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Sample records for exogenous neurotrophic molecules

  1. Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) reduces synaptic depression during repetitive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Neus; Santafé, Manel M; Tomàs, Marta; Priego, Mercedes; Obis, Teresa; Lanuza, Maria A; Besalduch, Nuria; Tomàs, Josep

    2012-09-01

    It has been shown that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has trophic and maintenance effects on several types of peripheral and central neurons, glia, and cells outside the nervous system. Both CNTF and its receptor, CNTF-Rα, are expressed in the muscle. We use confocal immunocytochemistry to show that the trophic cytokine and its receptor are present in the pre- and post-synaptic sites of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Applied CNTF (7.5-200 ng/ml, 60 min-3 h) does not acutely affect spontaneous potentials (size or frequency) or quantal content of the evoked acetylcholine release from post-natal (in weak or strong axonal inputs on dually innervated end plates or in the most mature singly innervated synapses at P6) or adult (P30) NMJ of Levator auris longus muscle of the mice. However, CNTF reduces roughly 50% the depression produced by repetitive stimulation (40 Hz, 2 min) on the adult NMJs. Our findings indicate that, unlike neurotrophins, exogenous CNTF does not acutely modulate transmitter release locally at the mammalian neuromuscular synapse but can protect mature end plates from activity-induced synaptic depression. © 2012 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  2. Reprogramming with Small Molecules instead of Exogenous Transcription Factors

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    Tongxiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs could be employed in the creation of patient-specific stem cells, which could subsequently be used in various basic and clinical applications. However, current iPSC methodologies present significant hidden risks with respect to genetic mutations and abnormal expression which are a barrier in realizing the full potential of iPSCs. A chemical approach is thought to be a promising strategy for safety and efficiency of iPSC generation. Many small molecules have been identified that can be used in place of exogenous transcription factors and significantly improve iPSC reprogramming efficiency and quality. Recent studies have shown that the use of small molecules results in the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. These studies might lead to new areas of stem cell research and medical applications, not only human iPSC by chemicals alone, but also safe generation of somatic stem cells for cell based clinical trials and other researches. In this paper, we have reviewed the recent advances in small molecule approaches for the generation of iPSCs.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor works coordinately with partner molecules to initiate tyrosine hydroxylase expression in striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Stull, N D; Iacovitti, L

    1995-05-22

    Previous studies demonstrated that the cooperative interaction of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and a partner molecule could induce the novel expression of the catecholamine (CA) biosynthetic enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in striatal neurons [Du and Iacovitti, J. Neurosci., in press; Du et al., J. Neurosci., 14 (1994) 7688-7694; Iacovitti et al., submitted]. The present study demonstrates that in addition to aFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is also capable of moderate levels of TH induction (30% TH+ striatal neurons) when administered at high concentrations (100 ng/ml). As with aFGF, BDNF's activity depended on its coupling to an appropriate partner molecule; the most potent of which were 10 microM dopamine (DA) and 50 microM mazindol. BDNF + DA-induced TH expression was first evident after at 12 h; peaked by 18 h and declined by 4 days in culture. Cyclohexamide eliminated nearly all and alpha-amanitin reduced by half the TH induction elicited by DA and BDNF; indicating that both de novo transcription and translation were required for increased expression. In contrast with aFGF and BDNF, other putative dopamine differentiation factors, such as glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), were able to elicit barely detectable (10%) levels of TH induction, regardless of the partner molecule used. These studies suggest that aFGF and/or BDNF may work coordinately with partner molecules to initiate TH expression; while a number of factors including, CNTF and GDNF, may be involved in its subsequent modulation.

  4. Direct and sustained intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules using acoustic-transfection with high frequency ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Chiu, Chi Tat; Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Hyung Ham; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-02-01

    Controlling cell functions for research and therapeutic purposes may open new strategies for the treatment of many diseases. An efficient and safe introduction of membrane impermeable molecules into target cells will provide versatile means to modulate cell fate. We introduce a new transfection technique that utilizes high frequency ultrasound without any contrast agents such as microbubbles, bringing a single-cell level targeting and size-dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules. The transfection apparatus consists of an ultrasonic transducer with the center frequency of over 150 MHz and an epi-fluorescence microscope, entitled acoustic-transfection system. Acoustic pulses, emitted from an ultrasonic transducer, perturb the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane of a targeted single-cell to induce intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules. Simultaneous live cell imaging using HeLa cells to investigate the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ and propidium iodide (PI) and the delivery of 3 kDa dextran labeled with Alexa 488 were demonstrated. Cytosolic delivery of 3 kDa dextran induced via acoustic-transfection was manifested by diffused fluorescence throughout whole cells. Short-term (6 hr) cell viability test and long-term (40 hr) cell tracking confirmed that the proposed approach has low cell cytotoxicity.

  5. Direct and sustained intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules using acoustic-transfection with high frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Chiu, Chi Tat; Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Hyung Ham; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K Kirk

    2016-02-04

    Controlling cell functions for research and therapeutic purposes may open new strategies for the treatment of many diseases. An efficient and safe introduction of membrane impermeable molecules into target cells will provide versatile means to modulate cell fate. We introduce a new transfection technique that utilizes high frequency ultrasound without any contrast agents such as microbubbles, bringing a single-cell level targeting and size-dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules. The transfection apparatus consists of an ultrasonic transducer with the center frequency of over 150 MHz and an epi-fluorescence microscope, entitled acoustic-transfection system. Acoustic pulses, emitted from an ultrasonic transducer, perturb the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane of a targeted single-cell to induce intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules. Simultaneous live cell imaging using HeLa cells to investigate the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) and propidium iodide (PI) and the delivery of 3 kDa dextran labeled with Alexa 488 were demonstrated. Cytosolic delivery of 3 kDa dextran induced via acoustic-transfection was manifested by diffused fluorescence throughout whole cells. Short-term (6 hr) cell viability test and long-term (40 hr) cell tracking confirmed that the proposed approach has low cell cytotoxicity.

  6. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inhibits Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression in Interleukin-1β-Treated Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Katsuhiro; Obinata, Yusuke; Konishi, Akihiro; Kajiya, Mikihito; Matsuda, Shinji; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Sasaki, Shinya; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2016-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances periodontal tissue regeneration. Tissue regeneration is characterized by inflammation, which directs the quality of tissue repair. The objective of this study is to propose the relevance of BDNF to inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of BDNF on intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, which is an inflammatory marker, expressed in interleukin (IL)-1β-treated human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). In addition, we studied the effect of BDNF on the adhesion of neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells to HMVECs in a cell adhesion assay. We demonstrated that BDNF attenuates the IL-1β-induced ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. Treatment of HMVECs with IL-1β led to an increase in the number of adherent neutrophil-like HL-60 cells. BDNF significantly decreased the number of neutrophil-like HL-60 cells attached to HMVECs. In conclusion, BDNF may reduce excess inflammation through reduced neutrophil recruitment by regulating ICAM-1 expression.

  7. The synergistic effect of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and coronary artery disease on brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Te; Wang, Jun-Sing; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Shih-Yi; Fu, Chia-Po; Liang, Kae-Woei; Hsu, Chiann-Yi; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neural protection and energy homeostasis. In this study, we examined the effects of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and coronary artery disease (CAD) on BDNF. Subjects who had undergone diagnostic angiography for angina were recruited, and a total of 240 subjects (144 with CAD and 96 without CAD) were enrolled. Serum BDNF was determined at 0, 30, and 120min during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) for BDNF. Serum VCAM-1 was determined at fasting. Significantly lower AUC of BDNF (42.8±10.7 vs. 47.4±11.7ng-h/ml, P=0.002) and higher serum VCAM-1 (583±383 vs. 482±171ng/ml, P=0.017) were noted in subjects with CAD compared to those without CAD. High VCAM-1 level was an independent predictor of low AUC of BDNF in subjects with and without CAD (95%CI between -0.011 and -0.002, P=0.008; -0.033 and -0.002, P=0.029, respectively). Serum BDNF was lowest in the CAD subjects with high VCAM-1 levels at all time points during OGTT. Our results showed that CAD was associated with low serum BDNF in response to OGTT, and VCAM-1 had a synergistic effect with CAD on the BDNF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. NEUROTROPHIC EFFECTS OF ETIFOXINE

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    I. Yu. Torshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher anxiety results in the decreased levels of various neurotrophic factors and enkephalins and in impaired production of proinflammatory cytokines. The anxiolytic etifoxine is used to treat anxiety states and adjustment disorders. Etifoxine modulates the GABAergic transmission and metabolism of neurosteroids. The latter determines the unique neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties of the drug, such as increased expression of neurotrophic factors, regeneration of nerve fibers, and preservation and regeneration of myelin sheaths. Other important pharmacological effects of an etifoxine molecule have been also discovered; these are to relieve allodynia related to 3α-steroids and GABA receptors and to effectively treat cerebral edema, experimental autoimmune encephalitis, and excessive nervous excitability in the presence of alcohol withdrawal. In addition, the chemoreactome simulation of the molecule of etifoxine has established that its attenuated side effects are due to its lower interaction with serotonin, acetylcholine, adrenergic and other neurotransmitter receptors than is shown by benzodiazepines. Etifoxine has been also found to have anti-inflammatory (due to antihistamine and antileukotriene effects and antitumor activities and an ability to affect hemodynamics and vessel walls.The paper presents a systematic analysis of the results of trials of the neurotrophic properties of etifoxine. It considers how the drug stimulates the expression of neurotrophic factors, accelerates the maturation and regeneration of nerve fibers, and regenerates myelin sheaths.The neurotrophic effects of etifoxine along with its anxiolytic activity will accelerate the recovery of patients with different neurological diseases and enhance the quality of their neurorehabilitation.

  9. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF): New facets of an old molecule for treating neurodegenerative and metabolic syndrome pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquin, Sarah; Sharma, Mukut; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is the most extensively studied member of the cytokine family that signal through intracellular chains of the gp130/LIFRβ receptor. The severe phenotype in patients suffering from mutations inactivating LIFRβ indicates that members of this cytokine family play key, non-redundant roles during development. Accordingly, three decades of research has revealed potent and promising trophic and regulatory activities of CNTF in neurons, oligodendrocytes, muscle cells, bone cells, adipocytes and retinal cells. These findings led to clinical trials to test the therapeutic potential of CNTF and CNTF derivatives for treating neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases. Promising results have encouraged continuation of studies for treating retinal degenerative diseases. Results of some clinical trials showed that side-effects may limit the systemically administrated doses of CNTF. Therefore, therapies being currently tested rely on local delivery of CNTF using encapsulated cytokine-secreting implants. Since the side effects of CNTF might be linked to its ability to activate the alternative IL6Rα-LIFRβ-gp130 receptor, CNTFR-specific mutants of CNTF have been developed that bind to the CNTFRα-LIFRβ-gp130 receptor. These developments may prove to be a breakthrough for therapeutic applications of systemically administered CNTF in pathologies such as multiple sclerosis or Alzheimer's disease. The "designer cytokine approach" offers future opportunities to further enhance specificity by conjugating mutant CNTF with modified soluble CNTFRα to target therapeutically relevant cells that express gp130-LIFRβ and a specific cell surface marker. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Exogenous ochronosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Brogeras, M; Sánchez-Viera, M

    2006-01-01

    We describe a case of a 70-year-old woman who had been using a skin-lightening cream containing hydroquinone for a previous diagnosis of melasma. She presented a hyperpigmentation predominantly on her cheeks and eyebrows. The biopsy showed deposition of yellow-brown globules in the dermis. A diagnosis of exogenous ochronosis was made. An attempt of treatment using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been initiated recently.

  11. Effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on motoneuron survival

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Stöckli, Kurt A.; Kreutzberg, Georg W.; Thoenen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the extensive degeneration of motoneurons in the rat facial nucleus after transection of the facial nerve in newborn rats can be prevented by local ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration. CNTF differs distinctly from known neurotrophic molecules such as NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in both its molecular characteristics (CNTF is a cytosolic rather than a secretory molecule) and its broad spectrum of biological activities. CNTF is expressed selectively by Schwann cell...

  12. Brain derived neurotrophic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Gede, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies are curre......Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies...

  13. Towards Clinical Application of Neurotrophic Factors to the Auditory Nerve; Assessment of Safety and Efficacy by a Systematic Review of Neurotrophic Treatments in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aren Bezdjian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies have evidenced protection of the auditory nerve by exogenous neurotrophic factors. In order to assess clinical applicability of neurotrophic treatment of the auditory nerve, the safety and efficacy of neurotrophic therapies in various human disorders were systematically reviewed. Outcomes of our literature search included disorder, neurotrophic factor, administration route, therapeutic outcome, and adverse event. From 2103 articles retrieved, 20 randomized controlled trials including 3974 patients were selected. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (53% was the most frequently reported indication for neurotrophic therapy followed by diabetic polyneuropathy (28%. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (50%, nerve growth factor (24% and insulin-like growth factor (21% were most often used. Injection site reaction was a frequently occurring adverse event (61% followed by asthenia (24% and gastrointestinal disturbances (20%. Eighteen out of 20 trials deemed neurotrophic therapy to be safe, and six out of 17 studies concluded the neurotrophic therapy to be effective. Positive outcomes were generally small or contradicted by other studies. Most non-neurodegenerative diseases treated by targeted deliveries of neurotrophic factors were considered safe and effective. Hence, since local delivery to the cochlea is feasible, translation from animal studies to human trials in treating auditory nerve degeneration seems promising.

  14. Mimicking the neurotrophic factor profile of embryonic spinal cord controls the differentiation potential of spinal progenitors into neuronal cells.

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    Masaya Nakamura

    Full Text Available Recent studies have indicated that the choice of lineage of neural progenitor cells is determined, at least in part, by environmental factors, such as neurotrophic factors. Despite extensive studies using exogenous neurotrophic factors, the effect of endogenous neurotrophic factors on the differentiation of progenitor cells remains obscure. Here we show that embryonic spinal cord derived-progenitor cells express both ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mRNA before differentiation. BDNF gene expression significantly decreases with their differentiation into the specific lineage, whereas CNTF gene expression significantly increases. The temporal pattern of neurotrophic factor gene expression in progenitor cells is similar to that of the spinal cord during postnatal development. Approximately 50% of spinal progenitor cells differentiated into astrocytes. To determine the effect of endogenous CNTF on their differentiation, we neutralized endogenous CNTF by administration of its polyclonal antibody. Neutralization of endogenous CNTF inhibited the differentiation of progenitor cells into astrocytes, but did not affect the numbers of neurons or oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, to mimic the profile of neurotrophic factors in the spinal cord during embryonic development, we applied BDNF or neurotrophin (NT-3 exogenously in combination with the anti-CNTF antibody. The exogenous application of BDNF or NT-3 promoted the differentiation of these cells into neurons or oligodendrocytes, respectively. These findings suggest that endogenous CNTF and exogenous BDNF and NT-3 play roles in the differentiation of embryonic spinal cord derived progenitor cells into astrocytes, neurons and oligodendrocytes, respectively.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in asthmatic children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Neurotrophins represent candidate molecules regulating and controlling this cross-talk between the immune and nervous system3. Neurotrophins are a family of peptides that promote survival, growth and differentiation of neurons. They include; nerve growth factor (NGF), brain- derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and.

  16. Constitutive expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor in mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severi, Ilenia; Carradori, Maria Rita; Lorenzi, Teresa; Amici, Adolfo; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a potent survival molecule for a large number of neuronal and glial cells in culture; its expression in glial cells is strongly upregulated after a variety of nerve tissue injuries. Exogenously administered CNTF produces an anorectic effect via activation of hypothalamic neurons and stimulates neurogenesis in mouse hypothalamus. To determine whether CNTF is produced endogenously in the hypothalamus, we sought cellular sources and examined their distribution in adult mouse hypothalamus by immunohistochemistry. CNTF immunoreactivity (IR) was predominantly detected in the ependymal layer throughout the rostrocaudal extension of the third ventricle, where numerous ependymocytes and tanycytes exhibited specific staining. Some astrocytes in the grey matter of the anterior hypothalamus and in the median eminence of the hypothalamic tuberal region were also positive. Stimulation of cells bearing CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) induces specific activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling system. Treatment with recombinant CNTF and detection of the nuclear expression of phospho-STAT3 (P-STAT3) showed that CNTF-producing ependymal cells and tanycytes were intermingled with, or very close to, P-STAT3-positive, CNTFRα-bearing cells. A fraction of CNTF-producing ependymal cells and tanycytes and some median eminence astrocytes also exhibited P-STAT3 IR. Thus, in normal adult mice the ependyma of the third ventricle is both a source of and a target for CNTF, which may play hitherto unknown roles in hypothalamic function in physiological conditions. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  17. Ciliary neurotrophic factor reduces the proliferation and promotes the differentiation of TH- MYCN transformed sympathoadrenal progenitors.

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    DeWitt, John; Pappas, Anthony; Nishi, Rae

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer caused by the transformation of sympathoadrenal progenitors. By following the formation of tumors in homozygous TH-MYCN mice, an established mouse model of neuroblastoma, we were able to capture transformed cells prior to the formation of large, vascularized tumors in order to determine the responsiveness of cells to neurotrophic factors. We discovered that the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor is abundantly expressed in tumor cells from these mice. Furthermore, CNTF - but not nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor, neurotrophin 3, or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor - promoted neuronal differentiation and withdrawal from the cell cycle. Thus, the transformation of sympathoadrenal progenitors by MYCN overexpression differentially affects responsiveness to neurotrophic molecules. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) interactions in induction of neurite outgrowth and identification of a binding site for NCAM in the heel region of GDNF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Gotfryd, Kamil; Li, Shizhong

    2009-01-01

    The formation of appropriate neuronal circuits is an essential part of nervous system development and relies heavily on the outgrowth of axons and dendrites and their guidance to their respective targets. This process is governed by a large array of molecules, including glial cell line-derived ne...

  19. Ciliary neurotrophic factor reduces proliferation and promotes differentiation of TH-MYCN transformed sympathoadrenal progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, John; Pappas, Anthony; Nishi, Rae

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer caused by transformation of sympathoadrenal progenitors. By following the formation of tumors in homozygous TH-MYCN mice, an established mouse model of neuroblastoma, we were able to capture transformed cells prior to the formation of large, vascularized tumors in order to determine the responsiveness of cells to neurotrophic factors. We discovered that the CNTF receptor is abundantly expressed in tumor cells from these mice. Furthermore, CNTF, but not nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor, NT-3, or glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor, promoted neuronal differentiation and withdrawal from the cell cycle. Thus, transformation of sympathoadrenal progenitors by MYCN overexpression differentially affects responsiveness to neurotrophic molecules. PMID:25171250

  20. Modulation of neurotrophic signaling pathways by polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Razieh; Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are an important class of phytochemicals, and several lines of evidence have demonstrated their beneficial effects in the context of a number of pathologies including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. In this report, we review the studies on the effects of polyphenols on neuronal survival, growth, proliferation and differentiation, and the signaling pathways involved in these neurotrophic actions. Several polyphenols including flavonoids such as baicalein, daidzein, luteolin, and nobiletin as well as nonflavonoid polyphenols such as auraptene, carnosic acid, curcuminoids, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including caffeic acid phentyl ester enhance neuronal survival and promote neurite outgrowth in vitro, a hallmark of neuronal differentiation. Assessment of underlying mechanisms, especially in PC12 neuronal-like cells, reveals that direct agonistic effect on tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) receptors, the main receptors of neurotrophic factors including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) explains the action of few polyphenols such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone. However, several other polyphenolic compounds activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Increased expression of neurotrophic factors in vitro and in vivo is the mechanism of neurotrophic action of flavonoids such as scutellarin, daidzein, genistein, and fisetin, while compounds like apigenin and ferulic acid increase cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Finally, the antioxidant activity of polyphenols reflected in the activation of Nrf2 pathway and the consequent upregulation of detoxification enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 as well as the contribution of these effects to the neurotrophic activity have also been discussed. In conclusion, a better understanding of the neurotrophic effects of polyphenols and

  1. Exogenous Testosterone Stimulates Gluconeogenesis In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... source of energy for the mammalian brain. The mechanism of action of steroid hormones on target organ cells, and the role of testosterone as a performance enhancing drug are discussed. Keywords: Exogenous testosterone, Protein, Glucose, Gluconeogenesis, Hypoproteinemic rat. Animal Research International Vol.

  2. A novel neurotrophic drug for cognitive enhancement and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Chen

    Full Text Available Currently, the major drug discovery paradigm for neurodegenerative diseases is based upon high affinity ligands for single disease-specific targets. For Alzheimer's disease (AD, the focus is the amyloid beta peptide (Aß that mediates familial Alzheimer's disease pathology. However, given that age is the greatest risk factor for AD, we explored an alternative drug discovery scheme that is based upon efficacy in multiple cell culture models of age-associated pathologies rather than exclusively amyloid metabolism. Using this approach, we identified an exceptionally potent, orally active, neurotrophic molecule that facilitates memory in normal rodents, and prevents the loss of synaptic proteins and cognitive decline in a transgenic AD mouse model.

  3. Functional CD1a is stabilized by exogenous lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolova, Vania; Kistowska, Magdalena; Paoletti, Samantha; Baltariu, Gabriel M; Bausinger, Huguette; Hanau, Daniel; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2006-05-01

    Self-glycosphingolipids bind to surface CD1 molecules and are readily displaced by other CD1 ligands. This capacity to exchange antigens at the cell surface is not common to other antigen-presenting molecules and its physiological importance is unclear. Here we show that a large pool of cell-surface CD1a, but not CD1b molecules, is stabilized by exogenous lipids present in serum. Under serum deprivation CD1a molecules are altered and functionally inactive, as they are unable to present lipid antigens to T cells. Glycosphingolipids and phospholipids bind to, and restore functionality to CD1a without the contribution of newly synthesized and recycling CD1a molecules. The dependence of CD1a stability on exogenous lipids is not related to its intracellular traffic and rather to its antigen-binding pockets. These results indicate a functional dichotomy between CD1a and CD1b molecules and provide new information on how the lipid antigenic repertoire is immunologically sampled.

  4. Measurements of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Klein, Anders Bue; Vinberg, Maj

    2007-01-01

    Although numerous studies have dealt with changes in blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), methodological issues about BDNF measurements have only been incompletely resolved. We validated BDNF ELISA with respect to accuracy, reproducibility and the effect of storage and repeated freezing...

  5. Exogenous Neuritin Promotes Nerve Regeneration After Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Li, Xingyi; Xi, Shaosong; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hong; Zhu, Jingling; Shan, Liya; Song, Xiaoming; Luo, Xing; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Insufficient local levels of neurotrophic factor after spinal cord injury (SCI) are the leading cause of secondary injury and limited axonal regeneration. Neuritin belongs to a family of neurotrophic factors that promote neurite outgrowth, maintain neuronal survival, and provide a favorable microenvironment for the regeneration and repair of nerve cells after injury. However, it is not known whether the exogenously applied neuritin protein has a positive effect on nerve repair after SCI. This was investigated in the present study using purified human recombinant neuritin expressed in and purified from Pichia pastoris, which was tested in a rat SCI model. A recombinant neuritin concentration of 60 μg/ml induced the recovery of hind limb motor function and stimulated nerve regeneration in rats with SCI. Continuous administration of neuritin at this dose at an early stage after SCI inhibited poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) protein degradation and decreased neuronal apoptosis. In addition, during the critical postinjury period of axonal regeneration, exogenous neuritin treatment increased the expression of neurofilament 200 and growth-associated protein 43 in the damaged tissue, which was associated with the restoration of hind limb movement. These results suggest that neuritin creates an environment that promotes nerve cell survival and neurite regeneration after SCI, which contribute to nerve regeneration and the recovery of motor function.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in megakaryocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Chacon Fernandez, Pedro; Sauberli, Katharina; Colzani, Maria; Moreau, Thomas; Ghevaert, Cedric; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has thus far been examined in neurons where it is expressed at very low levels, in an activity-dependent fashion. In humans, BDNF has long been known to accumulate in circulating platelets, at levels far higher than in the brain. During the process of blood coagulation, BDNF is released from platelets, which has led to its extensive use as a readily accessible biomarker, under the assumption that serum levels may somehow ...

  7. The Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Montag

    2014-01-01

    The study of the biological basis of personality is a timely research endeavor, with the aim of deepening our understanding of human nature. In recent years, a growing body of research has investigated the role of the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the context of individual differences across human beings, with a focus on personality traits. A large number of different approaches have been chosen to illuminate the role of BDNF for personality, ranging from the measurement of BDNF...

  8. Neurotrophic Factor Control of Satiety and Body Weight

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Baoji; Xie, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Energy balance, the relationship between energy intake and expenditure, is regulated by a complex interplay of hormones, brain circuits and peripheral tissues. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine that suppresses appetite and increases energy expenditure. Ironically, obese individuals have high levels of plasma leptin and are resistant to leptin treatment. Neurotrophic factors, particularly ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are also important ...

  9. Comparing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor secretion of induced neurotrophic factor secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mostafavi, Fatemeh Sadat

    2013-08-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) may be equally beneficial in treating neurodegenerative diseases. However, ADSCs have practical advantages. In this study, we aimed to induce neurotrophic factors secreting cells in human ADSCs. Then, we compared the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) secretion in neurotrophic factors secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells. Isolated human ADSCs and BMSCs were induced to neurotrophic factor (NTF)-secreting cells. The levels of expression and secretion of BDNF and CTNF of induced cells were assessed using immunocytochemical, Real-Time polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The level of BDNF significantly increased in both the induced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) relative to ADSCs and the BMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, ELISA analysis showed that the release of BDNF in the induced BMSCs was almost twofold more than the induced ADSCs. Overall, NTF-secreting factor cells derived BMSCs and ADSCs could secret a range of different growth factors. Therefore, the variation in neurotrophic factors of different induced MSC populations suggest the possible beneficial effect of each specific kind of neurotrophic factor secreting cells for the treatment of a particular neurodegenerative disease. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  10. CNTF mediates neurotrophic factor secretion and fluid absorption in human retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF protects photoreceptors and regulates their phototransduction machinery, but little is known about CNTF's effects on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE physiology. Therefore, we determined the expression and localization of CNTF receptors and the physiological consequence of their activation in primary cultures of human fetal RPE (hfRPE. Cultured hfRPE express CNTF, CT1, and OsM and their receptors, including CNTFRα, LIFRβ, gp130, and OsMRβ, all localized mainly at the apical membrane. Exogenous CNTF, CT1, or OsM induces STAT3 phosphorylation, and OsM also induces the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (p44/42 MAP kinase. CNTF increases RPE survivability, but not rates of phagocytosis. CNTF increases secretion of NT3 to the apical bath and decreases that of VEGF, IL8, and TGFβ2. It also significantly increases fluid absorption (J(V across intact monolayers of hfRPE by activating CFTR chloride channels at the basolateral membrane. CNTF induces profound changes in RPE cell biology, biochemistry, and physiology, including the increase in cell survival, polarized secretion of cytokines/neurotrophic factors, and the increase in steady-state fluid absorption mediated by JAK/STAT3 signaling. In vivo, these changes, taken together, could serve to regulate the microenvironment around the distal retinal/RPE/Bruch's membrane complex and provide protection against neurodegenerative disease.

  11. CNTF mediates neurotrophic factor secretion and fluid absorption in human retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Wen, Rong; Banzon, Tina; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Miller, Sheldon S

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) protects photoreceptors and regulates their phototransduction machinery, but little is known about CNTF's effects on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) physiology. Therefore, we determined the expression and localization of CNTF receptors and the physiological consequence of their activation in primary cultures of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). Cultured hfRPE express CNTF, CT1, and OsM and their receptors, including CNTFRα, LIFRβ, gp130, and OsMRβ, all localized mainly at the apical membrane. Exogenous CNTF, CT1, or OsM induces STAT3 phosphorylation, and OsM also induces the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (p44/42 MAP kinase). CNTF increases RPE survivability, but not rates of phagocytosis. CNTF increases secretion of NT3 to the apical bath and decreases that of VEGF, IL8, and TGFβ2. It also significantly increases fluid absorption (J(V)) across intact monolayers of hfRPE by activating CFTR chloride channels at the basolateral membrane. CNTF induces profound changes in RPE cell biology, biochemistry, and physiology, including the increase in cell survival, polarized secretion of cytokines/neurotrophic factors, and the increase in steady-state fluid absorption mediated by JAK/STAT3 signaling. In vivo, these changes, taken together, could serve to regulate the microenvironment around the distal retinal/RPE/Bruch's membrane complex and provide protection against neurodegenerative disease.

  12. Neurotrophic properties of the Lion's mane medicinal mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Higher Basidiomycetes) from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Puei-Lene; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Wong, Kah-Hui; David, Rosie Pamela; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Malek, Sri Nurestri A

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are important in promoting the growth and differentiation of neurons. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is essential for the maintenance of the basal forebrain cholinergic system. Hericenones and erinacines isolated from the medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus can induce NGF synthesis in nerve cells. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic interaction between H. erinaceus aqueous extract and exogenous NGF on the neurite outgrowth stimulation of neuroblastoma-glioma cell NG108-15. The neuroprotective effect of the mushroom extract toward oxidative stress was also studied. Aqueous extract of H. erinaceus was shown to be non-cytotoxic to human lung fibroblast MRC-5 and NG108-15 cells. The combination of 10 ng/mL NGF with 1 μg/mL mushroom extract yielded the highest percentage increase of 60.6% neurite outgrowth. The extract contained neuroactive compounds that induced the secretion of extracellular NGF in NG108-15 cells, thereby promoting neurite outgrowth activity. However, the H. erinaceus extract failed to protect NG108-15 cells subjected to oxidative stress when applied in pre-treatment and co-treatment modes. In conclusion, the aqueous extract of H. erinaceus contained neuroactive compounds which induced NGF-synthesis and promoted neurite outgrowth in NG108-15 cells. The extract also enhanced the neurite outgrowth stimulation activity of NGF when applied in combination. The aqueous preparation of H. erinaceus had neurotrophic but not neuroprotective activities.

  13. Neurotrophic requirements of human motor neurons defined using amplified and purified stem cell-derived cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Jorge Lamas

    Full Text Available Human motor neurons derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs are a potentially important tool for studying motor neuron survival and pathological cell death. However, their basic survival requirements remain poorly characterized. Here, we sought to optimize a robust survival assay and characterize their response to different neurotrophic factors. First, to increase motor neuron yield, we screened a small-molecule collection and found that the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 enhances motor neuron progenitor proliferation up to 4-fold in hESC and hiPSC cultures. Next, we FACS-purified motor neurons expressing the Hb9::GFP reporter from Y-27632-amplified embryoid bodies and cultured them in the presence of mitotic inhibitors to eliminate dividing progenitors. Survival of these purified motor neurons in the absence of any other cell type was strongly dependent on neurotrophic support. GDNF, BDNF and CNTF all showed potent survival effects (EC(50 1-2 pM. The number of surviving motor neurons was further enhanced in the presence of forskolin and IBMX, agents that increase endogenous cAMP levels. As a demonstration of the ability of the assay to detect novel neurotrophic agents, Y-27632 itself was found to support human motor neuron survival. Thus, purified human stem cell-derived motor neurons show survival requirements similar to those of primary rodent motor neurons and can be used for rigorous cell-based screening.

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to neuronal dysfunction in a model of allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Armin; Lommatzsch, Marek; Neuhaus-Steinmetz, Ulrich; Quarcoo, David; Glaab, Thomas; McGregor, Gerard P; Fischer, Axel; Renz, Harald

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a candidate molecule for mediating functional neuronal changes in allergic bronchial asthma. Recently, enhanced production of BDNF during allergic airway inflammation caused by infiltrating T-cells and macrophages as well as by resident airway epithelial cells has been described. It was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of enhanced BDNF levels on lung function and airway inflammation in a mouse model of allergic inflammation.Ovalbumin-...

  15. Exogenous melatonin administration is beneficial for male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A concern in the use of exogenous melatonin as a therapeutic intervention is that it may interfere with reproductive function. Herein, we report that chronic exogenous melatonin administration does not impair male reproductive function during ageing and at old age in male Sprague Dawley rats. Methods: ...

  16. Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes to unlock nutrients: Histological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes to unlock nutrients: Histological investigation of its effects on fibre degradation in ruminants. ... There is a need for a better understanding of the mode-of-action of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) used as additives in ruminant feeds. ... Keywords: Fibre digestion, histology, in vitro digestion ...

  17. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Overexpression Induces Precocious Critical Period in Mouse Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Hanover, Jessica L.; Huang, Z. Josh; Tonegawa, Susumu; Stryker, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a candidate molecule for regulating activity-dependent synaptic plasticity on the grounds of its expression pattern in developing visual cortex and that of its receptor, trkB (Castrén et al., 1992; Bozzi et al., 1995; Schoups et al., 1995; Cabelli et al., 1996), as well as the modulation of these patterns by activity (Castrén et al., 1992; Bozzi et al., 1995; Schoups et al., 1995). Infusing trkB ligands or their neutralizing agents, the trkB-IgG fus...

  18. Neurotrophic factors in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Barbosa, Izabela Guimarães; Luna, Juliano Victor; Rocha, Natalia Pessoa; Silva Miranda, Aline; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2012-10-30

    In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the levels of neurotrophins (NF) of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in different stages of treatment and their relationship with OCD clinical features. Forty patients with OCD and 40 healthy controls had Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), and Glial Cell-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GNDF) plasma levels measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patients with OCD were further examined with the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). Patients with OCD exhibited significantly lower levels of BDNF and significantly increased levels of NGF as compared to healthy controls. In OCD, statistically significant negative correlations between BDNF levels and number of working days lost per week were found. Additional analyses revealed a statistically significant positive correlation between both NGF and GDNF and severity of washing symptoms. Plasma levels of NF were not affected by age, age at OCD onset, gender, major depressive disorder, the relative dose of serotonin-reuptake inhibitors being prescribed, or the use of antipsychotics. Our findings suggest that patients with OCD may exhibit a particular NF profile, with functional impairment correlating with BDNF levels and severity of washing symptoms correlating with NGF and GDNF levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on sperm quality of normozoospermic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Hassan; Khanlarkhani, Neda; Sobhani, Aligholi; Najafi, Atefeh; Amidi, Fardin

    2017-07-05

    The neurotrophin family of proteins and their receptors act as important proliferative and pro-survival factors in differentiation of nerve cells and are thought to play key roles in the development of reproductive tissues and normal function of spermatozoa. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) on the sperm viability and motility, lipid peroxidation (LPO), mitochondrial activity and concentration of leptin, nitric oxide (NO) and insulin in normozoospermic men. Semen samples from 20 normozoospermic men were divided into three groups: (i) control, (ii) BDNF and (iii) BDNF + K252a. BDNF and K252a were added in the dose of 0.133 and 0.1 nM, respectively. Viability was assessed by eosin-nigrosin staining technique, and motility was observed by microscopy. NO concentration and mitochondrial activity were measured with flow cytometry, and LPO was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Results showed that exogenous BDNF at 0.133 nM could significantly (p < 0.05) influence viability, motility, NO concentration, mitochondrial activity and LPO content. Secretions of insulin and leptin by human sperm were increased in cells exposed to the exogenous BDNF, whereas viability, mitochondrial activity and insulin and leptin secretions were decreased in cells exposed to the K252.

  20. Exogenous and endogenous corticosterone alter feather quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesRochers, David W; Reed, J Michael; Awerman, Jessica; Kluge, Jonathan A; Wilkinson, Julia; van Griethuijsen, Linnea I; Aman, Joseph; Romero, L Michael

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoids affect feather replacement in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) after approximately 56% of flight feathers were removed. We hypothesized that corticosterone would retard feather regrowth and decrease feather quality. After feather regrowth began, birds were treated with exogenous corticosterone or sham implants, or endogenous corticosterone by applying psychological or physical (food restriction) stressors. Exogenous corticosterone had no impact on feather length and vane area, but rectrices were lighter than controls. Exogenous corticosterone also decreased inter-barb distance for all feathers and increased barbule number for secondaries and rectrices. Although exogenous corticosterone had no affect on rachis tensile strength and stiffness, barbicel hooking strength was reduced. Finally, exogenous corticosterone did not alter the ability of Bacillus licheniformis to degrade feathers or affect the number of feathers that failed to regrow. In contrast, endogenous corticosterone via food restriction resulted in greater inter-barb distances in primaries and secondaries, and acute and chronic stress resulted in greater inter-barb distances in rectrices. Food-restricted birds had significantly fewer barbules in primaries than chronic stress birds and weaker feathers compared to controls. We conclude that, although exogenous and endogenous corticosterone had slightly different effects, some flight feathers grown in the presence of high circulating corticosterone are lighter, potentially weaker, and with altered feather micro-structure.

  1. [Neurotrophic keratitis after vitrectomy and circumferential endophotocoagulation for retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchère Lavayssiere, C; Lux, A-L; Degoumois, A; Stchepinsky Launay, M; Denion, E

    2016-02-01

    Circumferential (360°) endophotocoagulation is frequently implemented during vitrectomies for retinal detachment. This photocoagulation may result in neurotrophic keratitis by damaging the ciliary nerves in the suprachoroidal space on their way to the pupil. We report a series of 4 cases of neurotrophic keratitis following a circumferential endophotocoagulation. A retrospective observational case series of 4 non-diabetic patients having presented with a neurotrophic keratitis following a retinal detachment treated with vitrectomy and circumferential endophotocoagulation (532 nm) at Caen University Hospital. We report the various forms of corneal lesions and the diagnostic criteria allowing for the diagnosis of neurotrophic keratitis. Neurotrophic keratitis is caused by lesions occurring at various levels of corneal innervation. Endophotocoagulation may cause a neurotrophic keratitis by damaging the short and long ciliary nerves on their way to the pupil in the suprachoroidal space. The sequelae of this condition can limit visual recovery. Hence, it is probably advisable to screen for corneal anesthesia or severe hypesthesia following a retinal detachment treated with vitrectomy and circumferential endophotocoagulation and to implement prophylactic treatment (intensive lubricant therapy; preservative-free eye drops) if needed. The risk of neurotrophic keratitis should be weighed against the dose of laser retinopexy necessary and sufficient to obtain a sustained retinal reattachment. If circumferential endophotocoagulation is implemented, it is probably sensible to monitor corneal sensitivity and to adapt postoperative treatment if necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurotrophic Factor Control of Satiety and Body Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baoji; Xie, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Energy balance, the relationship between energy intake and expenditure, is regulated by a complex interplay of hormones, brain circuits and peripheral tissues. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine that suppresses appetite and increases energy expenditure. Ironically, obese individuals have high levels of plasma leptin and are resistant to leptin treatment. Neurotrophic factors, particularly ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are also important for the control of body weight. CNTF can overcome leptin resistance to reduce body weight, although CNTF and leptin activate similar signalling cascades. Mutations in the gene for BDNF lead to insatiable appetite and severe obesity. PMID:27052383

  3. Neurotrophic factor control of satiety and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baoji; Xie, Xiangyang

    2016-05-01

    Energy balance--that is, the relationship between energy intake and energy expenditure--is regulated by a complex interplay of hormones, brain circuits and peripheral tissues. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine that suppresses appetite and increases energy expenditure. Ironically, obese individuals have high levels of plasma leptin and are resistant to leptin treatment. Neurotrophic factors, particularly ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are also important for the control of body weight. CNTF can overcome leptin resistance in order to reduce body weight, although CNTF and leptin activate similar signalling cascades. Mutations in the gene encoding BDNF lead to insatiable appetite and severe obesity.

  4. The Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Montag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the biological basis of personality is a timely research endeavor, with the aim of deepening our understanding of human nature. In recent years, a growing body of research has investigated the role of the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the context of individual differences across human beings, with a focus on personality traits. A large number of different approaches have been chosen to illuminate the role of BDNF for personality, ranging from the measurement of BDNF in the serum/plasma to molecular genetics to (genetic brain imaging. The present review provides the reader with an overview of the current state of affairs in the context of BDNF and personality.

  5. Neurotrophic factors in tension-type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan B. Domingues

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factors (NF are involved in pain regulation and a few studies have suggested that they may play a pathophysiological role in primary headaches. The aim of this study was to investigate NF levels in patients with tension type headache (TTH. We carried out a cross sectional study including 48 TTH patients and 48 age and gender matched controls. Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, and Headache Impact Test were recorded. Serum levels of NF were determined by ELISA. There were not significant differences between NF levels between TTH patients and controls. Patients with chronic and episodic TTH had not significant differences in NF levels. The presence of headache at the time of evaluation did not significantly alter the levels of NF. Depression and anxiety scores as well as headache impact did not correlate with NF levels. Our study suggest that the serum levels of NF are not altered in TTH.

  6. Diagnosis and management of neurotrophic keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchetti M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marta Sacchetti,1 Alessandro Lambiase2 1Cornea and Ocular Surface Unit, Ospedale San Raffaele di Milano-IRCCS, Milan, 2Ophthalmology, University La Sapienza of Rome, Italy Abstract: Neurotrophic keratitis (NK is a degenerative disease characterized by corneal sensitivity reduction, spontaneous epithelium breakdown, and impairment of corneal healing. Several causes of NK, including herpetic keratitis, diabetes, and ophthalmic and neurosurgical procedures, share the common mechanism of trigeminal damage. Diagnosis of NK requires accurate investigation of clinical ocular and systemic history, complete eye examination, and assessment of corneal sensitivity. All diagnostic procedures to achieve correct diagnosis and classification of NK, including additional examinations such as in vivo confocal microscopy, are reviewed. NK can be classified according to severity of corneal damage, ie, epithelial alterations (stage 1, persistent epithelial defect (stage 2, and corneal ulcer (stage 3. Management of NK should be based on clinical severity, and aimed at promoting corneal healing and preventing progression of the disease to stromal melting and perforation. Concomitant ocular diseases, such as exposure keratitis, dry eye, and limbal stem cell deficiency, negatively influence the outcome of NK and should be treated. Currently, no specific medical treatment exists, and surgical approaches, such as amniotic membrane transplantation and conjunctival flap, are effective in preserving eye integrity, without ameliorating corneal sensitivity or visual function. This review describes experimental and clinical reports showing several novel and potential therapies for NK, including growth factors and metalloprotease inhibitors, as well as three ongoing Phase II clinical trials. Keywords: neurotrophic keratitis, cornea sensitivity, cornea innervation, persistent epithelial defect

  7. Resveratrol Produces Neurotrophic Effects on Cultured Dopaminergic Neurons through Prompting Astroglial BDNF and GDNF Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicated astroglia-derived neurotrophic factors generation might hold a promising therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD. Resveratrol, naturally present in red wine and grapes with potential benefit for health, is well known to possess a number of pharmacological activities. Besides the antineuroinflammatory properties, we hypothesized the neuroprotective potency of resveratrol is partially due to its additional neurotrophic effects. Here, primary rat midbrain neuron-glia cultures were applied to investigate the neurotrophic effects mediated by resveratrol on dopamine (DA neurons and further explore the role of neurotrophic factors in its actions. Results showed resveratrol produced neurotrophic effects on cultured DA neurons. Additionally, astroglia-derived neurotrophic factors release was responsible for resveratrol-mediated neurotrophic properties as evidenced by the following observations: (1 resveratrol failed to exert neurotrophic effects on DA neurons in the cultures without astroglia; (2 the astroglia-conditioned medium prepared from astroglia-enriched cultures treated with resveratrol produced neurotrophic effects in neuron-enriched cultures; (3 resveratrol increased neurotrophic factors release in the concentration- and time-dependent manners; (4 resveratrol-mediated neurotrophic effects were suppressed by blocking the action of the neurotrophic factors. Together, resveratrol could produce neurotrophic effects on DA neurons through prompting neurotrophic factors release, and these effects might open new alternative avenues for neurotrophic factor-based therapy targeting PD.

  8. Neurotrophic factor intervention restores auditory function in deafened animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Takayuki; Bredberg, Göran; Ulfendahl, Mats; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Petri Olivius, N.; Kaksonen, Risto; Lindström, Bo; Altschuler, Richard; Miller, Josef M.

    2002-02-01

    A primary cause of deafness is damage of receptor cells in the inner ear. Clinically, it has been demonstrated that effective functionality can be provided by electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve, thus bypassing damaged receptor cells. However, subsequent to sensory cell loss there is a secondary degeneration of the afferent nerve fibers, resulting in reduced effectiveness of such cochlear prostheses. The effects of neurotrophic factors were tested in a guinea pig cochlear prosthesis model. After chemical deafening to mimic the clinical situation, the neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and an analogue of ciliary neurotrophic factor were infused directly into the cochlea of the inner ear for 26 days by using an osmotic pump system. An electrode introduced into the cochlea was used to elicit auditory responses just as in patients implanted with cochlear prostheses. Intervention with brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the ciliary neurotrophic factor analogue not only increased the survival of auditory spiral ganglion neurons, but significantly enhanced the functional responsiveness of the auditory system as measured by using electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses. This demonstration that neurotrophin intervention enhances threshold sensitivity within the auditory system will have great clinical importance for the treatment of deaf patients with cochlear prostheses. The findings have direct implications for the enhancement of responsiveness in deafferented peripheral nerves.

  9. Synergistic neurotrophic effects of piracetam and thiotriazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gromova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the synergy between the nootropic drug piracetam and the metabolic agent thiotriazoline that maintains energy metabolism and survival of neurons and other types of cells. Piracetam, a nootropic drug, a chemical pyrrolidone derivative, is used in neurological, psychiatric, and narcological practice. There is evidence on the positive effect of piracetam in elderly and senile patients with coronary heart disease. This drug is supposed to stimulate redox processes, to enhance glucose utilization, and to improve regional blood flow in the ischemic brain regions. Due to its action, the drug activates glycolytic processes and elevates ATP concentrations in brain tissue. Thiotriazoline is a compound that has antioxidant, anti-ischemic properties. The co-administration of piracetam and thiothriazoline is an innovation area in the treatment of stroke and other brain damages, especially in insulin resistance and high blood glucose levels. The paper considers the neurobiological properties of thiotriazoline and piracetam, which synergistically exert neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects.

  10. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Megakaryocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Fernández, Pedro; Säuberli, Katharina; Colzani, Maria; Moreau, Thomas; Ghevaert, Cedric; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2016-05-06

    The biosynthesis of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has thus far been examined in neurons where it is expressed at very low levels, in an activity-dependent fashion. In humans, BDNF has long been known to accumulate in circulating platelets, at levels far higher than in the brain. During the process of blood coagulation, BDNF is released from platelets, which has led to its extensive use as a readily accessible biomarker, under the assumption that serum levels may somehow reflect brain levels. To identify the cellular origin of BDNF in platelets, we established primary cultures of megakaryocytes, the progenitors of platelets, and we found that human and rat megakaryocytes express the BDNF gene. Surprisingly, the pattern of mRNA transcripts is similar to neurons. In the presence of thapsigargin and external calcium, the levels of the mRNA species leading to efficient BDNF translation rapidly increase. Under these conditions, pro-BDNF, the obligatory precursor of biologically active BDNF, becomes readily detectable. Megakaryocytes store BDNF in α-granules, with more than 80% of them also containing platelet factor 4. By contrast, BDNF is undetectable in mouse megakaryocytes, in line with the absence of BDNF in mouse serum. These findings suggest that alterations of BDNF levels in human serum as reported in studies dealing with depression or physical exercise may primarily reflect changes occurring in megakaryocytes and platelets, including the ability of the latter to retain and release BDNF. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  12. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluorescence usually originates from the lowest excited electronic state (singlet) irrespective of the excitation and hence, the fluorescence spectrum of a molecule is characterized by a single band. However, what makes DMABN a very special molecule is that it exhibits dual fluorescence (i.e. emission of. Molecule Matters.

  13. Biomedical applications of photoacoustic imaging with exogenous contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Geoffrey P; Yeager, Doug; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information, and, with the help of exogenous contrast agents, cellular and molecular signatures of tissue. In this article, we review the biomedical applications of photoacoustic imaging assisted with exogenous contrast agents. Dyes, noble metal nanoparticles, and other constructs are contrast agents which absorb strongly in the near-infrared band of the optical spectrum and generate strong photoacoustic response. These contrast agents, which can be specifically targeted to molecules or cells, have been coupled with photoacoustic imaging for preclinical and clinical applications ranging from detection of cancer cells, sentinel lymph nodes, and micrometastasis to angiogenesis to characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Multi-functional agents have also been developed, which can carry drugs or simultaneously provide contrast in multiple imaging modalities. Furthermore, contrast agents were used to guide and monitor the therapeutic procedures. Overall, photoacoustic imaging shows significant promise in its ability to assist in diagnosis, therapy planning, and monitoring of treatment outcome for cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other pathologies.

  14. Delayed treatment with a novel neurotrophic compound reduces behavioral deficits in rabbit ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapchak, Paul A; Schubert, David R; Maher, Pamela A

    2011-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major risk for morbidity and mortality in our aging population. Currently only one drug, the thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator, is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat stroke. Therefore, there is a need to develop new drugs that promote neuronal survival following stroke. We have synthesized a novel neuroprotective molecule called CNB-001 (a pyrazole derivative of curcumin) that has neurotrophic activity, enhances memory, and blocks cell death in multiple toxicity assays related to ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested the efficacy of CNB-001 in a rigorous rabbit ischemic stroke model and determined the molecular basis of its in vivo activity. CNB-001 has substantial beneficial properties in an in vitro ischemia assay and improves the behavioral outcome of rabbit ischemic stroke even when administered 1 h after the insult, a therapeutic window in this model comparable to tissue plasminogen activator. In addition, we elucidated the protein kinase pathways involved in neuroprotection. CNB-001 maintains the calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathways associated with neurotrophic growth factors that are critical for the maintenance of neuronal function. On the basis of its in vivo efficacy and novel mode of action, we conclude that CNB-001 has a great potential for the treatment of ischemic stroke as well as other CNS pathologies.

  15. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Alzheimer's Disease: Risk, Mechanisms, and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing-Hui; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a neurotrophic support on neuron of central nervous system (CNS) and is a key molecule in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and memory storage in hippocampus. However, changes of BDNF level and expression have been reported in the CNS as well as blood of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in the last decade, which indicates a potential role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of AD. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the latest progress in the field of BDNF and its biological roles in AD pathogenesis. We will discuss the interaction between BDNF and amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, the effect of BDNF on synaptic repair in AD, and the association between BDNF polymorphism and AD risk. The most important is, enlightening the detailed biological ability and complicated mechanisms of action of BDNF in the context of AD would provide a future BDNF-related remedy for AD, such as increment in the production or release of endogenous BDNF by some drugs or BDNF mimics.

  16. The neurotrophic receptor Ntrk2 directs lymphoid tissue neovascularization during Leishmania donovani infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Dalton

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (Ntrk2, also known as TrkB and its ligands brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf, neurotrophin-4 (NT-4/5, and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 are known primarily for their multiple effects on neuronal differentiation and survival. Here, we provide evidence that Ntrk2 plays a role in the pathologic remodeling of the spleen that accompanies chronic infection. We show that in Leishmania donovani-infected mice, Ntrk2 is aberrantly expressed on splenic endothelial cells and that new maturing blood vessels within the white pulp are intimately associated with F4/80(hiCD11b(loCD11c(+ macrophages that express Bdnf and NT-4/5 and have pro-angiogenic potential in vitro. Furthermore, administration of the small molecule Ntrk2 antagonist ANA-12 to infected mice significantly inhibited white pulp neovascularization but had no effect on red pulp vascular remodeling. We believe this to be the first evidence of the Ntrk2/neurotrophin pathway driving pathogen-induced vascular remodeling in lymphoid tissue. These studies highlight the therapeutic potential of modulating this pathway to inhibit pathological angiogenesis.

  17. Preferential Enhancement of Sensory and Motor Axon Regeneration by Combining Extracellular Matrix Components with Neurotrophic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniel; González-Pérez, Francisco; Giudetti, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Udina, Esther; Del Valle, Jaume; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-12-29

    After peripheral nerve injury, motor and sensory axons are able to regenerate but inaccuracy of target reinnervation leads to poor functional recovery. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components and neurotrophic factors (NTFs) exert their effect on different neuronal populations creating a suitable environment to promote axonal growth. Here, we assessed in vitro and in vivo the selective effects of combining different ECM components with NTFs on motor and sensory axons regeneration and target reinnervation. Organotypic cultures with collagen, laminin and nerve growth factor (NGF)/neurotrophin-3 (NT3) or collagen, fibronectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) selectively enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons and motor neurite outgrowth from spinal cord slices respectively. For in vivo studies, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with a collagen and laminin matrix with NGF/NT3 encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (MP) (LM + MP.NGF/NT3), or a collagen and fibronectin matrix with BDNF in PLGA MPs (FN + MP.BDNF). Retrograde labeling and functional tests showed that LM + MP.NGF/NT3 increased the number of regenerated sensory neurons and improved sensory functional recovery, whereas FN + MP.BDNF preferentially increased regenerated motoneurons and enhanced motor functional recovery. Therefore, combination of ECM molecules with NTFs may be a good approach to selectively enhance motor and sensory axons regeneration and promote appropriate target reinnervation.

  18. Preferential Enhancement of Sensory and Motor Axon Regeneration by Combining Extracellular Matrix Components with Neurotrophic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniel; González-Pérez, Francisco; Giudetti, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Udina, Esther; Del Valle, Jaume; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, motor and sensory axons are able to regenerate but inaccuracy of target reinnervation leads to poor functional recovery. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components and neurotrophic factors (NTFs) exert their effect on different neuronal populations creating a suitable environment to promote axonal growth. Here, we assessed in vitro and in vivo the selective effects of combining different ECM components with NTFs on motor and sensory axons regeneration and target reinnervation. Organotypic cultures with collagen, laminin and nerve growth factor (NGF)/neurotrophin-3 (NT3) or collagen, fibronectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) selectively enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons and motor neurite outgrowth from spinal cord slices respectively. For in vivo studies, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with a collagen and laminin matrix with NGF/NT3 encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (MP) (LM + MP.NGF/NT3), or a collagen and fibronectin matrix with BDNF in PLGA MPs (FN + MP.BDNF). Retrograde labeling and functional tests showed that LM + MP.NGF/NT3 increased the number of regenerated sensory neurons and improved sensory functional recovery, whereas FN + MP.BDNF preferentially increased regenerated motoneurons and enhanced motor functional recovery. Therefore, combination of ECM molecules with NTFs may be a good approach to selectively enhance motor and sensory axons regeneration and promote appropriate target reinnervation. PMID:28036084

  19. Managing Agricultural Indigenous And Exogenous Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing Agricultural Indigenous And Exogenous Knowledge Through Information And Communication Technologies For Poverty Reduction In Tanzania. ... Access to, and use of, ICTs provides new and faster ways of delivering and accessing information and knowledge that may improve productivity in a wide range of ...

  20. Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes to unlock nutrients: Histological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Useni , Alain

    2013-07-08

    Jul 8, 2013 ... Abstract. There is a need for a better understanding of the mode-of-action of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes. (EFE) used as additives in ruminant feeds. Four forages, treated with EFE, were evaluated in vitro and histologically, in an attempt to determine the effect of EFE on tissue degradation. Weeping love ...

  1. Effect of exogenous phytohormones and sucrose on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of exogenous phytohormones and sucrose on micropropagation and microtuberization from nodal cuttings of Manihot esculenta was studied. Direct and indirect organogeneses were established from these explants. When nodal cuttings were cultured in the presence of 0.01 to 0.1 mg.L-1 of BAP or NAA there was ...

  2. [Exogenous NO mediated GSH-PCs synthesis pathway in tomato under copper stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Yu, Shi-Xin; Zhang, Min; Cui, Xiu-Min

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), as a biologically active molecule, widely involved in the biotic and abiotic stresses. By using solution culture, this paper reported the dynamic changes in enzyme activity and metabolites related to GSH-PCs synthesis way mediated by exogenous NO in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). The results showed that exogenous NO could affect the metabolic pathway of GSH-PCs in tomato seedlings under copper stress. Compared with CK, the activity of γ-ECS and GS was significantly activated, consequently resulting in a sharp rise in GSH and PCs contents in tomato root. Moreover, γ-ECS and GS activity, GSH and PCs contents constantly rise with the extension of processing time under copper stress. Adding exogenous SNP could further improve γ-ECS and GS activity in tomato, and promote the production of GSH and PCs, which contributed to enhancing the ability of removing superoxide and chelating excess Cu2+ to reduce its biological toxicity. To a certain extent, GSH-PCs metabolic changes in leaf lagged behind that in roots. Exogenous BSO could significantly inhibit γ-ECS activity, and applying SNP could significantly reverse the inhibition on GSH and PCs synthesis by BSO. BSO had little effects on PCs content in leaf. Under copper stress, exogenous NO may initiate a signal mechanism and reduce the biotoxicity and oxidative damage caused by excessive Cu2+ by activating or enhancing the enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems in the GSH-PCs synthesis path.

  3. Modulation of estrogen receptor α levels by endogenous and exogenous ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. La Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available ERα is a ligand-activated transcription factor, member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Regulation of ERα levels is intrinsically required for its transcriptional activity and thus for the modulation of the physiological actions of the cognate hormone 17β-estradiol (E2. Indeed, ERα exogenous ligands that target this molecular circuitry are used as drugs in clinical practice. Interestingly, some natural and synthetic molecules, which human beings are commonly exposed to, interfere with the endocrine system and operate through ERα by selectively modifying its signalling. In addition, these molecules may also modulate ERα cellular content. Here, we report the recent advances in our understanding of how exogenous ERα ligands impact on receptor levels and change the physiological E2-dipendent modulation of specific cellular function.

  4. Alginate-matrigel microencapsulated schwann cells for inducible secretion of glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Roche C; Ereifej, Evon S; Broadrick, Kristy M; Rogers, Richard A; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2008-10-01

    Controlled expression of glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf) can be integrated in the development of a system for repair of injured peripheral nerves. This delivery strategy was demonstrated via inducible Gdnf from microencapsulated cells in barium alginate. The Schwann cell line RT4-D6P2T was initially modified utilizing an ecdysone-based stable transfection system to produce RT4-Gdnf cells. During construct preparation, it was found that C6 cells (where Gdnf cDNA was isolated) make three Gdnf transcript variants. Additionally, the importance of 5' untranslated region to drive biologically-functional Gdnf synthesis was shown. Encapsulation of RT4-Gdnf in 1% alginate was then performed. It was determined that cells were able to survive at least 1 month in vitro using starting densities of 20, 200 and 2000 cells/capsule and barium ion concentrations of 10, 50, 100 and 200 mM. Most importantly, encapsulated cells secreted exogenous Gdnf upon ponasterone A induction. Mixture of basement membrane extract Matrigel to alginate promoted increased proliferation, cell spreading and Gdnf release. Finally, compression tests showed that cell-loaded microcapsules fractured at 75% diameter compression with 38 kPa of stress. Regulated Gdnf release from these microcapsules in vivo may potentially aid in the regeneration of damaged nerves.

  5. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is such an innocuous molecule that you might not think it worthy of special attention. We take this molecule for granted because it is abundantly available on earth. About 80 % of the earth's atmosphere, which means a total of 4×1018 kg, is dinitrogen![1] Secondly, it is ignored because it is quite un- reactive. Nitrogen is such ...

  6. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  7. Pulmonary embolism due to exogenous estrogen intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Caner; Carus, Murat; Büyükcam, Fatih

    2017-12-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a relatively common clinical presentation of venous thromboembolism, which develops in relation to acute pulmonary arterial occlusion mostly caused by thrombi of the lower limbs. 29year old female admitted to emergency department with pulmonary thromboembolism due to an ingestion of 17 Diana 35 pills (2 mg cyproterone acetate and 0.035mg ethinyl estradiol) in a suicide attempt without any previously known predisposing factors. After thrombolytic therapy, the patient was discharged with oral warfarin treatment. We know that exogenous estrogen increase the risk of venous thromboembolism in therapeutic use. It should be kept in mind that even single ingestion of a single high-dose exogenous estrogen intake may induce pulmonary thromboembolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in asthmatic children | Salama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates the cross-talk between the immune and nervous systems which may play an important role in asthma pathophysiology. Objective: This study was aimed to investigate the relation between BDNF and asthma exacerbation and severity, and to study its possible ...

  9. Possible involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in the development of various non-neuronal tissues, as the reproductive system. BDNF transcript and protein has been detected in testis and sperms. The present work aimed to assess the possible involvement of BDNF mRNA expression in sperm functions, hormonal ...

  10. Determinants of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, B.A.A.; Molendijk, M.L.; Penninx, B.J.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Kenis, G.; Prickaerts, J.; Elzinga, B.M.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) belongs to the neurotrophin family of growth factors and affects the survival and plasticity of neurons in the adult central nervous system. The high correlation between cortical and serum BDNF levels has led to many human studies on BDNF levels

  11. Determinants of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, B. A. A.; Molendijk, M. L.; Penninx, B. J. W. H.; Buitelaar, J. K.; Kenis, G.; Prickaerts, J.; Elzinga, B. M.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) belongs to the neurotrophin family of growth factors and affects the survival and plasticity of neurons in the adult central nervous system. The high correlation between cortical and serum BDNF levels has led to many human studies on BDNF levels

  12. Tenacity of Exogenous Human Papillomavirus DNA in Sperm Washing

    OpenAIRE

    Brossfield, Jeralyn E.; Philip J. Chan; Patton, William C.; King, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm.

  13. Modulation of neurotrophic signaling pathways by polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi F

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatemeh Moosavi,1,2 Razieh Hosseini,1,2 Luciano Saso,3 Omidreza Firuzi1 1Medicinal and Natural Products Chemistry Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran; 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology “Vittorio Erspamer”, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: Polyphenols are an important class of phytochemicals, and several lines of evidence have demonstrated their beneficial effects in the context of a number of pathologies including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. In this report, we review the studies on the effects of polyphenols on neuronal survival, growth, proliferation and differentiation, and the signaling pathways involved in these neurotrophic actions. Several polyphenols including flavonoids such as baicalein, daidzein, luteolin, and nobiletin as well as nonflavonoid polyphenols such as auraptene, carnosic acid, curcuminoids, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including caffeic acid phentyl ester enhance neuronal survival and promote neurite outgrowth in vitro, a hallmark of neuronal differentiation. Assessment of underlying mechanisms, especially in PC12 neuronal-like cells, reveals that direct agonistic effect on tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk receptors, the main receptors of neurotrophic factors including nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF explains the action of few polyphenols such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone. However, several other polyphenolic compounds activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathways. Increased expression of neurotrophic factors in vitro and in vivo is the mechanism of neurotrophic action of flavonoids such as scutellarin, daidzein, genistein, and fisetin, while compounds like apigenin and ferulic acid increase cyclic adenosine monophosphate

  14. Macrophages present pinocytosed exogenous antigen via MHC class I whereas antigen ingested by receptor-mediated endocytosis is presented via MHC class II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppelenbosch, M. P.; DeSmedt, M.; Pynaert, G.; van Deventer, S. J.; Grooten, J.

    2000-01-01

    Macrophages present exogenous Ag either via MHC class I or MHC class II molecules. We investigated whether the mode of hemagglutinin (HA) uptake influences the class of MHC molecule by which this Ag is presented. Normally, HA is ingested by receptor-mediated endocytosis, but this may be switched to

  15. Evaluation of photosynthetic electrons derivation by exogenous redox mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longatte, Guillaume; Fu, Han-Yi; Buriez, Olivier; Labbé, Eric; Wollman, Francis-André; Amatore, Christian; Rappaport, Fabrice; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the complex process that occurs in plants or algae by which the energy from the sun is converted into an electrochemical potential that drives the assimilation of carbon dioxide and the synthesis of carbohydrates. Quinones belong to a family of species commonly found in key processes of the Living, like photosynthesis or respiration, in which they act as electron transporters. This makes this class of molecules a popular candidate for biofuel cell and bioenergy applications insofar as they can be used as cargo to ship electrons to an electrode immersed in the cellular suspension. Nevertheless, such electron carriers are mostly selected empirically. This is why we report on a method involving fluorescence measurements to estimate the ability of seven different quinones to accept photosynthetic electrons downstream of photosystem II, the first protein complex in the light-dependent reactions of oxygenic photosynthesis. To this aim we use a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, impaired in electron downstream of photosystem II and assess the ability of quinones to restore electron flow by fluorescence. In this work, we defined and extracted a "derivation parameter" D that indicates the derivation efficiency of the exogenous quinones investigated. D then allows electing 2,6-dichlorobenzoquinone, 2,5-dichlorobenzoquinone and p-phenylbenzoquinone as good candidates. More particularly, our investigations suggested that other key parameters like the partition of quinones between different cellular compartments and their propensity to saturate these various compartments should also be taken into account in the process of selecting exogenous quinones for the purpose of deriving photoelectrons from intact algae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  17. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  18. Enumerating molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  19. Protein as chemical cue: non-nutritional growth enhancement by exogenous protein in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren Joshi

    Full Text Available Research pertaining to microbe-microbe and microbe-plant interactions has been largely limited to small molecules like quorum sensing chemicals. However, a few recent reports have indicated the role of complex molecules like proteins and polysaccharides in microbial communication. Here we demonstrate that exogenous proteins present in culture media can considerably accelerate the growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, even when such proteins are not internalized by the cells. The growth enhancement is observed when the exogenous protein is not used as a source of carbon or nitrogen. The data show non-specific nature of the protein inducing growth; growth enhancement was observed irrespective of the protein type. It is shown that growth enhancement is mediated via increased siderophore secretion in response to the exogenous protein, leading to better iron uptake. We highlight the ecological significance of the observation and hypothesize that exogenous proteins serve as chemical cues in the case of P.putida and are perceived as indicator of the presence of competitors in the environment. It is argued that enhanced siderophore secretion in response to exogenous protein helps P.putida establish numerical superiority over competitors by way of enhanced iron assimilation and quicker utilization of aromatic substrates.

  20. Exogenous nitric oxide-induced postharvest disease resistance in citrus fruit to Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yahan; Li, Shunmin; Zeng, Kaifang

    2016-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in numerous plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To investigate the effects of NO on the control of postharvest anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in citrus fruit and its possible mechanisms, citrus fruit were treated with an NO donor. The results showed that exogenous NO released from 50 µmol L(-1) sodium nitroprusside aqueous solution could effectively reduce the disease incidence and lesion diameter of citrus fruit inoculated with C. gloeosporioides during storage at 20 °C. Exogenous NO could regulate hydrogen peroxide levels, stimulate the synthesis of phenolic compounds, and induce phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, catalase activities, and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Furthermore, exogenous NO could inhibit weight loss, improve the ascorbic acid and titratable acidity content, and delay the increase in total soluble solids content in citrus fruit during storage at 20 °C. The results suggest that the use of exogenous NO is a potential method for inducing the disease resistance of fruit to fungal pathogens and for extending the postharvest life of citrus fruit. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Exogenous Glutathione Enhances Mercury Tolerance by Inhibiting Mercury Entry into Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Ok Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing understanding of the crucial roles of glutathione (GSH in cellular defense against heavy metal stress as well as oxidative stress, little is known about the functional role of exogenous GSH in mercury (Hg tolerance in plants. Here, we provide compelling evidence that GSH contributes to Hg tolerance in diverse plants. Exogenous GSH did not mitigate the toxicity of cadmium (Cd, copper (Cu, or zinc (Zn, whereas application of exogenous GSH significantly promoted Hg tolerance during seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, tobacco, and pepper. By contrast, addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis, severely retarded seed germination and seedling growth of the plants in the presence of Hg. The effect of exogenous GSH on Hg specific tolerance was also evident in the presence of other heavy metals, such as Cd, Cu, and Zn, together with Hg. GSH treatment significantly decreased H2O2 and O2- levels and lipid peroxidation, but increased chlorophyll content in the presence of Hg. Importantly, GSH treatment resulted in significantly less accumulation of Hg in Arabidopsis plants, and thin layer chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that GSH had much stronger binding affinity to Hg than to Cd, Cu, or Zn, suggesting that tight binding of GSH to Hg impedes Hg uptake, leading to low Hg accumulation in plant cells. Collectively, the present findings reveal that GSH is a potent molecule capable of conferring Hg tolerance by inhibiting Hg accumulation in plants.

  2. Endogenous vs. exogenous regulations in the commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abatayo, Anna Lou; Lynham, John

    2016-01-01

    It is widely believed that there is strong experimental evidence to support the idea that exogenously imposed regulations crowd out the intrinsic motivations of common pool resource (CPR) users to refrain from over-harvesting. We introduce a novel experimental design that attempts to disentangle...... levels among CPR users in a laboratory experiment. We also observe no differences between weak external regulations and no regulations, after controlling for a potential confound. However, when we add communication to our endogenous treatment, we observe significant behavioral differences between...

  3. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Molecule Matters - N-Heterocyclic Carbenes - The Stable Form of R2 C: Anil J Elias. Feature Article Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 456-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 11. Molecule Matters - Carbon Dioxide: Molecular States and Beyond. T P Radhakrishnan. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 11 November 2006 pp 88-92. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS IN COMBINATORIAL APPROACHES FOR SPINAL CORD REGENERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Julianne; Weidner, Norbert; Blesch, Armin

    2012-01-01

    Axonal regeneration is inhibited by a plethora of different mechanisms in the adult central nervous system (CNS). While neurotrophic factors have been shown to stimulate axonal growth in numerous animal models of nervous system injury, a lack of suitable growth substrates, an insufficient activation of neuron-intrinsic regenerative programs and extracellular inhibitors of regeneration limit the efficacy of neurotrophic factor delivery for anatomical and functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Thus, growth-stimulating factors will likely have to be combined with other treatment approaches to tap into the full potential of growth factor therapy for axonal regeneration. In addition, the temporal and spatial distribution of growth factors have to be tightly controlled to achieve biologically active concentrations, to allow for the chemotropic guidance of axons and to prevent adverse effects related to the widespread distribution of neurotrophic factors. Here, we will review the rationale for combinatorial treatments in axonal regeneration and summarize some recent progress in promoting axonal regeneration in the injured CNS using such approaches. PMID:22526621

  7. Rodent Models of Depression: Neurotrophic and Neuroinflammatory Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Stepanichev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rodent models are an indispensable tool for studying etiology and progress of depression. Since interrelated systems of neurotrophic factors and cytokines comprise major regulatory mechanisms controlling normal brain plasticity, impairments of these systems form the basis for development of cerebral pathologies, including mental diseases. The present review focuses on the numerous experimental rodent models of depression induced by different stress factors (exteroceptive and interoceptive during early life (including prenatal period or adulthood, giving emphasis to the data on the changes of neurotrophic factors and neuroinflammatory indices in the brain. These parameters are closely related to behavioral depression-like symptoms and impairments of neuronal plasticity and are both gender- and genotype-dependent. Stress-related changes in expression of neurotrophins and cytokines in rodent brain are region-specific. Some contradictory data reported by different groups may be a consequence of differences of stress paradigms or their realization in different laboratories. Like all experimental models, stress-induced depression-like conditions are experimental simplification of clinical depression states; however, they are suitable for understanding the involvement of neurotrophic factors and cytokines in the pathogenesis of the disease—a goal unachievable in the clinical reality. These major regulatory systems may be important targets for therapeutic measures as well as for development of drugs for treatment of depression states.

  8. Activation of the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) signalling pathway in cortical neurons of multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ranjan; McDonough, Jennifer; Chang, Ansi; Swamy, Lakshman; Siu, Alan; Kidd, Grahame J; Rudick, Richard; Mirnics, Karoly; Trapp, Bruce D

    2007-10-01

    Neuronal and axonal degeneration results in irreversible neurological disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. A number of adaptive or neuroprotective mechanisms are thought to repress neurodegeneration and neurological disability in MS patients. To investigate possible neuroprotective pathways in the cerebral cortex of MS patients, we compared gene transcripts in cortices of six control and six MS patients. Out of 67 transcripts increased in MS cortex nine were related to the signalling mediated by the neurotrophin ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Therefore, we quantified and localized transcriptional (RT-PCR, in situ hybridization) and translational (western, immunohistochemistry) products of CNTF-related genes. CNTF-receptor complex members, CNTFRalpha, LIFRbeta and GP130, were increased in MS cortical neurons. CNTF was increased and also expressed by neurons. Phosphorylated STAT3 and the anti-apoptotic molecule, Bcl2, known down stream products of CNTF signalling were also increased in MS cortical neurons. We hypothesize that in response to the chronic insults or stress of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, cortical neurons up regulate a CNTF-mediated neuroprotective signalling pathway. Induction of CNTF signalling and the anti-apoptotic molecule, Bcl2, thus represents a compensatory response to disease pathogenesis and a potential therapeutic target in MS patients.

  9. Expressing exogenous functional odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomina Alla F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory discrimination depends on the large numbers of odorant receptor genes and differential ligand-receptor signaling among neurons expressing different receptors. In this study, we describe an in vitro system that enables the expression of exogenous odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons. Olfactory sensory neurons in the culture express characteristic signaling molecules and, therefore, provide a system to study receptor function within its intrinsic cellular environment. Results We demonstrate that cultured olfactory sensory neurons express endogenous odorant receptors. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer enables successful ectopic expression of odorant receptors. We show that the ectopically expressed mouse I7 is functional in the cultured olfactory sensory neurons. When two different odorant receptors are ectopically expressed simultaneously, both receptor proteins co-localized in the same olfactory sensory neurons up to 10 days in vitro. Conclusion This culture technique provided an efficient method to culture olfactory sensory neurons whose morphology, molecular characteristics and maturation progression resembled those observed in vivo. Using this system, regulation of odorant receptor expression and its ligand specificity can be studied in its intrinsic cellular environment.

  10. Ciliary neurotrophic factor infused intracerebroventricularly shows reduced catabolic effects when linked to the TAT protein transduction domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, André S; Rezende, Alexandre C S; Grigoletto, Jessica; Rogério, Fabio; Velloso, Lício A; Skaper, Stephen D; Negro, Alessandro; Langone, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) regulates the differentiation and survival of a wide spectrum of developing and adult neurons, including motor neuron loss after injury. We recently described a cell-penetrant recombinant human CNTF (rhCNTF) molecule, formed by fusion with the human immunodeficiency virus-1 transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein transduction domain (TAT-CNTF) that, upon subcutaneous administration, retains full neurotrophic activity without cytokine-like side-effects. Although the CNTF receptor is present in hypothalamic nuclei, which are involved in the control of energy, rhCNTF but not TAT-CNTF stimulates signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 phosphorylation in the rat hypothalamus after subcutaneous administration. This could be due limited TAT-CNTF distribution in the hypothalamus and/or altered intracellular signaling by the fusion protein. To explore these possibilities, we examined the effect of intracerebroventricular administration of TAT-CNTF in male adult rats. TAT-CNTF-induced weight loss, although the effect was smaller than that seen with either rhCNTF or leptin (which exerts CNTF-like effects via its receptor). In contrast to rhCNTF and leptin, TAT-CNTF neither induced morphological changes in adipose tissues nor increased uncoupling protein 1 expression in brown adipose tissue, a characteristic feature of rhCNTF and leptin. Acute intracerebroventricular administration of TAT-CNTF induced a less robust phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 in the hypothalamus, compared with rhCNTF. The data show that fusion of a protein transduction domain may change rhCNTF CNS distribution, while further strengthening the utility of cell-penetrating peptide technology to neurotrophic factor biology beyond the neuroscience field.

  11. The future of exogenous surfactant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Douglas F; Notter, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Since the identification of surfactant deficiency as the putative cause of the infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) by Avery and Mead in 1959, our understanding of the role of pulmonary surfactant in respiratory physiology and the pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI) has advanced substantially. Surfactant replacement has become routine for the prevention and treatment of infant RDS and other causes of neonatal lung injury. The role of surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period, however, has proven more complex. Relative surfactant deficiency, dysfunction, and inhibition all contribute to the disturbed physiology seen in ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Consequently, exogenous surfactant, while a plausible therapy, has proven to be less effective in ALI/ARDS than in RDS, where simple deficiency is causative. This failure may relate to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution, or simply an inability of the drug to substantially impact the underlying pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS. Both animal and human studies suggest that direct types of ALI (eg, aspiration, pneumonia) may be more responsive to surfactant therapy than indirect lung injury (eg, sepsis, pancreatitis). Animal studies are needed, however, to further clarify aspects of drug composition, timing, delivery, and dosing before additional human trials are pursued, as the results of human trials to date have been inconsistent and largely disappointing. Further study and perhaps the development of more robust pharmaceutical surfactants offer promise that exogenous surfactant will find a place in our armamentarium of treatment of ALI/ARDS in the future. 2011 Daedalus Enterprises

  12. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10] Elsila et al. (2005) GCA 5, 1349. [11] Glavin and Dworkin (2009) PNAS 106, 5487. [12] Pizzarello et al. (2003) GCA 67, 1589. [13] Chan et al. (2012) MAPS. 47, 1502. [14] Burton et al. (2011) MAPS 46, 1703.

  13. The intricacies of neurotrophic factor therapy for retinal ganglion cell rescue in glaucoma: a case for gene therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marianna Foldvari Ding Wen Chen

    2016-01-01

    .... The unmet need could be addressed by neurotrophic factor gene therapy, where plasmid DNA, encoding neurotrophic factors, is delivered to retinal cells to maintain sufficient levels of neurotrophins in the retina...

  14. The effects of exogenous proline and osmotic stress on morpho ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For evaluation of growth parameters of strawberry callus under osmotic stress and exogenous proline, embryonic calli were transferred to Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing four sucrose (osmotic stress) treatments including 3, 6, 9 and 12% and various concentrations of exogenous Lproline (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 ...

  15. Metabolic response to exogenous ethanol in yeast: An in vivo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-02

    Aug 2, 2012 ... exogenous ethanol on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentative metabolism. ... Exogenous stress; in vivo NMR; metabolomic; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; STOCSY .... Proton decoupled 13C-NMR spectra of yeast medium during fermentation: (a) representative spectra at the beginning and (b) at the end ...

  16. The Endogenous-Exogenous Partition in Attribution Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglanski, Arie W.

    1975-01-01

    Within lay explanation of actions, several significant inferences are assumed to follow from the partition between endogenous and exogenous attributions. An endogenous action is judged to constitute an end in itself; an exogenous action is judged to serve as a means to some further end. (Editor/RK)

  17. Neonatal Levels of Neurotrophic Factors and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W. Abdallah, Morsi; L. Mortensen, Erik; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2013-01-01

    To examine levels of 3 neurotrophic factors (NTFs): Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in dried blood spot samples of neonates diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) later in life and frequency-matched controls....

  18. [Exogenous tooth discoloration in children: black stains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandon, D; Chabane-Lemboub, A; Le Gall, M

    2011-12-01

    Black-stains are a coloring frequently met in pediatric dentistry. They can be medically diagnosed as 1-mm borders or unfinished lines formed by a dark exogenous substance which follows the gingival festoon of bet coronary (in cervical third of the crown) temporary teeth and permanent, or they can appear in like points or dark spots. They are caused by bacteria anaerobic chromogenous. The dominant responsible species are actinomyces. Blacks-stains are ferrous depots, formed following a chemical interaction on the surface of the tooth between sulphide of hydrogen (under the effect of the anaerobic bacteria which are producing hydrogen) and the iron contained in the saliva (by a healthy diet) or that released by red blood corpuscles (in case of bloody gums). Black-stains are a shape of characteristic dental plaque by its flora with trend to calcify. It contains an insoluble iron salt with a content raised in calcium and in inorganic phosphor. The coloring Black-stain is a mild pathology and has no incidence on the vitality of the tooth. Certainly these spots are unsightly. The dental surgeon in current practice can deprive them. The pediatrician plays a leading role in the diagnosis and advice to parents and patients affected by these stains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Exogenous surfactant therapy: new synthetic surfactants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, Th

    2008-06-01

    There are numerous pulmonary conditions in which qualitative or quantitative anomalies of the surfactant system have been demonstrated. In premature newborns with immature lungs, a functional deficit in surfactant is the main physiopathologic mechanism of the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Since the landmark pilot study of Fujiwara, published more than 20 years ago, the efficacy of exogenous surfactant for the treatment of neonatal RDS has been established by numerous controlled studies and meta-analyses. Enlightened by a growing insight into both the structure and function of the different surfactant components, a new generation of synthetic surfactants has been developed. Various complementary approaches have confirmed the fundamental role of the two hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, in the surfactant system, thus opening the way to the design of analogues, either by chemical synthesis or expression in a prokaryotic system. An example of these peptide-containing synthetic surfactant preparations, lucinactant (Surfaxin), has been recently tested in comparison to a synthetic surfactant that does not contain protein as well as to animal derived surfactant preparations. Major clinical outcomes between lucinactant and animal-derived surfactant preparations were fund similar in two randomized controlled trials, opening the way to a new generation of synthetic surfactants in the near future.

  20. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of SVHRP.

  1. Enhancing tolerance of rice (Oryza sativa) to simulated acid rain by exogenous abscisic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi; Liang, Chanjuan

    2017-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates much important plant physiological and biochemical processes and induces tolerance to different stresses. Here, we studied the regulation of exogenous ABA on adaptation of rice seedlings to simulated acid rain (SAR) stress by measuring biomass dry weight, stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis rate, nutrient elements, and endogenous hormones. The application of 10 μM ABA alleviated the SAR-induced inhibition on growth, stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis rate, and decreases in contents of nutrient (K, Mg, N, and P) and hormone (auxin, gibberellins, and zeatin). Moreover, 10 μM ABA could stimulate the Ca content as signaling molecules under SAR stress. Contrarily, the application of 100 μM ABA aggravated the SAR-induced inhibition on growth, stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis rate, and contents of nutrient and hormone. The results got after a 5-day recovery (without SAR) show that exogenous 10 μM ABA can promote self-restoration process in rice whereas 100 μM ABA hindered the restoration by increasing deficiency of nutrients and disturbing the balance of hormones. These results confirmed that exogenous ABA at proper concentration could enhance the tolerance of rice to SAR stress.

  2. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  3. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jôice Dias Corrêa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a member of the neurotrophic factor family. Outside the nervous system, BDNF has been shown to be expressed in various nonneural tissues, such as periodontal ligament, dental pulp, and odontoblasts. Although a role for BDNF in periodontal regeneration has been suggested, a function for BDNF in periodontal disease has not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the BDNF levels in periodontal tissues of patients with chronic periodontitis (CP and periodontally healthy controls (HC. All subjects were genotyped for the rs4923463 and rs6265 BDNF polymorphisms. Periodontal tissues were collected for ELISA, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and microscopic analysis from 28 CP patients and 29 HC subjects. BDNF levels were increased in CP patients compared to HC subjects. A negative correlation was observed when analyzing concentration of BDNF and IL-10 in inflamed periodontium. No differences in frequencies of BDNF genotypes between CP and HC subjects were observed. However, BDNF genotype GG was associated with increased levels of BDNF, TNF-α, and CXCL10 in CP patients. In conclusion, BDNF seems to be associated with periodontal disease process, but the specific role of BDNF still needs to be clarified.

  4. Bioreactor Transient Exposure Activates Specific Neurotrophic Pathway in Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmitti, V.; Benedetti, E.; Caracciolo, V.; Sebastiani, P.; Di Loreto, S.

    2010-02-01

    Altered gravity forces might influence neuroplasticity and can provoke changes in biochemical mechanisms. In this contest, neurotrophins have a pivotal role, particularly nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A suspension of dissociated cortical cells from rat embryos was exposed to 24 h of microgravity before plating in normal adherent culture system. Expression and transductional signalling pathways of NGF and BDNF were assessed at the end of maturational process (8-10 days in vitro). Rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWV) pre-exposition did not induce changes in NGF expression and its high affinity receptor TrkA. On the contrary both BDNF expression and its high affinity receptor TrkB were strongly up-regulated, inducing Erk-5, but not Erk-1/2 activation and, in turn, MEF2C over-expression and activation. According to our previous and present results, we postulate that relatively short microgravitational stimuli, applied to neural cells during the developmental stage, exert a long time activation of specific neurotrophic pathways.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling in the HVC is required for testosterone-induced song of female canaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Tessa E; Dittrich, Falk; Pieneman, Anton W; Jansen, René F; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Lessmann, Volkmar; Lilliehook, Christina; Goldman, Steven A; Gahr, Manfred

    2009-12-09

    Testosterone-induced singing in songbirds is thought to involve testosterone-dependent morphological changes that include angiogenesis and neuronal recruitment into the HVC, a central part of the song control circuit. Previous work showed that testosterone induces the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase), which in turn leads to an upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production in HVC endothelial cells. Here we report for the first time that systemic inhibition of the VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase is sufficient to block testosterone-induced song in adult female canaries, despite sustained androgen exposure and the persistence of the effects of testosterone on HVC morphology. Expression of exogenous BDNF in HVC, induced locally by in situ transfection, reversed the VEGFR2 inhibition-mediated blockade of song development, thereby restoring the behavioral phenotype associated with androgen-induced song. The VEGFR2-inhibited, BDNF-treated females developed elaborate male-like song that included large syllable repertoires and high syllable repetition rates, features known to attract females. Importantly, although functionally competent new neurons were recruited to HVC after testosterone treatment, the time course of neuronal addition appeared to follow BDNF-induced song development. These findings indicate that testosterone-associated VEGFR2 activity is required for androgen-induced song in adult songbirds and that the behavioral effects of VEGFR2 inhibition can be rescued by BDNF within the adult HVC.

  6. Expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR-alpha) following experimental intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Hirabayashi, Hidehiro; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Uranishi, Ryunosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Sugie, Yuko; Ishizaka, Shigeaki; Sakaki, Toshisuke

    2005-04-04

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is known as a neuro-survival factor in the developing and developed CNS, as well as in the CNS following injury. However, little is known about the expression of CNTF or that of its receptor (CNTFR-alpha) in cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We investigated the temporal and spatial profiles of CNTF and CNTFR-alpha expression using a collagenase-induced ICH rat model. CNTF expression was up-regulated from the day following ICH induction and reached a peak level at 5 to 14 days, with increased expression observed in brain tissue surrounding the hematoma lesion and white matter structures in association with astroglial proliferation. Further, CNTFR-alpha was transiently expressed in the cerebral cortex surrounding the hematoma, with a peak at 5 days. Administration of exogenous CNTF into the lesion following initiation of ICH resulted in a prolonged expression of CNTFR-alpha on cortical neurons neighboring the hematoma. Our findings suggest differential regulation of CNTF and CNTFR-alpha, and the possibility of a therapeutic strategy using CNTF administration for ICH.

  7. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling in the HVC Is Required for Testosterone-Induced Song of Female Canaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Tessa E.; Dittrich, Falk; Pieneman, Anton W.; Jansen, René F.; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Lessmann, Volkmar; Lilliehook, Christina; Goldman, Steven A.; Gahr, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone-induced singing in songbirds is thought to involve testosterone-dependent morphological changes that include angiogenesis and neuronal recruitment into the HVC, a central part of the song control circuit. Previous work showed that testosterone induces the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase), which in turn leads to an upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production in HVC endothelial cells. Here we report for the first time that systemic inhibition of the VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase is sufficient to block testosterone-induced song in adult female canaries, despite sustained androgen exposure and the persistence of the effects of testosterone on HVC morphology. Expression of exogenous BDNF in HVC, induced locally by in situ transfection, reversed the VEGFR2 inhibition-mediated blockade of song development, thereby restoring the behavioral phenotype associated with androgen-induced song. The VEGFR2-inhibited, BDNF-treated females developed elaborate male-like song that included large syllable repertoires and high syllable repetition rates, features known to attract females. Importantly, although functionally competent new neurons were recruited to HVC after testosterone treatment, the time course of neuronal addition appeared to follow BDNF-induced song development. These findings indicate that testosterone-associated VEGFR2 activity is required for androgen-induced song in adult songbirds and that the behavioral effects of VEGFR2 inhibition can be rescued by BDNF within the adult HVC. PMID:20007475

  8. Post-stroke recovery: the role of activity-dependent release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Antonio; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2014-11-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of long-term disability with no pharmacological approaches available to limit the degree of damage or aid in recovery. Considerable effort has been made to minimize neuronal damage using neuroprotective compounds. However, attempts have so far failed to translate into the clinic. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase type B are actively produced throughout the brain and are involved in regulating neuronal activity and normal day-to-day function. Further, BDNF has been shown to play a role in both protection and recovery of functions after stroke. This review focuses on the endogenous release of BDNF as well as activity-induced (pharmacological and physical) elevation in BDNF, and the role this plays during both acute (hours to days) and subacute (days to weeks) periods after stroke. Exogenous administration has previously been shown not to cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore, we have focused this review on approaches that allow us to directly stimulate, using pharmacological therapies and mimetics, physical activity and potential drug delivery systems that can be used to administer BDNF. Finally, we also discuss the role of BDNF polymorphisms and the influence of epigenetic regulation of BDNF on post-stroke recovery.

  9. Cell type-specific regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in states of allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groneberg, D A; Fischer, T C; Peckenschneider, N; Noga, O; Dinh, Q T; Welte, T; Welker, P

    2007-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a molecule influencing neuronal proliferation and differentiation. In states of allergy, it may orchestrate inflammatory changes by linking the immune system with the nervous system. Because the precise regulation of gene transcription in mast cells MCs is not clear, the present studies assessed the gene regulation of BDNF in this inflammatory cell type. Transcriptional expression of BDNF in human skin was studied in isolated cells using RT-PCR. In situ lesional MC BDNF protein expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and related to the differential staining of MCs and functional effects of BDNF on HaCaT keratinocytes. BDNF mRNA expression was found in isolated human skin MCs, keratinocytes, and fibroblasts. Also, low levels were found in endothelial cells and melanocytes. BDNF protein expression was found in situ in lesional and non-lesional MCs. A significantly decreased expression of BDNF protein was found in atopic dermatitis lesional MCs when compared with control MC expression. Functional in vitro experiments demonstrated that a decrease in BDNF stimulation led to increased secretion rates for stem cell factor and IL-8 in HaCaT keratinocytes. The demonstration of a decreased level of BDNF gene transcription in lesional MCs points to a differential regulation of MC-released neutrotrophins in cutaneous allergic inflammation. Topically administered neurotrophin receptor-modulating compounds should be receptor target specific and not universally acting in diseases such as atopic dermatitis or allergic asthma.

  10. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used in treatment of paediatric diseases, but evidence of associated adverse cerebral effects is accumulating. The various pharmacokinetic profiles of the exogenous glucocorticoids and the changes in pharmacodynamics during childhood, result in different exposure...... of nervous tissue to exogenous glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids activate two types of intracellular receptors, the mineralocorticoid receptor and the glucocorticoid receptor. The two receptors differ in cerebral distribution, affinity and effects. Exogenous glucocorticoids favor activation...... of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...

  11. The use of exogenous microbial species to enhance the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    film bioreactor with exogenous bacterial and diatoma species would increase the removal of chemical oxygen demand, nitrogenous compounds and suspended solids from a real-time coal gasification wastewater to meet environmental ...

  12. Effects of exogenous polyamines and inhibitors of polyamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) and dicyclohexylamine (DCHA) or three exogenous polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) were added into a modified HLM-1 maturation medium inoculated with embryogenic tissues. Medium responses were ...

  13. Is subclinical hypothyroidism increasing exogen obesity in children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Tuna Kirsaclioglu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion:.Thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test may be helpful to determine subclinical hypothyroidism in exogen obese children, if basal TSH levels were elevated. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(1.000: 1-7

  14. Endogenous versus exogenous shocks in systems with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Helmstetter, A.

    2003-02-01

    Systems with long-range persistence and memory are shown to exhibit different precursory as well as recovery patterns in response to shocks of exogenous versus endogenous origins. By endogenous, we envision either fluctuations resulting from an underlying chaotic dynamics or from a stochastic forcing origin which may be external or be an effective coarse-grained description of the microscopic fluctuations. In this scenario, endogenous shocks result from a kind of constructive interference of accumulated fluctuations whose impacts survive longer than the large shocks themselves. As a consequence, the recovery after an endogenous shock is in general slower at early times and can be at long times either slower or faster than after an exogenous perturbation. This offers the tantalizing possibility of distinguishing between an endogenous versus exogenous cause of a given shock, even when there is no “smoking gun”. This could help in investigating the exogenous versus self-organized origins in problems such as the causes of major biological extinctions, of change of weather regimes and of the climate, in tracing the source of social upheaval and wars, and so on. Sornette et al., Volatility fingerprints of large stocks: endogenous versus exogenous, cond-mat/0204626 has already shown how this concept can be applied concretely to differentiate the effects on financial markets of the 11 September 2001 attack or of the coup against Gorbachev on 19 August 1991 (exogenous) from financial crashes such as October 1987 (endogenous).

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K. S.; Nielsen, A. R.; Krogh-Madsen, R.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis  Decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and depression. These disorders are associated with type 2 diabetes, and animal models suggest that BDNF plays a role in insulin resistance. We therefore...... explored whether BDNF plays a role in human glucose metabolism. Subjects and methods  We included (Study 1) 233 humans divided into four groups depending on presence or absence of type 2 diabetes and presence or absence of obesity; and (Study 2) seven healthy volunteers who underwent both a hyperglycaemic...... and a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Results  Plasma levels of BDNF in Study 1 were decreased in humans with type 2 diabetes independently of obesity. Plasma BDNF was inversely associated with fasting plasma glucose, but not with insulin. No association was found between the BDNF G196A (Val66Met) polymorphism...

  16. Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, K; Vinberg, M; Kessing, L V

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker related to disease activity and neuroprogression in bipolar disorder, speculated to mirror alterations in brain expression of BDNF. The research area is rapidly evolving; however, recent...... investigations have yielded conflicting results with substantial variation in outcomes, highlighting the need to critically assess the state of current evidence. The aims of the study were to investigate differences in peripheral blood BDNF concentrations between bipolar disorder patients and healthy control......-November 2014) and PsycINFO (1806-November 2014), and 35 studies comprising a total of 3798 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The results indicated that crude peripheral blood BDNF levels may be lower in bipolar disorder patients overall (Hedges' g=-0.28, 95% CI: -0.51 to -0.04, P=0...

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: role in depression and suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Dwivedi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Yogesh DwivediPsychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: Depression and suicidal behavior have recently been shown to be associated with disturbances in structural and synaptic plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, one of the major neurotrophic factors, plays an important role in the maintenance and survival of neurons and in synaptic plasticity. Several lines of evidence suggest that BDNF is involved in depression, such that the expression of BDNF is decreased in depressed patients. In addition, antidepressants up-regulate the expression of BDNF. This has led to the proposal of the “neurotrophin hypothesis of depression”. Increasing evidence demonstrates that suicidal behavior is also associated with lower expression of BDNF, which may be independent from depression. Recent genetic studies also support a link of BDNF to depression/suicidal behavior. Not only BDNF, but abnormalities in its cognate receptor tropomycin receptor kinase B (TrkB and its splice variant (TrkB.T1 have also been reported in depressed/suicidal patients. It has been suggested that epigenetic modulation of the Bdnf and Trkb genes may contribute to their altered expression and functioning. More recently, impairment in the functioning of pan75 neurotrophin receptor has been reported in suicide brain specimens. pan75 neurotrophin receptor is a low-affinity neurotrophin receptor that, when expressed in conjunction with low availability of neurotropins/Trks, induces apoptosis. Overall, these studies suggest the possibility that BDNF and its mediated signaling may participate in the pathophysiology of depression and suicidal behavior. This review focuses on the critical evidence demonstrating the involvement of BDNF in depression and suicide.Keywords: BDNF, neurotrophins, p75NTR, Trk receptor, depression, antidepressants, suicide, genetics, epigenetics

  18. Neurotrophic Keratopathy: Therapeutic Approach Using a Novel Matrix Regenerating Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Marta; Marques, Sara; Gil, João Quadrado; Campos, Joana; Ramos, Paula; Rosa, Andreia Martins; Quadrado, Maria João; Murta, Joaquim Neto

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of a new matrix-regenerating agent (RGTA), Cacicol ® , a polymer that mimics heparan sulfates bound to extracellular matrix proteins, avoiding its proteolysis, to treat neurotrophic keratopathy (NK). Uncontrolled prospective clinical study performed between January 2014 and May 2016. Twenty-five patients (25 eyes) with corneal neurotrophic ulcers, nonresponsive to at least 2 weeks of conservative therapy, were treated with Cacicol, instilled once/twice a week. During follow-up, slit-lamp examination, anterior segment photography, fluorescein-dye testing, and best-corrected visual acuity were analyzed. Ulcer evolution was evaluated using image analysis software (ImageJ ® ) and healing defined as decrease of the corneal ulcer area. An independent observer measured ulcer area. All patients had complete corneal healing within an average of 4.13 ± 2.32 weeks. Mean ulcer area decreased significantly (P = 0.001) from 16.51% ± 18.56% (1st day) to 8.68% ± 11.25% at the 7th day and to 4.73% ± 10.75% at the 14th day. Compared with day 1, mean ulcer area decreased 60.24% after 7 days (P = 0.001), 54.92% after 14 days (P = 0.059), and 83.00% after 21 days (P = 0.003). Two cases of recurrence (8.0%) were registered. No systemic or local side effects were noticed. The new regenerating agent, Cacicol, represents an effective and safe therapy to treat NK.

  19. Secretion of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor in co-culture of four cell types in cerebrospinal fluid-containing medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sanjiang; Zhuang, Minghua; Wu, Rui

    2012-12-25

    The present study co-cultured human embryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, human Schwann cells, human amniotic epithelial cells and human vascular endothelial cells in complete culture medium-containing cerebrospinal fluid. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor secretion in the supernatant of co-cultured cells. Results showed that the number of all cell types reached a peak at 7-10 days, and the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor peaked at 9 days. Levels of secreted nerve growth factor were four-fold higher than brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which was three-fold higher than glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Increasing concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (10%, 20% and 30%) in the growth medium caused a decrease of neurotrophic factor secretion. Results indicated co-culture of human embryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, human Schwann cells, human amniotic epithelial cells and human vascular endothelial cells improved the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The reduction of cerebrospinal fluid extravasation at the transplant site after spinal cord injury is beneficial for the survival and secretion of neurotrophic factors from transplanted cells.

  20. [Precursors and propeptides of neurotrophic factors as the modulators of biological activity of its mature forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieva, L M; Shubin, A V; Gasanov, E V

    2012-01-01

    Here, we review the problems of neurotrophic factors' folding, the role of its precursors (proneurotrophins) and the contribution of elements deleted during its maturation (propeptides) in biological functioning of these growth factors.

  1. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Liping; Yu, K N; Bao, Lingzhi; Wu, Wenqing; Wang, Hongzhi; Han, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of Endogenous and Exogenous Tocopherols in the Lipid Stability of Marine Oil Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Miroslava Suárez-Jiménez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In marine organisms primarily intended for human consumption, the quality of the muscle and the extracted oils may be affected by lipid oxidation during storage, even at low temperatures. This has led to a search for alternatives to maintain quality. In this sense, antioxidant compounds have been used to prevent such lipid deterioration. Among the most used compounds are tocopherols, which, due to their natural origin, have become an excellent alternative to prevent or retard lipid oxidation and maintain the quality of marine products. Tocopherols as antioxidants have been studied both exogenously and endogenously. Exogenous tocopherols are often used by incorporating them into plastic packaging films or adding them directly to fish oil. It has been observed that exogenous tocopherols incorporated in low concentrations maintain the quality of both muscle and the extracted oils during food storage. However, it has been reported that tocopherols applied at higher concentrations act as a prooxidant molecule, probably because their reactions with singlet oxygen may generate free radicals and cause the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oils. However, when tocopherols are included in a fish diet (endogenous tocopherols, the antioxidant effect on the muscle lipids is more effective due to their incorporation into the membrane lipids, which can help extend the shelf life of seafood by reducing the lipid deterioration that occurs due to antioxidant synergy with other phenolic compounds used supplements in fish muscle. This review focuses on the most important studies in this field and highlights the potential of using tocopherols as antioxidants in marine oils.

  4. Role of Endogenous and Exogenous Tocopherols in the Lipid Stability of Marine Oil Systems: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Jiménez, Guadalupe Miroslava; López-Saiz, Carmen María; Ramírez-Guerra, Hugo Enrique; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat Marina; Ruiz-Cruz, Saul; Torres-Arreola, Wilfrido

    2016-01-01

    In marine organisms primarily intended for human consumption, the quality of the muscle and the extracted oils may be affected by lipid oxidation during storage, even at low temperatures. This has led to a search for alternatives to maintain quality. In this sense, antioxidant compounds have been used to prevent such lipid deterioration. Among the most used compounds are tocopherols, which, due to their natural origin, have become an excellent alternative to prevent or retard lipid oxidation and maintain the quality of marine products. Tocopherols as antioxidants have been studied both exogenously and endogenously. Exogenous tocopherols are often used by incorporating them into plastic packaging films or adding them directly to fish oil. It has been observed that exogenous tocopherols incorporated in low concentrations maintain the quality of both muscle and the extracted oils during food storage. However, it has been reported that tocopherols applied at higher concentrations act as a prooxidant molecule, probably because their reactions with singlet oxygen may generate free radicals and cause the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oils. However, when tocopherols are included in a fish diet (endogenous tocopherols), the antioxidant effect on the muscle lipids is more effective due to their incorporation into the membrane lipids, which can help extend the shelf life of seafood by reducing the lipid deterioration that occurs due to antioxidant synergy with other phenolic compounds used supplements in fish muscle. This review focuses on the most important studies in this field and highlights the potential of using tocopherols as antioxidants in marine oils. PMID:27886145

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor preserves intestinal mucosal barrier function and alters gut microbiota in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosal barrier (IMB enables the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules while preserving the ability to absorb nutrients. In this study, we explored the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF on IMB function and gut microbiota in mice. BDNF gene knock-out mice (the BDNF+/− group and wild-type mice (the BDNF+/+ group were selected. The gut microbiota of these mice was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE assay. The ultrastructure of the ileum and the colonic epithelium obtained from decapitated mice were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The protein expression of epithelial tight junction proteins, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 and occludin was detected by immunohistochemistry staining. The protein expression of claudin-1 and claudin-2 was determined by Western blotting. The DGGE band patterns of gut microbiota in the BDNF+/− group were significantly different from that in the BDNF+/+ group, which indicated that the BDNF expression alters the gut microbiota in mice. Compared with the BDNF+/+ group, the BDNF+/− group presented no significant difference in the ultrastructure of ileal epithelium; however, a significant difference was observed in the colonic epithelial barrier, manifested by decreased microvilli, widening intercellular space and bacterial invasion. Compared with the BDNF+/+ group, the expression of ZO-1 and occludin in the BDNF+/− group was significantly decreased. The expression of claudin-1 in the BDNF+/− group was significantly reduced, while the expression of claudin-2 was elevated. These findings indicate that BDNF preserves IMB function and modulates gut microbiota in mice.

  6. Dynamic plasticity: the role of glucocorticoids, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other trophic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J D; Milner, T A; McEwen, B S

    2013-06-03

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secreted protein that has been linked to numerous aspects of plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS). Stress-induced remodeling of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala is coincident with changes in the levels of BDNF, which has been shown to act as a trophic factor facilitating the survival of existing and newly born neurons. Initially, hippocampal atrophy after chronic stress was associated with reduced BDNF, leading to the hypothesis that stress-related learning deficits resulted from suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis. However, recent evidence suggests that BDNF also plays a rapid and essential role in regulating synaptic plasticity, providing another mechanism through which BDNF can modulate learning and memory after a stressful event. Numerous reports have shown BDNF levels are highly dynamic in response to stress, and not only vary across brain regions but also fluctuate rapidly, both immediately after a stressor and over the course of a chronic stress paradigm. Yet, BDNF alone is not sufficient to effect many of the changes observed after stress. Glucocorticoids and other molecules have been shown to act in conjunction with BDNF to facilitate both the morphological and molecular changes that occur, particularly changes in spine density and gene expression. This review briefly summarizes the evidence supporting BDNF's role as a trophic factor modulating neuronal survival, and will primarily focus on the interactions between BDNF and other systems within the brain to facilitate synaptic plasticity. This growing body of evidence suggests a more nuanced role for BDNF in stress-related learning and memory, where it acts primarily as a facilitator of plasticity and is dependent upon the coactivation of glucocorticoids and other factors as the determinants of the final cellular response. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Overexpression Induces Precocious Critical Period in Mouse Visual Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanover, Jessica L.; Huang, Z. Josh; Tonegawa, Susumu; Stryker, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a candidate molecule for regulating activity-dependent synaptic plasticity on the grounds of its expression pattern in developing visual cortex and that of its receptor, trkB (Castrén et al., 1992; Bozzi et al., 1995; Schoups et al., 1995; Cabelli et al., 1996), as well as the modulation of these patterns by activity (Castrén et al., 1992; Bozzi et al., 1995; Schoups et al., 1995). Infusing trkB ligands or their neutralizing agents, the trkB-IgG fusion proteins, into visual cortex alters the development and plasticity of ocular dominance columns (Cabelli et al., 1995; Riddle et al., 1995; Galuske et al., 1996; Gillespie et al., 1996; Cabelli et al., 1997). To test further the physiological role of BDNF, we studied a transgenic mouse that expresses elevated levels of BDNF in primary visual cortex (V1) postnatally (Huang et al., 1999). We found that unlike the infusion experiments, excess BDNF expressed in mouse visual cortex did not block ocular dominance plasticity. Instead, single neurons in V1 of the BDNF transgenic mice were as susceptible to the effects of monocular deprivation (MD) as neurons in wild-type mice, but only during a precocious critical period. At a time when V1 in the wild-type mouse responded maximally to a 4 d MD with a reduction in its response to deprived eye visual stimulation, the transgenic mouse V1 had already passed the peak of its precocious critical period and no longer responded maximally. This finding suggests a role for BDNF in promoting the postnatal maturation of cortical circuitry. PMID:10559430

  8. S-nitrosoglutathione induces ciliary neurotrophic factor expression in astrocytes, which has implications to protect the central nervous system under pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paintlia, Manjeet K; Paintlia, Ajaib S; Singh, Avtar K; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-02-08

    Accumulating evidence suggests that reactive astrogliosis has beneficial and detrimental outcomes in various CNS disorders, but the mechanism behind this dichotomy is unclear. Recent advances in this direction suggested that NO signaling is critical to regulate the outcomes of reactive astrogliosis in vivo. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, we here investigated the effect of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO; a physiological NO donor) in astrocytes in vitro settings. GSNO enhanced the expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurotrophic factors including ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The enhanced CNTF expression in GSNO-treated astrocytes was ascribed to NO-mediated sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling. It was associated with p38 MAPK-dependent increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ transactivation. In addition, the chromatin accessibility of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ accompanied with ATF2 and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) was enhanced across the CNTF gene promoter in GSNO treated astrocytes. Interestingly, secreted CNTF was responsible for increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in GSNO-treated astrocytes in an autocrine manner via a JAK2- and STAT3-dependent mechanism. In addition, CNTF secreted by GSNO-treated astrocytes enhanced the differentiation of immature oligodendrocytes in vitro. These effects of GSNO were consistent with an endogenously produced NO in astrocytes stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. We conclude that NO signaling induces CNTF expression in astrocytes that favors the beneficial outcomes of reactive astrogliosis in vivo. Our data suggest that the endogenously produced NO or its exogenous source has potential to modulate the outcomes of reactive astrogliosis to protect CNS under pathological conditions.

  9. S-Nitrosoglutathione Induces Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Expression in Astrocytes, Which Has Implications to Protect the Central Nervous System under Pathological Conditions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paintlia, Manjeet K.; Paintlia, Ajaib S.; Singh, Avtar K.; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that reactive astrogliosis has beneficial and detrimental outcomes in various CNS disorders, but the mechanism behind this dichotomy is unclear. Recent advances in this direction suggested that NO signaling is critical to regulate the outcomes of reactive astrogliosis in vivo. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, we here investigated the effect of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO; a physiological NO donor) in astrocytes in vitro settings. GSNO enhanced the expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurotrophic factors including ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The enhanced CNTF expression in GSNO-treated astrocytes was ascribed to NO-mediated sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling. It was associated with p38 MAPK-dependent increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ transactivation. In addition, the chromatin accessibility of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ accompanied with ATF2 and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) was enhanced across the CNTF gene promoter in GSNO treated astrocytes. Interestingly, secreted CNTF was responsible for increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in GSNO-treated astrocytes in an autocrine manner via a JAK2- and STAT3-dependent mechanism. In addition, CNTF secreted by GSNO-treated astrocytes enhanced the differentiation of immature oligodendrocytes in vitro. These effects of GSNO were consistent with an endogenously produced NO in astrocytes stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. We conclude that NO signaling induces CNTF expression in astrocytes that favors the beneficial outcomes of reactive astrogliosis in vivo. Our data suggest that the endogenously produced NO or its exogenous source has potential to modulate the outcomes of reactive astrogliosis to protect CNS under pathological conditions. PMID:23264628

  10. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Facilitates Functional Recovery from ALS-Cerebral Spinal Fluid-Induced Neurodegenerative Changes in the NSC-34 Motor Neuron Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shruthi, Shanmukha; Sumitha, R; Varghese, Anu Mary; Ashok, S; Chandrasekhar Sagar, B K; Sathyaprabha, T N; Nalini, A; Kramer, Boris W; Raju, Trichur R; Vijayalakshmi, K; Alladi, Phalguni Anand

    2017-01-01

    The survival of motor neurons is dependent upon neurotrophic factors both during childhood and adolescence and during adult life. In disease conditions, such as in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the mRNA levels of trophic factors like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and vascular endothelial growth factor are downregulated. This was replicated in our in vivo experimental system following the injection of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) of sporadic ALS (ALS-CSF) patients. To evaluate the protective role of BDNF in a model of sporadic ALS patients. The expressions of endogenous BDNF, its receptor TrkB, the enzyme choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), and phosphorylated neurofilaments were studied in NSC-34 cells. The calcium-buffering and proapoptotic effects were assessed by calbindin-D28K and caspase-3 expression, respectively. ALS-CSF considerably depleted the endogenous BDNF protein, while its effect on IGF-1 and FGF-2 was inconsequential; this indirectly indicates a key role for BDNF in supporting motor neuronal survival. The exogenous supplementation of BDNF reversed autocrine expression; however, it may not be completely receptor mediated, as the TrkB levels were not restored. BDNF completely revived ChAT expression. It may inhibit apoptosis by restoring Ca2+ homeostasis, since caspase-3 and calbindin-D28K expression was back to normal. The organellar ultrastructural changes were only partially reversed. Our study provides evidence that BDNF supplementation ameliorates most but not all degenerative changes. The incomplete revival at the ultrastructural level signifies the requirement of factors other than BDNF for near-total protection of motor neurons, and, to an extent, it explains why only a partial success is achieved in clinical trials with BDNF in ALS patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Neuropsychiatric findings in Cushing syndrome and exogenous glucocorticoid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkman, Monica N

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the neuropsychiatric presentations elicited by spontaneous hypercortisolism and exogenous supraphysiologic glucocorticoids. Patients with Cushing disease and syndrome develop a depressive syndrome: irritable and depressed mood, decreased libido, disrupted sleep and cognitive decrements. Exogenous short-term glucocorticoid administration may elicit a hypomanic syndrome with mood, sleep and cognitive disruptions. Treatment options are discussed. Brain imaging and neuropsychological studies indicate elevated cortisol and other glucocorticoids are especially deleterious to hippocampus and frontal lobe. The research findings also shed light on neuropsychiatric abnormalities in conditions that have substantial subgroups exhibiting elevated and dysregulated cortisol: aging, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Complex patterns of synchrony in networks undergoing exogenous drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Jack; Zochowski, Michal

    2007-03-01

    It has been established that various exogenous oscillatory drives modulate neural activity (and potentially information processing) in the brain. We explore the effect of an exogenous drive on the spatio-temporal pattern formation of a network of coupled non-identical R"ossler oscillators. We investigate the formation and properties of the phase locked states, dependent on the network properties as well as those of the external drive. We have found that such drive has a complex effect on the pattern formation in the network, depending on the coupling strength between the oscillators, drive strength as well as its frequency relative to the oscillators.

  13. Differentiation of stem cells upon deprivation of exogenous FGF2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Gabrielsen, Anette; Reda, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Establishing a model for in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) towards the germ cell lineage could be used to identify molecular mechanisms behind germ cell differentiation that may help in understanding human infertility. Here, we evaluate whether a lack of exogenous...... fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is supporting spontaneous differentiation of hESCs cultured on human foreskin fibroblast (hFF) monolayers towards germ cell lineage. Additionally to depriving the hESCs of exogenous FGF2, cells were stimulated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). To get a more comprehensive...

  14. Restriction-modification mediated barriers to exogenous DNA uptake and incorporation employed by Prevotella intermedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Johnston

    Full Text Available Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontal pathogen, is increasingly implicated in human respiratory tract and cystic fibrosis lung infections. Nevertheless, the specific mechanisms employed by this pathogen remain only partially characterized and poorly understood, largely due to its total lack of genetic accessibility. Here, using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT genome and methylome sequencing, bisulfite sequencing, in addition to cloning and restriction analysis, we define the specific genetic barriers to exogenous DNA present in two of the most widespread laboratory strains, P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and P. intermedia Strain 17. We identified and characterized multiple restriction-modification (R-M systems, some of which are considerably divergent between the two strains. We propose that these R-M systems are the root cause of the P. intermedia transformation barrier. Additionally, we note the presence of conserved Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR systems in both strains, which could provide a further barrier to exogenous DNA uptake and incorporation. This work will provide a valuable resource during the development of a genetic system for P. intermedia, which will be required for fundamental investigation of this organism's physiology, metabolism, and pathogenesis in human disease.

  15. Rhythmical changes of a level nitric oxide (NO in roots etiolated seedlings of pea (Pisum sativum L. and influence of exogenous calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Glyan’ko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studied time dynamics (during 60 mines a level oxide nitric (NO in cross cuts of roots 2 – day etiolated seedlings of pea sowing (Pisum sativum L. by use of fluorescent probe DAF-2DA and a fluorescent microscope depending on action exogenous calcium (Ca2+. During an exposition of seedlings on water, solution CaCl2 are shown fluctuation in level NO in roots – his increase and decrease that testifies to the certain rhythm in generation NO. Exogenous factors (Ca2+ change time dynamics of level NO in comparison with variant “water”. Ca2+chelate EGTA removes action exogenous calcium on rhythmical change of a level NO in roots. Results are discussed in aspect of close interference of signaling systems and molecules (Ca2+, NO, Н2О2.

  16. Human ciliary neurotrophic factor-overexpressing stable bone marrow stromal cells in the treatment of a rat model of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Hojjat-Allah; Tiraihi, Taki; Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Delshad, Ali Reza; Sadeghizade, Majid; Taheri, Taher

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system (CNS) often causes motor dysfunctions. However, because of the CNS complexity and variability in the clinical presentations, efforts to repair damaged CNS tissue and restoring its functions are particularly demanding. On the other hand, recent progress in the regenerative therapy field have led to novel approaches for the treatment of traumatic CNS injury and renewed hopes to overcome the obstacles. It appears that the balance between neurite re-growth-inhibiting and neurite re-growth-inducing molecules determines the axonal re-growth fate. Neurotrophic factors can tilt this balance and indeed promote cell survival and axonal re-growth over neurodegeneration. One of the promising neurotrophic factors in this field is ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). We transfected rat bone marrow stromal cells with a mammalian expression vector-inserted human CNTF gene through the use of a non-viral method to prepare human CNTF-overexpressing stem cells under ex vivo conditions. We transplanted these modified cells to the rat model of spinal cord traumatic injury to explore functional recovery after contusion induction. Our data from immunocytochemistry and behavioral tests showed that such cells can act as a powerful potential approach to treat traumatic CNS injuries because these modified cells improved the behavioral test scores in the rat model of spinal cord injury. CNTF-overexpressing bone marrow stromal cells can ameliorate spinal cord traumatic injury and can be used in the treatment of traumatic CNS injuries in the near future. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurotrophic effects of a cyanine dye via the PI3K-Akt pathway: attenuation of motor discoordination and neurodegeneration in an ataxic animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Ohta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurotrophic factors may be future therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disease. In the screening of biologically active molecules for neurotrophic potency, we found that a photosensitizing cyanine dye, NK-4, had remarkable neurotrophic activities and was a potent radical scavenger. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we evaluated the effect of NK-4 on the protection of neurons against oxidative damage and investigated the associated intracellular signaling pathways. Subsequently, we evaluated the effect of NK-4 in an animal model of neurodegeneration. In vitro, NK-4 showed dose-dependent protection of PC12 cells from toxicity induced by oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. Comparison of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways between treatment with NK-4 and nerve growth factor (NGF using K252a, an inhibitor of the NGF receptor TrkA, revealed that NK-4 activity occurs independently of NGF receptors. LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor, blocked the protective effect of NK-4, and NK-4 caused activation of Akt/protein kinase B, a downstream effector of PI3K. These results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of NK-4 are mediated by the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. NK-4 treatment also attenuated stress-induced activation of SAPK/JNK, which suggests that NK-4 activates a survival signaling pathway and inhibits stress-activated apoptotic pathways independently of the TrkA receptor in neuronal cells. In vivo, administration of NK-4 improved motor coordination in genetic ataxic hamsters, as assessed by rota-rod testing. Histological analysis showed that cerebellar atrophy was significantly attenuated by NK-4 treatment. Notably, the Purkinje cell count in the treated group was threefold higher than that in the vehicle group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that NK-4 is a potential agent for therapy for neurodegenerative

  18. Reduced serum levels of oestradiol and brain derived neurotrophic factor in both diabetic women and HFD-feeding female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Shan-Wen; Khandekar, Neeta; Tong, Shi-Fei; Yang, He-Qin; Wang, Wan-Ru; Huang, Xu-Feng; Song, Zhi-Yuan; Lin, Shu

    2017-04-01

    The estrogen levels in the pre and post menstrual phases interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor in a complex manner, which influences the overall state of the body. To study the role of oestradiol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in modulating obesity related type 2 diabetes and the interactions between two factors, we enrolled 15 diabetic premenopausal women and 15 diabetic postmenopausal women respectively, the same number of healthy pre and postmenopausal women were recruited as two control groups. The fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipids, estrogen, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were measured through clinical tests. Additionally, we set up obese female mouse model to mimic human trial stated above, to verify the relationship between estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Our findings revealed that there is a moderately positive correlation between brain-derived neurotrophic factor and oestradiol in females, and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor may worsen impaired insulin function. The results further confirmed that high fat diet-fed mice which exhibited impaired glucose tolerance, showed lower levels of oestradiol and decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in the ventromedial hypothalamus. The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduced on condition that the level of oestradiol is sufficiently low, such as women in postmenopausal period, which aggravates diabetes through feeding-related pathways. Increasing the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor may help to alleviate the progression of the disease in postmenopausal women with diabetes.

  19. Scleral contact lens management of bilateral exposure and neurotrophic keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Fiona; Carley, Fiona; Biswas, Susmito; Tromans, Cindy

    2012-12-01

    We report an interesting case of therapeutic scleral lens management of bilateral exposure and neurotrophic keratopathy resulting from bilateral cranial nerve (CN) palsies including V, VI and VII, which caused lagophthalmos and anaesthetic corneas. Subsequent development of severe exposure keratitis with vascularisation and keratinisation of the inferior cornea was previously treated with intensive ocular lubrication, botulinum toxin injections to the upper eyelid levator muscle, temporary tarsorrhophies, bilateral amniotic membrane grafts, punctal plugs, lid taping, gold eyelid weights and soft bandage contact lenses. Corneal integrity was re-established but visual acuity remained significantly compromised by corneal vascularisation, scarring and keratin deposits. Visions on presentation to the contact lens department were R 1.90 logMAR, L 1.86 logMAR. Therapeutic, high Dk, non-fenestrated, saline filled, scleral lenses were fitted. Daily wear of these lenses have protected and hydrated the cornea, enabling corneal surface recovery whilst retaining visual and social function. The visual acuities 6 months post-scleral fitting with lenses in situ are R 0.90 logMAR and L logMAR 0.70. Copyright © 2012 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Congenital Corneal Anesthesia and Neurotrophic Keratitis: Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Mantelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic keratitis (NK is a rare degenerative disease of the cornea caused by an impairment of corneal sensory innervation, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensitivity resulting in epithelial keratopathy, ulceration, and perforation. The aetiopathogenesis of corneal sensory innervation impairment in children recognizes the same range of causes as adults, although they are much less frequent in the pediatric population. Some extremely rare congenital diseases could be considered in the aetiopathogenesis of NK in children. Congenital corneal anesthesia is an extremely rare condition that carries considerable diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Typically the onset is up to 3 years of age and the cornea may be affected in isolation or the sensory deficit may exist as a component of a congenital syndrome, or it may be associated with systemic somatic anomalies. Accurate diagnosis and recognition of risk factors is important for lessening long-term sequelae of this condition. Treatment should include frequent topical lubrication and bandage corneal or scleral contact lenses. Surgery may be needed in refractory cases. The purpose of this review is to summarize and update data available on congenital causes and treatment of corneal hypo/anesthesia and, in turn, on congenital NK.

  1. S100B protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruisong; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Zhihong; Wu, Kun

    2011-01-01

    Human milk contains a wide variety of nutrients that contribute to the fulfillment of its functions, which include the regulation of newborn development. However, few studies have investigated the concentrations of S100B protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in human milk. The associations of the concentrations of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF with maternal factors are not well explored. To investigate the concentrations of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF in human milk and characterize the maternal factors associated with their levels in human milk, human milk samples were collected at days 3, 10, 30, and 90 after parturition. Levels of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF, and their mRNAs in the samples were detected. Then, these concentrations were compared with lactation and other maternal factors. S100B protein levels in human milk samples collected at 3, 10, 30, and 90 d after parturition were 1249.79±398.10, 1345.05±539.16, 1481.83±573.30, and 1414.39±621.31 ng/L, respectively. On the other hand, the BDNF concentrations in human milk samples were 10.99±4.55, 13.01±5.88, 13.35±6.43, and 2.83±5.47 µg/L, while those of GDNF were 10.90±1.65, 11.38±1., 11.29±3.10, and 11.40±2.21 g/L for the same time periods. Maternal post-pregnancy body mass index was positively associated with S100B levels in human milk (r = 0.335, P = 0.030milk. S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF are present in all samples of human milk, and they may be responsible for the long term effects of breast feeding.

  2. Nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and the chronobiology of mood: a new insight into the "neurotrophic hypothesis"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirassa P

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Paola Tirassa,1 Adele Quartini,2 Angela Iannitelli2–4 1National Research Council (CNR, Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology (IBCN, 2Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine – "Sapienza" University of Rome, 3Italian Psychoanalytical Society (SPI, Rome, Italy; 4International Psychoanalytical Association (IPA, London, UKAbstract: The light information pathways and their relationship with the body rhythms have generated a new insight into the neurobiology and the neurobehavioral sciences, as well as into the clinical approaches to human diseases associated with disruption of circadian cycles. Light-based strategies and/or drugs acting on the circadian rhythms have widely been used in psychiatric patients characterized by mood-related disorders, but the timing and dosage use of the various treatments, although based on international guidelines, are mainly dependent on the psychiatric experiences. Further, many efforts have been made to identify biomarkers able to disclose the circadian-related aspect of diseases, and therefore serve as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic tools in clinic to assess the different mood-related symptoms, including pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, loss of interest or pleasure, appetite, psychomotor changes, and cognitive impairments. Among the endogenous factors suggested to be involved in mood regulation, the neurotrophins, nerve growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor show anatomical and functional link with the circadian system and mediate some of light-induced effects in brain. In addition, in humans, both nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have showed a daily rhythm, which correlate with the morningness–eveningness dimensions, and are influenced by light, suggesting their potential role as biomarkers for chronotypes and/or chronotherapy. The evidences of the relationship between the diverse mood-related disorders

  3. Opposite effects of a high-fat diet and calorie restriction on ciliary neurotrophic factor signalling in the mouse hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilenia eSeveri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the mouse hypothalamus, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is mainly expressed by ependymal cells and tanycytes of the ependymal layer covering the third ventricle. Since exogenously administered CNTF causes reduced food intake and weight loss, we tested whether endogenous CNTF might be involved in energy balance regulation. We thus evaluated CNTF production and responsiveness in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD, of ob/ob obese mice, and of mice fed a calorie restriction (CR regimen. RT-PCR showed that CNTF mRNA increased significantly in HFD mice and decreased significantly in CR animals. Western blotting confirmed that CNTF expression was higher in HFD mice and reduced in CR mice, but high interindividual variability blunted the significance of these differences. By immunohistochemistry, hypothalamic tuberal and mammillary region tanycytes stained strongly for CNTF in HFD mice, whereas CR mice exhibited markedly reduced staining. RT-PCR and Western blotting disclosed that changes in CNTF expression were paralleled by changes in the expression of its specific receptor, CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα. Injection of recombinant CNTF and detection of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (P-STAT3 showed that CNTF responsiveness by the ependymal layer, mainly by tanycytes, was higher in HFD than CR mice. In addition, in HFD mice CNTF administration induced distinctive STAT3 signalling in a large neuron population located in the dorsomedial and ventromedial nuclei, perifornical area and mammillary body. The hypothalamic expression of CNTF and CNTFRα did not change in the hyperphagic, leptin-deficient ob/ob obese mice; accordingly, P-STAT3 immunoreactivity in CNTF-treated ob/ob mice was confined to ependymal layer and arcuate neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that hypothalamic CNTF is involved in controlling the energy balance and that CNTF signalling plays a role in HFD obese mice at specific sites.

  4. Activation of transcription factors STAT1 and STAT5 in the mouse median eminence after systemic ciliary neurotrophic factor administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severi, Ilenia; Senzacqua, Martina; Mondini, Eleonora; Fazioli, Francesca; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2015-10-05

    Exogenously administered ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) causes weight loss in obese rodents and humans through leptin-like activation of the Jak-STAT3 signaling pathway in hypothalamic arcuate neurons. Here we report for the first time that 40min after acute systemic treatment, rat recombinant CNTF (intraperitoneal injection of 0.3mg/kg of body weight) induced nuclear translocation of the tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of STAT1 and STAT5 in the mouse median eminence and other circumventricular organs, including the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis and the subfornical organ. In the tuberal hypothalamus of treated mice, specific nuclear immunostaining for phospo-STAT1 and phospho-STAT5 was detected in ependymal cells bordering the third ventricle floor and lateral recesses, and in median eminence cells. Co-localization studies documented STAT1 and STAT5 activation in median eminence β-tanycytes and underlying radial glia-like cells. A few astrocytes in the arcuate nucleus responded to CNTF by STAT5 activation. The vast majority of median eminence tanycytes and radial glia-like cells showing phospho-STAT1 and phospho-STAT5 immunoreactivity were also positive for phospho-STAT3. In contrast, STAT3 was the sole STAT isoform activated by CNTF in arcuate nucleus and median eminence neurons. Finally, immunohistochemical evaluation of STAT activation 20, 40, 80, and 120min from the injection demonstrated that cell activation was accompanied by c-Fos expression. Collectively, our findings show that CNTF activates STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 in vivo. The distinctive activation pattern of these STAT isoforms in the median eminence may disclose novel targets and pathways through which CNTF regulates food intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Adult ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors help maintain facial motor neuron choline acetyltransferase expression in vivo following nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Rydyznski, Carolyn E; Rasch, Matthew S; Trinh, Dennis S; MacLennan, A John

    2017-04-01

    Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration promotes the survival of motor neurons in a wide range of models. It also increases the expression of the critical neurotransmitter enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by in vitro motor neurons, likely independent of its effects on their survival. We have used the adult mouse facial nerve crush model and adult-onset conditional disruption of the CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene to directly examine the in vivo roles played by endogenous CNTF receptors in adult motor neuron survival and ChAT maintenance, independent of developmental functions. We have previously shown that adult activation of the CreER gene construct in floxed CNTFRα mice depletes this essential receptor subunit in a large subset of motor neurons (and all skeletal muscle, as shown in this study) but has no effect on the survival of intact or lesioned motor neurons, indicating that these adult CNTF receptors play no essential survival role in this model, in contrast to their essential role during embryonic development. Here we show that this same CNTFRα depletion does not affect ChAT labeling in nonlesioned motor neurons, but it significantly increases the loss of ChAT following nerve crush. The data suggest that, although neither motor neuron nor muscle CNTF receptors play a significant, nonredundant role in the maintenance of ChAT in intact adult motor neurons, the receptors become essential for ChAT maintenance when the motor neurons are challenged by nerve crush. Therefore, the data suggest that the receptors act as a critical component of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1206-1215, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Di, Guohu; Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Yao; Qi, Xia; Duan, Haoyun; Xie, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a well-known neuroprotective cytokine, has been found to play an important role in neurogenesis and functional regulations of neural stem cells. As one of the most innervated tissue, however, the role of CNTF in cornea epithelium remains unclear. This study was to explore the roles and mechanisms of CNTF in the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and wound healing of both normal and diabetic mouse corneal epithelium. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of corneal epithelium, the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing were promoted by exogenous CNTF application, while delayed by CNTF neutralizing antibody. In cultured corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, CNTF enhanced the colony-forming efficiency, stimulated the mitogenic proliferation, and upregulated the expression levels of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell-associated transcription factors. Furthermore, the promotion of CNTF on the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing was mediated by the activation of STAT3. Moreover, in diabetic mice, the content of CNTF in corneal epithelium decreased significantly when compared with that of normal mice, and the supplement of CNTF promoted the diabetic corneal epithelial wound healing, accompanied with the advanced activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the regeneration of corneal nerve fibers. Thus, the capability of expanding corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and promoting corneal epithelial wound healing and nerve regeneration indicates the potential application of CNTF in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency and treating diabetic keratopathy. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Effects of exogenous amines on reproduction in female Angora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of exogenous amines on reproduction in female Angora goats 1,2. T.D.A. Forbes,* D.R. Tolleson and C.M. .... or pulsatile LH secretion may cause infertility (Randel, 1990;. Short et ai., 1990). The combination of poor ..... Bioi. Reprod. 29, 11. RANDEL, R.D., 1990. Nutrition and postpartum rebreeding in cattle. J. Anim.

  8. The use of exogenous microbial species to enhance the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The objective of this study was to determine whether inoculating a hybrid fixed-film bioreactor with exogenous bacterial and diatoma species would increase the removal of chemical oxygen demand, nitrogenous compounds and suspended solids from a real-time coal gasification wastewater to meet ...

  9. Effects of whey, molasses and exogenous enzymes on the ensiling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to assess the effects of whey, molasses and exogenous enzymes on fermentation, aerobic stability and nutrient composition of ensiled maize cobs. Five treatments were ensiled in 1.5 L anaerobic glass jars over 32 days, namely i) control (maize cobs without additives (CON); ii) maize cobs with ...

  10. Exogenous ethylene inhibits sprout growth in onion bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufler, Gebhard

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Exogenous ethylene has recently gained commercial interest as a sprouting inhibitor of onion bulbs. The role of ethylene in dormancy and sprouting of onions, however, is not known. Methods A cultivar (Allium cepa ‘Copra’) with a true period of dormancy was used. Dormant and sprouting states of onion bulbs were treated with supposedly saturating doses of ethylene or with the ethylene-action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP). Initial sprouting was determined during storage at 18 °C by monitoring leaf blade elongation in a specific size class of leaf sheaths. Changes in ATP content and sucrose synthase activity in the sprout leaves, indicators of the sprouting state, were determined. CO2 and ethylene production of onion bulbs during storage were recorded. Key results Exogenous ethylene suppressed sprout growth of both dormant and already sprouting onion bulbs by inhibiting leaf blade elongation. In contrast to this growth-inhibiting effect, ethylene stimulated CO2 production by the bulbs about 2-fold. The duration of dormancy was not significantly affected by exogenous ethylene. However, treatment of dormant bulbs with 1-MCP caused premature sprouting. Conclusions Exogenous ethylene proved to be a powerful inhibitor of sprout growth in onion bulbs. The dormancy breaking effect of 1-MCP indicates a regulatory role of endogenous ethylene in onion bulb dormancy. PMID:18940850

  11. Enhanced antioxidant defense after exogenous application of Ca 2+ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both of these nutrients play an important role in ameliorating drought stress in crop plants. This experiment was designed to study whether exogenous application of Ca2+ and K+ before the drought could enhance the potential of plants to survive under limiting water conditions. Brassica napus L. cv Bulbul-98 seedlings ...

  12. Effects of exogenous amines on reproduction in female Angora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 JournalPaper TA30056,Texas Agric. Exp. 5ta. 2 This research is a contribution to Western Regional Research. ProjectW-112, ReproductivePerformancein DomesticRuminants. Dailey, 1982), and heifers (Hardin & Randel, 1983) given exogenous GnRH, and to alter progesterone production by bovine corpora lutea in vitro ...

  13. The Effects of Exogenous Melatonin on Sperm Characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Effects of Exogenous Melatonin on Sperm Characteristics of West African Dwarf Goat Bucks. ... As a result, melatonin had a positive effect on reproductive status of WADG as shown by significant higher testicular development, testosterone and sperm quality. However the effect of melatonin was more pronounced in the ...

  14. Effect of exogenous gibberellic acid on germination, seedling growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The exogenous application of gibberellin increased germination percentage and improved length and fresh weight of roots and shoots under salt treatment. It also increased both acid phosphatase and phytase activities in roots under this constraint. The application of gibberellic acid compensated for the negative effect of ...

  15. Do Endogenous and Exogenous Action Control Compete for Perception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Roland; Heinemann, Alexander; Kiesel, Andrea; Thomaschke, Roland; Janczyk, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Human actions are guided either by endogenous action plans or by external stimuli in the environment. These two types of action control seem to be mediated by neurophysiologically and functionally distinct systems that interfere if an endogenously planned action suddenly has to be performed in response to an exogenous stimulus. In this case, the…

  16. Utilization of exogenous siderophores and natural catechols by Listeria monocytogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, N.; Coulanges, V; Andre, P.; Vidon, D J

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes does not produce siderophores for iron acquisition. We demonstrate that a number of microbial siderophores and natural iron-binding compounds are able to promote the growth of iron-starved L. monocytogenes. We suggest that the ability of L. monocytogenes to use a variety of exogenous siderophores and natural catechols accounts for its ubiquitous character.

  17. Exogenous cycilc AMP and cycilc GMP influence the metabolism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Exogenous cycilc AMP and cycilc GMP influence the metabolism of traces of tritium-labeled glycerol in rabbits. Yongfeng Liu, Linsen Zan*, Fang Wei, Dengke Liu, Yaping Xin and Wanqiang Tian. College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, 712100, Republic ...

  18. Metabolic response to exogenous ethanol in yeast: An in vivo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we applied this approach to evaluate the effects of increasing concentration of exogenous ethanol on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentative metabolism. We show that the STOCSY analysis correctly identifies the different types of correlations among the enriched metabolites involved in the fermentation, ...

  19. Effect of exogenous application of salicylic acid on proline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, during the exogenously applied SA to salt stress, proline metabolism was significantly altered and the extent of alteration varied between the SA and salt stress, leading to the maintenance of the turgor by accumulating higher levels of free proline accumulation in C. recutita, supporting its protection from salt ...

  20. Entrainment of Goodwin’s oscillators by periodic exogenous signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proskurnikov, Anton; Cao, Ming; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2015-01-01

    The circadian pacemakers, which have been discovered in most of living organisms, are known to be entrainable by the environmental exogenuous cues, or zeitgebers (“time givers”). If the influence of an exogenous periodic excitation is sufficiently long, the internal circadian “clock” adjusts the

  1. Alleviating effect of exogenous nitric oxide in cucumber seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study indicated that exogenous NO at 1.0 mmoll-1 SNP enhanced chilling stress tolerance. In comparison with cvZND 461, cvZND407 had higher tolerance ability to chilling stress. Key words: Antioxidative enzymes, chilling stress, cucumber, nitric oxide (NO) osmotic adjustment; reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  2. The analgesic effects of exogenous melatonin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst

    2016-10-01

    The hormone, melatonin is produced with circadian rhythm by the pineal gland in humans. The melatonin rhythm provides an endogenous synchronizer, modulating e.g. blood pressure, body temperature, cortisol rhythm, sleep-awake-cycle, immune function and anti-oxidative defence. Interestingly, a number of experimental animal studies demonstrate significant dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects of exogenous melatonin. Similarly, recent experimental- and clinical studies in humans indicate significant analgesic effects. In study I, we systematically reviewed all randomized studies investigating clinical effects of perioperative melatonin. Meta-analyses demonstrated significant analgesic and anxiolytic effects of melatonin in surgical patients, equating reductions of 20 mm and 19 mm, respectively on a VAS, compared with placebo. Profound heterogeneity between the included studies was, however, present. In study II, we aimed to investigate the analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of exogenous melatonin in a validated human inflammatory pain model, the human burn model. The study was performed as a randomized, double blind placebo-controlled crossover study. Primary outcomes were pain during the burn injury and areas of secondary hyperalgesia. No significant effects of exogenous melatonin were observed with respect to primary or secondary outcomes, compared to placebo. Study III and IV estimated the pharmacokinetic variables of exogenous melatonin. Oral melatonin demonstrated a t max value of 41 minutes. Bioavailability of oral melatonin was only 3%. Elimination t 1/2 were approximately 45 minutes following both oral and intravenous administration, respectively. High-dose intravenous melatonin was not associated with increased sedation, in terms of simple reaction times, compared to placebo. Similarly, no other adverse effects were reported. In Study V, we aimed to re-analyse data obtained from a randomized analgesic drug trial by a selection of

  3. [Neurotrophic factors and their role in the pathogenesis of affective disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filuś, Jakub F; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2005-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are a group of proteins with a similar structure (The regulation of neuronal plasticity and neuron protection are some of their biological functions). The group of neurotrophic factors consists of: growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin 4/5 (NT-4/5). BDNF is the most important neurotrophin from the affective disorders point of view. Preclinical and clinical studies of altered BDNF expression during chronic stress and increased BDNF activity during antidepressant treatment, confirm the role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of depression. Studies on animal models point to the antidepressant effect of BDNF, similar to long-term antidepressant treatment. The intracellular mechanisms mediated by this neurotrophic factor are connected with signal transduction pathways in cells (mainly mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate cascade). The BDNF serum level studies suggest a correlation between the BDNF expression in the central nervous system and its serum levels, what could make BDNF levels specific markers of depression. The molecular genetic studies focus on associations between BDNF gene polymorphisms and bipolar disorder or cognitive functioning disturbances. The novel pathogenetic theories of depression based on neuronal plasticity (Duman et al.) and disturbances in neurogenesis (Kempermann and Kronenberg) can be a kind of recapitulation of research on the role of neurotrophins in depression. However many issues related to the role of neurotrophic factors in affective disorders are still unclear and determine areas of future scientific interests in this field.

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor regulation of adult forebrain neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Batt, Myra K; Cronier, Brigitte A; Jackson, Michele C; Bruno Garza, Jennifer L; Trinh, Dennis S; Mason, Carter O; Spearry, Rachel P; Bhattacharya, Shayon; Robitz, Rachel; Nakafuku, Masato; MacLennan, A John

    2013-01-16

    Appropriately targeted manipulation of endogenous neural stem progenitor (NSP) cells may contribute to therapies for trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. A prerequisite to such therapies is a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adult NSP cells in vivo. Indirect data suggest that endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor signaling may inhibit neuronal differentiation of NSP cells. We challenged subventricular zone (SVZ) cells in vivo with low concentrations of CNTF to anatomically characterize cells containing functional CNTF receptors. We found that type B "stem" cells are highly responsive, whereas type C "transit-amplifying" cells and type A neuroblasts are remarkably unresponsive, as are GFAP(+) astrocytes found outside the SVZ. CNTF was identified in a subset of type B cells that label with acute BrdU administration. Disruption of in vivo CNTF receptor signaling in SVZ NSP cells, with a "floxed" CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) mouse line and a gene construct driving Cre recombinase (Cre) expression in NSP cells, led to increases in SVZ-associated neuroblasts and new olfactory bulb neurons, as well as a neuron subtype-specific, adult-onset increase in olfactory bulb neuron populations. Adult-onset receptor disruption in SVZ NSP cells with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV-Cre) also led to increased neurogenesis. However, the maintenance of type B cell populations was apparently unaffected by the receptor disruption. Together, the data suggest that endogenous CNTF receptor signaling in type B stem cells inhibits adult neurogenesis, and further suggest that the regulation may occur in a neuron subtype-specific manner.

  5. Oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases: a neurotrophic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinet, Carme; Gonzalo, Hugo; Fleitas, Catherine; Menal, Maria Jose; Egea, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophins are important neurotrophic factors involved in the survival, differentiation and function of a wide variety of neuron populations. A common feature for most neurotrophins is that they are synthesized as precursor proteins (pro-neurotrophins) that upon being processed by proteolysis render the mature active form responsible for most of their trophic functions. However, some of the pro-neurotrophin form of these proteins, such as the precursor form of NGF (pro-NGF), have been shown to induce opposite effects and trigger apoptosis on neurons through the p75NTR receptor. This suggests that the balance between the levels of proneurotrophin and neurotrophin must be tightly controlled. In this context, it has been shown that in conditions of oxidative stress due for instance to aging or the development of some neurodegenerative disease, neurotrophins are oxidatively modified at least by advanced glycation/lipoxidation end products (AGE/ALEs) which makes pro-NGF refractary to be processed. The lack of maturation and the imbalance in favor of the precursor form may change the pattern of active signaling pathways towards cell death, thus exacerbating the deleterious alterations, for instance during the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Besides that, AGE/ALEs also induce the processing of the pro-NGF receptor p75NTR by α- secretase which is followed by the processing by γ -secretase and the release of the intracellular domain of p75NTR (p75NTRICD). Once cleaved, p75NTRICD recruits two intracellular interactors, NRIF and TRAF6, which allows NRIF phosphorylation by JNK. The phosphorylated form of NRIF then translocates to the nucleus and induces the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins. In this chapter we will summarize the mechanisms by which ROS- induce protein modifications, which proteins are susceptible to be modified, how these modifications affect function and signaling and, finally, how they can be related to neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Effect of neurotrophic factor, MDP, on rats’ nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Fornazari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine the immune-modulating effects of the neurotrophic factor N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP on median nerve regeneration in rats. We used male Wistar rats (120-140 days of age, weighing 250-332 g and compared the results of three different techniques of nerve repair: 1 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures alone (group S - 10 rats, 2 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures plus fibrin tissue adhesive (FTA; group SF - 20 rats, and 3 sutures plus FTA, with MDP added to the FTA (group SFM - 20 rats. Functional assessments using the grasp test were performed weekly for 12 weeks to identify recovery of flexor muscle function in the fingers secondary to median nerve regeneration. Histological analysis was also utilized. The total number and diameter of myelinated fibers were determined in each proximal and distal nerve segment. Two indices, reported as percentage, were calculated from these parameters, namely, the regeneration index and the diameter change index. By the 8th week, superiority of group SFM over group S became apparent in the grasping test (P = 0.005. By the 12th week, rats that had received MDP were superior in the grasping test compared to both group S (P < 0.001 and group SF (P = 0.001. Moreover, group SF was better in the grasping test than group S (P = 0.014. However, no significant differences between groups were identified by histological analysis. In the present study, rats that had received MDP obtained better function, in the absence of any significant histological differences.

  7. Low concentration of exogenous carbon monoxide protects mammalian cells against proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Liping [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Bao, Lingzhi; Wu, Wenqing; Wang, Hongzhi [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, Wei, E-mail: hanw@hfcas.cn [Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We show the possibility of modulate proliferation induced by radiation-induced bystander effect with low concentration carbon monoxide. • Carbon monoxide inhibited proliferation via modulating the transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. • Exogenous carbon monoxide has potential application in clinical radiotherapy. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been proposed to have tight relationship with the irradiation-caused secondary cancers beyond the irradiation-treated area after radiotherapy. Our previous studies demonstrated a protective effect of low concentration carbon monoxide (CO) on the genotoxicity of RIBE after α-particle irradiation. In the present work, a significant inhibitory effect of low-dose exogenous CO, generated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer [CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2)], on both RIBE-induced proliferation and chromosome aberration was observed. Further studies on the mechanism revealed that the transforming growth factor β1/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, which mediated RIBE signaling transduction, could be modulated by CO involved in the protective effects. Considering the potential of exogenous CO in clinical applications and its protective effect on RIBE, the present work aims to provide a foundation for potential application of CO in radiotherapy.

  8. Fructose and Sucrose Intake Increase Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation during Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommelen, Jorn; Fuchs, Cas J.; Beelen, Milou; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Jeukendrup, Asker E.; Cermak, Naomi M.; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Peak exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates typically reach ~1 g·min−1 during exercise when ample glucose or glucose polymers are ingested. Fructose co-ingestion has been shown to further increase exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of fructose co-ingestion provided either as a monosaccharide or as part of the disaccharide sucrose on exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates during prolonged exercise in trained cyclists. Ten trained male cyclists (VO2peak: 65 ± 2 mL·kg−1·min−1) cycled on four different occasions for 180 min at 50% Wmax during which they consumed a carbohydrate solution providing 1.8 g·min−1 of glucose (GLU), 1.2 g·min−1 glucose + 0.6 g·min−1 fructose (GLU + FRU), 0.6 g·min−1 glucose + 1.2 g·min−1 sucrose (GLU + SUC), or water (WAT). Peak exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates did not differ between GLU + FRU and GLU + SUC (1.40 ± 0.06 vs. 1.29 ± 0.07 g·min−1, respectively, p = 0.999), but were 46% ± 8% higher when compared to GLU (0.96 ± 0.06 g·min−1: p < 0.05). In line, exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates during the latter 120 min of exercise were 46% ± 8% higher in GLU + FRU or GLU + SUC compared with GLU (1.19 ± 0.12, 1.13 ± 0.21, and 0.82 ± 0.16 g·min−1, respectively, p < 0.05). We conclude that fructose co-ingestion (0.6 g·min−1) with glucose (1.2 g·min−1) provided either as a monosaccharide or as sucrose strongly increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates during prolonged exercise in trained cyclists. PMID:28230742

  9. Actions of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Glucocorticoid Stress in Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Numakawa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Altered neurogenesis is suggested to be involved in the onset of brain diseases, including mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Neurotrophic factors are well known for their positive effects on the proliferation/differentiation of both embryonic and adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs. Especially, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been extensively investigated because of its roles in the differentiation/maturation of NSCs/NPCs. On the other hand, recent evidence indicates a negative impact of the stress hormone glucocorticoids (GCs on the cell fate of NSCs/NPCs, which is also related to the pathophysiology of brain diseases, such as depression and autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, studies including ours have demonstrated functional interactions between neurotrophic factors and GCs in neural events, including neurogenesis. In this review, we show and discuss relationships among the behaviors of NSCs/NPCs, BDNF, and GCs.

  10. [Biophysics of single molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdiuk, I N; Deriusheva, E I

    2011-01-01

    The modern methods of research of biological molecules whose application led to the development of a new field of science, biophysics of single molecules, are reviewed. The measurement of the characteristics of single molecules enables one to reveal their individual features, and it is just for this reason that much more information can be obtained from one molecule than from the entire ensample of molecules. The high sensitivity of the methods considered in detail makes it possible to come close to the solution of the basic problem of practical importance, namely, the determination of the nucleotide sequence of a single DNA molecule.

  11. Randomized trial of ciliary neurotrophic factor delivered by encapsulated cell intraocular implants for retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David G; Weleber, Richard G; Duncan, Jacque L; Jaffe, Glenn J; Tao, Weng

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and effect on visual function of ciliary neurotrophic factor delivered via an intraocular encapsulated cell implant for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Ciliary neurotrophic factor for late-stage retinitis pigmentosa study 3 (CNTF3; n = 65) and ciliary neurotrophic factor for early-stage retinitis pigmentosa study 4 (CNTF4; n = 68) were multicenter, sham-controlled dose-ranging studies. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a high- or low-dose implant in 1 eye and sham surgery in the fellow eye. The primary endpoints were change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 12 months for CNTF3 and change in visual field sensitivity at 12 months for CNTF4. Patients had the choice of retaining or removing the implant at 12 months for CNTF3 and 24 months for CNTF4. There were no serious adverse events related to either the encapsulated cell implant or the surgical procedure. In CNTF3, there was no change in acuity in either ciliary neurotrophic factor- or sham-treated eyes at 1 year. In CNTF4, eyes treated with the high-dose implant showed a significant decrease in sensitivity while no change was seen in sham- and low dose-treated eyes at 12 months. The decrease in sensitivity was reversible upon implant removal. In both studies, ciliary neurotrophic factor treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in retinal thickness. Long-term intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor is achieved by the encapsulated cell implant. Neither study showed therapeutic benefit in the primary outcome variable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment with exogenous surfactant stimulates endogenous surfactant synthesis in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, JEH; Carnielli, VP; Janssen, DJ; Wattimena, JLD; Hop, WC; Sauer, PJ; Zimmermann, LJI

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with exogenous surfactant has greatly improved clinical outcome. Some infants require multiple doses, and it has not been studied whether these large amounts of exogenous surfactant disturb endogenous surfactant

  13. Analyzing Bullwhip Effect in Supply Networks under Exogenous Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Darvish

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains a model for analyzing and measuring the propagation of order amplifications (i.e. bullwhip effect for a single-product supply network topology considering exogenous uncertainty and linear and time-invariant inventory management policies for network entities. The stream of orders placed by each entity of the network is characterized assuming customer demand is ergodic. In fact, we propose an exact formula in order to measure the bullwhip effect in the addressed supply network topology considering the system in Markovian chain framework and presenting a matrix of network member relationships and relevant order sequences. The formula turns out using a mathematical method called frequency domain analysis. The major contribution of this paper is analyzing the bullwhip effect considering exogenous uncertainty in supply networks and using the Fourier transform in order to simplify the relevant calculations. We present a number of numerical examples to assess the analytical results accuracy in quantifying the bullwhip effect.

  14. Exogenous melatonin improves Malus resistance to Marssonina apple blotch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lihua; Wang, Ping; Li, Mingjun; Ke, Xiwang; Li, Cuiying; Liang, Dong; Wu, Shan; Ma, Xinli; Li, Chao; Zou, Yangjun; Ma, Fengwang

    2013-05-01

    We examined whether exogenously applied melatonin could improve resistance to Marssonina apple blotch (Diplocarpon mali) by apple [Malus prunifolia (Willd.) Borkh. cv. Donghongguo]. This serious disease leads to premature defoliation in the main regions of apple production. When plants were pretreated with melatonin, resistance was increased in the leaves. We investigated the potential roles for melatonin in modulating levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well the activities of antioxidant enzymes and pathogenesis-related proteins during these plant-pathogen interactions. Pretreatment enabled plants to maintain intracellular H2O2 concentrations at steady-state levels and enhance the activities of plant defence-related enzymes, possibly improving disease resistance. Because melatonin is safe and beneficial to animals and humans, exogenous pretreatment might represent a promising cultivation strategy to protect plants against this pathogen infection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Who Benefits from Transshipment? Exogenous vs. Endogenous Wholesale Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Lingxiu Dong; Nils Rudi

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies how transshipments affect manufacturers and retailers, considering both exogenous and endogenous wholesale prices. For a distribution system where a single manufacturer sells to multiple identical-cost retailers, we consider both the manufacturer being a price taker and the manufacturer being a price setter in a single-period setup under multivariate normal demand distribution. In the case of the manufacturer being a price taker, we provide several analytical results regard...

  16. Tenacity of exogenous human papillomavirus DNA in sperm washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossfield, J E; Chan, P J; Patton, W C; King, A

    1999-07-01

    Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm. Prewashed sperm were equally divided and sperm in one portion were exposed to L1 HPV DNA fragments for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Untreated washed sperm served as the control. After transfection, the sperm were washed by either centrifuge, two-layer Isolate colloid wash, or test-yolk buffer procedures. Sperm parameters were measured on a Hamilton Thorn HTM-C analyzer. Sperm DNA were extracted and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out targeting the L1 consensus gene of HPV and the designated sentinel gene, 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Amplified products were analyzed in 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. PCR analyses detected the consensus L1 HPV gene in sperm after they were processed through either of the three procedures. Controls were negative for the L1 gene. Extracted DNA were verified by PCR amplification of 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Transfected sperm had higher percentages of total motility and progression compared with the control. Centrifuged, washed, transfected sperm exhibited a greater curvilinear velocity and hyperactivation. The data showed that washing would not remove exogenous HPV DNA from sperm cells. The viral DNA was tenaciously bound to the sperm, suggesting an internalization into the sperm. The viral DNA also increased the motility of the sperm by affecting the velocity and progression of the sperm, which suggested either an increase in metabolism, an enhancement of the calcium-regulated motility mechanism, or an artifact of PCR reagents. More studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of DNA stimulated sperm motility.

  17. Exogenous antioxidants—Double-edged swords in cellular redox state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The balance between oxidation and antioxidation is believed to be critical in maintaining healthy biological systems. Under physiological conditions, the human antioxidative defense system including e.g., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (GSH) and others, allows the elimination of excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) including, among others superoxide anions (O2.-), hydroxyl radicals (OH.), alkoxyl radicals (RO.) and peroxyradicals (ROO.). However, our endogenous antioxidant defense systems are incomplete without exogenous originating reducing compounds such as vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids and polyphenols, playing an essential role in many antioxidant mechanisms in living organisms. Therefore, there is continuous demand for exogenous antioxidants in order to prevent oxidative stress, representing a disequilibrium redox state in favor of oxidation. However, high doses of isolated compounds may be toxic, owing to prooxidative effects at high concentrations or their potential to react with beneficial concentrations of ROS normally present at physiological conditions that are required for optimal cellular functioning. This review aims to examine the double-edged effects of dietary originating antioxidants with a focus on the most abundant compounds, especially polyphenols, vitamin C, vitamin E and carotenoids. Different approaches to enrich our body with exogenous antioxidants such as via synthetic antioxidants, diets rich in fruits and vegetables and taking supplements will be reviewed and experimental and epidemiological evidences discussed, highlighting that antioxidants at physiological doses are generally safe, exhibiting interesting health beneficial effects. PMID:20972369

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor in maternal plasma and umbilical cord blood from pre-eclamptic and physiological pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienertova-Vasku, J; Bienert, P; Zlamal, F; Splichal, Z; Tomandl, J; Tomandlova, M; Hodicka, Z; Ventruba, P; Vasku, A

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the circulating levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in maternal serum and umbilical cord blood from respective pregnancies in pre-eclampsia (PE) cases and a control cohort. A total of 12 pre-eclampsia cases and 34 healthy controls were enrolled and the maternal peripheral blood - umbilical cord blood duos, were examined for BDNF and CNTF levels. BNDF levels were significantly higher in umbilical cord blood from pre-eclamptic pregnancies; there was also significant difference between maternal plasma and umbilical cord blood levels of BDNF (p CNTF levels in umbilical cord blood (CNTF-UCB) were significantly higher in PE cases than in the controls (p = 0.03). Significant differences were observed in expression of BDNF and CNTF proteins in maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood between pre-eclampsia cases and healthy controls.

  19. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  20. Function of endothelium at adolescents with constitutional exogenous obesity before and after rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Miroshnichenko, O. (Olga)

    2011-01-01

    Function of endothelium at 43 adolescents with constitutional exogenous obesity before rehabilitation and at 33 healthy adolescents has been studied. Disorder of endothelial function has been established in 32 (74.4%) adolescents with constitutional exogenous obesity and in 7 (21.2%) healthy adolescents. We showed the efficiency of the rehabilitation program on restoration of endothelial function at adolescents with constitutional exogenous obesity.

  1. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem, E-mail: aesmaeili@sci.ui.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-15

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  2. [VEGF as an angiogenic, neurotrophic, and neuroprotective factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiecińska, Magdalena; Marciniak, Katarzyna; Nowak, Jerzy Z

    2005-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, occurring in several isoforms: VEGF-A, -B, -C, -D) is a well-known endothelial cell mitogen and vascular growth and permeability factor. Recent work done over the last few years has elucidated the important role of VEGF, which participates in the regulation of normal (physiological or therapeutic) and pathological angiogenesis (VEGF-A, VEGF-B) and lymphangiogenesis (VEGF-C, VEGF-D). VEGF has also been implicated in practically every stage of angiogenesis, yet its role in the initiation of new blood vessel creation appears to be the most important. In addition to its role as a key angiogenic factor, VEGF also possesses neurotrophic and neuroprotective activity both in the peripheral and in the central nervous system, exerting a direct action on neurons, Schwann cells, astrocytes, neural stem cells, and microglia. VEGF interacts with three subtypes of VEGF receptors occurring on the cellular membrane known as VEGFR-1 (Flt-1), VEGFR-2 (Flk-1/KDR), and VEGFR-3 (Flt-4). All these receptor types possess an internal tyrosin kinase domain. Interaction of VEGF with particular subtypes of receptors activates a circuit of signaling pathways, e.g. PI3K/Akt, Ras/Raf-MEK/Erk, eNOS/NO, and IP3/Ca2+. These participate in the generation of specific biological responses connected with proliferation, migration, increasing vascular permeability, or promoting endothelial cell survival. Recent findings from experiments performed on animals with experimentally evoked focal cerebral ischemia suggest that the neuroprotective activity of VEGF runs in parallel with its ability to promote neurogenesis and angiogenesis and that these effects may operate independently through multiple mechanisms. The above-mentioned three major features characterizing the neurobiological activity of VEGF, i.e. neuroprotection, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis, together with their possible functional link(s), provide the rationale for considering VEGF-based therapy as a

  3. β5 Integrin Up-Regulation in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Promotes Cell Motility in Human Chondrosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Te-Mao; Fong, Yi-Chin; Liu, Shan-Chi; Chen, Po-Chun; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis; it has a poor prognosis and shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a small-molecule protein from the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcomes of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on migration activity in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma tissues showed significant expression of BDNF, which was higher than that in normal cartilage and primary chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased the migration and expression of β5 integrin in human chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, knockdown of BDNF expression markedly inhibited migratory activity. BDNF-mediated migration and β5 integrin up-regulation were attenuated by antibody, inhibitor, or siRNA against the TrkB receptor. Pretreatment of chondrosarcoma cells with PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB inhibitors or mutants also abolished BDNF-promoted migration and integrin expression. The PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB signaling pathway was activated after BDNF treatment. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration of chondrosarcoma by increasing β5 integrin expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis. PMID:23874483

  4. β5 integrin up-regulation in brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes cell motility in human chondrosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yang Lin

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis; it has a poor prognosis and shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small-molecule protein from the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcomes of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on migration activity in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma tissues showed significant expression of BDNF, which was higher than that in normal cartilage and primary chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased the migration and expression of β5 integrin in human chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, knockdown of BDNF expression markedly inhibited migratory activity. BDNF-mediated migration and β5 integrin up-regulation were attenuated by antibody, inhibitor, or siRNA against the TrkB receptor. Pretreatment of chondrosarcoma cells with PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB inhibitors or mutants also abolished BDNF-promoted migration and integrin expression. The PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB signaling pathway was activated after BDNF treatment. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration of chondrosarcoma by increasing β5 integrin expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis.

  5. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in Individuals With Schizophrenia and Healthy Aging: Testing the Accelerated Aging Hypothesis of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhana; Mulsant, Benoit H; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Rajji, Tarek K

    2017-07-01

    Schizophrenia has been hypothesized to be a syndrome of accelerated aging. Brain plasticity is vulnerable to the normal aging process and affected in schizophrenia: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important neuroplasticity molecule. The present review explores the accelerated aging hypothesis of schizophrenia by comparing changes in BDNF expression in schizophrenia with aging-associated changes. Individuals with schizophrenia show patterns of increased overall mortality, metabolic abnormalities, and cognitive decline normally observed later in life in the healthy population. An overall decrease is observed in BDNF expression in schizophrenia compared to healthy controls and in older individuals compared to a younger cohort. There is a marked decrease in BDNF levels in the frontal regions and in the periphery among older individuals and those with schizophrenia; however, data for BDNF expression in the occipital, parietal, and temporal cortices and the hippocampus is inconclusive. Accelerated aging hypothesis is supported based on frontal regions and peripheral studies; however, further studies are needed in other brain regions.

  6. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Induces Decreased Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroprotection in the Diabetic Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Abu El-Asrar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-(BDNF- mediated neuroprotection is reduced by high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in diabetic retina, paired vitreous and serum samples from 46 proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 34 nondiabetic patients were assayed for BDNF, HMGB1, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and TBARS. We also examined retinas of diabetic and HMGB1 intravitreally injected rats. The effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced changes in retinal BDNF expressions was studied. Western blot, ELISA, and TBARS assays were used. BDNF was not detected in vitreous samples. BDNF levels were significantly lower in serum samples from diabetic patients compared with nondiabetics, whereas HMGB1, sRAGE, sICAM-1, and TBARS levels were significantly higher in diabetic serum samples. MCP-1 levels did not differ significantly. There was significant inverse correlation between serum levels of BDNF and HMGB1. Diabetes and intravitreal administration of HMGB1 induced significant upregulation of the expression of HMGB1, TBARS, and cleaved caspase-3, whereas the expression of BDNF and synaptophysin was significantly downregulated in rat retinas. Glycyrrhizin significantly attenuated diabetes-induced downregulation of BDNF. Our results suggest that HMGB1-induced downregulation of BDNF might be involved in pathogenesis of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration.

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in asthmatic children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    INTRODUCTION. The development and maintenance of asthma is thought to involve the nervous system and the immune system1. The regulatory network between the immunological events and the neuronal control of airway smooth muscle contractility remains to be defined2. Neurotrophins represent candidate molecules ...

  8. Exogenous stromal cell-derived factor-1 induces modest leukocyte recruitment in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Steven M; Andonegui, Graciela; Bonder, Claudine S; Liu, Lixin

    2008-06-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1; CXCL12), a CXC chemokine, has been found to be involved in inflammation models in vivo and in cell adhesion, migration, and chemotaxis in vitro. This study aimed to determine whether exogenous SDF-1 induces leukocyte recruitment in mice. After systemic administration of SDF-1alpha, expression of the adhesion molecules P-selectin and VCAM-1 in mice was measured using a quantitative dual-radiolabeled Ab assay and leukocyte recruitment in various tissues was evaluated using intravital microscopy. The effect of local SDF-1alpha on leukocyte recruitment was also determined in cremaster muscle and compared with the effect of the cytokine TNFalpha and the CXC chemokine keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC; CXCL1). Systemic administration of SDF-1alpha (10 microg, 4-5 h) induced upregulation of P-selectin, but not VCAM-1, in most tissues in mice. It caused modest leukocyte recruitment responses in microvasculature of cremaster muscle, intestine, and brain, i.e., an increase in flux of rolling leukocytes in cremaster muscle and intestines, leukocyte adhesion in all three tissues, and emigration in cremaster muscle. Local treatment with SDF-1alpha (1 microg, 4-5 h) reduced leukocyte rolling velocity and increased leukocyte adhesion and emigration in cremasteric venules, but the responses were much less profound than those elicited by KC or TNFalpha. SDF-1alpha-induced recruitment was dependent on endothelial P-selectin, but not P-selectin on platelets. We conclude that the exogenous SDF-1alpha enhances leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and induces modest and endothelial P-selectin-dependent leukocyte recruitment.

  9. EFFECT OF EXOGENOUS ABSCISIC ACID ON GROWTH AND BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE HALOPHYTE SUAEDA MARITIMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbarasi G.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Different types of phytohormones are being extensively used to alleviate the adverse effect of salinity stress on plant growth. Among those, Abscisic acid (ABA is a plant stress hormone and one of the most important signaling molecules in plants. Drought and salinity activate De-novo abscisic acid synthesis prevent further water loss by evaporation through stomata, mediated by changes in the guard cell turgor pressure. Under osmotic stress abscisic acid induce the accumulation of protein involved in the biosynthesis of osmolites which increasing the stress tolerance of plant. In addition, exogenous application of ABA enhances the tolerance of plants or plant cells to cold, heat, drought, anoxia and heavy metal stresses. This study was carried out to study the exogenous abscisic (ABA acid induced regulatory role on the growth, water content, protein content, chlorophyll content, osmolyte accumulation and protein profiling through SDS PAGE in a halophyte, Suaeda maritima. The osmolyte accumulation of proline and glycine betaine was found to be more in 50 µM ABA concentrations. The protein profiling through SDS PAGE revealed that ̴ 66KDa proteins was not expressed in the control plant and in 10μM ABA treated plants. Interestingly, the ABA treatment induced a new protein of 14.2KDa in 10μM concentration. The ABA treated plants with concentrations 50μM, 100μM and 150μM showed changes in the expression of protein in abundance than the control and 10μM ABA treated plants. The findings in this study indicate that among all the concentrations, 50μM ABA concentration treated plants exhibited higher growth rate.

  10. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1/LFA-1 ligation favors human Th1 development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Hermelijn H.; de Jong, Esther C.; Schuitemaker, Joost H. N.; Geijtenbeek, Theo B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Wierenga, Eddy A.

    2002-01-01

    Th cell polarization toward Th1 or Th2 cells is strongly driven by exogenous cytokines, in particular IL-12 or IL-4, if present during activation by Ag-presenting dendritic cells (DC). However, additional Th cell polarizing mechanisms are induced by the ligation of cell surface molecules on DC and

  11. Preservation of biological activity of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) after microencapsulation and sterilization by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa-Casalengua, P; Jiang, C; Bravo-Osuna, I; Tucker, B A; Molina-Martínez, I T; Young, M J; Herrero-Vanrell, R

    2012-10-15

    A main issue in controlled delivery of biotechnological products from injectable biodegradable microspheres is to preserve their integrity and functional activity after the microencapsulation process and final sterilization. The present experimental work tested different technological approaches to maintain the biological activity of an encapsulated biotechnological product within PLGA [poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)] microspheres (MS) after their sterilization by gamma irradiation. GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), useful in the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases, was chosen as a labile model protein. In the particular case of optic nerve degeneration, GDNF has been demonstrated to improve the damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) survival. GDNF was encapsulated in its molecular state by the water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) technique or as solid according to the solid-in-oil-in-water (S/O/W) method. Based on the S/O/W technique, GDNF was included in the PLGA microspheres alone (S/O/W 1) or in combination with an antioxidant (vitamin E, Vit E) (S/O/W 2). Microspheres were sterilized by gamma-irradiation (dose of 25 kGy) at room and low (-78 °C) temperatures. Functional activity of GDNF released from the different microspheres was evaluated both before and after sterilization in their potential target cells (retinal cells). Although none of the systems proposed achieved with the goal of totally retain the structural stability of the GDNF-dimer, the protein released from the S/O/W 2 microspheres was clearly the most biologically active, showing significantly less retinal cell death than that released from either W/O/W or S/O/W 1 particles, even in low amounts of the neurotrophic factor. According to the results presented in this work, the biological activity of biotechnological products after microencapsulation and sterilization can be further preserved by the inclusion of the active molecule in its solid state in combination with

  12. Continued administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor protects mice from inflammatory pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Cognet, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described as a surv......Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described...... as a survival and differentiation factor for neurons and oligodendrocytes, significantly ameliorates the clinical course of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. In the acute phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 35-55, treatment with CNTF did...... not change the peripheral immune response but did reduce the number of perivascular infiltrates and T cells and the level of diffuse microglial activation in spinal cord. Blood brain barrier permeability was significantly reduced in CNTF-treated animals. Beneficial effects of CNTF did not persist after...

  13. Neurotrophic requirements of rat embryonic catecholaminergic neurons from the rostral ventrolateral medulla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, JCVM; Gibbons, H; van Roon, WMC; Comer, AM; Lipski, J

    1999-01-01

    The factors that regulate the ontogeny and differentiation of C1 adrenergic neurons located in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are completely unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of a number of neurotrophic factors on the survival of E18-19 rat C1 adrenergic

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and early-life stress: Multifaceted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neural development and plasticity. Longtermchanges in the BDNF pathway are associated with childhood adversity and adult depression symptoms.Initially, stress-induced decreases in the BDNF pathway were found in some studies, but subsequent ...

  15. NS 1231, a novel compound with neurotrophic-like effects in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagø, Lone; Bonde, Christian; Peters, Dan

    2002-01-01

    NS 1231 [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrrolo-[3.2-h]naphthalene-2,3-dione-3-oxime] belongs to a chemical series of compounds, which exhibit neurotrophic-like activities. In vitro, NS 1231 rescued nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells from death induced by withdrawal...

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and addiction: Pathological versus therapeutic effects on drug seeking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, J.M.; Taylor, J.R.; de Vries, T.J.; Peters, J.

    2015-01-01

    Many abused drugs lead to changes in endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in neural circuits responsible for addictive behaviors. BDNF is a known molecular mediator of memory consolidation processes, evident at both behavioral and neurophysiological levels. Specific neural

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  18. Gender specific associations of serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, M.L.; Bus, B.A.A.; Spinhoven, P.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Prickaerts, J.; Voshaar, R.C.O.; Elzinga, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Whereas animal models indicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in anxiety-related behaviour, little is known about BDNF in patients with an anxiety disorder. We tested the hypothesis that serum BDNF levels are low in patients with an anxiety disorder as

  19. Human obesity associated with an intronic SNP in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 ...

  20. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-Yue; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Mo, Zhou-Yun; Chen, Shi-Jie; Xiang, Si-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Xue, Min

    2015-09-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  1. Decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the remitted state of unipolar depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob; Knorr, U; Bennike, B

    2012-01-01

    Decreased levels of peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been associated with depression. It is uncertain whether abnormally low levels of BDNF in blood are present beyond the depressive state and whether levels of BDNF are associated with the course of clinical illness....

  2. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Autism: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Altered blood BDNF levels have been frequently identified in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There are however wide discrepancies in the evidence. Therefore, we performed the present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at…

  3. Circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor has diagnostic and prognostic value in traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.K. Korley (Frederick K.); R. Diaz-Arrastia (Ramon); A.H.B. Wu (Alan H. B.); J.K. Yue (John); G. Manley (Geoffrey); H.I. Sair (Haris I.); J.E. van Eyk (Jennifer); A.D. Everett (Allen D.); D. Okonkwo (David); A.B. Valadka (Alex); W.A. Gordon (Wayne A.); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); P. Mukherjee (Pratik); E.L. Yuh (Esther); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); A.M. Puccio (Ava); D.M. Schnyer (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBrain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and regeneration. We investigated the diagnostic and prognostic values of serum BDNF in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examined serum BDNF in two independent cohorts of TBI cases presenting to the emergency

  4. Axonal neuropathy-associated TRPV4 regulates neurotrophic factor-derived axonal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongwoo; Jung, Jooyoung; Kim, Hyungsup; Oh, Jungeun; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Jung, Saewoon; Kim, Kyung-Tai; Cho, Hawon; Yang, Dong-Jin; Kim, Sung Min; Kim, In-Beom; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Oh, Uhtaek

    2012-02-17

    Spinal muscular atrophy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies are characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy caused by the degenerations of peripheral motor and sensory nerves. Recent advances in genetics have resulted in the identification of missense mutations in TRPV4 in patients with these hereditary neuropathies. Neurodegeneration caused by Ca(2+) overload due to the gain-of-function mutation of TRPV4 was suggested as the molecular mechanism for the neuropathies. Despite the importance of TRPV4 mutations in causing neuropathies, the precise role of TRPV4 in the sensory/motor neurons is unknown. Here, we report that TRPV4 mediates neurotrophic factor-derived neuritogenesis in developing peripheral neurons. TRPV4 was found to be highly expressed in sensory and spinal motor neurons in early development as well as in the adult, and the overexpression or chemical activation of TRPV4 was found to promote neuritogenesis in sensory neurons as well as PC12 cells, whereas its knockdown and pharmacologic inhibition had the opposite effect. More importantly, nerve growth factor or cAMP treatment up-regulated the expression of phospholipase A(2) and TRPV4. Neurotrophic factor-derived neuritogenesis appears to be regulated by the phospholipase A(2)-mediated TRPV4 pathway. These findings show that TRPV4 mediates neurotrophic factor-induced neuritogenesis in developing peripheral nerves. Because neurotrophic factors are essential for the maintenance of peripheral nerves, these findings suggest that aberrant TRPV4 activity may lead to some types of pathology of sensory and motor nerves.

  5. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongioanni, P; Reali, C; Sogos, V

    2004-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as motor neuron disease, is a fatal neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness resulting in paralysis, which might be treated with ciliary neurotrophic factor. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of ciliary neutrophic factor in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group trials register (searched June 2003) for randomized trials, MEDLINE (from January 1966 to October 2003) and EMBASE (from January 1980 to October 2003), checked the reference lists of papers identified and contacted the authors of studies identified to get additional unpublished results. We considered the following selection criteria: Types of studies: randomized controlled clinical trials; adults with a diagnosis of either probable or definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis according to the El Escorial criteria; Types of interventions: treatment with ciliary neurotrophic factor for at least six months, in a placebo-controlled randomized format; Types of outcome measures Primary: survival; Secondary: muscle strength, respiratory function, changes in bulbar functions, changes in quality of life, proportion of patients with adverse side effects (such as cough, asthenia, nausea, anorexia, weight loss and increased salivation). We identified two randomized trials. The data were extracted and examined independently by the reviewers. Some missing data were obtained from investigators. Two trials, with a total population of 1,300 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients treated with subcutaneous injections of recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor, were examined in this review. The methodological quality of these trials was considered adequate. No significant difference was observed between ciliary neurotrophic factor and placebo groups for survival, the primary outcome measure. The relative risk was 1.07 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.41). No significant differences between the groups were

  6. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  7. Time course of neurotrophic factor upregulation and retinal protection against light-induced damage after optic nerve section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valter, Krisztina; Bisti, Silvia; Gargini, Claudia; Di Loreto, Silvia; Maccarone, Rita; Cervetto, Luigi; Stone, Jonathan

    2005-05-01

    To assess neurotrophic factor upregulation in the retina after damage to the optic nerve and relate that regulation to changes in photoreceptor stability and function. Retinas of adult pigmented (Long-Evans) rats were examined at successive times (1-60 days) after unilateral optic nerve section. The distribution and expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and their receptor elements FGFR1 and CNTFRalpha were studied with immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. FGF-2 and CNTF mRNA levels were also assessed, with semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Levels and localization of the intracellular signaling molecule ERK and its activated, phosphorylated form pERK, were examined by immunohistochemistry. To assess the correlation between neurotrophic factor levels and their protective effect against light damage, albino (Sprague-Dawley) rats were exposed to bright continuous light (1000 lux) for 24 or 48 hours at successive times after nerve section. The TUNEL technique was used to visualize neuronal cell death in the retina. CNTF upregulation was detected 1 week after optic nerve section, peaked at 2 weeks, and fell to control levels at 4 weeks. CNTF appeared first in the inner retina in the ganglion cells, then in the Muller cells in which it became prominent at the outer limiting membrane (OLM) and in the outer segment (OS) region of photoreceptors. FGF-2 upregulation became prominent, particularly in photoreceptors, 21 to 28 days after surgery, continued to 2 months, and slowly declined thereafter. Double labeling with antibodies to ligand and the receptor showed colocalization of CNTF to its receptor at the OS region, whereas FGF-2-to-FGFR1 binding was found in the outer nuclear (ONL) and outer plexiform (OPL) layers. Optic nerve section provided a significant protective effect against light-induced damage in the first 2 weeks. There was no protection when animals were exposed to damaging light 1 month

  8. Improved control of exogenous attention in action video game players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Cain

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Action video game players have demonstrated a number of attentional advantages over non-players. Here, we propose that many of those benefits might be underpinned by improved control over exogenous (i.e., stimulus-driven attention. To test this we used an anti-cuing task, in which a sudden-onset cue indicated that the target would likely appear in a separate location on the opposite side of the fixation point. When the time between the cue onset and the target onset was short (40 ms, non-players (nVGPs showed a typical exogenous attention effect. Their response times were faster to targets presented at the cued (but less probable location compared with the opposite (more probable location. Video game players (VGPs, however, were less likely to have their attention drawn to the location of the cue. When the onset asynchrony was long (600 ms, VGPs and nVGPs were equally able to endogenously shift their attention to the likely (opposite target location. In order to rule out processing-speed differences as an explanation for this result, we also tested VGPs and nVGPs on an attentional blink task. In a version of the attentional blink task that minimized demands on task switching and iconic memory, VGPs and nVGPs did not differ in second target identification performance (i.e., VGPs had the same magnitude of attentional blink as nVGPs, suggesting that the anti-cuing results were due to flexible control over exogenous attention rather than to more general speed-of-processing differences.

  9. A combination of He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO application efficiently protect wheat seedling from oxidative stress caused by elevated UV-B stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Limei; Han, Rong

    2016-12-01

    The elevated ultraviolet-B (UV-B) stress induces the accumulation of a variety of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which seems to cause oxidative stress for plants. To date, very little work has been done to evaluate the biological effects of a combined treatment with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous nitric oxide (NO) application on oxidative stress resulting from UV-B radiation. Thus, our study investigated the effects of a combination with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO treatment on oxidative damages in wheat seedlings under elevated UV-B stress. Our data showed that the reductions in ROS levels, membrane damage parameters, while the increments in antioxidant contents and antioxidant enzyme activity caused by a combination with He-Ne laser and exogenous NO treatment were greater than those of each individual treatment. Furthermore, these treatments had a similar effect on transcriptional activities of plant antioxidant enzymes. This implied that the protective effects of a combination with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO treatment on oxidative stress resulting from UV-B radiation was more efficient than each individual treatment with He-Ne laser or NO molecule. Our findings might provide beneficial theoretical references for identifying some effective new pathways for plant UV-B protection.

  10. Cholestasis and endogenous opioids: liver disease and exogenous opioid pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar

    2007-01-01

    A class of endogenous opioids is upregulated in liver disease particular to cholestasis, which contributes to symptoms in liver disease such as pruritus, hypotension and encephalopathy. Symptoms associated with cholestasis are reversed or at least ameliorated by mu opioid receptor antagonists. Palliation of symptoms related to cholestatic liver disease also involves bile acid binding agents. Opioid receptor antagonists, unlike bile acid binding agents, have been reported to relieve multiple symptoms, except for pruritus, and improve liver function as demonstrated in experimental cholestasis. Exogenous opioid pharmacology is altered by liver disease. Dose reduction or prolongation of dose intervals is necessary depending on the severity of liver disease.

  11. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging...produce at high densities. We revealed broad Feshbach resonances that we hope will allow production of higher-density 85Rb clouds. We are now...attempting to achieve the next step, formation of 85RbCs molecules. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, ultracold polar molecules, Feshbach resonance 16. SECURITY

  12. Exogenous orienting of visual-spatial attention in ADHD children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Rodrigo; López, Vladimir; Carrasco, Ximena; Anllo-Vento, Lourdes; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2013-02-01

    Visual spatial orienting of attention towards exogenous cues has been one of the attentional functions considered to be spared in ADHD. Here we present a design in which 60 (30 ADHD) children, age: 10.9±1.4, were asked to covertly orient their attention to one or two (out of four) cued locations, and search for a target stimulus in one of these locations, while recording behavioral responses and EEG/ERP. In all conditions, ADHD children showed delayed reaction times and poorer behavioral performance. They also exhibited larger cue-elicited P2 but reduced CNV in the preparation stage. Larger amplitude of CNV predicted better performance in the task. Target-elicited N1 and selection negativity were also reduced in the ADHD group compared to non-ADHD. Groups also differed in the early and late P3 time-windows. The present results suggest that exogenous orienting of attention could be dysfunctional in ADHD under certain conditions. This limitation is not necessarily caused by an impairment of the orienting process itself, but instead by a difficulty in maintaining the relevant information acquired during the early preparation stage through the target processing stage, when it is really needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Exogenic geomorphic processes dynamics at the Black Sea coast, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Yulia; Tsvetkova, Daria

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays there is an obvious grow of anthropogenic load going on in many areas worldwide. Under such conditions, intensive activation of a number of exogenic geomorphic processes may be observed. Moreover, if natural environment is aggressive itself their dynamics and rates may reach enormous values. Our work is conducted at the Black Sea coast, known for its mountainous topography, wet subtropical climate and intensive anthropogenic development (especially during the last decade due to the recent Olympic games). We chose two key basins near Sochi, Russia to study a number of presented exogenic processes, including rill, gully and channel erosion, weathering, suffusion and piping, soil creep. A set of field study methods is used to monitor the processes dynamics since 2005 (and late 1970s for soil creep). In addition, soil erosion rates and landslide susceptibility were modelled to get information of the watersheds dynamics. This is ongoing work, but the results of the passed period of observations will be resented. Special attention is paid to the processes connectivity and their input into sediment redistribution over the river basins.

  14. Field contamination of skeletonized human remains with exogenous DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Suni M; Christensen, Alexander F

    2013-01-01

    The Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory reports the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of over 800 skeletal samples a year for the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command-Central Identification Laboratory. These sequences are generated from degraded skeletal remains that are presumed to belong to U.S. service members missing from past military conflicts. In the laboratory, it is possible to control for contamination of remains; however, in the field, it can be difficult to prevent modern DNA from being transferred to skeletal elements and being carried forward through the analysis process. Four such cases are described here along with the controls in place in the laboratory to eliminate the possibility of the exogenous DNA being reported as authentic. In each case, the controls implemented by the laboratories prevented the false reporting of contaminant exogenous DNA from remains that were either faunal or human, but lacked endogenous DNA. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  15. Dynamic Financial Constraints: Distinguishing Mechanism Design from Exogenously Incomplete Regimes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaivanov, Alexander; Townsend, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    We formulate and solve a range of dynamic models of constrained credit/insurance that allow for moral hazard and limited commitment. We compare them to full insurance and exogenously incomplete financial regimes (autarky, saving only, borrowing and lending in a single asset). We develop computational methods based on mechanism design, linear programming, and maximum likelihood to estimate, compare, and statistically test these alternative dynamic models with financial/information constraints. Our methods can use both cross-sectional and panel data and allow for measurement error and unobserved heterogeneity. We estimate the models using data on Thai households running small businesses from two separate samples. We find that in the rural sample, the exogenously incomplete saving only and borrowing regimes provide the best fit using data on consumption, business assets, investment, and income. Family and other networks help consumption smoothing there, as in a moral hazard constrained regime. In contrast, in urban areas, we find mechanism design financial/information regimes that are decidedly less constrained, with the moral hazard model fitting best combined business and consumption data. We perform numerous robustness checks in both the Thai data and in Monte Carlo simulations and compare our maximum likelihood criterion with results from other metrics and data not used in the estimation. A prototypical counterfactual policy evaluation exercise using the estimation results is also featured. PMID:25246710

  16. Exogenous nitric oxide inhibits shedding of ADAM17 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowska, Monika; Stalińska, Krystyna; Mezyk-Kopeć, Renata; Wawro, Karolina; Duda, Katarzyna; Das, Sudipta; Bereta, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Both ADAM17, the secretase responsible for the shedding of ectodomains of numerous membrane proteins including TNF and its receptors, as well as nitric oxide synthesized by inducible nitric oxide synthase play regulatory roles in inflammation and tumor progression. We analyzed the effect of endogenous and exogenous nitric oxide on the expression and activity of ADAM17 in murine endothelial cells and a monocyte/macrophage cell line. We found that endogenous nitric oxide influenced neither ADAM17 mRNA level nor the shedding of two ADAM17 substrates, TNF and TNFR1. Exogenous NO significantly diminished the release of TNF and TNFR1 without affecting the ADAM17 transcript level. Our data seem contrary to a previous report that showed the activation of ADAM17 by nitric oxide (Zhang et al., 2000, J Biol Chem 275: 15839-15844). We discuss potential mechanisms of NO-mediated inhibition of ectodomain shedding and possible reasons of discrepancy between our results and the previous report.

  17. Exogenous CO2 in South American sparkling wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardelli Susiane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sparkling wine production and consumption have increased significantly in the last years. With the increased demand appear the necessity to check the sparkling wine authenticity, because the practice of adding CO2 in sparkling wine is not allow. A way to control the carbonation process is through the determination of CO2 δ13C, because the sugar added during the second fermentation define the CO2 isotopic value, according to elaboration process. For this reason, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between values of δ13C from still wines and sparkling wines, in order to set up limit values to exogenous carbonation control. Thirty-eight still wines elaborated by microvinification and 59 samples of commercial sparkling wines were analyzed, using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS. The most negative value of natural δ13C from still wine found was − 24.7‰, it can be to estimate that lowest values are an indicative of industrial CO2 addition. Among the commercial sparkling wine from South America evaluated in this study, 10% from the samples showed signs of carbonation. Through this research was possible to establish limits of isotopic values to determine the presence of exogenous CO2.

  18. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) plus soluble CNTF receptor alpha increases cyclooxygenase-2 expression, PGE2 release and interferon-gamma-induced CD40 in murine microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jain, Mohit Raja; Li, Hong; Levison, Steven W

    2009-03-06

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been regarded as a potent trophic factor for motor neurons. However, recent studies have shown that CNTF exerts effects on glial cells as well as neurons. For instance, CNTF stimulates astrocytes to secrete FGF-2 and rat microglia to secrete glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which suggest that CNTF exerts effects on astrocytes and microglia to promote motor neuron survival indirectly. As CNTF is structurally related to IL-6, which can stimulate immune functions of microglia, we hypothesized that CNTF might exert similar effects. We performed 2-D and 1-D proteomic experiments with western blotting and flow cytometry to examine effects of CNTF on primary microglia derived from neonatal mouse brains. We show that murine microglia express CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFRalpha), which can be induced by interferon-gamma (IFNgamma). Whereas IL-6 activated STAT-3 and ERK phosphorylation, CNTF did not activate these pathways, nor did CNTF increase p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation. Using 2-D western blot analysis, we demonstrate that CNTF induced the dephosphorylation of a set of proteins and phosphorylation of a different set. Two proteins that were phosphorylated upon CNTF treatment were the LYN substrate-1 and beta-tubulin 5. CNTF weakly stimulated microglia, whereas a stronger response was obtained by adding exogenous soluble CNTFRalpha (sCNTFRalpha) as has been observed for IL-6. When used in combination, CNTF and sCNTFRalpha collaborated with IFNgamma to increase microglial surface expression of CD40 and this effect was quite pronounced when the microglia were differentiated towards dendritic-like cells. CNTF/sCNTFRalpha complex, however, failed to increase MHC class II expression beyond that induced by IFNgamma. The combination of CNTF and sCNTFRalpha, but not CNTF alone, enhanced microglial Cox-2 protein expression and PGE2 secretion (although CNTF was 30 times less potent than LPS). Surprisingly, Cox-2 production was

  19. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF plus soluble CNTF receptor α increases cyclooxygenase-2 expression, PGE2 release and interferon-γ-induced CD40 in murine microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF has been regarded as a potent trophic factor for motor neurons. However, recent studies have shown that CNTF exerts effects on glial cells as well as neurons. For instance, CNTF stimulates astrocytes to secrete FGF-2 and rat microglia to secrete glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, which suggest that CNTF exerts effects on astrocytes and microglia to promote motor neuron survival indirectly. As CNTF is structurally related to IL-6, which can stimulate immune functions of microglia, we hypothesized that CNTF might exert similar effects. Methods We performed 2-D and 1-D proteomic experiments with western blotting and flow cytometry to examine effects of CNTF on primary microglia derived from neonatal mouse brains. Results We show that murine microglia express CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα, which can be induced by interferon-γ (IFNγ. Whereas IL-6 activated STAT-3 and ERK phosphorylation, CNTF did not activate these pathways, nor did CNTF increase p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation. Using 2-D western blot analysis, we demonstrate that CNTF induced the dephosphorylation of a set of proteins and phosphorylation of a different set. Two proteins that were phosphorylated upon CNTF treatment were the LYN substrate-1 and β-tubulin 5. CNTF weakly stimulated microglia, whereas a stronger response was obtained by adding exogenous soluble CNTFRα (sCNTFRα as has been observed for IL-6. When used in combination, CNTF and sCNTFRα collaborated with IFNγ to increase microglial surface expression of CD40 and this effect was quite pronounced when the microglia were differentiated towards dendritic-like cells. CNTF/sCNTFRα complex, however, failed to increase MHC class II expression beyond that induced by IFNγ. The combination of CNTF and sCNTFRα, but not CNTF alone, enhanced microglial Cox-2 protein expression and PGE2 secretion (although CNTF was 30 times less potent than LPS. Surprisingly, Cox-2

  20. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The most logical way to reduce the reactivity of a molecule of 1 would be to put a single molecule of 1 in an unreactive "cage". Chemistry Nobel winner Donald J. Cram (1987) has shown that it is indeed possible (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl., 30, 1028. 1991)!. Cram and co-workers synthesized a variety of spheroidal molecu-.

  1. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  3. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  4. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    “What are electrons doing in molecules?” This is a deceptively simple question that scientists have been trying to answer for more than eighty years. With the advent of quantum mechanics in 1926, it became clear that we must understand the dynamics of electronic motion in atoms, molecules and solids in order to explain ...

  5. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  6. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances sympathetic neurite growth in rat hearts at early developmental stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-01-01

    Molecular signaling of sympathetic innervation of myocardium is an unresolved issue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neurotrophic factors on sympathetic neurite growth towards cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) were isolated from neonatal

  7. Effect of microgravity on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor gene expression in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybko, A S; Ilchibaeva, T V; Kulikov, A V; Kulikova, E A; Krasnov, I B; Sychev, V N; Shenkman, B S; Popova, N K; Naumenko, V S

    2015-09-01

    Mice were exposed to 1 month of space flight on the Russian biosatellite BION-M1 to determine its effect on the expression of genes involved in the maintenance of the mouse brain dopamine system. The current article focuses on the genes encoding glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF). Space flight reduced expression of the GDNF gene in the striatum and hypothalamus but increased it in the frontal cortex and raphe nuclei area. At the same time, actual space flight reduced expression of the gene encoding CDNF in the substantia nigra but increased it in the raphe nuclei area. To separate the effects of space flight from environmental stress contribution, we analyzed expression of the investigated genes in mice housed for 1 month on Earth in the same shuttle cabins that were used for space flight and in mice of the vivarium control group. Shuttle cabin housing failed to alter the expression of the GDNF and CDNF genes in the brain structures investigated. Thus, actual long-term space flight produced dysregulation in genetic control of GDNF and CDNF genes. These changes may be related to downregulation of the dopamine system after space flight, which we have shown earlier. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Our results provide the first evidence of microgravity effects on expression of the GDNF and CDNF neurotrophic factor genes. A considerable decrease in mRNA level of GDNF and CDNF in the nigrostriatal dopamine system was found. Because both GDNF and CDNF play a significant role in maintenance and survival of brain dopaminergic neurons, we can assume that this dysregulation in genetic control of GDNF and CDNF genes in substantia nigra could be among the reasons for the deleterious effects of space flight on the dopamine system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Single molecule electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyunwook; Reed, Mark A; Lee, Takhee

    2011-04-12

    Single molecule electronic devices in which individual molecules are utilized as active electronic components constitute a promising approach for the ultimate miniaturization and integration of electronic devices in nanotechnology through the bottom-up strategy. Thus, the ability to understand, control, and exploit charge transport at the level of single molecules has become a long-standing desire of scientists and engineers from different disciplines for various potential device applications. Indeed, a study on charge transport through single molecules attached to metallic electrodes is a very challenging task, but rapid advances have been made in recent years. This review article focuses on experimental aspects of electronic devices made with single molecules, with a primary focus on the characterization and manipulation of charge transport in this regime. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels and postoperative cognitive dysfunction after surgery for rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoxia; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Chan; Zhang, Guanpeng; Zhang, Junhui; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Luye; Wang, Maohua; Wang, Xiaobin

    2018-03-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is an important complication of cardiac surgery with poor outcomes. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels are decreased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but the association between glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels and postoperative cognitive dysfunction is poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of postoperative serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels to predict postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients with rheumatic heart disease undergoing heart valve replacement. This was a prospective observational study of 80 patients undergoing elective heart valve replacement surgery from June 2015 to June 2016 at the Affiliated Hospital of Southeast Medical University. Cognitive functions were assessed 1 day before and 7 days after surgery. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before (T1) and 1 (T2), 2 (T3), and 7 (T4) days after surgery. Perioperative parameters were evaluated to assess the relationship between glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors and postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction was identified in 38 patients (47.5%) 7 days after surgery. Average glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels at 2 and 7 days after surgery in the postoperative cognitive dysfunction group were lower than in the nonpostoperative cognitive dysfunction group at the same time points (P derived neurotrophic factor (T1-T3) and Δglial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (T1-T4) were identified as good predictors of postoperative cognitive dysfunction with threshold for postoperative cognitive dysfunction detection of 49.10 and 60.90, respectively. The perioperative glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with postoperative cognitive dysfunction were lower than in patients without postoperative

  10. SorLA Controls Neurotrophic Activity by Sorting of GDNF and Its Receptors GFRα1 and RET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Simon; Lume, Maria; Olsen, Ditte

    2013-01-01

    Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has reached clinical trials for Parkinson's disease. GDNF binds to its coreceptor GFRα1 and signals through the transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase RET, or RET independently through NCAM or syndecan-3...... function, marked hyperactivity, and reduced anxiety, all of which are phenotypes related to abnormal GDNF activity. Taken together, these findings establish SorLA as a critical regulator of GDNF activity in the CNS....

  11. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, T.; Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersen...

  12. Effect of Training Exercise on Urinary Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels and Cognitive Performances in Overweight and Obese Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Angelo; Buratta, Livia; Pippi, Roberto; Aiello, Cristina; Ranucci, Claudia; Reginato, Elisa; Santangelo, Valerio; DeFeo, Pierpaolo; Mazzeschi, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Exercise-mediated, brain-derived neurotrophic factor induction benefits health and cognitive functions. The multifaceted interplay between physical activity, urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive functioning has been largely neglected in previous literature. In this pilot study, two bouts of training exercise (65% and 70% of heart rate reserve) influenced urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive performances in 12 overweight and obese participants. Percent heart rate reserve, expenditure energy, brain-derived neurotrophic factor urinary levels and cognitive performances were measured before and after the exercise. No significant variations in energy expenditure were observed, while differences of heart rate reserve between two groups were maintained. Both bouts of training exercise induced a similar reduction in urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Only visuo-spatial working memory capacity at 65% of heart rate reserve showed a significant increase. These findings indicate a consistent effect of training exercise on urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive factors in overweight and obese participants.

  13. The Role of Neurotrophic Factors Conjugated to Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: In Vitro Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofra Ziv-Polat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Local delivery of neurotrophic factors is a pillar of neural repair strategies in the peripheral nervous system. The main disadvantage of the free growth factors is their short half-life of few minutes. In order to prolong their activity, we have conjugated to iron oxide nanoparticles three neurotrophic factors: nerve growth factor (βNGF, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2. Comparative stability studies of free versus conjugated factors revealed that the conjugated neurotrophic factors were significantly more stable in tissue cultures and in medium at 37°C. The biological effects of free versus conjugated neurotrophic factors were examined on organotypic dorsal root ganglion (DRG cultures performed in NVR-Gel, composed mainly of hyaluronic acid and laminin. Results revealed that the conjugated neurotrophic factors enhanced early nerve fiber sprouting compared to the corresponding free factors. The most meaningful result was that conjugated-GDNF, accelerated the onset and progression of myelin significantly earlier than the free GDNF and the other free and conjugated factors. This is probably due to the beneficial and long-acting effect that the stabilized conjugated-GDNF had on neurons and Schwann cells. These conclusive results make NVR-Gel enriched with conjugated-GDNF, a desirable scaffold for the reconstruction of severed peripheral nerve.

  14. Exogenous nitric oxide donor protects Artemisia annua from oxidative stress generated by boron and aluminium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, Tariq; Khan, M Masroor A; Naeem, M; Idrees, Mohd; Moinuddin; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Ram, M

    2012-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signal molecule modulating the response of plants to environmental stress. Here we report the effects of boron (B) and aluminium (Al) contamination in soil, carried out with or without application of exogenous SNP (NO donor), on various plant processes in Artemisia annua, including changes in artemisinin content. The addition of B or Al to soil medium significantly reduced the yield and growth of plants and lowered the values of net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, internal CO(2) concentration and total chlorophyll content. The follow-up treatment of NO donor favoured growth and improved the photosynthetic efficiency in stressed as well as non-stressed plants. Artemisinin content was enhanced by 24.6% and 43.8% at 1mmole of soil-applied B or Al. When SNP was applied at 2mmole concentration together with either 1mmole of B and/or Al, it further stimulated artemisinin biosynthesis compared to the control. Application of B+Al+SNP proved to be the best treatment combination for the artemisinin content in Artemisia annua leaves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MHC class I endosomal and lysosomal trafficking coincides with exogenous antigen loading in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genc Basha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs is a crucial prerequisite for effective priming of cytotoxic T-cell responses against bacterial, viral and tumor antigens; however, this antigen presentation pathway remains poorly defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to develop a comprehensive understanding of this process, we tested the hypothesis that the internalization of MHC class I molecules (MHC-I from the cell surface is directly involved in cross-presentation pathway and the loading of antigenic peptides. Here we provide the first examination of the internalization of MHC-I in DCs and we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic domain of MHC-I appears to act as an addressin domain to route MHC-I to both endosomal and lysosomal compartments of DCs, where it is demonstrated that loading of peptides derived from exogenously-derived proteins occurs. Furthermore, by chasing MHC-I from the cell surface of normal and transgenic DCs expressing mutant forms of MHC-I, we observe that a tyrosine-based endocytic trafficking motif is required for the constitutive internalization of MHC-I molecules from the cell surface into early endosomes and subsequently deep into lysosomal peptide-loading compartments. Finally, our data support the concept that multiple pathways of peptide loading of cross-presented antigens may exist depending on the chemical nature and size of the antigen requiring processing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that DCs have 'hijacked' and adapted a common vacuolar/endocytic intracellular trafficking pathway to facilitate MHC I access to the endosomal and lysosomal compartments where antigen processing and loading and antigen cross-presentation takes place.

  16. On weak exogeneity of the student's t and elliptical linear regression models

    OpenAIRE

    Jiro Hodoshima

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies weak exogeneity of conditioning variables for the inference of a subset of parameters of the conditional student's t and elliptical linear regression models considered by Spanos (1994). Weak exogeneity of the conditioning variables is shown to hold for the inference of regression parameters of the conditional student's t and elliptical linear regression models. A new definition of weak exogeneity is given which utilizes block-diagonality of the conditional information matri...

  17. Surfactant inhibition in acute respiratory failure : consequences for exogenous surfactant therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Eijking, Eric

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is characterized by immaturity of the lung, resulting in relative or absolute absence of pulmonary surfactant. Worldwide, neonates suffering from RDS have been treated successfully with exogenous surfactant preparations. Currently, exogenous surfactant administration has been accepted as a valuable treatment for this syndrome. Nevertheless, many questions on exogenous surfactant treatment remain unanswered. It has been observed that...

  18. Single molecule logical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Nicolas; Hliwa, Mohamed; Joachim, Christian

    2012-01-01

    After almost 40 years of development, molecular electronics has given birth to many exciting ideas that range from molecular wires to molecular qubit-based quantum computers. This chapter reviews our efforts to answer a simple question: how smart can a single molecule be? In our case a molecule able to perform a simple Boolean function is a child prodigy. Following the Aviram and Ratner approach, these molecules are inserted between several conducting electrodes. The electronic conduction of the resulting molecular junction is extremely sensitive to the chemical nature of the molecule. Therefore designing this latter correctly allows the implementation of a given function inside the molecular junction. Throughout the chapter different approaches are reviewed, from hybrid devices to quantum molecular logic gates. We particularly stress that one can implement an entire logic circuit in a single molecule, using either classical-like intramolecular connections, or a deformation of the molecular orbitals induced by a conformational change of the molecule. These approaches are radically different from the hybrid-device approach, where several molecules are connected together to build the circuit.

  19. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  20. Elevated levels of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor in rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2014-01-01

    Impaired neuroplasticity may be implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, involving peripheral alterations of the neurotrophins brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3). Evidence is limited by methodological issues and is based primarily on case-control desi......Impaired neuroplasticity may be implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, involving peripheral alterations of the neurotrophins brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3). Evidence is limited by methodological issues and is based primarily on case...... were measured in 37 rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients and in 40 age- and gender matched healthy control subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In a longitudinal design, repeated measurements of BDNF and NT-3 were evaluated in various affective states in bipolar disorder...

  1. Retrograde axonal transport of ciliary neurotrophic factor is increased by peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, R; Adryan, K M; Zhu, Y; Harkness, P J; Lindsay, R M; DiStefano, P S

    1993-09-16

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes the survival of several populations of neurons, including sensory and motor neurons. Although CNTF is abundant in adult sciatic nerve, the mature protein lacks a signal sequence and is not secreted; therefore, it has been proposed to act as a lesion factor. The identification of a functional CNTF receptor revealed ligand-specific phosphorylation cascades and gene induction. However, it is not clear how these signal-transducing events are elicited in neuronal cell bodies that may be distant from the source of CNTF. We report here that CNTF can be retrogradely transported by adult sensory neurons. More importantly, sensory and motor neurons both show greatly increased transport of CNTF following peripheral nerve lesion. Axotomy-induced increases in retrograde transport of neurotrophic factors may be an important response of neuronal cell bodies during regeneration.

  2. Exogenous endothelial cells as accelerators of hematopoietic reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizer J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the successes of recombinant hematopoietic-stimulatory factors at accelerating bone marrow reconstitution and shortening the neutropenic period post-transplantation, significant challenges remain such as cost, inability to reconstitute thrombocytic lineages, and lack of efficacy in conditions such as aplastic anemia. A possible means of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution would be administration of cells capable of secreting hematopoietic growth factors. Advantages of this approach would include: a ability to regulate secretion of cytokines based on biological need; b long term, localized production of growth factors, alleviating need for systemic administration of factors that possess unintended adverse effects; and c potential to actively repair the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Here we overview the field of hematopoietic growth factors, discuss previous experiences with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in accelerating hematopoiesis, and conclude by putting forth the rationale of utilizing exogenous endothelial cells as a novel cellular therapy for acceleration of hematopoietic recovery.

  3. Contact Process with Exogenous Infection and the Scaled SIS Process

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, June

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of contagion in networks depends on the graph topology. This paper is concerned with studying the time-asymptotic behavior of the extended contact processes on static, undirected, finite-size networks. This is a contact process with nonzero exogenous infection rate (also known as the {\\epsilon}-SIS, {\\epsilon} susceptible-infected-susceptible, model [1]). The only known analytical characterization of the equilibrium distribution of this process is for complete networks. For large networks with arbitrary topology, it is infeasible to numerically solve for the equilibrium distribution since it requires solving the eigenvalue-eigenvector problem of a matrix that is exponential in N , the size of the network. We show that, for a certain range of the network process parameters, the equilibrium distribution of the extended contact process on arbitrary, finite-size networks is well approximated by the equilibrium distribution of the scaled SIS process, which we derived in closed-form in prior work. We co...

  4. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Exogenous hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Dreyer, L; Tryggvadottir, L

    1997-01-01

    The well-described influence of several aspects of reproductive life on the risk for cancer in the reproductive organs has raised concern regarding the safety of exogenous hormones, particularly since sex hormones have become one of the most widely used drugs among women in the western world....... The major areas of application include oral contraception and hormone replacement therapy in women with menopausal symptoms. Since the introduction of oral contraceptives onto the Nordic market in the late 1960s, the number of users has grown steadily, to reach proportions of long-term users among women...... years) of hormone replacement therapy among Nordic women aged 40-69 in 1995 was estimated to be 10-11%, which on the basis of an associated relative risk for breast cancer ranging from 1.2-1.5 suggests than an annual total of 260 cases of breast cancer could be avoided in the Nordic countries around...

  5. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  6. Heavy exotic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+1 binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb-(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  7. Exogenous alpha 1-antitrypsin down-regulates SERPINA1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadagi, Ahmad; Johansson, Helene; Zemack, Helen; Salipalli, Sandeep; Mörk, Lisa-Mari; Kannisto, Kristina; Jorns, Carl; Gramignoli, Roberto; Strom, Stephen; Stokkeland, Knut; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Jonigk, Danny; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Nowak, Greg; Ellis, Ewa C S

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of the therapy with purified human plasma alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is to increase A1AT levels and to prevent lungs from elastolytic activity in patients with PiZZ (Glu342Lys) A1AT deficiency-related emphysema. Potential hepatic gains of this therapy are unknown. Herein, we investigated the effect of A1AT therapy on SERPINA1 (gene encoding A1AT) expression. The expression of SERPINA1 was determined in A1AT or A1AT plus Oncostatin M (OSM) treated primary human hepatocytes isolated from liver tissues from A1AT deficient patients and control liver tissues. In addition, SERPINA1 mRNA was assessed in lung tissues from PiZZ emphysema patients with and without A1AT therapy, and in adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from healthy PiMM donors. In a dose-dependent manner purified A1AT lowered SERPINA1 expression in hepatocytes. This latter effect was more prominent in hepatocytes stimulated with OSM. Although it did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.0539)-analysis of lung tissues showed lower SERPINA1 expression in PiZZ emphysema patients receiving augmentation therapy relative to those without therapy. Finally, exogenously added purified A1AT (1mg/ml) reduced SERPINA1 expression in naïve as well as in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human adherent PBMCs. Exogenous A1AT protein reduces its own endogenous expression. Hence, augmentation with native M-A1AT protein and a parallel reduction in expression of dysfunctional mutant Z-A1AT may be beneficial for PiZZ liver, and this motivates further studies.

  8. Exogenous alpha 1-antitrypsin down-regulates SERPINA1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Karadagi

    Full Text Available The main goal of the therapy with purified human plasma alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT is to increase A1AT levels and to prevent lungs from elastolytic activity in patients with PiZZ (Glu342Lys A1AT deficiency-related emphysema. Potential hepatic gains of this therapy are unknown. Herein, we investigated the effect of A1AT therapy on SERPINA1 (gene encoding A1AT expression. The expression of SERPINA1 was determined in A1AT or A1AT plus Oncostatin M (OSM treated primary human hepatocytes isolated from liver tissues from A1AT deficient patients and control liver tissues. In addition, SERPINA1 mRNA was assessed in lung tissues from PiZZ emphysema patients with and without A1AT therapy, and in adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC isolated from healthy PiMM donors. In a dose-dependent manner purified A1AT lowered SERPINA1 expression in hepatocytes. This latter effect was more prominent in hepatocytes stimulated with OSM. Although it did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.0539-analysis of lung tissues showed lower SERPINA1 expression in PiZZ emphysema patients receiving augmentation therapy relative to those without therapy. Finally, exogenously added purified A1AT (1mg/ml reduced SERPINA1 expression in naïve as well as in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated human adherent PBMCs. Exogenous A1AT protein reduces its own endogenous expression. Hence, augmentation with native M-A1AT protein and a parallel reduction in expression of dysfunctional mutant Z-A1AT may be beneficial for PiZZ liver, and this motivates further studies.

  9. Behavioural dissociation between exogenous and endogenous temporal orienting of attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Rohenkohl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the current study we compared the effects of temporal orienting of attention based on predictions carried by the intrinsic temporal structure of events (rhythm and by instructive symbolic cues; and tested the degree of cognitive, strategic control that could be exerted over each type of temporal expectation. The experiments tested whether the distinction between exogenous and endogenous orienting made in spatial attention may extend to the temporal domain. TASK DESIGN AND MAIN RESULTS: In this task, a ball moved across the screen in discrete steps and disappeared temporarily under an occluding band. Participants were required to make a perceptual discrimination on the target upon its reappearance. The regularity of the speed (rhythmic cue or colour (symbolic cue of the moving stimulus could predict the exact time at which a target would reappear after a brief occlusion (valid trials or provide no temporal information (neutral trials. The predictive nature of rhythmic and symbolic cues was manipulated factorially in a symmetrical and orthogonal fashion. To test for the effects of strategic control over temporal orienting based on rhythmic or symbolic cues, participants were instructed either to "attend-to-speed" (rhythm or "attend-to-colour". Our results indicated that both rhythmic and symbolic (colour cues speeded reaction times in an independent fashion. However, whilst the rhythmic cueing effects were impervious to instruction, the effects of symbolic cues were contingent on the instruction to attend to colour. FINAL CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results provide evidence for the existence of qualitatively separable types of temporal orienting of attention, akin to exogenous and endogenous mechanisms.

  10. Disulfide bonds regulate binding of exogenous ligand to human cytoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Taku; Nose, Azusa; Kukino, Kaori; Sawai, Hitomi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Uno, Tadayuki

    2014-06-01

    Cytoglobin (Cgb) was discovered a decade ago and is a fourth member of the group of hexacoordinated globin-folded proteins. Although some crystal structures have been reported and several functions have been proposed for Cgb, its physiological role remains uncertain. In this study, we measured cyanide binding to the ferric state of the wild-type (WT) Cgb, and found that the binding consisted of multiple steps. These results indicated that Cgb may be comprised of several forms, and the presence of monomers, dimers, and tetramers was subsequently confirmed by SDS-PAGE. Remarkably, each species contained two distinguishable forms, and, in the monomer, analyses of alternative cysteine states suggested the presence of an intramolecular disulfide bond (monomer SS form) and a structure with unpaired thiol groups (monomer SH form). These confirmed that forms were separated by gel-exclusion chromatography, and that the cyanide binding of the separated fractions was again measured; they showed different affinities for cyanide, with the monomer fraction showing the highest affinity. In addition, the ferrous state in each fraction showed distinct carbon monoxide (CO)-binding properties, and the affinities for cyanide and CO suggested a linear correlation. Furthermore, we also prepared several variants involving the two cysteine residues. The C38S and C83S variants showed a binding affinity for cyanide similar to the value for the monomer SH form, and hence the fraction with the highest affinity for exogenous ligands was designated as a monomer SS form. We concluded that polymerization could be a mechanism that triggers the exertion of various physiological functions of this protein and that an appropriate disulfide bond between the two cysteine residues was critical for regulating the binding affinity of Cgb, which can act as a ROS scavenger, for exogenous ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Altitude Acclimatization and Blood Volume: Effects of Exogenous Erythrocyte Volume Expansion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sawka, M

    1996-01-01

    ...: (a) altitude acclimatization effects on erythrocyte volume and plasma volume; (b) if exogenous erythrocyte volume expansion alters subsequent erythrocyte volume and plasma volume adaptations; (c...

  12. Role of ciliary neurotrophic factor in the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; He, Zhili; Ruan, Juan; Ma, Zilong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Chengxin; Iqbal, Khalid; Sun, Shenggang; Chen, Honghui

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has been fully studied for its structure, receptor, and signaling pathways and its multiplex effects on neural system, skeletal muscle, and weight control. Recent research demonstrates that CNTF also plays an important role in neurogenesis and the differentiation of neural stem cells. In this article, we summarize the general characteristics of CNTF and its function on neural stem cells, which could be a valuable therapeutic strategy in treating neurological disorders.

  13. The effect of regular aerobic exercise on urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor in children

    OpenAIRE

    Yunita Fediani; Masayu Rita Dewi; Muhammad Irfannuddin; Masagus Irsan Saleh; Safri Dhaini

    2014-01-01

    Background Nervous system development in early life influences the quality of cognitive ability during adulthood. Neuronal development and neurogenesis are highly influenced by neurotrophins. The most active neurotrophin is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Physical activity has a positive effect on cognitive function. However, few experimental studies have been done on children to assess the effect of aerobic regular exercise on BDNF levels. Objective To asses...

  14. The effect of regular aerobic exercise on urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor in children

    OpenAIRE

    Yunita Fediani; Masayu Rita Dewi; Muhammad Irfannuddin; Masagus Irsan Saleh; Safri Dhaini

    2014-01-01

    Background Nervous system development in early life influences the quality of cognitive ability during adulthood. Neuronal development and neurogenesis are highly influenced by neurotrophins. The most active neurotrophin is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Physical activity has a positive effect on cognitive function. However, few experimental studies have been done on children to assess the effect of aerobic regular exercise on BDNF levels. Objective To assess the effect of regu...

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects against tau-related neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, S-S; Shen, L-L; C. Zhu; Bu, X-L; Liu, Y-H; Liu, C-H; Yao, X-Q; Zhang, L-L; Zhou, H-D; Walker, D. G.; J. Tan; G?tz, J; Zhou, X-F; Wang, Y-J

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is characterized with the formation of neuritic plaques consisting of amyloid-beta (A?) and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. A growing body of evidence indicates a potential protective effect of BDNF against A?-induced neurotoxicity in AD mouse models. However, the direct therapeutic effect of BDNF supplement on tauopathy ...

  16. Neurotrophic peptide aldehydes: Solid phase synthesis of fellutamide B and a simplified analog

    OpenAIRE

    Schneekloth, John S.; John L Sanders; Hines, John; Crews, Craig M.

    2006-01-01

    A combination of solid phase and solution phase synthetic methods have been used to complete the total synthesis of the neurotrophic lipopeptide aldehyde fellutamide B (2). The β-hydroxy aliphatic tail was prepared by regioselective reductive opening of a cyclic sulfate, and later coupled to a solid phase resin. The synthetic compound was then examined in cytotoxicity and nerve growth factor (NGF) induction assays. A simplified analog of fellutamide B also showed activity.

  17. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2, at a relatively low concentration (20 µM, effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB and micronucleus (MN. In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2 of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2 with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1, MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures.

  18. Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Decreases Sepsis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury and Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Huang, Jian; Li, Yi; Chang, Ruiming; Wu, Haidong; Lin, Jiali; Huang, Zitong

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has shown various physiological effects including anti-inflammatory activity in several diseases, whereas the therapeutic efficacy of CO on sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been reported as of yet. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of exogenous CO on sepsis-induced AKI and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation in rats. Male rats were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis and AKI. Exogenous CO delivered from CO-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) was used intraperitoneally as intervention after CLP surgery. Therapeutic effects of CORM-2 on sepsis-induced AKI were assessed by measuring serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), kidney histology scores, apoptotic cell scores, oxidative stress, levels of cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, and NLRP3 inflammasome expression. CORM-2 treatment protected against the sepsis-induced AKI as evidenced by reducing serum Scr/BUN levels, apoptotic cells scores, increasing survival rates, and decreasing renal histology scores. Furthermore, treatment with CORM-2 significantly reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels and oxidative stress. Moreover, CORM-2 treatment significantly decreased NLRP3 inflammasome protein expressions. Our study provided evidence that CORM-2 treatment protected against sepsis-induced AKI and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and suggested that CORM-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate for treating sepsis-induced AKI. PMID:26334271

  19. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenqing; Nie, Lili; Yu, K N; Wu, Lijun; Kong, Peizhong; Bao, Lingzhi; Chen, Guodong; Yang, Haoran; Han, Wei

    2016-12-08

    During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2), at a relatively low concentration (20 µM), effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and micronucleus (MN). In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2) of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2) with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1), MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures.

  20. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and neurotrophin-3 levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, Ayhan; Toker, Aysun; Işık, Ümit; Kılınç, İbrahim

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggested that neurotrophins are involved in the etiopathogenesis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study aimed to investigate whether there are differences in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and neurotrophin-3 (NTF3) levels between children with ADHD and healthy controls. A total of 110 treatment-naive children with the combined presentation of ADHD and 44 healthy controls aged 8-18 years were enrolled in this study. The severity of ADHD symptoms was determined by scores on the Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised Short and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised Short. The severity of depression and anxiety symptoms of the children were evaluated by the self-report inventories. Serum levels of neurotrophins were measured using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) revealed a significant main effect of groups in the levels of serum neurotrophins, an effect that was independent of age, sex, and the severity of the depression and anxiety. The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) indicated that the mean serum GDNF and NTF3 levels of ADHD patients were significantly higher than that of controls. However, serum BDNF and NGF levels did not show any significant differences between groups. No correlations between the levels of serum neurotrophins and the severity of ADHD were observed. These results suggest that elevated serum GDNF and NTF3 levels may be related to ADHD in children.

  1. Association Between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Genotype and Upper Extremity Motor Outcome After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jungsoo; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-06-01

    The identification of intrinsic factors for predicting upper extremity motor outcome could aid the design of individualized treatment plans in stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors, including intrinsic genetic factors, for upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke. A total of 97 patients with subacute stroke were enrolled. Upper limb motor impairment was scored according to the upper limb of Fugl-Meyer assessment score at 3 months after stroke. The prediction of upper extremity motor outcome at 3 months was modeled using various factors that could potentially influence this impairment, including patient characteristics, baseline upper extremity motor impairment, functional and structural integrity of the corticospinal tract, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models were used to identify the significance of each factor. The independent predictors of motor outcome at 3 months were baseline upper extremity motor impairment, age, stroke type, and corticospinal tract functional integrity in all stroke patients. However, in the group with severe motor impairment at baseline (upper limb score of Fugl-Meyer assessment derived neurotrophic factor genotype was also an independent predictor of upper extremity motor outcome 3 months after stroke. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype may be a potentially useful predictor of upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke with severe baseline motor involvement. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of phloretin in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghumatkar, Priya J; Patil, Sachin P; Jain, Pankaj D; Tambe, Rufi M; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Phloretin (PHL), a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in the roots and leaves of apple tree. In vitro study on GT1-7 immortalized hypothalamic neurons exposed to amyloid beta (25-35), demonstrated that PHL significantly influenced membrane fluidity and potential. PHL also significantly decreased excitotoxicity by restoring the calcium homeostasis in the same. Thus, PHL proves to be a promising therapeutic moiety which should be further screened in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic roles of PHL in the subacute scopolamine induced amnesia in mice. In this study, mice were pretreated with PHL 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, 10mg/kg and Donepezil (DON) 1mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p) for 14days. The last 7days of treatment regimen included daily injection of SCP 1.5mg/kg to induce cognitive deficits. Mice were subjected to behavioral analysis. Biochemical estimation of the brain homogenates for acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress biomarkers were conducted. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was carried out particularly in the hippocampus. PHL was found to significantly improve the performance of mice in Morris water maze test (Pnootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic activities in SCP induced memory impaired mice and hence, is a promising therapeutic moiety in the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. More inflammation but less brain-derived neurotrophic factor in antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Hu, Ming-Chuan; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Lin, Shih-Hsien; Li, Chia-Ling; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2017-11-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is highly comorbid with substance use disorders (SUDs). We hypothesize that chronic neuroinflammation and the loss of neurotrophic factors prompts the pathogenesis of both disorders. We used ELISA to measure plasma levels of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], C-reactive protein [CRP]) and anti-inflammatory factors (transforming growth factor-β1 [TGF-β1] and interleukin-10 [IL-10]), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in male patients with ASPD (n=74), SUDs (n=168), ASPD comorbid with SUDs (ASPD+SUDs) (n=438), and Healthy Controls (HCs) (n=81). A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) controlled for possible confounders was used to compare cytokines and BDNF levels between groups. The results of MANCOVA adjusted for age showed a significant (pdisorder (OUD) and other SUDs groups showed that the IL-10 levels were specifically higher in OUD and ASPD±OUD groups than other SUDs (P≤0.001). We conclude that uncontrolled inflammation and losing neurotrophic factors, with or without comorbid SUDs, underlies ASPD. IL-10 expression might be more specifically associated with OUD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Flavonoid Naringenin Attenuates Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis and Improves Neurotrophic Effects in the Diabetic Rat Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dosari, Dalia I; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S; Alhomida, Abdullah S; Ola, Mohammad S

    2017-10-24

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of decreased vision and blindness worldwide. Diabetes-induced oxidative stress is believed to be the key factor that initiates neuronal damage in the diabetic retina leading to DR. Experimental approaches to utilize dietary flavonoids, which possess both antidiabetic and antioxidant activities, might protect the retinal damage in diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of naringenin in the retina of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats were orally treated and untreated with naringenin (50 mg/kg/day) for five weeks and retinas were analyzed for markers of oxidative stress, apoptosis and neurotrophic factors. Systemic effects of naringenin treatments were also analyzed and compared with untreated groups. The results showed that elevated levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) and decreased level of glutathione (GSH) in diabetic rats were ameliorated with naringenin treatments. Moreover, decreased levels of neuroprotective factors (Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)), tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB) and synaptophysin in diabetic retina were augmented with naringenin treatments. In addition, naringenin treatment ameliorated the levels of apoptosis regulatory proteins; B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3 in the diabetic retina. Thus, the study demonstrates the beneficial effects of naringenin that possesses anti-diabetic, antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties, which may limit neurodegeneration by providing neurotrophic support to prevent retinal damage in diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Purification and characterization of a long-acting ciliary neurotrophic factor via genetically fused with an albumin-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longfu; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yongdong; Su, Zhiguo

    2017-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promising candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative or metabolic diseases, but suffers rapid clearance in body. Herein we constructed a new long-acting recombinant human CNTF (rhCNTF) by genetic fusion with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) through a flexible peptide linker, hoping to endow the new molecule prolonged serum circulation time by binding with endogenous human serum albumin (HSA) and then utilizing the naturally long-half-life property of HSA. This fused protein rhCNTF-ABD was expressed in Escherichia coli mainly in the soluble form and purified through a two-step chromatography, with purity of 95% and a high yield of 90-100 mg/L culture. The in vitro binding ability of rhCNTF-ABD with HSA was firstly verified by incubation of the two components together followed by HP-SEC analysis. ABD-fused rhCNTF showed similar secondary and tertiary structure as the parent protein. It retained approximately 94.1% of the native bioactivity as demonstrated via CCK-8 cell viability assay analysis. In vivo studies in SD rats were performed and the terminal half-life of 483.89 min for rhCNTF-ABD was determined, which is about 14 folds longer than that of rhCNTF (34.28 min) and comparable with 20 k-40 kDa PEGylated rhCNTFs. The new constructed rhCNTF-ABD represents a potential therapeutic modality, and the proposed strategy may also have useful applications for other long-lasting biopharmaceutics' design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Compromised Neurotrophic and Angiogenic Regenerative Capability during Tendon Healing in a Rat Model of Type-II Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha S Ahmed

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus type-II (DM-II may increase the risk of suffering painful connective tissue disorders and tendon ruptures. The pathomechanisms, however, by which diabetes adversely affects connective tissue matrix metabolism and regeneration, still need better definition. Our aim was to study the effect of DM-II on expressional changes of neuro- and angiotrophic mediators and receptors in intact and healing Achilles tendon. The right Achilles tendon was transected in 5 male DM-II Goto-Kakizaki (GK and 4 age-matched Wistar control rats. The left Achilles tendons were left intact. At week 2 post-injury, NGF, BDNF, TSP, and receptors TrkA, TrkB and Nk1 gene expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR and their protein distribution by immunohistochemistry in intact and injured tendons. The expression of tendon-related markers, Scleraxis (SCX and Tenomodulin (TNMD, was evaluated by qRT-PCR in intact and injured tendons. Injured tendons of diabetic GK rats exhibited significantly down-regulated Ngf and Tsp1 mRNA and corresponding protein levels, and down-regulated Trka gene expression compared to injured Wistar controls. Intact tendons of DM-II GK rats displayed reduced mRNA levels for Ngf, Tsp1 and Trkb compared to corresponding intact non-diabetic tendons. Up-regulated Scx and Tnmd gene expression was observed in injured tendons of normal and diabetic GK rats compared to intact Wistar controls. However, these molecules were not up-regulated in injured DM-II GK rats compared to their corresponding controls. Our results suggest that DM-II has detrimental effects on neuro- and angiotrophic pathways, and such effects may reflect the compromised repair seen in diabetic Achilles tendon. Thus, novel approaches for regeneration of injured, including tendinopathic, and surgically repaired diabetic tendons may include therapeutic molecular modulation of neurotrophic pathways such as NGF and its receptors.

  7. Cabergoline, a dopamine receptor agonist, has an antidepressant-like property and enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuichi; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Ninomiya, Midori; Yoon, Hyung Shin; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Dopamine agonists have been implicated in the treatment of depression. Cabergoline is an ergot derivative with a high affinity to dopamine D(2)-like receptors; however, there have been few preclinical studies on its antidepressant-like effects. Behavioral effects of cabergoline were examined in rats using forced swimming (FST), novelty-suppressed feeding (NST), open field (OFT), and elevated-plus maze (EPT) tests. In a single treatment paradigm, behaviors of rats were analyzed 4 h after single injection of cabergoline (s.c., 0-4 micromol/kg). In a repeated-treatment paradigm, OFT, EPT, and FST were conducted on days 11, 12, and 13-14, respectively, during daily cabergoline injections (s.c., 0.5 micromol/kg), and then hippocampus was removed 24 h after the last injection. NST was conducted in a separate experiment at day 14. Western blotting was used for the analysis of the protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the activation of intracellular signaling molecules. Single injection of cabergoline demonstrated decreased immobility in FST and distance traveled during 0-10 min in OFT, while time spent and entry into open arms were increased at 4 micromol/kg. When cabergoline was repeatedly administered, immobility in FST and the latency of feeding in NSF were significantly reduced, while vertical movement was increased in OFT. The time in closed arms was tended to be decreased in EPT. Expression of BDNF and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 were up-regulated after the chronic administration of cabergoline. Cabergoline exerts antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects, which may be mediated by potentiation of intracellular signaling of BDNF.

  8. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  9. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  10. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  11. Endogenous production, exogenous delivery and impact-shock synthesis of organic molecules - An inventory for the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, Christopher; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of organic-rich comets, carbonaceous asteroids, and interplanetary dust particles and of impact shock-synthesized organics in the atmosphere to the origin of life on earth is studied and quantitatively compared with the principal non-heavy-bombardment sources of prebiotic organics. The results suggest that heavy bombardment before 3.5 Gyr ago either produced or delivered quantities of organics comparable to those produced by other energy sources.

  12. Ageing of enteric neurons: oxidative stress, neurotrophic factors and antioxidant enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsak Kris

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ageing is associated with gastrointestinal dysfunction, which can have a major impact on quality of life of the elderly. A number of changes in the innervation of the gut during ageing have been reported, including neuronal loss and degenerative changes. Evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS are elevated in ageing enteric neurons, but that neurotrophic factors may reduce generation of neuronal ROS. Two such factors, glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 have also been found to protect enteric neurons against oxidative stress induced cell death of enteric ganglion cells in vitro. We have investigated the possible roles of neurotrophic factors further, by examining their expression in the gut during ageing, and by analysing their effects on antioxidant enzyme production in cultures of enteric ganglion cells. Results Analysis of the expression of GDNF and its receptors c-Ret and GFR α − 1 in rat gut by RT-PCR showed that expression continues throughout life and into ageing, in both ad libitum(AL and calorically-restricted (CR animals. Levels of expression of GDNF and GFR α − 1 were elevated in 24 month AL animals compared to 24 month CR animals, and to 24 CR and 6 month control animals respectively. The related factor Neurturin and its receptor GFR α − 2 were also expressed throughout life, the levels of the GFR – α-2(b isoform were reduced in 24 m AL animals. Immunolabelling showed that c-Ret and GFR α − 1 proteins were expressed by myenteric neurons in ageing animals. GDNF, but not NT-3, was found to increase expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase by cultured enteric ganglion cells. Conclusions The neurotrophic factors GDNF and neurturin and their receptors continue to be expressed in the ageing gut. Changes in the levels of expression of GDNF , GFR α-1 and GFR α-2(b isoform occurred in 24 m AL animals. GDNF, but not

  13. Ciliary neurotrophic factor is not required for terminal sprouting and compensatory reinnervation of neuromuscular synapses: re-evaluation of CNTF null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Megan C; Son, Young-Jin

    2007-06-01

    Loss of synaptic activity or innervation induces sprouting of intact motor nerve terminals that adds or restores nerve-muscle connectivity. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and terminal Schwann cells (tSCs) have been implicated as molecular and cellular mediators of the compensatory process. We wondered if the previously reported lack of terminal sprouting in CNTF null mice was due to abnormal reactivity of tSCs. To this end, we examined nerve terminal and tSC responses in CNTF null mice using experimental systems that elicited extensive sprouting in wildtype mice. Contrary to the previous report, we found that motor nerve terminals in the null mice sprout extensively in response to major sprouting-stimuli such as exogenously applied CNTF per se, botulinum toxin-elicited paralysis, and partial denervation by L4 spinal root transection. In addition, the number, length and growth patterns of terminal sprouts, and the extent of reinnervation by terminal or nodal sprouts, were similar in wildtype and null mice. tSCs in the null mice were also reactive to the sprouting-stimuli, elaborating cellular processes that accompanied terminal sprouts or guided reinnervation of denervated muscle fibers. Lastly, CNTF was absent in quiescent tSCs in intact, wildtype muscles and little if any was detected in reactive tSCs in denervated muscles. Thus, CNTF is not required for induction of nerve terminal sprouting, for reactivation of tSCs, and for compensatory reinnervation after nerve injury. We interpret these results to support the notion that compensatory sprouting in adult muscles is induced primarily by contact-mediated mechanisms, rather than by diffusible factors.

  14. The contribution of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors to adult motor neuron survival in vivo is specific to insult type and distinct from that for embryonic motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Rydyznski, Carolyn E; Spearry, Rachel P; Robitz, Rachel; Maclennan, A John

    2013-10-01

    Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes motor neuron (MN) survival following trauma and in genetic models of MN disease. Unconditional disruption of the mouse CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene leads to MN loss, demonstrating a developmental role for endogenous CNTF receptor signaling. These data also suggest that CNTF receptors may promote adult MN survival and that appropriately manipulating the receptors could effectively treat adult MN disorders. This effort would greatly benefit from a better understanding of the roles played by CNTF receptors in adult MNs. We have previously found that adult onset disruption of CNTFRα in facial MNs of "floxed CNTFRα" mice by AAV-Cre vector injection leads to significantly more MN loss than in identically treated controls. While indicating that CNTF receptors can promote adult MN survival, the data did not distinguish between potential roles in MN maintenance versus roles in protecting MNs from the injection associated trauma or the toxicity of the chronic Cre recombinase (Cre) produced by the AAV-Cre. Here we used an inducible Cre gene construct to produce adult-onset CNTFRα disruption in facial MNs without the traumatic and toxic effects of the AAV-Cre procedure. The MNs survive without CNTFRα, even when challenged by facial nerve crush or the injection-associated trauma, thereby suggesting, in conjunction with our previous study, that endogenous CNTF receptor signaling can protect MNs against toxic insult, such as that produced by chronic Cre. The data also indicate that in vivo CNTF receptors play very different roles in adult and embryonic MNs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Exocytosis and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Interneuron Synapse by the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene Dysbindin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qiang; Yang, Feng; Xiao, Yixin; Tan, Shawn; Husain, Nilofer; Ren, Ming; Hu, Zhonghua; Martinowich, Keri; Ng, Julia S; Kim, Paul J; Han, Weiping; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Weinberger, Daniel R; Je, H Shawn

    2016-08-15

    Genetic variations in dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1 or dysbindin-1) have been implicated as risk factors in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The encoded protein dysbindin-1 functions in the regulation of synaptic activity and synapse development. Intriguingly, a loss of function mutation in Dtnbp1 in mice disrupted both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic transmission in the cerebral cortex; pyramidal neurons displayed enhanced excitability due to reductions in inhibitory synaptic inputs. However, the mechanism by which reduced dysbindin-1 activity causes inhibitory synaptic deficits remains unknown. We investigated the role of dysbindin-1 in the exocytosis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) from cortical excitatory neurons, organotypic brain slices, and acute slices from dysbindin-1 mutant mice and determined how this change in BDNF exocytosis transsynaptically affected the number of inhibitory synapses formed on excitatory neurons via whole-cell recordings, immunohistochemistry, and live-cell imaging using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. A decrease in dysbindin-1 reduces the exocytosis of BDNF from cortical excitatory neurons, and this reduction in BDNF exocytosis transsynaptically resulted in reduced inhibitory synapse numbers formed on excitatory neurons. Furthermore, application of exogenous BDNF rescued the inhibitory synaptic deficits caused by the reduced dysbindin-1 level in both cultured cortical neurons and slice cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate that these two genes linked to risk for schizophrenia (BDNF and dysbindin-1) function together to regulate interneuron development and cortical network activity. This evidence supports the investigation of the association between dysbindin-1 and BDNF in humans with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of Exogenous Testosterone for the Treatment of Male Factor Infertility: A Survey of Nigerian Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omisanjo, Olufunmilade Akinfolarin; Ikuerowo, Stephen Odunayo; Abdulsalam, Moruf Adekunle; Ajenifuja, Sheriff Olabode; Shittu, Khadijah Adebisi

    2017-01-01

    Though exogenous testosterone is known for its contraceptive effects in men, it is sometimes prescribed by medical practitioners for the treatment of male factor infertility in the mistaken belief that exogenous testosterone improves sperm count. The aim of this study was to evaluate the scope of testosterone use in the treatment of male factor infertility by medical practitioners in Lagos, Nigeria. A survey using a structured questionnaire was carried out amongst doctors attending a regular Continuing Medical Education (CME) programme in Lagos, Nigeria. There were 225 respondents. Most of the respondents (69.8%, n = 157) indicated that exogenous testosterone increases sperm count. Only 22 respondents (9.8%) indicated (correctly) that exogenous testosterone decreases sperm count. Seventy-seven respondents (34.2%) had prescribed some form of exogenous testosterone in the treatment of male factor infertility. The vast majority of respondents who had prescribed testosterone (81.8%, n = 63) thought exogenous testosterone increases sperm count. There was no statistically significant difference in the pattern of prescription across the respondents' specialty (p = 0.859) or practice type (p = 0.747). The misuse of exogenous testosterone for the treatment of male infertility was common amongst the respondents, with most of them wrongly believing that exogenous testosterone increases sperm count.

  17. Exogenous abscisic acid application during grain filling in winter wheat improves cold tolerance of offspring's seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, X.; Cai, J.; Liu, Fulai

    2014-01-01

    to exogenous ABA, resulting in much lowered malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 concentrations and O2- production rate. In addition, the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II was also enhanced in ABA-treated offspring's seedlings. It is concluded that exogenous ABA treatment at later grain-filling stage...

  18. Exogenous stimuli and circadian peak expiratory flow variation in allergic asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, DS; VanderHeide, S; DeReus, DM; Koeter, GH; VanAalderen, WMC; Meijer, G.

    The influence of exogenous factors in the home on the circadian variation of airway obstruction has not been fully assessed in children with asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of exogenous stimuli to the degree of peak expiratory flow (PEF) variability during 24

  19. On the Metabolism of Exogenous Ketones in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna J. Stubbs

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Currently there is considerable interest in ketone metabolism owing to recently reported benefits of ketosis for human health. Traditionally, ketosis has been achieved by following a high-fat, low-carbohydrate “ketogenic” diet, but adherence to such diets can be difficult. An alternative way to increase blood D-β-hydroxybutyrate (D-βHB concentrations is ketone drinks, but the metabolic effects of exogenous ketones are relatively unknown. Here, healthy human volunteers took part in three randomized metabolic studies of drinks containing a ketone ester (KE; (R-3-hydroxybutyl (R-3-hydroxybutyrate, or ketone salts (KS; sodium plus potassium βHB.Methods and Results: In the first study, 15 participants consumed KE or KS drinks that delivered ~12 or ~24 g of βHB. Both drinks elevated blood D-βHB concentrations (D-βHB Cmax: KE 2.8 mM, KS 1.0 mM, P < 0.001, which returned to baseline within 3–4 h. KS drinks were found to contain 50% of the L-βHB isoform, which remained elevated in blood for over 8 h, but was not detectable after 24 h. Urinary excretion of both D-βHB and L-βHB was <1.5% of the total βHB ingested and was in proportion to the blood AUC. D-βHB, but not L-βHB, was slowly converted to breath acetone. The KE drink decreased blood pH by 0.10 and the KS drink increased urinary pH from 5.7 to 8.5. In the second study, the effect of a meal before a KE drink on blood D-βHB concentrations was determined in 16 participants. Food lowered blood D-βHB Cmax by 33% (Fed 2.2 mM, Fasted 3.3 mM, P < 0.001, but did not alter acetoacetate or breath acetone concentrations. All ketone drinks lowered blood glucose, free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations, and had similar effects on blood electrolytes, which remained normal. In the final study, participants were given KE over 9 h as three drinks (n = 12 or a continuous nasogastric infusion (n = 4 to maintain blood D-βHB concentrations greater than 1 mM. Both drinks

  20. Globally Important Haptophyte Algae Use Exogenous Pyrimidine Compounds More Efficiently than Thiamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowska, Magdalena A; Shome, Brateen; Sudek, Sebastian; McRose, Darcy L; Hamilton, Maria; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Begley, Tadhg P; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2017-10-10

    the productivity and structure of eukaryotic phytoplankton communities has been discussed for half a century. We examined B1 biosynthesis and salvage pathways in diverse phytoplankton species. These comparative genomic analyses as well as experiments show that phytoplankton thought to require exogenous B1 not only utilize intermediate compounds to meet this need but also exhibit stronger growth on these compounds than on thiamin. Furthermore, oceanic phytoplankton have lower cellular thiamin quotas than previously reported, and salvage of intermediate compounds is likely a key mechanism for meeting B1 requirements under environmentally relevant scenarios. Thus, several lines of evidence now suggest that availability of specific precursor molecules could be more important in structuring phytoplankton communities than the vitamin itself. This understanding of preferential compound utilization and thiamin quotas will improve biogeochemical model parameterization and highlights interaction networks among ocean microbes. Copyright © 2017 Gutowska et al.

  1. Competition between endogenous and exogenous attention to nonemotional stimuli in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Jun; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated whether impaired endogenous attention and enhanced exogenous attention for the processing of nonemotional stimuli were observed in individuals with high social anxiety. In each trial, participants were presented with an endogenous cue at a center, followed by exogenous cues at peripheral locations; subsequently, nonemotional masked targets were presented wherein the subjects were asked to distinguish between the targets. The accuracy rates were influenced by social anxiety only in exogenous conditions. Individuals with high social anxiety exhibited higher accuracy in the valid condition than in the invalid condition of exogenous attention, whereas individuals with low social anxiety displayed uniform accuracy rates in valid, neutral, and invalid conditions. The validity effects in individuals with high social anxiety did not diminish when controlling for trait and state anxiety and depression. The results suggest that individuals with high social anxiety have an enhanced exogenous attentional system and that they are attracted to salient stimuli regardless of emotionality.

  2. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  3. Endogenous and exogenous control of gametogenesis and spawning in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Annie; Hamel, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    Most echinoderms display seasonal or other temporal cycles of reproduction that presumably result from the complex interplay of endogenous and exogenous signals. Various environmental, chemical and hormonal factors, acting directly or indirectly, individually or in combination, have been proposed to cue, favour or modulate a suite of reproductive functions from the onset of gametogenesis to gamete release. From as early as the nineteenth century, an astonishing array of studies has been published on topics related to the control of reproduction in echinoderms, ranging from fortuitous behavioural observations to complex experimental demonstrations and molecular analyses. Although the exact pathways involved in the perception of external signals and their transduction into coordinated spawning events remain obscure for most species, significant advances have been made that shed new light on the information gathered over decades of research. By compiling the existing literature (over 1000 references), interpreting the main results, critically assessing the methodologies used and reviewing the emerging hypotheses, we endeavour to draw a clearer picture of the existing knowledge and to provide a framework for future investigation of the mechanisms that underlie reproductive strategies in echinoderms and, by extension, in other marine invertebrates.

  4. Exogenous application of glycinebetaine increases chilling tolerance in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eung-Jun; Jeknic, Zoran; Chen, Tony H H

    2006-06-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Moneymaker) plants are chilling sensitive, and do not naturally accumulate glycinebetaine (GB), a metabolite that functions as a stress protectant. We reported previously that exogenous GB application enhanced chilling tolerance in tomato. To understand its protective role better, we have further evaluated various parameters associated with improved tolerance. Although its effect was most pronounced in younger plants, this benefit was diminished 1 week after GB application. When administered by foliar spray, GB was readily taken up and translocated to various organs, with the highest levels being measured in meristematic tissues, including the shoot apices and flower buds. In leaves, the majority of endogenous GB was found in the cytosol; only 0.6-22.0% of the total leaf GB was localized in chloroplasts. Immediately after GB application, levels of H(2)O(2), catalase activity and expression of the catalase gene (CAT1) were all higher in GB-treated than in control plants. One day after exposure to chilling stress, the treated plants had significantly greater catalase activity and CAT1 expression, although their H(2)O(2) levels remained unchanged. During the following 2 d of this chilling treatment, GB-treated plants maintained lower H(2)O(2) levels but had higher catalase activity than the controls. These results suggest that, in addition to protecting macromolecules and membranes directly, GB-enhanced chilling tolerance may involve the induction of H(2)O(2)-mediated antioxidant mechanisms, e.g. enhanced catalase expression and catalase activity.

  5. Dynamic structural transformations of coordination supramolecular systems upon exogenous stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Peng; Chen, Jing; Liu, Chun-Sen; Du, Miao

    2015-02-18

    Reactions in the solid state, especially single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SC-SC) transformations, provide an appealing pathway to obtain target crystalline materials with modified properties via a solvent-free green chemistry approach. This feature article focuses on the progress to date in the context of coordination supramolecular systems (CSSs), especially coordination polymers (CPs) or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which show interesting dynamic natures upon exposure to various exogenous stimuli, including concentration, temperature, light and mechanical force, as well as their synergic effect. In essence, dynamic CSSs normally possess crucial crystalline-reactive characteristics: (i) metal ions or clusters with unstable or metastable electronic configurations and coordination geometries; (ii) organic ligands bearing physicochemically active functional groups for subsequent reactions; (iii) polymeric networks of high flexibility for structural bending, rotation, swelling, or shrinking; (iv) guest moieties to be freely exchanged or eliminated by varying the environmental conditions. The significant changes in catalytic, sorption, magnetic, or luminescent properties accompanied by the structural transformations will also be discussed, which reveal the proof-of-concept thereof in designing new functional crystalline materials.

  6. Exposure to Early Life Stress Results in Epigenetic Changes in Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in a Parkinsonian Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabisile Mpofana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early life adversity increases the risk of mental disorders later in life. Chronic early life stress may alter neurotrophic factor gene expression including those for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF that are important in neuronal growth, survival, and maintenance. Maternal separation was used in this study to model early life stress. Following unilateral injection of a mild dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, we measured corticosterone (CORT in the blood and striatum of stressed and nonstressed rats; we also measured DNA methylation and BDNF and GDNF gene expression in the striatum using real time PCR. In the presence of stress, we found that there was increased corticosterone concentration in both blood and striatal tissue. Further to this, we found higher DNA methylation and decreased neurotrophic factor gene expression. 6-OHDA lesion increased neurotrophic factor gene expression in both stressed and nonstressed rats but this increase was higher in the nonstressed rats. Our results suggest that exposure to early postnatal stress increases corticosterone concentration which leads to increased DNA methylation. This effect results in decreased BDNF and GDNF gene expression in the striatum leading to decreased protection against subsequent insults later in life.

  7. Alterations in BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) and GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) serum levels in bipolar disorder: The role of lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Zeliha; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Ceylan, Deniz; Yalçın, Yaprak; Can, Güneş; Resmi, Halil; Akan, Pınar; Ergör, Gül; Aydemir, Omer; Cengisiz, Cengiz; Kerim, Doyuran

    2014-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been consistently reported to be decreased in mania or depression in bipolar disorders. Evidence suggests that Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has a role in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. Whether GDNF and BDNF act in the same way across different episodes in bipolar disorders is unclear. BDNF and GDNF serum levels were measured simultaneously by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in 96 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder according to DSM-IV (37 euthymic, 33 manic, 26 depressed) in comparison to 61 healthy volunteers. SCID- I and SCID-non patient version were used for clinical evaluation of the patients and healthy volunteers respectively. Correlations between the two trophic factor levels, and medication dose, duration and serum levels of lithium or valproate were studied across different episodes of illness. Patients had significantly lower BDNF levels during mania and depression compared to euthymic patients and healthy controls. GDNF levels were not distinctive. However GDNF/BDNF ratio was higher in manic state compared to euthymia and healthy controls. Significant negative correlation was observed between BDNF and GDNF levels in euthymic patients. While BDNF levels correlated positively, GDNF levels correlated negatively with lithium levels. Regression analysis confirmed that lithium levels predicted only GDNF levels positively in mania, and negatively in euthymia. Small sample size in different episodes and drug-free patients was the limitation of thestudy. Current data suggests that lithium exerts its therapeutic action by an inverse effect on BDNF and GDNF levels, possibly by up-regulating BDNF and down-regulating GDNF to achieve euthymia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Astrocytes as a source for Extracellular matrix molecules and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eWiese

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Research of the past 25 years has shown that astrocytes do more than participating and building up the blood brain barrier and detoxify the active synapse by reuptake of neurotransmitters and ions. Indeed, astrocytes express neurotransmitter receptors and, as a consequence, respond to stimuli. Deeper knowledge of the differentiation processes during development of the central nervous system (CNS might help explaining and even help treating neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and psychiatric disorders in which astrocytes have been shown to play a role. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes develop from a multipotent stem cell that prior to this has produced primarily neuronal precursor cells. This switch towards the more astroglial differentiation is regulated by a change in receptor composition on the cell surface and responsiveness of the respective trophic factors Fibroblast growth factor (FGF and Epidermal growth factor (EGF. The glial precursor cell is driven into the astroglial direction by signaling molecules like Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, and EGF. However, the early astrocytes influence their environment not only by releasing and responding to diverse soluble factors but also express a wide range of extracellular matrix (ECM molecules, in particular proteoglycans of the lectican family and tenascins. Lately these ECM molecules have been shown to participate in glial development. In this regard, especially the matrix protein Tenascin C (Tnc proved to be an important regulator of astrocyte precursor cell proliferation and migration during spinal cord development. On the other hand, ECM molecules expressed by reactive astrocytes are also known to act mostly in an inhibitory fashion under pathophysiological conditions. In this regard, we further summarize recent data concerning the role of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and Tnc under pathological

  9. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    etc.) as well as explain the variations in bond lengths, bond angles, conformational angles, barriers to internal rotation! inversion, stretching!bending force constants, etc. However, when a molecule is quite large, with many occupied MOs, it is not advisable to bypass the actual computation of forces. As another application of ...

  11. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Molecular lattices; spin–spin interaction; photo-induced magnetism; single molecule magnets. ... Since the first successful synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be categorized on the basis of the chemical nature of the magnetic units involved: organic-, ...

  12. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  13. Quantum Interference of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL │ ARTICLE. Quantum Interference of Molecules. Probing the Wave Nature of Matter. Anu Venugopalan. Keywords. Matter waves, wave-particle du- ality, electron interference, decoherence. Anu Venugopalan is on the faculty of the School of. Basic and Applied. Sciences, GGS. Indraprastha University,. Delhi.

  14. On quark molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A D; Okun, Lev Borisovich

    1974-01-01

    A nonrelativistic quark model with three triplets and an octet of coloured gluons is considered. The interaction energy is calculated for some quark molecules. It is shown that states of the type qqqq and qqqqq are bounded more tightly than qq and qqq, respectively. This may indicate an existence of exotic particles in the nature or, perhaps, that the model is invalid. (11 refs).

  15. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  16. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Molecular-Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1303-1306. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    attempting to adapt the success of organic chemistry in the study of organosilicon compounds. Nevertheless chemists persisted with a sense of doggedness to try and mimic organic molecules with non- carbon elements. The year 1981 marks a watershed in the efforts to prepare and stabilise multiply-bonded compounds of ...

  18. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2015-11-10

    Nov 10, 2015 ... Module 3: Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter: Quantum theory of radiation, spontaneous, stimulated emission and absorption probabilities, electric dipole selection rules, Einstein A and B coefficients, Rabi coefficients, Thomson Scattering, Jaynes-Cummings Model. Module 4: Molecules ...

  19. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ethanol, blue in isopropyl alcohol, green in acetone and greenish-yellow in anisole. The electronic absorption spectrum of a molecule often depends on the solvent used. The change in position (and, sometimes, intensity) of the UVNis band accompanying a change in the polarity of the medium is called solvatochromism.

  20. Excitons: Molecules in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Forming molecules from atoms is commonplace in dense atomic gases. But it now seems that some two-dimensional materials provide a suitable environment for creating complex molecular states from the hydrogen-like electron-hole pairs that form in semiconductors.

  1. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Molecule of the Month Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 66-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    a heterogeneous medium the local environment of each molecule may be different. This gives rise to large vari- ations of those properties which depend on the medium. (e.g., local polarity or viscosity). For instance, in a bio- logical cell the local environment at the membrane may be drastically different from that in the ...

  3. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1232-1237. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Transfection of the inner cell mass and lack of a unique DNA sequence affecting the uptake of exogenous DNA by sperm as shown by dideoxy sequencing analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, M; Chan, P J; Kalugdan, T H; King, A

    1997-02-01

    . Band intensities of the four sequencing columns were similar. Formalin pretreatment of the sperm inhibited uptake of the DNA fragments from the smallest to the largest DNA molecules. Exogenous DNA taken into blastocysts are localized to both the inner cell mass and trophoblast cells. Only live sperm exhibited the capacity to carry various sizes of exogenous DNA, suggesting the involvement of active cell membrane mechanism in the transference process. The results showed that DNA fragments terminating in any of the four nucleotides were equally taken up by the sperm cell. Fragments of DNA produced by the sequencing reaction failed to identify a unique DNA sequence that would facilitate or inhibit the sperm from taking up exogenous DNA.

  5. Leptin, ciliary neurotrophic factor, leukemia inhibitory factor and interleukin-6: class-I cytokines involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of the reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozio, E; Ruscica, M; Galliera, E; Corsi, M M; Magni, P

    2009-12-01

    Class-I cytokines represent a large group of molecules involved in different physiological processes including host defence, immune regulation, food intake, energy metabolism and, relevant for this review, reproduction. In this latter respect, here, we focus the attention on four of these molecules, specifically leptin, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). These cytokines present similar three-dimensional fold structure, interact with related class-I receptors, which are expressed in the same regions (i.e., hypothalamus), and activate similar intracellular pathways. Leptin and CNTF share functional similarities, by acting at hypothalamic and pituitary levels, and their receptors are colocalized in the arcuate and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. For both these molecules, no effect on GnRH migration has been described. LIF has also been shown to affect gonadotropin secretion and here we present the novel observation that it is also able to stimulate GnRH secretion in vitro. Moreover, in the mouse, LIF is prenatally expressed in nasal regions where GnRH neurons originate and start their migration, and in vitro it stimulates intrinsic cell motility and directional migration. The role of the prototypical cytokine, IL-6, on the GnRH-LH axis is not fully clear and additional information seem necessary to better clarify this aspect. In conclusion, the data here discussed suggest that this family of cytokines appears to participate to the complex control of the reproductive function by affecting the development and function of the hypothalamus-pituitary system at different ontogenic times and anatomical sites.

  6. Chronic sleep restriction elevates brain interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha and attenuates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Mark R; Kim, Youngsoo; Karpova, Svetlana A; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E; Gerashchenko, Dmitry

    2014-09-19

    Acute sleep loss increases pro-inflammatory and synaptic plasticity-related molecules in the brain, including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These molecules enhance non-rapid eye movement sleep slow wave activity (SWA), also known as electroencephalogram delta power, and modulate neurocognitive performance. Evidence suggests that chronic sleep restriction (CSR), a condition prevalent in today's society, does not elicit the enhanced SWA that is seen after acute sleep loss, although it cumulatively impairs neurocognitive functioning. Rats were continuously sleep deprived for 18h per day and allowed 6h of ad libitum sleep opportunity for 1 (SR1), 3 (SR3), or 5 (SR5) successive days (i.e., CSR). IL-1β, TNF-α, and BDNF mRNA levels were determined in the somatosensory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and basal forebrain. Largely, brain IL-1β and TNF-α expression were significantly enhanced throughout CSR. In contrast, BDNF mRNA levels were similar to baseline values in the cortex after 1 day of SR and significantly lower than baseline values in the hippocampus after 5 days of SR. In the basal forebrain, BDNF expression remained elevated throughout the 5 days of CSR, although IL-1β expression was significantly reduced. The chronic elevations of IL-1β and TNF-α and inhibition of BDNF might contribute to the reported lack of SWA responses reported after CSR. Further, the CSR-induced enhancements in brain inflammatory molecules and attenuations in hippocampal BDNF might contribute to neurocognitive and vigilance detriments that occur from CSR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rescue and sprouting of motoneurons following ventral root avulsion and reimplantation combined with intraspinal adeno-associated viral vector-mediated expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blits, Bas; Carlstedt, Thomas P; Ruitenberg, Marc Jan; de Winter, Fred; Hermens, Wim T J M C; Dijkhuizen, Paul A; Claasens, Jill W C; Eggers, Ruben; van der Sluis, Ronald; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, Joost

    2004-10-01

    Following avulsion of a spinal ventral root, motoneurons that project through the avulsed root are axotomized. Avulsion between, for example, L2 and L6 leads to denervation of hind limb muscles. Reimplantation of an avulsed root directed to the motoneuron pool resulted in re-ingrowth of some motor axons. However, most motoneurons display retrograde atrophy and subsequently die. Two neurotrophic factors, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), promote the survival of motoneurons after injury. The long-term delivery of these neurotrophic factors to the motoneurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord is problematic. One strategy to improve the outcome of the neurosurgical reinsertion of the ventral root following avulsion would involve gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding these neurotrophic factors near the denervated motoneuron pool. Here, we show that AAV-mediated overexpression of GDNF and BDNF in the spinal cord persisted for at least 16 weeks. At both 1 and 4 months post-lesion AAV-BDNF- and -GDNF-treated animals showed an increased survival of motoneurons, the effect being more prominent at 1 month. AAV vector-mediated overexpression of neurotrophins also promoted the formation of a network of motoneuron fibers in the ventral horn at the avulsed side, but motoneurons failed to extent axons into the reinserted L4 root towards the sciatic nerve nor to improve functional recovery of the hind limbs. This suggests that high levels of neurotrophic factors in the ventral horn promote sprouting, but prevent directional growth of axons of a higher number of surviving motoneurons into the implanted root.

  8. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  9. In vitro assessment of TAT - Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor therapeutic potential for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbon, Silvia; Stocco, Elena; Negro, Alessandro; Dalzoppo, Daniele; Borgio, Luca; Rajendran, Senthilkumar; Grandi, Francesca; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Grandi, Claudio

    2016-10-15

    In regenerative neurobiology, Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) is raising high interest as a multifunctional neurocytokine, playing a key role in the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. Despite its promising trophic and regulatory activity, its clinical application is limited by the onset of severe side effects, due to the lack of efficient intracellular trafficking after administration. In this study, recombinant CNTF linked to the transactivator transduction domain (TAT) was investigated in vitro and found to be an optimized fusion protein which preserves neurotrophic activity, besides enhancing cellular uptake for therapeutic advantage. Moreover, a compelling protein delivery method was defined, in the future perspective of improving nerve regeneration strategies. Following determination of TAT-CNTF molecular weight and concentration, its specific effect on neural SH-SY5Y and PC12 cultures was assessed. Cell proliferation assay demonstrated that the fusion protein triggers PC12 cell growth within 6h of stimulation. At the same time, the activation of signal transduction pathway and enhancement of cellular trafficking were found to be accomplished in both neural cell lines after specific treatment with TAT-CNTF. Finally, the recombinant growth factor was successfully loaded on oxidized polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds, and more efficiently released when polymer oxidation rate increased. Taken together, our results highlight that the TAT domain addiction to the protein sequence preserves CNTF specific neurotrophic activity in vitro, besides improving cellular uptake. Moreover, oxidized PVA could represent an ideal biomaterial for the development of nerve conduits loaded with the fusion protein to be delivered to the site of nerve injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Unchanged Neurotrophic Factors and Their Receptors Correlate With Sparing in Extraocular Muscles in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, Vahid M; Gaied, Aida R N; Brännström, Thomas; Pedrosa Domellöf, Fatima; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the impact of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on the extraocular muscles (EOMs) by examining the distribution of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and their receptors in EOMs and limb muscles from ALS transgenic mice. Muscle samples collected from transgenic mice overexpressing human superoxide dismutase type 1 mutations (SOD1G93A, the most widely used mouse model of ALS) at 50 and 150 days as well as age-matched controls were analyzed with immunohistochemistry using antibodies against brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and the neurotrophin receptors p75NTR, tyrosine kinase (Trk) receptor TrkB and TrkC, and GDNF family receptor alpha-1 (GFRα-1). There was an intrinsic difference in NTF expression between EOMs and limb muscles in control mice: EOMs presented significantly lower number of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) labeled for BDNF and NT-4 at 50 days, and for BDNF and GDNF at 150 days, compared with the control limb muscles of corresponding age. In ALS transgenic mice at 150 days, NTF expression in limb muscles was significantly changed but not in EOMs: the limb muscles presented a significant decline in the number of NMJs labeled for BDNF, NT-4, GDNF, p75NTR, TrkB, and TrkC, which was not observed in EOMs. The significant differences in expression of NTFs on NMJs between EOMs and limb muscles in both control and ALS transgenic mice suggest that NTF may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALS and the resistance of EOMs to the disease.

  11. Modulation of neurogenesis via neurotrophic factors in acupuncture treatments for neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Sae-Won; Choi, Byung Tae

    2017-10-01

    Acupuncture is one of the main healing arts in Oriental medicine. It has long been used in East Asian countries, including Korea and China, and is thought to be an effective alternative treatment for various neurological diseases. The therapeutic effects of acupuncture come from inserting a needle at specific acupoints on the body surface, with subsequent delivery of stimulation via manual rotation or electric pulses (electroacupuncture, EA). In various neurological disease models, peripheral nerve stimulation using acupuncture or EA may have protective effects on neural tissues by increasing expression of neurotrophic factors (NTFs), such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial-derived neurotrophic factor, in the central nervous system, especially the brain. In addition, acupuncture may contribute to recovery from functional impairments following brain damage by encouraging neural stem cell proliferation, which is active at the initial stage of injury, and by further facilitating differentiation. Hence, acupuncture may act as a stimulator activating peripheral nerves at specific acupoints and inducing the expression of various NTFs in the brain. Subsequently, NTFs induced by this treatment trigger autocrine or paracrine signaling, which stimulates adult neurogenesis, thereby exerting therapeutic effects on functional impairments in neurological diseases. Acupuncture may offer an alternative treatment that promotes adult neurogenesis through the expression of NTFs in the brain. It may also have synergistic effects when combined with pharmacological interventions, again facilitating neurogenesis. This review examines recent studies concerning the effects of acupuncture and EA on adult neurogenesis associated with NTF expression in neurological diseases, in particular stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical exercise in overweight to obese individuals induces metabolic- and neurotrophic-related structural brain plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eMueller

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous cross-sectional studies on body-weight-related alterations in brain structure revealed profound changes in the gray matter (GM and white matter (WM that resemble findings obtained from individuals with advancing age. This suggests that obesity may lead to structural brain changes that are comparable with brain aging. Here, we asked whether weight-loss-dependent improved metabolic and neurotrophic functioning parallels the reversal of obesity-related alterations in brain structure. To this end we applied magnetic resonance imaging together with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-tensor imaging in overweight to obese individuals who participated in a fitness course with intensive physical training three days per week over a period of three months. After the fitness course, participants presented, with inter-individual heterogeneity, a reduced body mass index (BMI, reduced serum leptin concentrations, elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, and alterations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentrations suggesting changes of metabolic and neurotrophic function. Exercise-dependent changes in BMI and serum concentration of BDNF, leptin, and HDL-C were related to an increase in GM density in the left hippocampus, the insular cortex, and the left cerebellar lobule. We also observed exercise-dependent changes of diffusivity parameters in surrounding WM structures as well as in the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that weight-loss due to physical exercise in overweight to obese participants induces profound structural brain plasticity, not primarily of sensorimotor brain regions involved in physical exercise, but of regions previously reported to be structurally affected by an increased body weight and functionally implemented in gustation and cognitive processing.

  13. Physical exercise in overweight to obese individuals induces metabolic- and neurotrophic-related structural brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Möller, Harald E; Horstmann, Annette; Busse, Franziska; Lepsien, Jöran; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies on body-weight-related alterations in brain structure revealed profound changes in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) that resemble findings obtained from individuals with advancing age. This suggests that obesity may lead to structural brain changes that are comparable with brain aging. Here, we asked whether weight-loss-dependent improved metabolic and neurotrophic functioning parallels the reversal of obesity-related alterations in brain structure. To this end we applied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-tensor imaging in overweight to obese individuals who participated in a fitness course with intensive physical training twice a week over a period of 3 months. After the fitness course, participants presented, with inter-individual heterogeneity, a reduced body mass index (BMI), reduced serum leptin concentrations, elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and alterations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations suggesting changes of metabolic and neurotrophic function. Exercise-dependent changes in BMI and serum concentration of BDNF, leptin, and HDL-C were related to an increase in GM density in the left hippocampus, the insular cortex, and the left cerebellar lobule. We also observed exercise-dependent changes of diffusivity parameters in surrounding WM structures as well as in the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that weight-loss due to physical exercise in overweight to obese participants induces profound structural brain plasticity, not primarily of sensorimotor brain regions involved in physical exercise, but of regions previously reported to be structurally affected by an increased body weight and functionally implemented in gustation and cognitive processing.

  14. Neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of long term lithium treatment in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riadh, Nciri; Allagui, Mohamed Salah; Bourogaa, Ezzedine; Vincent, Christian; Croute, Françoise; Elfeki, Abdelfattah

    2011-08-01

    Since the worldwide approval of lithium therapy in 1970, lithium has been used for its anti-manic, antidepressant, and anti-suicidal effects. The last decade has witnessed the following discoveries about its neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, yet the therapeutic mechanisms at the cellular level remain not-fully defined. We have undertaken the present study to determine if chronic lithium treatment, at therapeutically relevant concentrations, exerts neurotrophic/neuroprotective effects in the mouse brain in vivo. For this purpose, 10 months aged mice were fed for 3 months on food pellets contained 1 g (L1 group) or 2 g (L2 group) lithium carbonate/kg, resulting in serum concentrations of 0.4 and 0.8 mM, respectively. The evaluation of lipid peroxidation level and the activities of catalase, superoxide-dismutase and glutathione-peroxidase showed that chronic Li administration, at therapeutic doses doesn't induce oxidative stress in brain tissue. No changes in the expression levels of molecular chaperones, namely, the HSP70, and HSP90 heat shock proteins and the GRP94 glucose-regulated protein were detected. Moreover, this treatment has caused (1) an increase in the relative brain weight (2) a delay in the age induced cerebral glucose impairment (3) an enhancement of the neurogenesis in hippocampus and enthorinal cortex highlighted by silver impregnation. Under these experimental conditions, no modifications were observed in expression levels of GSK3 and of its downstream target β-catenin proteins. These results suggested that chronic Li administration, at therapeutic doses, has a neuroprotective/neurotrophic properties and its therapeutic mechanism doesn't implicate GSK3 inactivation.

  15. Exogenous normal lymph reduces liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharides in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.G. Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The liver is one of the target organs damaged by septic shock, wherein the spread of endotoxins begins. This study aimed to investigate the effects of exogenous normal lymph (ENL on lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, LPS, and LPS+ENL groups. LPS (15 mg/kg was administered intravenously via the left jugular vein to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups. At 15 min after the LPS injection, saline or ENL without cell components (5 mL/kg was administered to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups, respectively, at a rate of 0.5 mL/min. Hepatocellular injury indices and hepatic histomorphology, as well as levels of P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and Na+-K+-ATPase, were assessed in hepatic tissues. Liver tissue damage occurred after LPS injection. All levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST in plasma as well as the wet/dry weight ratio of hepatic tissue in plasma increased. Similarly, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and MPO levels in hepatic tissues were elevated, whereas Na+-K+-ATPase activity in hepatocytes decreased. ENL treatment lessened hepatic tissue damage and decreased levels of AST, ALT, ICAM-1, and MPO. Meanwhile, the treatment increased the activity of Na+-K+-ATPase. These results indicated that ENL could alleviate LPS-induced liver injury, thereby suggesting an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of liver injury accompanied by severe infection or sepsis.

  16. Exogenous normal lymph reduces liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharides in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.G.; Zhang, L.L.; Niu, C.Y.; Zhang, J. [Institute of Microcirculation, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, China, Institute of Microcirculation, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, Hebei (China)

    2014-02-17

    The liver is one of the target organs damaged by septic shock, wherein the spread of endotoxins begins. This study aimed to investigate the effects of exogenous normal lymph (ENL) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, LPS, and LPS+ENL groups. LPS (15 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via the left jugular vein to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups. At 15 min after the LPS injection, saline or ENL without cell components (5 mL/kg) was administered to the LPS and LPS+ENL groups, respectively, at a rate of 0.5 mL/min. Hepatocellular injury indices and hepatic histomorphology, as well as levels of P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase, were assessed in hepatic tissues. Liver tissue damage occurred after LPS injection. All levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in plasma as well as the wet/dry weight ratio of hepatic tissue in plasma increased. Similarly, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and MPO levels in hepatic tissues were elevated, whereas Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity in hepatocytes decreased. ENL treatment lessened hepatic tissue damage and decreased levels of AST, ALT, ICAM-1, and MPO. Meanwhile, the treatment increased the activity of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. These results indicated that ENL could alleviate LPS-induced liver injury, thereby suggesting an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of liver injury accompanied by severe infection or sepsis.

  17. Ozone Concentration Prediction via Spatiotemporal Autoregressive Model With Exogenous Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoun, W.; Senoussi, R.

    2009-04-01

    Forecast of environmental variables are nowadays of main concern for public health or agricultural management. In this context a large literature is devoted to spatio-temporal modelling of these variables using different statistical approaches. However, most of studies ignored the potential contribution of local (e.g. meteorological and/or geographical) covariables as well as the dynamical characteristics of observations. In this study, we present a spatiotemporal short term forecasting model for ozone concentration based on regularly observed covariables in predefined geographical sites. Our driving system simply combines a multidimensional second order autoregressive structured process with a linear regression model over influent exogenous factors and reads as follows: ‘2 ‘q j Z (t) = A (Î&,cedil;D )Ã- [ αiZ(t- i)]+ B (Î&,cedil;D )Ã- [ βjX (t)]+ ɛ(t) i=1 j=1 Z(t)=(Z1(t),…,Zn(t)) represents the vector of ozone concentration at time t of the n geographical sites, whereas Xj(t)=(X1j(t),…,Xnj(t)) denotes the jth exogenous variable observed over these sites. The nxn matrix functions A and B account for the spatial relationships between sites through the inter site distance matrix D and a vector parameter Î&.cedil; Multidimensional white noise ɛ is assumed to be Gaussian and spatially correlated but temporally independent. A covariance structure of Z that takes account of noise spatial dependences is deduced under a stationary hypothesis and then included in the likelihood function. Statistical model and estimation procedure: Contrarily to the widely used choice of a {0,1}-valued neighbour matrix A, we put forward two more natural choices of exponential or power decay. Moreover, the model revealed enough stable to readily accommodate the crude observations without the usual tedious and somewhat arbitrarily variable transformations. Data set and preliminary analysis: In our case, ozone variable represents here the daily maximum ozone

  18. Preventive effects of chronic exogenous growth hormone levels on diet-induced hepatic steatosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Ya-ping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which is characterized by hepatic steatosis, can be reversed by early treatment. Several case reports have indicated that the administration of recombinant growth hormone (GH could improve fatty liver in GH-deficient patients. Here, we investigated whether chronic exogenous GH levels could improve hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet in rats, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Results High-fat diet-fed rats developed abdominal obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance. Chronic exogenous GH improved fatty liver, by reversing dyslipidaemia, fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Exogenous GH also reduced serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha levels, and ameliorated hepatic lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. Hepatic fat deposition was also reduced by exogenous GH levels, as was the expression of adipocyte-derived adipokines (adiponectin, leptin and resistin, which might improve lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis. Exogenous GH seems to improve fatty liver by reducing fat weight, improving insulin sensitivity and correcting oxidative stress, which may be achieved through phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of a group of signal transducers and activators of hepatic signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Chronic exogenous GH has positive effects on fatty liver and may be a potential clinical application in the prevention or reversal of fatty liver. However, chronic secretion of exogenous GH, even at a low level, may increase serum glucose and insulin levels in rats fed a standard diet, and thus increase the risk of insulin resistance.

  19. Self-protection against gliotoxin--a component of the gliotoxin biosynthetic cluster, GliT, completely protects Aspergillus fumigatus against exogenous gliotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schrettl

    Full Text Available Gliotoxin, and other related molecules, are encoded by multi-gene clusters and biosynthesized by fungi using non-ribosomal biosynthetic mechanisms. Almost universally described in terms of its toxicity towards mammalian cells, gliotoxin has come to be considered as a component of the virulence arsenal of Aspergillus fumigatus. Here we show that deletion of a single gene, gliT, in the gliotoxin biosynthetic cluster of two A. fumigatus strains, rendered the organism highly sensitive to exogenous gliotoxin and completely disrupted gliotoxin secretion. Addition of glutathione to both A. fumigatus Delta gliT strains relieved gliotoxin inhibition. Moreover, expression of gliT appears to be independently regulated compared to all other cluster components and is up-regulated by exogenous gliotoxin presence, at both the transcript and protein level. Upon gliotoxin exposure, gliT is also expressed in A. fumigatus Delta gliZ, which cannot express any other genes in the gliotoxin biosynthetic cluster, indicating that gliT is primarily responsible for protecting this strain against exogenous gliotoxin. GliT exhibits a gliotoxin reductase activity up to 9 microM gliotoxin and appears to prevent irreversible depletion of intracellular glutathione stores by reduction of the oxidized form of gliotoxin. Cross-species resistance to exogenous gliotoxin is acquired by A. nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively, when transformed with gliT. We hypothesise that the primary role of gliotoxin may be as an antioxidant and that in addition to GliT functionality, gliotoxin secretion may be a component of an auto-protective mechanism, deployed by A. fumigatus to protect itself against this potent biomolecule.

  20. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  1. Neurotrophic factors in Parkinson's disease are regulated by exercise: Evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Paula Grazielle Chaves; Domingues, Daniel Desidério; de Carvalho, Litia Alves; Allodi, Silvana; Correa, Clynton Lourenço

    2016-04-15

    We carried out a qualitative review of the literature on the influence of forced or voluntary exercise in Parkinson's Disease (PD)-induced animals, to better understand neural mechanisms and the role of neurotrophic factors (NFs) involved in the improvement of motor behavior. A few studies indicated that forced or voluntary exercise may promote neuroprotection, through upregulation of NF expression, against toxicity of drugs that simulate PD. Forced training, such as treadmill exercise and forced-limb use, adopted in most studies, in addition to voluntary exercise on a running wheel are suitable methods for NFs upregulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on dopaminergic function and motor behavior during aging

    OpenAIRE

    Boger, Heather A.; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Saylor, Alicia J.; Bender, Tara S.; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Fortress, Ashley M.; Zaman, Vandana; Huang, Peng; Middaugh, Lawrence D.; Randall, Patrick K.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.; Rohrer, Baerbel; Helke, Kristi L.; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical in synaptic plasticity and in the survival and function of midbrain dopamine neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of a partial genetic deletion of BDNF on motor function and dopamine (DA) neurotransmitter measures by comparing (Bdnf+/−) with wildtype mice (WT) at different ages. Bdnf+/ and WT mice had similar body weights until 12 months of age; however, at 21 months, Bdnf+/− mice were significantly heavier than WT mice. H...

  3. Role of glial-cell-derived neurotrophic factor in salivary gland stem cell response to irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xiaohong; Varendi, Kärt; Maimets, Martti

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Recently, stem cell therapy has been proposed to allow regeneration of radiation damaged salivary glands. It has been suggested that glial-cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes survival of mice salivary gland stem cells (mSGSCs). The purpose of this study...... was to investigate the role of GDNF in the modulation of mSGSC response to irradiation and subsequent salivary gland regeneration. Methods Salivary gland sphere derived cells of Gdnf hypermorphic (Gdnfwt/hyper) and wild type mice (Gdnfwt/wt) were irradiated (IR) with γ-rays at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 Gy. mSGSC survival...

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, impaired glucose metabolism, and bipolar disorder course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Santos, Camila M; Rizzo, Lucas B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in bipolar disorder (BD). However, current evidence is limited and results have been highly heterogeneous. This study aimed to assess the moderating effect of impaired glucose metabolism...... mellitus. Information related to current and past psychiatric/medical history, as well as prescription of pharmacological treatments was also captured. RESULTS: Individuals with BD had lower levels of BDNF, relative to healthy controls, after adjustment for age, gender, current medications, smoking...

  5. Cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and C-reactive protein in bipolar I disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne Sophie; Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and inflammatory markers may reflect key pathophysiological mechanisms in bipolar disorder in relation to disease activity and neuroprogression. AIMS: To investigate whether neutrophins and inflammatory marker vary with mood......% (95% CI: 17-66%, p=0.006) when compared with hypomanic/manic states after adjustment. BDNF and the other inflammatory markers did not vary according to affective state in adjusted mixed models. LIMITATIONS: Patients were all medicated, specifically with high doses of atypical antipsychotics during...

  6. Neurotrophic keratopathy secondary to trigeminal nerve aplasia in patient with Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olavarri González, G; García-Valcarcel González, B; Baeza Autillo, A; Balado Vazquez, P

    2016-04-01

    A 4-year-old male diagnosed with Goldenhar syndrome, with an unremarkable ophthalmic history, develops a neurotrophic ulcer secondary to trigeminal nerve aplasia. It was treated with multilaminar amniotic membrane transplantation. Trigeminal nerve aplasia is not usually reported in Goldenhar syndrome. Therefore, it seems necessary to perform routine eye examinations, from an early age, to prevent serious complications associated with corneal anaesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) translation in dendrites

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Vera Lúcia Margarido

    2010-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Biologia Celular e Molecular apresentada ao Departamento de Ciências da Vida da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra A especificidade espacial e temporal subjacente à diversidade de processos de plasticidade sináptica que ocorrem no sistema nervoso central está profundamente relacionada com a disponibilidade da proteína brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) em domínios sub-celulares distintos, especialmente na área pós-sinápti...

  8. Dissociable endogenous and exogenous attention in disorders of consciousness☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennu, Srivas; Finoia, Paola; Kamau, Evelyn; Monti, Martin M.; Allanson, Judith; Pickard, John D.; Owen, Adrian M.; Bekinschtein, Tristan A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that despite the seeming inability of patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states to generate consistent behaviour, some might possess covert awareness detectable with functional neuroimaging. These findings motivate further research into the cognitive mechanisms that might support the existence of consciousness in these states of profound neurological dysfunction. One of the key questions in this regard relates to the nature and capabilities of attention in patients, known to be related to but distinct from consciousness. Previous assays of the electroencephalographic P300 marker of attention have demonstrated its presence and potential clinical value. Here we analysed data from 21 patients and 8 healthy volunteers collected during an experimental task designed to engender exogenous or endogenous attention, indexed by the P3a and P3b components, respectively, in response to a pair of word stimuli presented amongst distractors. Remarkably, we found that the early, bottom-up P3a and the late, top-down P3b could in fact be dissociated in a patient who fitted the behavioural criteria for the vegetative state. In juxtaposition with healthy volunteers, the patient's responses suggested the presence of a relatively high level of attentional abilities despite the absence of any behavioural indications thereof. Furthermore, we found independent evidence of covert command following in the patient, as measured by functional neuroimaging during tennis imagery. Three other minimally conscious patients evidenced non-discriminatory bottom-up orienting, but no top-down engagement of selective attentional control. Our findings present a persuasive case for dissociable attentional processing in behaviourally unresponsive patients, adding to our understanding of the possible levels and applications of consequent conscious awareness. PMID:24273727

  9. Engineered Assimilation of Exogenous and Endogenous Formate in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yishai, Oren; Goldbach, Leander; Tenenboim, Hezi; Lindner, Steffen N; Bar-Even, Arren

    2017-09-15

    Decoupling biorefineries from land use and agriculture is a major challenge. As formate can be produced from various sources, e.g., electrochemical reduction of CO2, microbial formate-assimilation has the potential to become a sustainable feedstock for the bioindustry. However, organisms that naturally grow on formate are limited by either a low biomass yield or by a narrow product spectrum. The engineering of a model biotechnological microbe for growth on formate via synthetic pathways represents a promising approach to tackle this challenge. Here, we achieve a critical milestone for two such synthetic formate-assimilation pathways in Escherichia coli. Our engineering strategy involves the division of the pathways into metabolic modules; the activity of each module-providing at least one essential building block-is selected for in an appropriate auxotrophic strain. We demonstrate that formate can serve as a sole source of all cellular C1-compounds, including the beta-carbon of serine. We further show that by overexpressing the native threonine cleavage enzymes, the entire cellular glycine requirement can be provided by threonine biosynthesis and degradation. Together, we confirm the simultaneous activity of all pathway segments of the synthetic serine-threonine cycle. We go beyond the formate bioeconomy concept by showing that, under anaerobic conditions, formate produced endogenously by pyruvate formate-lyase can replace exogenous formate. The resulting prototrophic strain constitutes a substantial rewiring of central metabolism in which C1, glycine, and serine metabolism proceed via a unique set of pathways. This strain can serve as a platform for future metabolic-engineering efforts and could further pave the way for investigating the plasticity of metabolic networks.

  10. Generalized space time autoregressive with exogenous variable model and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Dewi; Nurani Ruchjana, Budi; Soemartini

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we proposed the Generalized Space Time Autoregressive with variable Exogenous, abbreviated GSTARX as GSTAR development with the addition of exogenous variables. GSTARX not only involves the element of time and location, but also the influence of exogenous variables in the model. GSTARX equation can be written as a linear model, so we can estimate parameters of GSTARX model using Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) method. For our case study, we use GSTARX model with uniform and inverse distance weights to predict an export volume of Crude Palm Oil (CPO) in several locations on the island of Sumatera, where X is the international CPO prices.

  11. Exogenous and Endogeneous Disialosyl Ganglioside GD1b Induces Apoptosis of MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hyung Ha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gangliosides have been known to play a role in the regulation of apoptosis in cancer cells. This study has employed disialyl-ganglioside GD1b to apoptosis in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using exogenous treatment of the cells with GD1b and endogenous expression of GD1b in MCF-7 cells. First, apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was observed after treatment of GD1b. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with GD1b reduced cell growth rates in a dose and time dependent manner during GD1b treatment, as determined by XTT assay. Among the various gangliosides, GD1b specifically induced apoptosis of the MCF-7 cells. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence assays showed that GD1b specifically induces apoptosis in the MCF-7 cells with Annexin V binding for apoptotic actions in early stage and propidium iodide (PI staining the nucleus of the MCF-7 cells. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with GD1b activated apoptotic molecules such as processed forms of caspase-8, -7 and PARP (Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, without any change in the expression of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis molecules such as Bax and Bcl-2. Second, to investigate the effect of endogenously produced GD1b on the regulation of cell function, UDP-gal: β1,3-galactosyltransferase-2 (GD1b synthase, Gal-T2 gene has been transfected into the MCF-7 cells. Using the GD1b synthase-transfectants, apoptosis-related signal proteins linked to phenotype changes were examined. Similar to the exogenous GD1b treatment, the cell growth of the GD1b synthase gene-transfectants was significantly suppressed compared with the vector-transfectant cell lines and transfection activated the apoptotic molecules such as processed forms of caspase-8, -7 and PARP, but not the levels of expression of Bax and Bcl-2. GD1b-induced apoptosis was blocked by caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD. Therefore, taken together, it was concluded that GD1b could play an important role in the regulation of breast cancer apoptosis.

  12. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  13. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  14. Effect of exogenous H2O2 on antioxidant enzymes of Brassica juncea L. seedlings in relation to 24-epibrassinolide under chilling stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Sirhindi, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Renu; Kumar, Sandeep; Jain, Gagandeep

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is most stable molecule among reactive oxygen species, which play a vital role in growth and development of plant as signaling molecule at low concentration in response to various abiotic and biotic stresses. Exogenous application of H2O2 is known to induce chilling tolerance in plants. Brassinosteroids are plant steroid hormones known for their anti-stress properties. In this study, effect of exogenous H2O2 on antioxidant defense system of Brassica juncea L. seedlings was investigated in 24-epibrassinolide (24-EBL) treated and untreated seedlings under chilling stress. The surface sterilized seeds of B. juncea L. were germinated in petriplates containing different concentrations of H2O2 alone and in combination with 10(-8) M 24-EBL. Chilling treatment (4 degrees C) was given to 10-days old seedlings grown in different treatments for 6 h daily up to 3 days. 24 h recovery period was given to chilling treated seedlings by placing at 25 degrees C + 2 degrees C and harvested for antioxidant enzymes on 14th day after sowing (DAS). Treatment of 24-EBL in combination with H2O2 (15 and 20 mM) helped in reducing the toxicity of seed and seedlings due to H2O2 exposure on their germination rate, shoot and root length respectively. 24-EBL treatment at seed and seedling stage helped in alleviating the toxic effect of H2O2 through antioxidant defense system by increasing the activities of various enzymes involved in antioxidant defense system such as catalase (CAT, E.C. 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (APOX, E.C. 1.11.1.11), and superoxide dismutase (SOD, E.C. 1.15.1.1). In conclusion, exogenous pretreatment of H2O2 to seeds of B. juncea L. adapted the seedlings to tolerate chilling stress, which was further ameliorated in combination of H2O2 with 24-EBL.

  15. Rational selection and engineering of exogenous principal sigma factor (σHrdB) to increase teicoplanin production in an industrial strain of Actinoplanes teichomyceticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcriptional engineering has presented a strong ability of phenotypic improvement in microorganisms. However, it could not be directly applied to Actinoplanes teichomyceticus L-27 because of the paucity of endogenous transcription factors in the strain. In this study, exogenous transcription factors were rationally selected and transcriptional engineering was carried out to increase the productivity of teicoplanin in L-27. Results It was illuminated that the σHrdB molecules shared strong similarity of amino acid sequences among some genera of actinomycetes. Combining this advantage with the ability of transcriptional engineering, exogenous sigma factor σHrdB molecules were rationally selected and engineered to improve L-27. hrdB genes from Actinoplanes missouriensis 431, Micromonospora aurantiaca ATCC 27029 and Salinispora arenicola CNS-205 were selected based on molecular evolutionary analysis. Random mutagenesis, DNA shuffling and point mutation were subsequently performed to generate diversified mutants. A recombinant was identified through screening program, yielding 5.3 mg/ml of teicoplanin, over 2-fold compared to that of L-27. More significantly, the engineered strain presented a good performance in 500-l pilot scale fermentation, which meant its valuable potential application in industry. Conclusions Through rational selection and engineering of exogenous transcriptional factor, we have extended the application of transcriptional engineering. To our knowledge, it is the first time to focus on the related issue. In addition, possessing the advantage of efficient metabolic perturbation in transcription level, this strategy could be useful in analyzing metabolic and physiological mechanisms of strains, especially those with the only information on taxonomy. PMID:24428890

  16. Rational selection and engineering of exogenous principal sigma factor (σ(HrdB)) to increase teicoplanin production in an industrial strain of Actinoplanes teichomyceticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyong; Yang, Liu; Wu, Kuo; Li, Guanghui

    2014-01-16

    Transcriptional engineering has presented a strong ability of phenotypic improvement in microorganisms. However, it could not be directly applied to Actinoplanes teichomyceticus L-27 because of the paucity of endogenous transcription factors in the strain. In this study, exogenous transcription factors were rationally selected and transcriptional engineering was carried out to increase the productivity of teicoplanin in L-27. It was illuminated that the σ(HrdB) molecules shared strong similarity of amino acid sequences among some genera of actinomycetes. Combining this advantage with the ability of transcriptional engineering, exogenous sigma factor σ(HrdB) molecules were rationally selected and engineered to improve L-27. hrdB genes from Actinoplanes missouriensis 431, Micromonospora aurantiaca ATCC 27029 and Salinispora arenicola CNS-205 were selected based on molecular evolutionary analysis. Random mutagenesis, DNA shuffling and point mutation were subsequently performed to generate diversified mutants. A recombinant was identified through screening program, yielding 5.3 mg/ml of teicoplanin, over 2-fold compared to that of L-27. More significantly, the engineered strain presented a good performance in 500-l pilot scale fermentation, which meant its valuable potential application in industry. Through rational selection and engineering of exogenous transcriptional factor, we have extended the application of transcriptional engineering. To our knowledge, it is the first time to focus on the related issue. In addition, possessing the advantage of efficient metabolic perturbation in transcription level, this strategy could be useful in analyzing metabolic and physiological mechanisms of strains, especially those with the only information on taxonomy.

  17. Brain Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF and hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacher Claire-Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play an important role in energy-balance regulation. Notably leptin, an adipocyte-secreted cytokine, regulates the activity of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in the modulation of appetite. Leptin decreases appetite and stimulates weight loss in rodents. Unfortunately, numerous forms of obesity in humans seem to be resistant to leptin action. The ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a neurocytokine that belongs to the same family as leptin and that was originally characterized as a neurotrophic factor that promotes the survival of a broad spectrum of neuronal cell types and that enhances neurogenesis in adult rodents. It presents the advantage of stimulating weight loss in humans, despite the leptin resistance. Moreover, the weight loss persists several weeks after the cessation of treatment. Hence, CNTF has been considered as a promising therapeutic tool for the treatment of obesity and has prompted intense research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its potent anorexigenic properties. It has been found that CNTF shares signaling pathways with leptin and is expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, a key hypothalamic region controlling food intake. Endogenous CNTF may also participate in the control of energy balance. Indeed, its expression in the ARC is inversely correlated to body weight in rats fed a high-sucrose diet. Thus hypothalamic CNTF may act, in some individuals, as a protective factor against weight gain during hypercaloric diet and could account for individual differences in the susceptibility to obesity.

  18. Impaired expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobbio, Lucilla; Fiorese, Fulvia; Vigo, Tiziana; Cilli, Michele; Gherardi, Gianfranco; Grandis, Marina; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Abbruzzese, Michele; Schenone, Angelo

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the contribution of Schwann cell-derived ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) to the pathogenesis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) and addressed the question as to whether it plays a role in the development of axonal damage observed in the disease, with aging. Ciliary neurotrophic factor was underexpressed in experimental CMT1A but not in other models of hereditary neuropathies. Sciatic nerve crush experiments and dosage of CNTF at different time points showed that expression of this trophic factor remained significantly lower in CMT1A rats than in normal controls; moreover, in uninjured CMT1A sciatic nerves CNTF levels further decreased with ageing, thus paralleling the molecular signs of axonal impairment, that is increased expression of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments and amyloid precursor protein. Administration of CNTF to dorsal root ganglia cultures reduced dephosphorylation of neurofilaments in CMT1A cultures, without improving demyelination. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that the production of CNTF by Schwann cells is markedly reduced in CMT1A. Moreover, the observations suggest that trophic support to the axon is impaired in CMT1A and that further studies on the therapeutic use of trophic factors or their derivatives in experimental and human CMT1A are warranted.

  19. Endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor modulates anxiety and depressive-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruga, Isabella; Hartwig, Silvia; Merkler, Doron; Thöne, Jan; Hovemann, Bernhard; Juckel, Georg; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A

    2012-04-15

    On a molecular level, depression is characterized by an altered monoaminergic neurotransmission as well as a modulation of cytokines and other mediators in the central nervous system. In particular, neurotrophic factors may influence affective behavior including depression and anxiety. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) plays an important role in the regulation of neuronal development, neuroprotection and may also influence cognitive processes. Here we investigate the affective behavior in mice deficient for CNTF (CNTF -/- mice) at young age of 10-20 weeks. CNTF -/- mice displayed an increased anxiety-like behavior with a 30% reduction of the time spent in the bright compartment of the light/dark box as well as a significantly increased startle response. In the learned helplessness paradigm, CNTF -/- mice are more prone to depressive-like behavior. In the hippocampus of 20 weeks old, but not 10 weeks old, CNTF -/- mice, these changes correlated with a loss of parvalbumin immunoreactive GABAergic interneurons and a reduction of serotonin levels as well as 5-HT receptor 1A expression. Modulation of monoaminergic neurotransmitter levels via chronic application of the antidepressants amitriptyline and citalopram did not exert beneficial effects. These data imply that endogenous CNTF plays a pivotal role for the structural maintenance of hippocampal functions and thus has an important impact on the modulation of affective behavior in rodent models of anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of neurotrophic factors and energy metabolism by antidepressants in astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Martin, Jean Luc

    2013-09-01

    There is growing evidence that astrocytes are involved in the neuropathology of major depression. In particular, decreases in glial cell density observed in the cerebral cortex of individuals with major depressive disorder are accompanied by a reduction of several astrocytic markers suggesting that astrocyte dysfunction may contribute to the pathophysiology of major depression. In rodents, glial loss in the prefrontal cortex is sufficient to induce depressive-like behaviors and antidepressant treatment prevents the stress-induced reduction of astrocyte number in the hippocampus. Collectively, these data support the existence of a link between astrocyte loss or dysfunction, depressive-like behavior and antidepressant treatment. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized to play important roles in neuronal development, neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and maintenance of brain homeostasis. It is also well established that astrocytes provide trophic, structural, and metabolic support to neurons. In this article, we review evidence that antidepressants regulate energy metabolism and neurotrophic factor expression with particular emphasis on studies in astrocytes. These observations support a role for astrocytes as new targets for antidepressants. The contribution of changes in astrocyte glucose metabolism and neurotrophic factor expression to the therapeutic effects of antidepressants remains to be established. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.

  1. Neurotrophic growth factor responses to lower body resistance training in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy J; Scribbans, Trisha D; Bentley, Robert F; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Gurd, Brendon; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2016-03-01

    Resistance exercise is an efficacious stimulus for improving cognitive function in older adults, which may be mediated by the upregulation of blood-borne neurotrophic growth factors (NTFs) like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). However, the NTF response to resistance exercise and training in older adults is poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to characterize the timing and magnitude of the NTF response following an acute bout of resistance exercise before and after 8 weeks of resistance training. Ten cognitively normal, older adults (ages 60-77 years, five men) were examined. The acute NTF response to resistance exercise was assessed via serum samples drawn at designated time points following exercise. This procedure was then repeated following 8 weeks of resistance training. BDNF increased immediately post-exercise (Δ9% pre-training, Δ11% post-training) then returned to resting levels while IGF-1 remained stable following resistance exercise before and after 8 weeks of resistance training. Basal levels of both NTFs were unaffected by the 8 week training period. We report a transient increase in serum BDNF following a bout of resistance exercise in older adults, which could have implications for the design of interventions seeking to maximize cognitive function in older adults.

  2. Comparing interval and continuous exercise training regimens on neurotrophic factors in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzalpour, Mohammad Esmaiel; Chadorneshin, Hossein Taheri; Foadoddini, Mohsen; Eivari, Hossein Abtahi

    2015-08-01

    The research literature suggests that oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory factors influence neurotrophins in vitro. However, there is insufficient information about their effects on exercise training conditions, especially during high intensity trainings. This study aimed to compare the effects of 6weeks of high intensity interval and continuous training regimens on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the rat brain. For this purpose, twenty-four Albino Wistar rats were divided into sedentary control (SC), high intensity interval training (HIIT), and continuous training (CT) groups. Both HIIT and CT regimens increased H2O2 level and TNF-α concentration in the brain, and the alterations made were greater following HIIT than CT. In addition, both HIIT and CT regimens increased BDNF and GDNF concentrations significantly, with a higher elevation following HIIT than CT. Furthermore, H2O2 level and TNF-α concentration correlated positively with both BDNF and GDNF concentrations. Generally, high intensity interval training regimen, rather than continuous training regimen, is highly potential to improve BDNF and GDNF through a greater increase in H2O2 and TNF-α as oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and gray matter volume in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, S; Aggio, V; Hoogenboezem, T A; Ambrée, O; de Wit, H; Wijkhuijs, A J M; Locatelli, C; Colombo, C; Arolt, V; Drexhage, H A; Benedetti, F

    2017-02-01

    Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric condition characterized by grey matter (GM) volumes reduction. Neurotrophic factors have been suggested to play a role in the neuroprogressive changes during the illness course. In particular peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker related to disease activity and neuroprogression in BD. The aim of our study was to investigate if serum levels of BDNF are associated with GM volumes in BD patients and healthy controls (HC). We studied 36 inpatients affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD type I and 17 HC. Analysis of variance was performed to investigate the effect of diagnosis on GM volumes in the whole brain. Threshold for significance was PBDNF levels compared with HC. Reduced GM volumes in BD patients compared to HC were observed in several brain areas, encompassing the caudate head, superior temporal gyrus, insula, fusiform gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex. The interaction analysis between BDNF levels and diagnosis showed a significant effect in the middle frontal gyrus. HC reported higher BDNF levels associated with higher GM volumes, whereas no association between BDNF and GM volumes was observed in BD. Our study seems to suggest that although the production of BDNF is increased in BD possibly to prevent and repair neural damage, its effects could be hampered by underlying neuroinflammatory processes interfering with the neurodevelopmental role of BDNF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurogenic and neurotrophic effects of BDNF peptides in mouse hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Carmen Cardenas-Aguayo

    Full Text Available The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a member of the neurotrophin family, is down regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, depression, stress, and anxiety; conversely the level of this neurotrophin is increased in autism spectrum disorders. Thus, modulating the level of BDNF can be a potential therapeutic approach for nervous system pathologies. In the present study, we designed five different tetra peptides (peptides B-1 to B-5 corresponding to different active regions of BDNF. These tetra peptides were found to be non-toxic, and they induced the expression of neuronal markers in mouse embryonic day 18 (E18 primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. Additionally, peptide B-5 induced the expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. The BDNF peptides induced only a moderate activation (phosphorylation at Tyr 706 of the TrkB receptor, which could be blocked by the Trk's inhibitor, K252a. Peptide B-3, when combined with BDNF, potentiated the survival effect of this neurotrophin on H(2O(2-treated E18 hippocampal cells. Peptides B-3 and B-5 were found to work as partial agonists and as partial antagonists competing with BDNF to activate the TrkB receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the described BDNF tetra peptides are neurotrophic, can modulate BDNF signaling in a partial agonist/antagonist way, and offer a novel therapeutic approach to neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated.

  5. Verification of functional AAV-mediated neurotrophic and anti-apoptotic factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kells, Adrian P; Henry, Rebecca A; Hughes, Stephanie M; Connor, Bronwen

    2007-04-15

    The use of viral vectors for gene delivery offer many advantages for both basic research and therapeutic application through the continuous expression of a gene product within a target region. It is vital however that any gene product is correctly expressed in a biologically active form, and this should be confirmed prior to large scale in vivo studies. Using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to direct the expression of either a neurotrophic factor or an anti-apoptotic protein, we have developed a range of in vitro assays to verify functional transgenic protein expression. Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) activity was confirmed by demonstrating enhanced generation of GABAergic neurons in embryonic (E15) striatal cultures and AAV-mediated glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) function using an assay for dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic (E14) ventral mesencephalic cultures. To assess functional anti-apoptotic factor expression we designed cell-survival assays, using embryonic cortical cultures to confirm Bcl-x(L) activity and the HT1080 cell-line for X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) activity following AAV-mediated expression. This study demonstrates that the use of functional assays provides valuable confirmation of desired biotherapeutic expression prior to extensive investigation with new gene delivery vectors.

  6. Identification of hypothalamic neuron-derived neurotrophic factor as a novel factor modulating appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Mardi S; Swanson, Roy D; Semsarzadeh, Nina N; McCulloh, Patrick S; Kwon, Kiwook; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Wong, G William; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-06-15

    Disruption of finely coordinated neuropeptide signals in the hypothalamus can result in altered food intake and body weight. We identified neuron-derived neurotrophic factor (NENF) as a novel secreted protein through a large-scale screen aimed at identifying novel secreted hypothalamic proteins that regulate food intake. We observed robust Nenf expression in hypothalamic nuclei known to regulate food intake, and its expression was altered under the diet-induced obese (DIO) condition relative to the fed state. Hypothalamic Nenf mRNA was regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, itself an important regulator of appetite. Delivery of purified recombinant BDNF into the lateral cerebral ventricle decreased hypothalamic Nenf expression, while pharmacological inhibition of trkB signaling increased Nenf mRNA expression. Furthermore, recombinant NENF administered via an intracerebroventricular cannula decreased food intake and body weight and increased hypothalamic Pomc and Mc4r mRNA expression. Importantly, the appetite-suppressing effect of NENF was abrogated in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, demonstrating a diet-dependent modulation of NENF function. We propose the existence of a regulatory circuit involving BDNF, NENF, and melanocortin signaling. Our study validates the power of using an integrated experimental and bioinformatic approach to identify novel CNS-derived proteins with appetite-modulating function and reveals NENF as an important central modulator of food intake.

  7. Selective loss of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the dentate gyrus attenuates antidepressant efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Megumi; Barrot, Michel; Autry, Anita E; Theobald, David; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2008-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in neural plasticity in the adult nervous system and has been suggested as a target gene for antidepressant treatment. The neurotrophic hypothesis of depression suggests that loss of BDNF from the hippocampus contributes to an increased vulnerability for depression, whereas upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus is suggested to mediate antidepressant efficacy. We have used a viral-mediated gene transfer approach to assess the role of BDNF in subregions of the hippocampus in a broad array of behavioral paradigms, including depression-like behavior and antidepressant responses. We have combined the adeno-associated virus (AAV) with the Cre/loxP site-specific recombination system to induce the knockout of BDNF selectively in either the CA1 or dentate gyrus (DG) subregions of the hippocampus. We show that the loss of BDNF in either the CA1 or the DG of the hippocampus does not alter locomotor activity, anxiety-like behavior, fear conditioning, or depression-related behaviors. However, the selective loss of BDNF in the DG but not the CA1 region attenuates the actions of desipramine and citalopram in the forced swim test. These data suggest that the loss of hippocampal BDNF per se is not sufficient to mediate depression-like behavior. However, these results support the view that BDNF in the DG might be essential in mediating the therapeutic effect of antidepressants.

  8. Effect of Oxcarbazepine on Serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Bipolar Mania: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; Mishra, Biswa Ranjan; Jowhar, Jaseem; Mohapatra, Debadatta; Parida, Sansita; Bisoi, Debasis

    2017-05-31

    In bipolar disorder, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level decreases leading to dysfunctions of critical neurotrophic, cellular plasticity and neuroprotective processes. The present study was conducted to evaluate the change in serum BDNF level with oxcarbazepine monotherapy in bipolar mania. The present study is a prospective, interventional, open label clinical study conducted on 25 patients of bipolar mania and 25 healthy controls. Detailed history, clinical evaluation including Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scoring and serum BDNF were assessed at baseline for all 50 subjects. The bipolar patients were prescribed tablet oxcarbazepine and followed up after 4 weeks for clinical evaluation and re-estimation of serum BDNF and YMRS scoring. The serum BDNF level in bipolar manic patients were compared with healthy controls at baseline and results revealed that there is a significant reduction (p=0.002) in serum BDNF level in bipolar patients. At follow-up after 4 weeks, the mean change in serum BDNF in bipolar group who were on oxcarbazepine monotherapy was found statistically significant (p=0.02) in comparison to healthy controls. In bipolar group, the YMRS score and serum BDNF at baseline have an inverse relation(r=-0.59) whereas change of the YMRS score had a positive correlation (r=0.67) with the change of serum BDNF over 4 weeks. In bipolar mania serum BDNF level is low and it is found to be increased with short term monotherapy with oxcarbazepine.

  9. Therapeutic effects of neurotrophic factors in experimental spinal cord injury models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enomoto M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitsuhiro Enomoto1,21Department of Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgery, Graduate School, 2Hyperbaric Medical Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Neurotrophic factors (NFs play important roles in regenerative medicine approaches to mitigate primary and secondary damage after spinal cord injury (SCI because their receptors are still present in the injured spinal cord even though the expression of the NFs themselves is decreased. Several reports have shown that NF administration increases regenerative signaling after SCI, particularly by stimulating axonal growth. However, few NFs cross the blood–brain barrier, and most of them show low stability and limited diffusion within the central nervous system. To overcome this problem, transplantation strategies using genetically modified NF-secreting Schwann cells, neural and glial progenitor cells, and mesenchymal stem cells have been applied to animal models of SCI. In particular, multifunctional NFs that bind to TrkB, TrkC, and p75NTR receptors have been discovered in the last decade and utilized in preclinical cell therapies for spinal cord repair. To achieve functional recovery after SCI, it is important to consider the different effects of each NF on axonal regeneration, and strategies should be established to specifically harness the multifunctional properties of NFs. This review provides an overview of multifunctional NFs combined with cell therapy in experimental SCI models and a proposal to implement their use as a clinically viable therapy.Keywords: spinal cord injury, neurotrophic factor, multineurotrophin, regeneration, cell transplantation

  10. Identification of a putative invertebrate helical cytokine similar to the ciliary neurotrophic factor/leukemia inhibitory factor family by PSI-BLAST-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xinyi; Yan, Weiyao; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhong, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoxin

    2009-08-01

    Most of our knowledge of helical cytokine-like molecules in invertebrates relies on functional assays and similarities at the physicochemical level. It is hard to predict helical cytokines in invertebrates based on sequences from mammals and vertebrates, because of their long evolutionary divergence. In this article, we collected 12 kinds of fish cytokines and constructed their respective consensus sequences using hidden Markov models; then, the conserved domains region of each consensus sequence were further extracted by the SMART tool, and used as the query sequence for PSI-BLAST analysis in Drosophila melanogaster. After two filtering processes based on the properties of helical cytokines, we obtained one protein named CG14629, which shares 25% identities/46% positives to fish M17 cytokine in the half length of the N-terminus. Considering the homology between M17 and LIF/CNTF (leukemia inhibitory factor/ciliary neurotrophic factor), and the close relationship between Dome, the putative cytokine receptor in Drosophila cells, and LIFR/CNTFR (LIF receptor/CNTF receptor), the results suggest that CG14629 is a good candidate for the helical cytokine ortholog in D. melanogaster.

  11. Ciliary neurotrophic factor upregulates follistatin and Pak1, causes overexpression of muscle differentiation related genes and downregulation of established atrophy mediators in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsompanidis, Alexandros; Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Blüher, Susann; Kalozoumi, Georgia; Sanoudou, Despina; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-06-01

    The Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) is a pluripotent cytokine with anorexigenic actions in the hypothalamus that improves insulin sensitivity, increases energy expenditure and induces weight loss. Since CNTF also has an established myotrophic role, we sought to examine whether skeletal muscle contributes to the CNTF-induced metabolic improvement and identify the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects. We used a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, to which high or low CNTF doses were administered for 7days. Whole transcriptome expression levels were analyzed in dissected soleus muscles using microarrays and data were then confirmed using qRT-PCR. We demonstrate that CNTF administration significantly downregulates leptin, while it upregulates follistatin and Pak1; a molecule associated with insulin sensitization in skeletal muscle. A significant overexpression of muscle differentiation related genes and downregulation of established atrophy mediators was observed. The overall gene expression changes suggest an indirect, beneficial effect of CNTF on metabolism, energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity, exerted by the pronounced stimulation of muscle growth, with similarities to the described effect of follistatin and the activation of the Akt pathway in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Is Involved in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)-Enhanced Cell Motility and Matrix Metalloproteinase 1 Expression in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Fong, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the primary malignancy of bone that is characterized by a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis, and is therefore associated with poor prognoses. Chondrosarcoma further shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a small molecule in the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcome of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on cell motility in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma cell lines had significantly higher cell motility and BDNF expression compared to normal chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased cell motility and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in human chondrosarcoma cells. BDNF-mediated cell motility and MMP-1 up-regulation were attenuated by Trk inhibitor (K252a), ASK1 inhibitor (thioredoxin), JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and p38 inhibitor (SB203580). Furthermore, BDNF also promoted Sp1 activation. Our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration and invasion activity of chondrosarcoma cells by increasing MMP-1 expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, ASK1, JNK/p38, and Sp1. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis. PMID:23892595

  13. Diminished adrenal sensitivity to endogenous and exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone in critical illness: A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.C. de Jong (Margriet F.C.); N. Molenaar (Nienke); A. Beishuizen (Albertus); A.J. Groeneveld

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Adrenal dysfunction may represent critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI), as evidenced by a diminished cortisol response to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), but this concept and its clinical significance remain highly controversial. We

  14. Symptomatic spinal epidural lipomatosis without exogenous steroid intake; report of case with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gero, B.T.; Chynn, K.Y.

    1989-05-01

    We present a case of epidural lipomatosis, in which there is no association with exogenous steroids and describe a previously unreported plain film finding. To our knowledge these are the first published MR images of this condition.

  15. Evaluation of endothelial function in exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism and the effect of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mohammad Hosseini

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that FMD decreased in exogenous subclinical hyperthyroid patients which could be partially restored by treatment. These findings suggest that treatment of subclinical hyperthyroid state could improve endothelial dysfunction and at the end decreased the cardiovascular complications.

  16. Surfactant inhibition in acute respiratory failure : consequences for exogenous surfactant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P. Eijking (Eric)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is characterized by immaturity of the lung, resulting in relative or absolute absence of pulmonary surfactant. Worldwide, neonates suffering from RDS have been treated successfully with exogenous surfactant preparations. Currently,

  17. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity to Cole (Brassica campestris L. Cruciferae) by exogenous glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Huang, Bin; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we determined the influence of exogenous GSH on cadmium toxicity to cole. GSH addition had beneficial effect on plant development and growth, especially on aboveground biomass and root length. Despite that exogenous GSH insignificantly promoted Cd uptake by the plant, it could decrease of Cd root-to-shoot transport and ameliorate Cd toxicity to the plant. At 6 mg Cd kg-1 soil, GSH addition well countered the Cd-induced significant reduction in CAT activity, but only insignificantly decreased MDA content, suggesting exogenous GSH might indirectly protect plant against oxidative stress via regulating antioxidative enzyme activities. However, at 12 mg Cd kg-1 soil, GSH application insignificantly increased the antioxidant activities but significantly decreased MDA content, indicating external GSH could directly participate in removing radical oxygen species. The results suggest exogenous GSH may have the potential of decreasing Cd accumulation in the edible parts of cultivars and alleviating Cd toxicity.

  18. Neural correlates of endogenous attention, exogenous attention and inhibition of return in touch

    OpenAIRE

    A. Jones; Forster, B.

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention helps process the myriad of information constantly touching our body. Both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms are relied upon to effectively process this information; however, it is unclear how they relate in the sense of touch. In three tasks we contrasted endogenous and exogenous event-related potential (ERP) and behavioural effects. Unilateral tactile cues were followed by a tactile target at the same or opposite hand. Clear behavioural effects showed facilitation of e...

  19. Diminished adrenal sensitivity to endogenous and exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone in critical illness: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, Margriet FC; Molenaar, Nienke; Beishuizen, Albertus; Groeneveld, AB Johan

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Adrenal dysfunction may represent critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI), as evidenced by a diminished cortisol response to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), but this concept and its clinical significance remain highly controversial. We studied the adrenal response to exogenous ACTH as a function of the endogenous cortisol-to-ACTH ratio, a measure of adrenal sensitivity, and of clinical variables, during critical illness and recover...

  20. Evaluating the Genetic, Hormonal, and Exogenous Factors Affecting Somatic Copy Number Variation in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0579 TITLE: Evaluating the Genetic , Hormonal, and Exogenous Factors Affecting Somatic Copy Number Variation in...Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluating the Genetic , Hormonal, and Exogenous Factors Affecting Somatic Copy...progress in subaim 1a, substantially improving the design of our proposed transgenic animal , the “deletion reporter mouse”, and are finalizing cloning

  1. The sensitivity of the child to sex steroids: possible impact of exogenous estrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Juul, Anders; Leffers, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    to estradiol and may respond with increased growth and/or breast development even at serum levels below the current detection limits; (iii) no threshold has been established, below which no hormonal effects can be seen in children exposed to exogenous steroids or endocrine disruptors; (iv) changes in hormone...... threshold for estrogenic action has been established, caution should be taken to avoid unnecessary exposure of fetuses and children to exogenous sex steroids and endocrine disruptors, even at very low levels....

  2. Design of a small molecule against an oncogenic noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Cameron, Michael D; Haga, Christopher L; Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Duckett, Derek R; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    The design of precision, preclinical therapeutics from sequence is difficult, but advances in this area, particularly those focused on rational design, could quickly transform the sequence of disease-causing gene products into lead modalities. Herein, we describe the use of Inforna, a computational approach that enables the rational design of small molecules targeting RNA to quickly provide a potent modulator of oncogenic microRNA-96 (miR-96). We mined the secondary structure of primary microRNA-96 (pri-miR-96) hairpin precursor against a database of RNA motif-small molecule interactions, which identified modules that bound RNA motifs nearby and in the Drosha processing site. Precise linking of these modules together provided Targaprimir-96 (3), which selectively modulates miR-96 production in cancer cells and triggers apoptosis. Importantly, the compound is ineffective on healthy breast cells, and exogenous overexpression of pri-miR-96 reduced compound potency in breast cancer cells. Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-Down (Chem-CLIP), a small-molecule RNA target validation approach, shows that 3 directly engages pri-miR-96 in breast cancer cells. In vivo, 3 has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and decreases tumor burden in a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer. Thus, rational design can quickly produce precision, in vivo bioactive lead small molecules against hard-to-treat cancers by targeting oncogenic noncoding RNAs, advancing a disease-to-gene-to-drug paradigm.

  3. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  4. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Effects of Treatment and Clinical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N.; Rizavi, Hooriyah S.; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2008-01-01

    The study determines the gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the lymphocytes of subjects with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) before and during treatment with mood stabilizers and in drug-free normal control subjects. Results indicate the potential of BDNF levels as a biomarker for PBD and as a treatment predictor and…

  5. Effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor on retrograde cell reaction after facial nerve crush in young adults rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Ulenkate, H.J.L.M.; Jennekens, F.G.I.

    1996-01-01

    Locally applied ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has a powerful effect on retrograde axonal reaction following facial nerve crush in neonatal rats. We examined whether it also exerts a strong effect on retrograde axonal reaction in young adult rats when administered subcutaneously. The dose was 1

  6. Light-induced retinal injury enhanced neurotrophins secretion and neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate neurotrophins expression and neurotrophic effect change in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs under different types of stimulation. METHODS: Rats were exposed in 10,000 lux white light to develop light-induced retinal injury. Supernatants of homogenized retina (SHR, either from normal or light-injured retina, were used to stimulate MSCs. Quantitative real time for polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were conducted for analysis the expression change in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF in MSCs after stimulation. Conditioned medium from SHR-stimulated MSCs and control MSCs were collected for evaluation their effect on retinal explants. RESULTS: Supernatants of homogenized retina from light-injured rats significantly promoted neurotrophins secretion from MSCs (p<0.01. Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells stimulated by light-injured SHR significantly reduced DNA fragmentation (p<0.01, up-regulated bcl-2 (p<0.01 and down-regulated bax (p<0.01 in retinal explants, displaying enhanced protective effect. CONCLUSIONS: Light-induced retinal injury is able to enhance neurotrophins secretion from mesenchymal stem cells and promote the neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells.

  7. Association between serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and plasma interleukin-6 in major depressive disorder with melancholic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patas, K.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bus, B.A.A.; Vogelzangs, N.; Molendijk, M.L.; Elzinga, B.M.; Bosker, F.J.; Voshaar, R.C.O.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory processes as well as attenuation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) availability are involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although it is generally presumed that these two systems interact negatively in the brain, preclinical and human in vitro

  8. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  9. Bioactivity-guided fractionation identifies amygdalin as a potent neurotrophic agent from herbal medicine Semen Persicae extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuanbin; Zhao, Jia; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Li, Xuechen; Rong, Jianhui

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicine Semen Persicae is widely used to treat blood stasis in Chinese medicine and other oriental folk medicines. Although little is known about the effects of Semen Persicae and its active compounds on neuron differentiation, our pilot study showed that Semen Persicae extract promoted neurite outgrowth in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. In the present study, we developed a bioactivity-guided fractionation procedure for the characterization of the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae extract. The resultant fractions were assayed for neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells based on microscopic assessment. Through liquid-liquid extraction and reverse phase HPLC separation, a botanical glycoside amygdalin was isolated as the active compound responsible for the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae extract. Moreover, we found that amygdalin rapidly induced the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). A specific ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 attenuated the stimulatory effect of amygdalin on neurite outgrowth. Taken together, amygdalin was identified as a potent neurotrophic agent from Semen Persicae extract through a bioactivity-guided fractional procedure. The neurotrophic activity of amygdalin may be mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 pathway.

  10. Bioactivity-Guided Fractionation Identifies Amygdalin as a Potent Neurotrophic Agent from Herbal Medicine Semen Persicae Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanbin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine Semen Persicae is widely used to treat blood stasis in Chinese medicine and other oriental folk medicines. Although little is known about the effects of Semen Persicae and its active compounds on neuron differentiation, our pilot study showed that Semen Persicae extract promoted neurite outgrowth in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. In the present study, we developed a bioactivity-guided fractionation procedure for the characterization of the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae extract. The resultant fractions were assayed for neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells based on microscopic assessment. Through liquid-liquid extraction and reverse phase HPLC separation, a botanical glycoside amygdalin was isolated as the active compound responsible for the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae extract. Moreover, we found that amygdalin rapidly induced the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2. A specific ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 attenuated the stimulatory effect of amygdalin on neurite outgrowth. Taken together, amygdalin was identified as a potent neurotrophic agent from Semen Persicae extract through a bioactivity-guided fractional procedure. The neurotrophic activity of amygdalin may be mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 pathway.

  11. Regenerative medicine for central nervous system disorders: Role of therapeutic molecules in stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Suárez-Meade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of stem cell therapy is greatly influenced by their secretory properties. Evidence suggests that there is a high concentration of growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF after stem cell transplantation. Also, the presence of therapeutic molecules and cytokines such as stem cell factor (SCF, stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α, RNAs, nuclear enriched abundant transcript 1 (NEAT1, and metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1 is consistent throughout several studies. Apart from modulating the homeostasis of the surrounding tissues, these factors have pleiotropic properties over the host tissue, among which are angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and neurogenic effects. In the present manuscript, we discuss the different secretion factors and their beneficial activity after stem cell transplantation. Recent developments in emerging technologies for coadjunctive therapies that may aid in stem cell transplantation into the central nervous system, such as cell encapsulation, molecular Trojan horses, and viral vectors, are also presented in this article.

  12. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  13. WHAT ARE THE MOLECULES DOING?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    The color of substances results from the absorption of selected components of white light by the collection of molecules constituting a visible sample of the substance. The molecules are however not coloured. Indicator molecules change their structure and composition when exposed to acids or bases, because they react ...

  14. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (heart attack) and hypertension. Nitric oxide (NO), an inorganic molecule formed by vascular endothelial cells is now thought to be a messenger molecule that is believed to playa crucial role in various biological processes of both physiological and pathological importance. Nitric oxide is a simple heterodiatomic molecule ...

  15. Thyroxin treatment protects against white matter injury in the immature brain via brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Pi-Lien; Huang, Chao-Ching; Huang, Hsiu-Mei; Tu, Dom-Gene; Chang, Ying-Chao

    2013-08-01

    Low level of thyroid hormone is a strong independent risk factor for white matter (WM) injury, a major cause of cerebral palsy, in preterm infants. Thyroxin upregulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor during development. We hypothesized that thyroxin protected against preoligodendrocyte apoptosis and WM injury in the immature brain via upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Postpartum (P) day-7 male rat pups were exposed to hypoxic ischemia (HI) and intraperitoneally injected with thyroxin (T4; 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg) or normal saline immediately after HI at P9 and P11. WM damage was analyzed for myelin formation, axonal injury, astrogliosis, and preoligodendrocyte apoptosis. Neurotrophic factor expression was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Neuromotor functions were measured using open-field locomotion (P11 and P21), inclined plane climbing (P11), and beam walking (P21). Intracerebroventricular injection of TrkB-Fc or systemic administration of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone was performed. On P11, the HI group had significantly lower blood T4 levels than the controls. The HI group showed ventriculomegaly and marked reduction of myelin basic protein immunoreactivities in the WM. T4 (1 mg/kg) treatment after HI markedly attenuated axonal injury, astrocytosis, and microgliosis, and increased preoligodendrocyte survival. In addition, T4 treatment significantly increased myelination and selectively upregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the WM, and improved neuromotor deficits after HI. The protective effect of T4 on WM myelination and neuromotor performance after HI was significantly attenuated by TrkB-Fc. Systemic 7,8-dihydroxyflavone treatment ameliorated hypomyelination after HI injury. T4 protects against WM injury at both pathological and functional levels via upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-TrkB signaling in the immature brain.

  16. TARGETING OF NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS, THEIR RECEPTORS, AND SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF ORGANOPHOSPHATES IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; Seidler, Frederic J.; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors control neural cell differentiation and assembly of neural circuits. We previously showed that organophosphate pesticides differentially regulate members of the fibroblast growth factor (fgf) gene family. We administered chlorpyrifos and diazinon to neonatal rats on postnatal days 1–4 at doses devoid of systemic toxicity or growth impairment, and spanning the threshold for barely-detectable cholinesterase inhibition. We evaluated the impact on gene families for different classes of neurotrophic factors. Using microarrays, we examined the regional expression of mRNAs encoding the neurotrophins (ntfs), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), nerve growth factor (ngf), the wnt and fzd gene families and the corresponding receptors. Chlorpyrifos and diazinon both had widespread effects on the fgf, ntf, wnt and fzd families but much less on the bdnf and ngf groups. However, the two organophosphates showed disparate effects on a number of key neurotrophic factors. To determine if the actions were mediated directly on differentiating neurons, we tested chlorpyrifos in PC12 cells, an in vitro model of neural cell development. Effects in PC12 cells mirrored many of those for members of the fgf, ntf and wnt families, as well as the receptors for the ntfs, especially during early differentiation, the stage known to be most susceptible to disruption by organophosphates. Our results suggest that actions on neurotrophic factors provide a mechanism for the developmental neurotoxicity of low doses of organophosphates, and, since effects on expression of the affected genes differed with test agent, may help explain regional disparities in effects and critical periods of vulnerability. PMID:18502319

  17. The influence of exogenous peptide on beta2-microglobulin exchange in the HLA complex: analysis in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C L; Ruprai, A K; Solache, A; Lowdell, M; Price, C P; Cohen, S B; Parham, P; Madrigal, J A; Newman, D J

    1998-07-01

    We used an optical biosensor to determine the relative binding affinity of peptides to purified HLA class I molecules. In this assay we monitor beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) exchange within the HLA-A2 molecule, whereby native beta2m in the complex is replaced by beta2m immobilized at the surface of the biosensor. Quantitative kinetic measurements permit us to obtain association rate (kass), dissociation rate (kdiss) and affinity constants (KA) for the beta2m exchange reaction, alone, (control) and in the presence of exogenous peptide. We tested a panel of six peptides which had been designed and synthesized with an HLA-A2 binding motif, and had also been tested by the T2-cell binding assay, along with control peptides. The biosensor results demonstrate that exogenous peptide influences the dynamics of beta2m exchange in a sequence-specific manner. Five of six peptides increased the association rate, decreased the dissociation rate, and significantly increased the affinity (KA=1. 55-1.88x10(9) M-1) of HLA-A2 for immobilized beta2m compared with the control (KA =1.14+/-0.04x10(9)M-1), demonstrating stabilization of the complex. One peptide was unable to stabilize the complex, as also shown in the T2 binding assay. However, analysis of peptide sequences demonstrated that the HLA-A2 secondary motif as well as primary motif residues are required for HLA-A2 stabilization. Further experiments demonstrated that beta2m exchange alone cannot stabilize the HLA class I complex at the cell surface until a peptide of sufficient binding affinity is bound. Hence kinetics equal to or below the control values in our biosensor assay probably represent an unstable complex in vivo. Unlike other methods described for the analysis of peptide stabilization, this approach is significantly faster, provides full kinetic analysis, and is simpler, since it requires no labeling of peptides. Furthermore, this may have important implications in the assessment of peptide vaccines.

  18. Differential effects of exogenous and endogenous attention on second-order texture contrast sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Antoine; Landy, Michael S.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    The visual system can use a rich variety of contours to segment visual scenes into distinct perceptually coherent regions. However, successfully segmenting an image is a computationally expensive process. Previously we have shown that exogenous attention—the more automatic, stimulus-driven component of spatial attention—helps extract contours by enhancing contrast sensitivity for second-order, texture-defined patterns at the attended location, while reducing sensitivity at unattended locations, relative to a neutral condition. Interestingly, the effects of exogenous attention depended on the second-order spatial frequency of the stimulus. At parafoveal locations, attention enhanced second-order contrast sensitivity to relatively high, but not to low second-order spatial frequencies. In the present study we investigated whether endogenous attention—the more voluntary, conceptually-driven component of spatial attention—affects second-order contrast sensitivity, and if so, whether its effects are similar to those of exogenous attention. To that end, we compared the effects of exogenous and endogenous attention on the sensitivity to second-order, orientation-defined, texture patterns of either high or low second-order spatial frequencies. The results show that, like exogenous attention, endogenous attention enhances second-order contrast sensitivity at the attended location and reduces it at unattended locations. However, whereas the effects of exogenous attention are a function of the second-order spatial frequency content, endogenous attention affected second-order contrast sensitivity independent of the second-order spatial frequency content. This finding supports the notion that both exogenous and endogenous attention can affect second-order contrast sensitivity, but that endogenous attention is more flexible, benefitting performance under different conditions. PMID:22895879

  19. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  20. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  1. [Adhesion molecules and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierres, A; Benoliel, A M; Bongrand, P

    1999-12-01

    This review was aimed at summarizing recent advances in the understanding of cell adhesion in order to discuss the possible relevance of new knowledge to the exploration of cancer patients and elaboration of therapeutic strategies. During the last 10 years, many adhesion molecules were identified, thus allowing to determine their tissue distribution and functional regulation. The concept of adhesiveness was refined. It is now well known that adhesive rate (i.e., the minimal contact time required for bond formation) and binding strength (i.e., the minimal force required to detach bound cells) are distinct parameters. They may be regulated independently, and influence the cell behavior in different ways. It is now possible to achieve accurate control of tumor cell adhesiveness, either by inhibiting an adhesive mechanism (through monoclonal antibodies, competitive ligands, or inhibition of receptor expression with antisense strategy or gene knock-out) or by promoting a binding mechanism (with receptor transfection or pro-inflammatory stimulation). Recent progress opens new possibilities for diagnosis and treatment. First, the interpretation of experimental data may be improved. Cell adhesive behavior is not entirely accounted for by the density of membrane adhesion receptors. Indeed, adhesion is influenced by receptor connection to the cytoskeleton and structure of the cell coat. An adhesion receptor may be anti-metastatic through an increase in tumor cohesion and cell differentiation, or pro-metastatic, through facilitation of cell migration towards a target tissue. New therapeutic strategies may include anti-adhesive procedure aimed at preventing metastasis formation. The potential importance of a better control of inflammatory processes is also emphasized in view of the influence of these processes on the expression of adhesion molecules.

  2. Ciliary neurotrophic factor analogue aggravates CCl4-induced acute hepatic injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Jun-Feng; Min, Guang-Ning; Han, Wei; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2017-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and CNTF analogs were reported to have hepatoprotective effect and ameliorate hepatic steatosis in db/db or high-fat-diet-fed mice. Because hepatic steatosis and injury are also commonly induced by hepatotoxin, the aim of the present study is to clarify whether CNTF could alleviate hepatic steatosis and injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ). Unexpectedly, when combined with CCl 4 , CNTF aggravated hepatic steatosis and liver injury. The mechanism is associated with effects of CNTF that inhibited lipoprotein secretion and drastically impaired the ability of lipoproteins to act as transport vehicles for lipids from the liver to the circulation. While injected after CCl 4 cessation, CNTF could improve liver function. These data suggest that CNTF could be a potential hepatoprotective agent against CCl 4 -induced hepatic injury after the cessation of CCl 4 exposure. However, it is forbidden to combine recombinant mutant of human CNTF treatment with CCl 4 .

  3. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) delivery to retina: an overview of current research advancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Maryam; Alizadeh, Effat; Saei Arezoumand, Khatereh; Fallahi Motlagh, Behzad; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2017-10-24

    The intraocular administration of the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been found to attenuate the photoreceptor degeneration and preserve retinal functions in the animal research models of the inherited or induced retinal disease. Studies with the aim of CNTF transfer to the posterior segment inside the eye have been directed to determine the best method for its administration. An ideal delivery method would overcome the eye drug elimination mechanisms or barriers and provide the sustained release of the CNTF into retina in the safest fashion with the minimum harm to the quality of life. This review focuses on the present state of CNTF delivery to retina, also provides an overview of available technologies and their challenges.

  4. Downregulated Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Tapan; Kotwani, Anita

    2017-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of neurotrophin growth factor family, physiologically mediates induction of neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation, promotes neuronal growth and survival and maintains synaptic plasticity and neuronal interconnections. Unlike the central nervous system, its secretion in the peripheral nervous system occurs in an activity-dependent manner. BDNF improves neuronal mortality, growth, differentiation and maintenance. It also provides neuroprotection against several noxious stimuli, thereby preventing neuronal damage during pathologic conditions. However, in diabetic retinopathy (a neuromicrovascular disorder involving immense neuronal degeneration), BDNF fails to provide enough neuroprotection against oxidative stress-induced retinal neuronal apoptosis. This review describes the prime reasons for the downregulation of BDNF-mediated neuroprotective actions during hyperglycemia, which renders retinal neurons vulnerable to damaging stimuli, leading to diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence for a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from the brain during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice; Adser, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an important role in regulating maintenance, growth and survival of neurons. However, the main source of circulating BDNF in response to exercise is unknown. To identify whether the brain is a source of BDNF during exercise, eight volunteers rowed for 4...... h while simultaneous blood samples were obtained from the radial artery and the internal jugular vein. To further identify putative cerebral region(s) responsible for BDNF release, mouse brains were dissected and analysed for BDNF mRNA expression following treadmill exercise. In humans, a BDNF...... release from the brain was observed at rest (P BDNF, while that contribution decreased following 1 h of recovery. In mice, exercise induced a three...

  6. [BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (BDNF): NEUROBIOLOGY AND MARKER VALUE IN NEUROPSYCHIATRY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levada, O A; Cherednichenko, N V

    2015-01-01

    In this review current publications about neurobiology and marker value of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in neuropsychiatry are analyzed. It is shown that BDNF is an important member of the family of neurotrophins which widely represented in various structures of the CNS. In prenatal period BDNF is involved in all stages of neuronal networks formation, and in the postnatal period its main role is maintaining the normal brain architectonics, involvement in the processes of neurogenesis and realization of neuroprotective functions. BDNF plays an important role in learning and memory organization, food and motor behavior. BDNF brain expression decreases with age, as well as in degenerative and vascular dementias, affective, anxiety, and behavioral disorders. The reducing of BDNF serum, level reflects the decreasing of its cerebral expression and could be used as a neurobiological marker of these pathological processes but the rising of its concentration could indicate the therapy effectiveness.

  7. Sex differences in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling: Functions and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yi-Chao; Wang, Shao-Ran; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2017-01-02

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates diverse processes such as neuronal survival, differentiation, and plasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that molecular events that direct sexual differentiation of the brain interact with BDNF signaling pathways. This Mini-Review first examines potential hormonal and epigenetic mechanisms through which sex influences BDNF signaling. We then examine how sex-specific regulation of BDNF signaling supports the development and function of sexually dimorphic neural circuits that underlie male-specific genital reflexes in rats and song production in birds. Finally, we discuss the implications of sex differences in BDNF signaling for gender-biased presentation of neurological and psychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Although this Mini-Review focuses on BDNF, we try to convey the general message that sex influences brain functions in complex ways and underscore the requirement for and challenge of expanding research on sex differences in neuroscience. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevents dendritic retraction of adult mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, Kate E; Ng, Wai S; Barde, Yves-Alain; Song, Bing; Morgan, James E

    2016-08-01

    We used cultured adult mouse retinae as a model system to follow and quantify the retraction of dendrites using diolistic labelling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following explantation. Cell death was monitored in parallel by nuclear staining as 'labelling' with RGC and apoptotic markers was inconsistent and exceedingly difficult to quantify reliably. Nuclear staining allowed us to delineate a lengthy time window during which dendrite retraction can be monitored in the absence of RGC death. The addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a marked reduction in dendritic degeneration, even when application was delayed for 3 days after retinal explantation. These results suggest that the delayed addition of trophic factors may be functionally beneficial before the loss of cell bodies in the course of conditions such as glaucoma. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Serum concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanari, Anna-Martha V; Andreazza, Tahiana; Costa, Ângelo B; Salvador, Jaqueline; Koff, Walter J; Aguiar, Bianca; Ferrari, Pamela; Massuda, Raffael; Pedrini, Mariana; Silveira, Esalba; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo S; Gama, Clarissa S; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia; Kapczinski, Flavio; Lobato, Maria Ines R

    2013-10-01

    Gender Identity Disorder (GID) is characterized by a strong and persistent cross-gender identification that affects different aspects of behavior. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity. Altered BDNF-signaling is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disordersand is related to traumatic life events. To examine serum BDNF levels, we compared one group of DSM-IV GID patients (n = 45) and one healthy control group (n = 66). Serum BDNF levels were significantly decreased in GID patients (p = 0.013). This data support the hypothesis that the reduction found in serum BDNF levels in GID patients may be related to the psychological abuse that transsexuals are exposed during their life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of physical activity and exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, T; Larsen, K T; Ried-Larsen, M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the effects of physical activity and exercise on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in healthy humans. Experimental and observational studies were identified from PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and SPORT Discus. A total of 32 articles...... met the inclusion criteria. Evidence from experimental studies suggested that peripheral BDNF concentrations were elevated by acute and chronic aerobic exercise. The majority of the studies suggested that strength training had no influence on peripheral BDNF. The results from most observational...... studies suggested an inverse relationship between the peripheral BDNF level and habitual physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness. More research is needed to confirm the findings from the observational studies....

  11. Single molecule electronics and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule.

  12. Exogenous salicylic acid improves freezing tolerance of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyunsuk; Min, Kyungwon; Arora, Rajeev

    2017-10-20

    Salicylic acid (SA)-treatment has been reported to improve plant tolerance to various abiotic stresses. However, its effect on freezing tolerance has not been well investigated. We investigated the effect of exogenous SA on freezing tolerance of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves. We also explored if nitric oxide (NO) and/or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediation was involved in this response, since these are known as primary signaling molecules involved in many physiological processes. A micro-centrifuge tube-based system used to apply SA to petiolate spinach leaves (0.5 mM over 4-d) was effective, as evident by SA content of leaf tissues. SA-treatment did not hamper leaf growth (fresh and dry weight; equatorial and longitudinal length) and was also not significantly different from 25% Hoagland controls vis-à-vis growth. SA application significantly improved freezing tolerance as evidenced by reduced ion-leakage and alleviated oxidative stress (lower accumulation of O2·- and H2O2) following freeze-thaw stress treatments (-6.5, -7.5, and -8.5 °C). Improved freezing tolerance of SA-treated leaves was paralleled by increased proline and ascorbic acid (AsA) accumulation. A 9-d cold acclimation (CA) treatment also improved leaf freezing tolerance (compared to non-acclimated control) and was accompanied by accumulation of SA and proline. Our results indicate that increased FST may be associated with accumulation of compatible solutes (proline) and antioxidants (AsA). Notably, the beneficial effect of SA on freezing tolerance was abolished when either H2O2- or NO-scavenger (1 μM N-acetylneuraminic acid, NANA or 100 μM hemoglobin, HB, respectively) was added to SA as pretreatment. Our data suggest that SA-induced freezing tolerance in spinach may be mediated by NO and H2O2 signaling. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Immune modulation and increased neurotrophic factor production in multiple sclerosis patients treated with testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giesser Barbara S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system with a pronounced neurodegenerative component. It has been suggested that novel treatment options are needed that target both aspects of the disease. Evidence from basic and clinical studies suggests that testosterone has an immunomodulatory as well as a potential neuroprotective effect that could be beneficial in MS. Methods Ten male MS patients were treated with 10 g of gel containing 100 mg of testosterone in a cross-over design (6 month observation period followed by 12 months of treatment. Blood samples were obtained at three-month intervals during the observation and the treatment period. Isolated blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs were used to examine lymphocyte subpopulation composition by flow cytometry and ex vivo protein production of cytokines (IL-2, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-17, IL-10, IL-12p40, TGFβ1 and growth factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor BDNF, platelet-derived growth factor PDGF-BB, nerve growth factor NGF, and ciliary neurotrophic factor CNTF. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH skin recall tests were obtained before and during treatment as an in vivo functional immune measure. Results Testosterone treatment significantly reduced DTH recall responses and induced a shift in peripheral lymphocyte composition by decreasing CD4+ T cell percentage and increasing NK cells. In addition, PBMC production of IL-2 was significantly decreased while TGFβ1 production was increased. Furthermore, PBMCs obtained during the treatment period produced significantly more BDNF and PDGF-BB. Conclusion These results are consistent with an immunomodulatory effect of testosterone treatment in MS. In addition, increased production of BDNF and PDGF-BB suggests a potential neuroprotective effect. Trial Registration NCT00405353 http://www.clinicaltrials.gov

  14. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryn, V; Halvorsen, B; Ueland, T; Isaksen, J; Kolkova, K; Ravn, K; Skjeldal, O H

    2015-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors are essential regulators of neuronal maturation including synaptic synthesis. Among those, Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been in particular focus in the understanding of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aim of our study was to investigate whether BNDF could be used as diagnostic/biological marker for ASD. For this purpose we examined the plasma levels of BDNF and the precursors pro- BDNF in patients with ASD and compared it with non-autistic controls; determined whether there was a correlation between the BDNF and proBDNF levels and clinical severity. We also investigated the coding region of BDNF identify for well-variations which could be associated to ASD. The 65 ASD patients (51 boys) were enrolled from a recent completed epidemiological survey covering two counties (Oppland and Hedmark) in Norway. The mean age of the total number of children who participated in this study was 11,7 years. 30 non-autistic children were included as controls, 14 boys and 16 girls. The mean age was 11.3 years. Exclusion criteria for control group were individuals suffering from either neurological, endocrine, or immune insuffiency. Patients with ASD were characterized by moderately but significantly elevated plasma levels of BDNF compared to matched controls. No differences were observed in the proBDNF level between patients and controls. Within the ASD group, children with intellectual disability demonstrated increased BDNF, but not proBDNF levels, while the presence of ADHD had no impact on circulating proBDNF or BDNF. No further associations between plasma proBDNF or BDNF and other clinical demographics were observed. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SNAP-25 is abundantly expressed in enteric neuronal networks and upregulated by the neurotrophic factor GDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrenschee, M; Böttner, M; Harde, J; Lange, C; Cossais, F; Ebsen, M; Vogel, I; Wedel, T

    2015-06-01

    Control of intestinal motility requires an intact enteric neurotransmission. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) is an essential component of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The aim of the study was to investigate the localization and expression of SNAP-25 in the human intestine and cultured enteric neurons and to assess its regulation by the neurotrophic factor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). SNAP-25 expression and distribution were analyzed in GDNF-stimulated enteric nerve cell cultures, and synaptic vesicles were evaluated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Human colonic specimens were processed for site-specific SNAP-25 gene expression analysis and SNAP-25 immunohistochemistry including dual-labeling with the pan-neuronal marker PGP 9.5. Additionally, gene expression levels and distributional patterns of SNAP-25 were analyzed in colonic specimens of patients with diverticular disease (DD). GDNF-treated enteric nerve cell cultures showed abundant expression of SNAP-25 and exhibited granular staining corresponding to synaptic vesicles. SNAP-25 gene expression was detected in all colonic layers and isolated myenteric ganglia. SNAP-25 co-localized with PGP 9.5 in submucosal and myenteric ganglia and intramuscular nerve fibers. In patients with DD, both SNAP-25 mRNA expression and immunoreactive profiles were decreased compared to controls. GDNF-induced growth and differentiation of cultured enteric neurons is paralleled by increased expression of SNAP-25 and formation of synaptic vesicles reflecting enhanced synaptogenesis. The expression of SNAP-25 within the human enteric nervous system and its downregulation in DD suggest an essential role in enteric neurotransmission and render SNAP-25 as a marker for impaired synaptic plasticity in enteric neuropathies underlying intestinal motility disorders.

  16. Considerations on the Use of Exogenous Fibrolytic Enzymes to Improve Forage Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán D. Mendoza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Digestion of cell wall fractions of forage in the rumen is incomplete due to the complex links which limit their degradation. It is therefore necessary to find options to optimize the use of forages in ruminant production systems. One alternative is to use exogenous enzymes. Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes are of fungal or bacterial origin and increase nutrient availability from the cell wall, which consists of three fractions in different proportions depending on the species of forage: digestible, potentially digestible, and indigestible. The response to addition of exogenous enzymes varies with the type of forage; many researchers infer that there are enzyme-forage interactions but fail to explain the biological mechanism. We hypothesize that the response is related to the proportion of the potentially digestible fraction. The exogenous enzyme activity depends on several factors but if the general conditions for enzyme action are available, the potentially digestible fraction may determine the magnitude of the response. Results of experiments with exogenous fibrolytic enzymes in domestic ruminants are inconsistent. This, coupled with their high cost, has made their use unattractive to farmers. Development of cheaper products exploring other microorganisms with fibrolytic activity, such as Fomes fomentarius or Cellulomonas flavigena, is required.

  17. Considerations on the Use of Exogenous Fibrolytic Enzymes to Improve Forage Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Germán D.; Plata-Pérez, Fernando X.

    2014-01-01

    Digestion of cell wall fractions of forage in the rumen is incomplete due to the complex links which limit their degradation. It is therefore necessary to find options to optimize the use of forages in ruminant production systems. One alternative is to use exogenous enzymes. Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes are of fungal or bacterial origin and increase nutrient availability from the cell wall, which consists of three fractions in different proportions depending on the species of forage: digestible, potentially digestible, and indigestible. The response to addition of exogenous enzymes varies with the type of forage; many researchers infer that there are enzyme-forage interactions but fail to explain the biological mechanism. We hypothesize that the response is related to the proportion of the potentially digestible fraction. The exogenous enzyme activity depends on several factors but if the general conditions for enzyme action are available, the potentially digestible fraction may determine the magnitude of the response. Results of experiments with exogenous fibrolytic enzymes in domestic ruminants are inconsistent. This, coupled with their high cost, has made their use unattractive to farmers. Development of cheaper products exploring other microorganisms with fibrolytic activity, such as Fomes fomentarius or Cellulomonas flavigena, is required. PMID:25379525

  18. An Exogenous Surfactant-Producing Bacillus subtilis Facilitates Indigenous Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peike; Li, Guoqiang; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Zhou, Jiefang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study used an exogenous lipopeptide-producing Bacillus subtilis to strengthen the indigenous microbial enhanced oil recovery (IMEOR) process in a water-flooded reservoir in the laboratory. The microbial processes and driving mechanisms were investigated in terms of the changes in oil properties and the interplay between the exogenous B. subtilis and indigenous microbial populations. The exogenous B. subtilis is a lipopeptide producer, with a short growth cycle and no oil-degrading ability. The B. subtilis facilitates the IMEOR process through improving oil emulsification and accelerating microbial growth with oil as the carbon source. Microbial community studies using quantitative PCR and high-throughput sequencing revealed that the exogenous B. subtilis could live together with reservoir microbial populations, and did not exert an observable inhibitory effect on the indigenous microbial populations during nutrient stimulation. Core-flooding tests showed that the combined exogenous and indigenous microbial flooding increased oil displacement efficiency by 16.71%, compared with 7.59% in the control where only nutrients were added, demonstrating the application potential in enhanced oil recovery in water-flooded reservoirs, in particular, for reservoirs where IMEOR treatment cannot effectively improve oil recovery. PMID:26925051

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor of the cerebral microvasculature: a forgotten and nitric oxide-dependent contributor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, A; Prigent-Tessier, A; Quirié, A; Bertrand, N; Savary, S; Gondcaille, C; Garnier, P; Demougeot, C; Marie, C

    2017-04-01

    Evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin largely involved in cognition, is expressed by cerebral endothelial cells led us to explore in rats the contribution of the cerebral microvasculature to BDNF found in brain tissue and the link between cerebrovascular nitric oxide (NO) and BDNF production. Brain BDNF protein levels were measured before and after in situ removal of the cerebral endothelium that was achieved by brain perfusion with a 0.2% CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulphonate) solution. BDNF protein and mRNA levels as well as levels of endothelial NO synthase phosphorylated at serine 1177 (P-eNOS ser1177 ) were measured in cerebral microvessel-enriched fractions. These fractions were also exposed to glycerol trinitrate. Hypertension (spontaneously hypertensive rats) and physical exercise training were used as experimental approaches to modulate cerebrovascular endothelial NO production. CHAPS perfusion resulted in a marked decrease in brain BDNF levels. Hypertension decreased and exercise increased P-eNOS ser1177 and BDNF protein levels. However, BDNF mRNA levels that were increased by exercise did not change after hypertension. Finally, in vitro exposure of cerebral microvessel-enriched fractions to glycerol trinitrate enhanced BDNF production. These data reveal that BDNF levels measured in brain homogenates correspond for a large part to BDNF present in cerebral endothelial cells and that cerebrovascular BDNF production is dependent on cerebrovascular endothelial eNOS activity. They provide a paradigm shift in the cellular source of brain BDNF and suggest a new approach to improve our understanding of the link between endothelial function and cognition. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christophorou, L.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration is a predictor of chronic kidney disease in patients with cardiovascular risk factors - Hyogo Sleep Cardio-Autonomic Atherosclerosis study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masafumi Kurajoh; Manabu Kadoya; Akiko Morimoto; Akio Miyoshi; Akinori Kanzaki; Miki Kakutani-Hatayama; Kae Hamamoto; Takuhito Shoji; Yuji Moriwaki; Tetsuya Yamamoto; Masaaki Inaba; Mitsuyoshi Namba; Hidenori Koyama

    2017-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to have protective effects against cardiovascular diseases and death through neural and non-neural pathways via tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling...

  2. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in major depressive disorder : state-trait issues, clinical features and pharmacological treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, M. L.; Bus, B. A. A.; Spinhoven, Ph; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Kenis, G.; Prickaerts, J.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude; Elzinga, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence supports 'the neurotrophin hypothesis of depression' in its prediction that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in depression. However, some key questions remain unanswered, including whether abnormalities in BDNF persist beyond the clinical state of depression,

  3. Exogenous T₃ elicits long day-like alterations in testis size and the RFamides Kisspeptin and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone in short-day Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Jerad R; Carter, Sara N; Freeman, David A

    2013-06-01

    Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) exhibit robust seasonal rhythms of reproduction driven by changes in day length. Day length is encoded endogenously by the duration of nocturnal melatonin (Mel) secretion from the pineal gland. Short duration Mel signals stimulate whereas long duration Mel signals inhibit reproduction. The mechanism by which Mel regulates the reproductive axis has not been fully characterized. In Siberian hamsters, the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T₃) is thought to be part of the photoperiodic mechanism. The availability of T₃ is decreased in hamsters housed in short day lengths, and injections of exogenous T₃ stimulate testicular growth in short-day (SD) Siberian hamsters. Thus, T₃ acts as a neuroendocrine intermediate between the Mel rhythm and the reproductive axis. The RFamides kisspeptin (Kiss1) and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) also act as a link between the Mel rhythm and the reproductive axis. Expression of both of these neuropeptides is regulated by photoperiod and Mel. Kiss1 stimulates, and GnIH inhibits, the reproductive axis in long-day housed hamsters. It remains unknown whether T₃ acts through changes in RFamide expression in the regulation of reproduction or whether these molecules act independently of one another. We tested the hypothesis that exogenous T₃ administered to SD hamsters, a treatment that stimulates testicular growth, would also result in alterations in the patterns of Kiss1- and GnIH-immunoreactivity. Administration of T₃ to SD hamsters resulted in significant testicular growth as well as a long day-like pattern of RFamide peptide expression. Thus, exogenous T₃ elicited increased numbers of Kiss1-positive cells in the hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular nucleus, decreased numbers of Kiss1-positive cells in the arcuate nucleus, and a greater number of GnIH-positive cells in the dorsomedial hypothalamus compared with SD controls. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that

  4. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  5. Restoring the encoding properties of a stochastic neuron model by an exogenous noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra ePaffi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we evaluate the possibility of improving the encoding properties of an impaired neuronal system by superimposing an exogenous noise to an external electric stimulation signal. The approach is based on the use of mathematical neuron models consisting of stochastic HH-like circuit, where the impairment of the endogenous presynaptic inputs is described as a subthreshold injected current and the exogenous stimulation signal is a sinusoidal voltage perturbation across the membrane. Our results indicate that a correlated Gaussian noise, added to the sinusoidal signal can significantly increase the encoding properties of the impaired system, through the Stochastic Resonance (SR phenomenon. These results suggest that an exogenous noise, suitably tailored, could improve the efficacy of those stimulation techniques used in neuronal systems, where the presynaptic sensory neurons are impaired and have to be artificially bypassed.

  6. Role of microcrackes of apple surface in exogenous calcium uptake by fruit at harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Wójcik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine of exogenous calcium uptake by 8 cultivars of apples (Malus domestica Borkh.. Fruits at harvest time were dipped in l% CaCl2 solution and stored at 18-20ºC during 14 days. Apples dipped in water served as control. The results showed significant differences between cultivars in apple calcium content. The least fruit calcium content was observed by cv. Jonagold and the highest by cv. Lobo. It was found significant, positive correlation between fruit calcium content and ability of apples to exogenous calcium uptake. The study showed that intensity of apple surface cracking is not a main factor influencing on exogenous calcium uptake. Apple peel surface without the blush was more sensitive to form the microcrackes than surface with the blush.

  7. Effect of exogenous phytase on degradation of inositol phosphate in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask-Pedersen, Dorte Buus; Glitsø, Lene Vibe; Skov, L.K.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of exogenous phytase on inositol phosphate degradation in the rumen of dairy cows was investigated in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Four lactating Danish Holstein cows fitted with ruminal, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were offered a total mixed ration (TMR) with a high content of inositol...... to the TMR. Degradation of InsP6 occurred mainly before the duodenum. The ruminal degradability of InsP6 was increased with increasing dietary concentrations of phytase: 86.4, 93.7, 94.5, and 96.3% for none, low, medium, or high, respectively. A comparison of the InsP6 content in individual feedstuffs......, and high phytase doses, respectively). It was not possible to distinguish between the degradation of inositol phosphate occurring in the TMR and in the rumen. Exogenous phytase had no effect on total P intake or flow of total P to the duodenum and ileum, whereas exogenous phytase increased flow...

  8. Sodic alkaline stress mitigation by exogenous melatonin in tomato needs nitric oxide as a downstream signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Gong, Biao; Jin, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiufeng; Wei, Min; Yang, Fengjuan; Li, Yan; Shi, Qinghua

    2015-08-15

    The present study was designed to determine the interactive effect of exogenous melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) on sodic alkaline stress mitigation in tomato seedlings. It was observed that exogenous melatonin treatment elevated NO levels in alkaline-stressed tomato roots. However, exogenous NO had little effects on melatonin levels. Importantly, melatonin-induced NO generation was accompanied by increased tolerance to alkaline stress. Chemical scavenging of NO reduced melatonin-induced alkaline stress tolerance and defense genes' expression. However, inhibition of melatonin biosynthesis had a little effect on NO-induced alkaline stress tolerance. These results strongly suggest that NO, acting as a downstream signal, is involved in the melatonin-induced tomato tolerance to alkaline stress. This process creates a new signaling pathway for improving stress tolerance in plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Exogenous Surfactants on the Parameters of Blood Gas Composition in Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the effects of the surfactants Surfactant-BL and Curosurf on pulmonary oxygenizing properties in preterm neonatal infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. The studies were performed in 81 preterm neonates with severe RDS. For the therapy of RDS, the exogenous surfactants Surfactant-BL and Curosurf were used in 52 and 29 children with RDS, respectively. The similarity of infants from both groups was statistically confirmed. Blood gas composition and artificial ventilation parameters were examined. Results. The administration of the exogenous surfactants Surfactant-BL and Curosurf normalized blood gas composition, enhanced alveolar ventilation, and improved pulmonary ventilation-perfusion relationships. The exogenous surfactants permit the performance of artificial ventilation when the values are close to the physiological ones. There were no significant differences in the effects on the surfactants on gas exchange parameters. Key words: respiratory distress syndrome, surfactant, artificial ventilation, mean airway pressure, blood gas composition.

  10. Long noncoding nature brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense is associated with poor prognosis and functional regulation in non-small cell lung caner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, MingJing; Xu, Zhonghua; Jiang, Kanqiu; Xu, Weihua; Chen, Yongbin; Xu, ZhongHeng

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the prognostic potential and functional regulation of human nature antisense, brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense, in non-small cell lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer carcinoma and adjacent non-carcinoma lung tissues were extracted from 151 patients. Their endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense expression levels were compared by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Clinical relevance between endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense expression level and patients' clinicopathological variances or overall survival was analyzed. The potential of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense being an independent prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer was also evaluated. In in vitro non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense was upregulated through forced overexpression. The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense upregulation on non-small cell lung cancer in vitro survival, proliferation, and migration were evaluated by viability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, and transwell assays. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense is lowly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer carcinoma tissues and further downregulated in late-stage carcinomas. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense downregulation was closely associated with non-small cell lung cancer patients' advanced tumor, lymph node, metastasis stage, and positive status of lymph node metastasis, and confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor for patients' poor overall survival. In non-small cell lung cancer A549 and H226 cell lines, forced overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense did not alter cancer cell viability but had significantly tumor suppressive effect in inhibiting in vitro non-small cell lung cancer proliferation and migration. Endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense in

  11. Cell-Surface Glyco-Engineering by Exogenous Enzymatic Transfer Using a Bifunctional CMP-Neu5Ac Derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Zong, Chengli; Sheikh, M Osman; Sun, Tiantian; Wells, Lance; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2017-09-27

    Cell-surface engineering strategies that permit long-lived display of well-defined, functionally active molecules are highly attractive for eliciting desired cellular responses and for understanding biological processes. Current methodologies for the exogenous introduction of synthetic biomolecules often result in short-lived presentations, or require genetic manipulation to facilitate membrane attachment. Herein, we report a cell-surface engineering strategy that is based on the use of a CMP-Neu5Ac derivative that is modified at C-5 by a bifunctional entity composed of a complex synthetic heparan sulfate (HS) oligosaccharide and biotin. It is shown that recombinant ST6GAL1 can readily transfer the modified sialic acid to N-glycans of glycoprotein acceptors of living cells resulting in long-lived display. The HS oligosaccharide is functionally active, can restore protein binding, and allows activation of cell signaling events of HS-deficient cells. The cell-surface engineering methodology can easily be adapted to any cell type and is highly amenable to a wide range of complex biomolecules.

  12. Dance partner or dance floor?: exogenous factors resulting in accidents in professional dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Eileen M; Mill, Helmgard; Wanke, Alice; Davenport, Jaqueline; Checcetti, Fistd; Koch, Franziska; Groneberg, David A

    2013-09-01

    Injury prevention in professional dancers is very important due to the high risk for acute injuries posing a threat to dancers' careers. Causative factors of acute injuries in professional dance can be divided into exogenous and endogenous factors. Although both are known in professional dance, there is still a lack of data to have a differentiated view. The aim of this study is to analyze exogenous factors resulting in work accidents of professional dancers. The data for the evaluation were obtained from work accident reports (n = 1,438, female 722, male 716) from six Berlin Theatres. Evaluation and descriptive statistics were conducted by SPSS 18 and Excel 2007. About half (48.5%, n = 698) of all work accidents are caused by exogenous factors. The "dance partner" is the most common exogenous factor (39.9%), followed by the dance floor (28.24%) and props (13.6%). The lower extremity is the most frequent structure injured in either sex (male 47.3%, female 61.3%), followed by the upper extremity in females (14.6%) and spine in male dancers (19.8%). The stage is the most common injury location in both genders (males 63.9%, females 56.8%). Acute injuries caused by exogenous factors were particularly sustained during performances (males 58.8%, females 50.5%) and during rehearsals (males 33%, females 39.9%). This study shows the key significance of exogenous factors in acute injuries in professional dance. Preserving the dancers' health and preventing injuries takes top priority, and therefore, interventions in the artistic work cannot be ruled out when preventive measures are implemented.

  13. Coping with an exogenous glucose overload: glucose kinetics of rainbow trout during graded swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how chronically hyperglycemic rainbow trout modulate glucose kinetics in response to graded exercise up to critical swimming speed (Ucrit), with or without exogenous glucose supply. Our goals were 1) to quantify the rates of hepatic glucose production (Ra glucose) and disposal (Rd glucose) during graded swimming, 2) to determine how exogenous glucose affects the changes in glucose fluxes caused by exercise, and 3) to establish whether exogenous glucose modifies Ucrit or the cost of transport. Results show that graded swimming causes no change in Ra and Rd glucose at speeds below 2.5 body lengths per second (BL/s), but that glucose fluxes may be stimulated at the highest speeds. Excellent glucoregulation is also achieved at all exercise intensities. When exogenous glucose is supplied during exercise, trout suppress hepatic production from 16.4 ± 1.6 to 4.1 ± 1.7 μmol·kg−1·min−1 and boost glucose disposal to 40.1 ± 13 μmol·kg−1·min−1. These responses limit the effects of exogenous glucose to a 2.5-fold increase in glycemia, whereas fish showing no modulation of fluxes would reach dangerous levels of 114 mM of blood glucose. Exogenous glucose reduces metabolic rate by 16% and, therefore, causes total cost of transport to decrease accordingly. High glucose availability does not improve Ucrit because the fish are unable to take advantage of this extra fuel during maximal exercise and rely on tissue glycogen instead. In conclusion, trout have a remarkable ability to adjust glucose fluxes that allows them to cope with the cumulative stresses of a glucose overload and graded exercise. PMID:26719305

  14. THE SPECIAL STATUS OF EXOGENOUS WORD-FORMATION WITHIN THE GERMAN WORD-FORMATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilyuk Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the properties of exogenous word-formation system taking into account the existence of two word-formation systems in modern German. On the basis of foreign research which reveal modern trends in German word-formation connected with the internationalization and the development of new European Latin language. The author defines key features of exogenous word-formation, i.e. foreign origin of wordformation units, unmotivated units, unmotivated interchange in base and affixes as well as limited distribution rules in combination with German word-formation. The article analyzes various approaches to word-division, as well as motivated and unmotivated interchange of consonants in bases and in affixes. Unmotivated interchange showcases a special status of the exogenous word-formation within German. Another item covered by the article is the issue of confix. The article has opinions of researchers about correctness of its separation and a list of its features. The author presents his definition of confix: a confix is a bound exogenous word-formation unit with a certain lexical and semantic meaning and joining other units directly or indirectly (through linking morpheme -o-, which is able to make a base. Moreover, some confixes are able to participate at word-combination and have unlimited distribution. So far, confix showcases the integration of exogenous word-formation and traditional German word-formation. The research proves the special status of exogenous word-formation in German. Its results can be used as a base for further analysis of co-existing word-formation systems in German and determination of their characteristic features.

  15. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) plus soluble CNTF receptor ? increases cyclooxygenase-2 expression, PGE2 release and interferon-?-induced CD40 in murine microglia

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jain, Mohit Raja; Li, Hong; Levison, Steven W

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been regarded as a potent trophic factor for motor neurons. However, recent studies have shown that CNTF exerts effects on glial cells as well as neurons. For instance, CNTF stimulates astrocytes to secrete FGF-2 and rat microglia to secrete glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which suggest that CNTF exerts effects on astrocytes and microglia to promote motor neuron survival indirectly. As CNTF is structurally related ...

  16. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  17. Molecules Best Paper Award 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecules starts to institute the “Best Paper” award to recognize these outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the first “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2012. Nominations were selected by the editor-in-chief and selected editorial board members from all the papers published in 2008. [...

  18. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013. Candidates were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2009.

  19. Molecules Best Paper Award 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules instituted some years ago a “Best Paper” award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published each year in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the third “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2014. The winners were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2010. Reviews and research papers were evaluated separately.

  20. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  1. Molecules Best Paper Award 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules instituted some years ago a “Best Paper” award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of organic synthesis, natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published each year in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the third “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2015. The winners were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2011. Reviews and research papers were evaluated separately. We are pleased to announce that the following eight papers have won the Molecules Best Paper Award for 2015:[...

  2. Interaction between exogenous insulin, endogenous insulin, and glucose in type 2 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Parkner, Tina; Bruun, Niels Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Little is known about the influence of exogenous insulin and actual glucose levels on the release of endogenous insulin in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. This study investigated the interaction among serum endogenous insulin (s-EI), serum exogenous......-IAsp, and s-EI were equal within visit TH and within visit CH, but variances were significantly higher during visit CH compared with visit TH. The s-IAsp reached lower levels at visit CH compared with visit TH (test for slope=1, P=0.005). The s-EI depended on p-glucose in a nonlinear fashion during the first...

  3. [Research on problem of exogenous pollution of Chinese medicine resources from perspective of circular economy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Tian, Kan; Tian, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Based on the in-depth analysis of the current situation of the exogenous pollution of Chinese medicine resources, this research mainly discusses the intrinsic link and practical significance between the development of circular economy in Chinese medicine resources and the control of the problem of the exogenous pollution from the perspective of circular economy, and proposes some suggestions to develop the recycling economy of Chinese medicine resources from the establishment of legal system, mechanism of development, production norms, industry standards and regulatory system of the recycling of Chinese medicine resources. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  4. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    OpenAIRE

    Byers, D M

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from [1-14C]myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit p...

  5. Protection of honeybee Apis mellifera by its endogenous and exogenous lactic flora against bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irakli Janashia

    2016-09-01

    Three exogenous bacteriocin-producing LAB strains were tested against the same pathogens and against 25 endogenous bacterial isolates representing 11 different LAB species. The screening showed that all the tested exogenous bacteriocin-producing strains inhibited the tested P. larvae strains. The endogenous LAB strains exhibited varied sensitivity profiles when treated with bacteriocin-producing strains. This raises similar challenges to those observed in antibiotic applications leading to dysbacteriosis, even though the efficacy of these bacteriocins against P. larvae in an in vitro system is evident.

  6. Targeted taste cell-specific overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult taste buds elevates phosphorylated TrkB protein levels in taste cells, increases taste bud size, and promotes gustatory innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Irina V; Margolskee, Robert F; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2012-05-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most potent neurotrophic factor in the peripheral taste system during embryonic development. It is also expressed in adult taste buds. There is a lack of understanding of the role of BDNF in the adult taste system. To address this, we generated novel transgenic mice in which transgene expression was driven by an α-gustducin promoter coupling BDNF expression to the postnatal expression of gustducin in taste cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly stronger BDNF labeling in taste cells of high BDNF-expressing mouse lines compared with controls. We show that taste buds in these mice are significantly larger and have a larger number of taste cells compared with controls. To examine whether innervation was affected in Gust-BDNF mice, we used antibodies to neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and ATP receptor P2X3. The total density of general innervation and specifically the gustatory innervation was markedly increased in high BDNF-expressing mice compared with controls. TrkB and NCAM gene expression in laser capture microdissected taste epithelia were significantly up-regulated in these mice. Up-regulation of TrkB transcripts in taste buds and elevated taste cell-specific TrkB phosphorylation in response to increased BDNF levels indicate that BDNF controls the expression and activation of its high affinity receptor in taste cells. This demonstrates a direct taste cell function for BDNF. BDNF also orchestrates and maintains taste bud innervation. We propose that the Gust-BDNF transgenic mouse models can be employed to further dissect the specific roles of BDNF in the adult taste system.

  7. Lower brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels associated with worsening fatigue in prostate cancer patients during repeated stress from radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saligan, L N; Lukkahatai, N; Holder, G; Walitt, B; Machado-Vieira, R

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue during cancer treatment is associated with depression. Neurotrophic factors play a major role in depression and stress and might provide insight into mechanisms of fatigue. This study investigated the association between plasma concentrations of three neurotrophic factors (BDNF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor; GDNF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor; and SNAPIN, soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion attachment receptor-associated protein) and initial fatigue intensification during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in euthymic non-metastatic prostate cancer men. Fatigue, as measured by the 13-item Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue (FACT-F), and plasma neurotrophic factors were collected at baseline (prior to EBRT) and mid-EBRT. Subjects were categorized into fatigue and no fatigue groups using a > 3-point change in FACT-F scores between the two time points. Multiple linear regressions analysed the associations between fatigue and neurotrophic factors. FACT-F scores of 47 subjects decreased from baseline (43.95 ± 1.3) to mid-EBRT (38.36 ± 1.5, P < 0.001), indicating worsening fatigue. SNAPIN levels were associated with fatigue scores (rs = 0.43, P = 0.005) at baseline. A significant decrease of BDNF concentration (P = 0.008) was found in fatigued subjects during EBRT (n = 39). Baseline SNAPIN and decreasing BDNF levels may influence worsening fatigue during EBRT. Further investigations are warranted to confirm their role in the pathophysiology and therapeutics of fatigue.

  8. Improved cold tolerance in Elymus nutans by exogenous application of melatonin may involve ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juanjuan; Wu, Ye; Miao, Yanjun; Xu, Yamei; Zhao, Enhua; Wang, Jin; Sun, Huaien; Liu, Qian; Xue, Yongwei; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2017-01-03

    Melatonin is an important secondary messenger that plays a central role in plant growth, as well as abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. However, the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms of melatonin-mediated cold tolerance, especially interactions between melatonin and other key molecules in the plant stress response, remain unknown. Here, the interrelation between melatonin and abscisic acid (ABA) was investigated in two genotypes of Elymus nutans Griseb., the cold-tolerant Damxung (DX) and the cold-sensitive Gannan (GN) under cold stress. Pre-treatment with exogenous melatonin or ABA alleviated oxidative injury via scavenging ROS, while enhancing both antioxidant enzyme activities and non-enzymatic antioxidant contents. Treatment of fluridone, an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor caused membrane lipid peroxidation and lowered melatonin-induced antioxidant defense responses. It is worth noting that cold stress significantly induced both endogenous melatonin and ABA levels in both genotypes. Application of melatonin increased ABA production, while fluridone significantly suppressed melatonin-induced ABA accumulation. ABA and fluridone pre-treatments failed to affect the endogenous melatonin concentration. Moreover, exogenous melatonin up-regulated the expression of cold-responsive genes in an ABA-independent manner. These results indicate that both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways may contribute to melatonin-induced cold tolerance in E. nutans.

  9. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  10. Injury-induced CRMP4 expression in adult sensory neurons; a possible target gene for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Sang Hwa; Seo, Su-Yeong; Suh, Duk Joon; Park, Hwan Tae

    2010-11-12

    Neurotrophic cytokines, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) play an important role in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. In the present study, we screened gene expression induced by CNTF in adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using the Illumina microarray. We found that the expression of both short and long forms of collapsin response-mediator protein 4 (CRMP4) was increased in cultured primary sensory neurons by CNTF. In addition, sciatic nerve injury induced the expression of CRMP4 mRNA and protein in DRG neurons. Finally, the increased CRMP4 protein was transported into peripheral axons following nerve injury. These findings indicate that CRMP4 may be a target gene for CNTF in the regenerative axon growth of DRG neurons after injury. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Co-administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor with its soluble receptor protects against neuronal death and enhances neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozog, Mark A; Modha, Geetanjalee; Church, John; Reilly, Rayne; Naus, Christian C

    2008-03-07

    Attempts to promote neuronal survival and repair with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) have met with limited success. The variability of results obtained with CNTF may, in part, reflect the fact that some of the biological actions of the cytokine are mediated by a complex formed between CNTF and its specific receptor, CNTFRalpha, which exists in both membrane-bound and soluble forms. In this study, we compared the actions of CNTF alone and CNTF complexed with soluble CNTFRalpha (hereafter termed "Complex") on neuronal survival and growth. Although CNTF alone produced limited effects, Complex protected against glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity via gap junction-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Further examination revealed that only Complex promoted neurite outgrowth. Differential gene expression analysis revealed that, compared with CNTF alone, Complex differentially regulates several neuroprotective and neurotrophic genes. Collectively, these findings indicate that CNTF exerts more robust effects on neuronal survival and growth when applied in combination with its soluble receptor.

  12. Role of exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in the regulation of energy homeostasis in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Pedersen, Maria; Krabbe, Karen S

    2009-01-01

    identifies BDNF as a player not only in central metabolism, but also in regulating energy metabolism in peripheral organs. Low levels of BDNF are found in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and major depression. In addition, BDNF levels are low in obesity...... and independently so in patients with type 2 diabetes. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is expressed in non-neurogenic tissues, including skeletal muscle, and exercise increases BDNF levels not only in the brain and in plasma, but in skeletal muscle as well. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein...... expression was increased in muscle cells that were electrically stimulated, and BDNF increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase-beta (ACCbeta) and enhanced fatty oxidation both in vitro and ex vivo. These data identify BDNF as a contraction...

  13. From Molecular to Nanotechnology Strategies for Delivery of Neurotrophins: Emphasis on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géral, Claire; Angelova, Angelina; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases represent a major public health problem, but beneficial clinical treatment with neurotrophic factors has not been established yet. The therapeutic use of neurotrophins has been restrained by their instability and rapid degradation in biological medium. A variety of strategies has been proposed for the administration of these leading therapeutic candidates, which are essential for the development, survival and function of human neurons. In this review, we describe the existing approaches for delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is the most abundant neurotrophin in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Biomimetic peptides of BDNF have emerged as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders. Polymer-based carriers have provided sustained neurotrophin delivery, whereas lipid-based particles have contributed also to potentiation of the BDNF action. Nanotechnology offers new possibilities for the design of vehicles for neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Recent developments in nanoscale carriers for encapsulation and transport of BDNF are highlighted. PMID:24300402

  14. Lack of association between brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism and aggressive behavior in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xuan; Dong, Zai-Quan; Tian, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Li-Na; Gu, Yan; Hu, Ze-Qing; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-01-30

    We investigated the association of the Val66Met gene polymorphism in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene with aggressive behavior among Southern Han Chinese schizophrenia patients. We used polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism to determine the genotypes and the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) to measure aggressive behavior. No significant differences in genotype or allele distribution of Val66Met were identified between aggressive and non-aggressive schizophrenia patients. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Dendrobium alkaloids prevent Aβ25–35-induced neuronal and synaptic loss via promoting neurotrophic factors expression in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Nie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Neuronal and synaptic loss is the most important risk factor for cognitive impairment. Inhibiting neuronal apoptosis and preventing synaptic loss are promising therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In this study, we investigate the protective effects of Dendrobium alkaloids (DNLA, a Chinese medicinal herb extract, on β-amyloid peptide segment 25–35 (Aβ25-35-induced neuron and synaptic loss in mice. Method Aβ25–35(10 µg was injected into the bilateral ventricles of male mice followed by an oral administration of DNLA (40 mg/kg for 19 days. The Morris water maze was used for evaluating the ability of spatial learning and memory function of mice. The morphological changes were examined via H&E staining and Nissl staining. TUNEL staining was used to check the neuronal apoptosis. The ultrastructure changes of neurons were observed under electron microscope. Western blot was used to evaluate the protein expression levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus and cortex. Results DNLA significantly attenuated Aβ25–35-induced spatial learning and memory impairments in mice. DNLA prevented Aβ25–35-induced neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex, increased the number of Nissl bodies, improved the ultrastructural injury of neurons and increased the number of synapses in neurons. Furthermore, DNLA increased the protein expression of neurotrophic factors BDNF, CNTF and GDNF in the hippocampus and cortex. Conclusions DNLA can prevent neuronal apoptosis and synaptic loss. This effect is mediated at least in part via increasing the expression of BDNF, GDNF and CNTF in the hippocampus and cortex; improving Aβ-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in mice.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates hippocampal synaptic transmission by increasing N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Eric S; Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been found to regulate synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Whole-cell and single-channel recordings from cultured hippocampal neurons revealed a mechanism responsible for enhanced synaptic strength. Specifically, brain-derived neurotrophic factor augmented glutamate-evoked, but not acetylcholine-evoked, currents 3-fold and increased N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor open probability. Activation of trkB NT receptors was critical, as glutamate curr...

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rapidly enhances phosphorylation of the postsynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1

    OpenAIRE

    Suen, Piin-Chau; Wu, Kuo; Levine, Eric S; Mount, Howard T. J.; Xu, Jia-Ling; LIN, SIANG-YO; Black, Ira B.

    1997-01-01

    Although neurotrophins have traditionally been regarded as neuronal survival factors, recent work has suggested a role for these factors in synaptic plasticity. In particular, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) rapidly enhances synaptic transmission in hippocampal neurons through trkB receptor stimulation and postsynaptic phosphorylation mechanisms. Activation of trkB also modulates hippocampal long-term potentiation, in which postsynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors play a...

  18. Corallocins A-C, Nerve Growth and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inducing Metabolites from the Mushroom Hericium coralloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittstein, Kathrin; Rascher, Monique; Rupcic, Zeljka; Löwen, Eduard; Winter, Barbara; Köster, Reinhard W; Stadler, Marc

    2016-09-23

    Three new natural products, corallocins A-C (1-3), along with two known compounds were isolated from the mushroom Hericium coralloides. Their benzofuranone and isoindolinone structures were elucidated by spectral methods. All corallocins induced nerve growth factor and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in human 1321N1 astrocytes. Furthermore, corallocin B showed antiproliferative activity against HUVEC and human cancer cell lines MCF-7 and KB-3-1.

  19. Altered Acoustic Startle Reflex, Prepulse Inhibition, and Peripheral Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Morphine Self-Administered Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong Hyo; Park, Thomas Y; Lin, Erica; Li, He; Yang, Chae Ha; Choi, Kwang H

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies suggested that opiate withdrawal may increase anxiety and disrupt brain-derived neurotrophic factor function, but the effects of i.v. morphine self-administration on these measures remain unclear. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with a catheter in the jugular vein. After 1 week of recovery, the animals were allowed to self-administer either i.v. morphine (0.5 mg/kg per infusion, 4 h/d) or saline in the operant conditioning chambers. The acoustic startle reflex and prepulse inhibition were measured at a baseline and on self-administration days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (1- and 3-hour withdrawal). Blood samples were collected on self-administration days 3, 5, and 7 from separate cohorts of animals, and the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and corticosterone were assayed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Compared with the saline group, the morphine self-administration group showed hyper-locomotor activity and reduced defecation during the self-administration. The morphine self-administration increased acoustic startle reflex at 1-hour but not 3-hour withdrawal from morphine and disrupted prepulse inhibition at 3-hour but not 1-hour withdrawal. The blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were decreased in the morphine self-administration group at self-administration days 3 and 5, while the corticosterone levels remained unchanged throughout the study. The current findings suggest that spontaneous withdrawal from i.v. morphine self-administration may have transient effects on acoustic startle, sensorimotor gating, and peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, and these changes may contribute to the adverse effects of opiate withdrawal.

  20. The neurotrophic factor neurturin contributes toward an aggressive cancer cell phenotype, neuropathic pain and neuronal plasticity in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; D'Haese, Jan G; Tieftrunk, Elke; Kujundzic, Kristina; Schorn, Stephan; Xing, Baocai; Kehl, Timo; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors possess an emerging role in the pathophysiology of several gastrointestinal disorders, regulating innervation, pain sensation and disease-associated neuroplasticity. Here, we aimed at characterizing the role of the neurotrophic factor neurturin (NRTN) and its receptor glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha-2 (GFRα-2) in pancreatic cancer (PCa) and pancreatic neuropathy. For this purpose, NRTN and GFRα-2 were studied in normal human pancreas and PCa tissues via immunohistochemistry, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and correlated to abdominal pain. The impact of NRTN/GFRα-2 on PCa cell (PCC) biology was investigated via exposure to hypoxia, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide viability and matrigel invasion assays in native and specific small interfering RNA-silenced PCCs. To assess the influence of NRTN on pancreatic neuroplasticity and neural invasion (NI), its impact was explored via an in vitro 'neuroplasticity assay' and a 3D neural migration assay. NRTN and GFRα-2 demonstrated a site-specific upregulation in PCa, predominantly in nerves, PCCs and extracellular matrix. Patients with severe pain demonstrated higher intraneural GFRα-2 immunoreactivity than patients with no pain. PCa tissue and PCCs contained increased amounts of NRTN, which was suppressed under hypoxia. NRTN promoted PCC invasiveness, and silencing of NRTN limited both PCC proliferation and invasion. Depletion of NRTN from PCa tissue extracts and PCC supernatants decreased axonal sprouting in neuronal cultures but did not influence glial density. Silencing of NRTN in PCCs boosted NI. We conclude that increased NRTN/GFRα-2 in PCa seems to promote an aggressive PCC phenotype and neuroplasticity in PCa. Accelerated NI following NRTN suppression constitutes a novel explanation for the attraction of PCC to nerves in the hypoxic PCa tumor microenvironment. PCa is characterized by

  1. Concentrated growth factor increases Schwann cell proliferation and neurotrophic factor secretion and promotes functional nerve recovery in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jie; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yue; Sun, Xiaolin; Wen, Chaoju; Shahmoradi, Mahdi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-02-01

    Concentrated growth factor (CGF) is a newly generated complex that comprises a fibrin matrix incorporating growth factors and plasmatic and leukocyte cytokines. It has been widely used in bone regenerative medicine. However, the effect of CGF on peripheral nerve regeneration had not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of using CGF for nerve regeneration by i) investigating the effect of CGF on the proliferation of Schwann cells (SCs) and secretion of neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line‑derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro; and ii) analyzing the effect of CGF on functional nerve recovery after nerve injury in vivo. CGF was prepared from venous blood taken from rats, and using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we noted that it featured a fiber‑like appearance with pore size ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 µm. The soluble component of CGF was used to produce conditioned media with which to treat the Schwann cell line. A cell counting kit-8 assay and cell cycle analysis were both used to study the proliferative effect of CGF on SCs. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that there was an increase in the mRNA and protein expression of NGF and GDNF, both of which are markers of SC neurotrophic secretion. A model of sciatic nerve crush injury was established for the in vivo experiment, and CGF was found to increase the sciatic functional index (indicative of nerve function). We noted that CGF increased SC proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors in vitro, and promoted functional recovery after peripheral nerve injuries in vivo. These results suggest that CGF is a promising candidate biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration, and may potentially be utilized to repair nerve injuries.

  2. Transplantation of hypoxic preconditioned neural stem cells benefits functional recovery via enhancing neurotrophic secretion after spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei-Li; Liu, Peng; Wang, Guan; Pu, Jung-Ang; Xue, Xin; Zhao, Jian-Hua

    2017-09-08

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating, costly, and common pathological condition that affects the function of central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are few promising therapeutic strategies available for SCI. To look for a suitable therapeutic strategy, we have developed a sublethal hypoxic preconditioning procedure using Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, LDH releasing and cell viability assays in vitro. Meanwhile, we have examined the benefits of neural stem cells (NSCs) transplantation prior to hypoxic preconditioning on functional recovery and potential mechanism via MRI screening, H&E and Nissl staining, immunofluorescence staining and Elisa assays. Our data showed that transplantation of hypoxic prconditioned NSCs could enhance neuronal survival, especially 5-TH(+) and ChAT(+) neurons, in the injured spinal cord to reinforce functional benefits. The hypoxia exposure upregulated HIF-1α, neurotrophic and growth factors including neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, functional recovery, including locomotor and hypersensitivities to mechanical and thermal stimulation assessed via behavioral and sensory tests, improved significantly in rats with engraftment of NSCs after hypoxia exposure from day 14 post-SCI, compared with the control and N-NSCs groups. In short, the approach employed in this study could result in functional recovery via upregulating neurotrophic and growth factors, which implies that hypoxic preconditioning strategy could serve as an effective and feasible strategy for cell-based therapy in the treatment of SCI in rats. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Focal release of neurotrophic factors by biodegradable microspheres enhance motor and sensory axonal regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) promote nerve regeneration and neuronal survival after peripheral nerve injury. However, drawbacks related with administration and bioactivity during long periods limit their therapeutic application. In this study, PLGA microspheres (MPs) were used to locally release different NTFs and evaluate whether they accelerate axonal regeneration in comparison with free NTFs or controls. ELISA, SEM, UV/visible light microscopy, organotypic cultures of DRG explants and spina...

  4. Multimodal physical activity increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and improves cognition in institutionalized older women

    OpenAIRE

    Vedovelli, Kelem; Giacobbo, Bruno Lima; Corrêa, Márcio Silveira; Wieck, Andréa; Argimon, Irani Iracema de Lima; Bromberg, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity has been proposed as a promising intervention to improve cognition and decrease the risk of dementia in older adults. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to mediate, at least partially, these effects of exercise. However, intervention studies of the effects of multimodal exercises on cognition and BDNF levels are scarce and composed by small samples. Thus, the generalization of the conclusions of these studies depends on the reproducibility of the results. In or...

  5. Differential effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 on hindlimb function in paraplegic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, Vanessa S.; Park, Jihye; Gage, Fred H.; Mendell, Lorne M.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of viral administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on locomotor recovery in adult rats with complete thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection injuries, in order to determine the effect of chronic neurotrophin expression on spinal plasticity. At the time of injury, BDNF, NT-3 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) (control) was delivered to the lesion via adeno-associated virus (AAV) constructs. AAV–BDNF was significantly more effectiv...

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor can act as a pronecrotic factor through transcriptional and translational activation of NADPH oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sun H.; Won, Seok J.; Sohn, Seonghyang; Hyuk J. Kwon; Jee Y Lee; Park, Jong H.; Gwag, Byoung J.

    2002-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that neurotrophins (NTs) potentiate or cause neuronal injury under various pathological conditions. Since NTs enhance survival and differentiation of cultured neurons in serum or defined media containing antioxidants, we set out experiments to delineate the patterns and underlying mechanisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)–induced neuronal injury in mixed cortical cell cultures containing glia and neurons in serum-free media without antioxidants, ...

  7. Quantum transport through single molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio Oliveros, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes three-terminal transport measurements through single molecules. The interest in this field stems from the dream that single molecules will form the building blocks for future nanoscale electronic devices. The advantages are their small size -nanometers-, and their synthetic

  8. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for human retinal degeneration: phase I trial of CNTF delivered by encapsulated cell intraocular implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Paul A; Caruso, Rafael C; Tao, Weng; Coleman, Hanna R; Thompson, Darby J S; Fullmer, Keri R; Bush, Ronald A

    2006-03-07

    Neurotrophic factors are agents with a promising ability to retard progression of neurodegenerative diseases and are effective in slowing photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. Here we report a human clinical trial of a neurotrophic factor for retinal neurodegeneration. In this Phase I safety trial, human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was delivered by cells transfected with the human CNTF gene and sequestered within capsules that were surgically implanted into the vitreous of the eye. The outer membrane of the encapsulated cell implant is semipermeable to allow CNTF to reach the retina. Ten participants received CNTF implants in one eye. When the implants were removed after 6 months, they contained viable cells with minimal cell loss and gave CNTF output at levels previously shown to be therapeutic for retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs. Although the trial was not powered to form a judgment as to clinical efficacy, of seven eyes for which visual acuity could be tracked by conventional reading charts, three eyes reached and maintained improved acuities of 10-15 letters, equivalent to two- to three-line improvement on standard Snellen acuity charts. A surgically related choroidal detachment in one eye resulted in a transient acuity decrease that resolved with conservative management. This Phase I trial indicated that CNTF is safe for the human retina even with severely compromised photoreceptors. The approach to delivering therapeutic proteins to degenerating retinas using encapsulated cell implants may have application beyond disease caused by genetic mutations.

  9. Impact of aerobic training on immune-endocrine parameters, neurotrophic factors, quality of life and coordinative function in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Gold, Stefan M; Witte, Jan; Bartsch, Katharina; Lang, Undine E; Hellweg, Rainer; Reer, Rüdiger; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Heesen, Christoph

    2004-10-15

    In recent years it has become clear that multiple sclerosis (MS) patients benefit from physical exercise as performed in aerobic training but little is known about the effect on functional domains and physiological factors mediating these effects. We studied immunological, endocrine and neurotrophic factors as well as coordinative function and quality of life during an 8-week aerobic bicycle training in a waitlist control design. In the immune-endocrine study (1) 28 patients were included, the coordinative extension study (2) included 39 patients. Training was performed at 60% VO(2)max after determining individual exertion levels through step-by-step ergometry. Metabolic (lactate), endocrine (cortisol, adrendocortico-releasing hormone, epinephrine, norepinephrine), immune (IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptor), and neurotrophic (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF)) parameters were compared from a prestudy and a poststudy endurance test at 60% VO(2)max for 30 min. In study (1), lowered lactate levels despite higher workload levels indicated a training effect. Disease-specific quality of life (as measured by the Hamburg Quality of Life Questionnaire for Multiple Sclerosis, HAQUAMS) significantly increased in the training group. No significant training effects were seen for endocrine and immune parameters or neurotrophins. In study (2), two out of three coordinative parameters of the lower extremities were significantly improved. In summary, low-level aerobic training in MS improves not only quality of life but also coordinative function and physical fitness.

  10. The Impacts of Swimming Exercise on Hippocampal Expression of Neurotrophic Factors in Rats Exposed to Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is associated with stress-induced neural atrophy in limbic brain regions, whereas exercise has antidepressant effects as well as increasing hippocampal synaptic plasticity by strengthening neurogenesis, metabolism, and vascular function. A key mechanism mediating these broad benefits of exercise on the brain is induction of neurotrophic factors, which instruct downstream structural and functional changes. To systematically evaluate the potential neurotrophic factors that were involved in the antidepressive effects of exercise, in this study, we assessed the effects of swimming exercise on hippocampal mRNA expression of several classes of the growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NGF, NT-3, FGF2, VEGF, and IGF-1 and peptides (VGF and NPY in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS. Our study demonstrated that the swimming training paradigm significantly induced the expression of BDNF and BDNF-regulated peptides (VGF and NPY and restored their stress-induced downregulation. Additionally, the exercise protocol also increased the antiapoptotic Bcl-xl expression and normalized the CUMS mediated induction of proapoptotic Bax mRNA level. Overall, our data suggest that swimming exercise has antidepressant effects, increasing the resistance to the neural damage caused by CUMS, and both BDNF and its downstream neurotrophic peptides may exert a major function in the exercise related adaptive processes to CUMS.

  11. Multichanneled Nerve Guidance Conduit with Spatial Gradients of Neurotrophic Factors and Oriented Nanotopography for Repairing the Peripheral Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yo-Cheng; Chen, Ming-Hong; Liao, Shih-Yung; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Kuan, Chen-Hsiang; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Wang, Tzu-Wei

    2017-10-17

    Peripheral nerve injuries, causing sensory and motor impairment, affect a great number of patients annually. It is therefore important to incorporate different strategies to promote nerve healing. Among the treatment options, however, the efficacy of nerve conduits is often compromised by their lack of living cells, insufficient growth factors, and absence of the extracellular matrix (ECM)-like structure. To improve the functional recovery, we aimed to develop a natural biodegradable multichanneled scaffold characterized with aligned electrospun nanofibers and neurotrophic gradient (MC/AN/NG) to guide axon outgrowth. The gelatin-based conduits mimicked the fascicular architecture of natural nerve ECM. The multichanneled (MC) scaffolds, cross-linked with microbial transglutaminase, possessed sustainable mechanical stability. Meanwhile, the release profile of dual neurotrophic factors, nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), exhibited a temporal-controlled manner. In vitro, the differentiated neural stem cells effectively extended their neurites along the aligned nanofibers. Besides, in the treated group, the cell density increased in high NGF concentration regions of the gradient membrane, and the BDNF significantly promoted myelination. In a rabbit sciatic nerve transection in vivo model, the MC/AN/NG scaffold showed superior nerve recovery and less muscle atrophy comparable to autograft. By integrating multiple strategies to promote peripheral nerve regeneration, the MC/AN/NG scaffolds as nerve guidance conduits showed promising results and efficacious treatment alternatives for autologous nerve grafts.

  12. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  13. Vibrational coupling in plasmonic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chongyue; Dongare, Pratiksha D; Su, Man-Nung; Wang, Wenxiao; Chakraborty, Debadi; Wen, Fangfang; Chang, Wei-Shun; Sader, John E; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2017-10-31

    Plasmon hybridization theory, inspired by molecular orbital theory, has been extremely successful in describing the near-field coupling in clusters of plasmonic nanoparticles, also known as plasmonic molecules. However, the vibrational modes of plasmonic molecules have been virtually unexplored. By designing precisely configured plasmonic molecules of varying complexity and probing them at the individual plasmonic molecule level, intramolecular coupling of acoustic modes, mediated by the underlying substrate, is observed. The strength of this coupling can be manipulated through the configuration of the plasmonic molecules. Surprisingly, classical continuum elastic theory fails to account for the experimental trends, which are well described by a simple coupled oscillator picture that assumes the vibrational coupling is mediated by coherent phonons with low energies. These findings provide a route to the systematic optical control of the gigahertz response of metallic nanostructures, opening the door to new optomechanical device strategies. Published under the PNAS license.

  14. An optical conveyor for molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Franz M; Braun, Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Trapping single ions under vacuum allows for precise spectroscopy in atomic physics. The confinement of biological molecules in bulk water is hindered by the lack of comparably strong forces. Molecules have been immobilized to surfaces, however often with detrimental effects on their function. Here, we optically trap molecules by creating the microscale analogue of a conveyor belt: a bidirectional flow is combined with a perpendicular thermophoretic molecule drift. Arranged in a toroidal geometry, the conveyor accumulates a hundredfold excess of 5-base DNA within seconds. The concentrations of the trapped DNA scale exponentially with length, reaching trapping potential depths of 14 kT for 50 bases. The mechanism does not require microfluidics, electrodes, or surface modifications. As a result, the trap can be dynamically relocated. The optical conveyor can be used to enhance diffusion-limited surface reactions, redirect cellular signaling, observe individual biomolecules over a prolonged time, or approach single-molecule chemistry in bulk water.

  15. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  16. Micro-dose hCG as luteal phase support without exogenous progesterone administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C Yding; Fischer, R; Giorgione, V

    2016-01-01

    For the last two decades, exogenous progesterone administration has been used as luteal phase support (LPS) in connection with controlled ovarian stimulation combined with use of the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) trigger for the final maturation of follicles. The introduction of the GnRHa tr...

  17. The exogenous factors determining aggressive behavior among reformatories’ inmates toward staff. The problem of personnel safety

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Chomczyński

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the selected exogenous conditions influencing the safety of staff in Polish reformatories for juvenile delinquents. There are discussed the circumstances linked with staff and inmates’ activities raising the risk of extraordinary events occurrence. The article posses the empirical character and the results presented here base on qualitative techniques..

  18. Effect of exogenous hormones and chilling on dormancy breaking of seed of Asafoetida (Ferula assafoetida L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otroshy, M.; Zamani, A.; Khodambashi, M.; Ebrahimi, M.; Struik, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    Asafoetida (Ferula assafoetida L.) is a medicinal plant with a problematic seed germination. Seeds of this plant have a long dormancy. The present research was carried out to investigate whether exogenous application of the hormones Gibberellic Acid (GA3), N6-furfurylaminopurine (kinetin) and

  19. How exogenous nitric oxide regulates nitrogen assimilation in wheat seedlings under different nitrogen sources and levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balotf, Sadegh; Islam, Shahidul; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman; Juhasz, Angela; Ma, Wujun

    2018-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is one of the most important nutrients for plants and nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling plant growth regulator involved in nitrogen assimilation. Understanding the influence of exogenous NO on nitrogen metabolism at the gene expression and enzyme activity levels under different sources of nitrogen is vitally important for increasing nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). This study investigated the expression of key genes and enzymes in relation to nitrogen assimilation in two Australian wheat cultivars, a popular high NUE cv. Spitfire and a normal NUE cv. Westonia, under different combinations of nitrogen and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) as the NO donor. Application of NO increased the gene expressions and activities of nitrogen assimilation pathway enzymes in both cultivars at low levels of nitrogen. At high nitrogen supplies, the expressions and activities of N assimilation genes increased in response to exogenous NO only in cv. Spitfire but not in cv. Westonia. Exogenous NO caused an increase in leaf NO content at low N supplies in both cultivars, while under high nitrogen treatments, cv. Spitfire showed an increase under ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) treatment but cv. Westonia was not affected. N assimilation gene expression and enzyme activity showed a clear relationship between exogenous NO, N concentration and N forms in primary plant nitrogen assimilation. Results reveal the possible role of NO and different nitrogen sources on nitrogen assimilation in Triticum aestivum plants.

  20. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Rode, Anna Kathrine Obelitz

    2015-01-01

    . The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys...

  1. Endogenously- and Exogenously-Driven Selective Sustained Attention: Contributions to Learning in Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lucy C.; Thiessen, Erik D.; Godwin, Karrie E.; Dickerson, John P.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2015-01-01

    Selective sustained attention is vital for higher order cognition. Although endogenous and exogenous factors influence selective sustained attention, assessment of the degree to which these factors influence performance and learning is often challenging. We report findings from the Track-It task, a paradigm that aims to assess the contribution of…

  2. The effects of exogenous putrescine on sex-specific responses of Populus cathayana to copper stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lianghua; Wang, Ling; Chen, Fugui; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2013-11-01

    We used the dioecious tree, Populus cathayana, as a model species to study plants' physiological and biochemical responses to copper (Cu) stress, exogenous putrescine (Put) treatment and their interaction. Although males accumulated higher Cu concentrations in leaves than did females under Cu stress, they did not suffer more damage than females, as reflected by changes in gas exchange, pigment contents, membrane lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) and protein oxidation (carbonyl). Higher Cu tolerance of males was correlated with a higher H2O2 scavenging ability and proline responses, and a better maintenance of non-protein thiols (NP-SHs) and spermine (Spm) contents. We also discovered that mitigation effects of exogenous Put on Cu stress occurred, as visible as a recovery of the total chlorophyll content, and lower TBARS and carbonyl under interaction treatment when compared to Cu stress alone. Exogenous Put decreased the Cu concentration in leaves of both sexes, but to different degrees. Such effects of exogenous Put suggested that Put may play important roles in the stabilization of membrane integrity and protein structures, and it may modulate the uptake and transportation of Cu. Our results indicated that (1) males are more tolerant to Cu stress than females; (2) Put could mitigate Cu toxicity in P. cathayana, but to a different degree in males and females; (3) males are better candidates than females for Cu extraction and phytoremediation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of exogenous ethylene inhibits postharvest peel browning of ‘Huangguan’ pear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel browning disorder has an enormous impact on the exterior quality of ‘Huangguan’ pear whereas the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, the effect of exogenous ethylene on peel browning of pear fruits stored at 0' was evaluated. Results showed that ethylene effectively inhibited ...

  4. The Use of Exogenous Melatonin in Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder: a Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijlswijk, I.M. van; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Smits, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To perform a meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of exogenous melatonin in advancing sleep-wake rhythm in patients with delayed sleep phase disorder. Design: Meta analysis of papers indexed for PubMed, Embase, and the abstracts of sleep and chronobiologic societies

  5. Programming of endogenous and exogenous saccades: Evidence for a competitive integration model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godijn, R.J.; Theeuwes, J.

    2002-01-01

    Participant's were required to make a saccade to a uniquely colored target while ignoring the presentation of an onset distractor. The results provide evidence for a competitive integration model of saccade programming that assumes endogenous and exogenous saccades are programmed in a common saccade

  6. Microbial population heterogeneity versus bioreactor heterogeneity: evaluation of Redox Sensor Green as an exogenous metabolic biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baert, Jonathan; Delepierre, Anissa; Telek, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    performances (i.e. microbial population heterogeneity). In this work, we have evaluated the relevance of Redox Sensor Green (RSG) as an exogenous biosensor of metabolic activity at the single cell level. RSG signal is proportional to the activity of the electron transport chain and its signal is strongly...

  7. A meta-analytic study of exogenous oscillatory electric potentials in neuroenhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Wischnewski, M.

    2016-01-01

    The assumption that transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) enhances perceptual and cognitive ability in healthy volunteers by exposing the brain to exogenous oscillatory electric fields is increasingly finding its way into society and commercial parties. The aim of the present study is

  8. Scaling the relative dominance of exogenous drivers in structuring desert small mammal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Daniela; Ojeda, Ricardo A.

    2015-11-01

    Assemblage patterns could be primarily generated by two types of drivers: exogenous (such as environmental and climatic factors) and endogenous (interactions such as competition, predation, mutualism or herbivory). The most widely accepted hypothesis states that at smaller scales (such as patch scale), interspecific interactions are the major drivers structuring communities, whereas at larger regional scales, factors such as climate, topography and soil act as ecological filters that determine assemblage composition. The general aim of this paper is to compare different exogenous drivers in terms of their relative dominance in structuring desert small mammal communities across a range of spatial scales, from patch to regional, and compare them with previous results on endogenous drivers. Our results show that as spatial scale increases, the explanatory power of exogenous factors also increases, e.g. from 17% at the patch scale (i.e. abundance) to 99% at the regional scale (i.e. diversity). Moreover, environmental drivers vary in type and strength depending on the community estimator across several spatial scales. On the other hand, endogenous drivers such as interspecific interactions are more important at the patch scale, diminishing in importance towards the regional scale. Therefore, the relative importance of exogenous versus endogenous drivers affects small mammal assemblage structure at different spatial scales. Our results fill up a knowledge gap concerning ecological drivers of assemblage structure at intermediate spatial scales for Monte desert small mammals, and highlight the importance of dealing with multi-causal factors in explaining ecological patterns of assemblages.

  9. Response to exogenous surfactant is different during open lung and conventional ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kaam, Anton H.; Haitsma, Jack J.; Dik, Willem A.; Naber, Birgitta A.; Alblas, Elise H.; de Jaegere, Anne; Kok, Joke H.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies have shown that the efficacy of exogenous surfactant is dose-dependent during conventional positive pressure ventilation (PPVCON). The present study aimed to determine whether this dose-dependent relationship is also present during open lung (OLC) ventilation. We also

  10. Automatic detection of exogenous respiration end-point using artificial neural network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, I.A.E.; Spanjers, H.; Keesman, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    When aerobic bacteria receive a biodegradable material such as wastewater, then respiration changes from endogenous to exogenous. The reverse occurs when biodegradation is complete. When using respirometry a respirogram is recorded showing those changes in respiration, and for an expert it is not

  11. Endogenous and exogenous components in the circadian variation of core body temperature in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddinga, AE; Beersma, DGM; VandenHoofdakker, RH

    Core body temperature is predominantly modulated by endogenous and exogenous components. In the present study we tested whether these two components can be reliably assessed in a protocol which lasts for only 120 h. In this so-called forced desynchrony protocol, 12 healthy male subjects (age 23.7

  12. Exogenous tocopherol and ascorbic acid improve in vitro recovery of cryopreserved Rubus shoot tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative processes involved in stresses such as cold temperatures can decrease the viability of plant tissues. Antioxidants that counteract these oxidative reactions could improve plant viability following the stresses involved in cryopreservation. We studied the effects of exogenous vitamin E (V...

  13. Transurethral lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser of a large exogenous prostatic calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masanori; Ohara, Rei; Kanao, Kent; Nakajima, Yosuke

    2011-04-01

    Prostatic calculi are classified into two types, endogenous and exogenous calculi, based on their origin. Endogenous calculi are commonly observed in elderly men; however, exogenous prostatic calculi are extremely rare. We report here the case of a 51-year-old man who suffered incontinence and pollakiuria with a giant exogenous prostatic calculus almost completely replacing the prostatic tissue. X-rays and computed tomography demonstrated a large calculus of 65 × 58 mm in the small pelvic cavity. The patient underwent a transurethral lithotripsy with a holmium-YAG laser and a total of 85 g of disintegrated stones was retrieved and chemical stone analysis revealed the presence of magnesium ammonium phosphate. The incontinence improved and the voiding volume increased dramatically, and no stone recurrence in the prostatic fossa occurred at the 2 years follow-up. The etiology of this stone formation seemed to be based on some exogenous pathways combined with urinary stasis and chronic urinary infection due to compression fracture of the lumbar vertebra.

  14. Exogenous Social Identity Cues Differentially Affect the Dynamic Tracking of Individual Target Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Roy; Gabbert, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experiment to investigate the top-down effect of exogenous social identity cues on a multiple-identity tracking task, a paradigm well suited to investigate the processes of binding identity to spatial locations. Here we simulated an eyewitness event in which dynamic targets, all to be tracked with equal effort, were identified from…

  15. The safety profile of exogenous insulin in people with type 2 diabetes: justification for concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, C J; Johnson, J A

    2012-01-01

    There is no doubt about the value of exogenous insulin for people with type 1 diabetes. The purpose of this commentary is to discuss emerging evidence that this may not be the case for the majority of people with type 2 diabetes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. The exogenous factors determining aggressive behavior among reformatories’ inmates toward staff. The problem of personnel safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Chomczyński

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the selected exogenous conditions influencing the safety of staff in Polish reformatories for juvenile delinquents. There are discussed the circumstances linked with staff and inmates’ activities raising the risk of extraordinary events occurrence. The article posses the empirical character and the results presented here base on qualitative techniques..

  17. Metabolism of exogenously applied fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in hypoxic vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, C D; Roberts, T M

    1994-12-01

    Exogenously administered fructose 1,6-bisphosphate reportedly protects ischemic or hypoxic tissue and facilitates metabolic recovery. The mechanism of action of exogenous fructose 1,6-bisphosphate has been an issue of considerable debate, since there is a lack of direct evidence that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate can cross the cell membrane and act as an intermediate in glycolysis. We synthesized [1,6-13C]fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and directly examined its cellular metabolism in hog carotid artery segments using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. [1,6-13C]fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (2.1 mM) was metabolized by hog carotid artery during normoxia and hypoxia with a major metabolic product being [3-13C]lactate. The production of [3-13C]lactate was greater during hypoxia than during normoxia, indicating that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate metabolism responded to the energetic state of the tissue. We found that exogenously added fructose 1,6-bisphosphate at 2.1 mM did not significantly improve the ability of hypoxic hog carotid artery to maintain isometric force, whereas 20 mM fructose 1,6-bisphosphate did significantly, although modestly, improve isometric force maintenance. These results indicate that exogenously added fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is capable of entering cells and serving as a glycolytic intermediate.

  18. How exogenous nitric oxide regulates nitrogen assimilation in wheat seedlings under different nitrogen sources and levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Balotf

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is one of the most important nutrients for plants and nitric oxide (NO as a signaling plant growth regulator involved in nitrogen assimilation. Understanding the influence of exogenous NO on nitrogen metabolism at the gene expression and enzyme activity levels under different sources of nitrogen is vitally important for increasing nitrogen use efficiency (NUE. This study investigated the expression of key genes and enzymes in relation to nitrogen assimilation in two Australian wheat cultivars, a popular high NUE cv. Spitfire and a normal NUE cv. Westonia, under different combinations of nitrogen and sodium nitroprusside (SNP as the NO donor. Application of NO increased the gene expressions and activities of nitrogen assimilation pathway enzymes in both cultivars at low levels of nitrogen. At high nitrogen supplies, the expressions and activities of N assimilation genes increased in response to exogenous NO only in cv. Spitfire but not in cv. Westonia. Exogenous NO caused an increase in leaf NO content at low N supplies in both cultivars, while under high nitrogen treatments, cv. Spitfire showed an increase under ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3 treatment but cv. Westonia was not affected. N assimilation gene expression and enzyme activity showed a clear relationship between exogenous NO, N concentration and N forms in primary plant nitrogen assimilation. Results reveal the possible role of NO and different nitrogen sources on nitrogen assimilation in Triticum aestivum plants.

  19. Exogenous attention to fear: Differential behavioral and neural responses to snakes and spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Sandra C; Kessel, Dominique; Hernández-Lorca, María; García-Rubio, María J; Rodrigues, Paulo; Gomes, Nuno; Carretié, Luis

    2017-05-01

    Research has consistently shown that threat stimuli automatically attract attention in order to activate the defensive response systems. Recent findings have provided evidence that snakes tuned the visual system of evolving primates for their astute detection, particularly under challenging perceptual conditions. The goal of the present study was to measure behavioral and electrophysiological indices of exogenous attention to snakes, compared with spiders - matched for rated fear levels but for which sources of natural selection are less well grounded, and to innocuous animals (birds), which were presented as distracters, while participants were engaged in a letter discrimination task. Duration of stimuli, consisting in a letter string and a concurrent distracter, was either presented for 180 or 360ms to explore if the stimulus duration was a modulating effect of snakes in capturing attention. Results showed a specific early (P1) exogenous attention-related brain potential with maximal amplitude to snakes in both durations, which was followed by an enhanced late attention-related potential (LPP) showing enhanced amplitudes to spiders, particularly under the longer exposure durations. These results suggest that exogenous attention to different classes of threat stimuli follows a gradual process, with the most evolutionary-driven stimulus, i.e., snakes, being more efficient at attracting early exogenous attention, thus more dependent on bottom-up processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of Peers in Student Academic Achievement in Exogenously Formed University Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androushchak, Gregory; Poldin, Oleg; Yudkevich, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the influence of classmates' ability characteristics on student achievement in exogenously formed university student groups. The study uses administrative data on undergraduate students at a large selective university in Russia. The presence of high-ability classmates has a significant positive effect on individual grades in key…

  1. Plants as Biofactories: Postharvest Stress-Induced Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Glucosinolates in Broccoli Subjected to Wounding Stress and Exogenous Phytohormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-García, Daniel; Nair, Vimal; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Jacobo-Velázquez, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Broccoli contains high levels of bioactive molecules and is considered a functional food. In this study, postharvest treatments to enhance the concentration of glucosinolates and phenolic compounds were evaluated. Broccoli whole heads were wounded to obtain florets and wounded florets (florets cut into four even pieces) and stored for 24 h at 20 °C with or without exogenous ethylene (ET, 1000 ppm) or methyl jasmonate (MeJA, 250 ppm). Whole heads were used as a control for wounding treatments. Regarding glucosinolate accumulation, ET selectively induced the 4-hydroxylation of glucobrassicin in whole heads, resulting in ∼223% higher 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin than time 0 h samples. Additionally, glucoraphanin was increased by ∼53% in whole heads treated with ET, while neoglucobrassicin was greatly accumulated in wounded florets treated with ET or MeJA, showing increases of ∼193 and ∼286%, respectively. On the other hand, although only whole heads stored without phytohormones showed higher concentrations of phenolic compounds, which was reflected in ∼33, ∼30, and ∼46% higher levels of 1,2,2-trisinapoylgentiobose, 1,2-diferulolylgentiobiose, and 1,2-disinapoyl-2-ferulolylgentiobiose, respectively; broccoli florets stored under air control conditions showed enhanced concentrations of 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 1,2-disinapoylgentiobiose, and 1,2-disinapoyl-2-ferulolylgentiobiose (∼22, ∼185, and ∼65% more, respectively). Furthermore, exogenous ET and MeJA impeded individual phenolics accumulation. Results allowed the elucidation of simple and effective postharvest treatment to enhance the content of individual glucosinolates and phenolic compounds in broccoli. The stressed-broccoli tissue could be subjected to downstream processing in order to extract and purify bioactive molecules with applications in the dietary supplements, agrochemical and cosmetics markets. PMID:26904036

  2. Plants as biofactories: Postharvest Stress-Induced Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Glucosinolates in Broccoli Subjected to Wounding Stress and Exogenous Phytohormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eVillarreal-García

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Broccoli contains high levels of bioactive molecules and is considered a functional food. In this study, postharvest treatments to enhance the concentration of glucosinolates and phenolic compounds were evaluated. Broccoli whole heads were wounded to obtain florets and wounded florets (florets cut into four even pieces and stored for 24 h at 20 ºC with or without exogenous ethylene (ET, 1000 ppm or methyl jasmonate (MeJA, 250 ppm. Whole heads were used as a control for wounding treatments. Regarding glucosinolate accumulation, ET selectively induced the 4-hydroxylation of glucobrassicin in whole heads, resulting in ~223% higher 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin than time 0 h samples. Additionally, glucoraphanin was increased by ~53% in whole heads treated with ET, while neoglucobrassicin was greatly accumulated in wounded florets treated with ET or MeJA, showing increases of ~193% and ~286%, respectively. On the other hand, although only whole heads stored without phytohormones showed higher concentrations of phenolic compounds, which was reflected in ~33%, ~30%, and 46% higher levels of 1,2,2-trisinapoylgentiobose, 1,2-diferulolylgentiobiose, and 1,2-disinapoyl-2-ferulolylgentiobiose, respectively; broccoli florets stored under air control conditions showed enhanced concentrations of 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 1,2-disinapoylgentiobiose, and 1,2-disinapoyl-2-ferulolylgentiobiose (~22%, ~185%, and ~65% more, respectively. However, exogenous ET and MeJA impeded individual phenolics accumulation. Results allowed the elucidation of simple and effective postharvest treatment to enhance the content of individual glucosinolates and phenolic compounds in broccoli. The stressed-broccoli tissue could be subjected to downstream processing in order to extract and purify bioactive molecules with applications in the dietary supplements, agrochemical and cosmetics markets.

  3. Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factors in Taiwanese Patients with Drug-Naïve First-Episode Major Depressive Disorder: Effects of Antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Yu-Jie; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factors are known to be related to the psychopathology of major depressive disorder. However, studies focusing on drug-naïve first-episode patients are still rare. Over a 6-year period, we examined the serum brain-derived neurotrophic factors levels in patients with first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder and compared them with sex-matched healthy controls. We also investigated the relationships between serum brain-derived neurotrophic factors levels, suicidal behavior, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores before and after a 4-week antidepressant treatment. The baseline serum brain-derived neurotrophic factors levels of 71 patients were significantly lower than those of the controls (P=.017), and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores in 71 patients did not correlate with brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were significantly lower in 13 suicidal major depressive disorder patients than in 58 nonsuicidal major depressive disorder patients (P=.038). Among 41 followed-up patients, there was no alteration in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factors levels after treatment with antidepressants (P=.126). In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of using pretreatment brain-derived neurotrophic factors to estimate the response to treatment, the area under the curve was 0.684. The most suitable cut-off point was 6.1 ng/mL (sensitivity=78.6%, specificity = 53.8%). Our data support the serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with drug-naïve first-episode major depressive disorder were lower than those in the healthy controls, and patients with pretreatment brain-derived neurotrophic factors >6.1 ng/mL were more likely to be responders. Although the relationship of our results to the mechanism of drug action and pathophysiology of depression remains unclear, the measure may have potential use as a predictor of response to treatment. In the future

  4. Implantation of encapsulated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-secreting cells prevents long-lasting learning impairment following neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain insult in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Shinji; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Date, Isao; Shingo, Tetsuro; Yasuhara, Takao; Mishima, Kenichi; Aoo, Naoya; Harada, Kazuhiko; Egashira, Nobuaki; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu

    2005-04-01

    Implantation of encapsulated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-secreting cells into brain parenchyma reduces histological brain damage following hypoxic-ischemic stress in neonatal rats. We examined the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors on long-term learning and memory impairment and morphological changes up to 18 weeks after hypoxic-ischemic stress in neonatal rats. Baby hamster kidney cells were transfected with expression vector either including (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group; n = 10) or not including (control-hypoxic-ischemic group; n = 8) human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor cDNA, encapsulated in semipermeable hollow fibers, and implanted into the left brain parenchyma of 7-day-old Wistar rats. Two days after implantation the rats received hypoxic-ischemic stress, and their behavior was then examined in several learning tasks: the 8-arm radial maze, choice reaction time, and water maze tasks, which examine short-term working memory, attention process, and long-term reference memory, respectively. The rats were killed 18 weeks after the hypoxic-ischemic insult for evaluation of brain damage. Two additional control groups were used: the control group (n = 15), which underwent no treatment, and the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor group (n = 6), which underwent implantation of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor capsule but did not undergo hypoxic-ischemic stress. The decrease in the size of the cerebral hemisphere was significantly less in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group, compared with the control-hypoxic-ischemic group, and improved performance was observed in all three tasks for the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group: for the control-hypoxic-ischemic group versus the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group, respectively, in the 8-arm radial maze test, average

  5. Association between exogenous testosterone and cardiovascular events: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onasanya, Oluwadamilola; Iyer, Geetha; Lucas, Eleanor; Lin, Dora; Singh, Sonal; Alexander, G Caleb

    2016-11-01

    Given the conflicting evidence regarding the association between exogenous testosterone and cardiovascular events, we systematically assessed published systematic reviews for evidence of the association between exogenous testosterone and cardiovascular events. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration Clinical Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the US Food and Drug Administration website for systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials published up to July 19, 2016. Two independent reviewers screened 954 full texts from 29 335 abstracts to identify systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials in which the cardiovascular effects of exogenous testosterone on men aged 18 years or older were examined. We extracted data for study characteristics, analytic methods, and key findings, and applied the AMSTAR (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) checklist to assess methodological quality of each review. Our primary outcome measure was the direction and magnitude of association between exogenous testosterone and cardiovascular events. We identified seven reviews and meta-analyses, which had substantial clinical heterogeneity, differing statistical methods, and variable methodological quality and quality of data abstraction. AMSTAR scores ranged from 3 to 9 out of 11. Six systematic reviews that each included a meta-analysis showed no significant association between exogenous testosterone and cardiovascular events, with summary estimates ranging from 1·07 to 1·82 and imprecise confidence intervals. Two of these six meta-analyses showed increased risk in subgroup analyses of oral testosterone and men aged 65 years or older during their first treatment year. One meta-analysis showed a significant association between exogenous testosterone and cardiovascular events, in men aged 18 years or older generally, with a summary estimate of 1·54 (95% CI 1·09-2·18). Our optimal information size analysis showed that any randomised controlled

  6. Enhancement of microbial 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene transformation with increased toxicity by exogenous nutrient amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Lin, Chia-Ying; Kao, Chih-Ming; Huang, Da-Ji; Chien, Chih-Ching; Chen, Ssu-Ching; Tsai, Isheng Jason; Chen, Chien-Cheng

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the bacterial strain Citrobacter youngae strain E4 was isolated from 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil and used to assess the capacity of TNT transformation with/without exogenous nutrient amendments. C. youngae E4 poorly degraded TNT without an exogenous amino nitrogen source, whereas the addition of an amino nitrogen source considerably increased the efficacy of TNT transformation in a dose-dependent manner. The enhanced TNT transformation of C. youngae E4 was mediated by increased cell growth and up-regulation of TNT nitroreductases, including NemA, NfsA and NfsB. This result indicates that the increase in TNT transformation by C. youngae E4 via nitrogen nutrient stimulation is a cometabolism process. Consistently, TNT transformation was effectively enhanced when C. youngae E4 was subjected to a TNT-contaminated soil slurry in the presence of an exogenous amino nitrogen amendment. Thus, effective enhancement of TNT transformation via the coordinated inoculation of the nutrient-responsive C. youngae E4 and an exogenous nitrogen amendment might be applicable for the remediation of TNT-contaminated soil. Although the TNT transformation was significantly enhanced by C. youngae E4 in concert with biostimulation, the 96-h LC50 value of the TNT transformation product mixture on the aquatic invertebrate Tigriopus japonicas was higher than the LC50 value of TNT alone. Our results suggest that exogenous nutrient amendment can enhance microbial TNT transformation; however, additional detoxification processes may be needed due to the increased toxicity after reduced TNT transformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, D M

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from [1-14C]myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from [14C]C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from [14C]acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

  8. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from (1-14C)myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from (14C)C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from (14C)acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

  9. Study of the Transformation of Meteoritic Organics during Hypervelocity Impacts in Support of Characterisation of Exogenous Organic Matter on the Surface of Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Maxim; Gerasimov, Mikhail; Ivanova, Marina; Lorenz, Cyril; Aseev, Sergey; Korochantsev, Alexander

    (nitriles: acetonitrile, benzonitrile, etc.) as well as sulfur-containing organic and inorganic compounds (thiophene, alkyl-, benzo-thiophenes, and sulphur dioxide). Residual extraction at 900(°) C gave only carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide and benzene. Murchison’s condensate surpassed the condensate from Kainsaz in diversity and quantity of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organic compounds. It also released much more quantities of sulphur dioxide and carbon dioxide. Differences in composition of Murchison’s and Kainsaz’s organics could be a result of different thermal history of these types of meteorites [3, 1]. Kainsaz is more metamorphosed type of carbonaceous chondrite than Murchison. As was shown during our experiments, the high-temperature evaporation of meteorites can lead not only to thermal decomposition of organic matter and its oxidation by oxygen derived from thermal dissociation of petrogenic oxides, but also to the synthesis of complex organic molecules (mainly heteroatomic). Mineral phases which are condensed from the vapor cloud can catalyze the synthesis of complex organic compounds. By the presence of heteroatomic compounds described above (nitriles and alkyl-thiophenes) in the Europa’s and Ganymede’s regolith we can propose their meteoritic origin. Thus, we propose an approach to the detection of exogenous organic compounds in the icy satellites derived from the meteoritic matter. Acknowledgements: This work was supported in part by RFBR grant 12-05-01161 and P-22 and P-28 Programs of the RAS. References: [1] Zaitsev M.A. et al. (2013) 44 (th) Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, abstract # 1905. [2] Ivanova M.A. et al. (2014) 45 (th) Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, abstract # 1014. [3] Cody G.D. et al. (2008) Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 272, 446-455.

  10. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Sarah W; de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E

    2017-01-01

    therapy. Exogenous GLP-2 increased jejunal mucosal surface area without affecting enteric VIP or nNOS neuronal immunopositivity, attenuated resection-induced reductions in jejunal hexose transporter abundance (SGLT-1, GLUT-2), increased plasma amylin and decreased peptide YY concentrations. Exogenous GLP...

  11. Assessing of distribution, mobility and bioavailability of exogenous Pb in agricultural soils using isotopic labeling method coupled with BCR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Yong; Xie, Hong; Cao, Ying-Lan; Cai, Chao; Zhang, Zhi

    2014-02-15

    The contamination of Pb in agricultural soils is one of the most important ecological problems, which potentially results in serious health risk on human health through food chain. Hence, the fate of exogenous Pb contaminated in agricultural soils is needed to be deeply explored. By spiking soils with the stable enriched isotopes of (206)Pb, the contamination of exogenous Pb(2+) ions in three agricultural soils sampled from the estuary areas of Jiulong River, China was simulated in the present study, and the distribution, mobility and bioavailability of exogenous Pb in the soils were investigated using the isotopic labeling method coupled with a four-stage BCR (European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure. Results showed that about 60-85% of exogenous Pb was found to distribute in reducible fractions, while the exogenous Pb in acid-extractable fractions was less than 1.0%. After planting, the amounts of exogenous Pb presenting in acid-extractable, reducible and oxidizable fractions in rhizospheric soils decreased by 60-66%, in which partial exogenous Pb was assimilated by plants while most of the metal might transfer downward due to daily watering and applying fertilizer. The results show that the isotopic labeling technique coupled with sequential extraction procedures enables us to explore the distribution, mobility and bioavailability of exogenous Pb contaminated in soils, which may be useful for the further soil remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  13. Ciliary neurotrophic factor has intrinsic and extrinsic roles in regulating B cell differentiation and bone structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askmyr, Maria; White, Kirby E; Jovic, Tanja; King, Hannah A; Quach, Julie M; Maluenda, Ana C; Baker, Emma K; Smeets, Monique F; Walkley, Carl R; Purton, Louise E

    2015-10-21

    The gp130 receptor and its binding partners play a central role in cytokine signalling. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the cytokines that signals through the gp130 receptor complex. CNTF has previously been shown to be a negative regulator of trabecular bone remodelling and important for motor neuron development. Since haematopoietic cell maintenance and differentiation is dependent on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, where cells of the osteoblastic lineage are important regulators, we hypothesised that CNTF may also have important roles in regulating haematopoiesis. Analysis of haematopoietic parameters in male and female Cntf(-/-) mice at 12 and 24 weeks of age revealed altered B lymphopoiesis. Strikingly, the B lymphocyte phenotype differed based on sex, age and also the BM microenvironment in which the B cells develop. When BM cells from wildtype mice were transplanted into Cntf(-/-) mice, there were minimal effects on B lymphopoiesis or bone parameters. However, when Cntf(-/-) BM cells were transplanted into a wildtype BM microenvironment, there were changes in both haematopoiesis and bone parameters. Our data reveal that haematopoietic cell-derived CNTF has roles in regulating BM B cell lymphopoiesis and both trabecular and cortical bone, the latter in a sex-dependent manner.

  14. Ciliary neurotrophic factor controls progenitor migration during remyelination in the adult rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernerey, Julien; Macchi, Magali; Magalon, Karine; Cayre, Myriam; Durbec, Pascale

    2013-02-13

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to be expressed after brain lesions and in particular after demyelination. Here, we addressed the role of this cytokine in the regulation of neural progenitor migration in the adult rodent brain. Using an acute model of demyelination, we show that CNTF is strongly re-expressed after lesion and is involved in the postlesional mobilization of endogenous progenitors that participate in the myelin regenerative process. We show that CNTF controls the migration of subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neural progenitors toward the demyelinated corpus callosum. Furthermore, an ectopic source of CNTF in adult healthy brains changes SVZ-derived neural progenitors' migratory behavior that migrate toward the source by activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3) pathway. Using various in vitro assays (Boyden chambers, explants, and video time-lapse imaging), we demonstrate that CNTF controls the directed migration of SVZ-derived progenitors and oligodendrocyte precursors. Altogether, these results demonstrate that in addition to its neuroprotective activity and its role in progenitor survival and maturation, CNTF acts as a chemoattractant and participates in the recruitment of endogenous progenitors during myelin repair.

  15. Ciliary neurotrophic factor for macular telangiectasia type 2: results from a phase 1 safety trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Emily Y; Clemons, Traci E; Peto, Tunde; Sallo, Ferenc B; Ingerman, Avner; Tao, Weng; Singerman, Lawrence; Schwartz, Steven D; Peachey, Neal S; Bird, Alan C

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the safety and tolerability of intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) using an encapsulated cell implant for the treatment of macular telangiectasia type 2. An open-label safety trial conducted in 2 centers enrolling 7 participants with macular telangiectasia type 2. The participant's more severely affected eye (worse baseline visual acuity) received the high-dose implant of CNTF. Patients were followed for a period of 36 months. The primary safety outcome was a change in the parameters of the electroretinogram (ERG). Secondary efficacy outcomes were changes in visual acuity, en face measurements of the optical coherence tomography of the disruption in the ellipsoid zone, and microperimetry when compared with baseline. The ERG findings demonstrated a reduction in the amplitude of the scotopic b-wave in 4 participants 3 months after implantation (month 3). All parameters returned to baseline values by month 12 and remained so at month 36 with no clinical impact on dark adaptation. There was no change in visual acuity compared with baseline. The area of the defect as measured functionally by microperimetry and structurally by the en face OCT imaging of the ellipsoid zone loss appeared unchanged from baseline. The intraocular delivery of CNTF in the encapsulated cell implant appeared to be safe and well tolerated in eyes with macular telangiectasia type 2. Further evaluation in a randomized controlled clinical trial is warranted to test for efficacy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  17. Synergetic effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and olfactory ensheathing cells on optic nerve reparation (complete translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-ping Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is no effective treatment for the repair of the optic nerve after injury, or improvement of its microenvironment for regeneration. Intravitreally injected ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs promote the long-distance regrowth of severed optic nerve fibers after intracranial injury. Here, we examined the efficacy of these techniques alone and in combination, in a rat model of optic nerve injury. We injected condensed OEC suspension at the site of injury, or CNTF into the vitreous body, or both simultaneously. Retrograde tracing techniques showed that 4 weeks postoperatively, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells and their axonal density in the optic nerve were greater in rats subjected to OEC injection only than in those receiving CNTF injection only. Furthermore, combined OEC + CNTF injection achieved better results than either monotherapy. These findings confirm that OECs are better than CNTF at protecting injured neurons in the eye, but that combined OEC and CNTF therapy is notably more effective than either treatment alone.

  18. Ciliary neurotrophic factor role in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein expression in Cuprizone-induced multiple sclerosis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Zivar; Hadiyan, Sara Pishgah; Navidi, Reza

    2013-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a minor component of the myelin sheath, but is an important autoantigen linked to the pathogenesis of MS. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to enhance the generation, maturation, and survival of oligodendrocytes in culture medium. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of CNTF on MOG expression in the cerebral cortex of Cuprizone-induced MS mice. The mice were treated by Cuprizone for five weeks in order to induce MS. The mice were then divided into 3 groups. The first group was injected subcutaneously (SC) by CNTF in the amount of 250 μg/kg BW per day. The second group (SHAM) was injected SC by normal saline and the third group was left without injection as the control group. After four weeks the mice were killed and the cerebral cortex was harvested and the expression of MOG was studied by Western blotting. The data from this study show that the MOG expression was significantly increased in the CNTF-injected group as compared to the other groups. It is concluded that CNTF increases the MOG expression and may be important in the pathophysiology of MS. It is also concluded that CNTF may play a role in the process of remyelination by inducing the MOG expression.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism, human memory, and synaptic neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Yvette N; McKay, Nicole S; Thompson, Christopher S; Hamm, Jeffrey P; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Some people have much better memory than others, and there is compelling evidence that a considerable proportion of this variation in memory ability is genetically inherited. A form of synaptic plasticity known as long-term potentiation (LTP) is the principal candidate mechanism underlying memory formation in neural circuits, and it might be expected, therefore, that a genetic influence on the degree of LTP might in turn influence memory abilities. Of the genetic variations thought to significantly influence mnemonic ability in humans, the most likely to have its effect via LTP is a single nucleotide polymorphism affecting brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF (Val66Met)]. However, although it is likely that BDNF influences memory via a modulation of acute plasticity (i.e., LTP), BDNF also has considerable influence on structural development of neural systems. Thus, the influence of BDNF (Val66Met) on mnemonic performance via influences of brain structure as well as function must also be considered. In this brief review, we will describe the phenomenon of LTP and its study in non-human animals. We will discuss the relatively recent attempts to translate this work to studies in humans. We will describe how this has enabled investigation of the effect of the BDNF polymorphism on LTP, on brain structure, and on memory performance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Differential activation of dendritic cells by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, O; Peiser, M; Altenähr, M; Knieling, H; Wanner, R; Hanf, G; Grosse, R; Suttorp, N

    2007-11-01

    Neurotrophins are involved in inflammatory reactions influencing several cells in health and disease including allergy and asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in the induction of inflammatory processes with an increasing role in allergic diseases as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neurotrophins on DC function. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells were generated from allergic and non-allergic donors. Neurotrophin receptors were demonstrated by western blotting, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Activation of small GTPases was evaluated by pull-down assays. DCs were incubated with nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and supernatants were collected for measurement of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta. Receptor proteins were detectable by western blot, fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis and fluorescence microscopy. Signalling after neurotrophin stimulation occurred in a ligand-specific pattern. NGF led to decreased RhoA and increased Rac activation, while BDNF affected RhoA and Rac activity in a reciprocal fashion. Cells of allergics released a significantly increased amount of IL-6, while for healthy subjects a significantly higher amount of IL-10 was found. These data indicate that DCs are activated by the neurotrophins NGF and BDNF by different pathways in a receptor-dependant manner. These cells then may initiate inflammatory responses based on allergic sensitization releasing preferred cytokines inducing tolerance or a T-helper type 2 response.