forming Schottky barriers at metal/semiconductor interfaces through which photoelectrons can tunnel from the nanoparticle into the semiconductor; photodetection in the infrared range, where photon energies are below the semiconductor band gap (insufficient for band-to-band absorption in semiconductor), is therefore possible. The nanoparticles are arranged in a sparse rectangular lattice so that the wavelength of the lattice-induced Rayleigh anomalies can overlap the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the individual particles, bringing about collective effects from the nanoparticle array. Using full-wave numerical simulations, we analyze the effects of lattice constant, embedding depth, and refractive index step between the semiconductor layer and an adjacent transparent conductive oxide layer. We show that the presence of refracti...

  6. Quantitative miRNA Expression Analysis Using Fluidigm Microfluidics Dynamic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Jang, J.; Simon, V.A.; Feddersen, R.M.; Rakhshan, F.; Schultz, D.A.; Zschunke, M.A.; Lingle, W.L.; Kolbert, C.P.; Jen, J.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a small non-coding RNA that can regulate gene expression in both plants and animals. Studies showed that miRNAs play a critical role in human cancer by targeting messenger RNAs that are positive or negative regulators of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we evaluated miRNA expression in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples and fresh frozen (FF) samples using a high throughput qPCR-based microfluidic dynamic array technology (Fluidigm). We compared the results to hybridization-based microarray platforms using the same samples. We obtained a highly correlated Ct values between multiplex and single-plex RT reactions using standard qPCR assays for miRNA expression. For the same samples, the microfluidic technology (Fluidigm 48.48 dynamic array systems) resulted in a left shift towards lower Ct values compared to those observed by standard TaqMan (ABI 7900HT, mean difference, 3.79). In addition, as little as 10ng total RNA was sufficient to reproducibly detect up to 96 miRNAs at a wide range of expression values using a single 96-multiplexing RT reaction in either FFPE or FF samples. Comparison of miRNAs expression values measured by microfluidic technology with those obtained by other array and Next Generation sequencing platforms showed positive concordance using the same samples but revealed significant differences for a large fraction of miRNA targets. The qPCRarray based microfluidic technology can be used in conjunction with multiplexed RT reactions for miRNA gene expression profiling. This approach is highly reproducible and the results correlate closely with the existing singleplex qPCR platform while achieving much higher throughput at lower sample input and reagent usage. It is a rapid, cost effective, customizable array platform for miRNA expression profiling and validation. However, comparison of miRNA expression using different platforms requires caution and the use of multiple platforms.

  7. Somatic mutations of the ret Protooncogene in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma are not restricted to exon 16 and are associated with tumor recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romei, C.; Elisei, R.; Pinchera, A. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Germline point mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the ret protooncogene have been identified as causative in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and in familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Somatic point mutations of the same gene, exclusively associated with codon 918 of exon 16, have also been reported in few cases of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma. We analyzed the blood and tumor DNA of 19 patients with sporadic MTC and 6 patients with primary parathyroid adenoma for point mutations at exons 10, 11, and 16 of the ret protooncogene by restriction analysis of the PCR-amplified product and by sequence analysis of exons 10 and 11. A Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Tyr mutation was found in both the tumoral and blood DNA of one patient, indicating that he was affected by an hereditary form of MTC, erroneously considered sporadic. In the other 18 patients with MTC, somatic point mutations of ret were found in 8 cases (44.4%). In 5 cases the mutation affected exon 16 (Met{sup 918}{r_arrow}Thr), and in 3 cases it affected exon 11 (Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Arg in 1 and Cys{sup 634}{r_arrow}Trp in 2); these 3 mutations were confirmed by sequence analysis. The remaining 10 patients had no mutation in exon 10 by either restriction analysis or sequence analysis. Clinical data showed that 75% of the patients whose tumor carried ret mutation had tumor recurrence and/or increased serum calcitonin concentrations during the postsurgical follow-up period as opposed to 10% of the patients without mutations (P < 0.02, by {chi}{sup 2} analysis). No ret mutation was found in the tumoral DNA from parathyroid adenomas. Our findings indicate that the somatic ret point mutation frequently found in sporadic MTC may affect not only exon 16 but also exon 11 and is associated with less favorable clinical outcome. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Analysis of arrayed nanocapacitor formed on nanorods by flow-rate interruption atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bo-Cheng; Ku, Ching-Shun; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Chakroborty, Subhendu; Wu, Albert T.

    2017-12-01

    Flow-rate interruption (FRI) atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was adopted to fabricate AZO/Al2O3/AZO thin film on a ZnO nanorod array template at low temperature. The high quality amorphous dielectric Al2O3 layer was deposited at 50 °C. The template with an average of 0.73 μm in length was made by a simple hydrothermal method on a c-plane sapphire with an AZO seed layer. Using Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were served as a mask to form vertical and well-aligned ZnO nanostructures. Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show ALD to have achieved good step coverage and thickness control in the thin films structure coating. The capacitance density of the arrayed template nanocapacitor increased more than 100% than those of the thin film capacitor at an applied frequency of 10 kHz. These results suggest that the ZnO-arrayed template could enhance energy storage capability by providing significant surface area. This structure provides a concept for high surface-area nanocapacitor applications.

  9. [Polymorphism of exon 4 in the CANP-3 gene in patients with primary myopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatova, N A; Krakhmaleva, I N; Shishkin, S S; Shakhovskaia, N I; Podnikova, N I; Lunga, I N; Tarksh, M A; Gerasimova, N L

    1999-12-01

    The structures of the gene for calpain (CANP-3) and of the DMD gene were analyzed in patients with primary myopathies [limb-girdle muscular distrophy (LGMD) and Duchenne-Becker myodystrophy (DBM)] from various regions of Russia. Via amplification of DNA isolated from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 74 patients, extended deletions were found in 18 out of 55 patients with DBM. In none of the 19 patients with LGMD, were extended deletions in the CANP-3 gene found. In most patients with LGMD, the amplification of the promoter region and exons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 of the CANP-3 gene yielded a single product of corresponding length, but in six patients (three sib pairs), amplification of exon 4 of the CANP-3 gene yielded two products of different size. The following single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis revealed a pronounced polymorphism of exon 4 of the CANP-3 gene in 14 out of 19 patients with LGMD. This structure of exon 4 of the CANP-3 gene was found neither in 16 patients with DBM who had deletions in the DMD gene nor in 16 patients with DBM who had no deletions in the DMD gene.

  10. Evolution, functional divergence and conserved exon-intron structure of bHLH/PAS gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Ma, Zhaowu; Xu, Xiaopeng; Guo, An-Yuan

    2014-02-01

    bHLH/PAS genes encode a family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors with bHLH, PAS and PAS_3 domain. bHLH/PAS genes are involved in many essential physiological and developmental processes, such as hypoxic response neural development, the circadian clock, and learning ability. Despite their important functions, the origin and evolution of this bHLH/PAS gene family has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we aim to explore the origin, evolution, gene structure conservation of this gene family and provide a model to analyze the evolution of other gene families. Our results show that genes of the bHLH/PAS family only exist in metazoans. They may have originated from the common ancestor of metazoans and expanded into vertebrates. We identified bHLH/PAS genes in more than ten species representing the main lineages and constructed the phylogenetic trees (Beyasian, ML and NJ) to classify them into three groups. The exon-intron structure analysis revealed that a relatively conserved "1001-0210" eight-exon structure exists in most groups and lineages. In addition, we found the exon fusion pattern in several groups in this conserved eight-exon structure. Further analysis indicated that bHLH/PAS protein paralogs evolved from several gene duplication events followed by functional divergence and purifying selection. We presented a phylogenetic model to describe the evolutionary history of the exon structures of bHLH/PAS genes. Taken together, our study revealed the evolutionary model, functional divergence and gene structure conservation of bHLH/PAS genes. These findings provide clues for the functional and evolutionary mechanism of bHLH/PAS genes.

  11. Modeling and experimental analysis of phased array synthetic jet cross-flow interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Zohaib

    Synthetic Jet Actuators (SJAs) are fluidic devices capable of adding momentum to static or non-static bodies of fluid without adding mass. They are therefore categorized as zero-net-mass-flux (ZNMF) momentum source. In its simplest compact form a SJA consists of an oscillatory surface connected to a cavity with a single exit orifice through which the fluid enters and exits. SJA technology has been utilized in applications ranging from boundary layer control over aerodynamic surfaces to fluidic mixing in dispersion applications. The ZNMF nature of the technology means it is not subject to constraints experienced by traditional momentum sources that require the addition of mass in order to impart momentum. The momentum that can be added by a single SJA is limited by the energy transfer capabilities of the oscillating surface. In modern SJAs this surface usually is a piezoceramic/metal composite subjected to a high voltage AC signal. For applications such as flow control over aerodynamic surfaces, modern SJAs are used in an array configuration and are capable of altering the flow momentum by values ranging from 0.01-10%. While it is possible to build larger actuators to increase this value the benefits associated with the compact size would be lost. It is therefore desirable to tune other parameters associated with SJA arrays to increase this value. The specific motivation for this study comes from the desire to control the momentum addition capacity of a specific SJA array, without having to alter any geometric parameters. In a broader sense this study focuses on understanding the physics of SJA interaction in array configuration through experiments which are then used to guide in the design of modeling technique that predicts SJA array behavior in cross-flows. The first half of the project focused on understanding SJA behavior through modeling. Numerical techniques were initially used to model SJA and SJA arrays in cross-flows. Reduced numerical models were then

  12. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brückner, Michael [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Becker, Katja [Justus Liebig University Giessen, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany); Frosch, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.frosch@uni-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  13. Analysis of cortical arrays from Tradescantia virginiana at high resolution reveals discrete microtubule subpopulations and demonstrates that confocal images of arrays can be misleading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Deborah A; Vantard, Marylin; Overall, Robyn L

    2008-04-01

    Cortical microtubule arrays are highly organized networks involved in directing cellulose microfibril deposition within the cell wall. Their organization results from complex interactions between individual microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins. The precise details of these interactions are often not evident using optical microscopy. Using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, we analyzed extensive regions of cortical arrays and identified two spatially discrete microtubule subpopulations that exhibited different stabilities. Microtubules that lay adjacent to the plasma membrane were often bundled and more stable than the randomly aligned, discordant microtubules that lay deeper in the cytoplasm. Immunolabeling revealed katanin at microtubule ends, on curves, or at sites along microtubules in line with neighboring microtubule ends. End binding 1 protein also localized along microtubules, at microtubule ends or junctions between microtubules, and on the plasma membrane in direct line with microtubule ends. We show fine bands in vivo that traverse and may encircle microtubules. Comparing confocal and electron microscope images of fluorescently tagged arrays, we demonstrate that optical images are misleading, highlighting the fundamental importance of studying cortical microtubule arrays at high resolution.

  14. Skipping Multiple Exons to Treat DMD-Promises and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslesh, Tejal; Maruyama, Rika; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2018-01-02

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Antisense-mediated exon-skipping is a promising therapeutic strategy that makes use of synthetic nucleic acids to skip frame-disrupting exon(s) and allows for short but functional protein expression by restoring the reading frame. In 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved eteplirsen, which skips DMD exon 51 and is applicable to approximately 13% of DMD patients. Multiple exon skipping, which is theoretically applicable to 80-90% of DMD patients in total, have been demonstrated in animal models, including dystrophic mice and dogs, using cocktail antisense oligonucleotides (AOs). Although promising, current drug approval systems pose challenges for the use of a cocktail AO. For example, both exons 6 and 8 need to be skipped to restore the reading frame in dystrophic dogs. Therefore, the cocktail of AOs targeting these exons has a combined therapeutic effect and each AO does not have a therapeutic effect by itself. The current drug approval system is not designed to evaluate such circumstances, which are completely different from cocktail drug approaches in other fields. Significant changes are needed in the drug approval process to promote the cocktail AO approach.

  15. Alternative splicing regulation of APP exon 7 by RBFox proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shafiul; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2014-12-01

    RBFox proteins are well-known alternative splicing regulators. We have shown previously that during neuronal differentiation of P19 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid and cell aggregation, RBFox1 shows markedly increased temporal expression. To find its key splicing regulation, we examined the effect of RBFox1 on 33 previously reported and validated neuronal splicing events of P19 cells. We observed that alternative splicing of three genes, specifically, amyloid precursor protein (APP), disks large homolog 3 (DLG3), and G protein, alpha activating activity polypeptide O (GNAO1), was altered by transient RBFox1 expression in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, an RBFox1 mutant (RBFox1FA) that was unable to bind the target RNA sequence ((U)GCAUG) did not induce these splicing events. APP generates amyloid beta peptides that are involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, and therefore we examined APP alternative splicing regulation by RBFox1 and other splicing regulators. Our results indicated that RBFox proteins promote the skipping of APP exon 7, but not the inclusion of exon 8. We made APP6789 minigenes and observed that two (U)GCAUG sequences, located upstream of exon 7 and in exon 7, functioned to induce skipping of exon 7 by RBFox proteins. Overall, RBFox proteins may shift APP from exon 7 containing isoforms, APP770 and APP751, toward the exon 7 lacking isoform, APP695, which is predominant in neural tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Germline mutations of BRCA1 gene exon 11 are not associated with platinum response neither with survival advantage in patients with primary ovarian cancer: understanding the clinical importance of one of the biggest human exons. A study of the Tumor Bank Ovarian Cancer (TOC) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Desislava; Ruscito, Ilary; Olek, Sven; Richter, Rolf; Hellwag, Alexander; Türbachova, Ivana; Woopen, Hannah; Baron, Udo; Braicu, Elena Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid

    2016-09-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 gene have been reported in up to 20 % of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Distinct clinical characteristics have been attributed to this special EOC population. We hypothesized that mutations in different BRCA1 gene exons may differently affect the clinical course of the disease. The aim of this study was to analyze, in a large cohort of primary EOCs, the clinical impact of mutations in BRCA1 gene exon 11, the largest exon of the gene sequence encoding the 60 % of BRCA1 protein. Two hundred sixty-three primary EOC patients, treated between 2000 and 2008 at Charité University Hospital of Berlin, were included. Patients' blood samples were obtained from the Tumor Ovarian Cancer (TOC) Network ( www.toc-network.de ). Direct sequencing of BRCA1 gene exon 11 was performed for each patient to detect mutations. Based on their BRCA1 exon 11 mutational status, patients were compared regarding clinico-pathological variables and survival. Mutations in BRCA1 exon 11 were found in 18 out of 263 patients (6.8 %). Further 10/263 (3.8 %) cases showed variants of uncertain significance (VUS). All exon 11 BRCA1-positive tumors (100 %) were Type 2 ovarian carcinomas (p = 0.05). Age at diagnosis was significantly younger in Type 2 exon 11 mutated patients (p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, BRCA1 exon 11 mutational status was not found to be an independent predictive factor for optimal cytoreduction, platinum response, or survival. Mutations in BRCA1 gene exon 11 seem to predispose women to exclusively develop a Type 2 ovarian cancer at younger age. Exon 11 BRCA1-mutated EOC patients showed distinct clinico-pathological features but similar clinical outcome with respect to sporadic EOC patients.

  17. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high resolution electron imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step towards the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:21919532

  18. Transfer-printing of single DNA molecule arrays on graphene for high-resolution electron imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Alava, Thomas; Barton, Robert A; Craighead, Harold G

    2011-10-12

    Graphene represents the ultimate substrate for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the deposition of biological samples on this highly hydrophobic material has until now been a challenge. We present a reliable method for depositing ordered arrays of individual elongated DNA molecules on single-layer graphene substrates for high-resolution electron beam imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis. This method is a necessary step toward the observation of single elongated DNA molecules with single base spatial resolution to directly read genetic and epigenetic information.

  19. The Psychological Challenges of Replacing Conventional Karyotyping with Genomic SNP Array Analysis in Prenatal Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Riedijk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant couples tend to prefer a maximum of information about the health of their fetus. Therefore, we implemented whole genome microarray instead of conventional karyotyping (CK for all indications for prenatal diagnosis (PND. The array detects more clinically relevant anomalies, including early onset disorders, not related to the indication and more genetic anomalies of yet unquantifiable risk, so-called susceptibility loci (SL for mainly neurodevelopmental disorders. This manuscript highlights the psychological challenges in prenatal genetic counselling when using the array and provides counselling suggestions. First, we suggest that pre-test decision counselling should emphasize deliberation about what pregnant couples wish to learn about the future health of their fetus more than information about possible outcomes. Second, pregnant couples need support in dealing with SL. Therefore, in order to consider the SL in a proportionate perspective, the presence of phenotypes associated with SL in the family, the incidence of a particular SL in control populations and in postnatally ascertained patients needs highlighting during post-test genetic counselling. Finally, the decision that couples need to make about the course of their pregnancy is more complicated when the expected phenotype is variable and not quantifiable. Therefore, during post-test psychological counseling, couples should concretize the options of continuing and ending their pregnancy; all underlying feelings and thoughts should be made explicit, as well as the couple’s resources, in order to attain adequate decision-making. As such, pre- and post-test counselling aids pregnant couples in handling the uncertainties that may accompany offering a broader scope of genetic PND using the array.

  20. Characterization of a patch-clamp microchannel array towards neuronal networks analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, Massimo; Snakenborg, Detlef; Lopacinska, Joanna M.

    2010-01-01

    for simultaneous patch clamping of cultured cells or neurons in the same network. A disposable silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO2) chip with a microhole array was integrated in a microfluidic system for cell handling, perfusion and electrical recording. Fluidic characterization showed that our PC mu CA can work...... theory, but the capacitance is still too high for high resolution recording. The system was tested on HeLa cells: successful cell trapping with a sealing of 40 M Omega was recorded. Modification of the Si/SiO2 chip is needed in order to achieve a better sealing and long-term cell culturing in the PC mu...

  1. Detection and Analysis of Low-Frequency Sperm Whale Vocalizations with a Towed Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Alexander

    Sperm whale vocalizations recorded during a sea test and calibration experiment in the Gulf of Maine on a single towed, horizontal, densely sampled, low-frequency (whales. Comparison of the vocalizations and background noise levels and the estimated transmission loss suggests the sperm whale detection range after coherent array processing exceeds 60 km in low-to-moderate sea states. Low-frequency source levels of vocalizations are estimated using the received levels and the estimated transmission loss, and applications of both this estimate and the receiver-side statistics are discussed.

  2. Terahertz Kerr nonlinearity analysis of a microribbon graphene array using the harmonic balance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghvaee, H. R.; Zarrinkhat, F.; Abrishamian, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    Transmission spectra of microribbon graphene arrays are investigated with a circuit model based on the transmission line method. The accuracy of the proposed method is comparable with full-wave electromagnetic simulation results versus chemical potential, incident angle, dimensions of microribbons and the permittivity of the substrate. This rigorous method takes less than a second to perform, therefore it can be employed to optimize other similar devices instead of numerical methods that involve heavy calculations. Furthermore, we depicted the Kerr effect with the harmonic balance method through calculating the parameters in steady state. The results of this novel approach exhibited an excellent agreement with full-wave simulation results.

  3. Efficiency analysis of a solar photovoltaic array coupled with an electrolyser power unit: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Shiroudi, Abolfazl; Deleuze, Michael; Mousavifar, Seyed Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen as an energy carrier is one of the most potential candidates for clean energy and can be produced by water electrolysis. The use of 10 kW photovoltaic arrays for supplying a 5 kW electrolyser which consists of 10 series-connected electrolyser stacks and a 28% alkaline (KOH) solution electrolyte has been investigated at the Taleghan renewable energies site in Iran. The hydrogen produced by the electrolyser provides energy for the 1 kW polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, which m...

  4. Wirelessly Networked Digital Phased Array: Analysis and Development of a Phase Synchronization Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    range of 200 nm [3]. This range is not sufficient for a BMD Early Warning Radar ( EWR ) system for rapid and forward deployment with great range coverage...and the EWR uses the L-band. The AN/SPY-3 Multi Function Radar (MFR) is the X-band active phased-array radar that will take care of the short range...DDG 1000 a far better range detection and EWR capability [5]. Figure 4. DDG 1000 (From [6]). Even if dual band radars can complement each

  5. Post-transcriptional exon shuffling events in humans can be evolutionarily conserved and abundant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balool, Haya H; Weber, David; Liu, Yilei; Wade, Mark; Guleria, Kamlesh; Nam, Pitsien Lang Ping; Clayton, Jake; Rowe, William; Coxhead, Jonathan; Irving, Julie; Elliott, David J; Hall, Andrew G; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Jackson, Michael S

    2011-11-01

    In silico analyses have established that transcripts from some genes can be processed into RNAs with rearranged exon order relative to genomic structure (post-transcriptional exon shuffling, or PTES). Although known to contribute to transcriptome diversity in some species, to date the structure, distribution, abundance, and functional significance of human PTES transcripts remains largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we identify 205 putative human PTES products from 176 genes. We validate 72 out of 112 products analyzed using RT-PCR, and identify additional PTES products structurally related to 61% of validated targets. Sequencing of these additional products reveals GT-AG dinucleotides at >95% of the splice junctions, confirming that they are processed by the spliceosome. We show that most PTES transcripts are expressed in a wide variety of human tissues, that they can be polyadenylated, and that some are conserved in mouse. We also show that they can extend into 5' and 3' UTRs, consistent with formation via trans-splicing of independent pre-mRNA molecules. Finally, we use real-time PCR to compare the abundance of PTES exon junctions relative to canonical exon junctions within the transcripts from seven genes. PTES exon junctions are present at 90% of the levels of canonical junctions, with transcripts from MAN1A2, PHC3, TLE4, and CDK13 exhibiting the highest levels. This is the first systematic experimental analysis of PTES in human, and it suggests both that the phenomenon is much more widespread than previously thought and that some PTES transcripts could be functional.

  6. Short Tandem Repeats in Human Exons: A Target for Disease Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villesen Palle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years it has been demonstrated that structural variations, such as indels (insertions and deletions, are common throughout the genome, but the implications of structural variations are still not clearly understood. Long tandem repeats (e.g. microsatellites or simple repeats are known to be hypermutable (indel-rich, but are rare in exons and only occasionally associated with diseases. Here we focus on short (imperfect tandem repeats (STRs which fall below the radar of conventional tandem repeat detection, and investigate whether STRs are targets for disease-related mutations in human exons. In particular, we test whether they share the hypermutability of the longer tandem repeats and whether disease-related genes have a higher STR content than non-disease-related genes. Results We show that validated human indels are extremely common in STR regions compared to non-STR regions. In contrast to longer tandem repeats, our definition of STRs found them to be present in exons of most known human genes (92%, 99% of all STR sequences in exons are shorter than 33 base pairs and 62% of all STR sequences are imperfect repeats. We also demonstrate that STRs are significantly overrepresented in disease-related genes in both human and mouse. These results are preserved when we limit the analysis to STRs outside known longer tandem repeats. Conclusion Based on our findings we conclude that STRs represent hypermutable regions in the human genome that are linked to human disease. In addition, STRs constitute an obvious target when screening for rare mutations, because of the relatively low amount of STRs in exons (1,973,844 bp and the limited length of STR regions.

  7. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a "splicing memory" hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. © 2015 Marquez et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Analysis of a Combined Antenna Arrays and Reverse-Link Synchronous DS-CDMA System over Multipath Rician Fading Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yong-Seok

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the BER analysis of antenna array (AA receiver in reverse-link asynchronous multipath Rician channels and analyze the performance of an improved AA system which applies a reverse-link synchronous transmission technique (RLSTT in order to effectively make a better estimation of covariance matrices at a beamformer-RAKE receiver. In this work, we provide a comprehensive analysis of user capacity which reflects several important factors such as the ratio of the specular component power to the Rayleigh fading power, the shape of multipath intensity profile, and the number of antennas. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that for the case of a strong specular path's power or for a high decay factor, the employment of RLSTT along with AA has the potential of improving the achievable capacity by an order of magnitude.

  9. Fingerprint analysis of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves based on ultra performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector combined with similarity analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xianrui; Ma, Meiling; Su, Weike

    2013-07-01

    A method for chemical fingerprint analysis of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves was developed based on ultra performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (UPLC-PAD) combined with similarity analysis (SA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). 10 batches of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves samples were collected from different regions of China. UPLC-PAD was employed to collect chemical fingerprints of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the relative retention times (RRT) and relative peak areas (RPA) of 10 characteristic peaks (one of them was identified as rutin) in precision, repeatability and stability test were less than 3%, and the method of fingerprint analysis was validated to be suitable for the Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves. The chromatographic fingerprints showed abundant diversity of chemical constituents qualitatively in the 10 batches of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves samples from different locations by similarity analysis on basis of calculating the correlation coefficients between each two fingerprints. Moreover, the HCA method clustered the samples into four classes, and the HCA dendrogram showed the close or distant relations among the 10 samples, which was consistent to the SA result to some extent.

  10. Design and analysis of a novel virtual gyroscope with multi-gyroscope and accelerometer array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Chaojun; Yu, Shuai; Zhang, Shengzhi; Liu, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    A new virtual gyroscope with multi-gyroscope and accelerometer array (MGAA) is proposed in this article for improving the performance of angular rate measurement. Outputs of the virtual gyroscope are obtained by merging the signals from gyroscopes and accelerometers through a novel Kalman filter, which intentionally takes the consideration of the MEMS gyroscope error model and kinematics theory of rigid body. A typical configuration of the virtual gyroscope, consisting of four accelerometers and three gyroscopes mounted on designated positions, is initiated to verify the feasibility of the virtual gyroscope with MGAA. Static test and dynamic test are performed subsequently to evaluate its performance. The angular random walk (ARW) and bias instability, two static performance parameters of gyroscope, are reduced from 0.019°/√s and 14.4°/h to 0.0074°/√s and 8.7°/h, respectively. The average root mean square error (RMSE) is reduced from 0.274°/s to 0.133°/s under dynamic test. Compared with the published multi-gyroscope array method, the virtual gyroscope proposed here has a better performance both in static and dynamic tests, with improvement factors of ARW and RMSE about 44.1% and 44.5% higher, respectively.

  11. Numerical Analysis of CNC Milling Chatter Using Embedded Miniature MEMS Microphone Array System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang-Li Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasingly common use of industrial automation for mass production, there are many computer numerical control (CNC machine tools that require the collection of data from intelligent sensors in order to analyze their processing quality. In general, for high speed rotating machines, an accelerometer can be attached on the spindle to collect the data from the detected vibration of the CNC. However, due to their cost, accelerometers have not been widely adopted for use with typical CNC machine tools. This study sought to develop an embedded miniature MEMS microphone array system (Radius 5.25 cm, 8 channels to discover the vibration source of the CNC from spatial phase array processing. The proposed method utilizes voice activity detection (VAD to distinguish between the presence and absence of abnormal noise in the pre-stage, and utilizes the traditional direction of arrival method (DOA via multiple signal classification (MUSIC to isolate the spatial orientation of the noise source in post-processing. In the numerical simulation, the non-interfering noise source location is calibrated in the anechoic chamber, and is tested with real milling processing in the milling machine. As this results in a high background noise level, the vibration sound source is more accurate in the presented energy gradation graphs as compared to the traditional MUSIC method.

  12. Performance analysis of high frequency single-site-location antenna arrays using numerical electromagnetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiantarelli, Harry T.

    1990-09-01

    Electronic support measures (ESM) systems play an increasingly important role in modern warfare and can influence the outcome of a military engagement. The application of ESM can be extended to anti-guerrilla and anti-drug operations where law enforcement agencies can exploit the fact that their presence is inducing the outlaw to depend more on radio communications to coordinate their activities. When a propagation path of no more than one reflection at the ionosphere (1-hop) can be assumed, position of an HF emitter can be determined by a single observing site using vertical triangulation, provided that the height of the ionosphere at the point where the radio wave is reflected, can be determined. This technique is known as high frequency direction finding single-site-location (HFDF SSL). This thesis analyzes the HFDF SSL error in measuring the direction of arrival of the signal, how this error is generated by the antenna array and its effect on emitter location. The characteristics of the two antenna arrays used by a specific HFDF SSL system that implements the phase-interferometer techniques were studied using electromagnetic modeling.

  13. Microdeletion and microduplication analysis of chinese conotruncal defects patients with targeted array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Gong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to develop a reliable targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to detect microdeletions and microduplications in congenital conotruncal defects (CTDs, especially on 22q11.2 region, and for some other chromosomal aberrations, such as 5p15-5p, 7q11.23 and 4p16.3. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with CTDs, including 12 pulmonary atresia (PA, 10 double-outlet right ventricle (DORV, 3 transposition of great arteries (TGA, 1 tetralogy of Fallot (TOF and one ventricular septal defect (VSD, were enrolled in this study and screened for pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs, using Agilent 8 x 15K targeted aCGH. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was performed to test the molecular results of targeted aCGH. RESULTS: Four of 27 patients (14.8% had 22q11.2 CNVs, 1 microdeletion and 3 microduplications. qPCR test confirmed the microdeletion and microduplication detected by the targeted aCGH. CONCLUSION: Chromosomal abnormalities were a well-known cause of multiple congenital anomalies (MCA. This aCGH using arrays with high-density coverage in the targeted regions can detect genomic imbalances including 22q11.2 and other 10 kinds CNVs effectively and quickly. This approach has the potential to be applied to detect aneuploidy and common microdeletion/microduplication syndromes on a single microarray.

  14. Towards an integrated biosensor array for simultaneous and rapid multi-analysis of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scognamiglio, Viviana, E-mail: viviana.scognamiglio@mlib.ic.cnr.it [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy); Pezzotti, Italo; Pezzotti, Gianni; Cano, Juan; Manfredonia, Ivano [Biosensor S.r.l. - Via degli Olmetti 44 00060 Formello, Rome (Italy); Buonasera, Katia [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy); Arduini, Fabiana; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe [Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche - Via della Ricerca Scientifica 00133, Rome (Italy); Giardi, Maria Teresa [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multitask biosensor for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensing system employ an array of biological recognition elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amperometric and optical transduction methods are provided in an integrated biosensor together with flow control systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biosensing device results in an integrated, automatic and portable system for environmental and agrifood application. - Abstract: In this paper we propose the construction and application of a portable multi-purpose biosensor array for the simultaneous detection of a wide range of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), based on the recognition operated by various enzymes and microorganisms. The developed biosensor combines both electrochemical and optical transduction systems, in order to increase the number of chemical species which can be monitored. Considering to the maximum residue level (MRL) of contaminants established by the European Commission, the biosensor system was able to detect most of the chemicals analysed with very high sensitivity. In particular, atrazine and diuron were detected with a limit of detection of 0.5 nM, with an RSD% less than 5%; paraoxon and chlorpyrifos were revealed with a detection of 5 {mu}M and 4.5 {mu}M, respectively, with an RSD% less than 6%; catechol and bisphenol A were identified with a limit of detection of 1 {mu}M and 35 {mu}M respectively, with an RSD% less than 5%.

  15. Information theory analysis of sensor-array imaging systems for computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, F. O.; Fales, C. L.; Park, S. K.; Samms, R. W.; Self, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    Information theory is used to assess the performance of sensor-array imaging systems, with emphasis on the performance obtained with image-plane signal processing. By electronically controlling the spatial response of the imaging system, as suggested by the mechanism of human vision, it is possible to trade-off edge enhancement for sensitivity, increase dynamic range, and reduce data transmission. Computational results show that: signal information density varies little with large variations in the statistical properties of random radiance fields; most information (generally about 85 to 95 percent) is contained in the signal intensity transitions rather than levels; and performance is optimized when the OTF of the imaging system is nearly limited to the sampling passband to minimize aliasing at the cost of blurring, and the SNR is very high to permit the retrieval of small spatial detail from the extensively blurred signal. Shading the lens aperture transmittance to increase depth of field and using a regular hexagonal sensor-array instead of square lattice to decrease sensitivity to edge orientation also improves the signal information density up to about 30 percent at high SNRs.

  16. A novel splicing silencer generated by DMD exon 45 deletion junction could explain upstream exon 44 skipping that modifies dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwianingsih, Ery Kus; Malueka, Rusdy Ghazali; Nishida, Atsushi; Itoh, Kyoko; Lee, Tomoko; Yagi, Mariko; Iijima, Kazumoto; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2014-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive muscle-wasting disease, is mostly caused by exon deletion mutations in the DMD gene. The reading frame rule explains that out-of-frame deletions lead to muscle dystrophin deficiency in DMD. In outliers to this rule, deletion junction sequences have never previously been explored as splicing modulators. In a Japanese case, we identified a single exon 45 deletion in the patient's DMD gene, indicating out-of-frame mutation. However, immunohistochemical examination disclosed weak dystrophin signals in his muscle. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of DMD exons 42 to 47 revealed a major normally spliced product with exon 45 deletion and an additional in-frame product with deletion of both exons 44 and 45, indicating upstream exon 44 skipping. We considered the latter to underlie the observed dystrophin expression. Remarkably, the junction sequence cloned by PCR walking abolished the splicing enhancer activity of the upstream intron in a chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA in vitro splicing. Furthermore, antisense oligonucleotides directed against the junction site counteracted this effect. These indicated that the junction sequence was a splicing silencer that induced upstream exon 44 skipping. It was strongly suggested that creation of splicing regulator is a modifier of dystrophinopathy.

  17. Feasibility analysis of XSOLANTRA: A mission concept to detect exoplanets with an array of CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banazadeh, P.; Lazio, J.; Jones, D.; Scharf, D. P.; Fowler, W.; Aladangady, C.

    Seeking “ nearby habitable worlds” was one of three science themes identified in the Astronomy Decadal Survey. Hundreds of extrasolar planets are known, but magnetic fields are likely required for these planets to be habitable. As of today, no direct constraints on the magnetic field characteristics of extrasolar planets exist. The ExtraSolar Observing Low-frequency Array of Nano Satellites for Radio Astronomy (XSOLANTRA), formerly known as XSOLARA is a feasibility study of a student designed, built, and tested micro-satellite mission to a Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO) around Earth. XSOLANTRA will look at the Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission generated by the interaction between stellar wind and a planetary magnetosphere from which interior composition and atmospheric shielding can be inferred. The science instrument for XSOLANTRA is the entire array of fourteen CubeSats operating together as an interferometer. The fourteen CubeSats will be stacked on a SHuttle Expendable Rocket for Payload Augmentation (SHERPA) vehicle as a payload and will be deployed once arrived at DRO. A feasibility study was conducted to demonstrate that a CubeSat mission with cost of no more than $60 million is capable of detecting extrasolar planets. The study showed that a CubeSat mission within these constraints is possible; however, some questions still remain unanswered. This paper summarizes the mission concept starting from the science requirements, key mission design decisions, component level feasibility analysis and management and cost analysis.

  18. Musical-Noise Analysis in Methods of Integrating Microphone Array and Spectral Subtraction Based on Higher-Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunobu Kondo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We conduct an objective analysis on musical noise generated by two methods of integrating microphone array signal processing and spectral subtraction. To obtain better noise reduction, methods of integrating microphone array signal processing and nonlinear signal processing have been researched. However, nonlinear signal processing often generates musical noise. Since such musical noise causes discomfort to users, it is desirable that musical noise is mitigated. Moreover, it has been recently reported that higher-order statistics are strongly related to the amount of musical noise generated. This implies that it is possible to optimize the integration method from the viewpoint of not only noise reduction performance but also the amount of musical noise generated. Thus, we analyze the simplest methods of integration, that is, the delay-and-sum beamformer and spectral subtraction, and fully clarify the features of musical noise generated by each method. As a result, it is clarified that a specific structure of integration is preferable from the viewpoint of the amount of generated musical noise. The validity of the analysis is shown via a computer simulation and a subjective evaluation.

  19. Analysis of flavonoids in honey by HPLC coupled with coulometric electrode array detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrus, Karoline; Schwartz, Heidi; Sontag, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    The analysis of flavonoids in unifloral honeys by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with coulometric electrode array detection (CEAD) is described. The compounds were extracted by a nonionic polymeric resin (Amberlite XAD-2) and then separated on a reversed phase column using gradient elution. Quercetin, naringenin, hesperetin, luteolin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, and galangin were detected in a coulometric electrode array detection system between +300 and +800 mV against palladium reference electrodes, and their presence was additionally confirmed by HPLC coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The method was applied to analysis of 19 honeys of different varieties and origin. The limits of detection and quantitation ranged between 1.6 and 8.3 μg/kg and 3.9 and 27.4 μg/kg, respectively. The recoveries were above 96% in fluid and above 89% in creamy honeys. Some of these honeys (melon, pumpkin, cherry blossom, dandelion, maple, and pine tree honey) were investigated for their flavonoid content and profile for the first time. Differences between honeys were observed both in flavonoid concentrations and in the flavonoid profiles. The flavonoid concentrations ranged from 0.015 to 3.4 mg/kg honey. Galangin, kaempferol, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and luteolin were detected in all investigated honeys, whereas hesperetin occurred only in lemon and orange honeys and naringenin in lemon, orange, rhododendron, rosemary, and cherry blossom honeys.

  20. Origin of introns by 'intronization' of exonic sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Penny, David

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of spliceosomal intron creation have proved elusive. Here we describe a new mechanism: the recruitment of internal exonic sequences ('intronization') in Caenorhabditis species. The numbers of intronization events and introns gained by other mechanisms are similar, suggesting...

  1. Human glucose phosphate isomerase: Exon mapping and gene structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiming; Lee, Pauline; Beutler, E. [Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1995-10-10

    The structure of the gene for human glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) has been determined. Three GPI clones were isolated from a human genomic library by using a full-length GPI cDNA probe and were characterized. Oligonucleotides based on the known cDNA sequence were used as primers in amplification and sequence analyses. This led to the identification of the exon-intron junctions. By this approach, 18 exons and 17 introns have been identified. The exons range in size from 44 to 431 nucleotides. The intronic sequences surrounding the exons provide useful information for the identification of mutations that give rise to human GPI deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Analysis of the Kanamycin in Raw Milk Using the Suspension Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the monoclonal antibody against kanamycin being prepared successfully, a bead-based indirect competitive fluorescent immunoassay was developed to detect kanamycin in milk. The fact that there was no significant cross-reaction with other aminoglycoside antibiotics implied that the monoclonal antibody was highly specific for kanamycin. The limit of detection (LOD and the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 in raw milk were 3.2 ng/mL and 52.5 ng/mL, respectively. Using the method developed in this study, the kanamycin concentrations were monitored in raw milk after the intramuscular administration of kanamycin in sick cows. Compared to the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, the method using the suspension array system was more sensitive. The results obtained in the present study showed a good correlation with that of the ELISA.

  3. Electron photoemission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays: analysis of collective resonances and embedding effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Uskov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    into the semiconductor; photodetection in the infrared range, where photon energies are below the semiconductor band gap (insufficient for band-to-band absorption in semiconductor), is therefore possible. The nanoparticles are arranged in a sparse rectangular lattice so that the wavelength of the lattice......-induced Rayleigh anomalies can overlap the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the individual particles, bringing about collective effects from the nanoparticle array. Using full-wave numerical simulations, we analyze the effects of lattice constant, embedding depth, and refractive index step...... between the semiconductor layer and an adjacent transparent conductive oxide layer. We show that the presence of refractive index mismatch between media surrounding the nanoparticles disrupts the formation of a narrow absorption peak associated with the Rayleigh anomaly, so the role of collective lattice...

  4. Improved Protein Arrays for Quantitative Systems Analysis of the Dynamics of Signaling Pathway Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chin-Rang [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Heart, Lung and Blood Inst.

    2013-12-11

    Astronauts and workers in nuclear plants who repeatedly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR, <10 cGy) are likely to incur specific changes in signal transduction and gene expression in various tissues of their body. Remarkable advances in high throughput genomics and proteomics technologies enable researchers to broaden their focus from examining single gene/protein kinetics to better understanding global gene/protein expression profiling and biological pathway analyses, namely Systems Biology. An ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop dynamic mathematical models of interacting biological systems capable of simulating living systems in a computer. This Glue Grant is to complement Dr. Boothman’s existing DOE grant (No. DE-FG02-06ER64186) entitled “The IGF1/IGF-1R-MAPK-Secretory Clusterin (sCLU) Pathway: Mediator of a Low Dose IR-Inducible Bystander Effect” to develop sensitive and quantitative proteomic technology that suitable for low dose radiobiology researches. An improved version of quantitative protein array platform utilizing linear Quantum dot signaling for systematically measuring protein levels and phosphorylation states for systems biology modeling is presented. The signals are amplified by a confocal laser Quantum dot scanner resulting in ~1000-fold more sensitivity than traditional Western blots and show the good linearity that is impossible for the signals of HRP-amplification. Therefore this improved protein array technology is suitable to detect weak responses of low dose radiation. Software is developed to facilitate the quantitative readout of signaling network activities. Kinetics of EGFRvIII mutant signaling was analyzed to quantify cross-talks between EGFR and other signaling pathways.

  5. Human transcriptome array for high-throughput clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihong; Seok, Junhee; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Jiang, Hui; Wilhelmy, Julie; Clark, Tyson A.; Kapur, Karen; Xing, Yi; Faham, Malek; Storey, John D.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Maier, Ronald V.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Wong, Wing Hung; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Toner, Mehmet; Warren, H. Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A.; Rahme, Laurence; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Hayden, Douglas; Mason, Philip; Fagan, Shawn; Yu, Yong-Ming; Cobb, J. Perren; Remick, Daniel G.; Mannick, John A.; Lederer, James A.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; West, Michael A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Smith, Richard; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Tibshirani, Rob; Lowry, Stephen; Calvano, Steven; Chaudry, Irshad; Cohen, Mitchell; Moore, Ernest E.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Baker, Henry V.; Efron, Philip A.; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Ochoa, Juan B.; Sperry, Jason L.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; De, Asit K.; Bankey, Paul E.; Herndon, David N.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Minei, Joseph P.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Hunt, John L.; Horton, Jureta; Cobb, J. Perren; Brownstein, Bernard; Freeman, Bradley; Nathens, Avery B.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Gibran, Nicole; Klein, Matthew; O'Keefe, Grant

    2011-01-01

    A 6.9 million-feature oligonucleotide array of the human transcriptome [Glue Grant human transcriptome (GG-H array)] has been developed for high-throughput and cost-effective analyses in clinical studies. This array allows comprehensive examination of gene expression and genome-wide identification of alternative splicing as well as detection of coding SNPs and noncoding transcripts. The performance of the array was examined and compared with mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results over multiple independent replicates of liver and muscle samples. Compared with RNA-Seq of 46 million uniquely mappable reads per replicate, the GG-H array is highly reproducible in estimating gene and exon abundance. Although both platforms detect similar expression changes at the gene level, the GG-H array is more sensitive at the exon level. Deeper sequencing is required to adequately cover low-abundance transcripts. The array has been implemented in a multicenter clinical program and has generated high-quality, reproducible data. Considering the clinical trial requirements of cost, sample availability, and throughput, the GG-H array has a wide range of applications. An emerging approach for large-scale clinical genomic studies is to first use RNA-Seq to the sufficient depth for the discovery of transcriptome elements relevant to the disease process followed by high-throughput and reliable screening of these elements on thousands of patient samples using custom-designed arrays. PMID:21317363

  6. GLINT: a user-friendly toolset for the analysis of high-throughput DNA-methylation array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Elior; Yedidim, Reut; Shenhav, Liat; Schweiger, Regev; Weissbrod, Omer; Zaitlen, Noah; Halperin, Eran

    2017-06-15

    GLINT is a user-friendly command-line toolset for fast analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation data generated using the Illumina human methylation arrays. GLINT, which does not require any programming proficiency, allows an easy execution of Epigenome-Wide Association Study analysis pipeline under different models while accounting for known confounders in methylation data. GLINT is a command-line software, freely available at https://github.com/cozygene/glint/releases . It requires Python 2.7 and several freely available Python packages. Further information and documentation as well as a quick start tutorial are available at http://glint-epigenetics.readthedocs.io . elior.rahmani@gmail.com or ehalperin@cs.ucla.edu.

  7. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Lung Cancer Patients 
with EGFR Mutations in Exons 19 and 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwang LIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Studies on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathways and the therapeutic effects of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have recently proven that targeted therapy has a major role in the treatment of lung cancer. However, the therapeutic effects of EGFR-TKIs on lung cancers with different EGFR mutation subtypes remain unclear. And if there is a significant difference in the effects of EGFR-TKIs, the mechanisms for the difference remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical importance of EGFR mutations in exons 19 and 21 of lung cancer patients and to compare the outcomes of these patients. Methods The study recruited 113 patients who had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with EGFR mutations. EGFR mutations were detected for 47 patients using Real-time PCR or DNA sequencinag. The mutations of the remaining patients were determined using xTag-EGFR liquid chip technology. All stages I-III patients underwent radical resection followed by 4 cycles of postoperative chemotherapy. Patients with pleural metastases underwent pleural biopsy, pleurodesis, and chemotherapy only. Patients with distant metastases underwent biopsy and chemotherapy only. Collected clinical data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0 software. Results EGFR exon mutations 19 and 21 were found in 56 and 57 patients, respectively. The mean age of patients with exon 19 mutations was lower than the age of the patients with exon 21 mutations (57.02±11.31 years vs 62.25±7.76 years, respectively; P0.05 between the patients with exon 19 and 21 mutations; and survival analysis of 91 (80.5% patients with complete clinical data found no differences in overall survival. Stratification analysis found out that patients with exon 19 mutations had longer overall survival associated with age>61 years, male gender, ever smoking, and stage IV disease; although the differences were not significant. Conclusion Compared to the lung

  8. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and...

  9. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yonghua [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an

  10. Expanded spectrum of exon 33 and 34 mutations in SRCAP and follow-up in patients with Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Wenke; Meinecke, Peter; Krüger, Gabriele; Rossier, Eva; Heinritz, Wolfram; Wüsthof, Achim; Horn, Denise

    2014-11-30

    Floating-Harbor syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant short stature syndrome with retarded speech development, intellectual disability and dysmorphic facial features. Recently dominant mutations almost exclusively located in exon 34 of the Snf2-related CREBBP activator protein gene were identified to cause FHS. Here we report the genetic analysis of 5 patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of FHS obtained by Sanger sequencing. All of them presented with short stature, speech delay as well as psychomotor delay and typical facial dysmorphism. Three patients showed a good response to growth hormone treatment. Two patients demonstrate novel, heterozygous de novo frameshift mutations in exon 34 (c.7396delA and c.7218dupT) leading to premature stop mutations in SRCAP (p.Val2466Tyrfs*9 and p.Gln2407Serfs*36, respectively). In two further patients we found already known SRCAP mutations in exon 34, c.7330C > T and c.7303C > T, respectively, which also lead to premature stop codons: p.Arg2444* and p.Arg2435*. In one patient, we identified a novel de novo stop mutation in exon 33 (c.6985C > T, p.Arg2329*) demonstrating that not all FHS cases are caused by mutations in exon 34 of SRCAP. Our data confirm a mutational hot spot in the final exon of SRCAP in the majority of FHS patients but also show that exon 33 of this gene can be affected.

  11. Pathogenic exon-trapping by SVA retrotransposon and rescue in Fukuyama muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Kanagawa, Motoi; Yu, Chih-chieh; Mori, Kouhei; Oda, Tetsuya; Kuga, Atsushi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Akman, Hasan O; DiMauro, Salvatore; Kaji, Ryuji; Yokota, Toshifumi; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Toda, Tatsushi

    2011-10-05

    Fukuyama muscular dystrophy (FCMD; MIM253800), one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders in Japan, was the first human disease found to result from ancestral insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) retrotransposon into a causative gene. In FCMD, the SVA insertion occurs in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the fukutin gene. The pathogenic mechanism for FCMD is unknown, and no effective clinical treatments exist. Here we show that aberrant messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, induced by SVA exon-trapping, underlies the molecular pathogenesis of FCMD. Quantitative mRNA analysis pinpointed a region that was missing from transcripts in patients with FCMD. This region spans part of the 3' end of the fukutin coding region, a proximal part of the 3' UTR and the SVA insertion. Correspondingly, fukutin mRNA transcripts in patients with FCMD and SVA knock-in model mice were shorter than the expected length. Sequence analysis revealed an abnormal splicing event, provoked by a strong acceptor site in SVA and a rare alternative donor site in fukutin exon 10. The resulting product truncates the fukutin carboxy (C) terminus and adds 129 amino acids encoded by the SVA. Introduction of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) targeting the splice acceptor, the predicted exonic splicing enhancer and the intronic splicing enhancer prevented pathogenic exon-trapping by SVA in cells of patients with FCMD and model mice, rescuing normal fukutin mRNA expression and protein production. AON treatment also restored fukutin functions, including O-glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) and laminin binding by α-DG. Moreover, we observe exon-trapping in other SVA insertions associated with disease (hypercholesterolemia, neutral lipid storage disease) and human-specific SVA insertion in a novel gene. Thus, although splicing into SVA is known, we have discovered in human disease a role for SVA-mediated exon-trapping and demonstrated the promise of splicing modulation therapy as the first radical

  12. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settles Matthew L

    2009-05-01

    -antisense transcript pairs, analysis of the gene ontology terms showed a significant over-representation of transcripts involved in energy production. These included several representations of ATP synthase, photosystem proteins and RUBISCO, which indicated that photosynthesis is likely to be regulated by antisense transcripts. Conclusion This study demonstrated the novel use of an adapted labeling protocol and a 3'IVT GeneChip array for large-scale identification of antisense transcription in wheat. The results show that antisense transcription is relatively abundant in wheat, and may affect the expression of valuable agronomic phenotypes. Future work should select potentially interesting transcript pairs for further functional characterization to determine biological activity.

  13. Exon Skipping and Gene Transfer Restore Dystrophin Expression in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells-Cardiomyocytes Harboring DMD Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Emily; Kalra, Spandan; Anderson, David; George, Vinoj; Ritso, Morten; Laval, Steven H.; Barresi, Rita; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    With an incidence of ∼1:3,500 to 5,000 in male children, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked disorder in which progressive muscle degeneration occurs and affected boys usually die in their twenties or thirties. Cardiac involvement occurs in 90% of patients and heart failure accounts for up to 40% of deaths. To enable new therapeutics such as gene therapy and exon skipping to be tested in human cardiomyocytes, we produced human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) from seven patients harboring mutations across the DMD gene. Mutations were retained during differentiation and analysis indicated the cardiomyocytes showed a dystrophic gene expression profile. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 restored dystrophin expression to ∼30% of normal levels in hiPSC-cardiomyocytes carrying exon 47–50 or 48–50 deletions. Alternatively, delivery of a dystrophin minigene to cardiomyocytes with a deletion in exon 35 or a point mutation in exon 70 allowed expression levels similar to those seen in healthy cells. This demonstrates that DMD hiPSC-cardiomyocytes provide a novel tool to evaluate whether new therapeutics can restore dystrophin expression in the heart. PMID:23829870

  14. Unravelling the complexity of human olfactory receptor repertoire by copy number analysis across population using high resolution arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Murthy, Megha; Manjegowda, Dinesh S; Nayaka, Radhika; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (OR), responsible for detection of odor molecules, belong to the largest family of genes and are highly polymorphic in nature having distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Since there are no reports on the presence of copy number variations in OR repertoire of Indian population, the present investigation in 43 Indians along with 270 HapMap and 31 Tibetan samples was undertaken to study genome variability and evolution. Analysis was performed using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip, Affymterix CytoScan(®) High-Density array, HD-CNV, and MAFFT program. We observed a total of 1527 OR genes in 503 CNV events from 81.3% of the study group, which includes 67.6% duplications and 32.4% deletions encompassing more of genes than pseudogenes. We report human genotypic variation in functional OR repertoire size across populations and it was found that the combinatorial effect of both "orthologous obtained from closely related species" and "paralogous derived sequences" provide the complexity to the continuously occurring OR CNVs.

  15. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-06-15

    To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

  16. Second spatial derivative analysis of cortical surface potentials recorded in cat primary auditory cortex using thin film surface arrays: Comparisons with multi-unit data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, James B; Irving, Sam; Pannu, Satinderpall S; Tooker, Angela C; Wise, Andrew K; Shepherd, Robert K; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2016-07-15

    Current source density analysis of recordings from penetrating electrode arrays has traditionally been used to examine the layer- specific cortical activation and plastic changes associated with changed afferent input. We report on a related analysis, the second spatial derivative (SSD) of surface local field potentials (LFPs) recorded using custom designed thin-film polyimide substrate arrays. SSD analysis of tone- evoked LFPs generated from the auditory cortex under the recording array demonstrated a stereotypical single local minimum, often flanked by maxima on both the caudal and rostral sides. In contrast, tone-pips at frequencies not represented in the region under the array, but known (on the basis of normal tonotopic organization) to be represented caudal to the recording array, had a more complex pattern of many sources and sinks. Compared to traditional analysis of LFPs, SSD analysis produced a tonotopic map that was more similar to that obtained with multi-unit recordings in a normal-hearing animal. Additionally, the statistically significant decrease in the number of acoustically responsive cortical locations in partially deafened cats following 6 months of cochlear implant use compared to unstimulated cases observed with multi-unit data (p=0.04) was also observed with SSD analysis (p=0.02), but was not apparent using traditional analysis of LFPs (p=0.6). SSD analysis of surface LFPs from the thin-film array provides a rapid and robust method for examining the spatial distribution of cortical activity with improved spatial resolution compared to more traditional LFP recordings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of creep crack growth by intelligent phased array ultrasonic inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, C.S. [Graduate School of Sungkyunkwan Univ., Kyungki (Korea); Lim, B.S. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Kyungki (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    At high temperatures typical for service conditions in fossil power plants, the creep fracture is dominated by the formation, growth and coalescence of cavities. Using high temperature pipe materials, P92 and P122, the characteristics of creep crack growth were analyzed in this study according to the cavities. The characteristics of cavities play a critical role in creep crack propagation and load line displacement. The effect of the load line displacement rate(dv/dt) and crack growth rate(da/dt) on the da/dt-C{sub t} relation of creep crack growth was evaluated at different temperatures and K{sub i}(initial stress intensity factor) values. The number of cavities increased with increasing temperature and K{sub i}. The crack growth rate and load line displacement rate increased with the increase in the cavity numbers. The kind and distribution of these internal flaws were investigated by an intelligent phased array ultrasonic method and they were utilized in deriving the relationship with the creep crack growth rate, which will predict the creep characteristics of these materials. (orig.)

  18. Analysis of the time-reversal operator for planar dipole arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2004-01-16

    The problem of imaging of targets in random media or cluttered environments is found in a wide variety of different applications, including ocean acoustics, medical ultrasound, geophysics, and radar. The solution often requires separating targets of interest from other scatterers, and compensating for wave speed variations in the medium. The problem is not usually the lack of data, but too much data, specifically the lack of a useful organizing principle for the data. The difficult part is separating the meaningful data from the remainder. It would therefore be most helpful if there were some means for skipping over those parts of the data that we do not really want to image very much, and looking at those parts (targets) that do interest us. This sounds challenging (maybe even impossible), but recent developments in acoustics make it clear that certain very limited imaging goals are achievable with much smaller data sets than are traditionally needed in, for example, seismic array processing. Early versions of this new method have been given the names of ''time-reversal acoustics'' or ''time-reversal mirrors,'' and have been developed most extensively by the French ultrasonics group led by Fink.

  19. Exonization of active mouse L1s: a driver of transcriptome evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badge Richard

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1s, L1s have been recently implicated in the regulation of mammalian transcriptomes. Results Here, we show that members of the three active mouse L1 subfamilies (A, GF and TF contain, in addition to those on their sense strands, conserved functional splice sites on their antisense strands, which trigger multiple exonization events. The latter is particularly intriguing in the light of the strong antisense orientation bias of intronic L1s, implying that the toleration of antisense insertions results in an increased potential for exonization. Conclusion In a genome-wide analysis, we have uncovered evidence suggesting that the mobility of the large number of retrotransposition-competent mouse L1s (~2400 potentially active L1s in NCBIm35 has significant potential to shape the mouse transcriptome by continuously generating insertions into transcriptional units.

  20. PCR detection of a C/T polymorphism in exon 1 of the porphobilinogen deaminase gene (PBGD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picat, C.; Bourgeois, F.; Grandchamp, B. (Faculte de Medicine, Paris (France))

    1991-09-25

    Sequencing of exon 1 revealed a C/T polymorphism in exon 1 of human porphobilinogen deaminase gene (PBGD) at position {minus}64 relatively to the initiation translational codon. Genetic defects of PBGD are responsible for acute intermittent porphyria. The use of a 5{prime} primer with a mutated sequence to amplify the region containing this polymorphism allows its restriction analysis. After a ApaI digest of the amplified fragment, two alleles can be identified: F1: 164 bp, F2: 145 bp + 19 bp. Codominant inheritance was demonstrated in two large families with AIP.

  1. Screening the dystrophin gene suggests a high rate of polymorphism in general but no exonic deletions in schizophrenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindor, N.M.; Sobell, J.L.; Thibodeau, S.N. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-15

    The dystrophin gene, located at chromosome Xp21, was evaluated as a candidate gene in chronic schizophrenia in response to the report of a large family in which schizophrenia cosegregated with Becker muscular dystrophy. Genomic DNA from 94 men with chronic schizophrenia was evaluated by Southern blot analysis using cDNA probes that span exons 1-59. No exonic deletions were identified. An unexpectedly high rate of polymorphism was calculated in this study and two novel polymorphisms were found, demonstrating the usefulness of the candidate gene approach even when results of the original study are negative. 41 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. SVA retrotransposition in exon 6 of the coagulation factor IX gene causing severe hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Murata, Moe; Takagi, Yuki; Kozuka, Toshihiro; Nakata, Yukiko; Hasebe, Ryo; Takagi, Akira; Kitazawa, Jun-ichi; Shima, Midori; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2015-07-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities of the coagulation factor IX gene (F9). Insertion mutations in F9 ranging from a few to more than 100 base pairs account for only a few percent of all hemophilia B cases. We investigated F9 to elucidate genetic abnormalities causing severe hemophilia B in a Japanese subject. We performed PCR-mediated analysis of F9 and identified a large insertion in exon 6. Next, we carried out direct sequencing of a PCR clone of the whole insert using nested deletion by exonuclease III and S1 nuclease. We identified an approximately 2.5-kb SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA)-F element flanked by 15-bp duplications in the antisense orientation in exon 6. Additionally, we carried out exontrap analysis to assess the effect of this retrotransposition on mRNA splicing. We observed that regular splicing at exons 5 and 6 of F9 was disturbed by the SVA retrotransposition, suggesting that abnormal FIX mRNA may be reduced by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In conclusion, this is the first report of SVA retrotransposition causing severe hemophilia B; only five cases of LINE-1 or Alu retrotranspositions in F9 have been reported previously.

  3. Wall Clutter Mitigation in Through-the-Wall Imaging Radar with Sparse Array Antenna Based on Independent Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For Through-the-Wall Imaging Radar (TWIR, wall clutter is critical for detecting target signals behind a wall. For a system with a sparse antenna array, the lack of observation channels makes it more difficult to separate the target signals and wall clutter. On the basis of fluctuation of the range profile in real transmit/receive channels, this paper proposes to use Independent Component Analysis (ICA on multiple down-range observations of each transmit/receive channel to remove the wall clutter. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method effectively separate target and clutter components, even though the signal-to-clutter ratio is only -30 dB.

  4. A low power X-ray diffractometer for soil analysis in remote locations employing a multiwire proportional counter detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, J. C.; Parnell, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    A low power X-ray powder diffraction system suitable for remote mineralogical analysis of lunar, planetary, or asteroid soils has been designed. A one Curie Fe-55 source provides a monochromatic X-ray beam of 5.9 keV. Seeman-Bohlin focusing geometry is employed in the camera, allowing peak detection to proceed simultaneously at all angles and obviating the need for moving parts. The detector system is an array of 500-600 proportional counters with a wire-spacing of 1 mm. An electronics unit comprising preamplifier, postamplifier, window discriminators, and storage flip-flops requiring only 3.5 milliwatts has been designed and tested. Total instrument power is less than 5 W.

  5. Characterization of Atmospheric Pressure Carbon Dioxide Dissociation in Arrays of Microplasma Channels by Emission Spectroscopy and Effluent Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhen; Shin, Chul; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, James Gary

    2014-10-01

    Levied by rigorous regulations, the enormous cost of atmospheric carbon dioxide emission urged voracious demands on remediation technologies globally. Microplasma technology is being investigated as a new candidate to efficiently dissociate or remediate carbon dioxide contained in atmosphere. At a flow rate of 60 sccm of pure CO2 feedstock gas, dissociation degree of up to 14% has been achieved with stable glow discharges in an array of Al/Al2O3 microplasma channels. In-situ characterizations of the effluent gases were conducted with residual gas analysis, gas chromatography, and infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, time and spatially resolved emission spectroscopy recorded with an intensified charge-coupled device in the 300-800 nm region revealed the excitation of CO and C2 species. The implications on the possible plasma chemistry and its reaction mechanisms in the microdischarge will be discussed. Work supported by AFOSR.

  6. Evaluation of resazurin microtiter plate assay and HPLC- photodiode array analysis of the roots of Asparagus adscendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kashif Maqbool; Nahar, Lutfun; Mannan, Abdul; Arfan, Muhammad; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali; Hobbs, Glyn; Sarker, Satyajit D

    2017-07-19

    Asparagus adscendens Roxb. (Asparagaceae), is native to the Himalayas. The present study, for the first time, was undertaken to explore the antimicrobial potential, to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the methanol extract of the roots of A. adscendens and its solid-phase extraction (SPE) fractions using resazurin microtitre assay against Gram-positive and negative bacterial-registered strains and to carry out HPLC-photodiode array analysis of the SPE fractions. The methanol extract and all SPE exhibited considerable level of antibacterial potential against Gram-positive bacteria (MIC: 2.5-0.009 mg/mL) than against Gram-negative bacteria (MIC: 1.25-2.5 mg/mL). The use of microtitre plates has the advantage of lower cost, fast and quantitative results. Like other Asparagus species, the presence of phenolic compounds in all SPE fractions was evident in the HPLC-PDA data.

  7. Sensor Emplacement Techniques and Seismic Noise Analysis for USArray Transportable Array Seismic Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassetto, A.; Busby, R. W.; Hafner, K.; Woodward, R.; Sauter, A.

    2013-12-01

    In preparation for the upcoming deployment of EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has supported exploratory work on seismic station design, sensor emplacement, and communication concepts appropriate for this challenging high-latitude environment. IRIS has installed several experimental stations to evaluate different sensor emplacement schemes both in Alaska and in the lower-48 of the U.S. The goal of these tests is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint and the weight of the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where there are few roads, cellular communications are scarce, most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, and permafrost underlies much of the state. We will review the methods used for directly emplacing broadband seismometers in comparison to the current methods used for the lower-48 TA. These new methods primarily focus on using a portable drill to make a bored hole three to five meters, beneath the active layer of the permafrost, or by coring 1-2 meters deep into surface bedrock. Both methods are logistically effective in preliminary trials. Subsequent station performance has been assessed quantitatively using probability density functions summed from power spectral density estimates. These are calculated for the continuous time series of seismic data recorded for each channel of the seismometer. There are five test stations currently operating in Alaska. One was deployed in August 2011 and the remaining four in October 2012. Our results show that the performance of seismometers in Alaska with auger-hole or core-hole installations can sometimes exceed that of the quietest TA stations in the lower-48, particularly horizontal components at long periods. A

  8. High-resolution Antibody Array Analysis of Childhood Acute Leukemia Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanderova, Veronika; Kuzilkova, Daniela; Stuchly, Jan; Vaskova, Martina; Brdicka, Tomas; Fiser, Karel; Hrusak, Ondrej; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a disease pathologically manifested at both genomic and proteomic levels. Molecular genetic technologies are currently widely used in clinical research. In contrast, sensitive and high-throughput proteomic techniques for performing protein analyses in patient samples are still lacking. Here, we used a technology based on size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation of target proteins with an antibody bead array (Size Exclusion Chromatography-Microsphere-based Affinity Proteomics, SEC-MAP) to detect hundreds of proteins from a single sample. In addition, we developed semi-automatic bioinformatics tools to adapt this technology for high-content proteomic screening of pediatric acute leukemia patients. To confirm the utility of SEC-MAP in leukemia immunophenotyping, we tested 31 leukemia diagnostic markers in parallel by SEC-MAP and flow cytometry. We identified 28 antibodies suitable for both techniques. Eighteen of them provided excellent quantitative correlation between SEC-MAP and flow cytometry (p leukemia. In this assay, we used 632 different antibodies and detected 501 targets. Of those, 47 targets were differentially expressed between at least two of the three acute leukemia subgroups. The CD markers correlated with immunophenotypic categories as expected. From non-CD markers, we found DBN1, PAX5, or PTK2 overexpressed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias, LAT, SH2D1A, or STAT5A overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and HCK, GLUD1, or SYK overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, OPAL1 overexpression corresponded to ETV6-RUNX1 chromosomal translocation. In summary, we demonstrated that SEC-MAP technology is a powerful tool for detecting hundreds of proteins in clinical samples obtained from pediatric acute leukemia patients. It provides information about protein size and reveals differences in protein expression between particular leukemia subgroups. Forty-seven of SEC-MAP identified

  9. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Deployment, Operation and Initial Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R.; Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Rudlosky, S.; Goodman, S. J.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Anseimo, E. M.; Pinto, O.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-10 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network is being deployed in the vicinity of Sao Paulo to create the SP-LMA for total lightning measurements in association with the international CHUVA [Cloud processes of the main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribution to cloud resolving modeling and to the GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement)] field campaign. Besides supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives and the Sao Luiz do Paraitinga intensive operation period (IOP) in November-December 2011, the SP-LMA will support the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), both sensors on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R), presently under development and scheduled for a 2015 launch. The proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready for use on "day1" following the launch of GOES-R. A preliminary survey of potential sites in the vicinity of Sao Paulo was conducted in December 2009 and January 2010, followed up by a detailed survey in July 2010, with initial network deployment scheduled for October 2010. However, due to a delay in the Sao Luiz do Paraitinga IOP, the SP-LMA will now be installed in July 2011 and operated for one year. Spacing between stations is on the order of 15-30 km, with the network "diameter" being on the order of 30-40 km, which provides good 3-D lightning mapping 150 km from the network center. Optionally, 1-3 additional stations may be deployed in the vicinity of Sao Jos dos Campos.

  10. Mechanistic toxicity assessment of nanomaterials by whole-cell-array stress genes expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Na; Onnis-Hayden, Annalisa; Gu, April Z

    2010-08-01

    This study performed mechanistic toxicity assessment of nanosilver (nAg) and nanotitanium dioxide anatase (nTiO2_a) via toxicogenomic approach, employing a whole-cell-array library consisting of 91 recombinated Escherichia coli K12 strains with transcriptional GFP-fusions covering most known stress response genes. The results, for the first time, revealed more detailed transcriptional information on the toxic mechanism of nAg and nTiO2_a, and led to a better understanding of the mode of action (MOA) of metal and metal oxide nanomaterials (NMs). The detailed pathways network established for the oxidative stress system and for the SOS (DNA damage) repair system based on the temporal gene expression profiling data revealed the relationships and sequences of key genes involved in these toxin response systems. Both NMs were found to cause oxidative stress as well as cell membrane and transportation damage. Genotoxicity and DNA damage were also observed, although nTiO2_a induced SOS response via previously identified pathway and nAg seemed to induce DNA repair via a pathway different from SOS. We observed that the NMs at lower concentration tend to induce more chemical-specific toxicity response, while at higher concentrations, more general global stress response dominates. The information-rich real-time gene expression data allowed for identification of potential biomarkers that can be employed for specific toxin detection and biosensor developments. The concentration-dependent gene expression response led to the determination of the No Observed Transcriptional Effect Level (NOTEL) values, which can be potentially applied in the regulatory and risk assessment framework as an alternative toxicity assessment end point.

  11. Chromatographic fingerprinting analysis of Zhizhu Wan preparation by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Aihua; Sakurai, Tetsuro; Jiang, Jinzhong; Wang, Xijun

    2014-10-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula has been used for over 1000 years and most of them contain complicate chemical constituents. Chromatographic fingerprinting has been widely accepted as a crucial method for qualitative and quantitative analyses for TCM. Zhi Zhu Wan (ZZW), a classical Chinese medical formula, has been commonly used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disease, which pose a serious challenge to its quality control. In this work, a sensitive and reliable method of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA) was developed to control the quality of ZZW for chemical fingerprint analysis and quantitative analysis of four major bioactive constituents, including hesperidin, naringin, neohesperidin, and atractylenolide I. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Waters Symmetry C18 column (4.6 mm × 250 mm, 5 μm particle size), with an aqueous 0.095% phosphate acid and acetonitrile mobile phase gradient. Optimization of other experimental conditions was validated with satisfactory accuracy, precision, repeatability, and recovery. In quantitative analysis, the four components showed good regression (R > 0.9994) within test ranges, and the recovery method ranged from 99.32% to 100.630%. HPLC fingerprints of the ZZW samples were compared by performing similarity analysis. The results indicated that the newly developed HPLC-PDA fingerprint method would be suitable for quality control of ZZW.

  12. Fingerprint Analysis of Desmodium Triquetrum L. Based on Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photodiode Array Detector Combined with Chemometrics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meiling; Zhao, Cui; Liang, Xianrui; Ying, Yin; Han, Bing; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    A fingerprinting approach was developed by means of ultra high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector for the quality control of Desmodium triquetrum L., an herbal medicine widely used for clinical purposes. Ten batches of raw material samples of D. triquetrum were collected from different regions of China. All UPLC analyses were carried out on a Waters ACQUITY UPLC BEH shield RP18 column (2.1 × 50 mm, 1.7 µm particle size) at 60°C, with a gradient mobile phase composed of 0.1% aqueous formic acid and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.45 mL/min. The method validation results demonstrated the developed method possessing desirable reproducibility, efficiency, and allowing fingerprint analysis in one chromatographic run within 13 min. The quality assessment was achieved by using chemometrics methods including similarity analysis, hierarchical clustering analysis and principal component analysis. The developed method can be used for further quality control of D. triquetrum. PMID:26791345

  13. Revised genomic structure of the human ghrelin gene and identification of novel exons, alternative splice variants and natural antisense transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herington Adrian C

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide hormone expressed in a range of normal tissues and pathologies. It has been reported that the human ghrelin gene consists of five exons which span 5 kb of genomic DNA on chromosome 3 and includes a 20 bp non-coding first exon (20 bp exon 0. The availability of bioinformatic tools enabling comparative analysis and the finalisation of the human genome prompted us to re-examine the genomic structure of the ghrelin locus. Results We have demonstrated the presence of an additional novel exon (exon -1 and 5' extensions to exon 0 and 1 using comparative in silico analysis and have demonstrated their existence experimentally using RT-PCR and 5' RACE. A revised exon-intron structure demonstrates that the human ghrelin gene spans 7.2 kb and consists of six rather than five exons. Several ghrelin gene-derived splice forms were detected in a range of human tissues and cell lines. We have demonstrated ghrelin gene-derived mRNA transcripts that do not code for ghrelin, but instead may encode the C-terminal region of full-length preproghrelin (C-ghrelin, which contains the coding region for obestatin and a transcript encoding obestatin-only. Splice variants that differed in their 5' untranslated regions were also found, suggesting a role of these regions in the post-transcriptional regulation of preproghrelin translation. Finally, several natural antisense transcripts, termed ghrelinOS (ghrelin opposite strand transcripts, were demonstrated via orientation-specific RT-PCR, 5' RACE and in silico analysis of ESTs and cloned amplicons. Conclusion The sense and antisense alternative transcripts demonstrated in this study may function as non-coding regulatory RNA, or code for novel protein isoforms. This is the first demonstration of putative obestatin and C-ghrelin specific transcripts and these findings suggest that these ghrelin gene-derived peptides may also be produced independently of preproghrelin

  14. Intron Retention and TE Exonization Events in ZRANB2

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    Sang-Je Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Zinc finger, RAN-binding domain-containing protein 2 (ZRANB2, contains arginine/serine-rich (RS domains that mediate its function in the regulation of alternative splicing. The ZRANB2 gene contains 2 LINE elements (L3b, Plat_L3 between the 9th and 10th exons. We identified the exonization event of a LINE element (Plat_L3. Using genomic PCR, RT-PCR amplification, and sequencing of primate DNA and RNA samples, we analyzed the evolutionary features of ZRANB2 transcripts. The results indicated that 2 of the LINE elements were integrated in human and all of the tested primate samples (hominoids: 3 species; Old World monkey: 8 species; New World monkey: 6 species; prosimian: 1 species. Human, rhesus monkey, crab-eating monkey, African-green monkey, and marmoset harbor the exon derived from LINE element (Plat_L3. RT-PCR amplification revealed the long transcripts and their differential expression patterns. Intriguingly, these long transcripts were abundantly expressed in Old World monkey lineages (rhesus, crab-eating, and African-green monkeys and were expressed via intron retention (IR. Thus, the ZRANB2 gene produces 3 transcript variants in which the Cterminus varies by transposable elements (TEs exonization and IR mechanisms. Therefore, ZRANB2 is valuable for investigating the evolutionary mechanisms of TE exonization and IR during primate evolution.

  15. Surgical Workflow Analysis: Ideal Application of Navigated Linear Array Ultrasound in Low-Grade Glioma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothes, Thomas Ernst; Siekmann, Max; König, Ralph Werner; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Coburger, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Background Intraoperative imaging in low-grade glioma (LGG) surgery can facilitate residual tumor control and improve surgical outcome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ideal application and typical interactions of intraoperative MRI (iMRI), conventional low-frequency intraoperative ultrasound (cioUS), and high-frequency linear array intraoperative ultrasound (lioUS) to optimize surgical workflow. Methods Prospectively, we included 11 patients with an LGG. Typical procedural workflow in the iMRI suite was recorded with a compatible software. We took notes of duration, frequency of application, the surgeon's evaluation of image quality, and the respective benefit of lioUS (15 MHz), cioUS (7 MHz), and iMRI (1.5 T). With the help of the workflow software, we meticulously analyzed ∼ 55 hours of surgery. Results During the interventions, lioUS was used more often (76.3%) than cioUS (23.7%) and showed a better mean image quality (1 = best to 6 = worst) of 2.08 versus 3.26 with cioUS. The benefit of the lioUS application was rated with an average of 2.27, whereas the cioUS probe only reached a mean value of 3.83. The most common application of lioUS was resection control (42.6%); cioUS was used mainly for orientation (63.2%). Overall, lioUS was used more often and was rated better for both the purposes just described regarding image quality and benefit. Estimated residual tumor based on lioUS alone was lower than the final residual tumor detected with iMRI (7.5% versus 14.5%). The latter technique was rated as the best imaging modality for resection control in all cases followed by lioUS. Conclusion We provide proof of principle for workflow assessment in cranial neurosurgery. Although iMRI remains the imaging method of choice, lioUS has shown to be beneficial in a combined setup. Evaluation of lioUS was significantly superior to cioUS in most indications except for subcortical lesions. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Investigation of the diagnostic value of chromosome analysis and bacterial artificial chromosome-based array comparative genomic hybridization in prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savli, Hakan; Keskin, Seda Eren; Cine, Naci

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and chromosome analysis in prenatal diagnosis. This study included the chromosome analysis and BAC-based array CGH analysis of 140 amniocentesis samples with prenatal diagnosis indications. Karyotype analysis showed trisomy 21 in 4 patients, trisomy 18 in 5 patients, monosomy X in 1 patient, and other anomalies in 3 patients. The BAC-based array CGH analysis showed 4 patients with trisomy 21, 4 patients with trisomy 18, and 1 patient with monosomy X as a numerical chromosome anomaly, while partial duplication was observed in chromosome 14 in 1 case as a structural anomaly. The array CGH is the most effective method available to complement cases where chromosome analysis, a gold standard in prenatal diagnosis, proves to be insufficient. Considering the inherent limitations of both methods, complementary features should be introduced in order to be able to give the most accurate data at the right time.

  17. Identifying the similarities and differences between single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNPa analysis and karyotyping in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes

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    Thiago Rodrigo de Noronha

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To standardize the single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNPa method in acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes, and to identify the similarities and differ- ences between the results of this method and karyotyping. Methods: Twenty-two patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia and three with myelodysplastic syndromes were studied. The G-banding karyotyping and single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis (CytoScan(r HD were performed using cells from bone marrow, DNA extracted from mononuclear cells from bone marrow and buccal cells (BC. Results: The mean age of the patients studied was 54 years old, and the median age was 55 years (range: 28-93. Twelve (48% were male and 13 (52% female. Ten patients showed abnormal karyotypes (40.0%, 11 normal (44.0% and four had no mitosis (16.0%. Regarding the results of bone marrow single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis: 17 were abnor- mal (68.0% and eight were normal (32.0%. Comparing the two methods, karyotyping identified a total of 17 alterations (8 deletions/losses, 7 trissomies/gains, and 2 translocations and single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis identified a total of 42 alterations (17 losses, 16 gains and 9 copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity. Conclusion: It is possible to standardize single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis in acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes and compare the results with the abnormalities detected by karyotyping. Single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis increased the detection rate of abnormalities compared to karyotyping and also identified a new set of abnormalities that deserve further investigation in future studies.

  18. Laser tweezer actuated microphotonic array devices for high resolution imaging and analysis in chip-based biosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkbeck, Aaron L.

    A new technology is developed that functionally integrates arrays of lasers and micro-optics into microfluidic systems for the purpose of imaging, analyzing, and manipulating objects and biological cells. In general, the devices and technologies emerging from this area either lack functionality through the reliance on mechanical systems or provide a serial-based, time consuming approach. As compared to the current state of art, our all-optical design methodology has several distinguishing features, such as parallelism, high efficiency, low power, auto-alignment, and high yield fabrication methods, which all contribute to minimizing the cost of the integration process. The potential use of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for the creation of two-dimensional arrays of laser optical tweezers that perform independently controlled, parallel capture, and transport of large numbers of individual objects and biological cells is investigated. One of the primary biological applications for which VCSEL array sourced laser optical tweezers are considered is the formation of engineered tissues through the manipulation and spatial arrangement of different types of cells in a co-culture. Creating devices that combine laser optical tweezers with select micro-optical components permits optical imaging and analysis functions to take place inside the microfluidic channel. One such device is a micro-optical spatial filter whose motion and alignment is controlled using a laser optical tweezer. Unlike conventional spatial filter systems, our device utilizes a refractive optical element that is directly incorporated onto the lithographically patterned spatial filter. This allows the micro-optical spatial filter to automatically align itself in three-dimensions to the focal point of the microscope objective, where it then filters out the higher frequency additive noise components present in the laser beam. As a means of performing high resolution imaging in the

  19. High-throughput analysis of ammonia oxidiser community composition via a novel, amoA-based functional gene array.

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    Guy C J Abell

    Full Text Available Advances in microbial ecology research are more often than not limited by the capabilities of available methodologies. Aerobic autotrophic nitrification is one of the most important and well studied microbiological processes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We have developed and validated a microbial diagnostic microarray based on the ammonia-monooxygenase subunit A (amoA gene, enabling the in-depth analysis of the community structure of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers. The amoA microarray has been successfully applied to analyse nitrifier diversity in marine, estuarine, soil and wastewater treatment plant environments. The microarray has moderate costs for labour and consumables and enables the analysis of hundreds of environmental DNA or RNA samples per week per person. The array has been thoroughly validated with a range of individual and complex targets (amoA clones and environmental samples, respectively, combined with parallel analysis using traditional sequencing methods. The moderate cost and high throughput of the microarray makes it possible to adequately address broader questions of the ecology of microbial ammonia oxidation requiring high sample numbers and high resolution of the community composition.

  20. Whole exon 5 and intron 5 replaced by RHCE in DVa(Hus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chaopeng; Xiong, Wen; Wang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    The DVa(Hus) was previously investigated through cDNA analysis, which revealed an RHD-CE(5)-D hybrid allele. However, the 5' and 3' breakpoints remain unknown. In this article, gene recombinations between the RHD and RHCE alleles were investigated by a combination approach of a sequence-specific primer PCR (PCR-SSP) and an RHD full-length coding region sequencing method on two Chinese subjects with weak D phenotypes. The hybrid Rhesus box of each individual was also investigated through an established PCR-based method. As a result, two partial D phenotypes, DVa(Hus) and DVI type III, were identified, each carrying one hybrid RHD-CE-D allele. The two samples were also serotyped with Rh phontypes of DccEe and DCcee, respectively. Other sequencing analyses of the DVaHus sample showed that the sequence of intron 4 is identical with RHD, whereas the whole sequence of exon 5 and intron 5 is identical with RHCE except for seven polymorphisms in the intron 5. We may concluded that in the case of this Chinese DVa(Hus), the whole exon 5 and complete intron 5 of a total segment of 1801 nucleotides were replaced by RHCE suggesting that the breakpoints of the replaced region are the 5' end of the exon 5 and the 3' end of the intron 5.

  1. PTESFinder: a computational method to identify post-transcriptional exon shuffling (PTES) events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuogu, Osagie G; Alhasan, Abd A; Alafghani, Hani M; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Elliott, David J; Elliot, David J; Jackson, Michael S

    2016-01-13

    Transcripts, which have been subject to Post-transcriptional exon shuffling (PTES), have an exon order inconsistent with the underlying genomic sequence. These have been identified in a wide variety of tissues and cell types from many eukaryotes, and are now known to be mostly circular, cytoplasmic, and non-coding. Although there is no uniformly ascribed function, several have been shown to be involved in gene regulation. Accurate identification of these transcripts can, however, be difficult due to artefacts from a wide variety of sources. Here, we present a computational method, PTESFinder, to identify these transcripts from high throughput RNAseq data. Uniquely, it systematically excludes potential artefacts emanating from pseudogenes, segmental duplications, and template switching, and outputs both PTES and canonical exon junction counts to facilitate comparative analyses. In comparison with four existing methods, PTESFinder achieves highest specificity and comparable sensitivity at a variety of read depths. PTESFinder also identifies between 13 % and 41.6 % more structures, compared to publicly available methods recently used to identify human circular RNAs. With high sensitivity and specificity, user-adjustable filters that target known sources of false positives, and tailored output to facilitate comparison of transcript levels, PTESFinder will facilitate the discovery and analysis of these poorly understood transcripts.

  2. Relationship between polymorphisms in exon 10 of FSHR gene and litter size in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X D; Zhu, H Y; Zhou, J; Wang, N; Zhou, N; Huang, L; Wu, T; Feng, Y F; Ding, Y Y; Yin, Z J

    2015-07-27

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a glycoprotein secreted by the anterior pituitary, can regulate ovarian function through the FSH receptor (FSHR). To evaluate the effects of the FSHR gene on reproductive traits in pigs, polymorphisms in exon 10 of the FSHR gene were observed by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism, and 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (C1491T, G1885A, and C1977T) in exon 10 of the porcine FSHR gene, and 3 genotypes (AA, AB, and BB) for C1491T and 2 haplotypes (D and E) for G1885A and C1977T were identified. Further analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes associated with reproductive traits including total number born (TNB) and number born alive (NBA) was carried out in 3 pig populations including Berkshire, Wannan Black (a Chinese indigenous pig breed), and BW pigs (two-way crossbred pigs produced from Berkshire ♂ and Wannan Black pig ♀). The results showed that the TNB and NBA of Wannan Black pigs with the AB genotype were significantly higher than in AA genotype sows (P pigs with the DE genotype were significantly higher than the DD and EE genotype sows (P DD > EE. The results showed that polymorphisms in exon 10 of the FSHR gene had a significant effect on litter size traits of Wannan Black and Berkshire pigs. These results can be applied for marker-assisted selection in the 2 swine breeds.

  3. Deletion of exons 1-5 of the STS gene causing X-linked ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Flores, M; Kofman-Alfaro, S H; Vaca, A L; Cuevas-Covarrubias, S A

    2001-03-01

    X-linked ichthyosis is an inherited disorder due to steroid sulfatase deficiency. It is clinically characterized by dark, adhesive, and regular scales of the skin. Most X-linked ichthyosis patients present large deletions of the STS gene and flanking markers; a minority show a point mutation or partial deletion of the STS gene. In this study we analyzed the STS gene in a family with simultaneous occurrence of X-linked ichthyosis and ichthyosis vulgaris. X-linked ichthyosis diagnosis was confirmed through steroid sulfatase assay in leukocytes using 7-[3H]-dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate as a substrate. Exons 1, 2, 5, and 6-10, and the 5' flanking markers DXS1130, DXS1139, and DXS996 of the STS gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. X-linked ichthyosis patients of the family (n = 4 males) had undetectable levels of STS activity (0.00 pmol per mg protein per h). The DNA analysis showed that only exons 6-10 and the 5' flanking markers of the STS gene were present. We report the first partial deletion of the STS gene spanning exons 1-5 in X-linked ichthyosis patients.

  4. Exon deletions and intragenic insertions are not rare in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 2

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    Kreuz Friedmar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autosomal recessively inherited ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 2 (AOA2 is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by juvenile or adolescent age of onset, gait ataxia, cerebellar atrophy, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia, and elevated serum AFP levels. AOA2 is caused by mutations within the senataxin gene (SETX. The majority of known mutations are nonsense, missense, and splice site mutations, as well as small deletions and insertions. Methods To detect mutations in patients showing a clinical phenotype consistent with AOA2, the coding region including splice sites of the SETX gene was sequenced and dosage analyses for all exons were performed on genomic DNA. The sequence of cDNA fragments of alternative transcripts isolated after RT-PCR was determined. Results Sequence analyses of the SETX gene in four patients revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation or a 4 bp deletion in three cases. In another patient, PCR amplification of exon 11 to 15 dropped out. Dosage analyses and breakpoint localisation yielded a 1.3 kb LINE1 insertion in exon 12 (patient P1 and a 6.1 kb deletion between intron 11 and intron 14 (patient P2 in addition to the heterozygous nonsense mutation R1606X. Patient P3 was compound heterozygous for a 4 bp deletion in exon 10 and a 20.7 kb deletion between intron 10 and 15. This deletion was present in a homozygous state in patient P4. Conclusion Our findings indicate that gross mutations seem to be a frequent cause of AOA2 and reveal the importance of additional copy number analysis for routine diagnostics.

  5. Transcriptome networks in the mouse retina: An exon level BXD RI database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Rebecca; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W; Geisert, Eldon E

    2015-01-01

    Differences in gene expression provide diverse retina phenotypes and may also contribute to susceptibility to injury and disease. The present study defines the transcriptome of the retina in the BXD RI strain set, using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array to investigate all exons of traditional protein coding genes, non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs. These data are presented in a highly interactive database on the GeneNetwork website. In the Normal Retina Database, the mRNA levels of the transcriptome from retinas was quantified using the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST array. This database consists of data from male and female mice. The data set includes a total of 52 BXD RI strains, the parental strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), and a reciprocal cross. In combination with GeneNetwork, the Department of Defense (DoD) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) Normal Retina Database provides a large resource for mapping, graphing, analyzing, and testing complex genetic networks. Protein-coding and non-coding RNAs can be used to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to expression differences among the BXD strains and to establish links between classical ocular phenotypes associated with differences in the genomic sequence. Using this resource, we extracted transcriptome signatures for retinal cells and defined genetic networks associated with the maintenance of the normal retina. Furthermore, we examined differentially expressed exons within a single gene. The high level of variation in mRNA levels found among the BXD RI strains makes it possible to identify expression networks that underline differences in retina structure and function. Ultimately, we will use this database to define changes that occur following blast injury to the retina.

  6. Substrate specificity analysis of protein kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 by peptide library and proteome array screening

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    Snyder Michael

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitotic exit network (MEN is a group of proteins that form a signaling cascade that is essential for cells to exit mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MEN has also been implicated in playing a role in cytokinesis. Two components of this signaling pathway are the protein kinase Dbf2 and its binding partner essential for its kinase activity, Mob1. The components of MEN that act upstream of Dbf2-Mob1 have been characterized, but physiological substrates for Dbf2-Mob1 have yet to be identified. Results Using a combination of peptide library selection, phosphorylation of opitmal peptide variants, and screening of a phosphosite array, we found that Dbf2-Mob1 preferentially phosphorylated serine over threonine and required an arginine three residues upstream of the phosphorylated serine in its substrate. This requirement for arginine in peptide substrates could not be substituted with the similarly charged lysine. This specificity determined for peptide substrates was also evident in many of the proteins phosphorylated by Dbf2-Mob1 in a proteome chip analysis. Conclusion We have determined by peptide library selection and phosphosite array screening that the protein kinase Dbf2-Mob1 preferentially phosphorylated substrates that contain an RXXS motif. A subsequent proteome microarray screen revealed proteins that can be phosphorylated by Dbf2-Mob1 in vitro. These proteins are enriched for RXXS motifs, and may include substrates that mediate the function of Dbf2-Mob1 in mitotic exit and cytokinesis. The relatively low degree of sequence restriction at the site of phosphorylation suggests that Dbf2 achieves specificity by docking its substrates at a site that is distinct from the phosphorylation site

  7. Statistical analysis of an RNA titration series evaluates microarray precision and sensitivity on a whole-array basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Andrew J; Oshlack, Alicia; Diyagama, Dileepa S; Bowtell, David D L; Smyth, Gordon K

    2006-11-22

    Concerns are often raised about the accuracy of microarray technologies and the degree of cross-platform agreement, but there are yet no methods which can unambiguously evaluate precision and sensitivity for these technologies on a whole-array basis. A methodology is described for evaluating the precision and sensitivity of whole-genome gene expression technologies such as microarrays. The method consists of an easy-to-construct titration series of RNA samples and an associated statistical analysis using non-linear regression. The method evaluates the precision and responsiveness of each microarray platform on a whole-array basis, i.e., using all the probes, without the need to match probes across platforms. An experiment is conducted to assess and compare four widely used microarray platforms. All four platforms are shown to have satisfactory precision but the commercial platforms are superior for resolving differential expression for genes at lower expression levels. The effective precision of the two-color platforms is improved by allowing for probe-specific dye-effects in the statistical model. The methodology is used to compare three data extraction algorithms for the Affymetrix platforms, demonstrating poor performance for the commonly used proprietary algorithm relative to the other algorithms. For probes which can be matched across platforms, the cross-platform variability is decomposed into within-platform and between-platform components, showing that platform disagreement is almost entirely systematic rather than due to measurement variability. The results demonstrate good precision and sensitivity for all the platforms, but highlight the need for improved probe annotation. They quantify the extent to which cross-platform measures can be expected to be less accurate than within-platform comparisons for predicting disease progression or outcome.

  8. Statistical analysis of an RNA titration series evaluates microarray precision and sensitivity on a whole-array basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowtell David DL

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns are often raised about the accuracy of microarray technologies and the degree of cross-platform agreement, but there are yet no methods which can unambiguously evaluate precision and sensitivity for these technologies on a whole-array basis. Results A methodology is described for evaluating the precision and sensitivity of whole-genome gene expression technologies such as microarrays. The method consists of an easy-to-construct titration series of RNA samples and an associated statistical analysis using non-linear regression. The method evaluates the precision and responsiveness of each microarray platform on a whole-array basis, i.e., using all the probes, without the need to match probes across platforms. An experiment is conducted to assess and compare four widely used microarray platforms. All four platforms are shown to have satisfactory precision but the commercial platforms are superior for resolving differential expression for genes at lower expression levels. The effective precision of the two-color platforms is improved by allowing for probe-specific dye-effects in the statistical model. The methodology is used to compare three data extraction algorithms for the Affymetrix platforms, demonstrating poor performance for the commonly used proprietary algorithm relative to the other algorithms. For probes which can be matched across platforms, the cross-platform variability is decomposed into within-platform and between-platform components, showing that platform disagreement is almost entirely systematic rather than due to measurement variability. Conclusion The results demonstrate good precision and sensitivity for all the platforms, but highlight the need for improved probe annotation. They quantify the extent to which cross-platform measures can be expected to be less accurate than within-platform comparisons for predicting disease progression or outcome.

  9. A missense mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene disrupts an ASF/SF2 splicing enhancer motif and causes pathogenic skipping of exon 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Vânia; Theisen, Patrícia; Antunes, Ofélia; Medeira, Ana; Ramos, José Silva; Jordan, Peter; Isidro, Glória

    2009-03-09

    A missense mutation at codon 640 in the APC gene was identified in a familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patient, however, its pathological consequence remained unclear. Here we found that this missense mutation interferes at the nucleotide level with an exonic splicing regulatory element and leads to aberrant splicing of the mutant APC transcript rather than exerting its effect through the observed amino acid change. Analysis of the patient RNA revealed complete skipping of exon 14 in transcripts from the mutant APC allele, leading to a frameshift and a premature stop codon. When cloned into a splicing reporter minigene and transfected into colorectal cell lines, the exon 14 point mutation c.1918C>G (pR640G) was found sufficient to cause the observed exon skipping. Bioinformatic analysis predicted the mutation to change SRp55, hnRNP A1 or ASF/SF2 splicing factor binding sites. Using RNA interference methodology these predictions were experimentally validated and revealed that only ASF/SF2 was required for exon 14 inclusion. These research data identify APC mutation c.1918C>G (pR640G) as pathogenic and indicate a mechanism involving disruption of an ASF/SF2 exonic splicing enhancer element. The results allow genetic diagnosis of a hereditary tumour predisposition but also illustrate the need to complement in silico prediction by splicing reporter assays.

  10. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII: a single base change that causes exon skipping in the type I collagen alpha 2(I) chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, A C; Oliver, J; Renouf, D V; McPheat, J; Palan, A; Pope, F M

    1991-06-01

    We have examined the procollagens and collagens produced by skin fibroblasts from a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII. The patient was heterozygous for an abnormal alpha 2(I) chain migrating with the approximate size of pN alpha 2(I) chains after pepsin digestion. Peptide mapping suggested that the abnormality was located at the amino-terminus of the alpha 2(I) chain. Quantitative analysis of the alpha 2(I) mRNA indicated loss of the exon 6 sequences, and subsequent polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNA demonstrated a deletion of the 54 bp of exon 6 from some of the alpha 2(I) mRNA. Analysis of genomic DNA from the patient revealed a single base change in one COL1A2 allele, substituting an A for a G as the first base of intron 6. This change mutates the obligate GT-dinulceotide splicing signal to AT and leads to exon skipping with splicing from exon 5 to exon 7. Loss of exon 6 sequences results in the loss of the procollagen-N-propeptidase cleavage site and a lysine residue that normally participates in covalent intermolecular crosslinking within collagen fibres.

  11. Estimation of the potential array output charge in the performance analysis of stand-alone photovoltaic systems without MPPT (Case study: Mediterranean climate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, F.J.; Echbarthi, I.; Nofuentes, G.; Fuentes, M.; Aguilera, J. [Grupo IDEA, Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica y Automatica, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, 23071 - Jaen (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    The potential array output energy, E{sub P}, stated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in their European Guidelines for the Assessment of Photovoltaic Plants and the IEC Standard 61724 does not estimate properly the potential array output of stand-alone photovoltaic (SAPV) systems without maximum power point tracker (MPPT) as it is the case for SAPV systems with MPPT and grid connected systems. In this way, the main purpose of this paper is to validate an expression that compromises simplicity and accuracy when estimating the potential array output of SAPV systems without MPPT. This issue can be of high interest to photovoltaic (PV) practitioners and experts as it can improve the analysis performance of this type of systems, helping to discriminate better the different losses in this kind of systems. Furthermore, a study of the array potential estimation through different expressions will be developed in order to evaluate which matches better the array potential output in SAPV system without MPPT. Although the analysis will be focused especially in Mediterranean climates, it will be derived some general conclusions that can be considered in other climates. (author)

  12. Starr: Simple Tiling ARRay analysis of Affymetrix ChIP-chip data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tresch Achim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with DNA microarrays (ChIP-chip is an assay used for investigating DNA-protein-binding or post-translational chromatin/histone modifications. As with all high-throughput technologies, it requires thorough bioinformatic processing of the data for which there is no standard yet. The primary goal is to reliably identify and localize genomic regions that bind a specific protein. Further investigation compares binding profiles of functionally related proteins, or binding profiles of the same proteins in different genetic backgrounds or experimental conditions. Ultimately, the goal is to gain a mechanistic understanding of the effects of DNA binding events on gene expression. Results We present a free, open-source R/Bioconductor package Starr that facilitates comparative analysis of ChIP-chip data across experiments and across different microarray platforms. The package provides functions for data import, quality assessment, data visualization and exploration. Starr includes high-level analysis tools such as the alignment of ChIP signals along annotated features, correlation analysis of ChIP signals with complementary genomic data, peak-finding and comparative display of multiple clusters of binding profiles. It uses standard Bioconductor classes for maximum compatibility with other software. Moreover, Starr automatically updates microarray probe annotation files by a highly efficient remapping of microarray probe sequences to an arbitrary genome. Conclusion Starr is an R package that covers the complete ChIP-chip workflow from data processing to binding pattern detection. It focuses on the high-level data analysis, e.g., it provides methods for the integration and combined statistical analysis of binding profiles and complementary functional genomics data. Starr enables systematic assessment of binding behaviour for groups of genes that are alingned along arbitrary genomic features.

  13. Biochemical characterization of patients with in-frame or out-of-frame DMD deletions pertinent to exon 44 or 45 skipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Karen; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Ricotti, Valeria; Torelli, Silvia; Feng, Lucy; Janghra, Narinder; Tasca, Giorgio; Guglieri, Michela; Barresi, Rita; Armaroli, Annarita; Ferlini, Alessandra; Bushby, Katherine; Straub, Volker; Ricci, Enzo; Sewry, Caroline; Morgan, Jennifer; Muntoni, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the reading frame of an out-of-frame DMD deletion can be repaired by antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon skipping. This creates a shorter dystrophin protein, similar to those expressed in the milder Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The skipping of some exons may be more efficacious than others. Patients with exon 44 or 45 skippable deletions (AOs in clinical development) have a less predictable phenotype than those skippable for exon 51, a group in advanced clinical trials. A way to predict the potential of AOs is the study of patients with BMD who have deletions that naturally mimic those that would be achieved by exon skipping. To quantify dystrophin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in patients with DMD deletions treatable by, or mimicking, exon 44 or 45 skipping. Retrospective study of nondystrophic controls (n = 2), patients with DMD (n = 5), patients with intermediate muscular dystrophy (n = 3), and patients with BMD (n = 13) at 4 university-based academic centers and pediatric hospitals. Biochemical analysis of existing muscle biopsies was correlated with the severity of the skeletal muscle phenotype. Dystrophin mRNA and protein expression. Patients with DMD who have out-of-frame deletions skippable for exon 44 or 45 had an elevated number of revertant and trace dystrophin expression (approximately 19% of control, using quantitative immunohistochemistry) with 4 of 9 patients presenting with an intermediate muscular dystrophy phenotype (3 patients) or a BMD-like phenotype (1 patient). Corresponding in-frame deletions presented with predominantly mild BMD phenotypes and lower dystrophin levels (approximately 42% of control) than patients with BMD modeling exon 51 skipping (approximately 80% of control). All 12 patients with in-frame deletions had a stable transcript compared with 2 of 9 patients with out-of-frame deletions (who had intermediate muscular dystrophy and BMD phenotypes). Exon

  14. Antisense-induced exon skipping for duplications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert-Jan B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting specific exons the DMD reading frame is restored and partially functional dystrophins are produced. Following proof of concept in cultured muscle cells from patients with various deletions and point mutations, we now focus on single and multiple exon duplications. These mutations are in principle ideal targets for this approach since the specific skipping of duplicated exons would generate original, full-length transcripts. Methods Cultured muscle cells from DMD patients carrying duplications were transfected with AONs targeting the duplicated exons, and the dystrophin RNA and protein were analyzed. Results For two brothers with an exon 44 duplication, skipping was, even at suboptimal transfection conditions, so efficient that both exons 44 were skipped, thus generating, once more, an out-of-frame transcript. In such cases, one may resort to multi-exon skipping to restore the reading frame, as is shown here by inducing skipping of exon 43 and both exons 44. By contrast, in cells from a patient with an exon 45 duplication we were able to induce single exon 45 skipping, which allowed restoration of wild type dystrophin. The correction of a larger duplication (involving exons 52 to 62, by combinations of AONs targeting the outer exons, appeared problematic due to inefficient skipping and mistargeting of original instead of duplicated exons. Conclusion The correction of DMD duplications by exon skipping depends on the specific exons targeted. Its options vary from the ideal one, restoring for the first time the true, wild type dystrophin, to requiring more 'classical' skipping strategies, while the correction of multi-exon deletions may need the design of tailored approaches.

  15. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described......, and that spontaneous recovery may occur in cases harboring an exon 5b mutation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  16. A digitizer based compact digital spectrometer for ion beam analysis using field programmable gate arrays and various energy algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäger, Markus [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Leipzig, PF 100920, 04009 Leipzig (Germany); Reinert, Tilo [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    We report on the implementation of a compact multi-detector fully digital spectrometer and data acquisition system at a nuclear microprobe for ion beam analysis and imaging. The spectrometer design allows for system scalability with no restriction on the number of detectors. It consists of four-channel high-speed digitizer modules for detector signal acquisition and one low-speed digital-to-analog converter (DAC) module with two DAC channels and additional general purpose inputs/outputs to control ion beam scanning and data acquisition. Each digitizer module of the spectrometer provides its own Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) as digital signal processing unit to analyze detector signals as well as to synchronize the ion beam position in hard real-time. With the customized FPGA designs for all modules, all calculation intensive tasks are executed inside the modules, which reduces significantly the data stream to and CPU load on the control computer. To achieve an optimal energy resolution for all detector/preamplifier pulse shape characteristics, a user-definable infinite impulse response filter with high throughput for energy determination was implemented. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and is able to process any type of detector signals such as particle induced x-ray emission, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, or scanning transmission ion microscopy.

  17. Design of Smart Ion-Selective Electrode Arrays Based on Source Separation through Nonlinear Independent Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte L.T.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of chemical sensor arrays based on Blind Source Separation (BSS provides a promising solution to overcome the interference problem associated with Ion-Selective Electrodes (ISE. The main motivation behind this new approach is to ease the time-demanding calibration stage. While the first works on this problem only considered the case in which the ions under analysis have equal valences, the present work aims at developing a BSS technique that works when the ions have different charges. In this situation, the resulting mixing model belongs to a particular class of nonlinear systems that have never been studied in the BSS literature. In order to tackle this sort of mixing process, we adopted a recurrent network as separating system. Moreover, concerning the BSS learning strategy, we develop a mutual information minimization approach based on the notion of the differential of the mutual information. The method works requires a batch operation, and, thus, can be used to perform off-line analysis. The validity of our approach is supported by experiments where the mixing model parameters were extracted from actual data.

  18. Single Event Analysis and Fault Injection Techniques Targeting Complex Designs Implemented in Xilinx-Virtex Family Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth; Kim, Hak

    2014-01-01

    An informative session regarding SRAM FPGA basics. Presenting a framework for fault injection techniques applied to Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Introduce an overlooked time component that illustrates fault injection is impractical for most real designs as a stand-alone characterization tool. Demonstrate procedures that benefit from fault injection error analysis.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of exosome-compromised human cells using high-density tiling arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    The extent of RNA degradation in the nucleus has traditionally been underestimated. However, all major RNA species are synthesized, processed and can be degraded in this compartment and consequently an enormous amount of nucleosides are turned over and recycled. The RNA exosome, a multisubunit......-mediated knock down. We have initiated a transcriptome analysis to investigate the global influence of the nuclear exosome on the abundance  of various RNAs (e.g. normal mRNAs, intergenic transcripts, miRNAs, endogenous retroviral RNAs and small non-coding RNAs). We use an ENCODE (ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements...

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation.

  1. A novel deletion of SNURF/SNRPN exon 1 in a patient with Prader-Willi-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; AlHumaidi, Susan S; Faqeih, Eissa A; Pitel, Beth A; Lundquist, Patrick; Aypar, Umut

    2017-08-01

    Here we report the smallest deletion involving SNURF/SNRPN that causes major symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), including hypotonia, dysmorphic features, intellectual disability, and obesity. A female patient with the aforementioned and additional features was referred to the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics laboratory for genetic testing. Chromosomal microarray analysis and subsequent Sanger sequencing identified a de novo 6.4 kb deletion at 15q11.2, containing exon 1 of the SNURF gene and exon 1 of the shortest isoform of the SNRPN gene. SNURF/SNRPN exon 1, which is methylated on the silent maternal allele, is associated with acetylated histones on the expressed paternal allele. This region also overlaps with the PWS-imprinting center (IC). Subsequent molecular methylation analysis was performed using methylation-specific MLPA (MS-MLPA), which characterized that the deletion of SNURF/SNRPN exon 1 was paternal in origin, consistent with the PWS-like phenotype. Since SNURF/SNRPN gene and the PWS-IC are known to regulate snoRNAs, it is likely that the PWS-like phenotype observed in patients with paternal SNURF/SNRPN deletion is due to the disrupted expression of SNORD116 snoRNAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Shared gene structures and clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons within the metazoan muscle myosin heavy chain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kollmar

    Full Text Available Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs. The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both have independently been developed

  3. Analysis on typhoon-induced microseisms from ocean bottom seismometer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzu-Chuan; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2013-04-01

    Ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) is usually used for active sources and passive listening experiments, such as air guns, explosives, earthquakes and other signals. In fact, the seismometer records not only the seismic waveforms but also noises generated by winds, waves, tides and other external forces. From the end of August to early September 2011, 15 OBSs were deployed offshore northeastern Taiwan for a recording period of about 20 days. At the end of August, the typhoon NANMADOL formed in the western Pacific and moved northwestward from the East Philippines and finally landed on the island of Taiwan. Due to storms or pressure changes caused by the typhoon, elastic waves would be directly or indirectly produced and recorded by the seismometers. In this study, by analyzing the seismic signals collected by the OBSs and the BATS stations, we investigate the influence induced by the changes of typhoon path and intensity on the submarine seismic noises. Preliminary results indicate that the seismic energy change related to the typhoon occurred mainly at 0.2-0.5 Hz, which is a relatively low frequency compared to that of earthquakes. The amplitude of this low-frequency noise increased when the distance between the typhoon and seismometer decreased. By comparing the seismic waves with the data collected from the marine weather buoy, we observed a positive correlation between the power of the low frequency microseisms and the wave height. This clearly indicates that the typhoon was the main source of microseisms during their passing. Owing to the ocean waves generated by the typhoon, the pressure altered by the water column change and recorded by the seismometers as seismic waves before being transmitted to the sea?oor. The spectrum analysis shows the presence of a high energy signals at 0.2-1 Hz with a period of about 12 hours which could be related to the tidal movements. In addition, the amplitude of the recorded microseisms is also affected by the depth of seismometers

  4. Genome-wide mapping of copy number variation in humans: comparative analysis of high resolution array platforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini R Haraksingh

    Full Text Available Accurate and efficient genome-wide detection of copy number variants (CNVs is essential for understanding human genomic variation, genome-wide CNV association type studies, cytogenetics research and diagnostics, and independent validation of CNVs identified from sequencing based technologies. Numerous, array-based platforms for CNV detection exist utilizing array Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genotyping or both. We have quantitatively assessed the abilities of twelve leading genome-wide CNV detection platforms to accurately detect Gold Standard sets of CNVs in the genome of HapMap CEU sample NA12878, and found significant differences in performance. The technologies analyzed were the NimbleGen 4.2 M, 2.1 M and 3×720 K Whole Genome and CNV focused arrays, the Agilent 1×1 M CGH and High Resolution and 2×400 K CNV and SNP+CGH arrays, the Illumina Human Omni1Quad array and the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. The Gold Standards used were a 1000 Genomes Project sequencing-based set of 3997 validated CNVs and an ultra high-resolution aCGH-based set of 756 validated CNVs. We found that sensitivity, total number, size range and breakpoint resolution of CNV calls were highest for CNV focused arrays. Our results are important for cost effective CNV detection and validation for both basic and clinical applications.

  5. Molecular characterization of exon 28 of von Willebrand's factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Polymorphisms in von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene are an important contributor to the expression of VWF gene and differences in ethnic distribution of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exists. Aims: Our objective was to molecularly characterize the exon 28 of the VWF gene in the three major ...

  6. Designing exons for human olfactory receptor gene subfamilies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 3. Designing exons for human olfactory receptor gene subfamilies using a mathematical paradigm. Sk Sarif Hassan Pabitra Pal Choudhury Amita Pal R L Brahmachary Arunava Goswami. Articles Volume 35 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 389-393 ...

  7. Exon duplications in the ATP7A gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mie; Skjørringe, Tina; Kodama, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked, fatal neurodegenerative disorder of copper metabolism, caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. Thirty-three Menkes patients in whom no mutation had been detected with standard diagnostic tools were screened for exon duplications in the ATP7A gene. ME...

  8. Investigation of ANGPTL3 expression, exon sequence and promotor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like proteins, has been demonstrated to affect lipid metabolism by inhibiting the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Objective: To compare the ANGPTL3 mRNA and protein expression, exon mutation and promoter district CpG island methylation ...

  9. Exon-trapping mediated by the human retrotransposon SVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancks, Dustin C; Ewing, Adam D; Chen, Jesse E; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kazazian, Haig H

    2009-11-01

    Although most human retrotransposons are inactive, both inactive and active retrotransposons drive genome evolution and may influence transcription through various mechanisms. In humans, three retrotransposon families are still active, but one of these, SVA, remains mysterious. Here we report the identification of a new subfamily of SVA, which apparently formed after an alternative splicing event where the first exon of the MAST2 gene spliced into an intronic SVA and subsequently retrotransposed. Additional examples of SVA retrotransposing upstream exons due to splicing into SVA were also identified in other primate genomes. After molecular and computational experiments, we found a number of functional 3' splice sites within many different transcribed SVAs across the human and chimpanzee genomes. Using a minigene splicing construct containing an SVA, we observed splicing in cell culture, along with SVA exonization events that introduced premature termination codons (PTCs). These data imply that an SVA residing within an intron in the same orientation as the gene may alter normal gene transcription either by gene-trapping or by introducing PTCs through exonization, possibly creating differences within and across species.

  10. Molecular characterization of exon 28 of von Willebrand's factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-12

    May 12, 2016 ... two probable cases among 95 patients with hemophilia A and 11 with hemophilia B between 1980 and 1986, but full investigation and family studies were not performed. In. Nigeria, we have been unable to find documented cases of. Molecular characterization of exon 28 of von Willebrand's factor gene in ...

  11. Characteristics of binding sites of intergenic, intronic and exonic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... miRNAFinder 2.2 (https://sites.google.com/site/malaheenee/home) was used to find miRNA origins (intergenic, exonic or intronic). A literature review of genes coding intronic miRNAs led to 51 oncogenes (Supplementary Table 1) that encode proteins participating in gastrointestinal and breast cancer.

  12. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most...

  13. Translational and Regulatory Challenges for Exon Skipping Therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ferlini, Alessandra; Goemans, Nathalie; Pasmooij, Anna M. G.; Wells, Dominic J.; Bushby, Katerine; Vroom, Elizabeth; Balabanov, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Several translational challenges are currently impeding the therapeutic development of antisense-mediated exon skipping approaches for rare diseases. Some of these are inherent to developing therapies for rare diseases, such as small patient numbers and limited information on natural history and

  14. A fast algorithm for exonic regions prediction in DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberkari, Hamidreza; Shamsi, Mousa; Heravi, Hamed; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a fast method for gene prediction in DNA sequences based on the period-3 property in exons. First, the symbolic DNA sequences were converted to digital signal using the electron ion interaction potential method. Then, to reduce the effect of background noise in the period-3 spectrum, we used the discrete wavelet transform at three levels and applied it on the input digital signal. Finally, the Goertzel algorithm was used to extract period-3 components in the filtered DNA sequence. The proposed algorithm leads to decrease the computational complexity and hence, increases the speed of the process. Detection of small size exons in DNA sequences, exactly, is another advantage of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm ability in exon prediction was compared with several existing methods at the nucleotide level using: (i) specificity - sensitivity values; (ii) receiver operating curves (ROC); and (iii) area under ROC curve. Simulation results confirmed that the proposed method can be used as a promising tool for exon prediction in DNA sequences.

  15. Surface acoustic wave sensor array system for trace organic vapor detection using pattern recognition analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Grate, Jay W.; Klusty, Mark

    1993-03-01

    A sensor system using surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors has been fabricated and tested against hazardous organic vapors, simulants of these vapors, and potential background vapors. The vapor tests included two- and three-component mixtures, and covered a wide relative humidity range. The sensor system was compared of four SAW devices coated with different sorbent materials with different vapor selectivities. Preconcentrators were included to improve sensitivity. The vapor experiments were organized into a large data set analyzed using pattern recognition techniques. Pattern recognition algorithms were developed to identify two different classes of hazards. The algorithms were verified against a second data set not included in the training. Excellent sensitivity was achieved by the sensor coatings, and the pattern recognition analysis, and was also examined by the preconcentrators. The system can detect hazardous vapors of interest in the ppb range even in varying relative humidity and in the presence of background vapors. The system does not false alarm to a variety of other vapors including gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel and cigarette smoke.

  16. Array comparative genome hybridization analysis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia in patients with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ken C; Chalker, Jane; Strehl, Sabine; Neat, Michael; Smith, Owen; Dastugue, Nicole; Kearney, Lyndal; Izraeli, Shai; Kempski, Helena; Cowell, John K

    2008-09-01

    Twenty-five cases of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) from Down syndrome (DS) patients were analyzed using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and compared with two other subgroups of non-DS patients with ALL; five cases with high-hyperdiploidy (HH) and nine cases with ETV6-RUNX1 positive clones. Seven cases of DS-acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (AMKL) were also included, DS-ALL cases showed relatively stable karyotypes with cryptic losses and gains that most frequently involved chromosomes X, 1, 2, 9, 11, 16, and 17. The most consistent change involved a deletion in 2p, spanning region Chr2:88273220-91084234, which in some cases appeared to be homozygous. ALL from non-DS patients showed a similar overall karyotypic stability, although gains of chromosome 21 were infrequent in the ETV6-RUNX1 positive cases. The most consistent change in this group involved a 12p deletion, where Chr12:10383878-16017619 defined the common region of overlap. All HH-ALL karyotypes showed variable gains of chromosome 21. This overall analysis supports the suggestion that, although constitutional trisomy 21 predisposes to ALL/AMKL, the cytogenetic changes associated with DS-ALL in particular, are most similar to those found in non-DS ETV6-RUNX1 positive ALL. The HH-ALL group, however, undergoes distinct karyotypic evolution not dependent on chromosome translocation/deletion events.

  17. Genomic analysis of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma by molecular inversion probe array reveals tumor suppressor-driven biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Erica F; Paxton, Christian N; O'Malley, Dennis P; Louissaint, Abner; Hornick, Jason L; Griffin, Gabriel K; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kim, Young S; Weiss, Lawrence M; Perkins, Sherrie L; South, Sarah T

    2017-09-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of dendritic cell origin that is currently poorly characterized by genetic studies. To investigate whether recurrent genomic alterations may underlie the biology of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and to identify potential contributory regions and genes, molecular inversion probe array analysis was performed on 14 independent formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. Abnormal genomic profiles were observed in 11 out of 14 (79%) cases. The majority showed extensive genomic complexity that was predominantly represented by hemizygous losses affecting multiple chromosomes. Alterations of chromosomal regions 1p (55%), 2p (55%), 3p (82%), 3q (45%), 6q (55%), 7q (73%), 8p (45%), 9p (64%), 11q (64%), 13q (91%), 14q (82%), 15q (64%), 17p (55%), 18q (64%), and 22q (55%) were recurrent across the 11 samples showing abnormal genomic profiles. Many recurrent genomic alterations in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma overlap deletions that are frequently observed across human cancers, suggesting selection, or an active role for these alterations in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma pathogenesis. In support of a tumor suppressor-driven biology, homozygous deletions involving tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A, RB1, BIRC3, and CYLD were also observed. Neither recurrent gains nor amplifications were observed. This genomic characterization provides new information regarding follicular dendritic cell sarcoma biology that may improve understanding about the underlying pathophysiology, provide better prognostication, and identify potential therapeutic markers for this rare disease.

  18. A sol-gel-integrated protein array system for affinity analysis of aptamer-target protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Eunkyung; Kang, Jeehye; Kim, Soyoun

    2011-06-01

    A sol-gel microarray system was developed for a protein interaction assay with high activity. Comparing to 2-dimensional microarray surfaces, sol-gel can offer a more dynamic and broad range for proteins. In the present study, this sol-gel-integrated protein array was used in binding affinity analysis for aptamers. Six RNA aptamers and their target protein, yeast TBP (TATA-binding protein), were used to evaluate this method. A TBP-containing sol-gel mixture was spotted using a dispensing workstation under high-humidity conditions and each Cy-3-labeled aptamer was incubated. The dissociation constants (K(d)) were calculated by plotting the fluorescent intensity of the bound aptamers as a function of the TBP concentrations. The K(d) value of the control aptamer was found to be 8 nM, which agrees well with the values obtained using the conventional method, electric mobility shift assay. The sol-gel-based binding affinity measurements fit well with conventional binding affinity measurements, suggesting their possible use as an alternative to the conventional method. In addition, aptamer affinity measurements by the sol-gel-integrated protein chip make it possible to develop a simple high-throughput affinity method for screening high-affinity aptamers.

  19. Cytotoxicity, In vitro anti-Leishmanial and fingerprint HPLC- photodiode array analysis of the roots of Trillium govanianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kashif Maqbool; Nahar, Lutfun; Mannan, Abdul; Ul-Haq, Ihsan; Arfan, Muhammad; Ali Khan, Ghazanfar; Hussain, Izhar; Sarker, Satyajit D

    2017-09-05

    Trillium govanianum Wall. ex D. Don (Melanthiaceae alt. Trilliaceae), commonly known as 'nagchhatry' or 'teen patra', distributed from Pakistan to Bhutan about 2500-3800 m altitude is indigenous to Himalayas region. In folk medicine the plant has been reported for the treatment of wound healing, sepsis and in various sexual disorders. This paper reports, for the first time, to evaluate the cytotoxicity, in vitro anti-leishmanial (promastigotes) and fingerprint HPLC-photodiode array analysis of the MeOH extract of the roots of T. govanianum and its solid phase extraction fractions. Reverse phase HPLC-PDA based quantification revealed the presence of significant amount of quercetin, myrecetin and kaemferol ranging from 0.221to 0.528 μg/mg DW. MeOH extract revealed distinguishable protein kinase inhibitory activity against Streptomyces 85E strain with 18 mm bald phenotype. The remarkable toxicity profile against brine shrimps and leishmanial was manifested by MeOH extract with LC50 10 and 38.5 μg/mL, respectively.

  20. [Quantitative analysis of eight polyacetylenes derived from Bupleuri Radix by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Fang, Yuan; Zhou, Yu-Zhi; Tian, Jun-Sheng; Qin, Xue-Mei; Gao, Xiao-Xia

    2017-05-01

    To establish quantitative methods for determination of polyacetylenes in Bupleuri Radix, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with photodiode array detector (UPLC-PDA) was developed. The analysis was performed on a Waters BEH C₁₈ column (2.1 mm×100 mm, 1.7 μm) using a gradient system of methanol and water. The flow rate was 0.3 mL•min⁻¹ and the detection wavelength was 315 nm. Eight polyacetylenes were prepared using traditional extraction and isolation method, of which compounds 7 and 8 were two new polyacetylenes. All calibration curves showed good linearity (r>0.999 0) within the concentration range. Both the intra- and inter-day precisions for eight analytes were less than 1.9%, respectively, with the mean recovery at the range of 93.21%-108.4%. Meanwhile, 17 bupleurum samples were examined with this process. The results showed a variety either the chemotaxonomic or content of polyacetylenes. The method indicated good linearity, limit of detection and quantification, precision, accuracy and recovery. The developed method allows quantitative assessment and quality control of polyacetylenes, and might be a good alternative according to detection levels in polyacetylenes from Bupleurum Radix. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  1. Chromosomal-array analysis reveals partial 11q duplication and partial 12p deletion in a mildly affected case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuğ, Esra; Yirmibeş Karaoğuz, Meral; Kayhan, Gülsüm; Ergün, Mehmet Ali; Perçin, Ferda E

    2014-07-01

    Partial trisomy 11q is a rare syndrome and may be observed due to an intra-chromosomal duplication or an inter-chromosomal insertion. The deletions of the short arm of chromosome 12 are also uncommon structural aberrations. Only a small fraction of structural chromosome anomalies are related to the unbalanced progeny of balanced translocation carrier parents. We here report on a 10-month-old baby boy who shows a very mild phenotype related to unique chromosomal abnormality, partial trisomy of 11q, and partial monosomy of 12p, due to the maternal balanced reciprocal translocation (11;12). The proband showed a 49.64 Mb duplication of 11q14.1-q25 and 0.44 Mb deletion of 12p13.33 in chromosomal array analysis. Since it is known that the duplications may cause a milder phenotype than deletions. Dysmorphic facial features, minor cardiac anomalies, respiratory distress, central nervous system anomalies, and psychomotor delay observed in the patient was similar to the reported pure 11q duplication cases, while behavioral problems observed in pure monosomy 12p cases could not be evaluated due to the young age of the patient. Phenotype-genotype correlation will be discussed in view of all the reported pure partial 11q trisomies and pure partial 12p deletion cases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. An Intelligent Architecture Based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays Designed to Detect Moving Objects by Using Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Ignacio; Mazo, Manuel; Lázaro, José L.; Gardel, Alfredo; Jiménez, Pedro; Pizarro, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a complete implementation of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithm in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices applied to high rate background segmentation of images. The classical sequential execution of different parts of the PCA algorithm has been parallelized. This parallelization has led to the specific development and implementation in hardware of the different stages of PCA, such as computation of the correlation matrix, matrix diagonalization using the Jacobi method and subspace projections of images. On the application side, the paper presents a motion detection algorithm, also entirely implemented on the FPGA, and based on the developed PCA core. This consists of dynamically thresholding the differences between the input image and the one obtained by expressing the input image using the PCA linear subspace previously obtained as a background model. The proposal achieves a high ratio of processed images (up to 120 frames per second) and high quality segmentation results, with a completely embedded and reliable hardware architecture based on commercial CMOS sensors and FPGA devices. PMID:22163406

  3. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Calado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs. The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications.

  4. An intelligent sensor array distributed system for vibration analysis and acoustic noise characterization of a linear switched reluctance actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications.

  5. Development of a novel splice array platform and its application in the identification of alternative splice variants in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Roman Javier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays strategies, which allow for the characterization of thousands of alternative splice forms in a single test, can be applied to identify differential alternative splicing events. In this study, a novel splice array approach was developed, including the design of a high-density oligonucleotide array, a labeling procedure, and an algorithm to identify splice events. Results The array consisted of exon probes and thermodynamically balanced junction probes. Suboptimal probes were tagged and considered in the final analysis. An unbiased labeling protocol was developed using random primers. The algorithm used to distinguish changes in expression from changes in splicing was calibrated using internal non-spliced control sequences. The performance of this splice array was validated with artificial constructs for CDC6, VEGF, and PCBP4 isoforms. The platform was then applied to the analysis of differential splice forms in lung cancer samples compared to matched normal lung tissue. Overexpression of splice isoforms was identified for genes encoding CEACAM1, FHL-1, MLPH, and SUSD2. None of these splicing isoforms had been previously associated with lung cancer. Conclusions This methodology enables the detection of alternative splicing events in complex biological samples, providing a powerful tool to identify novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cancer and other pathologies.

  6. Loss of exon identity is a common mechanism of human inherited disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Howard, Jonathan; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Sanford, Jeremy R

    2011-01-01

    ...) and exonic splicing silencers (ESS) in human inherited disease is still poorly understood. Here we use a top-down approach to determine rates of loss or gain of known human exonic splicing regulatory (ESR...

  7. Deep RNA sequencing reveals the smallest known mitochondrial micro exon in animals: The placozoan cox1 single base pair exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osigus, Hans-Jürgen; Eitel, Michael; Schierwater, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Placozoa holds a key position for our understanding of the evolution of mitochondrial genomes in Metazoa. Placozoans possess large mitochondrial genomes which harbor several remarkable characteristics such as a fragmented cox1 gene and trans-splicing cox1 introns. A previous study also suggested the existence of cox1 mRNA editing in Trichoplax adhaerens, yet the only formally described species in the phylum Placozoa. We have analyzed RNA-seq data of the undescribed sister species, Placozoa sp. H2 ("Panama" clone), with special focus on the mitochondrial mRNA. While we did not find support for a previously postulated cox1 mRNA editing mechanism, we surprisingly found two independent transcripts representing intermediate cox1 mRNA splicing stages. Both transcripts consist of partial cox1 exon as well as overlapping intron fragments. The data suggest that the cox1 gene harbors a single base pair (cytosine) micro exon. Furthermore, conserved group I intron structures flank this unique micro exon also in other placozoans. We discuss the evolutionary origin of this micro exon in the context of a self-splicing intron gain in the cox1 gene of the last common ancestor of extant placozoans.

  8. Mini-pillar array for hydrogel-supported 3D culture and high-content histologic analysis of human tumor spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jihoon; Lee, Dong Woo; Hwang, Hyun Ju; Yeon, Sang-Eun; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-06-21

    Three-dimensional (3D) cancer cell culture models mimic the complex 3D organization and microenvironment of human solid tumor tissue and are thus considered as highly predictive models representing avascular tumor regions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for monitoring drug penetration and therapeutic responses in 3D tumor models; however, photonic attenuation at increasing imaging depths and limited penetration of common fluorescence tracers are significant technical challenges to imaging. Immunohistological staining would be a good alternative, but the preparation of tissue sections from rather fragile spheroids through fixing and embedding procedures is challenging. Here we introduce a novel 3 × 3 mini-pillar array chip that can be utilized for 3D cell culturing and sectioning for high-content histologic analysis. The mini-pillar array chip facilitated the generation of 3D spheroids of human cancer cells within hydrogels such as alginate, collagen, and Matrigel. As expected, visualization of the 3D distribution of calcein AM and doxorubicin by optical sectioning was limited by photonic attenuation and dye penetration. The integrity of the 3D microtissue section was confirmed by immunostaining on paraffin sections and cryo-sections. The applicability of the mini-pillar array for drug activity evaluation was tested by measuring viability changes in spheroids exposed to anti-cancer agents, 5-fluorouracil and tirapazamine. Thus, our novel mini-pillar array platform can potentially promote high-content histologic analysis of 3D cultures and can be further optimized for field-specific needs.

  9. Ploidy status and copy number aberrations in primary glioblastomas defined by integrated analysis of allelic ratios, signal ratios and loss of heterozygosity using 500K SNP Mapping Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowell John K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic hybridization platforms, including BAC-CGH and genotyping arrays, have been used to estimate chromosome copy number (CN in tumor samples by detecting the relative strength of genomic signal. The methods rely on the assumption that the predominant chromosomal background of the samples is diploid, an assumption that is frequently incorrect for tumor samples. In addition to generally greater resolution, an advantage of genotyping arrays over CGH arrays is the ability to detect signals from individual alleles, allowing estimation of loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH and allelic ratios to enhance the interpretation of copy number alterations. Copy number events associated with LOH potentially have the same genetic consequences as deletions. Results We have utilized allelic ratios to detect patterns that are indicative of higher ploidy levels. An integrated analysis using allelic ratios, total signal and LOH indicates that many or most of the chromosomes from 24 glioblastoma tumors are in fact aneuploid. Some putative whole-chromosome losses actually represent trisomy, and many apparent sub-chromosomal losses are in fact relative losses against a triploid or tetraploid background. Conclusion These results suggest a re-interpretation of previous findings based only on total signal ratios. One interesting observation is that many single or multiple-copy deletions occur at common putative tumor suppressor sites subsequent to chromosomal duplication; these losses do not necessarily result in LOH, but nonetheless occur in conspicuous patterns. The 500 K Mapping array was also capable of detecting many sub-mega base losses and gains that were overlooked by CGH-BAC arrays, and was superior to CGH-BAC arrays in resolving regions of complex CN variation.

  10. ArrayMining: a modular web-application for microarray analysis combining ensemble and consensus methods with cross-study normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Enrico; Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2009-10-28

    Statistical analysis of DNA microarray data provides a valuable diagnostic tool for the investigation of genetic components of diseases. To take advantage of the multitude of available data sets and analysis methods, it is desirable to combine both different algorithms and data from different studies. Applying ensemble learning, consensus clustering and cross-study normalization methods for this purpose in an almost fully automated process and linking different analysis modules together under a single interface would simplify many microarray analysis tasks. We present ArrayMining.net, a web-application for microarray analysis that provides easy access to a wide choice of feature selection, clustering, prediction, gene set analysis and cross-study normalization methods. In contrast to other microarray-related web-tools, multiple algorithms and data sets for an analysis task can be combined using ensemble feature selection, ensemble prediction, consensus clustering and cross-platform data integration. By interlinking different analysis tools in a modular fashion, new exploratory routes become available, e.g. ensemble sample classification using features obtained from a gene set analysis and data from multiple studies. The analysis is further simplified by automatic parameter selection mechanisms and linkage to web tools and databases for functional annotation and literature mining. ArrayMining.net is a free web-application for microarray analysis combining a broad choice of algorithms based on ensemble and consensus methods, using automatic parameter selection and integration with annotation databases.

  11. ArrayMining: a modular web-application for microarray analysis combining ensemble and consensus methods with cross-study normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnogor Natalio

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical analysis of DNA microarray data provides a valuable diagnostic tool for the investigation of genetic components of diseases. To take advantage of the multitude of available data sets and analysis methods, it is desirable to combine both different algorithms and data from different studies. Applying ensemble learning, consensus clustering and cross-study normalization methods for this purpose in an almost fully automated process and linking different analysis modules together under a single interface would simplify many microarray analysis tasks. Results We present ArrayMining.net, a web-application for microarray analysis that provides easy access to a wide choice of feature selection, clustering, prediction, gene set analysis and cross-study normalization methods. In contrast to other microarray-related web-tools, multiple algorithms and data sets for an analysis task can be combined using ensemble feature selection, ensemble prediction, consensus clustering and cross-platform data integration. By interlinking different analysis tools in a modular fashion, new exploratory routes become available, e.g. ensemble sample classification using features obtained from a gene set analysis and data from multiple studies. The analysis is further simplified by automatic parameter selection mechanisms and linkage to web tools and databases for functional annotation and literature mining. Conclusion ArrayMining.net is a free web-application for microarray analysis combining a broad choice of algorithms based on ensemble and consensus methods, using automatic parameter selection and integration with annotation databases.

  12. Antisense Oligonucleotides Promote Exon Inclusion and Correct the Common c.-32-13T>G GAA Splicing Variant in Pompe Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik van der Wal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The most common variant causing Pompe disease is c.-32-13T>G (IVS1 in the acid α-glucosidase (GAA gene, which weakens the splice acceptor of GAA exon 2 and induces partial and complete exon 2 skipping. It also allows a low level of leaky wild-type splicing, leading to a childhood/adult phenotype. We hypothesized that cis-acting splicing motifs may exist that could be blocked using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs to promote exon inclusion. To test this, a screen was performed in patient-derived primary fibroblasts using a tiling array of U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA-based AONs. This resulted in the identification of a splicing regulatory element in GAA intron 1. We designed phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer-based AONs to this element, and these promoted exon 2 inclusion and enhanced GAA enzyme activity to levels above the disease threshold. These results indicate that the common IVS1 GAA splicing variant in Pompe disease is subject to negative regulation, and inhibition of a splicing regulatory element using AONs is able to restore canonical GAA splicing and endogenous GAA enzyme activity.

  13. Antisense Oligonucleotides Promote Exon Inclusion and Correct the Common c.-32-13T>G GAA Splicing Variant in Pompe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Erik; Bergsma, Atze J; Pijnenburg, Joon M; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, W W M Pim

    2017-06-16

    The most common variant causing Pompe disease is c.-32-13T>G (IVS1) in the acid α-glucosidase (GAA) gene, which weakens the splice acceptor of GAA exon 2 and induces partial and complete exon 2 skipping. It also allows a low level of leaky wild-type splicing, leading to a childhood/adult phenotype. We hypothesized that cis-acting splicing motifs may exist that could be blocked using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) to promote exon inclusion. To test this, a screen was performed in patient-derived primary fibroblasts using a tiling array of U7 small nuclear RNA (snRNA)-based AONs. This resulted in the identification of a splicing regulatory element in GAA intron 1. We designed phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer-based AONs to this element, and these promoted exon 2 inclusion and enhanced GAA enzyme activity to levels above the disease threshold. These results indicate that the common IVS1 GAA splicing variant in Pompe disease is subject to negative regulation, and inhibition of a splicing regulatory element using AONs is able to restore canonical GAA splicing and endogenous GAA enzyme activity. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Directivity of Antenna Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, A. A.; Gorobets, N. N.; Katrich, V. A.; Lyashchenko, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Theoretical investigation of directive gains of linear and planar antenna arrays depending on the distance between radiators and wavelength. Design/methodology/approach: Computing methods in applied mathematics in MathCad were used to calculate the twofold integrals of the radiation pattern over power throughout the whole space observed, defining the directivity in the most general terms. Patterns of radiators, i. e. elements of antenna arrays, are specified by mathematical models. The calculation accounts for the subintegral fast oscillating function. Findings: Calculations and analysis of a directive gain according to the number of radiators and distances between them in fractions of wavelength are made. It is shown that at the ratio of distance between radiators to wave-length being d/λ =0.5 the directivity of array of isotropic radiators is 1.5N², N - number of radiators. When increasing the d/λ to 0.65÷0.97 the directivity increases according to the law close to the linear one up to the maximum possible value for the specified number of radiators. With the increase of d/λ to the values greater than one, the directivity is significantly reduced (the “blinding” effect of non-phased antenna arrays) and its dependence with the growth of d/λ is decaying and oscillating in character. By that, the transfer function of antenna arrays has some vital difference from the transfer function of continuous antennas. Conclusions: Antenna arrays distort the waveform and spectrum of radiated and received signals as a result of irregular changes of their directivity depending on wavelength. The detected “blinding” effect of non-phased antenna arrays of large electrical dimensions must be taken into account in wideband and superwideband radio-electronics systems, especially in radio astronomy, telecommunications systems and superwideband radar.

  15. Analysis of volcano-related seismicity to constrain the magmatic plumbing system beneath Fogo, Cape Verde, by (multi-)array techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Carola; Wölbern, Ingo; Faria, Bruno; Rümpker, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Fogo is the only island of the Cape Verde archipelago with regular occurring volcanic eruptions since its discovery in the 15th century. The volcanism of the archipelago originates from a mantle plume beneath an almost stationary tectonic plate. With an eruption interval of approximately 20 years, Fogo belongs to the most active oceanic volcanoes. The latest eruption started in November 2014 and ceased in February 2015. This study aims to characterize and investigate the seismic activity and the magmatic plumbing system of Fogo, which is believed to be related to a magmatic source close to the neighboring island of Brava. According to previous studies, using conventional seismic network configurations, most of the seismic activity occurs offshore. Therefore, seismological array techniques represent powerful tools in investigating earthquakes and other volcano-related events located outside of the networks. Another advantage in the use of seismic arrays is their possibility to detect events of relatively small magnitude and to locate seismic signals without a clear onset of phases, such as volcanic tremors. Since October 2015 we have been operating a test array on Fogo as part of a pilot study. This array consists of 10 seismic stations, distributed in a circular shape with an aperture of 700 m. The stations are equipped with Omnirecs CUBE dataloggers, and either 4.5 Hz geophones (7 stations) or Trillium-Compact broad-band seismometers (3 stations). In January 2016 we installed three additional broad-band stations distributed across the island of Fogo to improve the capabilities for event localization. The data of the pilot study is dominated by seismic activity around Brava, but also exhibit tremors and hybrid events of unknown origin within the caldera of Fogo volcano. The preliminary analysis of these events includes the characterization and localization of the different event types using seismic array processing in combination with conventional localization

  16. Accurate, precise modeling of cell proliferation kinetics from time-lapse imaging and automated image analysis of agar yeast culture arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lue

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide mutant strain collections have increased demand for high throughput cellular phenotyping (HTCP. For example, investigators use HTCP to investigate interactions between gene deletion mutations and additional chemical or genetic perturbations by assessing differences in cell proliferation among the collection of 5000 S. cerevisiae gene deletion strains. Such studies have thus far been predominantly qualitative, using agar cell arrays to subjectively score growth differences. Quantitative systems level analysis of gene interactions would be enabled by more precise HTCP methods, such as kinetic analysis of cell proliferation in liquid culture by optical density. However, requirements for processing liquid cultures make them relatively cumbersome and low throughput compared to agar. To improve HTCP performance and advance capabilities for quantifying interactions, YeastXtract software was developed for automated analysis of cell array images. Results YeastXtract software was developed for kinetic growth curve analysis of spotted agar cultures. The accuracy and precision for image analysis of agar culture arrays was comparable to OD measurements of liquid cultures. Using YeastXtract, image intensity vs. biomass of spot cultures was linearly correlated over two orders of magnitude. Thus cell proliferation could be measured over about seven generations, including four to five generations of relatively constant exponential phase growth. Spot area normalization reduced the variation in measurements of total growth efficiency. A growth model, based on the logistic function, increased precision and accuracy of maximum specific rate measurements, compared to empirical methods. The logistic function model was also more robust against data sparseness, meaning that less data was required to obtain accurate, precise, quantitative growth phenotypes. Conclusion Microbial cultures spotted onto agar media are widely used for genotype

  17. The Low-Frequency Environment of the Murchison Widefield Array: Radio-Frequency Interference Analysis and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offringa, A. R.; Wayth, R. B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Kaplan, D. L.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bell, M. E.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Callingham, J. R.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dillon, J. S.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Jacobs, D. C.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kim, H.-S.; Kittiwisit, P.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, S.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Thyagarajan, N.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S.; Zheng, Q.

    2015-03-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope built in Western Australia at one of the locations of the future Square Kilometre Array. We describe the automated radio-frequency interference detection strategy implemented for the Murchison Widefield Array, which is based on the aoflagger platform, and present 72-231 MHz radio-frequency interference statistics from 10 observing nights. Radio-frequency interference detection removes 1.1% of the data. Radio-frequency interference from digital TV is observed 3% of the time due to occasional ionospheric or atmospheric propagation. After radio-frequency interference detection and excision, almost all data can be calibrated and imaged without further radio-frequency interference mitigation efforts, including observations within the FM and digital TV bands. The results are compared to a previously published Low-Frequency Array radio-frequency interference survey. The remote location of the Murchison Widefield Array results in a substantially cleaner radio-frequency interference environment compared to Low-Frequency Array's radio environment, but adequate detection of radio-frequency interference is still required before data can be analysed. We include specific recommendations designed to make the Square Kilometre Array more robust to radio-frequency interference, including: the availability of sufficient computing power for radio-frequency interference detection; accounting for radio-frequency interference in the receiver design; a smooth band-pass response; and the capability of radio-frequency interference detection at high time and frequency resolution (second and kHz-scale respectively).

  18. Use of genomic DNA control features and predicted operon structure in microarray data analysis: ArrayLeaRNA – a Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Carmen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are widely used for the study of gene expression; however deciding on whether observed differences in expression are significant remains a challenge. Results A computing tool (ArrayLeaRNA has been developed for gene expression analysis. It implements a Bayesian approach which is based on the Gumbel distribution and uses printed genomic DNA control features for normalization and for estimation of the parameters of the Bayesian model and prior knowledge from predicted operon structure. The method is compared with two other approaches: the classical LOWESS normalization followed by a two fold cut-off criterion and the OpWise method (Price, et al. 2006. BMC Bioinformatics. 7, 19, a published Bayesian approach also using predicted operon structure. The three methods were compared on experimental datasets with prior knowledge of gene expression. With ArrayLeaRNA, data normalization is carried out according to the genomic features which reflect the results of equally transcribed genes; also the statistical significance of the difference in expression is based on the variability of the equally transcribed genes. The operon information helps the classification of genes with low confidence measurements. ArrayLeaRNA is implemented in Visual Basic and freely available as an Excel add-in at http://www.ifr.ac.uk/safety/ArrayLeaRNA/ Conclusion We have introduced a novel Bayesian model and demonstrated that it is a robust method for analysing microarray expression profiles. ArrayLeaRNA showed a considerable improvement in data normalization, in the estimation of the experimental variability intrinsic to each hybridization and in the establishment of a clear boundary between non-changing and differentially expressed genes. The method is applicable to data derived from hybridizations of labelled cDNA samples as well as from hybridizations of labelled cDNA with genomic DNA and can be used for the analysis of datasets where

  19. Altered splicing of the BIN1 muscle-specific exon in humans and dogs with highly progressive centronuclear myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Böhm

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphysin 2, encoded by BIN1, is a key factor for membrane sensing and remodelling in different cell types. Homozygous BIN1 mutations in ubiquitously expressed exons are associated with autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy (CNM, a mildly progressive muscle disorder typically showing abnormal nuclear centralization on biopsies. In addition, misregulation of BIN1 splicing partially accounts for the muscle defects in myotonic dystrophy (DM. However, the muscle-specific function of amphiphysin 2 and its pathogenicity in both muscle disorders are not well understood. In this study we identified and characterized the first mutation affecting the splicing of the muscle-specific BIN1 exon 11 in a consanguineous family with rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal centronuclear myopathy. In parallel, we discovered a mutation in the same BIN1 exon 11 acceptor splice site as the genetic cause of the canine Inherited Myopathy of Great Danes (IMGD. Analysis of RNA from patient muscle demonstrated complete skipping of exon 11 and BIN1 constructs without exon 11 were unable to promote membrane tubulation in differentiated myotubes. Comparative immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of patient and canine biopsies revealed common structural defects, emphasizing the importance of amphiphysin 2 in membrane remodelling and maintenance of the skeletal muscle triad. Our data demonstrate that the alteration of the muscle-specific function of amphiphysin 2 is a common pathomechanism for centronuclear myopathy, myotonic dystrophy, and IMGD. The IMGD dog is the first faithful model for human BIN1-related CNM and represents a mammalian model available for preclinical trials of potential therapies.

  20. ArrayPitope: Automated Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions for Peptide Microarray-Based Antibody Epitope Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christian Skjødt; Østerbye, Thomas; Marcatili, Paolo; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Identification of epitopes targeted by antibodies (B cell epitopes) is of critical importance for the development of many diagnostic and therapeutic tools. For clinical usage, such epitopes must be extensively characterized in order to validate specificity and to document potential cross-reactivity. B cell epitopes are typically classified as either linear epitopes, i.e. short consecutive segments from the protein sequence or conformational epitopes adapted through native protein folding. Recent advances in high-density peptide microarrays enable high-throughput, high-resolution identification and characterization of linear B cell epitopes. Using exhaustive amino acid substitution analysis of peptides originating from target antigens, these microarrays can be used to address the specificity of polyclonal antibodies raised against such antigens containing hundreds of epitopes. However, the interpretation of the data provided in such large-scale screenings is far from trivial and in most cases it requires advanced computational and statistical skills. Here, we present an online application for automated identification of linear B cell epitopes, allowing the non-expert user to analyse peptide microarray data. The application takes as input quantitative peptide data of fully or partially substituted overlapping peptides from a given antigen sequence and identifies epitope residues (residues that are significantly affected by substitutions) and visualize the selectivity towards each residue by sequence logo plots. Demonstrating utility, the application was used to identify and address the antibody specificity of 18 linear epitope regions in Human Serum Albumin (HSA), using peptide microarray data consisting of fully substituted peptides spanning the entire sequence of HSA and incubated with polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA (and mouse anti-rabbit-Cy3). The application is made available at: www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ArrayPitope.

  1. Torque characteristic analysis and measurement of axial flux-type non-contact permanent magnet device with Halbach array based on 3D analytical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-Hyeon Jang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the torque characteristic analysis of an axial flux-type non-contact permanent magnet device with a Halbach magnet array using a 3D analytical method based on transfer relations. We obtain the magnetic field distribution due to the permanent magnet. The magnetic torque is derived from the magnetic field using a Maxwell stress tensor. The analytical results are validated extensively by comparison with 3D finite element analysis. Therefore, we derive an accurate analytical solution to reduce the analysis time, and we present an experimental verification using a manufactured model.

  2. Quantitative analysis of the size effect of room temperature nanoimprinted P3HT nanopillar arrays on the photovoltaic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guangzhu; Li, Chao; Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Yangjiang; Liu, Jieping; Li, Yaowen; Hu, Zhijun; Li, Yongfang

    2015-06-01

    We develop a solvent-assisted room temperature nanoimprint lithography (SART-NIL) technique to fabricate an ideal active layer consisting of poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanopillar arrays surrounded by [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy, two-dimensional grazing incidence wide angle X-rays diffraction, and conducting atomic force microscopy reveals that the SART-NIL technique can precisely control the size of P3HT nanopillar arrays. With the decrease in diameters of P3HT nanopillar arrays, the P3HT nanopillar arrays exhibit a more preferable face-on molecular orientation, enhanced UV-vis absorption and higher conducting ability along the direction perpendicular to the substrate. The ordered bulk heterojunction film consisting of P3HT nanopillar arrays with a diameter of ~45 nm (OBHJ-45) gives face-on orientation, a high interfacial area of 2.87, a high conducting ability of ~130 pA and efficient exciton diffusion and dissociation. The polymer solar cell (PSC) based on an OBHJ-45 film exhibits a significantly improved device performance compared with those of PSCs based on the P3HT nanoapillar arrays with diameters ~100 nm and ~60 nm. We believe that the SART-NIL technique is a powerful tool for fabricating an ideal active layer for high performance PSCs.We develop a solvent-assisted room temperature nanoimprint lithography (SART-NIL) technique to fabricate an ideal active layer consisting of poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanopillar arrays surrounded by [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy, two-dimensional grazing incidence wide angle X-rays diffraction, and conducting atomic force microscopy reveals that the SART-NIL technique can precisely control the size of P3HT nanopillar arrays. With the decrease in diameters of P3HT nanopillar arrays, the P3HT nanopillar arrays exhibit a more preferable face-on molecular orientation, enhanced UV-vis absorption and higher

  3. Three-dimensional lithographically-defined organotypic tissue arrays for quantitative analysis of morphogenesis and neoplastic progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Inman, Jamie L.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-02-13

    Here we describe a simple micromolding method to construct three-dimensional arrays of organotypic epithelial tissue structures that approximate in vivo histology. An elastomeric stamp containing an array of posts of defined geometry and spacing is used to mold microscale cavities into the surface of type I collagen gels. Epithelial cells are seeded into the cavities and covered with a second layer of collagen. The cells reorganize into hollow tissues corresponding to the geometry of the cavities. Patterned tissue arrays can be produced in 3-4 h and will undergo morphogenesis over the following one to three days. The protocol can easily be adapted to study a variety of tissues and aspects of normal and neoplastic development.

  4. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities by CGH-array in patients with dysmorphic and intellectual disability with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratte-Santos, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Katyanne Heringer; Santos, Thainá Altoe; Cintra, Terezinha Sarquis

    2016-01-01

    To investigate chromosomal abnormalities by CGH-array in patients with dysmorphic features and intellectual disability with normal conventional karyotype. Retrospective study, carried out from January 2012 to February 2014, analyzing the CGH-array results of 39 patients. Twenty-six (66.7%) patients had normal results and 13 (33.3%) showed abnormal results - in that, 6 (15.4%) had pathogenic variants, 6 (15.4%) variants designated as uncertain and 1 (2.5%) non-pathogenic variants. The characterization of the genetic profile by CGH-array in patients with intellectual disability and dysmorphic features enabled making etiologic diagnosis, followed by genetic counseling for families and specific treatment.

  5. Detection of an exon 53 polymorphism in the dystrophin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S

    1993-10-01

    We utilized a heteroduplex method to screen for small mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients who did not have deletions or duplications. A dystrophin exon 53 heteroduplex band was identified in 14.4% of the affected patients. Direct sequencing of the amplified product from DNA producing the heteroduplex revealed the presence of a polymorphism in the coding region. The codon for asparagine was converted from AAT to AAC.

  6. Characteristics of binding sites of intergenic, intronic and exonic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction of 784 intergenic (ig-miRNA), 686 intronic (in-miRNA) and 49 exonic miRNAs (ex-miRNA) with mRNAs of 51 oncogenes coding in-miRNAs was investigated. Out of the studied genes, 44 were targets for 94 ig-miRNAs, 29 were targets for 44 in-miRNAs and 7 were targets for 7 ex-miRNAs. The density of ...

  7. The Exon-Florio National Security Test for Foreign Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    Asia, Latin America, the Carribean , and North America. 24 Peninsular and Oriental Steam Company is a leading ports operator and transport company...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress The Exon-Florio National Security Test for Foreign Investment...c11173008 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour

  8. Identification of polymorphism in exons 7 and 12 of lactoferrin gene and its association with incidence of clinical mastitis in Murrah buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Krishanender; Verma, Archana; Das Gupta, Ishwar; Thakur, Yash Pal; Verma, Nishant; Arya, Ashwani

    2015-04-01

    Lactoferrin gene is one of the important candidate genes for mastitis resistance. The gene is located on chromosome BTA 22 and consists of 17 exons spanning over 34.5 kb of genomic DNA. The present study was undertaken with the objectives to identify allelic variants in exons 7 and 12 of lactoferrin gene and to analyze association between its genetic variants and incidence of clinical mastitis in Murrah buffalo. The amplification of exons 7 and 12 of lactoferrin gene yielded amplicons of 232- and 461-bp sizes. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of 232-bp amplicon using BccI restriction enzyme revealed three genotypes (AA, AB, and BB) with frequencies of 0.62, 0.22, and 0.16, respectively. The frequencies of two alleles, A and B, were estimated as 0.73 and 0.27. Hpy188I-RFLP for 461-bp amplicon revealed polymorphism with three genotypes, CC, CD, and DD, with respective frequencies of 0.06, 0.39, and 0.56, whereas frequencies for C and D alleles were 0.25 and 0.75. The chi-square (χ(2)) analysis revealed a significant association between incidence of clinical mastitis and genetic variants of exon 7, and animals of AA genotype of exon 7 were found to be least susceptible to mastitis. The findings indicate potential scope for incorporation of lactoferrin gene in selection and breeding of Murrah buffaloes for improved genetic resistance to mastitis.

  9. A novel exon 15-deleted, splicing variant of Slit2 shows potential for growth inhibition in addition to invasion inhibition in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ying; Yang, Chun-Hung; Sheu, Gwo-Tarng; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Wu, Yu-Chung; Chuang, Shu-Ming; Fann, Ming-Ji; Chang, Han; Lee, Huei; Chang, Jinghua Tsai

    2011-08-01

    The axon guidance cue molecule Slit2 has been shown to suppress cancer cell invasion. However, the role of Slit2 in growth inhibition is still controversial. The authors identified a novel exon 15 (AKEQYFIP)-deleted slit2, located at the end of the second leucine-rich repeat (LRR2). Because LRR2 interacts with Robo1 receptor to inhibit invasion, they hypothesized that exon 15 plays an important role in modulating Slit2 function. Slit2 expression was assessed via microarray analysis in 27 lung adenocarcinomas. Exon 15-deleted slit2 (slit2-ΔE15) and exon 15-containing slit2 (slit2-WT) were cloned and expressed in the CL1-5 lung cancer cell line. The effect of exon 15 on Slit2-mediated cell growth was evaluated by a xenografted model and in vitro cell growth assays. The effect of exon 15 on Slit2-mediated invasion was analyzed with a modified Boyden chamber in vitro. Tumor growth from CL1-5/Slit2-WT cells was comparable to that from CL1-5 cells bearing empty vector. However, tumor size from CL1-5/Slit2-ΔE15 cells was much smaller than that from Slit2-WT cells or vector control cells in the xenografted model. In vitro analyses demonstrated that Slit2-WT inhibits invasion of CL1-5 cells. In addition to inhibiting invasion, Slit2-ΔE15 greatly suppresses cell growth. The data demonstrated that exon 15 modulates Slit2 function in growth inhibition of lung cancer cells. Because slit2-ΔE15 splice variant is present in low invasive cancer cells and nontumor lung tissues, loss of this splice variant is an important event in tumor progression and invasion. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  10. [Relationship between R236C site in exon 7 of SP-B gene and respiratory distress syndrome in Han newborns in western Inner Mongolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Mei, Hua; Liu, Chun-Zhi; Zhang, Ya-Yu; Liu, Chun-Li; Song, Dan; Zhang, Yu-Heng

    2016-09-01

    To detect and analyze the genetic variation in exon 7 of lung surfactant protein B (SP-B), and to investigate the relationship between the genetic variation and the incidence of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) in Han populations in western Inner Mongolia. In the case-control study, 47 Han infants with NRDS were assigned to case group. All the 47 patients had the last three generations of their ancestors reside in western Inner Mongolia. Forty-seven Han newborns without NRDS were assigned to control group. PCR-based gene analysis was used to determine the mutation in exon 7 of SP-B gene and genotype and allele frequencies of the R236C site in exon 7 of SP-B gene. In Han newborns in western Inner Mongolia, there was no mutation in exon 7 of SP-B gene; two genotypes, CC and CT, were identified in the R236C site in exon 7 of SP-B gene. No TT genotype was found in the two groups. There were no significant differences in the genotype frequency of CC or CT as well as the allele frequency of C or T between the case and control groups (CC: 72% vs 85%, P>0.05; CT: 28% vs 15%, P>0.05; C: 85% vs 93%, P>0.05; T: 15% vs 7%, P>0.05). There is no mutation in exon 7 of SP-B gene in Han infants with NRDS in western Inner Mongolia. There is no significant association between the gene polymorphism of the R236C site in exon 7 of SP-B gene and the incidence of NRDS in Han populations in that region.

  11. Rodent-specific alternative exons are more frequent in rapidly evolving genes and in paralogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mironov Andrey A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for generating functional and evolutionary diversity of proteins in eukaryotes. Here, we studied the frequency and functionality of recently gained, rodent-specific alternative exons. Results We projected the data about alternative splicing of mouse genes to the rat, human, and dog genomes, and identified exons conserved in the rat genome, but missing in more distant genomes. We estimated the frequency of rodent-specific exons while controlling for possible residual conservation of spurious exons. The frequency of rodent-specific exons is higher among predominantly skipped exons and exons disrupting the reading frame. Separation of all genes by the rate of sequence evolution and by gene families has demonstrated that rodent-specific cassette exons are more frequent in rapidly evolving genes and in rodent-specific paralogs. Conclusion Thus we demonstrated that recently gained exons tend to occur in fast-evolving genes, and their inclusion rate tends to be lower than that of older exons. This agrees with the theory that gain of alternative exons is one of the major mechanisms of gene evolution.

  12. Efficient use of a translation start codon in BDNF exon I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Indrek; Tuvikene, Jürgen; Lekk, Ingrid; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains a number of 5' exons alternatively spliced with a common 3' exon. BDNF protein is synthesized from alternative transcripts as a prepro-precursor encoded by the common 3' exon IX, which has a translation start site 21 bp downstream of the splicing site. BDNF mRNAs containing exon I are an exception to this arrangement as the last three nucleotides of this exon constitute an in-frame AUG. Here, we show that this AUG is efficiently used for translation initiation in PC12 cells and cultured cortical neurons. Use of exon I-specific AUG produces higher levels of BDNF protein than use of the common translation start site, resulting from a higher translation rate. No differences in protein degradation, constitutive or regulated secretion were detected between BDNF isoforms with alternative 5' termini. As the BDNF promoter preceding exon I is known to be highly regulated by neuronal activity, our results suggest that the function of this translation start site may be efficient stimulus-dependent synthesis of BDNF protein. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains multiple untranslated 5' exons alternatively spliced to one common protein-coding 3' exon. However, exon I contains an in-frame ATG in a favorable translation context. Here, we show that use of this ATG is associated with more efficient protein synthesis than the commonly used ATG in exon IX. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Variants affecting exon skipping contribute to complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghee Lee

    Full Text Available DNA variants that affect alternative splicing and the relative quantities of different gene transcripts have been shown to be risk alleles for some Mendelian diseases. However, for complex traits characterized by a low odds ratio for any single contributing variant, very few studies have investigated the contribution of splicing variants. The overarching goal of this study is to discover and characterize the role that variants affecting alternative splicing may play in the genetic etiology of complex traits, which include a significant number of the common human diseases. Specifically, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in splicing regulatory elements can be characterized in silico to identify variants affecting splicing, and that these variants may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases as well as the inter-individual variability in the ratios of alternative transcripts. We leverage high-throughput expression profiling to 1 experimentally validate our in silico predictions of skipped exons and 2 characterize the molecular role of intronic genetic variations in alternative splicing events in the context of complex human traits and diseases. We propose that intronic SNPs play a role as genetic regulators within splicing regulatory elements and show that their associated exon skipping events can affect protein domains and structure. We find that SNPs we would predict to affect exon skipping are enriched among the set of SNPs reported to be associated with complex human traits.

  14. Translational and regulatory challenges for exon skipping therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ferlini, Alessandra; Goemans, Nathalie; Pasmooij, Anna M G; Wells, Dominic J; Bushby, Katerine; Vroom, Elizabeth; Balabanov, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    Several translational challenges are currently impeding the therapeutic development of antisense-mediated exon skipping approaches for rare diseases. Some of these are inherent to developing therapies for rare diseases, such as small patient numbers and limited information on natural history and interpretation of appropriate clinical outcome measures. Others are inherent to the antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping approach, which employs small modified DNA or RNA molecules to manipulate the splicing process. This is a new approach and only limited information is available on long-term safety and toxicity for most AON chemistries. Furthermore, AONs often act in a mutation-specific manner, in which case multiple AONs have to be developed for a single disease. A workshop focusing on preclinical development, trial design, outcome measures, and different forms of marketing authorization was organized by the regulatory models and biochemical outcome measures working groups of Cooperation of Science and Technology Action: "Networking towards clinical application of antisense-mediated exon skipping for rare diseases." The workshop included participants from patient organizations, academia, and members of staff from the European Medicine Agency and Medicine Evaluation Board (the Netherlands). This statement article contains the key outcomes of this meeting.

  15. Expression Profiling Smackdown: Human Transcriptome Array HTA 2.0 vs. RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Meghann; Driscoll, Heather; Tighe, Scott; Dragon, Julie; Bond, Jeff; Shukla, Arti; Vangala, Mahesh; Vincent, James; Hunter, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The advent of both microarray and massively parallel sequencing have revolutionized high-throughput analysis of the human transcriptome. Due to limitations in microarray technology, detecting and quantifying coding transcript isoforms, in addition to non-coding transcripts, has been challenging. As a result, RNA-Seq has been the preferred method for characterizing the full human transcriptome, until now. A new high-resolution array from Affymetrix, GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA 2.0), has been designed to interrogate all transcript isoforms in the human transcriptome with >6 million probes targeting coding transcripts, exon-exon splice junctions, and non-coding transcripts. Here we compare expression results from GeneChip HTA 2.0 and RNA-Seq data using identical RNA extractions from three samples each of healthy human mesothelial cells in culture, LP9-C1, and healthy mesothelial cells treated with asbestos, LP9-A1. For GeneChip HTA 2.0 sample preparation, we chose to compare two target preparation methods, NuGEN Ovation Pico WTA V2 with the Encore Biotin Module versus Affymetrix's GeneChip WT PLUS with the WT Terminal Labeling Kit, on identical RNA extractions from both untreated and treated samples. These same RNA extractions were used for the RNA-Seq library preparation. All analyses were performed in Partek Genomics Suite 6.6. Expression profiles for control and asbestos-treated mesothelial cells prepared with NuGEN versus Affymetrix target preparation methods (GeneChip HTA 2.0) are compared to each other as well as to RNA-Seq results.

  16. SU-F-T-458: Tracking Trends of TG-142 Parameters Via Analysis of Data Recorded by 2D Chamber Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrian, A; Kabat, C; Defoor, D; Saenz, D; Rasmussen, K; Kirby, N; Gutierrez, A; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: With increasing QA demands of medical physicists in clinical radiation oncology, the need for an effective method of tracking clinical data has become paramount. A tool was produced which scans through data automatically recorded by a 2D chamber array and extracts relevant information recommended by TG-142. Using this extracted information a timely and comprehensive analysis of QA parameters can be easily performed enabling efficient monthly checks on multiple linear accelerators simultaneously. Methods: A PTW STARCHECK chamber array was used to record several months of beam outputs from two Varian 2100 series linear accelerators and a Varian NovalisTx−. In conjunction with the chamber array, a beam quality phantom was used to simultaneously to determine beam quality. A minimalist GUI was created in MatLab that allows a user to set the file path of the data for each modality to be analyzed. These file paths are recorded to a MatLab structure and then subsequently accessed by a script written in Python (version 3.5.1) which then extracts values required to perform monthly checks as outlined by recommendations from TG-142. The script incorporates calculations to determine if the values recorded by the chamber array fall within an acceptable threshold. Results: Values obtained by the script are written to a spreadsheet where results can be easily viewed and annotated with a “pass” or “fail” and saved for further analysis. In addition to creating a new scheme for reviewing monthly checks, this application allows for able to succinctly store data for follow up analysis. Conclusion: By utilizing this tool, parameters recommended by TG-142 for multiple linear accelerators can be rapidly obtained and analyzed which can be used for evaluation of monthly checks.

  17. An X-ray fluorescence microscopic analysis of the tissue surrounding the multi-channel cochlear implant electrode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Kathryn; Cardamone, Tina; Furness, John B; Clark, Jonathan C M; Patrick, James F; Clark, Graeme M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the tissue surrounding the University of Melbourne's (UOMs) multi-channel cochlear implant electrode array and cochlear limited replacements, after long-term implantations. In particular, it aimed to identify the particulate material in the fibrous tissue capsule of the arrays implanted in 1978, 1983, and 1998, by using the Australian Synchrotron for X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to reveal the characteristic spectrum of metal, in particular platinum. This also helped to determine its format and chemical state. Tissue was retrieved following the recipient's death in 2007. Tissue was fixed and sections taken across the UOM and Cochlear Corporation (CI-22 and CI-24) electrode tracks. These were stained with Masson's trichrome. The Australian Synchrotron enabled XFM to accurately identify platinum from its characteristic fluorescence spectrum. There was a fibrous tissue capsule (about 100-µm thick) and small regions of calcification around the UOM and CI-22 arrays, but a thinner capsule (40-60-µm thick) around CI-24, and a greater degree of calcification. Dark particulate matter was observed within macrophages and especially in fibrous tissue in proximity to the UOM and CI-22 arrays. This was identified as platinum using X-ray fluorescence. There was also diffusion of platinum into the tissue surrounding the UOM and CI-22 electrodes and fine particles had penetrated the spiral ligament. The larger particulate matter in the tissue around the UOM and CI-22 arrays suggested that it had flaked off in the manufacturing of the UOM electrodes. The more diffuse spread of platinum in the tissue around the UOM and CI-22 electrodes was likely due to electrolysis, probably from charge imbalance with the bipolar pulses from the UOM implant. This did not occur with the Cochlear CI-24 device. Furthermore, the widespread fine particles of platinum could have also been due to corrosion, especially from the UOM electrodes.

  18. An analysis of the ArcCHECK-MR diode array's performance for ViewRay quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefson, Steven T; Culberson, Wesley S; Bednarz, Bryan P; DeWerd, Larry A; Bayouth, John E

    2017-07-01

    The ArcCHECK-MR diode array utilizes a correction system with a virtual inclinometer to correct the angular response dependencies of the diodes. However, this correction system cannot be applied to measurements on the ViewRay MR-IGRT system due to the virtual inclinometer's incompatibility with the ViewRay's multiple simultaneous beams. Additionally, the ArcCHECK's current correction factors were determined without magnetic field effects taken into account. In the course of performing ViewRay IMRT quality assurance with the ArcCHECK, measurements were observed to be consistently higher than the ViewRay TPS predictions. The goals of this study were to quantify the observed discrepancies and test whether applying the current factors improves the ArcCHECK's accuracy for measurements on the ViewRay. Gamma and frequency analysis were performed on 19 ViewRay patient plans. Ion chamber measurements were performed at a subset of diode locations using a PMMA phantom with the same dimensions as the ArcCHECK. A new method for applying directionally dependent factors utilizing beam information from the ViewRay TPS was developed in order to analyze the current ArcCHECK correction factors. To test the current factors, nine ViewRay plans were altered to be delivered with only a single simultaneous beam and were measured with the ArcCHECK. The current correction factors were applied using both the new and current methods. The new method was also used to apply corrections to the original 19 ViewRay plans. It was found the ArcCHECK systematically reports doses higher than those actually delivered by the ViewRay. Application of the current correction factors by either method did not consistently improve measurement accuracy. As dose deposition and diode response have both been shown to change under the influence of a magnetic field, it can be concluded the current ArcCHECK correction factors are invalid and/or inadequate to correct measurements on the ViewRay system. © 2017 The

  19. Association of Exon 10A and 10B inactivating mutation of follicle stimulating hormone receptor gene (FSHR) and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Vellore cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Kulkarni, Rucha; Ozalkar, Sharvari; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most common heterogenous endocrine disorder in women. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor is associated with normal development as well as maturation of follicles and triggers estrogen production in granulosa cells of the ovary. Inactivating mutation in FSHR gene correlated with reduction of ovarian function in women is due to damage to receptor function. This study aims to investigate whether inactivating mutations, in follicle stimulating hormone receptor gene is related to polycystic ovarian morphology in women with PCOS. Genomic DNA isolated from 15 subjects from Sandhya Hospital, Vellore (10 patients with PCOS and 5 healthy controls) was taken for this study. Patient data included a clinical report, hormonal levels, and ovarian morphological details. DNA isolation was followed by DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction using Exon 10 A and Exon 10 B primers. The PCR-RFLP analysis was performed using Dde1 restriction enzyme. Here we discuss inactivating mutation found in Exon 10 of FSHR gene in patients with PCOS.The absence of inactivating mutation was observed through PCR-RFLP study on Exon 10A and Exon 10B.

  20. hnRNP H enhances skipping of a nonfunctional exon P3A in CHRNA1 and a mutation disrupting its binding causes congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akio; Shen, Xin-Ming; Ito, Mikako; Matsuura, Tohru; Engel, Andrew G; Ohno, Kinji

    2008-12-15

    In humans and great apes, CHRNA1 encoding the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit carries an inframe exon P3A, the inclusion of which yields a nonfunctional alpha subunit. In muscle, the P3A(-) and P3A(+) transcripts are generated in a 1:1 ratio but the functional significance and regulation of the alternative splicing remain elusive. An intronic mutation (IVS3-8G>A), identified in a patient with congenital myasthenic syndrome, disrupts an intronic splicing silencer (ISS) and results in exclusive inclusion of the downstream P3A exon. We found that the ISS-binding splicing trans-factor was heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) H and the mutation attenuated the affinity of hnRNP for the ISS approximately 100-fold. We next showed that direct placement of hnRNP H to the 3' end of intron 3 silences, and siRNA-mediated downregulation of hnRNP H enhances recognition of exon P3A. Analysis of the human genome suggested that the hnRNPH-binding UGGG motif is overrepresented close to the 3' ends of introns. Pursuing this clue, we showed that alternative exons of GRIP1, FAS, VPS13C and NRCAM are downregulated by hnRNP H. Our findings imply that the presence of the hnRNP H-binding motif close to the 3' end of an intron is an essential but underestimated splicing regulator of the downstream exon.

  1. A novel point mutation within the EDA gene causes an exon dropping in mature RNA in Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariset Lorraine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a disorder characterized by abnormal development of tissues and organs of ectodermal origin caused by mutations in the EDA gene. The bovine EDA gene encodes the ectodysplasin A, a membrane protein expressed in keratinocytes, hair follicles and sweat glands, which is involved in the interactions between cell and cell and/or cell and matrix. Four mutations causing ectodermal dysplasia in cattle have been described so far. Results We identified a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the 9th base of exon 8 in the EDA gene in two calves of Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by ectodermal dysplasia. This SNP is located in the exonic splicing enhancer (ESEs recognized by SRp40 protein. As a consequence, the spliceosome machinery is no longer able to recognize the sequence as exonic and causes exon skipping. The mutation determines the deletion of the entire exon (131 bp in the RNA processing, causing a severe alteration of the protein structure and thus the disease. Conclusion We identified a mutation, never described before, that changes the regulation of alternative splicing in the EDA gene and causes ectodermal dysplasia in cattle. The analysis of the SNP allows the identification of carriers that can transmit the disease to the offspring. This mutation can thus be exploited for a rational and efficient selection of unequivocally healthy cows for breeding.

  2. High throughput flow cytometry based yeast two-hybrid array approach for large-scale analysis of protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Carter, Mark B.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Cai, Hong; Sklar, Larry A.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of protein-protein-interactions is a key focus of proteomics efforts. The yeast two-hybrid system has been the most commonly used method in genome-wide searches for protein interaction partners. However, the throughput of the current yeast two-hybrid array approach is hampered by the involvement of the time-consuming LacZ assay and/or the incompatibility of liquid handling automation due to the requirement for selection of colonies/diploids on agar plates. To facilitate large-scale yeast two-hybrid assays, we report a novel array approach by coupling a GFP reporter based yeast two-hybrid system with high throughput flow cytometry that enables the processing of a 96 well plate in as little as 3 minutes. In this approach, the yEGFP reporter has been established in both AH109 (MATa) and Y187 (MATα) reporter cells. It not only allows the generation of two copies of GFP reporter genes in diploid cells, but also allows the convenient determination of self-activators generated from both bait and prey constructs by flow cytometry. We demonstrate a Y2H array assay procedure that is carried out completely in liquid media in 96-well plates by mating bait and prey cells in liquid YPD media, selecting the diploids containing positive interaction pairs in selective media and analyzing the GFP reporter directly by flow cytometry. We have evaluated this flow cytometry based array procedure by showing that the interaction of the positive control pair P53/T is able to be reproducibly detected at 72 hrs post-mating compared to the negative control pairs. We conclude that our flow cytometry based yeast two-hybrid approach is robust, convenient, quantitative, and is amenable to large-scale analysis using liquid-handling automation. PMID:21954189

  3. TANGO Array. 2. Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauleo, P. E-mail: pablo.bauleo@colostate.edu; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A

    2004-01-11

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 18} eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of {approx}60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as {approx}4 deg. . The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  4. TANGO Array.. 2. Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    2004-01-01

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10 14 to 10 18 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of ˜60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜4°. The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  5. Mutations in Exons 9 and 13 of KIT Gene Are Rare Events in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasota, Jerzy; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Rys, Janusz; Kordek, Radzislaw; Nassar, Aziza; Sobin, Leslie H.; Miettinen, Markku

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, typically express the KIT protein. Activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (exon 11) of the c-kit gene have been shown in a subset of GISTs. These mutations lead into ligand-independent activation of the tyrosine kinase of c-kit, and have a transforming effect in vitro. Several groups have studied the clinical implication of the c-kit mutation status of exon 11 in GISTs and a possible relationship between c-kit mutations and malignant behavior has been established. Recently, a 1530ins6 mutation in exon 9 and missense mutations, 1945A>G in exon 13 of the c-kit gene were reported. The frequency and clinical importance of these findings are unknown. In this study we evaluated 200 GISTs for the presence of mutations in exons 9 and 13 of c-kit. Six cases revealed 1530ins6 mutation in exon 9 and two cases 1945A>G mutation in exon 13. All tumors with mutations in exon 9 and 13 lacked mutations in exon 11 of c-kit. None of the analyzed tumors had more than one type of c-kit mutation. All but one of the eight tumors with mutations in exon 9 or 13 of the c-kit gene were histologically and clinically malignant. All four of six cases with exon 9 mutation of which location of primary tumor was known, were small intestinal, suggesting that this type of mutation could preferentially occur in small intestinal tumors. Exon 9 and 13 mutations seem to be rare, and they cover only a small portion (8%) of the balance of GISTs that do not have mutations in exon 11 of c-kit. This finding indicates that other genetic alterations may activate c-kit in GISTs, or that KIT is not activated by mutations in all cases. PMID:11021812

  6. Optimal extraction and fingerprint analysis of Cnidii fructus by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis with photodiode array and mass spectrometry detections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fangyuan; Hu, Yongsheng; Ye, Xiaolan; Li, Ji; Chen, Zhao; Fan, Guorong

    2013-12-01

    A confirmatory and reliable procedure has been developed for extraction and determination of Cnidii fructus by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array, electrospray ionisation ion trap tandem mass spectrometry and time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-PDA-ESI-ITMS(n)/TOF-MS). The determination method enabled the characterisation of sixteen bioactive components in C. fructus and quantification of three major coumarins, namely osthole, imperatorin and isopimpinellin. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimise the extraction parameters yielding the optimum conditions of ASE (extraction temperature 122 °C, extraction time 5 min and two static cycles). And the total contents of three major coumarins extracted by ASE under the optimum conditions was significantly higher than those by reflux and ultrasonic extraction (P<0.05) with better reproducibility. At last, the proposed method coupled with pattern recognition was applied to analysis of C. fructus from eight different regions in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A synonymous polymorphic variation in ACADM exon 11 affects splicing efficiency and may affect fatty acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2013-01-01

    beta-oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids. We examined the functional basis for this association and identified linkage between rs211718 and the intragenic synonymous polymorphic variant c.1161A>G in ACADM exon 11 (rs1061337). Employing minigene studies we show that the c.1161A allele is associated...... with exon 11 missplicing, and that the c.1161G allele corrects this missplicing. This may result in production of more full length MCAD protein from the c.1161G allele. Our analysis suggests that the improved splicing of the c.1161G allele is due to changes in the relative binding of splicing regulatory......, perhaps due to improved splicing. This study is a proof of principle that synonymous SNPs are not neutral. By changing the binding sites for splicing regulatory proteins they can have significant effects on pre-mRNA splicing and thus protein function. In addition, this study shows that for a sequence...

  8. Development of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) techniques in New Zealand: Array simulation, image synthesis and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, S. D.

    2008-04-01

    This thesis presents the design and development of a process to model Very Long Base Line Interferometry (VLBI) aperture synthesis antenna arrays. In line with the Auckland University of Technology (AUT) Institute for Radiophysics and Space Research (IRSR) aims to develop the knowledge, skills and experience within New Zealand, extensive use of existing radio astronomical software has been incorporated into the process namely AIPS (Astronomical Imaging Processing System), MIRIAD (a radio interferometry data reduction package) and DIFMAP (a program for synthesis imaging of visibility data from interferometer arrays of radio telescopes). This process has been used to model various antenna array configurations for two proposed New Zealand sites for antenna in a VLBI array configuration with existing Australian facilities and a passable antenna at Scott Base in Antarctica; and the results are presented in an attempt to demonstrate the improvement to be gained by joint trans-Tasman VLBI observation. It is hoped these results and process will assist the planning and placement of proposed New Zealand radio telescopes for cooperation with groups such as the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA), others in the Pacific Rim and possibly globally; also potential future involvement of New Zealand with the SKA. The developed process has also been used to model a phased building schedule for the SKA in Australia and the addition of two antennas in New Zealand. This has been presented to the wider astronomical community via the Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand Journal, and is summarized in this thesis with some additional material. A new measure of quality ("figure of merit") for comparing the original model image and final CLEAN images by utilizing normalized 2-D cross correlation is evaluated as an alternative to the existing subjective visual operator image comparison undertaken to date by other groups. This new unit of measure is then used ! in the presentation of the

  9. Infrasound and seismic array analysis of snow avalanches: results from the 2015-2017 experiment in Dischma valley above Davos, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Emanuele; van Herwijnen, Alec; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    While flowing downhill a snow avalanche radiates seismic and infrasonic waves being coupled both with the ground and the atmosphere. Infrasound waves are mostly generated by the powder cloud of the avalanche, while seismic waves are mostly generated by the dense flowing snow mass on the ground, resulting in different energy partitioning between seismic and infrasound for different kinds of avalanches. This results into a general uncertainty on the efficiency of seismic and infrasound monitoring, in terms of the size and source-to-receiver distance of detectable events. Nevertheless, both seismic and infrasound have been used as monitoring systems for the remote detection of snow avalanches, being the reliable detection of snow avalanches of crucial importance to better understand triggering mechanisms, identify possible precursors, or improve avalanche forecasting. We present infrasonic and seismic array data collected during the winters of 2015- 2016 and 2016-2017 in the Dischma valley above Davos, Switzerland, where a five element infrasound array and a 7 element seismic array had been deployed at short distance from each other and with several avalanche paths nearby. Avalanche observation in the area is performed through automatic cameras providing additional information on the location, type (dry or wet), size and occurrence time of the avalanches released. The use of arrays instead of single sensors allows increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and identifying events in terms of back-azimuth and apparent velocity of the wave-field, thus providing indication on the source position of the recorded signal. For selected snow avalanches captured with automatic cameras, we therefore perform seismic and infrasound array processing to constrain the avalanche path and dynamics and investigate the partitioning of seismic and infrasound energy for the different portions of the avalanche path. Moreover we compare results of seismic and infrasound array processing for the

  10. Phased arrays '85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglitz, M. R.

    1985-11-01

    The conference Phased Arrays '85 was held in Bedford, MA, on October 15-18, 1985. It is pointed out that the 15 years between the 1970 and 1985 conferences dedicated to phased array antennas have seen many technological advances. Attention is given to the principle of operation, monolithic phased arrays, active arrays of monopole elements, scan compensated active element patterns, microstrip arrays, time delay technologies for phased array systems, ferrite materials for mm-wave phase shifters, phase-only optimization of phased array excitation by B-quadratic programming, a nearly frequency-independent sidelobe suppression technique for phased arrays, and active impedance effects in low sidelobe and ultrawideband phased arrays.

  11. Single Event Test Methodologies and System Error Rate Analysis for Triple Modular Redundant Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory; Edmonds, Larry D.; Swift, Gary; Carmichael, Carl; Tseng, Chen Wei; Heldt, Kevin; Anderson, Scott Arlo; Coe, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present a test methodology for estimating system error rates of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) mitigated with Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR). The test methodology is founded in a mathematical model, which is also presented. Accelerator data from 90 nm Xilins Military/Aerospace grade FPGA are shown to fit the model. Fault injection (FI) results are discussed and related to the test data. Design implementation and the corresponding impact of multiple bit upset (MBU) are also discussed.

  12. ArrayPitope: Automated Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions for Peptide Microarray-Based Antibody Epitope Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skjødt; Østerbye, Thomas; Marcatili, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    -reactivity. B cell epitopes are typically classified as either linear epitopes, i.e. short consecutive segments from the protein sequence or conformational epitopes adapted through native protein folding. Recent advances in high-density peptide microarrays enable high-throughput, high-resolution identification......-HSA (and mouse anti-rabbit-Cy3). The application is made available at: www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ArrayPitope....

  13. De novo disruption of promoter and exon 1 of STAR gene reveals essential role for gonadal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Piya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol transport into the mitochondria is required for synthesis of the first steroid, pregnenolone. Cholesterol is transported by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR, which acts at the outer mitochondrial membrane prior to its import. Mutations in the STAR protein result in lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH. Although the STAR protein consists of seven exons, biochemical analysis in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells showed that the first two were not essential for pregnenolone synthesis. Here, we present a patient with ambiguous genitalia, salt-lossing crisis within two weeks after birth and low cortisol levels. Sequence analysis of the STAR, including the exon–intron boundaries, showed the complete deletion of exon 1 as well as more than 50 nucleotides upstream of STAR promoter. Mitochondrial protein import with the translated protein through synthesis cassette of the mutant STAR lacking exon 1 showed protein translation, but it is less likely to have synthesized without a promoter in our patient. Thus, a full-length STAR gene is necessary for physiological mitochondrial cholesterol transport in vivo.

  14. CRIPT exonic deletion and a novel missense mutation in a female with short stature, dysmorphic features, microcephaly, and pigmentary abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Magalie S; Niu, Zhiyv; Bi, Weimin; Zhu, Wenmiao; Miloslavskaya, Irene; Chiang, Theodore; Streff, Haley; Seavitt, John R; Murray, Stephen A; Eng, Christine; Chan, Audrey; Yang, Yaping; Lalani, Seema R

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in CRIPT encoding cysteine-rich PDZ domain-binding protein are rare, and to date have been reported in only two patients with autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism and distinctive facies. Here, we describe a female with biallelic mutations in CRIPT presenting with postnatal growth retardation, global developmental delay, and dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, high forehead, and sparse hair and eyebrows. Additional clinical features included high myopia, admixed hyper- and hypopigmented macules primarily on the face, arms, and legs, and syndactyly of 4-5 toes bilaterally. Using whole exome sequencing (WES) and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), we detected a c.8G>A (p.C3Y) missense variant in exon 1 of the CRIPT gene inherited from the mother and a 1,331 bp deletion encompassing exon 1, inherited from the father. The c.8G>A (p.C3Y) missense variant in CRIPT was apparently homozygous in the proband due to the exon 1 deletion. Our findings illustrate the clinical utility of combining WES with copy number variant (CNV) analysis to provide a molecular diagnosis to patients with rare Mendelian disorders. Our findings also illustrate the clinical spectrum of CRIPT related mutations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Analysis of Dynamic Characteristic for Solar Arrays in Series and Global Maximum Power Point Tracking Based on Optimal Initial Value Incremental Conductance Strategy under Partially Shaded Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial shading (PS is an unavoidable condition which significantly reduces the efficiency and stability of a photovoltaic (PV system. With PS, the system usually exhibits multiple-peak output power characteristics, but single-peak is also possible under special PS conditions. In fact it is shown that the partial shading condition (PSC is the necessary but not sufficient condition for multiple-peak. Based on circuit analysis, this paper shows that the number of peak points can be determined by short-circuit currents and maximum-power poi